Podcasts about Warby Parker

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Eyeglasses retailer

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Warby Parker

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Best podcasts about Warby Parker

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Latest podcast episodes about Warby Parker

Rock N Roll Pantheon
You're Not Listening: Joan Jett - I Love Rock N Roll; Lake Street Dive - Hypotheticals

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:47


Today, YNL discusses I Love Rock N Roll by Joan Jett , and Hypotheticals by Lake Street Dive. If you think you don't like these songs, then You're Not Listening. So #CleanOutYourEars and #ListenUp! Click Here for the Official You're Not Listening Spotify Playlist! Every song that is discussed on YNL is on this playlist, as well as the most recent episode! To hear these songs on Youtube, click the links below! -I Love Rock N Roll Official Video -Hypotheticals Official Video Other Links from this episode: Check out more amazing music podcasts at www.pantheonpodcasts.com! If you enjoy this podcast, please make sure you SUBSCRIBE, rate & review, and reach out to us! Click here to visit our website! Twitter: @YNLPodcast Facebook: You're Not Listening Instagram: @YNLPodcast YNL Gear: TeeSpring Store! If you'd like to Support You're Not Listening, please check out our Patreon page and become a patron to get access to all of our extra content, exclusive playlists, and more! For your FREE in-home trial of 5 different glasses frames from Warby Parker, go to www.warbyparkertrial.com/notlistening!  Thanks so much for (not)listening! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stock Club
An $80 Billion Company With No Revenue

Stock Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:48


Business 101 tells us that companies need to make money, so how has a business with virtually zero revenues achieved a valuation of about $80 billion? Listen in as the MyWallSt team chat about the soon-to-IPO EV maker Rivian — will it really become a "Tesla-killer"?  In this episode, we also discuss: The global impact of Squid Game and what it means for Netflix. The things to look out for this earnings season. And two stocks on our watchlist — C3.ai and Warby Parker. MyWallSt operates a full disclosure policy. MyWallSt staff may hold long positions in some of the companies mentioned in this podcast.

Subscription Stories: True Tales from the Trenches
The Quantitative Side of Customer-Centricity with Wharton's Peter Fader

Subscription Stories: True Tales from the Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:00


Customer-centricity is essential in the world of subscriptions. To succeed you have to understand who your most valuable customers are, and invest your resources in those relationships. But measuring the value of each customer over an extended period of time, and understanding which metrics matter most, can be tricky. Peter Fader, the Frances and Pei-Yuan Chia Professor of Marketing at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, is perhaps the leading expert in the world on how to assess the value of a business by understanding the value of the customer over their entire relationship with an organization from source to completion. Peter has literally written the book on customer centricity. Well, actually, two books: Customer Centricity: Focus on the Right Customers for Strategic Advantage and The Customer Centricity Playbook which he co-authored with Sarah Toms. In this episode, we discuss customer-centricity, customer lifetime value and how to use available public data to evaluate a company--using D2C prescription glasses retailer Warby Parker as an example. We also talk about why current accounting standards don't always tell the full story--and how this needs to change.

How You Create
Designing Generative NFT Art with Jeremy Booth

How You Create

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 84:12


Jeremy Booth is a creative illustrator whose work focuses on commercial, editorial, and mural illustrations. His philosophy is to create bold illustrations that communicate well and are hard to forget. He has worked with brands such as Amazon, Slack, Warby Parker, Orange, ADP, Charles Schwab, CNES, Invision, and many more. And now he works full-time as a product illustrator for Coinbase.Most recently, Jeremy has been designing a new generative NFT art project called Bushidos. It is an 8,888 NFT samurai that defends the Ethereum blockchain from centralization and FUD. Jeremy and his team have been an active community and shares his learning from building his own collection and NFT community. The NFTs will be minted in October of 2021. Join their discord community for more information on how to participate –– https://www.bushidos.io

Industry Focus
CG: Peeking at the Future for Eyewear

Industry Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 26:41


Warby-Parker is one of the most successful direct-to-consumer eyewear specialists in the world. Join Motley Fool analysts Asit Sharma and Emily Flippen as they frame up what success could look like for this recently public company in the future. Check out more of our content here: Podcasts Youtube Twitter Reach us by Email @ IndustryFocus@fool.com

Motley Fool Money
“Generation Gamble” and the Rise of the Machines

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 38:37


September ends up being the worst month of the year for investors. Merck shares pop on encouraging results from its Covid-19 pill study. Alphabet and General Motors move one step closer to getting self-driving ride-sharing services on the road in California. Amazon unveils Astro, a $1,000 robot for your home. Warby Parker makes a strong debut on Wall Street. Zoom Video and Five9 call off their marriage. Andy Cross and Ron Gross analyze those stories and the latest from Bed Bath & Beyond, McCormick, Dollar Tree, and Sherwin-Williams. They also share why PubMatic and Editas are on their radar. Plus, Melissa Lee discusses the intersection of online betting, stock trading, and gaming in the upcoming CNBC primetime documentary “Generation Gamble”.

A Couple Cents
Warby Parker & Olaplex IPO. Palantir Analysis...

A Couple Cents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 57:25


Sign up for the full streams, community, and our favorite investments! https://www.acouplecents.com/ All content in this episode is my opinions and personal research for entertainment purposes only. It does not represent financial advice, nor should it be construed as such. Topics Covered (in order): Market Overview / Cents Update // $WRBY // $OLPX // $PLTR // VM: $HBI // VM: House Renovations Funds // VM: $LSPD // $FB // $PSFE // $BROS // $RIVN --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/acouplecents/message

Group Chat
Raise MY Debt Ceiling | Group Chat News

Group Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 68:33


Today we're talking about Warby Parker's soaring shares, a.k.a. Brand's stock price, Macy's fight for billboard space against Amazon, Fanatics' $10 billion valuation, the announcement of TikTok Shopping, Tom Brady's Eponymous fashion label, the shortage of food and workers in school meal programs, the announcement that the U.S. government will run out of money by October 18th, Britney Spears' father being temporarily removed as a conservator, the $400 ebay listing of Kanye West's gap hoodie, Winners, Losers, Content Recommendations, and more. Raise MY Debt Ceiling – Group Chat News 9.30.21 Dee wants in on the Warby Parker party. [5:05] Raise MY debt ceiling. [13:35] Another classic example of an old brand focusing on the wrong thing. [18:05] A couple friends out here winning. [22:33] TikTok continuing to dominate. [25:25] Will Tom Brady's new fashion label rival the Jordan Brand? [30:01] Ad Break. [37:02] Blame it on the supply chain. [38:30] Free Britney! [44:04] The Kanye magic touch. [46:27] Winners, Losers, and Content Recommendations. [51:26] Group Chat Shout Outs. [1:07:10] Related Links/Products Mentioned Warby Parker shares soar on first day of trading a.k.a. Brands Holding Corp. (AKA) US government will run out of money by October 18, Treasury secretary says Macy's to Amazon: Not in my house Explaining the whopping $10 billion valuation for Fanatics' nascent trading card business TikTok announces TikTok Shopping with new social-commerce features Tom Brady Launches Eponymous Fashion Label to Rival Jordan Brand Melrose Place Brand | Group Chat School meal programs are running out of food and workers Britney Spears' Dad Temporarily Removed As Conservator, Suspending His 13-Year Control Over Her Estate Kanye West's $90 Yeezy Gap hoodie is now being listed on eBay for $400 Super Bowl 2022 halftime show: Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre, Eminem, Mary J. Blige, Kendrick Lamar will headline Salt Bae's Knightsbridge restaurant serves up £630 steak The Morning Show | Apple TV+ JRE #1710 - Cullen Hoback Connect with Group Chat! Watch The Pod #1 Newsletter In The World For The Gram Tweet With Us Exclusive Facebook Content

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast
The Weekly Listen: The Next Big TV Event, TikTok Hits 1 Billion Users, and Ads in 3D | Oct 1, 2021

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 49:51


On today's episode, we discuss whether TV can produce an event that gathers a mass audience without relying on sports or news, why Warby Parker is eyeing brick and mortar, why advertising's future is in 3D, how folks find things to stream, what to make of TikTok's 1 billion users milestone, the new corporate dress code and greeting etiquette, where the football huddle came from, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analysts Suzy Davidkhanian and Paul Verna and analyst at Insider Intelligence Blake Droesch. Monday, Oct 4: Tech-Talk Webinar w/ NY Interconnect: How to Create National Success For Your Brand with TV Media's Local Market https://on.emarketer.com/Webinar-20211004-NYInterconnect-NationalSuccess-TechTalk-Hybrid_Busemailpage.html For sponsorship opportunities contact us:   advertising@insiderintelligence.com.   For more information visit:   https://www.insiderintelligence.com/contact/advertise/ Have questions or just want to say hi? Drop us a line at podcast@emarketer.com © 2021 Insider Intelligence

Your Money. Your Life. With Delano Saporu
Episode 88: Buying into your Financial Plan

Your Money. Your Life. With Delano Saporu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 17:50


On this episode: We have a large news week with Warby Parker going public, TikTok 1Billion users, and Tesla Full Self-Driving update. In the roundtable, we discuss buying into your financial plan. As always follow me on IG here: https://www.instagram.com/delano.saporu/?hl=en Connect with me here also: https://newstreetadvisorsgroup.com/social/ Want to support the show? Feel free to do so here! https://anchor.fm/delano-saporu4/support Thank you for listening --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/delano-saporu4/support

Snacks Daily

Warby Parker just went public with $56 worth of eyeglasses, but its greatest creation isn't shades — it's its business model. Amazon's biggest new product of the year is a lineup of robots to take over your home, your body, and fly through your kitchen. And the Debt Ceiling drama down in DC all comes down to today. $WRBY $CSPR $APRN $SFIX $HNST $AMZN Got a SnackFact? Tweet it @RobinhoodSnacks @JackKramer @NickOfNewYork Want a shoutout on the pod? Fill out this form: https://forms.gle/KhUAo31xmkSdeynD9 Got a SnackFact for the pod? We got a form for that too: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe64VKtvMNDPGSncHDRF07W34cPMDO3N8Y4DpmNP_kweC58tw/viewform Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Numbers by Barron's
2 More Companies Go Public via Direct Listing

Numbers by Barron's

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 4:17


Data management company Amplitude and eyeglasses retailer Warby Parker go public via direct listings. United Airlines will lay off 600 employees who did not comply with its vaccine deadline. Plus, YouTube combats misinformation. Host: Jacob Passy. Producer: Katie Ferguson.

MarketFoolery
Warby Parker Goes Public

MarketFoolery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 21:15


Dollar Tree pops on an increased share buyback plan and strategy to selectively increase prices. Online eyeglasses retailer Warby Parker goes public via direct listing. Asit Sharma analyzes those stories and shares why he's a fan of British software development company Endava.

Squawk Pod
Warby Parker's Debut, the Latino GDP, & a “Dangerous Man”

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 31:27


Eyewear start-up Warby Parker (WRBY) begins trading today via a direct listing, testing investors' appetite for a household direct-to-consumer retail name. Warby Parker co-founders and co-CEOs Neil Blumenthal and Dave Gilboa discuss the company's outlook and a tech driven future. The Latino Donor Collaborative has released its 2021 U.S. Latino GDP report, revealing that growth has averaged 5.6% over the last two years, double the rate of the U.S. economy. Sol Trujillo, co-founder of the Latino Donor Collaborative and of L'Attitude, discusses the findings from the report from the L'Attitude Conference in San Diego. Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell addressed inflation, the Fed's stock trading ethics on Capitol Hill, and Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) delivered impassioned remarks on the “danger” of Powell's renomination. Plus, it's National Coffee Day! In this episode: Neil Blumenthal, @NeilBlumenthalDave Gilboa, @WarbyParkerSol Trujillo, @LATTITUDEevent, @LDCLatinoJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkin

Wall Street Breakfast
Wall Street Breakfast September 29: In Need Of Direction

Wall Street Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 10:40


Our top stories today: In need of direction; U.S. credit default?; and Warby Parker. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dancers Doing Stuff
141 | Kendrick Samuel Talks Dreams, Good Energy and Constant Learning

Dancers Doing Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 58:53


Hello! Today I'm talking to Kendrick Samuel while making aromatherapy slime! Kendrick Samuel is an Actor, Model, Dancer, Choreographer and Movement Director better known as an all-around creative from Queens, NY. A few of his credits include Pyer Moss, Good Morning America, Squarespace, Warby Parker and more. He has his own clothing line, takes and develops his own film photography along with SO many other things! You are just going to have to listen to the full episode to find out all his many gifts. Follow Kendrick on instagram @kendricksamuel @theapparelbrand and @krsonfilm Don't forget to create your profile on Arts Wrk using my special link (and then I might get a prize!) and definitly add me as a connection once you have your profile set up! https://artswrk.com/join/HaleyGrove ________________________________ The Patreon is officially live! Check it out here https://www.patreon.com/essentiallyhaley

Equity
Equity Monday: Instagram pauses youth product as Amplitude, Warby Parker prep public offerings

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 11:10


This is Equity Monday, our weekly kickoff that tracks the latest private market news, talks about the coming week, digs into some recent funding rounds and mulls over a larger theme or narrative from the private markets. You can follow the show on Twitter here. I also tweet.A few things this morning:Instagram is pausing work on the kids-focused version of its social service. It claims that the product is the right thing to build, but that it wants to talk to folks about why, first. TechCrunch has more here.Shares of Box are up this morning, after the company endured a period of time in the wilderness.Google is cutting its cloud app marketplace take rate as marketplaces more broadly lose their ability to accrete economic value as middlepeople.Spotify is spending to advertise its advertising solution so that others can spend more money on Spotify.Swiss startup Frontify raises $50 million, more than double its previous round's size.And from Sweden, EV company Polestar may go public via a SPAC, as EV company Cake raises $60 million. Nice to see Sweden do so well in a key business category.Tesla is doing FSD stuff, which confuses us.And looking ahead, Amplitude will set a reference price this evening and direct list tomorrow. Warby Parker will set an IPO price tomorrow evening, and trade on Wednesday.And that's that! Chat Wednesday!

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch
Can You Hear This?

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 32:26


In a free-market economy, the role of government is often debated. On the one hand, business generally prefers to be left alone by government, interpreting the word “free” in free-market as free from regulation. On the other hand, there are any number of business organizations whose principal functions are to extract as many regulatory and tax advantages as possible for their particular industry.  In response to this lobbying, the Louisiana State government, like any good investor, does its best to diversify. The state has instituted economic development initiatives to attract and grow a wide range of businesses, from film to aerospace. You might remember a few years ago, starting with the re-development period after Hurricane Katrina, there was a big push to create what was called New Orleans' Biomedical District. That economic development has, as of today, reportedly created 34,000 new jobs and had an economic impact of some $3.3 billion. The Biomedical District includes the Veterans Administration Hospital, the University Medical Center, the Louisiana Cancer Research Center, and the New Orleans BioInnovation Center.  The New Orleans BioInnovation Center provides office space, laboratories, business support, and even financial investment for biotech startups. They have a 66,000 square-foot building on Canal Street that opened in 2011, and cost $47m to build. This size investment in a “build it and they will come” strategy takes some serious financial and science skill to navigate. Similar state-funded bio innovation initiatives in Baton Rouge and Shreveport failed. To keep the New Orleans enterprise afloat, in 2021 Kris Khalil was named Executive Director of the New Orleans BioInnovation Center. In one type of best-case scenario, the object of biomedical innovation is to come up with a medical device that becomes an everyday piece of equipment that sells in the millions. For example, the FitBit and Apple Watch have turned the decidedly un-sexy concept of a heart monitor into a fashion item. In the same way, eyeglasses are technically a medical device. But somehow, Warby Parker and others have turned assisted vision into what is now a fashion accessory. What's next? Which otherwise pedestrian item that we use for medical-assisted-living could become hip and ubiquitous? With the growing number of people walking around with ear-buds blasting sound directly into their ears, could the next medical fashion item become the hearing aid? If you'll excuse the pun, that might not be as crazy as it sounds. Federal legislation called “The Over The Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017” finally went into effect in early 2021. This legislation allows hearing aids to be sold in stores or online, without any consultation, prescription, or referral. As a result, some trend-spotters are predicting major growth in the hearing aid industry. Dina Zeevi is President of the Louisiana Society of Hearing Aid Specialists, and a Board Member and Administrative Secretary of the Louisiana Board of Hearing Aid Dealers. She's also a Hearing Instrument Specialist and the owner of a hearing aid store on the Westbank, called Hear Now. Out to Lunch is recorded over lunch at NOLA Pizza in the NOLA Brewing Taproom. You can find photos from this show by Jill Lafleur at our website.  And here's more lunchtime conversation about New Orleans' health and hearing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Remarkable Retail
Understanding Warby Parker and the Power of Customer-Based Valuation with special guest Daniel McCarthy

Remarkable Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:10


As pioneering digitally-native brands Warby Parker and Allbirds prepare to go public--and the fortunes of other highflying disruptor retailers like Peloton and Chewy ebb and flow--we get the chance to dissect how to make sense of key customer metrics with Daniel McCarthy, professor of marketing at Emory's Goizueta Business School, co-founder of Theta Equity Partners and pioneering thought leader on customer-based corporate valuation. It's a fast-paced MasterClass on how the cost of acquisition, retention rates and other customer cohort data provide valuable insight on the long-term prospects of any brand. We also learn whether Dan is bullish on Warby Parker, why we may not work so hard to chase "shifty" customers (or as Steve likes to call them "promiscuous" shoppers) and drop more than a few puns.But first we open up the episode with our quick takes on recent retail news that caught out attention, starting first with even more Amazon news than usual, including their new line of private brand televisions, plans to hire 125,000 distribution center staff, raise hourly wages and pay college tuition for their workers. We also dig into spending per trip information from NPD, monthly US Commerce data that shows consumers continue to shop like crazy, troubles at Casper, Walmart+ hitting 32 million members and the sad story of Sears closing its last Illinois store.NOTE: We're now back to regular weekly episodes.Also check out our newish   YouTube channel.Daniel McCarthy is an Assistant Professor of Marketing at Emory University's Goizueta School of Business. His research specialty is the application of leading-edge statistical methodology to contemporary empirical marketing problems. His research interests include customer lifetime value, limited data problems, and the marketing/finance interface.He popularized “customer-based corporate valuation” (CBCV), a methodology that drives any traditional valuation model off of the underlying behaviors of the target company's customers. His work has been featured in major media outlets such as the Harvard Business Review, Wall Street Journal, FT, Fortune, Barron's, Inc Magazine, the Economist, and CNBC. His research has been accepted and published in top-tier academic journals and has won numerous research awards.In addition to his roles and responsibilities at Emory, Dan co-founded and was Chief Statistician for Zodiac, a predictive customer analytics SaaS firm. Nike acquired Zodiac in March 2018. Dan has since co-founded Theta Equity Partners to revolutionize how firms (e.g., private equity, venture capital, and operating companies directly) value companies through CBCVSteve Dennis is an advisor, keynote speaker and author on strategic growth and business innovation. You can learn more about Steve on his       website.    The expanded and revised edition of his bestselling book  Remarkable Retail: How To Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Disruption is now available at  Amazon or just about anywhere else books are sold. Steve regularly shares his insights in his role as a      Forbes senior contributor and on       Twitter and       LinkedIn. You can also check out his speaker "sizzle" reel      here.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus        Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  and       The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois.  You can learn more about Michael       here  or on       LinkedIn.  Please drop us a rating and review wherever you subscribe to your podcasts and be sure to check out our newish YouTube channel. 

