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American multinational consumer goods company

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Best podcasts about procter gamble

Latest podcast episodes about procter gamble

Channel Mastery
Keith Bornholtz, Gathr Outdors

Channel Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 27:41


  Episode Highlights: Hear how Gathr Outdoors rebranded and expanded its offerings with numerous acquisitions   CEO, Keith Bornholtz does a deep dive into his leadership theory, a new role with Gathr, and the importance of devotion in a passion-driven outdoor industry  And I think, at least for this business, it's just essential that that entrepreneurial passion and the spirit of each and every one of the brands continues to survive and thrive. As Gathr creates a larger community of brands, Bornholtz sees vital importance in bringing each brand's individualism into the greater vision of Gathr Outdoors.     Description: In this episode of the Channel Mastery Podcast, I sit down with Keith Bornholtz, the CEO of the recently rebranded Gathr Outdoors. Bornholtz has worked for years in passion-based industries with his work in the pet space and brings a fresh leadership style to the former MacNeill Pride Group. He speaks to the brand's recent acquisitions, CPG business model, three H leadership styles, outdoor industry growth, and much more.  Bornholtz, who has over 30 years of experience in branded consumer products, joins Gathr Outdoors from Central Garden & Pet, where he was President of the pet distribution business unit and led a five-year strategic transformation of their national multi-channel platform. Bornholtz previously held senior leadership positions at Yes To Inc., Big Heart Pet Brands, Clorox, and Procter & Gamble. Bornholtz is an executive leader with a progressive history of improved operating performance and increased enterprise value in multiple environments.  Topics covered:Three H leadership styles, Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG), passion-based businesses, passion-based industries, corporate conglomerate, MacNeill Pride Group, acquisitions, COVID, bicycling, outdoor, endurance sports, RV, industry growth, outdoor industry, pro and the enthusiast in the outdoor industry,   

Scaling Culture
Krispy Kreme: Culture Change Management & Hybrid Workplace - Episode 70

Scaling Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 45:50


Our guest is Badia Rebolledo Abud, Chief People Officer at Krispy Kreme. Badia offers three decades of extraordinary success in a series of high-level roles at top-tier companies that include Krispy Kreme, Beiersdorf, Siemens, BEDEK, Nestle, and Procter & Gamble. At Krispy Kreme, Badia's main focus is to build the Human Resource strategy for the region from the ground up for this food and beverage company, including an expansion roadmap and a cultural vision for the region. Prior to Krispy Kreme, Badia achieved over two decades of experience driving positive outcomes across Executive HR Leadership, Personnel Development, HR Technologies, Change Management, and Employee Relations. In this episode of Scaling Culture, Ron and Badia discuss: Why it's harder to change culture than to create it How to effectively create and implement change in the workplace environment How to develop a results-driven mindset The power of language and humbleness to be able to speak to employees' hearts  For more information about Badia, please connect with her on LinkedIn. For more information about our podcast or to purchase the Scaling Culture Masterclass online course please go to ScalingCulture.Org And if you're enjoying the Scaling Culture podcast, please subscribe and share. We'll be back soon with another incredible guest! 

