Podcasts about Apple Watch

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  • Jan 22, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Apple Watch

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Latest podcast episodes about Apple Watch

Der Mobi-Test Podcast
Folge 158 - OnePlus am Ende, die Apple Watch gegen Amazfit und unsere Apps

Der Mobi-Test Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 72:55


Viel Neues gab es in der letzten Woche nicht, aber was es gab ist inhaltlich extrem spannend. Wir stimmen den Abgesang von OnePlus ein, diskutieren (mal wieder) über Apple Watch vs. den Rest der Welt inklusive der Google Pixel Watch, warum keiner heulen soll, wenn etwas plötzlich kostenpflichtig wird und überhaupt, welche Apps wir so alltäglich nutzen. Natürlich gibt es auch dabei wieder jede Menge Gründe zu diskutieren. Wir wollen euch zukünftig stärker in den Podcast einbinden. Ihr habt Fragen an uns? Dann fragt uns doch einfach. Ihr Fragen zu unseren Testkandidaten? Ihr wollte eure Meinung zu einem unserer Themen loswerden? Immer her damit oder ihr habt Vorschläge für Themen? Dann könnt ihr diese vorschlagen. Die Mailadresse ist: podcast (a) mobi-test.de

The CultCast
MORE Apple hardware, incoming! (CultCast #528)

The CultCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 49:33


This week: Apple could scrap 13-inch MacBook Pro, bring 5G to 10.2-inch iPad in 2022 13-MacBook Pro's days are numbered 10.2-inch iPad to get 5G, new MacBook Air this year Mac Pro with faster M1 chip to complete Apple silicon transition in 2022 Eurasian filings reveal new iPhone and iPad coming soon Apple education store now requires Unidays and only 1 device per year This episode supported by Easily create a beautiful website all by yourself, at Squarespace.com/cultcast. Use offer code CultCast at checkout to get 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain. Cult of Mac's watch store is full of beautiful straps that cost way less than Apple's. See the full curated collection at Store.Cultofmac.com CultCloth will keep your iPhone 13, Apple Watch, iPad, glasses and lenses sparkling clean, and for a limited time use code CULTCAST at checkout to score a free CarryCloth with any order at CultCloth.co. This week's stories Apple could scrap 13-inch MacBook Pro, bring 5G to 10.2-inch iPad in 2022 Apple will scrap the 13-inch MacBook Pro this year after introducing a new 14-inch model with a next-generation “M2” chip, one tipster claims. Mac Pro with faster M1 chip to complete Apple silicon transition in 2022 Apple will introduce a new Mac Pro with an upgraded M1 chipset by the end of the year to complete its Apple silicon transition, according to a tipster. Win an Invoxia Cellular GPS Tracker and stop losing things [Cult of Mac giveaway] If you live in a big city, you likely suffered the misfortune of having something stolen. Maybe thieves swiped your bike, motorcycle, car or backpack. Eurasian filings reveal new iPhone and iPad coming soon The Eurasian Economic Commission confirmed that Apple plans to release a new iPhone and iPad in the near future. The devices appear in the online database of the regulatory agency. Apple education store now requires Unidays and only 1 device per year The legendary Apple education discount loophole, now closed!

Unsung Science
How the Fitbit Knows You're Dreaming

Unsung Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 33:14


Over the last decade, a group of California scientists has quietly amassed the biggest sleep database ever assembled. It includes every dozing off, every wakeup, every REM-cycle, every chunk of deep sleep, from 15 billion nights of human slumber. It can tell us the average person's bedtime, whether men or women sleep longer, and which city is really the city that never sleeps. These scientists work at Fitbit—the company that sells fitness bands. And for them, revealing your sleep patterns is only the beginning. The longer-term goal of these scientists—and the ones working on the Apple Watch, Garmins, and other wearables—is to spot diseases before you even have symptoms. Diseases of your heart, your brain, your lungs—all picked up by a bracelet on your wrist. But how? Guests: Eric Friedman, cofounder and CTO of Fitbit. Conor Heneghan, senior research scientist, Google.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Der Kolumnen-Podcast
#83 / Die Apple Watch Series 7

Der Kolumnen-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 12:15


Ich war in Teenagerzeiten immer ein Uhrenträger. Eine G-Shock von Casio, mit Funktionen wie einer Stoppuhr, einem Wecker oder einem Timer, waren zu meinen Zeiten damals wirklich ein Highlight. Doch irgendwann legte ich diese Uhr einfach ab und war über viele Jahre hinweg einfach kein Uhrenträger mehr. Erst die erste Apple Watch belegte mein linkes Handgelenk wieder und seither war jede Series der Apple Watch für ein Jahr hier angelegt. Seit dem Herbst 2021 nutze ich die Apple Watch Series 7 und über sie möchte ich in dieser Kolumne reden.

Do By Friday
Moist, Succulent, Craveable

Do By Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 105:21


This week's challenge: make an Apple Watch face.You can hear the after show and support Do By Friday on Patreon!------Edited by Quinn RoseEngineered by Cameron Bopp------Show LinksMore notes on Podcast Notes automation – Six ColorsThe Theme SystemAmazon.com: Canvas One Line a Day: A Five-Year Memory Book (Yearly Memory Journal and Diary, Natural Canvas Cover): 9781452174792: Chronicle Books: BooksField Notes | Front Page Reporter's NotebookButton Creator for Stream Deck on the App StoreAmazon.com: Elgato Stream Deck XL - Advanced Stream Control with 32 Customizable LCD Keys, for Windows 10 and macOS 10.13 or Later (10GAT9901) : ElectronicsAmazon.com : Gold Bond Ultimate Healing Hand Cream, 3 oz., Lasts Through Handwashing : Beauty & Personal Carealexcox.meAnfernee - YouTubeUnsubscribe from emails, instantly - Unroll.MeTwo Headed GirlDocumentation for Visual Studio CodeYellowjackets (TV series) - WikipediaShoah (film) - WikipediaThe Ring (2002 film) - WikipediaCome and See - WikipediaKum & Go: Where & Means MoreTaskPaper – Plain text to-do lists for MacTickTick: Todo list, checklist and task manager app for Android, iPhone and WebDrafts | Where Text StartsGitHub Desktop | Simple collaboration from your desktopGit and GitHub for Poets - YouTubeThoughtAsylumGaslighting - WikipediaApple Unveils Apple Watch—Apple's Most Personal Device Ever - AppleCARROT Weather for iOS and AndroidApple Watch faces and their features - Apple SupportIntroducing Watchsmith - David Smith, Independent iOS DeveloperFlighty — A new way to track flightsHRV Tracker for Watch on the App StoreHeartWatch: Heart Rate Monitor on the App StoreSleepWatch — The Best Sleep Is Made.(Recorded Wednesday January 19, 2021)Next week's challenge: identify tasks that you would like to do on a regular basis. 

iOS Today (Video HI)
iOS 585: Get to Grips With the Apple Watch - Apple Watch Tips & Tricks

iOS Today (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 97:41


Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard share their favorite Apple Watch tips and tricks. App Grid vs. List How to use and re-arrange Control Center Always On Screen Watch Faces Complications! Shortcut: Change Watch Face with Focus Modes Customize Watch Dock Enable cinema mode with the Sleep Focus Mode News Apple is no longer letting users stay on iOS 14 with security updates Netflix now costs up to 4x Apple TV+ per month Apple Support says iPhone 13 models don't support Noise Cancellation feature available in previous iPhones Apple will allow dating apps in the Netherlands to use alternative payment systems, developers must maintain a separate app binary Safari Bug Allows Websites to Track Your Recent Browsing Activity in Real Time Shotcuts Corner Craig wants to automate turning on his Apple TV and launch Hulu at a specific time Eric needs help setting up a shortcut to record a memo and add it to the Notes app Feedback Paul is looking for a solution to get a notification when leaving behind his iPhone Bryan wants to know how to digitize audio cassettes directly to an iPad Pro App Caps Rosemary's: Wordle Mikah's: Etsy Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/ios-today. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can contribute to iOS Today by leaving us a voicemail at 757-504-iPad (757-504-4723) or sending an email to iOSToday@TWiT.tv. Sponsors: BetterHelp Podcast imperfectfoods.com promo code IOS

iOS Today (MP3)
iOS 585: Get to Grips With the Apple Watch - Apple Watch Tips & Tricks

iOS Today (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 97:14


Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard share their favorite Apple Watch tips and tricks. App Grid vs. List How to use and re-arrange Control Center Always On Screen Watch Faces Complications! Shortcut: Change Watch Face with Focus Modes Customize Watch Dock Enable cinema mode with the Sleep Focus Mode News Apple is no longer letting users stay on iOS 14 with security updates Netflix now costs up to 4x Apple TV+ per month Apple Support says iPhone 13 models don't support Noise Cancellation feature available in previous iPhones Apple will allow dating apps in the Netherlands to use alternative payment systems, developers must maintain a separate app binary Safari Bug Allows Websites to Track Your Recent Browsing Activity in Real Time Shotcuts Corner Craig wants to automate turning on his Apple TV and launch Hulu at a specific time Eric needs help setting up a shortcut to record a memo and add it to the Notes app Feedback Paul is looking for a solution to get a notification when leaving behind his iPhone Bryan wants to know how to digitize audio cassettes directly to an iPad Pro App Caps Rosemary's: Wordle Mikah's: Etsy Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/ios-today. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can contribute to iOS Today by leaving us a voicemail at 757-504-iPad (757-504-4723) or sending an email to iOSToday@TWiT.tv. Sponsors: BetterHelp Podcast imperfectfoods.com promo code IOS

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
iOS Today 585: Get to Grips With the Apple Watch

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 97:14


Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard share their favorite Apple Watch tips and tricks. App Grid vs. List How to use and re-arrange Control Center Always On Screen Watch Faces Complications! Shortcut: Change Watch Face with Focus Modes Customize Watch Dock Enable cinema mode with the Sleep Focus Mode News Apple is no longer letting users stay on iOS 14 with security updates Netflix now costs up to 4x Apple TV+ per month Apple Support says iPhone 13 models don't support Noise Cancellation feature available in previous iPhones Apple will allow dating apps in the Netherlands to use alternative payment systems, developers must maintain a separate app binary Safari Bug Allows Websites to Track Your Recent Browsing Activity in Real Time Shotcuts Corner Craig wants to automate turning on his Apple TV and launch Hulu at a specific time Eric needs help setting up a shortcut to record a memo and add it to the Notes app Feedback Paul is looking for a solution to get a notification when leaving behind his iPhone Bryan wants to know how to digitize audio cassettes directly to an iPad Pro App Caps Rosemary's: Wordle Mikah's: Etsy Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/ios-today. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can contribute to iOS Today by leaving us a voicemail at 757-504-iPad (757-504-4723) or sending an email to iOSToday@TWiT.tv. Sponsors: BetterHelp Podcast imperfectfoods.com promo code IOS

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)
MBW 801: Machine Gun Clippy - Safari bug, Netherlands App Store ruling, Apple Watch ads

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 119:56


Safari bug, Netherlands App Store ruling, Apple Watch ads Microsoft will buy Activision Blizzard, a bet on games being central to the internet's future. Safari bug can leak some of your Google account info and recent browsing history Netherlands App Store ruling: Apple will allow alternative payment methods, but developers must maintain a separate app binary Possibility of huge changes to App Store as US antitrust bill proceeds to committee Senate Judiciary Committee will consider The American Innovation and Choice Online Act this week; Tim Cook personally lobbying Senate Judiciary Committee against it Apple Watch Series 7 | 911 | Apple Apple Watch "911: Bob" Detectives | Cinematic mode | iPhone 13 Pro | Apple iPhone 14 Pro now rumored to feature 'hole + pill design' instead of notch Likely new iPhone SE and iPad Air models appear in Eurasian database Report: iPad Air 5 with 5G, Center Stage camera, and more coming this spring Report: 'iPhone SE+ 5G' coming this year followed by the larger model in 2023 Locket, an app for sharing photos to friends' home screens, hits the top of the App Store Microsoft Releases Office for Mac Update With Full Apple Silicon Support in Excel Tesla refuses to adopt CarPlay, but this developer has a workaround Aerial app for Mac updated with tvOS 15 screensavers and new features Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Above Avalon Andy's Pick: Multiselect for YouTube, U.S. free COVID tests Alex's Pick: Live Video in Keynote Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/macbreak zocdoc.com/macbreak hover.com/twit

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)
MBW 801: Machine Gun Clippy - Safari bug, Netherlands App Store ruling, Apple Watch ads