The 7investing Podcast
Bringing Synthetic Biology to Consumers, One Material at a Time

The 7investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 43:31


We've all experienced it. That favorite pair of sneakers or trusty yoga mat, both of which have soaked up who-knows-what over the years, eventually begs for retirement. You probably toss these items into the trash and never think about them again. The same is true for clothing, furniture, and thousands of other items that get us through everyday life, although some can be donated for a useful second life. Maybe "never think about them again" is a little too harsh. Consumers, especially younger consumers, are increasingly aware of the environmental footprint of these end-of-life decisions for the "stuff" they own. The generational shift in consumer behavior can certainly be counted as progress, but it's important to consider an item's full lifecycle. After all, an estimated 75% of the environmental impact for the items we own comes from the selection of raw materials used to manufacture them. That's all baked in well before they end up in a landfill. Companies are conscious of consumer attitudes about sustainability and eager to discover solutions, but they face significant challenges in finding reliable, high-quality sources of sustainable materials. We've all seen headlines about shoes made out of recycled water bottles, or car panels molded from seaweed, but these types of headline-grabbing "solutions" are impossible to scale, inject uncertainty into supply chains, and face considerable economic headwinds. Enter privately-held Bolt Threads. The sustainable materials company is using synthetic biology to create reliable supply streams of high-quality materials for some of the world's leading brands. The three publicly-disclosed material brands each solve specific problems in the select markets: Microsilk: Spider silk made with genetically-engineered microbes for improved cost and scale. These natural fibers can replace synthetic polymers in various fabric applications. Read more. B-silk Protein: Stumbled upon during the development of Microsilk, this ingredient can be added to cosmetic or personal care products to replace keratin (derived from animals) and silicone (a synthetic polymer). Read more. Mylo: A mycelium material used to replace animal leather without compromising on performance or luxury. Global companies launching Mylo products soon include adidas, lululemon, and Stella McCartney. Read more. 7investing Lead Advisor Maxx Chatsko sat down with Bolt Threads CEO and co-founder Dan Widmaier to discuss the opportunities and challenges in sustainable materials and the importance of making synthetic biology real for consumers with visible technology. Publicly-traded companies mentioned in this podcast include adidas, Allbirds, Ginkgo Bioworks, Kering, lululemon, Warby Parker, and Unilever. 7investing Lead Advisors and Dan Widmaier may have positions in the companies that are mentioned. This interview was originally recorded on September 9th, 2021 and was first published on September 14th, 2021. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/7investing/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/7investing/support

The Founder Hour
Jeff Fluhr | Co-Founder & Former CEO of StubHub

The Founder Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 62:08


Jeff Fluhr is the co-founder and former CEO of StubHub, the world's largest online ticket marketplace for sports, concerts, theater and other live entertainment events. He's also a General Partner at Craft Ventures, investing in marketplace and ecommerce companies such as Twilio, Warby Parker, and ZocDoc.Jeff began his career working for the Blackstone Group in New York. While at Stanford Graduate School of Business, he entered the annual business plan competition with the idea of creating a trusted and transparent marketplace where fans could buy and sell tickets for sporting events and concerts.He dropped out of school and co-founded StubHub in March 2000. By 2007, StubHub had over 400 employees, more than $600 million of gross merchandise volume and partnerships with many professional and college sports teams. Jeff served as CEO of StubHub until it was acquired by eBay for $310 million in 2007.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & STAY UPDATED > http://bit.ly/tfh-newsletterFOLLOW TFH ON INSTAGRAM > http://www.instagram.com/thefounderhourFOLLOW TFH ON TWITTER > http://www.twitter.com/thefounderhourINTERESTED IN BECOMING A SPONSOR? EMAIL US > partnerships@thefounderhour.com

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 129: What Are You Selling, Really? Developing Your Jewelry's Brand with Pam Levine, CEO and Brand Experience Expert of Levine Luxury Branding

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 33:42


What you'll learn in this episode: How to go through the all-important process of defining your jewelry business' brand Why engaging relationships with customers are your most valuable asset Where to learn more about digital marketing How to create jewelry displays that are equally beautiful and effective About Pam Levine Pam Levine is the CEO and Brand Experience Expert of Levine Luxury Branding, a boutique agency that develops inspiring brands, marketing and retail environments for luxury products. Pam began her career as a jeweler at Cartier and brings the same focus on detail to the designers, brands, retailers and licenses she works with. Pam's practice focuses on delivering substantial financial results through brand building and repositioning, new product and service innovation, visual and sensory merchandising and creative execution across multi-media platforms. She orchestrates a customer/visitor experience that conveys a distinctive and memorable impression at every touch-point, from the environment to staff interactions, to marketing communications and more. Known as a “curator of remarkable minds” Pam leads a cross-disciplinary team of marketing professionals and designers providing positioning strategies, retail assessments, store environments, packaging, display, collateral, web content and design, social media, corporate presentations and merchandising solutions. A respected expert and speaker on consumer experience and luxury marketing, Pam is a sought out tastemaker, known for adding the special touches that deliver a high impact, distinctive brand experience. Speaking engagements include Retail and Consumer Trends: International Retail Design Summit (Germany), Luxury Marketing Council, Globalshop, JCK Las Vegas Show and The Couture Show. Pam is an active member of RDI-Retail Design Institute, WJA Woman's Jewelry Association and MAD-Museum of Arts and Design, Loot Jewelry Show committee. She has served as the director of WAM, Woman as Mentors, NYC, and has been an adjunct professor of jewelry design, marketing and merchandising at the FIT- Fashion Institute of Technology. Additional Links: Linkedin Instagram Photos: Transcript: Marketing luxury goods is a fascinating endeavor that combines design, language and psychology. Few people know this field as well as Pam Levine, founder of Levine Luxury Branding. Starting as a bench jeweler for Cartier, Pam has forged her own path in the luxury space. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how she helps her clients define their brands; why old-school relationships with customers will always win over new-school marketing fads; and how to create jewelry displays that encourage customers to buy your work. Read the episode transcript below. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Pam Levine, founder and CEO of Levine Luxury Branding. In addition to having experience as a bench jeweler, Pam has a broad range of experience in designing customized display cabinets and cases. More importantly, she is a student of the psychology of luxury merchandising. Today, Levine Luxury Branding works with high-end companies to develop a brand that occupies top-of-mind awareness in the luxury consumer's mind.  We'll hear more about her jewelry journey and about the psychology of branding today. Pam, welcome to the program. Pam: Thank you so much, Sharon. It's such a pleasure to be here. Maybe we could give a little shout-out to Bonnie Levine for introducing us.  Sharon: Yes, Bonnie Levine, who's on the board of Art Jewelry Forum and does a tremendous amount for them in terms of choosing emerging designers and administering several of those programs, which is a full-time job in and of itself. Pam, tell us about your jewelry journey. You have such an interesting background. Pam: Thank you. I love the word journey because I guess we're still all in it. I grew up in a creative family, I would say. My father was an architect and furniture designer. He designed our home, and my mother was a sculptor. Both of them did many art projects together. They were both watercolor artists. I really was, from the womb, indoctrinated into a creative environment. I'm lucky enough to have learned how to appreciate materials, textures, form. They taught me how to see. From then on, anything creative, growing up in a creative home was like a part of my body and how I thought. I took a little jewelry class when I was in high school and never really thought there was a whole industry behind it. Then I ended up going to college and taking some jewelry classes. Eventually, I decided I loved working in metal. When I left school, I worked in the Faber Gallery, which at the time was the only jewelry gallery, I think, in the country that was promoting fine art jewelers. Sharon: That's the Faber Gallery? Pam: The Faber Gallery. It was on 47th Street and now it's on 53rd Street. I moved with them. Through there I met an engraver who introduced me to Cartier. They were looking for a woman jeweler to fill a quota, and I became one of the first jewelers on the benches in their 18-karat gold department and worked there. It was a fantastic opportunity and experience to be trained by master jewelers. Then I moved into product development at Cartier.  I eventually left to become a model maker for different jewelers around the city as I put my own line together. I had my own jewelry collection that I sold through museums, Bergdorf Goodman's, Saks Fifth Avenue, Nordstrom and a lot of museum shops. Then I was hired into the industry in the late 80s to become a creative director for a company that was a mass merchandiser of jewelry. At the time, I also accepted a job teaching at Fashion Institute of Technology in the design and fabrication of jewelry. They were close to each other. Since they were literally blocks away, and I decided if I was going to take a real job, I wanted to also be able to take the teaching job, so I worked them both. That job itself, the charge there was to hire a team of designers, oversee the product merchandising. What also came with that was developing programs for stores.  That's what got me involved in the retail side. What really started my whole journey, or stopped my jewelry journey in a way, was this intrigue with how do people make decisions about products that are stuck behind glass, that you can't touch, that you have to ask a salesperson in order to access? What I learned from designing displays and getting involved with these programs was that jewelry could be a lot more accessible through the design of the merchandising, how it was presented, by creating distinction and highlighting and dimension. It was design as well as strategy and understanding how people access and think about products on a sensory level and somewhat unconsciously. It was also about what the experience of shopping for jewelry or products that are stuck behind glass is like, and that's continued.  I left that position after about five years and went out on my own. I started working with other companies, more manufacturers in the industry to help them develop a new brand, market a new product or put a presentation together. One of my specialties was designing display systems. I designed Gordon Taylor's display; I redid their watch display system. That was for all different brands.  I also have designed many, many customized systems for different companies, designers and retailers. I moved more into understanding the retail mindset because I started working with more retailers. That was in the mid-90s, when I was speaking at the couture shows and industry shows. I really loved the idea of working again with designers or brands behind the scenes, the marketers that were bringing a product to market as well as the retailers. What happened in retail with the independent stores in the early to mid-90s was they were starting to sell designers, David Yurman and all the big names we know today, so there was a real conflict between, “How do we balance out the retail brand with all the other brands we have?” That's where I came in. It was a combination of creating a display system. For me, that is the most important part; it's like the product of the store because it's where you want your customers' focus to be. That's how I started the other part of what I'll call my retail design journey. I apply a lot of psychology to that as well. When I started working with stores, I got involved in marketing, all sorts of retail programs, ways to draw people through a whole store, putting together scavenger hunts and special events and all sorts of ways to intrigue, attract, add surprise and delight to that customer's experience. Sharon: Do you have clients who come to you from the ground up, like, “O.K., how do we develop this brand?” Pam: Those are my most favorite, when we get to do the whole package. The branding process that we do at Levin Luxury Branding starts with understanding the foundation, the distinction, the identity of the brand. Many designers, especially in the jewelry realm, believe that their product—and it often it is—is the distinct voice of the brand. You need to put a voice and a language to it, especially today, not that you never needed to. You need to establish the positioning statement and understand what your unique distinction is and how you can communicate that. Many people don't believe the store is just the brick and mortar anymore. It's not always, “Oh, this is the store.” The customer can shop in many different ways, so it's not just about the brick and mortar; it's tying it all together, and the way to tie it together is to start with a clear understanding and clever language that sets you apart.  That then brings the client into almost developing an advertising campaign. Today it's a big challenge because so much of this is DIY. We do it ourselves. We have the ability to post on Instagram and Facebook and Tik Tok and tell stories. Many people are naturally good at it, and others need to go through the branding process. If you're building a store and starting there, whichever touchpoint you're going to start with, the journey is much easier and the development or expansion of the brand is much easier once you have a clear understanding of who you are and how you are going to describe that. For some people, it might be all about joy, or it might be all about the colored stones. There are so many ways to focus this. Many jewelers have similar stories, which is why it's important to create a look and a feel and a distinction. Once you have that, then you have the basis for creating the language and messaging throughout your showcase straight onto Instagram, or whichever vehicle you're using, as well as advertising. We cover all of that. Sharon: In my experience, call them creative types, makers, jewelers, whatever, they are very good at what they do, but they haven't had business training and they don't understand. If somebody says, “O.K., I have a bunch of jewelry here and I have things in all different lines,” where should they start? What questions should they be asking in terms of developing the positioning and creating a brand? Pam: I think that the main questions are who is buying it, who's the customer, why does it matter, why buy this jewelry. These are tough questions to ask. Sharon: Very, very tough questions. Pam: How can we present it? What can I do? What is the distinction? What is my story? Some of it is bullet pointing, letting all the words come out. I think this is a bit of a challenge for me as well because I didn't come out of a digital marketing background; I'm a little old school. Today is a real mix of traditional and nontraditional. I think the biggest challenge is that one can't ignore the beauty and the value of being able to post on social media because it's so immediate. Especially Gen X and Gen Z, this is where they are shopping and where we're engaging them. Selling jewelry or any product starts with engagement and relationships. It's those questions that I think are the most important. Why, who, where are you selling from and what's unique about us.  Sharon: Those are critical questions and very difficult questions. Those questions are so difficult whether you're marketing online or offline. To me, that's the crux of it. You have to start there. Pam: Yes. If you'd like, I can show you a tree chart I use. The bottom of it shows the roots. There I have digital strategy, your engagement, your research. The other thing is that research is a very helpful tool, and we have this world at our fingertips. Some of it is studying and understanding how other people are languaging. Are they speaking in the first voice? Are they speaking in the third tone? How are others doing it. If they're going to zig, you want to zag, go a little differently. Is there a vision the person who's leading the company has? Is there innovation here? Research and trends are where you want to start, so you understand where you fit into the playing field of the market.  Today, we've got technology and user experience and retail experience and all these other catchwords, but the big one is audience, understanding who you're talking to. It can be as simple as sitting down with your best customers or your friends and having conversations with them and listening to their reactions. It's much more organic today. My struggle is that people come to me for all this. I have strategists and writers, and there are times when I still believe that is the best way to go. Anything that's new, we jump on the bandwagon; we did it when we first had billboards and when we first went on radio, when anything becomes accessible. Now with media, so much is accessible. Bottom line, it's all about making a plan, starting with understanding your identity and then deciding what is going to be the best route for you to follow. Also, how much can you handle if you would still like to spend the bulk of your time designing and making and staying true to yourself? I'm speaking to the jewelry designer and the bench jeweler who's doing it all themselves. It's a huge amount of pressure for a designer to do it themselves, so we do help them with that. There are also some wonderful online digital courses. I think digital marketing, which is something I'm studying myself now, is a different mindset. It's really about putting the customer first. It used to be about transaction and product, and now it's about putting the customer first. How can we speak to them in a language that is riveting to them, in a way that connects with them? It's about the relationship, and that has never changed.  The thing I also love about jewelry is that it's such an intimate product. It goes on your body. Jewelry is so beautiful, no matter how it's made, no matter what it's made out of. It's become a real form of self-expression. The amount of meaning in this product is more than anything we put on our body, unless maybe it's a beautiful couture dress. It's a very personal experience. That's why the relationship the independent jeweler forms with their buyer or collector is key. That can be done virtually as long as you understand and become comfortable with this new mindset of understanding who you customer is. A luxury customer, even if they're accessing things online, they're still going to need high-touch experience. I get intimidated by all of these touchpoints, all of these channels with our customers myself. I'm learning it as well, but I keep coming back to it. If we have a plan; if we don't just throw it out there and do it all at once; if we really understand our design and our look— Sharon: Is it branded? Does it fall within the brand?  Pam: Exactly. Once you have that foundation, then you move to the fun part, the design and the expression and the logos and all of that. I was speaking to a very close friend who's a designer, a retail architect, and design has become democratized. Photography has become democratized. Everything is at the tip of our fingers. It doesn't mean we understand it all or are experts, but we become the designer. I think people hit a point, especially if they haven't had the business background or the marketing background—what's wonderful today is there are a lot of young people out there who have grown up more natively with the virtual world.  There's somebody named Liz Cantor who teaches a fabulous course on Instagram to independent designers. You can join a small society she has that's very reasonable on a monthly basis. It's a fantastic how-to. A lot of it is the mindset. It walks you through how you need good photographs and other pieces to it. There's another woman named Kathleen Cutler who is a wonderful high-end sales expert. She teaches people how to digitally communicate and virtually sell, how to connect with your best clients, what kind of language to use, how to get comfortable emailing, all of that. These are the people I look up to, my young leaders, because that's the future of marketing in the industry in many ways.  On my own, I am partnering with Tobias Harris. That's his name. He comes out of architectural and retail design agencies. Together, we are merging design with branding. We are being approached by different architects; their clients are coming to them and saying, “Well, now I want to integrate technology,” or “I want to offer a customized kiosk,” or whatever it is, not necessarily in the jewelry world. We're finding that they never really figured out who they are or what their distinction is. We're offering programs on how to do this for them or take them through developing it themselves. Sharon: You said a couple of things. First of all, since the podcast is audio only, I'd love to post the tree chart, and we can have links to these other people. I think since we're both of a certain age, I don't want to knock—you can't just say you're a digital native, because I have people around me who are whizzes with this, but it's more than a matter of just throwing things up on Instagram. You have to have what you're saying, a strategy. You have to have the foundation, the background that you and I have. What are the questions, what's the plan, what's the positioning, who are you?  Pam: When I work with my strategists, my writers—and I have two brilliant ones—it is a fun thing to do. Usually what we do is put together a visual and a verbal. We do the positioning first, and it's based on who they are, deep interviews, and exploring the joy and the inspirations and all of the wonderful things that drive them to create these amazing pieces or whatever their product is. Some of them are more commercial; I've done a lot of programs for the Sterlings and the Kay Jewelers and the Jareds of world, but at the end of the day, it's connecting with your customer. I always say the context is as important as the content. The context is the environment, whether it's on your website or whether it's on Instagram. How are you presenting? Because anything that you present is a representation of your brand and has impact. Sharon: I think that's really important. I also want to emphasize that what you're saying is not just for commercial jewelers, but it can be for emerging artists, art jewelers. At some point, you're going to say, “O.K., I've gone to every gallery in the country 14 times. I want to grow, and I've got to be able to make a case for that or show how I'm different and why they might want to look at me.” Pam: Full disclosure, I'm looking at a digital program now that will show how to set up a jewelry case, how to merchandise different showcases. Different jewelry cases, traditionally around the diamond, showcase differently. There are certain products you put further away, the more expensive product in the showcase, and maybe you show fewer. There are ways of anchoring products. This is real visual merchandising as well as highlighting and understanding how people perceive and read a showcase. You don't want it to look like a bazaar. Our tendency is to show as much as we can. The understanding, though—and this is where the psychology comes in—is how people process, especially when somebody is speaking to them.  The other side is that there's some amazing technology out now that allows us to shop in a store on our own, to access information through barcodes and different things when we can't touch it. By the end of the day, it is the relationship; it is why we go into the store. We want to learn and understand and touch and feel and try on, and that's the thing that's very hard to do. Yes, you can have a digital hand and try the jewelry on like Warby Parker glasses, but there's something different about that relationship. That's why if you took everything away and you have a strong relationship with somebody who loves your jewelry, that is something to nurture. That's old school. That's traditional, but at the end of the day, that's where the heart of the matter is. Sharon: It is, yes. First of all, what you said about the teaching or the training or the thought process—how do you talk to people at a tradeshow? I'm sure there are people who are saying, “I don't need to know that. I'm an antique jewelry dealer,” but you have to be able to connect with somebody looking at it. What would you say are the top three things to consider when you're displaying something? What would you say? Pam: I should bounce back to another answer to a question you asked. What is most important underneath all this is authenticity in your position and in your language, because people pick it up very quickly. If you're copying somebody else, you know it; we just sense it. I think authenticity is the success of many independent jewelry designers and jewelers. Sharon: Authenticity—I would say you have to be able to support your brand. You can't just pick verbiage out of a hat. You have to be able to support it. Pam: All this identity stuff is never easy, whether we're trying to figure out—we go through this in different parts of our lives. When you work with a consultant like myself or my team, it gives you the ability to stand back. You have an outside opinion. It's very hard to do. Often, it's difficult to do it yourself. That's why we're looking into different how-to's to offer more training. Sharon: And I think that's brilliant.  Pam: I'm sorry, you asked me— Sharon: I don't want to form it in a negative way, but I want to ask—you probably walk into a store and say, “They should have put this.'' What are the biggest mistakes you see? Pam: Overcrowding a showcase, poor displays and warrant systems. To me, with the display case, like any other part of the sale, you have to show respect to your customer, especially in jewelry. We expect to come in and see beautiful jewelry, beautifully lit. Something that isn't fresh and new, especially in this day and age—whether you're doing a tradeshow or you have a high-end store, it's got to be up to date. The other opportunity is signage. Not just the name, but quotes, a beautiful line from a poem; “something beautiful is within reach,” something that is going to capture attention in the case. Not too much; I'm not a big proponent of props and other things. Height and dimension add a lot to the experience. Really, less is more. You want to tell a story in that case so people can home in on that collection. If you have too much of everything without certain anchor pieces or bolder pieces, even pieces that might be very, very high-end and may not be your main sellers, you want to anchor it with something that's going to be bold enough to attract attention and then tell the story around it.  I'm often disappointed because they're white displays. There's so much more that can be done. I'm not saying that isn't a fantastic color for reflecting diamond light and other things, but I would say light is important for everything. I'm also thinking windows and presentations. There's such an opportunity to intrigue people with how you present the product. Today, so many designers have their own displays, which is useful because we are so brand-oriented, especially everybody of the younger generation. It helps us to understand, to put a name to something. We can build that brand out with our colorations and look and feel through other media. The store is just one touchpoint. I say take the walls down and think of your other ways of communicating with your customer: Facebook advertising, traditional and non-traditional, email marketing, so people make that connection to the consistency. Your consistency can be one of two things. It could be one piece that represents your brand. It could be your logo, your voice, a tagline, something that helps you be distinctive. All those words alone, I should say, however, is not branding. Sharon: We could talk forever about this. Pam, thank you so much for being here. I really appreciate it. It's been a pleasure. Pam: Thank you. I hope I've answered all of your questions. Sharon: You absolutely did. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Numbers by Barron's
Solar Could Power 40% of U.S. Electricity by 2035