Fitt Insider
116. Courtney Reum, Co-founder of M13

Fitt Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 31:09


Today I'm joined by Courtney Reum, co-founder of M13 — a brand development and investment company.    In this episode, we discuss the shifting venture capital ecosystem, trends in health and wellness, and the firm's investments in companies like Tonal, Headspace, and ClassPass. Plus, Courtney shares his frameworks for evaluating potential investments.    More from Fitt Insider    Fitt Insider helps operators stay informed and make better decisions. We produce a weekly newsletter and podcast, curate an industry jobs board, and invest in early-stage companies.   *** Subscribe to our newsletter: https://insider.fitt.co/newsletter/   *** Visit the jobs board: https://jobs.fitt.co/   *** View current investment and get in touch: https://insider.fitt.co/investments/   More from Courtney   Courtney Reum is an innovator whose goal is to create impact towards global change. In April 2016, Courtney co-founded M13, a Los Angeles based brand development and investment company that accelerates businesses at the nexus of consumer products, technology, and media. M13 focuses on building emerging entrepreneurial businesses, and will directly invest more than $100 million of investments over the next 5 years.    Courtney began his career as an Investment Banker at Goldman Sachs in New York, working with such brands as Procter & Gamble, Under Armour, and Vitamin Water. In 2007, following his career at Goldman Sachs, Courtney and his brother Carter Reum established VEEV Spirits with the goal of creating “a better way to drink”. Originally offering a first of its kind vodka alternative, VEEV Spirits quickly grew to be one of the fastest-growing independent brands in the country and later, with the addition of VitaFrute™ Cocktails by VEEV, the first line of organic ready-to-drink cocktails.  VEEV has been honored as the winner of the Technomic Fast 50 Award and by Inc. Magazine as one of the 500 Fastest-Growing Companies in the U.S. (#7 in the food & beverage category).     While growing VEEV, Courtney & Carter began investing and providing guidance as advisors and board members to emerging businesses. Some of their select early investments include Bonobos, Birchbox, Warby Parker, Pinterest, Lyft, Kevita, and Krave Jerky. In 2016, Courtney & Carter sold a majority stake of VEEV Spirits to a multi-national strategic buyer, allowing them to found M13 and focus on their entrepreneurial stewardship of consumer brands. M13 currently has investments in 100+ companies spanning consumer brands, media, and technology.    Courtney holds a B.A. with distinction from Columbia University in New York and is an alumni of Harvard Business School.  He is also an active member of the Young Presidents Organization (YPO) and has served as the President of the Bel-Air Chapter. Courtney was appointed as one of Mayor Eric Garcetti's Commissioners for the Los Angeles Convention Center & Tourism Authority and is philanthropically involved as a Board Member of the Los Angeles Opera and City Year, which helps underserved schools.    Courtney was named one of the 100 Most Intriguing Entrepreneurs of both 2014 and 2015 by Goldman Sachs at its annual Builders + Innovators Summit, featured in Inc's “500 fastest growing private companies in America,” and included in the Forbes “30 Under 30” list. Courtney serves as a contributing writer for Inc magazine and is featured in best-selling books such as Richard Branson's “Screw Business as Usual” and Blake Mycoskie's (TOMs Shoes) “Start Something that Matters.”    Finally, Courtney and his brother are the authors of the national bestseller Shortcut Your Startup, which was published by Simon & Schuster in January 2018 and aimed to share their insights and empower the next generation of entrepreneurs. 

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
Dr Cate Shanahan | How PUFA's Get Stored in Your Body Fat & Why The American Heart Association Is The Biggest Fake News Organization KKP: 356