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 119:22


Safari bug, Netherlands App Store ruling, Apple Watch ads Microsoft will buy Activision Blizzard, a bet on games being central to the internet's future. Safari bug can leak some of your Google account info and recent browsing history Netherlands App Store ruling: Apple will allow alternative payment methods, but developers must maintain a separate app binary Possibility of huge changes to App Store as US antitrust bill proceeds to committee Senate Judiciary Committee will consider The American Innovation and Choice Online Act this week; Tim Cook personally lobbying Senate Judiciary Committee against it Apple Watch Series 7 | 911 | Apple Apple Watch "911: Bob" Detectives | Cinematic mode | iPhone 13 Pro | Apple iPhone 14 Pro now rumored to feature 'hole + pill design' instead of notch Likely new iPhone SE and iPad Air models appear in Eurasian database Report: iPad Air 5 with 5G, Center Stage camera, and more coming this spring Report: 'iPhone SE+ 5G' coming this year followed by the larger model in 2023 Locket, an app for sharing photos to friends' home screens, hits the top of the App Store Microsoft Releases Office for Mac Update With Full Apple Silicon Support in Excel Tesla refuses to adopt CarPlay, but this developer has a workaround Aerial app for Mac updated with tvOS 15 screensavers and new features Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Above Avalon Andy's Pick: Multiselect for YouTube, U.S. free COVID tests Alex's Pick: Live Video in Keynote Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/macbreak zocdoc.com/macbreak hover.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
MacBreak Weekly 801: Machine Gun Clippy

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 119:22


Safari bug, Netherlands App Store ruling, Apple Watch ads Microsoft will buy Activision Blizzard, a bet on games being central to the internet's future. Safari bug can leak some of your Google account info and recent browsing history Netherlands App Store ruling: Apple will allow alternative payment methods, but developers must maintain a separate app binary Possibility of huge changes to App Store as US antitrust bill proceeds to committee Senate Judiciary Committee will consider The American Innovation and Choice Online Act this week; Tim Cook personally lobbying Senate Judiciary Committee against it Apple Watch Series 7 | 911 | Apple Apple Watch "911: Bob" Detectives | Cinematic mode | iPhone 13 Pro | Apple iPhone 14 Pro now rumored to feature 'hole + pill design' instead of notch Likely new iPhone SE and iPad Air models appear in Eurasian database Report: iPad Air 5 with 5G, Center Stage camera, and more coming this spring Report: 'iPhone SE+ 5G' coming this year followed by the larger model in 2023 Locket, an app for sharing photos to friends' home screens, hits the top of the App Store Microsoft Releases Office for Mac Update With Full Apple Silicon Support in Excel Tesla refuses to adopt CarPlay, but this developer has a workaround Aerial app for Mac updated with tvOS 15 screensavers and new features Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Above Avalon Andy's Pick: Multiselect for YouTube, U.S. free COVID tests Alex's Pick: Live Video in Keynote Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/macbreak zocdoc.com/macbreak hover.com/twit

Radio Leo (Audio)
MacBreak Weekly 801: Machine Gun Clippy

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 119:22


Safari bug, Netherlands App Store ruling, Apple Watch ads Microsoft will buy Activision Blizzard, a bet on games being central to the internet's future. Safari bug can leak some of your Google account info and recent browsing history Netherlands App Store ruling: Apple will allow alternative payment methods, but developers must maintain a separate app binary Possibility of huge changes to App Store as US antitrust bill proceeds to committee Senate Judiciary Committee will consider The American Innovation and Choice Online Act this week; Tim Cook personally lobbying Senate Judiciary Committee against it Apple Watch Series 7 | 911 | Apple Apple Watch "911: Bob" Detectives | Cinematic mode | iPhone 13 Pro | Apple iPhone 14 Pro now rumored to feature 'hole + pill design' instead of notch Likely new iPhone SE and iPad Air models appear in Eurasian database Report: iPad Air 5 with 5G, Center Stage camera, and more coming this spring Report: 'iPhone SE+ 5G' coming this year followed by the larger model in 2023 Locket, an app for sharing photos to friends' home screens, hits the top of the App Store Microsoft Releases Office for Mac Update With Full Apple Silicon Support in Excel Tesla refuses to adopt CarPlay, but this developer has a workaround Aerial app for Mac updated with tvOS 15 screensavers and new features Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Above Avalon Andy's Pick: Multiselect for YouTube, U.S. free COVID tests Alex's Pick: Live Video in Keynote Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: expressvpn.com/macbreak zocdoc.com/macbreak hover.com/twit

Keine Zeit
Smarter, Schneller, Besser, 2

Keine Zeit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:08


„Du bist ich in einer Stunde.“ Review: Smarter, schneller, besser. Warum manche Menschen so viel erledigt bekommen – und andere nicht von Charles Duhigg Diskussion: Chris referiert über die Charakteristik von Mikrofonen. Mix entschuldigt sich für seinen Monolog von letzter Woche, den Chris aber eh verschlafen hat. Es geht nochmals um das neue Jahr: Wir machen uns das Leben in der Arbeit mit Kleinkram schwer (Hörerinnen-Feedback). Die Krux der banalen Dinge. Mix berichtet über seine Probleme mit Fahrtkostenabrechnungen. Chris: Wir verteilen unsere Zeit oft falsch. AppleWatch und Bedienungsanleitungen. Telefone sind das Problem. Chris' Hack, wie man Notizen schreibt. Chris: „Ein Telefonat ist nur so gut, wie du darauf vorbereitet bist.“ Mix wendet einen Hack an, andere Menschen jedoch nicht. Das ist sein Problem. Mix' Hack: Wichtige Telefonate nie ohne Ankündigung führen. Die Konsequenz: Weniger telefonieren, dafür aber ordentlich. Das heißt vorbereitet sein. Mix' 2. Hack: Jede Information in einem Anruf wird schriftlich bestätigt. Mix „Ich versuche die Verantwortung für alle zu übernehmen.“ Mix ist aber auch paranoid. Kleine Dinge können sehr schnell zu großen Dingen werden. Und das sollten wir verhindern. Chris: „Ein Projekt ist erst abgeschlossen, wenn aufgeräumt ist.“ Mix überschätzt sich gerne selbst. Chris rät seinen Kindern, die Schule hinzuwerfen und zu pokern. Mix: Akzeptiere, dass alles Mögliche passieren kann. „Wenn es kein Problem ist, gibt es keine Lösung“. (Oder so ähnlich). Mix bekam viel Haue wegen seiner Ausführungen über das Heiraten. Chris: „Das Leben ist kurviger.“ Das Prinzip der kleinen Schritte und vieler kleiner Entscheidungen. Mix: „Hört nicht auf euer Bauchgefühl.“ Nuggets: „Es muss sich etwas ändern.“ „Die Krux der banalen Dinge.“ „Wer nichts mehr zu sagen hat, der schweige für immer.“ „Read the f******* manual.“ „Pass auf. Das ist der Deal.“ „Du bist ich in einer Stunde.“ „Wir haben keinen Faden.“

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1345: 17 Jan 2022 | China's #1 EV Sold 400,000 Units Last Year

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 23:11


Show #1345 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 17th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon Executive Producer MARK RICHARDS ELECTRIC CAR SALES PASS ‘TIPPING POINT' IN SWITZERLAND - The number of new electric cars sold in Switzerland continues to accelerate – even faster than predicted, according to the Touring Club Switzerland (TCS) car association. - For the September to November period, fully electric vehicles accounted for 18.3% of new registrations and plug-in vehicles (electric and plug-in hybrids) hit a record 28% - The TCS described the 18.3% threshold as a milestone. Electric vehicles had clearly gone beyond a “tipping point” and moved into the mainstream, it said. - In Switzerland incentives for plug-in vehicles are not coordinated and vary between cantons. Top 5 Models: 1.       Tesla Model 3 2.       Volkswagen ID.3 3.       Škoda Enyaq 4.       Renault Zoe 5.       Fiat 500 · Original Source : https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/sci-tech/electric-cars-pass--tipping-point--in-switzerland/47260170 APPLE'S DIGITAL CAR KEYS MAY WORK WITH HYUNDAI AND GENESIS MODELS THIS SUMMER - Apple's digital car key feature might soon be useful for unlocking more than a handful of BMW models. - Hyundai and its upscale Genesis badge will support Apple CarKey "by the summer." It's not certain which models would provide the option, but it's notable that some trim levels of the Ioniq 5 and other Hyundai cars include NFC for a (currently proprietary) digital key. - CarKey (and its Android equivalent) treats the phone more like a physical key. You just have to bring your phone or Apple Watch to the door handle to unlock it, and you can even place your phone in a given area to start the car. People with ultra-wideband iPhones (such as the iPhone 11 and newer) can even leave their phone in their pocket when opening and starting the vehicle. Original Source : https://www.engadget.com/apple-carkey-hyundai-genesis-cars-172130052.html DEVELOPER HACK PUTS CARPLAY ON TESLA USING A RASPBERRY PI - A developer has come up with a way to get CarPlay running on a Tesla, with a workaround allowing drivers access to their iPhones while behind the wheel. - Polish developer Michal Gapinski came up with his own way.  In images and video posted to Twitter on Friday, Gapinski shows his Tesla running CarPlay on the display of his vehicle. The clips, spotted by Tesla North show the feature as being quite functional, including Apple Maps and Apple Music. - Gapinski instead bypasses Wi-Fi restrictions so that the Tesla's browser can connect to a secondary device. In turn, the browser displays what is shown on the host device as a live video feed. - Currently in its early stages, the developer says he plans to release it to the public "when it's polished." - the project actually relies on a Raspberry Pi running a custom build of Android. That build runs an interface that works with CarPlay, enabling Apple's UI to be usable from the larger screen. Original Source : https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/01/15/developer-hack-puts-carplay-on-tesla-using-a-raspberry-pi TRITIUM GOES PUBLIC TO EXPAND TO THREE PLANTS GLOBALLY - The Australian charging column manufacturer Tritium has launched on the US stock exchange Nasdaq. Tritium plans to invest the capital generated by the IPO in its expansion to three global manufacturing facilities and the development of global sales and service teams. - . Going public by merging with an already listed company has become the most utilized method for electric mobility companies to shorten the lengthy IPO process in the US. - Tritium currently has manufacturing facilities in Australia and is currently building manufacturing facilities in the USA. Tritium CEO Jane Hunter recently told Bloomberg that Tritium is ramping up speed to get its US manufacturing facility ready Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/01/14/tritium-goes-public-to-expand-to-three-plants-globally/ 400,000 UNITS OF SAIC-GM-WULING'S MINI EV WERE SOLD IN 2021 - General Motors' Chinese joint venture SAIC-GM-Wuling was the number one purveyor of electric vehicles in China last year, selling nearly 400,000 units of its sensible MINI EV hatchback. - numbers published by the China Passenger Car Association, SAIC-GM-Wuling sold a total of 395,451 examples of its MINI EV between January and December last year. This made it the best-selling EV in China ahead of the BYD Qin, which sold 187,227 units. - The MINI EV is priced from the equivalent of just over $4,000 USD in China, with each unit carrying a minuscule profit margin of $14 for SAIC-GM-Wuling. While the margins are small, sales of the vehicle allow the automaker to earn carbon credits, saving it money in the long term. Original Source : https://gmauthority.com/blog/2022/01/almost-400000-units-of-saic-gm-wulings-mini-ev-were-sold-in-2021/ CHINESE EVS FIND A NICHE MAKING SHORT-HAUL DELIVERIES IN JAPAN - Logistics companies in Japan, striving to cut costs and make the most out of the pandemic-inspired online shopping boom, are finding an unlikely white knight in Chinese electric-vehicle manufacturers, whose vans make last-mile deliveries not only cheaper, but cleaner as well. - Tokyo's SBS Holdings Inc., a listed logistics company that offers deliveries, recently struck a deal to buy 2,000 light EV trucks over five years from Japanese EV startup folofly. The cars will be made by a unit of Dongfeng Motor Group Co - Although Japan isn't currently a huge market for electric vehicles — EV penetration runs at just 1% versus 30% in some cities in China — Chinese automakers sense an opportunity. - "If Japanese companies just stick to producing cars, foreign companies will come in,” said Hiroyasu Koma, CEO of folofly, the company working with SBS and Dongfeng Motor on the former's fleet-electrification strategy. Original Source : https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2022/01/17/business/corporate-business/japan-buying-china-ev/ NEW 2023 PEUGEOT E-308: EV HATCHBACK TO BRING 250-MILE RANGE - Peugeot has confirmed the battery-electric variants of its 308 hatchback and SW estate will be more powerful, more efficient and have a longer range than its existing e-208 supermini. - The e-308 will join pure-combustion and plug-in hybrid variants of the family hatchback to complete the Peugeot 308 line up when it goes on sale next year. - The battery is only 4kWh bigger than the one in the smaller e-208 but Peugeot is claiming that a new NMC811 battery chemistry will give the car increased efficiency, of 5mi/kWh (12.4kWh/100km), - That would give the e-308 a test cycle range of nearly 250 miles. - The e-308 will go into full production in July 2023, with deliveries shortly afterwards. Pricing will be announced nearer the time. Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/new-2023-peugeot-e-308-ev-hatchback-bring-250-mile-range CATL TO UNVEIL BATTERY SWAP BRAND EVOGO - CATL, a leading Chinese battery firm, has officially confirmed it will hold a launch event for a new battery swap brand called EVOGO on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. Beijing time. - In a post on popular domestic microblogging platform Weibo, a picture showing CATL's power exchange station looking somewhat rough was recently exposed. CATL responded on Monday: “This is a test station, which is different from what we will release on Tuesday.” Original Source : https://pandaily.com/catl-to-unveil-battery-swap-brand-evogo/ OLA ELECTRIC SCOOTER PRODUCTION SOARS, OPENING NEW PAYMENT WINDOW - Despite running into initial delays, Ola has significantly ramped up production of its high-speed smart electric scooters. Now the Indian company says it will be opening up a new payment window soon to complete more orders of its Ola S1 and S1 Pro electric scooters. - Production rates appeared to have soared though, as the company boasted a daily rate of nearly 1,000 scooters at the beginning of the year. - The scooters are produced in a megafactory known as the Ola Futurefactory. It has an intended designed capacity of two million electric scooters per year, or around 5,500 per day. Original Source : https://electrek.co/2022/01/14/ola-production-blows-past-1000-electric-scooters-per-day-opening-more-orders-soon/ JAGUAR I-PACE SALES SHRUNK TO BELOW 10,000 IN 2021 Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/561066/jaguar-ipace-sales-2021/ PRODRIVE FEARS AUDI COULD "KILL" DAKAR COMPETITION IN 2023 Original Source : https://www.motorsport.com/dakar/news/prodrive-audi-kill-competition-2023-dakar/7275480/ EV SALES CAN OVERTHROW GAS-GUZZLERS IN EUROPE BY 2025, STUDY FINDS   Original Source : https://thenextweb.com/news/ev-sales-can-overthrow-gas-guzzlers-europe-2025-study-finds WHAT ELECTRIC VEHICLE TO BUY? FINALLY TV ADS CAN HELP Original Source : https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-15/what-electric-vehicle-to-buy-finally-tv-ads-can-help QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What TV, Print or Digital advertising have you seen for EVs recently which you noticed, or thought was memorable? Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