Numbers by Barron's

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 3:39


The U.S. Energy Department has high hopes for Solar. A new court ruling gives developers room to circumvent Apple. And eyewear maker, Warby Parker, could have a $2.7 Billion valuation when it goes public. Host: Shaina Mishkin.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
You're Not Listening: Alex Rosamilia of The Gaslight Anthem joins YNL! The Gaslight Anthem - The Patient Ferris Wheel; The Cure - Disintegration

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 73:57


We were fortunate enough to have Alex Rosamilia, guitarist from The Gaslight Anthem, The Forgivers, and Dead Swords join us to talk about some killer music! Alex breaks down The Patient Ferris Wheel with us and then we discuss Disintegration by The Cure. If you think you don't like these songs, then You're Not Listening. So #CleanOutYourEars and #ListenUp! Click Here for the Official You're Not Listening Spotify Playlist! Every song that is discussed on YNL is on this playlist, as well as the most recent episode! To hear these songs on Youtube, click the links below! -The Patient Ferris Wheel video -Disintegration Video Other Links from this episode: -Check out more amazing music podcasts at www.pantheonpodcasts.com! -Listen to the Forgivers on Spotify! -Follow Alex on Instagram! If you enjoy this podcast, please make sure you SUBSCRIBE, rate & review, and reach out to us! Click here to visit our website! Twitter: @YNLPodcast Facebook: You're Not Listening Instagram: @YNLPodcast YNL Gear: TeeSpring Store! If you'd like to Support You're Not Listening, please check out our Patreon page and become a patron to get access to all of our extra content, exclusive playlists, and more! For your FREE in-home trial of 5 different glasses frames from Warby Parker, go to www.warbyparkertrial.com/notlistening!  Thanks so much for (not)listening! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