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 66:29


Today, I am blessed to have here with me for a second time Dr. Cate Shanahan. She is the leading authority on nutrition and human metabolism. Free 7 Day Keto Challenge: http://www.ketokampchallenge.com A board-certified Family Physician with over 20 years of clinical experience, and NY Times bestselling author of The FatBurn Fix, Deep Nutrition and Food Rules, her expertise is fixing the underlying problems that cause metabolic damage and inflammation, leading to autoimmunity, weight gain, diabetes, cancer and accelerated aging processes. Her passion is helping people feel their best. After getting her BS in biology from Rutgers University, she trained in biochemistry and genetics at Cornell University's graduate school before attending Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She practiced in Hawaii for ten years where she studied ethnobotany and her healthiest patient's culinary habits.  She applied her learning and experiences in all these scientific fields to write Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food. Together with Dr. Tim DiFrancesco and NBA legend Gary Vitti, she created the PRO Nutrition program for the LA Lakers and helped forge a partnership between Whole Foods Market and numerous NBA teams.  In May of 2018 she begin  Director of Metabolic Health for ABC Fine Wine and Spirits, a progressive, family-run company interested in saving money by the betterment of health.  She's also the Medical & Scientific Advisor at CB Supplements, overseeing their premium-grade multi collagen protein, and for beliv, a forward-thinking Latin American beverage company.  In this episode, Dr. Cate explains how we are kept on an island of unhealthy seed oils. We chat about how these seeds oils are being stored in our body fat for years at a time and why extended fasts may not be safe for people who are not metabolically healthy. We talk about the differences between monounsaturated, saturated, and polyunsaturated fats. Then, Dr. Cate reveals how dietary linoleic acid omega-6 ends up in our membranes and inner fat cells. Tune in as Dr. Cate chats about the effects of fatty acids on mitochondria and why our mitochondria love a ketogenic lifestyle. Free 7 Day Keto Challenge: http://www.ketokampchallenge.com 90 Day Detox Program: http://www.ketokampdetox.com Order Keto Flex: http://www.ketoflexbook.com -------------------------------------------------------- / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  PureForm Omega Plant Based Oils (Best Alternative to Fish Oil): http://www.purelifescience.com Use ben4 for $4.00 off. Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  [01:30] When You're Scared of Fat, You'll Be Hungry For Processed Foods We are kept on an island of unhealthy seed oils by traumas around saturated fat and cholesterol. When you're scared of traditional fats, then that opens you up to being hungry for whatever the processed food companies want to feed you. Processed foods always have a lot of seed oils in them. Seed oils are truly toxic.   [06:50] The Differences Between Monounsaturated, Saturated, and Polyunsaturated Fats Monounsaturated is the main fatty acid in olive oil. The most common fats in seed oils are polyunsaturated. Saturated fats are the most common fat in coconut oil. It's also the most prevalent fat in butter. The difference between these fats chemically is the stability to heat. Saturated fats are the most stable and have an antioxidant effect. Polyunsaturated fatty acids oxidize and create oxidative stress.   [12:40] The Metabolic Pathway For How Dietary Linoleic Acid Omega-6 Ends Up In The Membranes and Inner Fat Cells You swallow a potato chip, and it gets broken up in your stomach a few hours later. Then it shows up in your intestinal tract where enzymes from your pancreas break apart the fats in there. Most of the fats are in the form of triglycerides. We have to use lipases in our pancreas to break it up. From there, it goes into the intestinal cells. Later, it gets picked up from your liver. The liver takes it all apart and repackages it in this thing called low-density lipoprotein.   [21:50] How Seed Oils Can Stay In Your Body For Extended Periods of Time Linoleic acid in our fat cells has a long half-life. Body fat is stuck with us until we use it. If you've been eating seed oils your whole life, it will take a couple of years for it to be gone. If you aren't metabolically healthy or fit, you shouldn't do extended fasts because they're releasing so many pro-inflammatory oils all at once.   [27:35] Should I Avoid Peanut Oil or Eat More Peanut Oil? Peanut oil is okay if it's unrefined. In fact, peanut oil is actually good because it's a traditional fat. Some peanuts have oil profiles that are more like olives. There's a lot of variables with plants, so it's hard to be absolute about anything. The best quality peanuts are the larger ones, and they do have a better fatty acid profile.   [33:15] Why Do Some People Think That Seed Oils Are Good For You?   The American Heart Association pumps out 13 journals either weekly or monthly. They're putting out hundreds of articles every year, funded by Procter & Gamble and other companies selling junk food and seed oils. The American Heart Association is giving out the wrong information. Dietitians are doing their homework; their job is to read the wrong pile of articles. The American Heart Association is the biggest fake news organization out there.   [36:30] Effects of Fatty Acids on Mitochondria: Implications For Cell Death Read the article Effects of Fatty Acids on Mitochondria: Implications For Cell Death: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12206909/ This study explains why people who have PUFA in their body fat will feel tired when they go on a diet. PUFA is a terrible fuel for your body cells. The mitochondria will stop producing energy when their fuel is PUFA. When people go on a diet, they feel like they can't do it anymore because they are so tired. Energy loss is a huge part of obesity.   [44:55] Why Ketones Are A Great Energy Source For The Mitochondria Ketones are designed out of your body fat. When you're burning your body fat, and your liver is healthy, it makes ketones for you. Ketones are like predigested fuel. Ketones are a better fuel, and our cells actually work better when they have access to that better fuel. Hearts that have access to ketones can actually pump 30% harder than hearts that don't.   [47:45] The Brain Needs Omega-3 and Omega-6: Here's What You Need To Know Your brain needs omega-3 and omega-6. However, your brain needs longer omega-3 and omega-6. Only fish and animal products can have long versions of omega-3 and omega-6. You have to have these enzymes that elongate them. If you've been eating too much seed oil, your enzymes are not functional, and they don't work very well. Fatty liver is such a devastating disease because it cannot elongate these fatty acids.   AND MUCH MORE!   Resources from this episode: Check out Dr. Cate's Website: https://drcate.com Follow Dr. Cate Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoctorCate/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/drcateshanahan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drcateshanahan/ Listen to Dr Cate Shanahan, The Fatburn Fix, 8 Fats to Avoid on Keto, & Metabolism Myths KKP:178: https://podcasts.apple.com/mn/podcast/dr-cate-shanahan-fatburn-fix-8-fats-to-avoid-on-keto/id1470779784?i=1000488992552 Read the article Effects of Fatty Acids on Mitochondria: Implications For Cell Death: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12206909/ Read The Fat Burn Fix: https://www.amazon.com/Fatburn-Fix-Great-Weight-Using/dp/1250114497/benazadi-20 Get Deep Nutrition: https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Nutrition-Your-Genes-Traditional/dp/1250113822/benazadi-20 Join theKeto Kamp Academy: https://ketokampacademy.com/7-day-trial-a WatchKeto Kamp on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUh_MOM621MvpW_HLtfkLyQ Watch Keto Kamp on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUh_MOM621MvpW_HLtfkLyQ Free 7 Day Keto Challenge: http://www.ketokampchallenge.com Order Keto Flex: http://www.ketoflexbook.com -------------------------------------------------------- / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  PureForm Omega Plant Based Oils (Best Alternative to Fish Oil): http://www.purelifescience.com Use ben4 for $4.00 off. Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  *Some Links Are Affiliates* // F O L L O W ▸ instagram | @thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2B1NXKW ▸ facebook | /thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2BVvvW6 ▸ twitter | @thebenazadi http://bit.ly/2USE0so ▸clubhouse | @thebenazadi Disclaimer: This podcast is for information purposes only. Statements and views expressed on this podcast are not medical advice. This podcast including Ben Azadi disclaim responsibility from any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. Opinions of guests are their own, and this podcast does not accept responsibility of statements made by guests. This podcast does not make any representations or warranties about guests qualifications or credibility. Individuals on this podcast may have a direct or non-direct interest in products or services referred to herein. If you think you have a medical problem, consult a licensed physician.