Radio Giga
Apple Watch zum Spottpreis: Aldi verkauft Smartwatch für kleines Geld

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


Es soll eine Apple Watch sein? Dann habt ihr im neuen Jahr Glück: In Kürze bietet Aldi die Kult-Smartwatch für kleines Geld an. Wir sagen euch, ob sich der Deal lohnt – denn zwei Einschränkungen gibt es beachten.

The Apple WatchCast Podcast - A podcast dedicated to the Apple Watch

Apple Fitness+ adds new Time to Run workouts, Uber parks its Apple Watch app, Apple puts Beddit to rest, Body Temp Sensor may not be in Series 8, and Prince of Persia on your Apple Watch, no app required. Plus reviews of Scribd, an update on the Mach-e and what those green and red lights on your Apple Watch mean.

Radio Giga
Donnerstag bei Aldi: Smartwatch für unter 25 Euro – lohnt sich der Kauf?

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022


Wer sich eine Apple Watch kaufen möchte, der muss um die 400 Euro auf den Tisch legen. Aldi geht einen ganz anderen Weg und verkauft in der nächsten Woche eine Smartwatch für unter 25 Euro. GIGA verrät euch, was ihr bei dem Preis erwarten dürft.

Radio Giga
Der Apple Watch gehen die Apps aus: Hat die Smartwatch ein Problem?

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022


Sprechen wir über erfolgreiche Smartwatches, kommen wir an der Apple Watch nicht vorbei. Der smarte Begleiter ist nicht nur erfolgreich, sondern führt die Branche explizit an und dominiert die Verkaufszahlen. Dennoch verabschieden sich immer mehr Apps, entsagen die Unterstützung. Ob dies ein Problem ist, kläre ich jetzt in der aktuellen Ausgabe der Wochenendkolumne.

More Than Just Code podcast - iOS and Swift development, news and advice

We're back for 2022, to follow up on buying a MacBook Pro, and Apple suing NSO Group. Tim and Mark discuss migrating a Core Data app from Objective-C to SwiftUI. We discuss the 15th anniversary of the iPhone announcement, Uber parks its Watch app, and 9 to 5 writes about Watch app abandonment. Introducing Swift for Visual Studio Code. How do Verifiable Vaccination Records with SMART Health Cards Work? Wordle copycat creator apologizes for ripping off the popular free word game. Picks: Swift Playgrounds 4.0, Headfirst SwiftUI, Apple Design Resources (updated), Springboard: the secret history of the first real smartphone.

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Full Show - What's An Apple Watch For?

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 103:48


We discuss Nick's Dear Redacted, what does having an Apple Watch do for you, and another round of Joke Court. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

9to5Mac Daily
January 14, 2022 – iOS 15 adoption, iPhone 14 cameras

9to5Mac Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 7:38


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from 9to5Mac. 9to5Mac Daily is available on iTunes and Apple's Podcasts app, Stitcher, TuneIn, Google Play, or through our dedicated RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. Sponsored by HabitMinder: Change your habits, change your life. HabitMinder helps you form healthy habits and stay accountable. Get started for free on iOS, Mac, and Apple Watch. New episodes of 9to5Mac Daily are recorded every weekday. Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes/Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories discussed in this episode:   Apple says iOS 15 adoption is lower than usual, but here's why TSMC reports record profits, has big expectations and big plans iPhone 14 Pro rumored to feature the first rear-camera megapixel increase since iPhone 6S Enjoy the podcast?: Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Daily! Follow Chance: Twitter: @ChanceHMiller Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Overcast RSS Stitcher TuneIn Google Play Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at happyhour@9to5mac.com. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

The CultCast
We've got more intel on iPhone 14 + Apple's secret FOLDING iPhones (CultCast #527)

The CultCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 61:28


This week: iPhone 14 Pro could pack strange ‘hole + pill' screen cutout to replace notch Apple continues testing multiple folding iPhone prototypes Apple's first headset could be 3 years ahead of rivals in computing power Apple VR headset won't create a full metaverse Apple's fancy Polishing Cloth is finally back in stock Apple loses head of Mac chip design to Intel This episode supported by Easily create a beautiful website all by yourself, at Squarespace.com/cultcast. Use offer code CultCast at checkout to get 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain. Cult of Mac's watch store is full of beautiful straps that cost way less than Apple's. See the full curated collection at Store.Cultofmac.com CultCloth will keep your iPhone 13, Apple Watch, iPad, glasses and lenses sparkling clean, and for a limited time use code CULTCAST at checkout to score a free CarryCloth with any order at CultCloth.co. This week's stories iPhone 14 Pro could pack strange ‘hole + pill' screen cutout to replace notch It was previously believed that Apple would use a hole punch cutout, like a lot of rival smartphone makers. Then that changed to a pill-shaped camera cutout. Now, one analyst, who has proven reliable in the past, says we should expect both. “We now believe Apple will have a hole + pill design on the iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max models,” tweeted Ross Young, CEO of Display Supply Chain Consultants, on Wednesday. “The smaller hole will not be invisible.” Apple continues testing multiple folding iPhone prototypes Word that the iPhone-maker continues working on folding handset comes from Dylandkt in a thread on Twitter: "For those who are curious about a foldable iPhone, Apple is definitely working and testing multiple prototypes that contain foldable displays. Too many compromises still exist with foldable display technology though. Apple's first headset could be 3 years ahead of rivals in computing power Apple's first mixed-reality headset will ship with the same 96W power adapter that you get with some 14-inch MacBook Pro models, according to an analyst, who says that's proof the device will pack plenty of computing power. Apple VR headset won't create a full metaverse While Apple is creating a VR headset, it's reportedly not developing a complete virtual world for users. It plans on virtual reality games, video and other experiences. But these supposedly won‘t be connected into a single VR metaverse. Apple's fancy Polishing Cloth is finally back in stock Sick of sticky smudges all over your Apple devices? The company's pricey Polishing Cloth is now back in stock for those who didn't get a chance to buy one before it quickly sold out last fall. GIVEAWAY Win a Journey 3 in 1 Wireless Charging Station for all your Apple gear [Cult of Mac giveaway] Apple loses head of Mac chip design to Intel – erfon The person responsible for overseeing the transition from Intel to Apple silicon left the company. Jeff Wilcox was Director, Mac System Architecture before his departure.

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast
#202: The $200 Tampon

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 89:53


#200: The fallacy of the "Celebrities Who Die In Threes" theory; Skeery discovered why you should never get drunk wearing an Apple Watch; Brody had his pipes cleaned- so to speak; Skeery's observation of the new old drink trend that's suddenly everywhere; a check in with the Abe 77 Voicemail Hotline; listener email Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1728: How Age Affects Your Ability to Build Muscle, The Best Workout Shoes, the Truth About Fitness Trackers & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 84:37


In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin answer Pump Head questions about only feeling back squats in the quads, how much age influences the ability to make muscle and strength gains, the value of fitness trackers like Whoop and Apple Watch, and the best workout shoes. Mind Pump Fit Tip: Contrary to popular belief, the best thing you can do for your immunity is to be fit, healthy, and lean. (3:59) Justin's horse immunity. (9:26) How the CDC is now suddenly changing its tune. (11:33) Are gyms poised to see a surge? (15:33) Why is Nike coming after Lululemon? (18:44) When will the NFT bubble burst? (24:40) What will the future of the housing market look like? (31:10) How ashwagandha consistently raises testosterone in men with low testosterone. (33:12) How it's harder to gain body fat with protein than carbs or fats. (40:20) The Shadow Banned Club. (42:18) A conspiracy theory surrounding parallel universes. (49:37) What Mind Pump is watching on TV. (53:49) #Quah question #1 – I only feel back squats in my quads. Am I doing something wrong, or is that common with most people? (57:38) #Quah question #2 - How much does age influence the ability to make muscle and strength gains? (1:01:22) #Quah question #3 – What are your thoughts on fitness trackers like Whoop, Apple Watch, etc.? (1:08:45) #Quah question #4 – What are the best workout shoes? (1:14:49) Related Links/Products Mentioned January Promotion (#1): NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS SPECIAL BUNDLE OFFERS January Promotion (#2): MAPS Anabolic 50% off **Code “JANUARY50” at checkout** CDC Director: Over 75% Of COVID Deaths In Vaccinated Had ‘At Least 4 Comorbidities' Walensky says Sotomayor's pediatric COVID hospitalization number was off dramatically Expert Ratings For Planet Fitness Mind Pump#1572: Is Tonal Worth The Money? With Aly Orady Mind Pump #1280: COVID-19 – The Death Of The Gym Industry? Nike sues Lululemon for patent infringement for the company's Mirror Home Gym and connected apps The Fight Before Christmas (2021) - IMDb Convicted Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes will spend the summer a free woman after a judge set her sentencing for late September All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg Summary of Ashwagandha Visit Organifi for the exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “MINDPUMP” at checkout** The effects of psilocybin on cognitive and emotional functions in healthy participants: Results from a phase 1, randomised, placebo-controlled trial involving simultaneous psilocybin administration and preparation Visit Magic Spoon for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Facebook parent company Meta to expand in Austin, leasing high-rise A Man find in Mexico a Nazi coin of the year 2039, a test of time travel or a parallel universe? Operation Highjump - The Black Vault Philadelphia Experiment - Wikipedia The Book of Boba Fett | Disney+ Originals The Righteous Gemstones (HBO) - HBO Max Visit LivON Labs for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! 3 Best Secrets - How To Make Your Butt Grow (AVOID MISTAKES!) | MIND PUMP TV Is it Harder to Put on Muscle as You Age? - Mind Pump Blog Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources

Do By Friday
Backsolve to Normal

Do By Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 99:59


This week's challenge: use a blood oximeter for biofeedback.You can hear the after show and support Do By Friday on Patreon!------Edited by Quinn RoseEngineered by Cameron Bopp------Show LinksIndulgence - WikipediaAmazon.com: Infowars Life - Ultimate Bone Broth (15 Servings, Chocolate) – Bone Broth Protein Powder with Collagen, Turmeric Root, Chaga Mushroom, Bee Pollen & Other Ancient Super-nutrients : Health & HouseholdUrban Dictionary: mann's assumptionReconcilable Differences - Relay FMHandkerchief code - WikipediaUrban Dictionary: Cuffing SeasonHomeControl Menu for HomeKit on the App StoreIDEVICES IDEV0002ANP5 Socket-Wi-Fi Light Bulb Adapter Works with HomeKit, Amazon Alexa & The Google Assistant, Small - - Amazon.comAmazon.com: NANOLEAFLongform Podcast #471: Sarah Marshall · LongformIt's Always Sunny in Philadelphia: Dennis and Dee on Welfare - Pt 1 - YouTube(12) In It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, the 'welfare store' contains the same people 10 years apart. : TVDetailsCharlie & Waitress Cartoon - YouTubeTop ScallopsSurvivor 41 Contestant Sets The Record Straight On Alleged Argument With Jeff Probst About The Hourglass Twist | CinemablendFormer 'Survivor' Player Shares What's Wrong With the Show - Season 41Car Pranks - YouTubeWhy Do Paper Cuts Hurt So Much? | Mental FlossUse Focus on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch - Apple SupportHow to use iOS 15's new Focus modes - The VergeHow to Automatically CHANGE your WALLPAPER with FOCUS Modes on iOS 15 - YouTubeObsidianKarl Ove Knausgård - WikipediaElena Ferrante - WikipediaThe Elements of Style, Fourth Edition: Strunk Jr., William, White, E. B., Test Editor, Angell, Roger: 7447521286972: Amazon.com: BooksOscar Wilde - WikipediaNauseous vs. Nauseated: What's the Difference? | GrammarlyPersonal Productivity | 43 FoldersChicago-style pizza - WikipediaThe Chicago Manual of Style - WikipediaYARN | Oh, that's funny, Bullseye. | Toy Story 2 (1999)Merlin's Wisdom Project (Draft)Strong Coffee Company - The World's Premier On-the-Go CoffeeAbed (Darkest Timeline) | Community Wiki | FandomPam Quote #336 - The Office - TV QuotesYARN | You play the opponent, not the cards. | The Office (2005) - S07E02 CounselingU-Haul Lesbian Moment | Do By FridayDerry Girls - WikipediaKurt Vonnegut: 8 Basics of Creative Writing - Gotham Writers WorkshopDreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style: Dreyer, Benjamin: 9780812995701: Amazon.com: BooksMark Forsyth 3 Books Collection Set (The Etymologicon, The Elements of Eloquence & Horologicon): Mark Forsyth: 9789123918348: Amazon.com: BooksWhat the difference between vers and switch? : bisexualAmazon.com : Masimo MightySat Fingertip Pulse Oximeter | Monitor Blood Oxygen & Heart Rate | Hospital Grade Technology : Sports & OutdoorsBiofeedback - WikipediaSleep Watch by Bodymatter on the App StoreBox Breathing: Getting Started with Box Breathing, How to Do It, Benefits and TipsGuide to Musical Rests: 8 Types of Rests in Sheet Music - 2022 - MasterClassHow to Read Piano Sheet Music: 7 Elements of Sheet Music - 2022 - MasterClassHow to Read Sheet Music: A Step-by-Step Guide – Musicnotes Now(Recorded Wednesday, January 12, 2021)Next week's challenge: make a new Apple Watch face.

9to5Mac Daily
January 13, 2022 – iPhone 14 design rumors, iOS 15.2.1 release

9to5Mac Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 7:28


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from 9to5Mac. 9to5Mac Daily is available on iTunes and Apple's Podcasts app, Stitcher, TuneIn, Google Play, or through our dedicated RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. Sponsored by HabitMinder: Change your habits, change your life. HabitMinder helps you form healthy habits and stay accountable. Get started for free on iOS, Mac, and Apple Watch. New episodes of 9to5Mac Daily are recorded every weekday. Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes/Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories discussed in this episode:   Apple releases iOS 15.2.1 with bug fixes for CarPlay and Messages Microsoft poaches key Apple semiconductor engineer as it ramps up in-house chip design iPhone 14 Pro now rumored to feature 'hole + pill design' Apple confirms iOS 15.2.1 patches HomeKit denial of service vulnerability Enjoy the podcast?: Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Daily! Follow Chance: Twitter: @ChanceHMiller Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Overcast RSS Stitcher TuneIn Google Play Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at happyhour@9to5mac.com. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

9to5Mac Daily
January 12, 2022 – App Store regulation, Apple and the metaverse

9to5Mac Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 7:20


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from 9to5Mac. 9to5Mac Daily is available on iTunes and Apple's Podcasts app, Stitcher, TuneIn, Google Play, or through our dedicated RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. Sponsored by HabitMinder: Change your habits, change your life. HabitMinder helps you form healthy habits and stay accountable. Get started for free on iOS, Mac, and Apple Watch. New episodes of 9to5Mac Daily are recorded every weekday. Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes/Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories discussed in this episode:   Apple puts Beddit to rest as Apple Watch Series 8 rumors suggest upgraded sleep tracking Report: Apple Headset not an 'all-day device,' creating a metaverse 'off limits' Kuo: Apple AR/VR headset will charge using same 96 W power adapter as MacBook Pro Third-party App Store payments in Korea: Apple will comply Enjoy the podcast?: Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Daily! Follow Chance: Twitter: @ChanceHMiller Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Overcast RSS Stitcher TuneIn Google Play Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at happyhour@9to5mac.com. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

Marked Safe: A Disaster Podcast
Figure It Out, Amanda!: Apple Watch Survival Stories

Marked Safe: A Disaster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 63:20


This week, Melanie's the ho, the midwest abandons God, Brianne gets a little defensive, Melanie has advice about boning, Captain Nash saves a life, and we're all on the same page about Ohio.Content warnings: pregnancy loss, loss of pet, near-drowning, COVID-related isolation, broken bones.Links:Apple Confirms #TattooGate Problem is RealApple WatchApple Watch 4 Adds ECG, EKG, and More Heart-Monitoring CapabilitiesApple Watch fall detection helps save life of 92-year-old farmer after fall from a ladderApple Watch helps track down missing Victorian father and son | 7NEWSApple Watch saves life of 92-year old Nebraska farmer who fell 21 feet from ladderApple Watch Series 7 | 911 | AppleBike crash left Spokane man unconscious, so his Apple Watch called 911 Florida woman meets 'angel' 911 operatorFlorida woman recounts moments leading up to her rescue from submerged carHow An Apple Watch Saved A Paddleboarder — And Could Help You, TooHow #tattoogate has highlighted a wider problem with wearablesiPhone and Apple Watch Help Florida Woman Escape Flipped, Sinking CarMan who fell through ice in Somersworth was rescuedMan who fell through ice saved by Apple WatchPaddleboarder rescued from ocean says Siri called 911Salsman, 92, recovering from 21-foot fallSaved by an Apple WatchSpokane man credits Apple Watch with saving dad's life after bike crashUse Emergency SOS on your Apple WatchVictorian father and son saved from drowning b

Loop Matinal
Quarta-feira, 12/1/2022

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 10:03


Patrocínio: Escritório Virtual nos EUA Passe ainda mais credibilidade aos seus clientes com um endereço físico e fiscal em Miami. Acesse: https://escritoriovirtualnoseua.com.br/ -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Uber desiste do app de Apple Watch: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/10/22877023/uber-apple-watch-app-discontinued Spotify fecha estúdio de podcast: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/11/22877242/spotify-studios-four-lay-off-original-podcast Anatel homologa o Galaxy S22: https://tecnoblog.net/noticias/2022/01/11/exclusivo-galaxy-s22-e-homologado-pela-anatel-e-vem-sem-carregador-na-caixa/ Samsung lança o Galaxy S21 FE no Brasil: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHKO4JAYvWU Google quer RCS no iPhone de qualquer jeito: https://9to5google.com/2022/01/10/google-rcs-imessage-android/ Facebook adia volta ao trabalho presencial: 
https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/10/facebook-meta-delays-office-return-to-march-covid-boosters-required.html Cofundador do Whatsapp vira CEO do Signal: https://9to5mac.com/2022/01/10/after-facebook-fallout-whatsapp-co-founder-now-the-ceo-of-signal/ LinkedIn ganhará salas de áudio: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/10/22876337/linkedin-launch-audio-events-clubhouse-twitter-spaces Policiais são mandados embora após caçarem Pokémons: https://boingboing.net/2022/01/10/top-los-angeles-cops-fired-for-ignoring-robbery-to-chase-a-snorlax-in-pokemon-go.html Take-Two compra a Zynga: https://www.b9.com.br/156456/dona-da-rockstar-compra-estudio-de-farmville-por-us-127-bilhoes/ AP terá NFTs de fotojornalismo: https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/10/22876993/associated-press-ap-nft-marketplace-xooa-blockchain-photo-journalism-funding Apple renova The Morning Show: https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2022/01/10/apple-tv-the-morning-show-e-renovada-para-a-3a-temporada/ Apple cobrará comissão para compras fora da App Store na Coreia: http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20220111000624 Apple descontinua o Beats Pill Plus: 
https://www.theverge.com/2022/1/10/22876792/apple-beats-pill-plus-battery-powered-speaker-discontinued Beats Fit Pro ganha preço no Brasil: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2022/01/10/beats-fit-pro-chegarao-ao-brasil-por-r2-600-a-portugal-por-230e/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)
MBW 800: Medically Contraindicated - iMessages, T-Mobile & iCloud, Apple Watch Apps

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 172:10


iMessages, T-Mobile & iCloud, Apple Watch Apps iMessage is winning: teens dread the green text bubble After ruining Android messaging, Google says iMessage is too powerful Google exec says Apple is 'holding back' customers who text Apple to allow alternative payment system for 1st time in South Korea Developer exposes another multimillion-dollar scam app on the App Store T-Mobile says iOS 15.2 bug turning off iCloud private relay for some users Intel poaches Apple engineer responsible for arm transition and M1 chips Uber parks its Apple Watch app in the ever-growing junkyard Netflix cameras & image capture Spotify HiFi delayed indefinitely as the company says it has no 'timing details to share' LAPD cops hunted Pokémon instead of responding to a robbery Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Cleo Abram Goes Indie Andy's Pick: Multiclock Screensaver Alex's Picks: Mixbus VBM Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: newrelic.com/macbreak betterhelp.com/macbreak ourcrowd.com/mbw

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)
MBW 800: Medically Contraindicated - iMessages, T-Mobile & iCloud, Apple Watch Apps

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 172:58


iMessages, T-Mobile & iCloud, Apple Watch Apps iMessage is winning: teens dread the green text bubble After ruining Android messaging, Google says iMessage is too powerful Google exec says Apple is 'holding back' customers who text Apple to allow alternative payment system for 1st time in South Korea Developer exposes another multimillion-dollar scam app on the App Store T-Mobile says iOS 15.2 bug turning off iCloud private relay for some users Intel poaches Apple engineer responsible for arm transition and M1 chips Uber parks its Apple Watch app in the ever-growing junkyard Netflix cameras & image capture Spotify HiFi delayed indefinitely as the company says it has no 'timing details to share' LAPD cops hunted Pokémon instead of responding to a robbery Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Cleo Abram Goes Indie Andy's Pick: Multiclock Screensaver Alex's Picks: Mixbus VBM Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: newrelic.com/macbreak betterhelp.com/macbreak ourcrowd.com/mbw

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
MacBreak Weekly 800: Medically Contraindicated

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 172:10


iMessages, T-Mobile & iCloud, Apple Watch Apps iMessage is winning: teens dread the green text bubble After ruining Android messaging, Google says iMessage is too powerful Google exec says Apple is 'holding back' customers who text Apple to allow alternative payment system for 1st time in South Korea Developer exposes another multimillion-dollar scam app on the App Store T-Mobile says iOS 15.2 bug turning off iCloud private relay for some users Intel poaches Apple engineer responsible for arm transition and M1 chips Uber parks its Apple Watch app in the ever-growing junkyard Netflix cameras & image capture Spotify HiFi delayed indefinitely as the company says it has no 'timing details to share' LAPD cops hunted Pokémon instead of responding to a robbery Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Cleo Abram Goes Indie Andy's Pick: Multiclock Screensaver Alex's Picks: Mixbus VBM Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: newrelic.com/macbreak betterhelp.com/macbreak ourcrowd.com/mbw