EP275 - Mickey Drexler on DTC Mickey Drexler is the former CEO of Ann Taylor, The Gap, J. Crew, and is a former board member of Apple and Warby Parker. He is currently the CEO of Alex Mill, a digitally native vertical brand, founded by his son Alex Drexler. He has been dubbed the “Merchant Prince” for his successful turn around of Ann Taylor, and his dramatic transformation of The Gap. In this broad ranging interview, we cover his distinguished career, his opinion about the recent direct to consumer trends, and much more. The interview is full of juicy tidbits including: Getting kicked out of a Levi's meeting after turning The Gap into a vertical integrated brand with its' own label. His efforts to sell J. Crew to Amazon. He turned down Steve Jobs first request to serve on the Apple Board of Directors, and how he later helped Steve and Ron design the Apple retail store. Steve Jobs desire to be a direct to consumer brand. The pros and cons of intuition versus data to select merchandise. His cameo on Breaking Bad. How Old Navy was partially inspired by Targets early private label efforts. And much more Episode 275 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Wednesday September 8th, 2021. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:24] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 275 being recorded on Wednesday September 8th 2021 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:39] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason and Scot show listeners. Jason last week we did a deep dive into the Warby Parker and all boobs s-1 filings which was a lot of fun and we got a lot of really good conversation out there with listeners talking about digitally native vertical Brands and we thought you know who could we bring on that keep this conversation going who has experience with wholesale Brands retailers in a vertically integrated d2c brand I'm pretty sure there's only one person in our industry that checks all those boxes and it is industry luminary Mickey Drexler we are very excited to have Mickey on the show Welcome Mickey. Mickey: [1:19] Thank you for having me and I'm excited to be here. Jason: [1:23] Oh my gosh Mickey we are we are thrilled to chat with you I'm eager to get into all the juicy topics going on in the industry and kind of cover your background but we have to start with the most important thing first and you may not know this Mickey but Scott as very successful in the e-commerce industry and he's invested a lot of his earnings from that industry into the car wash industry and. The reason I bring this up is because you you have famously been on the TV Show Breaking Bad. And I think that Scott is basically the plot for Breaking Bad is that. Scot: [2:05] Yeah I'm sitting on pallets of cash right now. Mickey: [2:08] One of the highlights of my life nine takes but it was really a lot of fun and I love that show. Scot: [2:17] It is a it is a great one. Jason: [2:19] One of the best shows on TV. Yeah so yeah we could probably do a whole show about breaking bad which I'm going to resist the temptation so, Mickey normally we start up the show by letting the guest kind of tell us a little bit about their background that could be tricky in your case because a lot of us orders probably know some of the highlights of your background and your backgrounds amazing but like when you meet someone that doesn't know you like how do you describe your career. Mickey: [2:50] Well I say I'm a retailer and I leave it at that, no reason to go further sometimes people after the fact say gee I didn't know you are who you are and cetera but if they want to know then maybe answer some specific questions, but I don't give them my resume. Jason: [3:16] Nice well for the sake of our listeners I am going to break it down a little bit although I appreciate the the humility of it and you you tell me if I have a ride but like you grew up in the Northeast and and started your career in the apparel industry so you work for a bunch of storied apparel retailers Abrams and Strauss Macy's Bloomingdale's and if I ever write your first big job that I don't think that many people remember is you were the CEO at Ann Taylor. Mickey: [3:51] Yes by the way the Northeast means the Bronx to move is that was very special in my life so that's who I grew up. And my first after the three I had joined say Bloomingdale's then briefly Macy's, Then I then I decided I did not want to work in the department store business anymore and I was fortunate enough to, become CEO banjo which is a tiny company losing a lot of money owned by a larger company that happened on Brooks Brothers and probably never heard of the other companies who spoke to March around anymore, and I did that for four years and we were then taken over by big bureaucratic department store, and I decided I was never more disappointed at that point in my life I was a pretty young guy, and I wanted to leave because they didn't appreciate the business we were in it was all about bureaucracy was Alex Stewart. Who then eventually like to play towards I'm not sure who they bought but so I left I left a mess a mess I left it in Taylor. And moved to Gap in San Francisco. Jason: [5:14] Yep and then for other young kids listening to the podcast Gap is going to sound like this famous iconic brand but when you joined in the late 80s um they haven't may be achieved all of their success yet and so like, frankly you you are traded in for being that the CEO that led this, enormous expansion and growth both financially and in terms of popular awareness of the Gap and I want to say you, you watched a couple of the Gap Brands like Old Navy and Gap Kids and somewhat relevant to the conversations we have on this show a lot I think you made a pretty significant decision to take Gap from being a wholesaler that sold a fair amount of other people's Goods to a vertically integrated brand that primarily focused on making your own goods and selling them direct to Consumers through your stores do I have that right. Mickey: [6:09] Yeah yeah correct I joined Gap you don't mind if I correct details I join Gap, at the end of 1983, which is then it started as a hundred percent Levi's company they only bought from Levi's and then when I got there was about one-third of their business was Levi's, and long story short, I learned in my retail life than especially having worked alongside Brooks Brothers which was at the beginning of the decline Franklin, in the mid-80s but they were they own their label and they didn't sell wholesale them, and they did not have to worry about competitors etc etc and going on sale. [7:05] They also with the highest profit company in a relatively small conglomerate of retailers and the reason was their margins were very high. Because again they weren't dealing with competitive sales my department store experience was the opposite, if you're in buying wholesale someone else will put the goods on sale and of course today you know 30 years later plus it's the standard. [7:35] And so I decided when I got to Ann Taylor. [7:39] To own our own label over time I didn't want to deal with competitors who have the same Goods as we did and we did, to consumer or whatever you call it today and that was in 1980 1980, 1970 actually 74 5 trans legally 1980 exactly I joined them in 1980 so when I hear about direct-to-consumer today being the new heart area, it's been there has been a number of your few of us who did it, and through a profit point of view it was the only way I wanted to go not want to buy wholesale we, leave ours ironically after nearer to kick this out because they said we were copying them I'll never forget the lunch was a long boring lunch in San Francisco, and I said after I said they should have told us that right at the beginning so we didn't have to go through this long boring lunch when they when they then said would not sell you anymore well frankly I didn't really care and when you have news like that, you figure it out better than you don't have these like, so we stopped being buying wholesale from Levi's and great brand virus they were no hugely monstrous plan, and we did it on their own but that was fine and that's how it began. Jason: [9:08] That's amazing and I'm totally with you it's I talked to all these young entrepreneurs that just started a new direct to Consumer brand and many of them are under the misguided impression that it's a new business model that they just invented. Mickey: [9:21] I know well there's a few of us then and now there are many many of us, but it is what it was it was not where you could build a business and wake up in the morning and control, your inventory and your prices when I joined the apple board in, I think years later in 1999 Steve Jobs basically felt that's what he wanted to do with apple that was his first year there. And he wanted to go direct and of course she did continue doing business with Walmart and Target and all that but he became. Direct, probably the greatest retailer ever and but you know it's a standard today and there's nothing new about it in fact it's old and it is what it is. Jason: [10:18] Yeah no I tease people that the very first merchants of all times I you know made their own rugs and sold them direct to Consumer so that's that was the first Model like wholesale is the newer the newer model. And so I do so then the next chapter is going to be J.Crew and we're going to go back and talk about some of the interesting issues that you confronted in some of these places but I do want to just highlight, I assume you still follow the Gap the, I would check out because it seems like you took them predominantly Direct in a lot of their news lately I don't know you fought it but they have a partnership with Walmart for their home goods and I just saw something today that they announced that they're going to distribute Athleta which is there they're their work out a pair of brand on this doing really well through REI so it's almost like they're it's interesting that they're now adding some wholesale back to their mix. Mickey: [11:13] Yep well each company is entitled to you know they all have a point of view they have a vision and I think that's what there is is can argue with it. Jason: [11:24] Yeah no and obviously pros and cons to all of these so then you left the Gap was it around 2000 2002 something like that. Mickey: [11:33] Yes I think I left in I think 2001 yeah yeah they say I think I left in 2001, in fact September 26 to be exact. 2001 and I started at J.Crew who's counting January I think 25th or something in 2002. Jason: [11:58] Awesome and what was the circumstances that J.Crew when you started. Mickey: [12:03] Well it was a mess a complete mess by the way I know you mentioned this but I started Old Navy I do it you probably know that story right. Jason: [12:16] No no tell us. Mickey: [12:18] Well it's an interesting story there's an article in the New York Times page 4 5. In terms of some some things I never forgot that like that and I read about Target Corporation then known as they Hudson starting a company to copy the gap. And what do you do when someone wants to copy you get emotional you get crazy and then you fly to Minneapolis to the Mall of America and say okay I want to see what it looks like. And I walked in on you say probably four minutes and I said this is way way off so I was relieved, because to me everyone would sewing machine is your competitor potential, I walked out and said you know is a big research company you know they I know they do a lot of research very successful and today more than ever, stopping Chicago on the way back to San Francisco I visited. Two stores demographics would be a price point below where Gap trailer very few me we were very much. [13:29] Not expecting, and I spoke to the store managers which you have to do in this world today you speak to who deals with customers it's like I've always done that it's my rule in any case they taught me a lot of lessons, Gap was too expensive for this area things are always on sale and I knew that I pick those tubes that low-margin stores, long story short got flew to San Francisco thinking about that, check the jeans Business 80 percent of genes in America than was sold 25 years ago sold below $30 a hundred percent of our genes are above 30 dollars, so I say this is not this is not a stupid idea, for them because we are considered a little more expensive I gave 10 of our Associates, then two hundred dollars each I assign. Them to shop certain categories: Target Walmart then you came on versions and come back. [14:39] Let's discuss it in one week they all came back bottom line is, they care about product they carry about price they couldn't care less if it ended 99 Cents 87 cents as Walmart used to do, etcetera and and right after that meeting I just said we're going to do it we're going to open up, our version of it was called everyday hero, and a few people from Jenny mean who worked at Marvin's was running for the gap, Jeff Eiffel we moved over we started with a small group to do what was then had no name. [15:23] And Don Fisher was always you know he was always pretty open about entrepreneurial stuff and I said was starting his company we didn't have a name long story short, I couldn't come up with the name I was in Paris going to the airport and I see a bar on Rue Saint Germain called Old Navy. And I said to Maggie who was with me marketing I think what a great name for a company, registered the next day in America no one had it and that was the name now of course my board didn't really like name you know but to me your name your kids you're not going to have a negotiation over what you name them, we have a negotiation I hard to naming companies that have with horrible names and later on I'll tell you how we got the Old Navy from olden days, and that was the beginning first store open whole Gap Warehouse only had three names and I said, we do this and we have no gaps in five years so then the next door is called Old Navy and that's how we started today it's about probably 80 and 90% of the earnings of the Gap Corporation I'm guessing. But tremendously successful. Jason: [16:38] Yeah that has been the tide that has lifted all the the Gap boats for a while. And yeah that that is amazing you raise something that I have to ask though because it comes up a lot I work with a lot of Brands and these days I spend a lot of time cautioning them about how good the retailers are becoming it inventing their own Brands and and their first reaction is always the same is your trip to Minneapolis like you know targets not very good at this I'm not very worried right, and I think that was absolutely true back then and in many categories it still is true but I would argue that in some categories, and Target more so than most is getting darn good at this and you look today at like cat and Jack and they're very successfully competing with with Baby Gap and and you know sort of traditional brands. Mickey: [17:30] Hundred hundred percent I totally agree but you know what you're good at and the products right. And I think their inspiration I was told was the crew cuts I don't know if that's true or not I'm not the kids business anymore and I don't pay attention, but absolutely true look if it's a vision, and and the product is right and I always say the product has to be right and in their case you know the price is right well the past its product, quality of product value and that's by the way we did oh maybe that's the story in any business right product right value. Right marketing and emotional connection to it and then we had operated retail. And the style and taste is all for us it's very important. Jason: [18:23] So then we mentioned that you you started that that January a J.Crew which was a mess at the time, and I want to say one of the things you did for J.Crew kind of mirroring the Old Navy story is launched the Madewell brand there. Mickey: [18:41] Well I did that before I join J.Crew. I bought the name Madewell from a fellow named David Mullen who was it really nice company, hear that David used to work with me in wash it was a wash consult very talented guy showed me the name before I went to J.Crew, I love the longer it's very hard to name a company and the name immediately resonated with me, and I should Wanted You by Sly can't afford it, and so I paid $125,000 for the name which you know once you finish with those naming companies which I wouldn't want to do they'll charge you a million dollars will come up and bad names no offense the main companies. But but I thought the name 1937 already it had history it had a feeling it had emotion so I bought the name and tucked it away, and when we went public when we turn Jake you around, see I was there to about three or four years to you actually turn around always starts a year and a half later and that's three years later or whenever I thought it was time to start me. [20:04] So that's what we start the username and that was unlike every day unlike the everyday hero. Target this was a this was more complicated because the Old Navy was price point or two or three below gas. [20:25] This one and I might say was the first company to get to a billion dollars in sales as fast as they did until Apple get there. So it took off like a rocket at Old Navy like a rock it was really a very nice toy and maybe well was much more difficult, we took it we had a number of different people leading it, and we just couldn't get it going the right way I made a number of mistakes in opening up. Bedroom state which knows things it was real estate wasn't on Vine and that didn't work, we just didn't get our act together for at least four years in five years, and I was really upset because I said you know this is taking away from the value of our public company so we must 15 and 20 million dollars a year which I think we were maybe 15 million a year, you know you take the multiple of the stock and all the sudden you know the company's worth three hundred million dollars less because we're starting made well, so that kind of aggravated me couldn't get rid of that aggravation way things are but then some set. [21:43] I came back to the corporation he left for you or two and he was putting to be in charge of. Male and he did an incredible job and so he and I work very closely together. And I always merchandising Missouri involved. [22:06] And he did the design and he had a vision for design I had a vision well the storefront, it was kind of a I was always inspired by I think they're still around but I'm not sure a bread bread store in the village called the suvi oh maybe, I don't know if it's still there to be the bakery yes I always loved the way the storm was so we designed a store. I kind of felt like a see it was the studio I'm just actually look at a picture again we fun and we built a really I was really pleased with the store but I was not pleased with how the business was going, and some sack pinion looking at the storefront now online beautiful store and it's beautiful store goal, and emotion, and then when he came in the rest then this is starting to take off like a rocket plus woman named Mary. Who was jeans made merry new Mary knew more veggies. [23:19] And she joined us from Jay Vernon and Mary came in. Thanks Gary Pierson and she and some set and it takes people to do it we put together we became a major genes, that was our vision the best kind of jeans that not crazy designer prices and the company took off also at some point like a lock. And that was the story of Nemo. And you know all the retail to be all the over companies to Fashion they hit a wall at times and then they come back or they don't come back, and hitting a wall is part of what goes on every company I've been involved as hit a wall at some point it's a wall in any me to save it and bring it back or it or it continues to have a hard time. Jason: [24:17] For sure the side note another company hit a wall sadly was Vesuvio which is a hundred year old Bakery in SoHo I have some good news bad news they had a Hiatus and they reopened in like 20/20 so the last and I was is in SoHo they were they were open I had not heard what has happened since the pandemic and I can imagine it wasn't a great time for them so I hope they're doing well. Mickey: [24:43] We'll check it out and we'll let you know that's cool. Jason: [24:47] Awesome so then I do want to kind of just wrap up the clear stuff and then we're going to dive in a little deeper on a few of the things that we've already talked about but so today you are Alex Mill and do you want to tell us a little bit about Alex. Mickey: [25:01] Yeah sure Alex my son or Alex. Jason: [25:03] We're both I was waiting for you to tell that yes. Mickey: [25:08] Well my son started the business in 2005 13, and he just started I was very involved and I pretty much had nothing to do with it at all which he reminded me when I started here, he says you know you don't even wear our t-shirts which were famous for. And he was right I just didn't pay any attention and I probably should have but he didn't ask me really and he was a wholesale come. And we do business it was kind of cool we had a little bit of a cult following and and I'm allergic to high prices which really gets translated as too bad value, you know I don't mind high prices in certain categories or where you get what you pay for for a you know the prices are ridiculous but you might learn from his luggage or whatever from a mess, but we designer clothes in general so he went along I went along he. [26:18] When I left J.Crew I didn't think anything about his business but when some stack. Who is he quit he had a non-compete and I was his age. So we need help I hope to get jobs in the industry part-time jobs freelance because he walked away from a very very big job, and so the day his non-compete was up, I that was the day he was a beginning of a new Alex will be in some segments and do each other, and Alex was very happy that he would find some partner and some seconds considered the founder of the company he's a major shareholder long of Alex and myself, and he joined us. [27:16] And then I was very happy kind of had a job again because I was doing stuff but not doing what I love to do which is be involved in building a company Vision etcetera, so I joined I think it was about two and a half years ago I'm not even sure the day. And we had a little tiny office which I'm now we doubled the space instead, that we start to build a business and we had a vision and a woman's and Alex and I at the beginning or I would say it wasn't a marriage made in heaven, it's the it's the come one since when and it took a lot of work and a lot of a lot of help. And we finally listening I'm going to say that he's going to listening to his mother my wife about making certain that he and I get along and I did that with him, it was like another else conversation and it's been really really nice over the last number of months but it's hard. To be with your dad and I was trying to figure out is he. Someone I work with or is he my son and it's extremely difficult and he kept dealing with me as whatever I done. [28:40] And so now he's you know he's a partner along with some set and and Hussein. And we hired a team and it's very hard to start a company I had the bank of Gap in the Bank of J.Crew in my other two startups now I didn't have their back. And so we funded us elves which in a way is really good I also do want to have for the first time in my life. Too many opinions that weren't right and that was a blessing even though you know I'm doing this for a million years, if we're right we're right if we're wrong way wrong but my best board members were always people I knew anyway not necessarily on the board. But when you have a money partner which I certainly did they think about profits they think which is nothing wrong with it but, take its long-term to build a profitable company, and when you have hit a wall you succeed if you're good at it I always had a kind of ability to. Knock down and I just get right back up and I don't stop. [30:00] But some cases that doesn't happen but here we are independent Leo and not negotiating colors or Styles or what someone else thinks we should do. We're expanding in the business is starting to really kind of take off now so I'm really excited I've always been excited. It's about the taste quality I look at the landscape out there. And I think this is not a lot of things going on that I feel or what I would say are incredibly impressive there are those winners, and you all know who they are so what I'm hearing so I think we're all excited but small you know. But that's small anymore 20 people work there and we all have like multiple jobs which is good I've say snorts growing pretty rapidly, so and you know that's our mission. Jason: [31:03] My I have a some great empathy for your son Alex I'm a fourth-generation retailer and I think I can imagine poor Alex just wanted his famous dad to wear his t-shirts and he got an activist investor instead. Mickey: [31:15] What your fourth generation retailer. Jason: [31:19] Yeah yeah my family sort of started out in the in the grocery and then later jewelry business, I did want to highlight you've referenced it a couple times that you're also you had a long stint on the board at Apple and I want to say I've been, worked with Ron Johnson the number of times and I've seen some interviews with Steve Jobs and in both cases they reference you as the the retail Savvy board member and Apple. Mickey: [31:46] I met Steve in I loved Steve idolized ski and I still love him to this day, he was extraordinary and I give very slowly thinking about the way he died went through, and to excuse me per. Steve we met what he wants he gets when he doesn't stop at anything the most seductive human being I've ever met in my life, we met at a mutual friend's birthday party in Napa Valley came up to me and we start the shoes and, you don't say what's the job so long Steve you know a niche wasn't and we're talking and he. [32:32] Got in touch with me after that asked if I would join this board, and I said no I don't like public companies now I took my schmuck anti schmuck pills after the okay, because hello is that a bad word to say she's no and I realized holy shit, and I just you know I was yeah I was on a board you know bless them family board, in other words and items on a number of other boards and I get bored very quickly on boards because that's the way I am and I need to be action busy, and I'm not a technologist I don't know much about it but. So a year later he came to me after becoming come to me and said you join my board I will join Apples by Gap store, well Steve hate Sports also, but he and I said deal why because God will he be amazing on the board, just as a factor of not going along with everything already. [33:50] And he became a pain in the ass to the number of people who isn't always on Tiny going and what's up this kind of but he privately we had a really nice strong relationship. And she joined the board I would say made a few enemies on the board because he whatever he thinks he says that's it he says. And and sometimes he says it doesn't make people happy so so that's essentially what happened so in any case I join these board. And first thing he wanted me to do was to design a store. [34:31] And we had a really bad looking store and that he designed and then we got a warehouse which we used to do with my old company, and we got a warehouse you designed a brand new store in the warehouse p.m. for 5,000 square feet and. The store was really good-looking that's basically what happens students are today simple it showed off the price. And it wasn't a story that was czechia where the product was competing with the design and that was our first Apple Store, and then after that I just you know he asked me about color of iPods he always want to review the colors Etc. You know it's like you're 16 years and lives through extraordinary success and you know appreciate it I don't know you and appreciate it well he was alive and well. But just I just always you know he went to the meetings he started every single meeting for it spent most of his time on the. [35:46] And you don't find that many people and many companies they spend most of their time necessary not on product that was steamed on product, things tough he was titled in an infant in a good way in my mind you know Obama didn't call him back, one morning he wanted to President Obama to launch the first iPhone he was Furious Obama didn't get that I'll never forget that, he says how do you not call me back like this light in four hours Al Gore was on the boy houses Steve I'll get him to call you back whatever. [36:24] You know Obama told and back when you had a minute came back and says he's going to launch the iPhone pushing never did but that's what Steve wanted to believe anyway amazing amazing run, an amazing person he and Johnny I everyday had lunch and every day was you know what's the future going to hold. For apple and he the other thing he did, is he kind of made me for sure and numbers feel stupid at the end of a board meeting I wasn't in technology guys sometimes I'd say something that you look the righteousness gee how can I say that, and then you can bury yourself and say oh I don't want to disappoint Steve yeah but he was to me was a special unique gift to the world. And I miss him and I think the world misses in today. Scot: [37:18] Absolutely, because I'm the entrepreneur on the program Jason has a fancy corporate job and a title that has more words that I can keep track of the so you've been a successful entrepreneur for decades what advice would you give to an aspiring entrepreneur listening to the show like what are, distill down some of the things you've learned through there. Mickey: [37:36] I was explaining to him that every single day this we haven't really nice marketing business we do well but every day I come to work. And I reach for the sky. [37:52] And I'm trying to explain that no matter what we're doing oh he also time says I'm too critical of things or people or whatever and I said you know Alex everyday. I come to work I said every day you come to work I come to work and I look for what. Could be better not for what you write and I think a lot of people have a hard time with that vision is, where you going how you get there with the unknowns is critical, so people say well how do you do this that and the other thing and I said I had a photograph of what Gap should be I didn't in Maine. I didn't J.Crew and I actually I did yet in J.Crew and I didn't Old Navy and I didn't so I had a photograph in my mind we get sale in one Business book. Because it was actually misses you by I had to do with those. [38:56] That didn't work but yet not them to get up into the skill set whose huge toes. What you need to do and I can't speak about Instinct in other areas but I think Instinct judgment. Seeing around corners where they say skate to where the puck is going. Is extremely important in the fashion business and knowing when to go knowing when to stop when things slow down extremely. [39:30] Picking the right team is something rules that rules but got to pick the right partners and when you make a mistake in a partnership and so many of us don't do this for cleanup face up to you but. [39:46] And do something of that. You know and the bigger companies are no longer into the smaller company like this. About your all living together and it doesn't take long and when you're writing your own checks, that's a big difference when you're writing your own checks which I know most people probably don't have the ability to do, it's very different than the private Equity the joint venture etc etc but he country each business, as if you own it it's your money in and that's part of it and then you know we will passion, I say leadership curiosity I think anyone was not curious in my mind can't do well running a company, they have to be curious unless it's look like you speak about technology I just assumed the same rules. But building a retail company it's kind of like painting a very beautiful picture as to what we'll stick together you know I once went twice went to visit Ford motor. Design. [41:01] Headquarters and the first time I got was because Anna meaning with Jeff Sons yeah. Surrender they show the new Mustang this is probably seven. The co-host and I said he says what do you think of the car in front of all these people I said it's a very cool looking car. [41:26] The wheels are really big and I would never want to Market or sell a car for have one myself with a wheels are bad, I know it's kind of silly ish but it's not it's putting together a painting and there's nothing worse, there are worse things in wheels that stand out like a sore thumb so he invited me to, Detroit with designer factors Co didn't go with me which I thought says. He's no one not because of Nations and it was seven people designing the one car. Now you understand why the cars a lot of cases look like they look. Steve always wanted to talk he would have done now they were to get when I he was he was fascinated with Tesla very impressed night, from his point of view it wasn't I said I know if you remember the to see your test sports car. Scot: [42:28] Register yeah. Mickey: [42:29] I said Steve it's such an ugly looking Paris looks to me like you are pathetic it's not about the course looks you can always design a beautiful car it's about what's inside. Mechanics engineering but anyway I think. You know as for me I'm accused of being a micromanager you really better be, you better care about the wheels better care about this hear about that Medicare by recalling about he just you know we have a few new bad colors in Arabic in Arabic. The color is of opinion L and if you buy three good colors and then two bad ones you don't morejon out on the product because you have bad colors which I don't think people pay enough attention to. And I could know what I'm trying to think what else to go on. Scot: [43:23] You know I know we're running up on time but just quickly quickly so you you kind of were very early on what this kind of direct to Consumer now there's this whole digitally native vertical brand what what do you think's driving that Trend and where do you think it goes. Mickey: [43:39] Yeah I think it continues to go because if you're buying wholesale you know the pricing is all off. And I saw that when I was you know young guy you know like when I was at Bloomingdales I was 23. Alexander's department store maybe Fourth Generation member states they I was a swimsuit sweater and t-shirt. And everything else I wasn't I didn't do that for terribly wrong but for the year I was in there you are Alexander's cut their prices. In the middle of June and I'll never forget I had a couple my prices we had a policy to meet price. Young kid in the business and I was Furious Alexander's just here and now my my profits and margins. Then what to help. Because I hadn't worked out on my bathing suits that was a stupid rule but it wasn't a bad I kind of like the idea of Crisis competitors that was the beginning, what's happened to the last 30 or 40 years T.J.Maxx the most important department store. [44:58] And you know the word stimuli, we have all the discounts that and you go online and you we had a big discussion here yesterday you said well we sell this to Nordstrom Rack and he said well if it was an existing item, we want think if it isn't bad covers and they said you can't miss anything going to go online, given a look for this island yes my little bit Nordstrom Rack will whoever Valance T.J.Maxx before you see Alex Mill so the pricing. Is critical so white and a lot of what I did was also because who I always admired Ralph Lauren Bailey – pricing and I know all these things cost and so I said we can put together. A design team that will hopefully be as good as a design team ourselves if we do that I say I don't I don't want to have another problem. [45:59] So the prophets were always all the retailers are inflated in America in Goods that are wholesale purchases, because it is plant safety and cost, and here we might sell 250 you spend fifty yourself Bloomingdale's 425 and hundred twenty-five goes to 275 or $300 is the difference. In pricing so TJ Max knows that really long Ross stores. Everyone knows it and and I think that's why I don't think there's a future to be in that business. And I sit to the parks to excited family with a lot and probably not have to hear this but. Jason: [46:46] Yeah no department stores listen to our show I promise I'm. Mickey: [46:52] So I said I really don't want to see I said where you going to be in five years or ten years if everything you bought. Is available at a discount and that's the truth. So and I have friends in the business they do hello mrs. with teaching marks they do with most of the partner stories and what does that leave you and Caroline Woods is a great coach. And really smart nice person but what is forty fifty sixty billion dollars huge profits so, and really big believer must now this is where I'm standing in the luxury business is not. We have they probably can do it now via makes does. They do with brilliantly I guess the other one you know they have they can probably do it who's those customers probably like it exclusivity they like paying more money and so on and so forth but it works through that I think it does, so so I know if I knew the answer to that question with that pricing thing is huge. Jason: [48:06] No it's a it's a big issue for the industry to figure out and people that don't are going to. Have it have a challenging future I think as you've highlighted I did want to ask you a question so, if anyone Google's Mickey Drexler your you're gonna find all these business articles with your picture on the cover and some variation of this title that we've all given you the merchant Prince um and that the kind of just I hope you're okay with it seems like you get that title whether you want it or not. The gist of all those is that man, Mickey had a really good run of picking a lot more winners than losers of therefore it having the the products that that consumers wanted and you know they're there for achieving a bunch of financial success for your various businesses and I've always wanted to ask you, is in your mind is that success as a merchant is that we're you better than other people at, identifying the trends that were emerging in what people wanted or were you better at getting people to want what what you liked. Mickey: [49:19] I think it's a little box I think our industry is lacking. Merchants today as much as I've seen over the last many many decades. I don't know what it is but I think you have a sense of seeing around corners you must see around the corners, I believe except if you're a seller if you're a Discounter and you're good at it you don't have to see around the corners just have to Source right, and I have the right price and have a great way to view or but those businesses are out there I don't really know them well. But that's important in most business not enough you know, worthy I think mostly eyeglasses they sell what's true of all of us most of what we sell, are what we would call her oh it items iconic but you have to feel it you have to see it. You have to have an inch and in the instinct is incredibly. [50:39] I think I was talking to a friend yesterday and he said in his 15 year old is now color rather than know what need p is. The expanse was something I said you know it's interesting I said to Henry I said do, is there anyone in your family who is musical I always ask someone that question whoever I interview, and sure enough Henry's wife plays very good these though and Henry was a musician. [51:13] Growing up. And now here's their son they are very talented musician artist creative there's always some kind of. DNA is connection is fine and it always also depends on who works I was very lucky, I started working for a woman named King Marcin I didn't work for she's the best Fortune taste Isle and when I got to Bloomingdale's like this young. [51:42] And I was after the first day in the house was checking on what they gave me a department to run, Stand start that's it you're the buyer one department and Katie Mercy was my mentors go off to Europe together factories and I guess I learned from her, and she the best merchants in the company if she wasn't a woman she's Co she was fantastic but there is something you get. Fun styling taste that you were born with and I think that's true in stinking with anything in the world. Tonight and it's not a scientific illusion but I everyone I interview I kind of want to know what their parents did. [52:30] For what this family that might have been a grandfather and a lot of especially creative it. So so I think that's really important the other part of the question is mostly was what you're going with and then creating your maker, well there's a lot of things under the radar and if you go after it you create demand for the people just don't expose it so we have recording a items we bring in, old mr. white we doing that way of doing this and they take off like crazy because someone wanted. And understanding what someone might want and Steve Jobs has tasks. [53:17] Is all part of the skill set with meeting. I'm not too bad Commodities during this price I thought would worry Parker bids was absolutely brilliant at figuring. What's out there with the stylish kind of cool pumping where people are going to pay $95 for their eyeglasses the only thing I say that Neil and Davis I think we need to at times. Balance or if you read Tales they could probably leave me come to my newest company of record I said I think you can have one more fun and I prices and however Orange. But the most important so then just like friends but no I think you you kind of born I see, I see him every time you sit down and look at it woman and she gets it it's in her blood why she has. And she's had a chief Merchant and see something and feels it and knows it and you know and then you have to be go to the message you're not quitting. [54:23] You have to know numbers you have to get Four Kings you have to figure out how long it'll be around you know has has everything. To the end of the numbers of databases we've been doing data since with 23 years old, whatever you always needed you need to know how much to buy anything happens to the forecast and you need to know how many sizes you do but now they have another fancy name for it. Act like merchandising second you're not going to succeed in affection. Jason: [54:58] I think you just answered my next question but that's like so obviously the traditional merchandising you have this science part which is the math and the forecasting and open a by and all that good stuff and you have the intuition which like to a certain extent seems like a god-given talent the, what's interesting to me is lately some of these new companies that have been born and Amazon being a great example like they used to hire a lot of merchants in every category so that have a, pet food buyer and you know and apparel buyer and a battery by or whatever they've kind of gotten rid of the merchant title and they've gone all-in on the data so they call it hands off the wheel and they let the computer decide what to buy, instead of a merchant and I've told lesser extent I think Katrina it Stitch fix, has that model a little where she uses data to inform her product a lot more and then you think of like she in and the Uber fast fashion space is, is that a future Trend like do you see that mostly working for these discount categories is that. Mickey: [56:03] Well I think you can argue Amazon but you know I thought when when I was I thought Amazon should have purchased J.Crew. I thought it would be really smart purchase they get a culture fashion and style. I think they'd be dangerous if they could figure that out. [56:30] And so we had someone approached them and of course it was done yeah not the personally I won't be there. I think that. If you look you can't even Stitch fix success but you cannot argue with kind of goods they sell if you. I like what I do I love I love what I do and it's about taste and style and if you do that for. Many have a point of view you'll probably do well so I need you to it is really good at the Bronx Science I couldn't get arrested enhanced you G I was always really good, I think you have to be good so I guess I do all the stuff they do I do. We're just hiring people do single stitch. We haven't been there but then again we are you know my choices to be the style formation with fun and emotion I give credit to any company. Whatever they do is stand financially successful of your poems but I don't know enough about Stitch fix lots of opportunities and Stitch fix. Jason: [57:50] Chien have you follow them at all. Mickey: [57:52] Like they're wildly successful I don't follow them when it's but you know. Jason: [58:00] It seems like they're a lot more about like plugging into all the social media you know like picking up the latest trends on on Instagram and Tick-Tock and things like that and then like you know super fast supply chain 2, didn't get those Trends in. Mickey: [58:16] Yeah and then again I care about quality and I care about all the stuff maybe bit different but if they're really from Julia. Jason: [58:25] It is it's a Chinese company they don't love for people to know that. Mickey: [58:29] Yeah well you know I wanted but sourcing their secretary like giveaway Price is Right. Jason: [58:36] Yeah it's super inexpensive like some people call it disposable fashion which is probably a. Mickey: [58:41] Yeah this is not what we want to do it's a kid's business on young business. I don't know we'll see how I like you know my company's that well so we'll see. [59:01] But but no I think the maths we really need a good mind and and for me I'm a huge micro. I'm looking at. Right now jumpsuit made dead which is brand-new and we're going to sell a lot of it is you know we just put it it's kind of comes naturally if you have the big jumps in the cellar. And and so you know you always create but you're not creating months Salem I just looked at. [59:36] I'm just really upset I looked at it I see why did me five men were 87 and it's $295 I said that's important just came in yesterday to the bad mark. And usually they can get away with doing that as a rebuttal so when you got it. And right now syllables troops crossed because it's not being self so you kind of get something you kind of knowing side and sort of okay. It's just bad news and it's not us. And you have to have a sense like covers the same thing most of them look alike so that the finger it comes. I think it's an offender brand new bottle and it's made by making sure it's a really good looking car and. I looked at it I said I don't want to renew pop color something that's you know not everyone's driving it's a very good looking car and you can see it's going to be a big guy. Because it's really designed well you know part talking about it over. Jason: [1:00:48] No I'm trying to switch. Mickey: [1:00:50] It's called The Defender I like your car like this. Not to me but you work committee should whatever but you could see the second Network, Tina news needles and I think it is I see a lot of them and cars used to be a lot more interesting design, then they are too maybe it's because is definitely people decide on here maybe it's the vision see it's hard to find cars and is Towing it. You know you all have an interest in cars. No we talked to what good looking car and not a lot of them are right so and I used to collect isn't nice. But but I kind of collecting child fantasize you've been having some cool cars but they are all kind of well design. They were uniquely designed and today you know it's a different world. Marker 06 Jason: [1:01:52] Yeah no for sure and it's it, interesting there sort of both out there there's you know people that you know still go for that unique distinctive looking care about the Aesthetics and there's people that you know just want to take an Uber for, for transportation so seems like a parallel is going in the same direction as that there's you know strong stuff with a strong point of view and that's that's quality and unique and then you know there's some people that you know just want, affordable inexpensive sweatshirt. Mickey: [1:02:23] Sure was were those for sure but you know I like the integrity. And not expensive I personally don't like expensive too expensive you know I mean I know maybe this is for sure. Jason: [1:02:43] Yeah well is it Mickey we could go on for hours but it has happened again we have used up all of our allotted time and I actually think. Mickey: [1:02:53] I'm having so much fun here guys. Jason: [1:02:55] I know I know why we will record the Extended Cut and you and I can just keep chatting. Mickey: [1:03:02] Anytime seriously. Jason: [1:03:04] You're our new guest host you're in. Mickey: [1:03:08] All right listen thanks a lot I appreciate the time and the questions and the schmoozing you know I do like two shoes so this is a great shoes. [1:03:26] Never ever I was on that I was on Instagram for about a minute and I came off like I don't want to forget. Scot: [1:03:36] Okay well you if people want more you exclusively come to the Jason Scott show that's where you'll be going. Mickey: [1:03:41] Anytime. Jason: [1:03:42] We really appreciated the time and enjoyed chatting with you and until next time happy commercing.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - High school tracking devices are back