Orbitals

If there's one flavor you can always count on, it's vanilla. Sweet, creamy, and nostalgic, it comes from a creeping orchid vine. But with increased demand, scientists are finding new ways to make it, including starting from an unexpected plant…rice! Solutions is made with funding and featuring scientists from 3M, Ascend Performance Materials, Baker Hughes, BASF, Dow, DuPont, Procter & Gamble, PPG, Royal DSM, SABIC, Solvay, and W. L. Gore & Associates, none of whom influenced any editorial decisions.

Ecommerce Brain Trust
Measuring Success Across the Digital Shelf - Episode 220

Ecommerce Brain Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 26:31


In today's podcast, we are talking with John Maltman about issues brands have been facing as a result of the shift to online sales channels. John gives his take on the best ways to measure success across retailers and retail media platforms, and explains what he thinks is next in the digital shelf tech.  Make sure you tune in to find out more! John Maltman is the founder and CEO of Digital Shelf Analytics platform e.fundamentals. He has built a successful 30+ year corporate career with blue-chip FMCG (CPG) companies including global giants Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo and Asda Walmart, complemented with leadership roles in high growth B2B technology and service businesses, before stepping into the world of start-ups. Frustrated with the industry's weak reaction to the enormous opportunities of ecommerce, John decided to apply his deep client-side knowledge to help brands win online, telling colleagues: ‘The market needs it, it doesn't exist, so we'll create it.'

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung
Pfizer, Procter & Gamble, Martin Marietta, McDonaldu00b4s, Yum! Brands, PepsiCo, Sea Ltd. - Opening Bell

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 14:12


Vor der heutigen FED-Zinsentscheidung präsentierten sich die US-Indizes gestern schwächer. Der Dow Jones ging mit einem Minus von 0,3 Prozent aus dem Handel. Der Nasdaq 100 gab sogar über ein Prozent ab.

Profit Answer Man: Implementing the Profit First System!
Ep 89 The Data Magician with Lynn Corazzi

Profit Answer Man: Implementing the Profit First System!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 41:46


Hi, I'm the Profit Answer Man Rocky Lalvani! I help small business owners simplify their financial reports so that they can make more informed business decisions with fewer hassles. We utilize the Profit First system created by Mike Michalowicz Effortless Cashflow Course: http://bit.do/effortlesscashflowcourse Schedule your free, no-obligation intro call: https://bookme.name/rockyl/lite/intro-appointment-15-minutes More about making profitability simple: http://profitcomesfirst.com/ Bio: Lynn Corazzi is the owner of Data2Profit Consulting. He helps small to medium-sized companies make more money with their data by using financial ideas and tools he learned at Procter & Gamble. He has a unique ability to help clients think big picture, while at the same time digging into the details of their results. When you feel you have a lot of numbers around but no answers, Lynn will make those numbers work as hard as you do, and turning your data into profit.     Links: https://www.data2profit.net Questions: questions@profitanswerman.com Email: rocky@profitcomesfirst.com Profit Answer Man Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/profitanswerman/ My podcast about living a richer more meaningful life: http://richersoul.com/ First 2 chapters of Profit First: https://sendfox.com/rocky Music provided by Junan from Junan Podcast Any financial advice is for educational purposes only and you should consult with an expert for your specific needs.