Radio Leo (Audio)
MacBreak Weekly 800: Medically Contraindicated

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 172:10


iMessages, T-Mobile & iCloud, Apple Watch Apps iMessage is winning: teens dread the green text bubble After ruining Android messaging, Google says iMessage is too powerful Google exec says Apple is 'holding back' customers who text Apple to allow alternative payment system for 1st time in South Korea Developer exposes another multimillion-dollar scam app on the App Store T-Mobile says iOS 15.2 bug turning off iCloud private relay for some users Intel poaches Apple engineer responsible for arm transition and M1 chips Uber parks its Apple Watch app in the ever-growing junkyard Netflix cameras & image capture Spotify HiFi delayed indefinitely as the company says it has no 'timing details to share' LAPD cops hunted Pokémon instead of responding to a robbery Picks of the Week Rene's Pick: Cleo Abram Goes Indie Andy's Pick: Multiclock Screensaver Alex's Picks: Mixbus VBM Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: newrelic.com/macbreak betterhelp.com/macbreak ourcrowd.com/mbw

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
"Different every step of the way" - A Dexcom G7 Update (and more) with CEO Kevin Sayer

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 32:24


This week, Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer spoke to the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference about the G7 and beyond. We talk about information from that presentation and get to as many of your questions as time allows. This interview took place on Tuesday Jan 11 and much of what we discussed isn't FDA approved. Dexcom presentation info here Club1921 info here  Our usual disclaimer: Dexcom is a sponsor of this podcast, but they don't dictate content and they don't tell me what to ask their executives. Recent Dexcom episodes: CTO Jake Leach talks about Garmin, Dexcom One & more CEO Kevin Sayer talks about G7, Direct to Watch, Adhesive and more CEO Kevin Sayer talks about Dexcom in Hospital, G7, VA program and more Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Episode Transcription Below  Stacey Simms 0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom and by Club 1921. Where Diabetes Connections are made This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. Welcome to another week of the show. You know I'm always so glad to have you here. We aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And I'm talking with Dexcom CEO this week, it's Kevin Sayer, he is back to check in with us again. And in the interest of getting this episode out to you as soon as I could. It might sound a little different right here at the beginning. But Dexcom episodes are always so high interest that it really merits a quick turnaround. I didn't want to sit on this interview for a week. So here's the setup. Dexcom CEO Kevin Sayer gave a presentation to the JP Morgan healthcare conference, if you're listening as this episode goes live, that was just Monday of this week, January 10, the interview you're about to hear took place on Tuesday, January 11. My usual disclaimer Dexcom is a sponsor of this podcast, but they don't dictate content and they don't tell me what to ask their executives. I asked the Diabetes Connections podcast Facebook group for questions. And Whoa, boy, did you have a lot as always not a surprise. And I really appreciate you sending those in, I got to as many as I could, while also trying to include what the folks at Dexcom had really asked me to bring up there are some topics that they wanted Kevin to make sure to address. And I think we do a pretty good job of trying to reach a balance here. Kevin, welcome and Happy New Year, Kevin Sayer 1:46 and Happy New Year to you. Stacey Simms 1:48 Thank you. Well, this seems to have started out in pretty happy way on the headline, just from this week. Dexcom CEO touts unprecedented performance of G7 in clinical trial. This is after your talk at the annual JP Morgan healthcare conference. Tell me a little bit about that unprecedented performance data. Kevin Sayer 2:08 I'm happy to. And I just have to qualify it by saying no, I can't send it to all your listeners at the end of the call yet. We're still waiting for approval in Europe. And we have filed this with the FDA, I'm going to take you back a little bit, we made a decision when we were going through the G7 development process that we wanted to answer that performed better than G6. And all of our scientists looked at us and they go oh, really, you're sure because this is really good. And so we spent a lot of time new algorithms and new manufacturing techniques, there's a lot of things in G7 that make it different. We also wanted to validate that performance with a study that was so large, nobody could refute it. So as you look at the data that I presented at the conference yesterday, over 300 patients 39,000 Match pairs all across since one ranges and on the I CGM standard side, but with the 5% 95% lower bound, and even the absolute points, you can see we are well within all of the iCGM standards, which are very technical and actually are a very good measure of how a sensor actually performs in reality. And they were very thoughtful in developing these standards to try and pick the centers that don't work to put you statistically in a bind to whereby if you really aren't performing in the low range or wherever, you're not going to get that iCGM designation. We're very comfortably there. And the overall MARD in the study, Stacey is eight point, you know I it's in the low eight for adults and pediatrics. And if you start looking at the data, we gather the data sets in three periods, you know, days one and two, the middle days, four, or five and six, and the last days nine and 10. It's pretty low, I think it's below 10. In the first group a day, the first days, which are always a little bit higher, traditionally in our centers than the other days. But in those middle and end days, it's it's near seven, and strips for six. I mean, we have done something that I've been in this business for since 1994. I didn't think we'd ever do this when I started. As far as being this good. This is really, really good data. And we're going to continue to deliver the experience to our customers that they demand from us. So as you can as you think about an iCGM that's driving an automated insulin delivery system. And not only is the performance great, the user where it's 60% smaller, it's a 30 minute warm up. It's a new app. From our perspective, we've got a lot of the clarity data, your listeners will know about clarity. We've got a lot of your clarity data right on the app. There's new alarm configurations. Stacey Simms 4:48 I'm gonna just jump in with a couple of quick clarifications before we go on. You mentioned a number of there that went by quickly I apologize when you talked about the 300 people in this trial 39,000 match what I missed that one Kevin Sayer 5:00 matched pairs. That's where you compare the CGM value to the blood glucose value from the laboratory instrument. So the way our studies work is literally we draw blood samples from the individuals in the study at intervals, and then we actually match the CGM data to that laboratory blood instrument. So 39,000 points from these 300 people in this study were matched. Got it? Stacey Simms 5:27 And you mentioned the MARD mean absolute relative difference. Most of you, as you listen are very familiar with this, the lower the better for CGM G6, I, my understanding was G6 was in the low nines. This is 8.1 for peds. 8.2 for adults, as I'm reading it, that's right. I know you can't tell me I'll ask you anyway, why? What made the difference here? Is it sighs is it algorithm? Do you have anything you can point to? Or is that a trade secret Kevin Sayer 5:49 it's combination, I think the algorithm has been the most, the algorithm changes were really extensive here. And, you know, we always have manufacturing processes to get better, the way we build the G7 centers different in every step of the way. Literally, our G6 manufacturing processes go away and the G7 ones take over the summer, we're a little similar on the actual sensor wire itself, and that manufacturing, but everything else is different. We just think it it's smaller, it's a lot shorter than G6 was. And so it is it's going to be a completely different experience for everybody. Stacey Simms 6:28 So to go back to what you were talking about, before I jumped in there, you were starting to talk about alarms, is there something different for the alarm, Kevin Sayer 6:35 the app is different. And so access to them, and, and just how you use them, if we try to get to be more consumer, thoughtful, as we configured the alarms, we'll see how everybody loves him. It'll be interesting. The alarms are one of the things we get the most comments on when we launch a product initially, we try and please everyone, but we never please everyone. And then you get you know, the agency at one time. I don't know if your call. I think one of our other discussions, we had to make the mute override not work on the low end. Boy, we got a lot of people mad at us about that one. So we've tried to comply with what our users want, and also comply with what the FDA has asked us to do. But I think users will find the alarm experience. Good as well. I like I think it's just gonna be a home run. Yeah, well, I Stacey Simms 7:24 mean, my son would be happy if an alarm never made a noise again. And I know other people who put like it to alarm every time there's any movement. So I hear where you're coming from, can you give any insight into the G7 app in terms of what the differences that we may see as users? And I guess especially one of the questions I always get is about follow any changes of significance coming that you can share follows Kevin Sayer 7:47 on a separate software track. And so the G7 system, the app is just we tried to get more data in the app itself, versus what we have with G6. So a lot of the clarity data, or at least summary query data is sitting there right in your app. And that will be i we think people will like that just to see how they're doing over time you got your time in range data for, you know, three 714, you know, a month, 90 days, see how you're doing time in range wise and the app is other than that it's relatively similar. The startup is different and you know, in the interface is going to be different. I think over time, what you'll see with us is that app is now going to get more sophisticated, we changed the entire software platform for G7 and started over again, and we developed a software platform, we can now really change and add on to a lot easier than we could in the past. And so we're hoping to have more frequent software releases. But we've also learned that CGM is not like Battlestar Galactica game, a game where you want to get a new release every two weeks to fire everybody up. We can't do a release every two weeks, because people depend on this for their, you know, for their lives. And if you do too frequent releases, and you botch a release, you do some wrong, you remember what happened, if we ever make a mistake on the software, the data side, we can't do that. But we do want to add more features more quickly in this platform will enable us to do that. I think one of the things you'll see going forward on the software side, we really want to automate a lot of the tech support features. We've added some, you know, you can get FAQs right from the app now with respect to your sensor, but there are other things we think we can do tech support wise in the app that will you know, reduce everybody's burden. Nobody likes making a phone call and nobody likes picking up the phone. And when we have a sensor fail, and we do have sensors fail, it just doesn't make any sense that you have to call us if we've got data on a phone, it'd be much easier. For example, if we could diagnose that failure right on the app and go through a very quick process to why but where you could get one. I can't give a timeframe when all those things are going to come but the platform is robust enough that over time, we can add features like that. One of the other nice things about G7, since it's fully disposable, you know, every sensor has its own unique serial number. Whereas with G6, that same transmitters used with three months' worth of sensors. So it will be, it will be fun to be able to follow things like that and see how the sensors go through the channel where everybody gets attract things of that nature. So what we're really looking forward to the change in our business that G7 affords us. Stacey Simms 10:28 As usual, I have listener questions, I'm going to try to not repeat because you've been really accessible in the last year, we've talked to a couple of folks from Dexcom, besides yourself. So as you listen, if I didn't get to your question, or if you have a question, good chance, we actually answered it in the last year, year and a half. But given let me ask you about compression lows, because that's one of the things we had talked about, about testing the G7. Any update on that in these trials, if you lay on it, you know, circulation slows, and you can get a false reading any better with the G7 Kevin Sayer 10:54 part of the clinical study is in the compression, because you're pretty much sitting in a chair with a needle in your arm drawing blood. So I'm sorry, we can't really test that we'll learn more about compression when it gets in the field. My hope is that it isn't as much but I can't promise that because I don't know, we're not enough people. I think there are ways over time where we can manage compression better, I'm not going to get into all the science on the phone, believe it or not, I do spend a lot of time with the engineers on this specific issue. Because I have it happened to me from time to time too. So I will call them up say Hey, can we do X, Y or Z? And I think there are some some answers, but I can't give them away because I don't want to give away the playbook. So let's let's just see what we can do overtime on that one. Stacey Simms 11:42 Okay. All right. But you know, the next clinical trial just have them lean against the side of their bed. Kevin Sayer 11:46 We will we'll have to do well. Diffic very scientific. Stacey Simms 11:50 Another question came up, and I think I'm gonna knock wood. I think we've been very lucky on this. It's about new iOS launches from Apple. And I'll read the question and it'll tell you, briefly our experience. This person said Dexcom is part of the Apple Developer Network developers have access to new release such as iOS months before launch, why does Dexcom lag behind Apple iOS launches by months in terms of quote, approved use. And our experience, frankly, is that we have not had any issues Benny and I both have, we just got but as a 13. Plus, we both had very old phones. And we have a latest software and no glitches for us. But that's not everyone's experience, can you talk a little bit about that, Kevin Sayer 12:30 we do get the iOS versions in advance, and we do our best to comply with them, I would I would tell you that it isn't as simple as it's made out to be. And the iOS version that's launched isn't always exactly what we've worked on as they as they make tweaks, not big ones. But you also test for everything that you know about the new iOS versions, and sometimes are things that you don't know, that are in there that come back and may affect the app later on, which is why we delay a little bit, we try and go through every bit of testing that you can imagine. And I'll be honest with your users, Apple's made iOS changes, because of us, we have called up and said, Look, you got to do XY and Z here we have a problem. And they're very good to work with, they've not been difficult at all, you know, when you think about iOS and Android operating system and all the things that they impact. And it's very hard not to impact somebody adversely when you do a new iOS launch. And you know, the perfect example with us is the home you'd override journey that I brought up earlier. In the beginning, I believe the only app that can overcome the mute override within iOS is authorized manna in the beginning was Apple's alarm clock, but other people would go around it with their apps was a medical device, we can't do a go around, we have to make sure what we do is in compliance and known so they work with us very well to make sure we could do what the FDA wanted with respect to the mute button. And the same thing with Android on that, and that was a very difficult exercise. So if there's a delay, it's because we're taking time to see what might have been put into iOS that would change our app. And it just one more thing that will stop. new operating systems are often designed to minimize power usage to extend battery life. Oftentimes, minimizing power usage affects an app that has to be running continuously. And those are the types of battles that we fight are things that we have to make sure we test as a new iOS minimizes power usage. Just does that turn us off? Does it does that stop Dexcom? And we've had, we've discovered things of that nature where it could affect our app. So there you go. Long answers. All right. Stacey Simms 14:44 No, no, that's great. And you mentioned you've asked iOS you've asked Apple to make changes. I assume the alarm was one any others that you can share. Kevin Sayer 14:52 I know that nothing I could share. Nothing major that I like you said they're very cognizant of the Dexcom community there we are. You know, we're we're a very large part of the iOS, you know, we're pretty, it's pretty vocal group when it comes to iOS, Stacey Simms 15:06 pretty vocal group period, the whole community. Alright, we say that with love. So another question came from my group, which was about Sugarmate. This is a, I would describe it as a third party app that uses the Dexcom information. And now the real time API to display and and act on data in its own way, my understanding is that Tandem owns Sugarmate, just from way of background here. And you know, Dexcom owns a little bit of Tandem. So there's a relationship there. Can you speak a little bit about data sources, but the bottom line question here was using Sugarmate