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 37:54


What's Trending: The largest union in the state got played, and an update from Eatonville high school's tracking monitors.  Big Local: Graham's fire department has an all women crew for the first time ever, and neighbors in Redmond speak out against homeless hotel.  Should I be offended? Notre Dame's coach gets backlash for trying to make a reference to a John McKay joke and Warby Parker boycotts Daily Wire advertising. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast
Amazon's Department Store, Warby Parker to IPO and Is the Online Shopping Boom Over? | Sep 8, 2021

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 26:03


On today's episode, we discuss why Amazon is diving into department stores, what they might look like, and what kind of impact they might have. We then talk about how some other retail giants fared in Q2, whether the online shopping boom has run its course, and where Warby Parker and Allbirds go from here. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Andrew Lipsman. For sponsorship opportunities contact us:   advertising@insiderintelligence.com.   For more information visit:   https://www.insiderintelligence.com/contact/advertise/ Have questions or just want to say hi? Drop us a line at podcast@emarketer.com © 2021 Insider Intelligence

The Alli Worthington Show
The Hard Good with Lisa Whittle

The Alli Worthington Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 46:22


Hey Friends! I'm so excited about today's episode and it is a special one! On the show today, I'm joined by my good friend, and Called Creatives Co-founder Lisa Whittle. This episode was quite vulnerable for me but I just loved our conversation!  We take a deep dive into why we need to find the good during the hard seasons, how to allow God to work in us during setbacks for bigger and better comebacks, and how to navigate through some of those “good“ hard seasons like loss, grief, and jealousy.  Can you imagine living life led by managed feelings versus out-of-control emotions? Lisa and I go over how that's possible and what the difference is.  Listen in to hear us talk about : How to shift the narrative from “what if” to “what is,” so that God can bring us back in a different way  How to know when God is speaking to us Allowing God to manage our feelings so they come back under our control.   Favorite quotes: 1. Whatever draws us to the good is good for us. 2. We need to make peace with a life that has gone rogue on us.   In this episode I answer this question: 1. I feel so uncomfortable with self-promotion. How can I build my business in a way that doesn't feel “icky”? (42:03) Great things we discussed:  1. Lisa Whittle  2. The Hard Good 3. Warby Parker  4. Maverick City Music  5. Jungle Cruise  6. Pillow Slides 7. Called Creatives  8. Standing Strong Hope you loved this episode! Be sure to subscribe in iTunes and slap some stars on a review! :) Xo,   Alli  www.alliworthington.com/lisawhittle7/

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP274 - Warby Parker and AllBirds IPOs