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung
Bitcoin, Nike, Tesla, Procter & Gamble, Thyssen, VW, Daimler Truck, Software AG - Märkte am Morgen

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 17:28


Die Wall Street hat den Anlegern in Deutschland gestern die Stimmung verhagelt. Kurz nach Handelsauftakt in den USA ging es für den DAX nach unten. Auch aus Asien sind die Vorgaben schwach.

The Worldly Marketer Podcast
TWM 226: How Plastic Bank Is Creating Value for Stakeholders Around the World w/ Saleem Ahamed

The Worldly Marketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 50:59


Saleem Ahamed is the Chief Marketing Officer at Plastic Bank, an organization that is helping the world to stop ocean plastic, while improving the lives of those who help collect it. Founded in 2013 and headquartered in Vancouver, British Columbia, Plastic Bank's mission is to empower the regenerative society by building ethical recycling ecosystems in coastal communities and reprocessing the materials for reintroduction into the global manufacturing supply chain. Currently, the company operates in Haiti, Brazil, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Egypt, and works with over 17,000 collectors. So far, Plastic Bank has stopped over one billion plastic bottles from entering our oceans. That's over 20 million kilograms of plastic waste. With a background in business and marketing, Saleem began his career over 25 years ago, working for Procter & Gamble in Europe. After more than a decade with Procter & Gamble, he joined Johnson & Johnson, where he eventually became Worldwide Director of Global Strategic Marketing. In 2012, he decided to launch a business of his own, as Co-Founder and CEO of Silver Health Systems, a valet dental care company. After four years of this entrepreneurial hiatus, he rejoined Johnson & Johnson to take on a series of senior leadership roles – including that of Global CMO – in the company's Diabetes Care division. In 2019, Saleem transitioned into the Cleantech space, when he took on the role of Chief Marketing Officer at Terramera, a Vancouver-based AgTech company focused on applying AI solutions to agricultural problems. Finally, in early 2020, he joined the team at Plastic Bank in his current position of CMO. In this interview, Saleem talks about why Plastic Bank set up its operations in the countries where it did, the importance of driving the value proposition through strategic brand management, and how the organization now creates value on multiple levels for different types of stakeholders – from local plastic collectors to multinational corporate partners.   Links: Plastic Bank website Plastic Bank on LinkedIn Plastic Bank on Facebook Plastic Bank on Instagram Plastic Bank on YouTube Plastic Bank on Twitter CEO David Katz's TED Talk Saleem on LinkedIn   This epsiode was sponsored by the Globalization and Localization Association (GALA).

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz
Underdog Mentality and How to Handle Your Public Image in a Crisis With David Oates of PR Security Service and Bill Byrne of Remedy PR

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 50:29


David Oates is the Principal at PR Security Service and has more than 25 years of strategic public relations and crisis communications experience. David started his career as a US Navy Public Affairs Officer before moving into leadership roles at ContentOne, Financial Profiles, Inc., and Stalwart Communications. He has expertise in addressing various crises spanning from the military government, corporate, charity, and startup environments.  Bill Byrne is the Co-founder and Director of Remedy Public Relations, where he oversees and helps execute public relations, social media, and marketing programs for clients. He has been in the public relations field for 25 years and has worked on campaigns for Intel, Burton Snowboards, Sony, Procter & Gamble, and emerging brands in tech, healthcare, finance, and even craft beer. In this episode… You're often in the public eye as a business owner, which comes with many responsibilities. In this day and age, when one misstep can bring down your business, how do you promote your company as an underdog in a competitive environment?  Unfortunately, many business owners focus too much on the campaign side of PR while forgetting to handle their image and devise a plan for crisis management. How do you manage your public image safely and stay ahead of the narrative if — and when — a crisis occurs? Listen to this episode of the Inspired Insider Podcast with Dr. Jeremy Weisz featuring the Principal at PR Security Service, David Oates, and Bill Byrne, Co-founder and Director of Remedy PR. They discuss staying on top of your public image, winning PR battles as an underdog, how to handle your public image in a crisis, and lots more.