and the situation to ask you, does Dexcom feel like they own the patient data? Or do the patients still own their data, even when going through the Dexcom web API's, we believe Kevin Sayer 15:49 the patient's own their data, not us, let me rephrase that we believe the patient's control the use of their data, we are the stewards of that data sitting on our servers. And so we have a responsibility to maintain it and to keep it but where that data goes and where that data is used. We do believe, particularly if it's identified data, that the patient absolutely has complete control over that there's vector sugar made, it's interesting, it was not using API's before it was a like many and non authorized use of the data to display it in a different format that people quite candidly, mess, like better than looking at the Dexcom app. And that's fine. That's why we built the live API's, we made a server change to upgrade our server platform, again, more capacity, more safety, more redundancy. It's a project that's been going on for years. And we've come to the end of that project this year. And when doing so there were some technical issues with Sugarmate, they very quickly switched over to the live API's. And now this is an authorized use of the data based on platform and data pipes that we built. So we're willing to share the data with people when they want it. I think that's an attitude of Dexcom. That changed very much over the years, when we first started, we had a hard time with that concept. Because we worked so hard to invent this technology and gather this data, why would we share it with anybody and say, See, you remember the early days and Nightscout, they were mad at us, we were mad at that. Now, we're not mad at anybody anymore. I think it's important that the data sharing be structured and be used for good purposes. But you know, all in all, it's a, it's a good use of the data that we have, because these are still Dexcom customers. If you want to, you're still buying sensors and using them. It's not a bad thing. Stacey Simms 17:35 Let me ask you a question about the sensors. And this came up in the fall. I've seen it less since but it's still out there. And I don't know if this is something you can answer. But it seems that we have not received this. But it seems that some customers are getting the G6 sensors, the inserters brand new in the original packaging, but a new label on it that says this product meets shelf-life extension requirements. I'm your people I reached out to them in the fall, they told me the stickers, oh, you know, it's all legit. There are updated expiration dates. But I'm curious why this is happening. And you know, what is the shelf life of the G6, Kevin Sayer 18:10 I can tell you exactly what's going on, you do shelf-life testing for product as selling your product will last. And over the course of our product lifecycle, you trying to extend that shelf life through more testing to make sure the product still works for the same amount of time period, if you manufactured product with 12 months shelf life, and then extend that shelf life to 18 months. And it's still the same product and still same manufacturing process rather than unbox it, put it in a new box or throw it away, we put a sticker on the outside because it's same products been tested, it's been proven that it works for 18 months, that's not a problem. That doesn't mean that it's 18 months old, we never have inventory that sits around that long to my knowledge, but we do extend shelf lives, it's important for us to do that, with respect to the distribution channel, particularly as we go to the pharmacy, you know, in the drugstore and and our distributors, the longer they have, you know that they can keep product, the better. We don't want people throwing product away if they don't have to. So all that means is we've extended our testing and shown that the product still works for a longer period of time and wanted to to label the product accordingly. That's all Stacey Simms 19:17 Yeah, I think because it came at a time when there is nervousness just in general not just in diabetes about supply chain and, you know, scarcity concerns. It just seemed unexpected, if that makes sense. Kevin Sayer 19:30 Well I one of the reasons to extend life is in fact supply chain we don't have inventory issues with G6 you know G6 is a very very well running process right now and still, you know, the premier sensor on the market. In fact, we launched a G6 derivation product in Europe, these past three months called Dexcom. One a it's a cash pay product sold on the E commerce platform in four European countries say See now and it's a lower price and geographies. But we did a feature that we took away, share and follow. We're not connecting any devices. It's it's a simpler technology. And again, we have d six supply to be able to go and do things like that. And we are planning to have G7 capacity to do similar things. We are not shooting small on either front will have capacity on both sides. And, you know, listeners on a supply chain perspective, we have been extremely diligent with respect to components for our products. And right now we see things very good today. We my operations team has just been outstanding on this front. So knock on wood, no, no Dexcom problems today. Stacey Simms 20:40 All right, two more questions for you. As always, we're going to run out of time. And as you're listening, I would refer you again, we did have a conversation about Dexcom. One in a previous show. So I will link that up. This one is more of I've asked this, you answered it, but I still continue to get questions to please ask you please make sure when GS seven comes out that Medicare is taken care of? Kevin Sayer 21:00 Well, that is a great question. And I think we've learned from our mistakes in the past. So we will when we get G7 done, what we will do is we will file with CMS to get G7 reimbursement. That's a process that I've heard anecdotally takes three to six months. So if we can get it done in three months, we can't file with CMS until it's approved. But we'll file after approval, and then we'll go and it is our plans to have capacity for all of our US users. When we go it is not that Medicare delay for G6 was one of the most emotionally gut-wrenching things I've dealt with here, because you can't imagine how many emails I got. But we didn't have capacity, and we didn't have everything ready. We've learned from our mistakes. And we'll hopefully be ready to go to everybody. That's our plan right now. Stacey Simms 21:49 That's great. Okay, and my last question is, and I hate doing this to you, but I'm doing it anyways, look into the chapter, we're gonna look, we're gonna come at it sideways, because I did have one listeners and ask him what's planned for the g8? And I said, Come on, let's let him get the G7. Oh, you know what? I'm happy? You can answer that. Let's go for it? Kevin Sayer 22:07 Well, well, I'll give you two because we did lose some time in the beginning because my computer wasn't functioning properly. As we look to the future, we want performance to continue to be better. And then we ask ourselves, but we're getting to the point where as you get to an eight, Mar D, we're getting close to finger six, I don't know how much more of a gap there's going to be, as we look to the future, and even G7 derivatives, we want to go to a longer life, we want to go to 15 days rather than 10. We'll be running studies doing that over the next couple of years. We've got a couple of plans there. We're always looking to upgrade the electronics, and how much better electronics, you know, I know one of your bigger user complaints is connectivity and loss of data, how do we improve that experience for our customers to make that better over time? Because we can always be better. And phones change faster than medical devices? So what why do we put there, we're looking at ways how we can help the environment for future product launches again, and changes in the next platforms, G6 has a lot more materials than G7 does as far as just raw plastic. So how do we make an impact there? On the cost side, there's some form factor things that are pretty far out there that we look at that I won't go into that are really, really fun. We'll see if we had done that. And if they're feasible from a cost of manufacturing perspective, but again, we're now very much focused on customer preference, rather than can't we make this work well enough, you know, in my early days here, it's Can we can we just get this thing working well enough to whereby people can rely on it. Whereas now it's one of those features that are going to make it a more engaging experience. And the last one will be software and analytics and things like that, as I look out over time, do we end up with analytics to whereby we can offer our users a menu of choices on the software side to whereby they can get more if you want Dexcom when don't want to connect or talk to anybody? You can have that if you want something that literally literally analyzes every glucose measurement that you take and does something scientifically. How do you get there, I think there's a number of experiences we can develop over time for future product generations without changing the form factor. So I don't see any slowdown in investment on the r&d side. And on the product side, G6 is the best product out there now and G7 will just be better in every way. And then we just keep going from there. Stacey Simms 24:27 And I appreciate you answering that. Thank you. So if you keep going from there, this is the sideways kind of question I wanted to ask. Okay, go ahead. Okay. A couple of days ago, Abbott announced the idea of what they're calling Lingo, which is bio wearables that will track not only glucose, but ketones and lactate and alcohol. And they say these are not medical devices. You know, this is for people who want to be you know, ultra-marathoners and things like that. We're already seeing sensors used in that way right now. Any plans to do something like this? Kevin Sayer 24:56 You know what our electronics platform for G7 We could put any, if we could develop a sensor wire with membranes and analytes and such for to measure something else, it would fit right into G7. And we design G7. With that in mind, we have advanced technology work going on with the other analytes. But it's still an advanced technology phase, we have to answer a couple of questions. First, have we done all we're supposed to do on the glucose side? Before we run there, and we got a lot to do right now, Stacy, you've heard me talk on this call. And so we need to get done what we started, we need to get G7 launched, we need to scale it up and manufacture it in the 10s. And ultimately, hundreds of millions of products as we stand up a factory in Malaysia and get our Arizona facility built out even more. So we've got to get that work done. The second piece, I'm going to answer this in three pieces. The second piece is what is the commercial opportunity for each of those things. They did announce this line of sensors, but they're all individual sensors. So I've worn a lactate sensor, I'll be completely honest with you from the lab and seeing what it does to my workouts and it's very cool, I can see which workout is better than another one. But I'm not ultra-marathoner, I probably wouldn't change my life. But it was very interesting to look at. There are other scientific uses of black data, particularly in a hospital setting. But what is the market for those, and so we're gonna kind of take an approach, we'll continue to develop the science and if Abbott wants to go develop a market, I am happy to follow this time rather than create it, like we've done with glucose. The third piece of this is there are a lot of biosensors out there. Now, you have your Apple Watch, and Apple is continuing to gather more and more data or ranks, whoop bands, Fitbits, they're advertised on television all the time, I would love to incorporate data from these other sensing technologies into into Dexcom. And vice versa, share our data with those people, particularly as you head down the health and wellness path. And let's get some other people's sensors into our platform. In all honesty, if Abbott's really good at sensing these other things, we'll take that data on our platform and analyze it to if they want to, I guarantee you, that probably isn't gonna, gonna happen. But we would, you know, let's be open about this. We're going to get our glucose work done to because we've not seen an opportunity that exceeds this. Stacey Simms 27:13 Got it? Excellent. Well, thank you so much for answering that it really is so interesting to watch and to see if, as you say, if any of this really, really makes a difference commercially, if people do want to adopt it widely. You know, I think the jury's still out, so we shall follow. Kevin Sayer 27:26 Hey, thanks for having me again. Stacey Simms 27:27 Thank you so much. Have a great day. You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information at the episode homepage, diabetes, Dash connections.com. I'll have the transcription up as soon as I can. But again, quick turnaround on this episode. Thank you so much, again, for sending in the questions. Obviously, I didn't get to all of them. And if you're not in the Facebook group, that's generally where I asked for questions for this kind of thing. It's Diabetes Connections of the group. I'll link it up in the show notes. As always, I know not everybody's on Facebook, please feel free to always email me if you email me now about Dexcom. I'll save those questions until the next time we talk to them. It's Stacey at diabetes connections.com. Again, it's in the show notes and it's on the website. But I get it not everybody is on Facebook these days. To that point, at the very beginning of the show, in that little sponsor tease before things even begin, I mentioned club 1921. So let me tell you a little bit more might be an update for some of you. Maybe some of you are hearing about this for the very first time. Briefly, club 1921 is a website. It's a project I've been working on for a long time. And it is a place where anyone with any type of diabetes can find events anywhere in the United States. We are in beta right now. I invite you to go to the website club 1920 one.com. Until around, check it out. Let me know what you think we've immediately identified we went into beta, late last fall several things mostly about the signup that need to be fixed, those could be fixed by the time you log in, my guess is closer to the end of January. There's a little bit of confusion there. I'll explain in a moment. But other than that, it's pretty well set. The idea here is that instead of a Google Calendar or something like that, this would be a website where you go, you sign up, you tell us what kind of events you're looking for, and then you never have to come back, we'll email you automatically. When events that meet your criteria are edit, very easy. So you pick your type of diabetes, you pick your location, you pick which type of events you want, you pick your age, I mean, you can just say I want everything in every category you can kind of go through, but whatever you pick, and you can change those if you want to come back and change your filters, but whatever you pick, we will email you when those events are added. If you want to add events. There are two types of events you can add one we're very creatively calling events. This is your JDRF walk. This is your friends for life conference. This is your hospital education for people with type two. It's an event by an organization a was a staff an event where they expect lots of people or it's regularly scheduled, or there's a fee, that kind of thing. The other kind of events we're calling Hangouts. These are my favorite types of events. I love what we're calling Hangouts. This is your mom, coffee, your kid play date at a playground, you know, you're going out to a bar, post COVID, with your adult friends with type one, hang outs are not put on by an established organization. They're put on by people like you and me, we don't have a staff, we just want to meet people in our area. When you're adding those. That's where a lot of the confusion came up in the registration process. Because if you want to add events or Hangouts, you actually have to sign up in a different way. So I'm going to talk more about that as the weeks go on. We're fixing that part of the website. But if you try to sign up and you see some confusion, it may be because you are trying to add an event or a Hangout. If you want to just sign up to learn about the events and Hangouts, it should be pretty simple. But if it's not, if you have any questions, any suggestions, please let me know. Email me Stacey at diabetes connections.com. Pretty soon you'll email me Stacey at Club 1920 one.com You're going to be hearing a lot more about this because I'm so excited about it. Yes, I know, we might not have a lot of events this year, that's fine. We're going to have events, eventually, in the diabetes space. Again, we're gonna have lots of events, and social media, Facebook, even things like Eventbrite are a terrible way to get the word out about them. And it shouldn't be work to find them, you should be able to just raise your hand and say, I want to know about this stuff. And it should automatically come to you. And that's what I'm hoping to do here. Okay, back to our regular schedule with the podcast. We will have our Wednesday in the news that's live at 430. Eastern on Wednesday on YouTube and Facebook, and then 445 on Instagram. And then that turns into an audio podcast episode for Fridays. And hopefully next week, we're back to Tuesday and Friday. And we won't do any of this nonsense of pushing episodes around. But I do appreciate your patience. Again, I didn't want you to wait a week for this interview. All right, thank you as always to my editor, the very flexible and understanding John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. And thank you so much for listening. I'm Stacey Simms. I'll see you back here in just a couple of days until then, be kind to yourself. Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Babbage from Economist Radio
Babbage: The smartwatch will see you now