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 63:43


EP274 - Warby Parker and AllBirds IPOs  Warby Parker and AllBirds filed their S-1 registrations with the SEC in preparation of making an initial public offering. In this episode we deep dive into all the information revealed in the fillings. Surprising Learnings From Warby Parker And AllBirds IPO Filings (forbes.com) Episode 274 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Wednesday September 1st, 2021. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:24] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 274 being recorded on Wednesday September first 2021 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scott Wingo. Scot: [0:40] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason and Scot show listeners Jason we have a lot of favorite things on this podcast but you know it's even cooler than some fresh Amazon quarterly results hot new Gadget. Even some exciting Star Wars news. Jason: [0:55] No what's God. Scot: [0:57] A fresh delicious hot out of the oven S1 and you know it's better than S1. Jason: [1:02] I'm guessing to S ones. Scot: [1:04] You are right that is right we have we're very excited this week because not only do we have one s one but we have two s ones so I don't know if that's an S 1 squared or S2 or how we talked about that I guess 2's ones, and what's really exciting is one of our favorite topics on the show is digitally native vertical brands also called dnv B's and we have two of them that filed within a week of each other so that's pretty exciting so the two are Warby Parker and allbirds and before we do a deep dive into those S ones and highlight some of the things that we found that were interesting for listeners I wanted to give everyone just kind of a reminder of a great way to read an s-1, so an s-1 is. [1:52] Haven't haven't done a gone public before it's kind of like a sandwich so you have three parts you have this kind of first part where there's all this introductory stuff and you're kind of like CIA in that part and then you get into the delicious sandwich part of the the meat and potatoes of this one which is commonly called management discussion and Analysis they called em DNA and that's the best part because really management actually writes that now they have a lot of guidance from lawyers and investment bankers and PR firm in all this Jazz but it's really most of the times it is the founders you know putting pen to paper and describing the business and their words then after that you have the lawyers kick in and then you have a pretty good chunk of risk factors and then the accountants kick in and you've got your your your Gap financials and all that stuff and all that's interesting but if you're going to I always start a nest one from the middle out so I like to read that mdna first because it's the best way to hear about the company from the founders. [2:54] Now Warren Buffett and his Charlie Munger they always kind of famously start at the back of this one and they like to start at the audited financials and that's kind of how they look at a business and that's important but especially for these I think it's pretty interesting because you know it tells us why the founders do this dnv be thing how's it going how do they think about their business what are the key metrics they're looking at inside of there and I think that's particularly relevant for listeners of this show because you can learn a lot you know these businesses may be there ahead of you or behind you and your scale but it I always learned a ton about. [3:34] You know what other operators are doing and thinking about their business and you pick up a lot of interesting new tidbits there may be things you like and don't like that you can add to your repertoire. Jason how do you how do you peel into a delicious yummy new S1. Jason: [3:49] Yeah well I mostly take your advice that I guess to two alternative views is just skip the s-1 entirely and wait for the retail Roadshow and so you can kind of watch a movie instead of have to do all this math and read. Scot: [4:02] Yeah I like the retail Roadshow too but sadly it comes weeks after this one so this one is like an appetizer before you get to the movie. Jason: [4:10] Yeah and II may be uniquely odd in this regard but I do find it amusing and humorous to read the risk factors. I know they have nothing to do with the business and weren't written by anyone that has anything to do with the business but I feel like. They're increasingly more creative in the voluminous wig west of apocalypses that could. Could strike the Earth and I want to say like of the hundred seventy one page Warby Parker S1 about a hundred pages of it is the risk factors. Scot: [4:42] Yeah, yeah and I mean it is fun to read but you're taking the right approach at it what drives me crazy is actually went through and looked at a bunch of the headlines for both these companies and I would say about 1/3 to 25 percent of the. Press that covers you things you know to be and I don't know if this is just lack of understanding or clickbait or some combination of those things but they always pull out the risk factors so you'll see you know allbirds is worried about Nike as a competitor and you know and then you're like what did they read about that and they've just pulled out a the competitor list of the risk factors well the lawyers are saying you know if anyone has ever sold a shoe put them in the risk factors you know it's not like it's not like the founders in their own words are staying up late at night worried about Nike but maybe they are but. Most of that stuff is not the founders words it's lawyers kind of saying you know here's a checklist list everyone that you've ever think you thought you've competed with now that's their guidance. Jason: [5:42] Yeah I mean the list of competitors isn't remotely shocking it's more of the zombie apocalypse that makes me chuckle. Scot: [5:48] Yeah and now there's all these, yes every time new legislation comes out you have to add a risk factors know it's like you know GDP our cyber security we use cloud computing that could go down we it's kind of like you have to think of everything that's ever happened and you want to cover it so that if you do get sued you can say well it was a risk factor you should have known we warned you. Cool so we flipped a coin and you are going to kick us off with a deep dive into or be. Jason: [6:21] Yeah yeah so we'll jump right into it and we'll start with some of the financial metrics per your point is pretty interesting because these are. Private companies they don't necessarily disclose a lot of this and so you kind of go from like a pretty vague view of these companies to a pretty detailed View and if you're some other DMV be that still private like there's great benchmarking data in here so Warby Parker. [6:48] 20/20 in this is all complicated because of course 2020 was an anomalous year 2020 revenue for Warby Parker was just under 400 million in sales so 393 million and kind of to give you a progression they were 272 million in 2018 then they jumped up, 370 million in 2019 and then you know a much smaller jump up to three hundred and ninety-three million in 2020. The more eye-popping number is they have six months of data from 20 21 and they're already at 270 million in 2021 so if you kind of compare first six months of this year to first six months of last year. Last year there were 176 million this year there are 270 so they're definitely seeing a nice clip of growth. And obviously as you grow bigger you would hope that that scale would help you with profitability when you're you know small and still you know in growth mode it's sometimes hard to make a profit, and in this case. It doesn't appear like they've achieved that escape velocity where they're starting to turn a profit yet like the gross margins are. [8:00] Are in a reasonable ballpark they're pretty consistent in the kind of 658 to 60% range and so they are generating. Net positive ebit has but they basically have had a net loss every year except 2019 when they broke even. So what's a little worrisome about that is. [8:26] You know you like if you look at 2018 you said hey they sold 270 million and they lost 22 million on it in 2019 they sold 370 million and they broke even. Like that's looking like a pretty good Trend that scale starting to help them with their profitability but then in 2020 where they had a lot of extra costs from covid and as we'll talk about in a bit they're somewhat store. They were even bigger 393 and they had their biggest loss ever 55 million, and they're doing better this year but they're not on a path to profitability this year either so they're the on the 270 million they've sold this year they've lost 7.3 million. Um before I jump further does any of that financial news sort of surprise you at all Scott or does that. Scot: [9:17] Now I have a different opinion but well we're going to do a little kind of analysis again. Jason: [9:22] I like it cliffhanger. Scot: [9:23] Yeah yeah. Jason: [9:24] So one of the interesting things well a all these digital native Brands you start off by like generating some buzz and selling some stuff to people that are already friendly to you and it's super easy sales and and cost to get those sales is very low but then pretty quickly all these companies go into digital advertising mode and they buy ads on Google and buy ads on. [9:47] To grow quickly and the first ads they buy a relatively cheap because, that they can you know Target a very specific audience and there aren't a lot of other people buying that exact same audience so the, the cost per ad is low and so the the customer acquisition cost can be pretty reasonable but as you get bigger. [10:06] You have to buy a bigger chunk of audience from Facebook and more people are competing for that same audience and it's a reverse auction so you have to pay the most to get the ad and so growing purely on this digital ad business. Pretty challenging particularly when Google and Facebook are so good at optimizing the the the maximum cost per ad and so. For almost every DMV be we've ever talked about they they have trouble scaling and they almost always Implement some new tactics later in their evolution to kind of scale beyond the digital ad phase and so in war Beast Partners case they were one of the first retailers to say, the MVPs to say hey we need to open a bunch of stores and stores can be really profitable billboard to help dramatically improve our customer acquisition costs so by 2018 they already had 88 stores, and right now they have a hundred and twenty-six or a hundred forty five stores so so they have a reasonable Fleet of stores that has grown pretty pretty quickly. Obviously there's a lot of extra costs for running those stores and obviously those stores didn't do particularly well in covid. [11:21] So some of the interesting things about the stores is that like in 2018 sixty percent of the revenue came from e-commerce forty percent of the revenue came from retail about the same in 2019 but as they jumped up there store counts and 2020 that. So in 2020 sixty percent of the revenue came from these retail stores 40 percent came from ecom's so the store is really are becoming the primary acquisition Channel. It's super interesting to look at the. [11:54] The unit economics of a customer how expensive it is to acquire a customer how much money they make on each customer has sticky each customer is and different s ones you know give, different granularity in case of Ori Parker they reported a customer acquisition cost so they said that in 2018 they spent $26 per customer to acquire customers. In 2019 they said they spent $27 to acquire customers and in 2020 and the pandemic influenced year they had to spend more they spent $40 per customer to acquire customers now put a big Asterix on that there's some controversy will get to in a minute but. If you take those numbers on face value those are pretty darn good customer acquisition cost for this kind of business other. [12:42] Kind of did you a native vertical brands that have have done it s one have disclosed some kind of eye-watering Lee expensive customer acquisition costs and so famously like Blue Apron was paying $400 a customer to acquire customers so so even $40 a customer it's pretty reasonable to kind of put that in perspective in 2020 they were getting about 218 dollars in sales per customer which is a little over two orders, um so the the the unit economics are potentially viable. Except for that sgna line and all the expensive advertising that they're having to do which is ultimately driving that those those net losses. So those were kind of my big. [13:31] Takeaways and I alluded to a controversy friend of the show and former guests Dan McCarthy who's a assistant professor Emery and one of the true gurus and in clv um he looked at this as one and at first he was like wow that's a really good customer acquisition cost they should be commended and then he like started reading the fine print and they've used a novel definition of customer acquisition costs they've divided all of their expenses by all of their customers and. About sixty percent of their customers are returning customers so in theory. You shouldn't be dividing all of your digital marketing by your total number of active customers you should be dividing it by the new active customers and that's kind of the traditional definition that Dan and most of the rest of the world use we don't know what that number is for Warby but it's probably a lot higher than the. Forty dollars that would be disclosed based on this kind of unique definition of customer acquisition costs. Scot: [14:39] They did they kind of elaborate on that or. Jason: [14:44] No they didn't at all. Scot: [14:45] And easier he just kind of picked it apart and like there was no. Jason: [14:48] Yeah like they like there's not enough data in the s-1 to try to estimate a. Revised customer acquisition cost now what Dan has done in the past is he's gone a hold of credit card panel data. And kind of backed into like customer acquisition cost by looking at the the. The spend from you know the from customers I haven't you know I don't know that he's done that analysis yet for these guys are the even has access to the data to try but. Yeah so at the moment we don't know what their khakis I have to be honest you like even if. You you kind of like double it because you say like oh they should have only been chart you know counting all these costs against the 40% new customers and not against the hundred percent active customers. You're still at like 80 dollars which is expensive you you can't make money spending $80 for a customer that you only sell $180 to. It's still better than a lot of these other companies that we've looked at. Scot: [15:58] The worse is Casper were the cactus a good couple hundred dollars higher than the mattress. Jason: [16:04] Yeah and I would say. Like these guys have about the most mature store model of any of these companies like Casper's up there too but the next company will talk about allbirds has a lot less stores so, you know if the opening your own stores is the way to lower kak then you would expect to see it in Warby Parker's S1. And my my takeaway from this is. Either you have to get to a much bigger and you're going to say something in a minute that potentially disagrees but either where we Partners hypothesis is you have to get to a much bigger number to get profitable. And so maybe you know instead of one or million run rate I need a billion dollar run rate. Or you need an alternative customer acquisition strategy beyond your own stores and digital ads which are the two tools warble uses and I would also argue where B is. About as good as it gets at sort of organic demand generation and they do they do great like social they do gritty like they do all the other guerrilla marketing tactics so like. [17:15] Um I would you know if they're not profitable on 390 million with their type of product it seems hard to imagine that someone else with the same type of product. Is going to do much better because they seem like a externally they seem like a darn good execute. Scot: [17:37] Yeah isn't in the die where category is dominated by the luxacore Oslo Exotica and they own like everything right so they do they have you know they have a licensed almost every frame like. Jason: [17:50] Yeah almost every designer brand you've ever heard of is a is actually like license to Exotica. Scot: [17:58] Yeah then they own the. Jason: [18:00] And they own a bunch of the chains of retail stores. But they also do wholesale so Exotica like both sell all those license frames to the third parties. And they sell through their own stores, and they sell at a way higher price point than Warby Parker so they have way more margin like you know part of the premise of Warby Parker is the eyewear should be affordable so their average per glasses is $95 whereas. Like that the aov firm exotic is going to be much higher. Scot: [18:33] Yeah I do I'm not a customer but I knew I do know people that are and they do tend to buy more I've heard him say is anecdotal but I've heard him say especially women they'll say you know the prices are low enough I can buy a two or three different pairs that kind of they almost become accessories at that just kind of interesting. Jason: [18:48] So that's what I was hoping to see right like you go man I've been part of a frame cost $500 I can't own that many frames but if they cost a hundred dollars I might have different ones for different outfits right or. Right and so yeah like. Could their average order value be much higher but on average they're only selling 2.14 pair of frames per customer. So they're like again frame is $95 their average revenue per orders $184. Um so they're not necessarily like seeing a huge kit I'm sure their customers like you describe but they're not there are apparently are not enough of those customers that that's. [19:28] Change dramatically changing the economics also where we park our his kind of expanded to be a vision care company rather than just eyeglasses so they launched contacts they have optometrist services in all the stores and you might go oh wow I wonder how those things are contributing and at the moment / this one they're not, like the the all the non glasses products cumulatively are about one percent of Revenue and all the Professional Services are one percent of Revenue so these the the eyeglasses are 98% of their business now maybe that means there's a lot more growth there. [20:05] But like my so my overall take away. These numbers did not surprise me in terms of Revenue it was about exactly where I would have expected I wasn't sure they would be profitable by now it wouldn't have surprised me if they were so it's a little concerning to me. That they're that they're not. Again if a ton of this loss in 2020 is because of the pandemic and they really did break even on 370 and if they find a way to end up profitable in 2021. Um I'm their biggest Revenue year ever then you know that that probably looks pretty good but I can tell you a ton of people were shocked by these numbers a ton of people thought Warby Parker was much bigger a lot of people were speculating that they were near or over a billion dollars in annual sales which I did not view is very likely and so I think this is kind of a. [21:01] Glass of cold water in the face of a lot of the DMV be Fanboys and d2c Fanboys that like these guys are, are basically the poster child for that whole segment and they're better than most of the other ones and you know even they do not have. Home run financials and so you know frankly like this this bodes poorly for the financials of a lot of other like apparel DMV bees that we haven't seen yet. Scot: [21:33] Well I guess my seemingly controversial take is when. You know when you talk to these investment bankers there's all of this data that indicates that you should really focus on growth and not profitability if you're if you're if you're in a category like this which you know the pitch is there's this new way to build a brand it's direct-to-consumer it's digitally native yeah we're having some stores so by focusing on ibadah you're essentially saying we were making profit and we, need this we don't have anything to spend it in essentially because it's just going to kind of move over to your balance sheet especially when do an IPO you're in a load of the balance sheet with presumably at least a hundred million maybe more so. When you when you look at the data especially at this scale it's much better to lose money or to not get profitable for years because. You want to pump all that into growth so every dollar you can drive into growth gets a much bigger multiple than a dollar that goes to the bottom line. [22:42] So yeah so that's that's why and then the other challenges once you're profitable. It's kind of hard to undo it the classic example is Amazon in our retail world you know how many times have you and I heard retailers complained that Amazon is a profitable this is when they weren't profitable today they are only say they're not profitable, eventually Amazon got to the point where they just couldn't not be profitable so but you know for a good kind of like, I don't know 20-year run their they weren't profitable so they were the extreme example of this and it gave them much more leverage over like a Walmart who had been printing ibadah never got used to it and got valued off eBay doc then you can't go in and say, there's a new disruptor and hey everyone we're going to we're going to stop being ibadah positive and growing even on we're going to focus on the top line to you know our spend. 500 billion on some fulfillment centers so it yeah I think it's appropriate and I'm sure you know the risk factors that's going to be probably one of the first ones is we. I don't plan to make money and we may never make money so yeah so I think it's actually. I would almost expecting to be losing more you know if I look at kind of 21 so a lot of these. [24:04] S ones they do a six-month view because they don't want to update it every quarter its kind of pain wdesk one while you're in process so they'll do it like a six-month you and I believe their six-month view was 270 million Revenue so that put them in a 540 anyone's is that what it was the okay. Yeah and then loss is 20 that's even a lost that loss of seven so losing 14 on that that's. Jason: [24:31] The well the even has our positive by the way the it's only the net loss that like so like they have they made 20 20 million ibadah on 270 million in sales in the first six months of this year so that's. Scot: [24:43] That must be the way you're some accounting the other thing that's really frustrating is a. Jason: [24:48] They have all sgna below that you badal line which is weird to me at least I don't like. Scot: [24:54] Yeah that is weird. Jason: [24:56] That's that's why you got from this yeah that's why you got get from this positive ebitda to this negative net loss. Scot: [25:06] Yeah this is one of the ways Amazon lost money for so long is they would capitalize the leases on now it's become an SEC rule I think this gets kind of the edge of my accounting knowledge. Jason: [25:16] Yeah and they didn't there was not like detailed disclosure about the real estate so I that is an interesting question how they finance these stores and do they own them and all that stuff but. Scot: [25:25] So I would almost say. As in a potential investor I'd rather get to a billion dollars faster and have a negative ebitda a light you know at a 500 million they had like a hundred million ebitda law side. I actually kind of think that's okay especially if they could grow faster. Jason: [25:44] Yeah and so I'll just say I generally agree with you and I certainly get the argument about profitability the the bigger concern for me is there an 11 year old company that's executed about as well as you can execute done all the things that the talking headset are smart to do and they only got two with a super compelling value proposition and very high MPS scores and they still only got to 390 million so I like my biggest cautionary take away from this whole thing is it's way harder to get to a billion dollars then people realize and none of these companies have done it not one have them have gotten to a billion dollars in run rate unless you call like white cloth digitally native vertical brand. So I do think scaling is hard and if it's hard for these guys it's going to be a heck of a lot harder for these why you know companies that want to be super Capital light and not have stores and and all of those things and I well I. Don't over worry about the profitability I will tell you the unit economics are mildly concerning their making a custom product like they have to you know make those lenses for each customer and if they're having to spend $80 to acquire a customer that only half their customers are buying a second time they're only getting a hundred and or 218 dollars in revenue from each customer and they have to make a custom product in that it just like. [27:13] I'm not saying they can't get to profitability at a billion dollars but it's. It doesn't look like a home run business I could it still could be a good investment right and I mean as long as there's someone that's willing to pay more for your stock after you own it not saying the stock won't do well at all but it doesn't look like. A company that's likely to just you know generate like obscene free cash flow like Amazon does. Scot: [27:40] Yeah I bet if you looked at a kind of store cohort you'd be happier with the profitability and maybe that was something. Jason: [27:49] Yeah I would have loved to see that in this one and obviously they didn't put it in there. Scot: [27:53] Yeah you know and and yes so they must have been advised that the institutional investors aren't going to be that concerned that I think. I think they're actually close enough with the lines are the lines are converging so you know you can kind of see if you just kind of. Plot them out you can see they'll cross no get profitable because they're already been up positive So eventually they'll get to that net loss off when the lines are diverging like Lyft and Uber when they went public they had to spend a lot of time in there s one talking about well we know our lines are diverging but it's because we're if you take our cities that are over a year old they're very profitable and the reason our losses are growing faster than revenue is because we're opening city so fast and that's how investors got comfort in that example. Jason: [28:37] Yeah and their lines are diverging from 19 to 20 now they're going to say well but that's covid-19. Scot: [28:43] Yeah yeah that's project I could see that. Jason: [28:44] No I'm sure does yeah and especially again because stores. So Scott what did you learn from the allbirds S1. Scot: [28:56] Yeah allbirds was it was a good read I enjoyed it it was different you know so I kind of appreciate that having read a lot of these it was less dry of any S1 especially the mdna section was felt like the founders had definitely put their heart and soul into it I don't know if you do you listen to the podcast how I built this they. A really good episode on there and you know the thing another thing I appreciate about allbirds is there's consistency there every time you every time I hear one of the founders I go in a store have an online experience Packaging. They're very purposeful and brand message is very very tight in and until you try to do that it's hard to appreciate how hard it is to execute on that so, so I just really felt like that was interesting that even this one kind of landed on me as if you know the same vibe that I got from the store and the product and everything so that was really cool and kudos to them on that probably the most interesting thing about the allbirds S1 is they try to kind of tilt it and they say look we're not going to do an IPO we're going to do an S peo and what they're essentially doing is saying we want to elevate the discussion and talk a lot about sustainability and so they call it a sustainable public Equity offering and spe now I'll get into more of that but I wanted to go into some of the numbers first. [30:26] So on the number side there 2019 Revenue was a hundred ninety-three million and then in 2020 they did 219 million so so that's 13 percent year-over-year growth. [30:38] So that was interesting to me and then they it has accelerated from 20 22 21 looking at the six month period to 27 percent, they unfortunately there they've got a fair amount of international business you've got this kind of no Financial impact of currency conversion the FX is what they call it so do their 25 or 27 depend on depending on the currency situation but let's call it mid-20s and. So that's interesting so they've got accelerating Revenue growth which Wall Street loves to call that ARG ARG and then they broke out digital and said that it was 89 percent of their business and in 2020 that was a hundred ninety-four did you see that going down because part of their use of proceeds is opening a lot more stores they have 27 stores as of the IPO so June. [31:33] June 20 and then I've been 21 and then they have the pretty much say you know one of the we're going to open a lot more stores and it's gonna be a big push for us they also are losing money they're losing about 40 million a year so kind of twenty percent of Revenue is being lost which kind of feels you're going to lose money you might as well lose you know twenty Thirty forty percent of of Revenue to accelerate so that felt more in line with kind of what I've seen is public-private kind of vc-backed company coming into the public markets couple highlights on the other metrics they talk a lot about how their nudging gross margins up they in 2018 gross margins were at 47% and then moving up to 51% and a good expansion there on the margin side that's pretty typical as you scale and you start to nail down with any kind of manufactured product there's definitely margin benefits of scale right because you're buying more pallets of wool I don't know what we'll comes in sheep's of wool and you're getting more you know your. Paying off your fulfillment centers and you're taking a lot of these fixed costs you just putting more stuff through them so on a unit basis it drives in Crete drives down your unit cost just driving up your gross margins. [33:00] They were they were much more silent on cackle TV than what you saw with Laura B and so some of the data they had was they try to repeat customers and that number has gone up and. 2019 it was 46 percent of their revenues from repeat customers and then that was up in twenty twenty two fifty three percent they last raised a hundred million on 1.7 billion and I'll come back to that and then let's see the biggest thing about their IPO I hinted at the top with this spe oh is there all about sustainability and it's pretty interesting because some people they just kind of throw that in there in the hopes that there's the public markets there are increasingly large number of either, purposely built vehicles for investors that want to focus on this area or. [33:55] There's a big investors that are moving this way one of the biggest public investors is called Black Rock and they run out, huge massive amount of capital most of it in mutual funds but I think they have some hedge funds and whatnot and their CEO is basically put a Line in the Sand and said by can't remember the year but let's call it 20 30 or something like that they are going to shed any investment it doesn't really have kind of a framework around sustainability and you know. What people uses This Acronym ESG so environmental social and governance in essentially everyone wants companies to to self report what they want to do across those three dimensions and even the SEC is started kind of hinting and recommending that companies that they're going to start doing some things here and requiring them in things like us ones and then, the thing that's really interesting in a public company that I didn't learn until I was kind of deep inside of one a lot of these mutual funds so you go public and you have this new set of shareholders that are largely got mutual funds you've got index funds and you've got hedge funds and then retail which would be individual people like buying to their Charles Schwab well the mutual funds in the index funds when you. [35:17] When every year you put out these different things that you want your shareholders to vote on well they they don't like to vote on those things they like to defer that to a third party and there's several of these third parties once called ISS and the other ones called, glass Lewis or something like that and these third parties therefore become very powerful because they aggregate a lot of the, you know because these decisions are referred to them they thus aggregate a lot of power from your shareholders and they are really starting to get where they are they're saying you know even that's going to be kind of the first Domino to fall I think where they're going to say hey the recommendations we make on your board and comp and all these things that they have to opine on to the, to to the shareholders that have Outsource that to them they're going to really focus in on ESG so so it's a big movement and there's a lot of even CNBC runs like a every other day segment on this topic because it's become such a big big deal and you know I actually think it's good I think you know you would as a as you know. [36:24] Public means transparency and I think companies should be transparent about this stuff and if if they say you know I don't know where we're a liquor company and we're not really focused on this that's fine or if they say we're all birds and this is going to be a huge differentiator for us that's fine too it just you know at least let potential shareholders know where you are on the spectrum of things okay so that's the background the. [36:51] So these guys say look we we think this is so important we want to put a stake in the ground and we've come up with 19 criteria that we hope we're going to be the first we're going to kind of self rate ourselves against these criteria and they fall against, cross effectively two categories for each of the es and the D environmental societal and governance so it's things like you know they want to be carbon neutral they're going to like an environmental they're going to favor vendors that that kind of have a similar carbon neutrality and sustainability mindset to them and on the governance side they're going to have more diversity on their board and those kinds of things. [37:31] One of the interesting things they do explicitly State and this caused a lot of noise on Wall Street is they when you go public you get all these people there's kind of this this literal they call it the book so let's say you're going to sell a hundred million worth of shares you do your Roadshow and then you typically end up with maybe a more orders than you have shares she'll get 300 million so one way to you have an allocation problem so one thing you can do is you can just cut everyone back to a third and you can say well you want to 10 million now we're give you three that's how you could Jam 300 million of demand into a hundred million dollar opportunity well these guys have said is we're actually going to your allocation is going to depend on where you are as an investor as it relates to ESG so essentially they're saying if you're like one of these companies like BlackRock that that is really kind of pushing the foundation there we may give you your full allocation but if you're this kind of hedge fund that doesn't really even have a website and no statement on this then you may get no allocation or a smaller size allocation so that was pretty interesting that's the first time that's been done and that that was kind of. [38:37] Pretty interesting on that so encountered an actually mentioned sustainability in the s-1 over 200 times which is it just shows how important it is to them and you know a lot of companies. Tried this out but allbirds was founded with this right the whole idea of allbirds was could you find sustainable products to make a shoe with and they started with the wool even the soul is made from a plant-based material, if it was obvious like she shows her something to remember what it is. Jason: [39:07] I Scot: [39:09] But it's not rubber it you know it's not a you know there's two types of rubber there is a plant-based rubber from a rubber tree but most rubber is obviously from a petroleum-based so the other thing I thought was interesting is the essentially layout they have five pillars essentially and they basically say hey here's our five pillars we're going to be product Innovative platform Purpose Driven brand with an inspired voice. [39:38] Connections with our repeat customers around the globe so so Global and repeat customers are important to them vertical retail distribution strategy robust infrastructure creating a platform for scale the sequence of those is pretty interesting because again the first one is product Innovation and then second one is purpose-driven and that's where they capture a lot of the ESG stuff. [40:00] The I thought for listeners this would be the most interesting one is vertical retail distribution strategies I just wanted to add one will highlight here are digitally LED vertical retail distribution strategy combines our digital offerings with our stores so we can meet customers where they are delivering value and convenience with our store serving as brand begins our company was born online from the outset we developed a direct convenient digital platform for our customers we opened our first store and 2017 have since been expanding yada yada so and then they wrap up and say in 20 as of June 30 we 20:21 we had the ability to reach up to 2.5 billion consumers in 35 countries across our digital and Retail platforms so I thought that was pretty interesting where they're basically saying this D and B, be thing even though we're at a relatively small scale we think it's still important part of our future and stores are really more of a brand, front face to the digital back and so I thought that was interesting, let's see that some data on repeat analysis but you know the. [41:10] Those are the highlights they that is really confusing table where people bought more than their repeat purchase rate went up. [41:19] I kind of get wrapped up in a chicken and egg thing there because like just by buying more haven't you already made your repeat purchase go up like I couldn't unpack that in my head but I need and up figure that one out for me look at a secret credit card data my analysis on this one so that those are the kind of highlights my analysis was this one was shockingly smaller than I would have thought you know I. I kind of backed in this because I had heard that valuation of 1.6 on their last they're kind of in this unicorn status here 1.6 billion in your like okay a lot of these Brands you look at kind of public comps you get 325 x as an e-commerce company so let's give them a generous valuation of 5x so they must be three or four hundred million and then. Turns out they're kind of in this lower 200 or 300 million scale so that was like well they must be growing at a crazy Pace because if you're going at a hundred percent then you can still get a really nice vault. A super-sized multiple like they must be that makes them hopefully even higher right so there like a times multiple but they're really not they were going 25% so it's kind of a bit of a head-scratcher for me and I'm really curious to see how the IPO does because I kind of assumed I'm not smarter than than all these investors have looked at this and put this price tag on it so I must be missing something so you know the things I think I may be missing. [42:43] You know there's there's a lot of talk they've partnered with Adidas and they're definitely going after the running category and so taking on Nike if you can build anything that's, no one 20th of a Nike that's a big brand so that could be people could be looking at this and seeing the optionality of that is this could be you know counter to Nike this ESG piece it could be that there is an supply-demand imbalance I think. [43:15] I think this is definitely the case where there's a lot more ESG aware dollars looking for places to invest than there are places to put them, so that could be a factor maybe there's some bullish bullishness on the store business where people have done models they say well if they're at, 25 stores and they go to 250 that's going to the growth is going to accelerate a tremendous base so you know I kind of swirl all those around and you know it is interesting so I then I kind of put myself and say well if I was going to be with Nike how would you go about them and Nike doesn't have a lot of weaknesses and yeah they're ten years ago you and I would have said while their weaknesses are not going direct to Consumers but they've largely fixed that right and you've got a lot of you've got a whole deck on that that's excellent so that's not a weakness anymore and but you know Nikes weakness is could be there is a, you know and I don't know any facts on this it's just there's a lot of noise out there right that there's these Chinese labor camps that their products are made in and these sweatshops and children making the shoes and then certainly so there's there's kind of that that they're kind of unclean sourcing if you will. [44:32] People claiming it I have no idea what's going on there and then you know there is an argument to be made that Nike to my knowledge hasn't done a lot to say wow our products are sustainable in these ways is just really isn't their thing so so it is a clever way to attack Nike and maybe it's actually a combination of all these things that investors see and they say we think this is a pretty clever way to attack Nike they're going to get some market share because we think it's important to Consumers it's important to us and they kind of scroll all that together and that's why it gets the bigger multiple so I may be curious to see how the IPO does to see if, that multiple holds up or in a there's definitely something going on there or maybe it was just an anomaly in the private Market. Jason: [45:20] Yeah and in both cases like the. The economics of the IPO aren't really revealed yet right like we're a ways away from from like Target prices and like understanding what the valuation is going to be for the IPO. Scot: [45:37] Yeah yeah you know these guys that could have effectively a Down Round where they essentially say hey we want. Jason: [45:42] Both have raised a lot of money at some like reasonably High valuations. Scot: [45:48] Yeah and you know they probably wouldn't be going public if the bankers weren't telling them they're going to get. Yeah I really nice mark up unless there was some desperation reason and I just don't they're not burning enough Capital that I don't think the existing investors couldn't sustain them for years so so mi bat is the bankers think that they're going to do really well and we'll see a big pop so it will say. Jason: [46:18] Yeah well if you think so a I would say like one of the things that encouraging so a one thing a few things to remember that are different between these two companies is allbirds is much younger than Warby Parker so I want to say Orbeez like 11 years old allbirds is like 5 years old so there earlier in their evolution that 27 stores versus a hundred forty five stores and that's a. A huge difference because a big expense in having stores is advertising to get people to your stores and you know. Beyond the digital advertising which is very expensive per customer like traditional advertising is much less expensive but you have to buy traditional advertising. Based on a metro area and when you only have 27 stores it means basically you're buying an ad to that getting amortized for a single store whereas when you have a hundred and forty-five stores you can have six stores in a a big Metro and that same ad is driving customers to six doors so my first thing I would say is. It seems like they're committed to a store strategy but they're early in the face like they could get an ice pop as they open more stores because all of the marketing and advertising that they're already doing spending money on, will work much harder when they get to a little bigger feet of stores and the. There are economies and scale of running a fleet of stores versus at 27 stores they're probably pretty inefficient. Scot: [47:48] Yeah they talked about how they've had they've invested in some distribution centers into the store so they're probably over distribution Centered for you know 25 stores. Jason: [47:58] So I do think the stores thing is encouraging, um I always am uncomfortable on the whole Purpose Driven thing so because I guess I'm going to mines and you didn't mention it but I think one of the novel things about them is they're one of the first companies to go public that's a certified B Corporation. Scot: [48:16] There's several others so there's that brand for girls nothing to you. Jason: [48:28] Okay well it's I mean regardless a hundred percent think as a marketing tactic that you're a hundred percent right like there is a cohort of customers that really care about a variety of these different missions and Nike doesn't particularly appeal to a lot of them right and so. Kind of providing a viable alternative you know is certainly a way to win a segment I do think. They're very credible like they've been talking about this this sustainability purpose since the very beginning they've invested in it the shoe is more expensive to make because of some of the sustainability choices that they've made so it's not just kind of. [49:12] Ecology washing on top of a you know a greedy brand and like I think their claim in their in their last one is that the the shoe has a like 30% less. Less ecological footprint than a traditional shoe and I think traditional she was code named for Nike by the way. So so I do think they are they are credible in their Purpose Driven thing and there's a. At the moment there are all these surveys of consumers that o gen Z is way more purpose-driven and and way more so than older cohorts they say that you know they really care about a brand that aligns with their goals and they care about the ecological issues and ethical issues in all of these different things and it feels like Auburn's is well positioned to cater to those customers so superficially you go oh nice it's a. It's a growing favorable Trend in there a strong executor at it and I think some of that is legitimate. [50:16] But in the back of my head there's this this famous academic paper from like 8 years ago called the myth of the ethical consumer and basically all young consumers have always said in surveys that they care about these various missions but when you look at their spending habits, there their convictions are a lot less strong than their stated preferences are and so I do I worry. [50:43] About completely hanging my hat on consumers doing the right thing when they're there. [50:50] Happily buying a lot of Nikes obviously I did also think it's interesting. Obviously the unit economics are wildly different than Warby Parker because of the nature of the product but they have 3.3 million us consumers worry Parker has two million consumers despite the fact where we Partners got this way bigger Fleet of stores and has been marketing for six more years so, so they are getting decent reach, both companies disclose their MPS scores their net promoter score and and they're both astronomically high and allbirds is even higher than Warby Parker so they. They're making their customers happy. They're doing well the one thing that jumped out at me as a opportunity is for allbirds that would be harder for worry Parker is. Okay you start out purely online and you're growing through digital ads and then you start opening stores and you invest a bunch in opening your own stores what other levers could you pull if you need to get your customer acquisition cost down. And it's not obvious to me what the big ones are for for Warby Parker, a play that some similar companies to allbirds have run is expanding in a wholesale once once they sort of reach a plateau and allbirds absolutely could do that as well and so it again my takeaway from both of these companies is. [52:17] Scaling is way harder than the the Twitter DTC Universe realizes they all want to imagine these companies are much bigger than they are because they've raised a bunch of money. It turns out raising a bunch of money doesn't equal winning a bunch of customers not saying these two companies can't be wildly successful in win a bunch of customers, I'm just saying it's really hard it's a huge competitive advantage to be a big company that already has a bunch of customers. And it's hard to start a new brand from scratch and catch up and these both of these are examples of that and it's going to be really interesting as they keep trying to grow to see what. What new things they try to accelerate that growth. Scot: [52:59] Yeah absolutely and I was curious I just looked it up allbirds is an 86 net promoter score and War B's latest measure is 83. Jason: [53:08] And those are both astronomical and side note there's some controversy about how people measure it in the inventors of the metric. Our kind of annoyed with how everyone's misusing it so it's not guaranteed that that's perfectly Apples to Apples but. That those numbers kind of fit with the consumer sentiment that I've experienced for both brands. Scot: [53:32] Yeah yeah we do a whole show on the purity of net promoter score. Jason: [53:37] That would be awesome. Scot: [53:40] But that in with some attribution man that's a party right there. Go well it wouldn't be a Jason and Scot show if we didn't have a little bit of. Jason: [53:52] Amazon news new your margin is there opportunity. Scot: [54:04] That's right we got a couple in lausanne news items the one I wanted to chat with you Jason is, Amazon announced they are partnering with buy now pay later firm a firm so that was an interesting one did that take you by surprise. Jason: [54:21] It did it totally did not it didn't surprise me at all that they're getting into buy now pay later it's a huge trend. In a way like I knew they didn't have one but it kind of when I heard it read it and I said it to myself out loud I was cut it's kind of shocking. That they're just now adding it now they have dabbled in the past. With with much earlier iterations of these sort of installment plans but what totally took me by surprise is that they chose a firm like a a firm is working with a lot of. Direct Amazon competitors that aren't going to be happy about this I'm thinking of for example Walmart. And so I'll be curious to see how that flushes out and have a firm can successfully keep both of those clients happy that would be impressive and frankly there's just so much money to be made in this space and an Amazon scale I'm somewhat surprised that they didn't do it themselves. Scot: [55:14] Yeah that shocked me to the thing is I've been digging into these being the combi and pills and it's really interesting so if you look at a firm karna and a bunch of these, you know what they're finding is the under 30 year old consumer, doesn't like the way credit card debt Works where you have this pool of you know that you can pull down and then it accumulates they much prefer to match it with a purchase and pay off the purchase and it's really interesting to read about that and then the the both the firms in there s ones they have a lot of data around us and increasingly even after they've gone public there's more data coming out about this trend so I was I was thinking. You know why Amazon has they if you're a seller though and you money you know they've got their own credit card there's got to be like. What is the larger Banks kind of effectively inside of Amazon that doesn't really Market itself as a bank because it doesn't want to be regulated like a bank maybe that's part of what. Triggers them not doing it. Jason: [56:16] Dress fear about yeah Fair. Scot: [56:18] Yeah there's any trust thing but it is funny you know we've been at this long enough I remember. I'm old enough to remember there was this startup called bill me later and they came on the scene and Amazon used it and you know loved it and was actually giving them quotes that conversions were up 20 percent and then eBay bot eBay / PayPal but Bill Me Later and Amazon ripped them off the site the next night it was controversial and we're all like holy cow I can't you know I think we're all shocked how quickly Amazon turned that off after seeing his praises so it is kind of funny to watch now Amazon jump back into it you know probably been 15 years at this point back into it and partner up with the firm so I almost kind of wondered if. Maybe there was an investment phase but also doesn't Shopify own a chunk of a firm like there's an alliance there too which is another it's unlike Amazon to lay down you kind of have connections into. Competitors even one degree away with a firm in the Middle With both Walmart and Shopify it all. Jason: [57:22] And there is Juicy data at play in this service so it is it is interesting. Scot: [57:28] Yeah days was famously he wouldn't ever he really didn't want to buy any Google ads because he didn't want them to see what they're up to. Jason: [57:36] No I mean part of me would almost suspect that Amazon is like trying to learn on a firm and that it wouldn't be a long-term deal but I entirely speculation. Scot: [57:46] I think both of our Spidey senses are tingling on this one and we'll keep an eye on it then there was a battle of press releases where Amazon Walmart said we're hiring 20,000 people and then Amazon du ha ha we're hiring 50,000 so that was that was the other Amazon news I saw. Jason: [58:02] Yeah I saw that too I got to be honest to me those were nothing Burgers it's super complicated both of those companies hire a ton of seasonal Labour way more than that right and. Sidenote like targets hiring a hundred and thirty thousand people for Christmas so those numbers just didn't seem that impressive and if I was if I was Walmart my press release would have said hey we've hired 500,000 people since covid-19 like that seems that's true and that seems a lot more impressive than than the 20,000 I guess what is interesting in both cases is, this is not seasonal labor these are full-time jobs just dedicated to fulfilling e-commerce orders so that's kind of interesting. [58:42] And two other tiny pieces of Walmart news in the the time that we don't have left Walmart did announce. An enhancement to their advertising echo system so they have a thing called the Amazon or Walmart connect and they launched a DSP for that. Demand-side platform it's a way to use Walmart data to Target segments and by ads both. On Walmart so walmart.com and in Walmart stores but also um across the the interweb using Walmart's first-party data and as we talked about in our privacy show as it's harder to use Google and Facebook targeting because of all these privacy concerns. It makes sense that that retailers are trying to maximize The Leverage they have with their 1p data Walmart has the most customers so they have the most wimpy data and so that that's kind of an interesting evolution of their ad platform and a potential competitive Advantage for Walmart. [59:47] And then another one that's just kind of interesting that I didn't necessarily expect Walmart launched a new delivery platform. Which is delivering goods for other retailers. So they call it Walmart Go Local and essentially you can be independent owner operator you know, in a town and sell stuff for home delivery and Walmart will use their network of owned delivery. People in vehicles to pick stuff up from your bakery and drive them to a customer for a fee. Scot: [1:00:19] Yeah we'll see how that goes I don't know if I want my bakery to be delivered by Walmart. Jason: [1:00:27] Yeah I mean there's a number of issues it just to me it's interesting because obviously Walmart used to be a pure retailer you know you're seeing them lean into a lot of services they it was a few weeks ago but they announced this deal with. With Adobe whether they're they're selling software to Adobe and now they're selling delivery services to you know Main Street when you know used to be the narrative was that Walmart was putting Main Street out of business so it just it's interesting to see the evolution of Walmart. Scot: [1:00:57] I've whenever Walmart talks about some of the services they show kind of a low WalMart delivery vehicle that looks a lot like an Amazon Prime van. Jason: [1:01:06] Yeah they have a lot of different they have kind of a patchwork Fleet of delivery services and some of them use different vehicles but you you maybe more expert in the Walmart delivery Fleet than I am. Scot: [1:01:20] I just see this picture and it I think a lot about Vans everyday and it resonates with me. [1:01:32] I appreciate it thanks for looking out for me well we are out of time and one of the topics we wanted to cover but what with all the juicy IPO news didn't get to this time but will dedicate neck so to it is there is a lot coming up we're kind of coming in to wear it the past the halfway point of Q3 and all eyes will turn to Q4 with the holiday season it's going to be really unique this year because we cut the covid thing we've got the Delta variant we've got all kinds of crazy weather going on with hurricanes so as a retailer it's a really wacky time and one of the things we want to talk about next show is ship again so we coined that here on the show last year and turned out to be probably bigger than even we anticipated what's going on with that and 2021 I see a lot of time thinking about Vanagon there's also chip again so which which caused Vanagon so with want to talk about all the geddens that we're seeing out there. And then also you know there's a lot of interesting things going on the supply chain we've been you know the team here at the Jason Scott show and our many analysts have been listening in to the quarterly results and and talking to retailers about this and we have a lot of information to share on that kind of T up what we think the holiday is going to look like from from those angles. Jason: [1:02:55] Wow that sounds like an awesome show I can't wait to hear it. Scot: [1:02:58] I know I cannot wait for us to make it. Jason: [1:03:01] Will Scott it's happen again we've totally used up our allotted time as always if this was valuable we sure would appreciate that five star review on iTunes and only takes a second it's easier than ever before to leave it jump over there give us a review and make sure you're subscribed to get that next podcast Scot teas. Scot: [1:03:21] Absolutely thanks everyone and until next time… Jason: [1:03:24] Happy commercing.

Who's Saving the Planet?
How Madeline Fraser Created The Warby Parker of Jewelry Companies

Who's Saving the Planet?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 41:14


Madeline Fraser came up with the idea for Gemist when she tried to design herself a custom ring. The ordeal proved successful but a headache. How is it that the custom jewelry process is so antiquated? The serial entrepreneur had an idea: let the consumer be in charge. After all, one size does not fit all when it comes to jewelry design. And so she brought the industry into the modern age with a unique home try-on experience (akin to Warby Parker eyeglasses). Not only that, the company's jewelry is handmade in Downtown Los Angeles using sustainable materials and ethical practices. That's enough to bring a twinkle to our eyes!

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast
319: GREATEST HITS: The Biggest Ecommerce Mattress Brand Ever

The Ecommerce Influence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 72:45


In this Greatest Hits episode we're revisiting a conversation about market disruption and big goals. JT Marino shares the story of his dream to build a company that would disrupt the mattress industry. JT Marino was the co-founder of Tuft & Needle, and this is his story of bootstrapping his way from nothing to the largest online mattress retailer in the world. JT, who is now the Chief Strategy Officer for SSB Phoenix, joins us to share his incredible story. We talk about why customer-centricity was one of Tuft & Needle's core principles from the beginning, and the role it played in their eventual merger with Serta Simmons. JT shares his thoughts on the importance, as a founder, of having an intimate understanding of how every aspect of your business works, and why they decided not to take any outside investments when they first started out. This is one of my favorite founder interviews we've done and I hope you enjoy it! Episode Highlights 4:58 Introducing JT Marino 6:47 How the friendship and partnership started between the founders of Turf & Needle, JT and Daehee 11:13 How the Tuft & Needle co-founders maintain a strong friendship while running a business together 12:51 How JT's prior experience with heavily-funded, but unsuccessful, Silicon Valley start-ups influenced Tuft & Needle's decision to not take outside investments. 17:21 The importance of identifying “the problem” when you're building a business, and how this led to the creation of Tuft & Needle 19:28 Some of the other principles the Tuft & Needle founders committed to before starting their business 22:11 How JT and Daehee used a problem-solution approach to determine whether they had a product-market fit for Tuft & Needle 27:59 The benefits of being highly involved with and having an intimate understanding of every aspect of the business, from manufacturing to supply chain to marketing 31:30 How Tuft & Needle moved through the pit of sorrow and started to scale 35:12 How a Hacker News blog post contributed to explosive growth of Tuft & Needle 37:51 The importance of customer satisfaction and word-of-mouth to Tuft & Needle's success, especially when they had a limited advertising budget 39:40 The various channels that helped grow the business over time 42:45 JT's approach to tracking attribution across a variety of channels 45:55 How Tuft & Needle developed advertising techniques and targeting that span across digital and non-digital 50:34 The unconventional reason Tuft & Needle started selling on Amazon 53:39 The Net Promoter Score target T&F set before making the decision to list on Amazon 56:10 JT's advice if you're considering selling on Amazon and the importance of looking at the market picture as you start to grow 59:35 The role customer-centricity played in Tuft & Needle's decision to merge with Serta 1:06:46 The future of the mattress industry 1:09:48 JT shares his hobbies and what's in store for him in the next year   Links And Resources Tuft & Needle How to Get Startup Ideas by Paul Graham Blog: How we bootstrapped to the #1 rated mattress on Amazon.com Meet the Warby Parker of Mattresses JT on Twitter: @johnmarino JT@tn.com The Coalition @a_brawn on Twitter Review or subscribe on iTunes

Remarkable Retail
A look behind the Magic Door with Ben Kaufman, CEO CAMP

Remarkable Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 36:08


This episode we welcome Ben Kaufman, CEO and founder of Camp, the fast growing "family experience" company, which now features multiple locations in the New York area and Dallas, with more on the way (including the Los Angeles and Boston areas). We explore Camp's unique approach to the toy category--and retail more broadly--which includes a mix of play, product and programming. In addition to learning what's behind "the Magic Door", we chat about what "experiential" retail should mean and how to measure success in the blended digital and physical world.But first we open up the episode with our quick takes on recent retail news that caught out attention, including Amazon's rumored new "department store" format and what to conclude (if anything) from recent retail earnings releases. We also unpack Warby Parker's S-1 filing and--as a prelude to our interview--dig into recent toy industry news, including Toys R Us at Macy's and Disney's expansion with Target.Here is the prescient Forbes article Steve references in the episode.NOTE: We'll be back to weekly episodes after Labor Day.Also be sure to check out our new  YouTube channel. Steve Dennis is an advisor, keynote speaker and author on strategic growth and business innovation. You can learn more about Steve on his       website.    The expanded and revised edition of his bestselling book  Remarkable Retail: How To Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Disruption is now available at  Amazon or just about anywhere else books are sold. Steve regularly shares his insights in his role as a      Forbes senior contributor and on       Twitter and       LinkedIn. You can also check out his speaker "sizzle" reel      here.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus        Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  and       The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois.  You can learn more about Michael       here  or on       LinkedIn. 