Babbage from Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:31


A new tech boom is disrupting medicine. We investigate how wearable trackers, such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch, could transform health care. And, could the devices help prevent the next pandemic? Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Babbage: The smartwatch will see you now

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:31


A new tech boom is disrupting medicine. We investigate how wearable trackers, such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch, could transform health care. And, could the devices help prevent the next pandemic? Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

9to5Mac Daily
January 11, 2022 – Apple Watch sensors, MLB negotiations

9to5Mac Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 6:47


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from 9to5Mac. 9to5Mac Daily is available on iTunes and Apple's Podcasts app, Stitcher, TuneIn, Google Play, or through our dedicated RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. Sponsored by HabitMinder: Change your habits, change your life. HabitMinder helps you form healthy habits and stay accountable. Get started for free on iOS, Mac, and Apple Watch. New episodes of 9to5Mac Daily are recorded every weekday. Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes/Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories discussed in this episode:   Report: Apple in 'serious talks' to broadcast Major League Baseball games starting next season Apple discontinues years-old Beats Pill+ Bluetooth speaker with no replacement Report: Apple still several years away from adding major new health sensors to Apple Watch Enjoy the podcast?: Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Daily! Follow Chance: Twitter: @ChanceHMiller Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Overcast RSS Stitcher TuneIn Google Play Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at happyhour@9to5mac.com. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

La Manzana Mordida
El Apple Watch se estanca

La Manzana Mordida

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 7:06


Malas noticias en la evolución de sensores de salud para el Apple Watch, así como la confirmación de una característica de pantalla del iPhone 14 Pro. De la misma forma, repasamos un posible cambio en futuros iPad, así como el diseño de la segunda generación de los AirPods Pro.- Hazte suscriptor VIP de La Manzana Mordida en https://bit.ly/lmmpremium - Visita nuestra web de noticias en lamanzanamordida.net- Suscríbete a nuestro canal de YouTube en https://bit.ly/YTLMM

The Dana & Parks Podcast
D&P Highlight: An incredibly eerie Apple Watch commercial.

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 12:19


Applelianos
7x51 iPhone SE 3

Applelianos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 65:40


Empezamos nueva semana con todas las noticias relevantes de Apple, hoy toca hablar del próximo iPhone SE 3, del Apple Watch y los próximos sensores, las operadoras están en contra de Private Relay, y un agujero en forma de cápsula en el iPhone 14. Esperamos que os entretenga. Un saludo Applelianos/as. //Enlaces de interés https://www.applesfera.com/iphone/iphone-se-3-tiene-fechas-para-su-presentacion-inminente-meses-marzo-abril-gurman https://www.applesfera.com/iphone/agujero-forma-capsula-iphone-14-para-reemplazar-al-notch-asi-puede-lucir-su-pantalla-rumores-aciertan https://www.applesfera.com/seguridad/private-relay-impide-a-operadoras-seguir-nuestra-navegacion-muchas-estan-pidiendo-que-se-prohiba-esta-caracteristica https://www.applesfera.com/rumores/sensores-revolucionarios-para-salud-apple-watch-estan-a-anos-distancia-mark-gurman //Donde encontrarnos Canal Twitch Oficial https://www.twitch.tv/applelianosdirectos Grupo Privado https://t.me/joinchat/5E0F_4C-r9xjNGM0 Canal Calidad FLAC https://t.me/ApplelianosFLAC Mi Shop Amazon https://amzn.to/30sYcbB Twitter Oficial https://twitter.com/ApplelianosPod Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/es/podcast/applelianos-podcast/id993909563 Ivoox https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-applelianos-podcast_sq_f1170563_1.html Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/2P1alAORWd9CaW7Fws2Fyd?si=6Lj9RFMyTlK8VFwr9LgoOw Youtube https://www.youtube.com/c/ApplelianosApplelianos/featured

Monday Morning Podcast
Monday Morning Podcast 1-10-21

Monday Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 69:30


Bill rambles about his vacation, the Apple Watch, and the great Bob Saget. Butcher Box: For a limited time ButcherBox is offering new members a great deal for the New Year! Sign up at ButcherBox.com/BURR, and you'll receive the Ultimate New Year's Bundle in your first box. Truebill: Don't fall for subscription scams. Start canceling today at Truebill.com/burr. It could save you THOUSANDS a year. Stamps.com: Sign up with promo code BURR for a special offer that includes a 4-week trial, free postage, and a digital scale. No long-term commitments or contracts See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

9to5Mac Daily
January 10, 2022 – Apple spring event rumors and more

9to5Mac Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 6:28


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from 9to5Mac. 9to5Mac Daily is available on iTunes and Apple's Podcasts app, Stitcher, TuneIn, Google Play, or through our dedicated RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. Sponsored by HabitMinder: Change your habits, change your life. HabitMinder helps you form healthy habits and stay accountable. Get started for free on iOS, Mac, and Apple Watch. New episodes of 9to5Mac Daily are recorded every weekday. Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes/Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories discussed in this episode:   Gurman: Apple likely to hold virtual event in March or April to announce iPhone SE 3 Spotify HiFi delayed indefinitely as company says it has no 'timing details to share' Apple Fitness+ expands with new Collections feature, 'Time to Run' Enjoy the podcast?: Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Daily! Follow Chance: Twitter: @ChanceHMiller Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Overcast RSS Stitcher TuneIn Google Play Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at happyhour@9to5mac.com. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

The Working With... Podcast
The Best Productivity And Time Management Habits

The Working With... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 14:36


Podcast 213 This week's question is about habits and more specifically the best habits to have for greater productivity and time management.   You can subscribe to this podcast on: Podbean | Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | TUNEIN   Links: Email Me | Twitter | Facebook | Website | Linkedin   The Working With… Weekly Newsletter The Time And Life Mastery Course The FREE Beginners Guide To Building Your Own COD System Carl Pullein Learning Centre Carl's YouTube Channel Carl Pullein Coaching Programmes The Working With… Podcast Previous episodes page   Episode 213 | Script Hello and welcome to episode 213 of the Working With Podcast. A podcast to answer all your questions about productivity, time management, self-development and goal planning. My name is Carl Pullein and I am your host for this show. Over the years I have been obsessed with time management and productivity, I have tried and tested multiple ways of better managing my time and my productivity. And from all that testing, I have learned that there are some hard and fast rules that, if followed, guarantees improvements in these areas.  I've spoken before about things like developing workflows, about making sure you plan the day the day before and keeping your task manager and calendar clean and tight. But of all the best methods, there is is one that stands out more than the others and that is the development of the right habits.  And that is what this week's question is all about. What set of habits should you adopt so that better time management and productivity becomes a habit, rather than something you need to think about. Now, before we get to this week's question, if you would like to receive all the content I produce each week in one convenient place, then subscribe to my weekly newsletter. Every Friday, I send out a newsletter that gives you all the links to things like my Youtube videos, my blog post and of course this podcast. Plus, I include one or two articles written by others that I have enjoyed reading as well as a couple of videos I have watched that have helped me develop my systems. PLUS… I also write a short essay each week that is exclusive to my newsletter that will give you tips and tricks to optimise your own productivity set up. And of course, it's all FREE. All you need do is sign up, which you can do from the link in the show notes. Okay, on with the show and that means it's time for me to hand you over to the Mystery Podcast Voice for this week's question This week's question comes from Julia. Julia ask, Hi Carl, I read Atomic Habits by James Clear over the Christmas break and that got be thinking about the best habits to help me become better at managing my time and getting more of my work finished. Do you have any thoughts on this?  Hi Julia, great question! Thank you for sending it in. Firstly, may I just say, Atomic Habits is one of the best books you can read if you want to transform your life as a whole, not just your productivity. I remember a few years ago I was struggling to fix my morning routine and make doing it consistent. After reading Atomic Habits I discovered the piece I was missing—something called “habit stacking” which was the missing piece to making it consistent.  Essentially habit stacking requires a trigger—in my case turning on the kettle in the morning to make my coffee, and then a sequence of little actions steps. So in the case of my morning routines, the turning on of my kettle leads to me doing my shoulder stretches while the kettle boils, which then triggers me drinking a glass of lemon water while my coffee brews, and once I have my coffee, I sit down either at my desk or on the sofa and write my journal for ten minutes.  I've got to say it really does work. Now, let's look at some habits you can develop that will massively improve your productivity.  Let' start with a simple habit. The habit of consciously closing out your day.  What do I mean by “closing out your day”? This means that at a specific time each day you stop and close down the day. It's where to put a hard border between your work life and your personal life.  While technology has done a lot to make our lives eminently more convenient and comfortable, it has also blurred the lines between our work life and personal life. This is not good for our mental and emotional wellbeing. There needs to be a time for work and a time for our personal activities. That could be doing some exercise or meeting up with friends. It's often these essential parts of our lives that get sacrificed on the alter of career development and business growth.  So, closing out your day is about drawing a line underneath your work and projects for the day so you can move to giving yourself some time.  A good closing down habit is to stop working on whatever it is you are working on. Then clearing your task manager's inbox. Then spending a few minutes planning out what needs to be done the next day. That involves looking at the tasks you have scheduled for the next day and your calendar for your appointments. You can prioritise your tasks and make sure you have sufficient time to accomplish everything you have planned for the day at this point.  Now, the benefit of this habit is you avoid worrying about what you have missed and what you have to do tomorrow. Just a few minutes at the end of the day going through what you collected in your inbox and looking at what you have scheduled for tomorrow calms your mind and allows you to properly shut down the work side of your life for the day.  What I notice about not closing out the day and planning the next, is your brain will randomly throw up thoughts about your work long into the evening and if you are particularly busy, it can have a negative affect on your sleep. You try to sleep but you are worrying about what you may or may not need to do the next day.  It's far better to get that sorted out before you finish the work day.  So habit number one - get into the habit of closing down the work day. That one habit alone will massively improve your productivity AND your focus.  The next habit I would recommend is to start the habit of journaling. A lot has been written about the benefits of journaling, but the biggest benefit for me is the focus and clarity I get from writing out what's on my mind.  If you include ten minutes of journaling in your morning routine you will get several benefits. The morning is when you are likely to be at your most creative—even if you are a night person—because as you begin to write you create a connection between your subconscious mind and the page. I cannot count the number of great ideas I've had from those ten minutes I write.  Now, I must confess, great ideas do not come every day—perhaps once or twice a month—but when they do, I often find myself switching from my journaling app to my notes and collecting the idea there.  But, perhaps the greatest benefit is the way journaling focuses you on the day. If you use a dedicated journaling app such as Day One, you can create a daily template. For me, my daily template includes a place where I can put my two objective tasks for the day—these are the tasks that I must complete that day, it also gives me a place to track my morning routines. For that I have a checklist to confirm I have completed my morning routines.  The benefit of this is I have record of what I have done, AND not done, so if I ever feel out of balance, I can go through my journal and see where the imbalance may have occurred. It's usually because I am not doing something important to me.  My journal is also my accountability buddy.  Last year was a torrid time for my exercise consistency. I really struggled to get back into my exercise routine after a Christmas break. Things did not start well. I strained my calf while out on my annual New Year's Day run which stopped me from running for two weeks. And we had moved house and the new environment caused me to drop out the habit of doing exercise in the afternoons.  I found I was berating myself almost every day and promising I would get back into my exercise routines the next day. This constant reminder eventually pushed me to solve this problem and by April I was getting back into the habit. By July I was back to where I wanted to be.  So habit number two; start journaling. It can be a little strange at first, but if you stick to it, eventually you will find you always have something to write about. Don't worry if in the early days you only write out the weather forecast or some news item. We all start there. Once you start doing this consistently, you will soon start writing out your thoughts.  Habit three is to write everything down. This has saved me so many time from missing something important. How many times have you agreed to a meeting and not written it down believing you will remember and at the appointed meeting time you get a call asking where you are? It's so easy to forget these things if we are not writing them down.  But it's more than that. If we don't have a trusted method of dealing with information our brains will try and do the job for you. The problem is our brains were never designed to store factual information in this way. Our 200,000 year old brain evolved to recognise patterns—it's what kept us alive on the open savannahs thousands of years ago. We recognised the pattern of some predatory creature stalking us for lunch. The crack of a twig or the russell of long dried grass.  If you think about all the information coming at us every second of the day through sounds, smells, sight and touch. It's impossible to be consciously aware of every information input. Pattern recognition is a far more effective way to alert us to danger or opportunity. Our brain automates the process and if a number of informational inputs come together at the same time that corresponds to a known danger or opportunity, you brain will make you consciously aware of it.  One the best things our ancestors have left us are their journals and notebooks. From Leonardo D' Vinci to Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin. People who changed the world captured every little idea and hypothesis into notebooks. We can go and see these notebooks and see how amazing ideas and inventions developed over time.  Now whether you collect everything in a paper notebook or a digital notes app doesn't matter. Choose something that works for you. Just make sure that you develop the habit of collecting everything. You can discard things later when you close down your day and clear out your inboxes.  I think of all the productivity tips and tricks I've learned over the years. Developing the habit of capturing everything has been the one that has had the biggest impact on my overall productivity. I would say I probably delete around thirty or forty percent of what I collect, but it very rare I miss something. If I do miss anything it was because I didn't write it down.  I've set up my phone and Apple Watch to be little collection tools. I use an application called Drafts which is a very powerful collecting tool available on all Apple devices (I've even done a series of videos on using Drafts for collecting)  Anything from my shopping list to tasks and notes are collected using Drafts or Siri in the case of my shopping list.  So the third habit I would suggest you develop is collect everything. Once it's written down and in a place your brain trusts you will look at later it will relax. Once you are in this habit, I can promise you you will find your stress levels reduce and you feel a lot more relaxed.  So there you go, Julia, three habits worth developing as we begin this New Year. Create a habit of closing down the day, begin journaling and collect everything in place you trust you will see later.  Those three little habits will give your productivity, mental well being and overall sense of accomplishment such aa positive boost.  Thank you, Julia for the great question and thank you to you too for listening. It just remains for me now to wish you all a very very productive week.   

9to5Mac Happy Hour
CarPlay complications, Lossless AirPods Pro, Apple Watch 911

9to5Mac Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 77:43


Benjamin and Zac discuss the divisive new series of Apple Watch commercials, intriguing rumors about Lossless music coming to AirPods Pro 2 courtesy of Ming-Chi Kuo, and whether the iPhone 15 will lose the physical SIM card slot. Plus, Zac poses a mysterious CarPlay riddle (find out the answer at the end of the show). Sponsored by LinkedIn Jobs: LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/HAPPYHOUR. Sponsored by Headspace: You deserve to feel happier, and Headspace is meditation made simple. Go to Headspace.com/MAC for a one-month free trial. Sponsored by BetterHelp: As a listener, you'll get 10% off your first month by visiting our sponsor at BetterHelp.com/MacHappyHour. Follow Zac Hall @apollozac Benjamin Mayo @bzamayo Read More Intel claims the new Core i9 processor is faster than the Apple M1 Max – but that doesn't mean much Report: Apple could launch an audiobooks service later this year The new Chipolo Card Spot brings Find My integration to your wallet This HomeKit bug could make your iPhone completely unusable; here are the details AAPL hits $3 trillion market cap, Apple now first company to reach milestone valuation Samsung unveils 2022 TVs with mini-LED panels, AirPlay 2, 144Hz refresh rates, NFT support, more AirPods with lossless audio support seem likely, but don't get too excited Report: iPhone 13 sales strong during holiday season, Apple's services business worth $1.5 trillion Kuo: AirPods Pro 2 to offer Lossless support, new form factor, more Apple shares real stories from Apple Watch users in new ‘911' video Listen to more Happy Hour Episodes Subscribe Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Listen to more 9to5 Podcasts Stacktrace Apple @ Work Alphabet Scoop Electrek The Buzz Podcast Space Explored Rapid Unscheduled Discussions Enjoy the podcast? Shop Apple at Amazon to support 9to5Mac Happy Hour or shop 9to5Mac Merch!

The CultCast
We've got NEW leaks on Apple's 2022 hardware (CultCast #526)

The CultCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 58:17


This week: Gurman's back at it laying out what we can expect Apple to release in 2022, plus new intel on AirPods Pro V2, a new cheaper Pro XDR Display, and we'll show you our favorite tech from CES 2022! This episode supported by Easily create a beautiful website all by yourself, at Squarespace.com/cultcast. Use offer code CultCast at checkout to get 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain. Cult of Mac's watch store is full of beautiful straps that cost way less than Apple's. See the full curated collection at Store.Cultofmac.com CultCloth will keep your iPhone 13, Apple Watch, iPad, glasses and lenses sparkling clean, and for a limited time use code CULTCAST at checkout to score a free CarryCloth with any order at CultCloth.co. This week's stories Gurman: iPhone 14 Models Without Notch, Redesigned MacBook Air With M2 Chip, and More to Launch in 2022 In the latest edition of his Power On newsletter, Bloomberg's Mark Gurman reiterated his expectations for new Apple products in 2022, including the iPhone 14 series, a redesigned MacBook Air with an M2 chip, an iPad Pro with wireless charging, and more. Redesigned AirPods Pro 2 will support high-quality lossless audio Apple will launch a second generation of AirPods Pro in the fall, according to an analyst who's also a reliable tipster. The upgraded earbuds allegedly will offer better sound than the current version, via support for lossless audio. And there reportedly will be other changes, too, including a new design. Apple's next desktop monitor could cost half the price of Pro Display XDR Apple's next desktop monitor won't be cheap, but it could be significantly less expensive than the high-end Pro Display XDR, according to a new report. Apple wins race to $3 trillion market cap Apple just became the first publicly traded U.S. company to be valued at a whopping $3 trillion. AAPL stock topped out at $182.88 a share Monday before dropping slightly, bringing the market cap back below the $3 trillion milestone. Win a Journey 3 in 1 Wireless Charging Station for all your Apple gear [Cult of Mac giveaway] The holidays are finally over, and if you were lucky enough to receive an Apple Watch, iPhone or AirPods as gifts, this latest giveaway is for you. Journey, a maker of innovative consumer electronics, is giving three lucky winners its 3 in 1 Wireless Charging Station. Comes in black or white, retails for $99.99 -- they are also having a 30% off sale right now. CES products This smart collar wants to be your dog's Apple Watch Most canine trackers use accelerometers and GPS sensors, but Invoxia has gone further with its new collar. The company, which makes a variety of location trackers, said it worked with board-certified veterinary cardiologists to develop deep-learning artificial intelligence (AI) that relies on miniaturized radar sensors for health readings. Targus backpack uses Apple Find My without AirTag You won‘t have to attach an AirTag tracker to the upcoming Targus Cypress Hero Backpack to locate it because it'll have Apple's Find My tracking technology built in. Schlage rolls out first smart lock in US to support Apple Home Key Schlage introduced the first smart lock in North America to support Apple Home Key — the Encode Plus Smart WiFi Deadbolt — on Tuesday at CES 2022. Samsung beats Apple to truly wireless charging over Wi-Fi waves Despite Apple's lengthy and ongoing efforts to deliver much-improved charging technologies, archrival Samsung has beaten Cupertino in the race for truly wireless charging. Except you won't find it in a smartphone … yet.

Accidental Tech Podcast
464: Monks at Drafting Tables

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 148:21


Follow-up: Stuart Hay on chroma sub-sampling, 4:2:2, 4:1:1, 4:2:0 Hyper Thunderbolt 4 Dock Hyper USB-C Media Hub A not-too-short aside about iPad connectivity and expandability Loopback David Smith’s tweet Audio Hijack Audiobus Drafting table Xcode and setting up for Apple Watch development (via Andy Norman) Slideshow App Recommendations Fotomagico Adobe Premiere Rush Canon’s flagship DSLR line will end… eventually. Single-lens reflex CES: QD-OLED TVs from Sony OLED explained Quantum dots explained Interview with Gary Geaves, VP of Acoustics at Apple MaxTech video Regarding latency About the UWB spectrum An aside about Apple TV interruptions Settings → Remotes and Devices → Bluetooth → Suggest Nearby AirPods #askatp: How much do we sleep? (via Nathaniel Gori) An aside about dog tracking collars fi — use the code NEWYEARS100 for $100 off. Not a sponsor. Promise. Post-show: Should Apple stop using leather? Thoughts on meat alternatives Late-episode follow-up: Fun Fact #52: We’re off Track Congratulations to David Sparks! Sponsored by: Squarespace: Make your next move. Use code ATP for 10% off your first order. Iodyne: Introducing the all-new Pro Data. Linode: Instantly deploy and manage an SSD server in the Linode Cloud. New accounts get a $100 credit. Become a member for ad-free episodes and our early-release, unedited “bootleg” feed! Become a member!

2 Guys Named Chris, Daily Show Highlights
Guess Who Wants An Apple Watch Now?

2 Guys Named Chris, Daily Show Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:02


Guess Who Wants An Apple Watch Now? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Correct Opinions with Trey Kennedy
Realistic New Years Resolutions, The Time I Worked With Antonio Brown, and The Apple Watch Commercial

Correct Opinions with Trey Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 74:12


Trey and Jake give their realistic New Year's resolutions. Trey reacts to an old commercial he did with Antonio Brown. The guys discuss the emotional Apple Watch commercial. http://www.truebill.com/trey Meet your personal finance manager http://www.outschool.com/trey $15 off your child's first class! Where Kids Love Learning chime.com/spotme Overdraft with No Fees liquidiv.com Code: TREY Make Your Water Work Harder Get 25% off Subscribe to the channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL3ESPT9yf1T8x6L0P4d39w?sub_confirmation=1 Love the opinions, but hate the ads? Subscribe to the ad-free version of Correct Opinions here!: https://correctopinions.supercast.tech/ Subscribe to Correct Opinions on Apple: http://bit.ly/COPodcast Buy my merch: https://fanjoy.co/collections/trey-kennedy Produced by: Trey Kennedy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Side Hustle School
#1831 - Q&A: “I'd like to sell an Apple Watch guide…”

Side Hustle School

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:22


Today's listener wants to make money helping people set up and get the best use out of their new smartwatch. What's the best course of action? Side Hustle School features a new episode EVERY DAY, featuring detailed case studies of people who earn extra money without quitting their job. This year, the show includes free guided lessons and listener Q&A several days each week. Show notes: SideHustleSchool.com Email: team@sidehustleschool.com Be on the show: SideHustleSchool.com/questions Connect on Twitter: @chrisguillebeau Connect on Instagram: @193countries Visit Chris's main site: ChrisGuillebeau.com If you're enjoying the show, please pass it along! It's free and has been published every single day since January 1, 2017. We're also very grateful for your five-star ratings—it shows that people are listening and looking forward to new episodes.