This is Product Management
280 Social Impact is Product Management

This is Product Management

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 27:52


Alex Fox is a Product Manager at Warby Parker and several other companies. Learn more about how to ensure social impact is at the core of your business, as well as how Alex built her career on that very foundation, on this episode of This Is Product Management. Also, do you need help with your user research? The Feedback Loop platform automates over 30 research processes, delivering you fast, quality consumer feedback in 72 hours or less. For a limited time we're offering unlimited testing* in the first month - If interested, please visit: feedbackloop.com/freemonth 

Working Girl Talk
Be a Delight to Work With! 6 Tips to Help You Be the Best Coworker

Working Girl Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 15:25


Have you ever worked with someone and thought, "They were so easy to work with!" or "I love working with them!" ? Don't we all want to be that person? Today, we're breaking down six tips to help you be the best coworker and the easiest person to work with.   This Week's News:

Omni Talk
Fast Five | Chris Returns To Rant About Amazon, Walmart, and Toys R Us

Omni Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 38:00


In the latest edition of the Omni Talk Fast Five, sponsored by the A&M Consumer & Retail Group and Takeoff, Chris Walton rejoins Anne Mezzenga on the show after a long medical absence to discuss: – Amazon's move into department stores. – The insanity that is Macy's new Toys R Us partnership. – All the sizzle without the steak in Walmart's new GoLocal delivery service concept. – The positive and potentially negative repercussions of Shipt's new preferred shopper innovation. – And why Warby Parker just may not be the city on the hill of omnichannel retailing that so many people have made them out to be for the past decade. To learn more about the A&M Consumer & Retail Group, visit: www.alvarezandmarsal.com/industries/retail/retail To learn more about Takeoff, visit: www.takeoff.com/

This Week in Startups - Video
Rapid Fire News: OnlyFans reverses course, Circle to clean up USDC reserves, Warby Parker S-1 | E1271

This Week in Startups - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 46:39


In today's news show, Jason covers OnlyFans being back to business as usual (1:31), the stablecoin Circle cleaning up commercial paper from their USDC reserves (16:49), and does a break down of Warby Parker's S-1 as the company prepare to go public via direct listing (30:30).

This Week in Startups - Audio
Rapid Fire News: OnlyFans reverses course, Circle to clean up USDC reserves, Warby Parker S-1 | E1271

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 46:43


In today's news show, Jason covers OnlyFans being back to business as usual (1:31), the stablecoin Circle cleaning up commercial paper from their USDC reserves (16:49), and does a break down of Warby Parker's S-1 as the company prepare to go public via direct listing (30:30).

TechCheck
The Nasdaq's Record Climb, Exclusive Interviews with Intuit CEO and Twilio CEO & OnlyFans Reverses its Content Ban

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 44:27


Our anchors start off the morning on the Nasdaq's record climb with CNBC's Mike Santoli here to break down valuations in tech. Then, we cover the latest surge in the meme stock world led by meme stock darlings GameStop and AMC. Plus, we bring you all the details on Warby Parker filing to go public via direct listing in an environment that has been unfriendly to direct-to-consumer IPOs. Then, in two exclusive interviews, we hear from Intuit CEO Sasan Goodarzi on the quarter, and later, Twilio Co-Founder and CEO Jeff Lawson on the company's decision to invest in a SPAC. Next, CNBC's Julia Boorstin covers her interview with Calibrate CEO Isabelle Kenyon as the telehealth startup announces a $100 million funding round. Also, hear why OnlyFans reversed its decision to ban explicit content on its platform. Plus, we have Brex Co-Founder and Co-CEO Henrique Dubugras on the fintech company's launch of venture debt financing

WSJ Minute Briefing
House Passes $3.5 Trillion Budget Blueprint

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 2:19


Goldman Sachs will require Covid-19 vaccinations for employees and visitors entering its offices. The origins of Covid-19 remain unclear, according to a new assessment by U.S. spy agencies. Eyewear maker Warby Parker plans to go public. Marc Stewart hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sweat Equity Podcast® Law Smith + Eric Readinger
#325: How To Create An Immersive Italian Foodie Experience To Your Home By Way Of Storytelling w/ Al Dente Tastings' Jessenia Rojas

Sweat Equity Podcast® Law Smith + Eric Readinger

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 47:23


Jessenia Rojas is the owner, operator and immersive Italian tour guide for Al Dente Tastings. aldentetastings.comEpisode sponsored by Try Express VPN - get 3 months FREE with our discounted URL tryexpressvpn.com/sweatAdditional Sweat Equity Podcast (SweatEquityPod.com) sponsors: Grasshopper, The Entrepreneurs Phone App - trygrasshopper.com/sweat, Warby Parker, The Disruptor In The Prescription Eyeglass And Sunglass Game - warbyparker.com/sweat HIRE ERIC READINGER - Eric@SweatEquityPod.com HIRE LAW SMITH - Law@TocoWorks.com Want to help the show without a financial transaction? Hook us up with by: SUBSCRIBE to Sweat Equity on Apple Podcasts app / Spotify / anywhere you listen to podcasts  FIVE STAR           review us with at least 1 sentence (funny ones read on air) SHARE With A Friend!

Rock N Roll Pantheon
You're Not Listening: Treat Her Right - I Think She Likes Me; Van Morrison - Tupelo Honey (live)

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 63:44


Bob Bland from the Bend and Scoop Podcast joins YNL to talk about some blues music! We discuss I Think She Likes Me by Treat Her Right , and Tupelo Honey (live version) by Van Morrison. If you think you don't like these songs, then You're Not Listening. So #CleanOutYourEars and #ListenUp! Click Here for the Official You're Not Listening Spotify Playlist! Every song that is discussed on YNL is on this playlist, as well as the most recent episode! To hear these songs on Youtube, click the links below! - I Think She Likes Me Official Video - Tupelo Honey Video Other Links from this episode: -Check out more amazing music podcasts at www.pantheonpodcasts.com! -Listen to Bend and Scoop at www.bendandscoop.com If you enjoy this podcast, please make sure you SUBSCRIBE, rate & review, and reach out to us! Click here to visit our website! Twitter: @YNLPodcast Facebook: You're Not Listening Instagram: @YNLPodcast YNL Gear: TeeSpring Store! If you'd like to Support You're Not Listening, please check out our Patreon page and become a patron to get access to all of our extra content, exclusive playlists, and more! For your FREE in-home trial of 5 different glasses frames from Warby Parker, go to www.warbyparkertrial.com/notlistening!  Thanks so much for (not)listening! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Baby Mamas No Drama with Kail Lowry & Vee Rivera
46: Big House Updates and Listener Questions

Baby Mamas No Drama with Kail Lowry & Vee Rivera

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 67:39


This week Kail and Vee catch up on both current and future house building. Kail is learning just how involved house building can be! Plus there are so many great listener submitted questions and requests for advice, but never enough time to answer them all. Vee has a few submissions that she wants to discuss; getting back with an ex who cheated, knowing when to tell your child about their biological parent, and telling someone their partner was unfaithful are all on the table. This episode was sponsored by: Canva, Upstart, Warby Parker, & Best Fiends Music by: Loyalty Freak Music

Baby Mamas No Drama with Kail Lowry & Vee Rivera
46: Big House Updates and Listener Questions

Baby Mamas No Drama with Kail Lowry & Vee Rivera

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 67:39


This week Kail and Vee catch up on both current and future house building. Kail is learning just how involved house building can be! Plus there are so many great listener submitted questions and requests for advice, but never enough time to answer them all. Vee has a few submissions that she wants to discuss; getting back with an ex who cheated, knowing when to tell your child about their biological parent, and telling someone their partner was unfaithful are all on the table. This episode was sponsored by: Canva, Upstart, Warby Parker, & Best Fiends Music by: Loyalty Freak Music

Scream!
#30 The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) (feat. Bri from Horror Soup)

Scream!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 97:03


We had to do something big for our 30th episode! Not only are we covering a masterpiece by the divisive Director Tobe Hooper - we brought Bri from Horror Soup along for the ride! Morbid Soup 2.0. IYKYK. NEXT EPISODE - Fear Street Part One: 1994 (2021) PATREON (AD FREE EPISODES AND MORE!) ➟ https://patreon.com/screampodcast SCREAM! PODCAST WEBSITE ➟ https://www.thescreampodcast.com/   SCREAM! SOCIALS: Instagram ➟ https://z-p42.www.instagram.com/screampodcast/ Twitter ➟ https://twitter.com/thescreampod Facebook ➟ https://www.facebook.com/thescreampod/?ref=py_c   SCREAMPODCAST@YAHOO.COM HORROR SOUP SOCIALS: Instagram ➟ @horrorsoup Twitter ➟ @horrorsoupsucks  LETTERBOXD (MOVIE REVIEW APP) ➟ https://letterboxd.com/horrorsoupcaleb/   ~Music Credits~   ETHAN HURT – WWW.ETHANHURT.COM KYLE HERMAN - @iamkyleherman on Instagram Thank you to our sponsors! - SimpliSafe!!! @ simplisafe.com/scream - Warby Parker!!! @ warbyparker.com/scream -

MuggleCast: the Harry Potter podcast
523: What If Neville Longbottom Was 'The Chosen One'?

MuggleCast: the Harry Potter podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 83:13


Our character discussions return as we celebrate the birthday of Neville Longbottom! Professor Trelawney drops in to give us a refresher on the Lost Prophecy Had Voldemort marked Neville as his equal, would a similar situation have played out with Alice sacrificing herself to save her son?  Neville & Hannah Abbott: was the plan all along that she and Neville end up together, or did the idea evolve as the series neared its end? The hosts give their reactions to the movies pairing Neville and Luna together. It's not fair! Augusta constantly compares Neville to her own son, Frank! Both orphaned in their own way, we discuss the similarities of Harry and Neville's upbringings. Was Neville always doomed to feeling “second best” even if  he had a more supportive parental figure? Why did Neville want to be sorted in Hufflepuff? Did it further diminish the house's reputation for readers early on in the series? The hosts share moments from their own lives where they felt like they didn't belong. Neville's Notable Moments of Development: we discuss him standing up to Harry, Ron and Hermione in Sorcerer's Stone, his actions inside the Ministry of Magic in Order of the Phoenix and his confrontation with Voldemort in Deathly Hallows Matt Lewis: how was Neville portrayed in the films and what were some notable movie differences for the character? What if... Neville was The Chosen One? What would his upbringing have looked like? Who would be his Ron and Hermione at Hogwarts? What would his relationship with Dumbledore be like? Quizzitch: Right after impersonating Neville Longbottom during his ride on the Knight Bus in Year 3, Harry bumps into the real Neville outside Flourish and Blotts. What is Neville looking for, in this moment? Visit MuggleCast.com/Quizzitch to submit your answer! This week's episode is sponsored by Warby Parker (order 5 pairs of glasses to try at home for free for 5 days – with no obligation to buy) and Logitech UE Fits ( get 15% off your pair of Ultimate Ears FITS True Wireless Earbuds using code MUGGLECAST). Support us on Patreon and receive magical benefits, like access to our recording studio, Bonus MuggleCast, a personalized thank you video from one of the hosts and more! On this month's Bonus MuggleCast, we talk about our favorite Jude Law Dumbledore moments from Crimes of Grindelwald!

Two Girls One Ghost
Episode 158 - An NDE Buffet

Two Girls One Ghost

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 91:23


Being so close to death, dying, and then coming back to life sounds like a real miracle.For some it truly is, as they return to their earthly bodies knowing more than they did just minutes before when they died. Dr. Parti and a few children have tales to tell us, learnings to teach us, and stories that will send shivers up your spine. This episode is sponsored by Warby Parker, Noom, BetterHelp, Native, Magic Spoon, and Pretty Litter. Warby Parker is committed to providing exceptional vision care online and in stores – offering eyeglasses, sunglasses, eye exams, and contact lenses! Try 5 pairs of glasses at home for free at warbyparker.com/tgog. Noom is the habit-change program that uses psychology to teach you how your mind works, so you can understand why you make the decisions you make, and feel empowered to change for good. Sign up for your trial today at noom.com/TGOG. Visit betterhelp.com/TGOG and join the over 1,000,000 people who have taken charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. Stay fresh, stay clean with Native by going to nativedeo.com/twogirls, or use promo code TWOGIRLS at checkout, and get twenty percent off your first order.  Go to magicspoon.com/tgog to grab a custom bundle of cereal and try it today! And be sure to use our promo code TGOG at checkout to save five dollars off your order! Do what Sabrina did and make the switch to PrettyLitter today! Get 20% off your first order by visiting PrettyLitter.com and use promo code TGOG. Finally, please Rate and Review the podcast on iTunes and follow us on social media! Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Editing by Upfire Digital. Original Music by Arms Akimbo!

Myths and Legends
232-Robin Hood: Public Enemy

Myths and Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 52:03


Robin decides that, you know what he needs? To walk directly into the home of his greatest enemies. Nothing bad can come from this. Nothing bad at all. The creature is the Wolpertinger, a German chimera who might help you solve some problems...but at the expense of your soul. -- Links: Tortilla blanket: https://myths.link/tortillas Twitter: https://myths.link/twitter Store: https://myths.link/store Membership: https://www.mythpodcast.com/membership -- Sponsors: Daily Harvest: Stay cool during the summer. Go to http://DailyHarvest.com and enter code "myths" to get $25 off your first box. Warby Parker! Try five pairs of glasses at home for FREE when you go to http://warbyparker.com/myths. Literati: Reimagine what a book club can be. Redeem your 30-day trial for only 99 cents at http://literati.com/legends. Faherty Brand: Stock up on all your clothes for summer now! Go to http://fahertybrand.com and use code "MYTHS" at checkout to snag 20% off all your summer gear! -- Music: "Gambrel" by Blue Dot Sessions "Glass Stopper" by Blue Dot Sessions “Lesser Gods of Metal” by Blue Dot Sessions "Bright and Blank" by Blue Dot Sessions "Vdet" by Blue Dot Sessions "Median Point" by Blue Dot Sessions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mile Higher Podcast
167: The Suspicious Death Of Natalie Wood: Accident Or Murder?

Mile Higher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 68:22


Thank you sponsors! Raycon https://bit.ly/3inI9ku | Stitch Fix https://bit.ly/3wt6s65  | Warby Parker https://bit.ly/3rKDqgL | Native https://bit.ly/2UolfhM | Pretty Litter https://bit.ly/3whbd2b code milehigher Josh's new podcast, Planet Sleep! https://linktr.ee/planetsleep  YT: https://bit.ly/2UnsTMr  Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2V59IqZ  Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3yrpN96  IG: @planetsleepcast https://bit.ly/3jHiN3H  TW: @planetsleepcast https://bit.ly/3xjNP5N  Merch designer application: https://forms.gle/ha2ErBnv1gK4rj2Y6  Check Out Our New CBD Company! Higher Love Wellness Co https://higherlovewellness.com/  Higher Love Wellness IG: @higherlovewellnessco  Higher Love Wellness TW: @higherlovecbd MHP Merch: http://milehighermerch.com Join our official FB group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/415831102854314   Join our Discord community, it's free! https://discord.gg/hZ356G9 MHP YouTube: http://bit.ly/2qaDWGf Are You Subscribed On Apple Podcast & Spotify?! Support MHP by leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcast :) https://apple.co/2H4kh58 MHP Topic Request Form: https://forms.gle/gUeTEzL9QEh4Hqz88  Subscribe to Kendall & Janelle's new podcast, The Sesh! https://bit.ly/2ZOqx9O  Check out Josh's Podcast, Lights Out! iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lights-out-podcast/id1505843600 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3SfSNbkVrfz3ceXmNr0lZ4?si=wOi02-XmQb-W81ucPckpLg You can follow us on all the things: @milehigherpod Twitter: http://twitter.com/milehigherpod Instagram: http://instagram.com/milehigherpod  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/milehigherpodcast Kendall: @kendallraeonyt IG: http://instagram.com/kendallraeonyt TW: https://twitter.com/kendallraeonyt YT: https://www.youtube.com/c/kendallsplace Josh: @milehigherjosh IG: http://instagram.com/milehigherjosh TW: https://twitter.com/milehigherjosh Janelle: @janelle_fields_ IG:https://www.instagram.com/janelle_fields_  TW:https://twitter.com/janelle_fields_ ✉ Send Us Mail & Fan Art ✉ Kendall Rae & Josh Thomas 8547 E Arapahoe Rd Ste J # 233 Greenwood Village, CO 80112 Music By: Mile Higher Boys YT: https://bit.ly/2Q7N5QO  IG: https://bit.ly/3kDle5s Welcome to the Mile Higher Podcast hosted by wife and husband duo Kendall Rae & Josh Thomas!Our show is focused on Crime & Conspiracies but we delve into many other topics including unexplained phenomena, metaphysics, futurism, ancient civilizations and news stories the mainstream media doesn't cover. Our guests include experts in these topics as well as like-minded individuals who share our passion for uncovering the truth and exploring the mysteries of our universe. We never changed, we just woke up and so can you. Come chill with us every Monday and prepare to take your mind a mile higher!

Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast
Bounce Back Players + Jason's Soap Box, Dynasty Download - Fantasy Football Podcast for 7/6

Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 59:09


The Fantasy Footballers are back with a new episode! On today's fantasy football podcast, the guys pick out players they expect to bounce back in 2021! Who will go undervalued in fantasy football drafts and bounce back in a big way? Plus, the latest NFL News, and a new edition of Dynasty Download! Manage your redraft, keeper, and dynasty fantasy football teams with the #1 fantasy football podcast. -- Fantasy Football Podcast for July 6th, 2021.   Get the 2021 Ultimate Draft Kit - www.UltimateDraftKit.com   Connect with the show: YouTube - YouTube.com/thefantasyfootballers Web - TheFantasyFootballers.com Patreon - JoinTheFoot.com Twitter - Twitter.com/theffballers Instagram - Instagram.com/fantasyfootballers   Want even more fantasy football goodness? Visit community.thefantasyfootballers.com to chat everything fantasy football, or JoinTheFoot.com to join our fantasy football community.   Check out today's sponsors:   Warby Parker: warbyparker.com/footballers Hello Fresh: HelloFresh.com/footballers14  -- Code: footballers14 Pristine Auction: PristineAuction.com -- Registration Code - BALLERS Sleeper: Sleeper.app Support this podcast

How I Built This with Guy Raz
Casper: Philip Krim

How I Built This with Guy Raz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 82:53


In the early 2000's, Philip Krim launched an e-commerce business out of his college dorm, selling everything from window blinds to eczema cream to yes, mattresses. Years later, inspired by online successes like Warby Parker and Harry's, Philip and his partners launched Casper, a DTC company that designed its own mattresses, compressed them into boxes, and helped turn a mundane purchase into an Instagrammable adventure. Within months, sales began to take off; and soon, copycat brands crowded into the DTC mattress space, creating competition and buzz in a previously sleepy sector. (Pun unavoidable) Despite these challenges, Casper's valuation soared to $1 billion in 2019, only to shrink by half for its 2020 IPO. Today, Philip says he's focused on the future, with ambitions to build Casper into a one-stop-brand for all things sleep-related.