VD-podden
#62: Hans Skruvfors - levererar med foodora

VD-podden

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 70:39


Hans Skruvfors tog över uppdraget som CEO på foodora 2020 och driver numera bolaget i riktningen att bli mer fokuserade på hemleveranser generellt, snarare än att bara erbjuda mat hem till dörren. foodoras app lanserades 2015 i Sverige men finns även i Norge och Finland men ägs av det globala bolaget Delivery Hero, där Hans även var innan. Tidigare har han arbetat med bolag som Nepa, Accenture och Procter & Gamble. Anmäl dig till Arash nyhetsbrev och få koll på det senaste inom ledarskap, tech och marknadsföring. Kolla på Vivas webinar on Demand här!

Nonprofit Architect  Podcast
Authentically American: Dean Wegner

Nonprofit Architect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 25:33


When you understand who your customer is you can adapt to their needs, you can take things off their plate and allow them to focus on making the impact on the world they want to make. As a business, you can be part of a bigger story, by impacting other nonprofits.      Conversation Highlights:   {00:44} Introduction to Dean Wegner.     {02:43} The West Point experience. {04:04} The Authentically American apparel company. {08:44} A business plan that works. {10:24} Being part of a bigger story. {13:19} Being a business that's nonprofit-minded.   {16:47} Understanding who your customer is and being able to adapt to their needs.   {18:33} Taking things off your customer's plate allows them to focus on making the impact they want to make.   {22:50} Advice to people that are in the nonprofit world considering nonprofit work or that have a business that they want to create something to partner with nonprofits?     Remarkable quotes:   God, family, country in that order. We are a brand that celebrates the American worker, patriotism and intentionally honors American heroes.   When you start with a blank sheet of paper you can be so intentional about who you are, what you stand for, your values, and your vision.  We forget as a nation the toll that takes on the people that are providing our blanket of freedom, we enjoy every day.   Understanding who your customer is and adapting to their needs.     Resources:   dwegner@authenticallyamerican.us   Website: https://www.authenticallyamerican.us  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthenticallyAmericanCo  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/authentically_american/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6jMed1mFeNLWaMXS5H6NBw?  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/authentically-american/  https://www.linkedin.com/in/dean-wegner-9874065/    Bio for Dean Wegner  Dean is a man of deep Christian faith, a Family man, Veteran, and Entrepreneur. Dean and his bride Kelly have been married for 26 years and they have 4 children, with the youngest being adopted from Ethiopia. Dean graduated from West Point in 1993 and served 7 years in the Army as a helicopter pilot and Army Ranger. After the Army, the majority of Dean's business career was spent in business development, marketing, and strategy with Mars and Procter & Gamble. In 2017, Dean founded Authentically American, a Veteran owned, American made premium apparel brand. Authentically American is a brand that celebrates patriotism, believes in the American worker, and honors our American heroes by intentionally donating 10% of profits to Veteran and First Responder charities. As a former Division I ice hockey player, Dean is highly competitive, possesses a tireless work ethic, and he still plays in a Men's “Beer League” every week. Dean is active in his church and serves on the board of several for-profit and non-profit companies and organizations. Dean and Authentically American are riding a wave of national media exposure having been featured in Forbes magazine, Fox News, Yahoo Finance, Newsmax TV, and SiriusXM Radio.     Nonprofit Architect Podcast Links      Website: http://nonprofitarchitect.org    Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/NonprofitArchitect     Ultimate Podcast Guide https://nonprofitarchitect.org/ultimate-podcast-guide/ Subscribe and leave a review https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nonprofit-architect-podcast/id1481292481  Patreon https://www.patreon.com/NonprofitArchitect  Watch on YOUTUBE https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQm8fnR2sHyrmLpV2jKYajA  Listen to these other great podcasts from Veterans. https://nonprofitarchitect.org/veteran-podcast-network/  Want help getting your podcast started? https://nonprofitarchitect.org/podcast-production-services/  

Remarkable Retail
What's New & Next For Luxury Retail, with Karen Katz, Steve Sadove and Oliver Chen

Remarkable Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 37:15


This week we've got a blockbuster panel featuring three of the most experienced and insightful veterans of the luxury world: Karen Katz (former President & CEO of the Neiman Marcus Group, Steve Sadove (former Chairman and CEO of Saks) and Oliver Chen (Managing director and senior equity research analyst at Cowen and Company). We cover a lot of territory, first trying to align on a working definition of what "luxury" really means today and how luxury was evolving pre-COVID. Then we shift into what's next, including our dream team's quick takes on luxury re-commerce, the role of the in-store experience, the importance of multi-brand retail (online and off), sustainability, exclusivity, storytelling and more. We wrap up getting everyone's view on why it's so hard for legacy brands to innovate and  whether .com spin-outs make any sense at all.But first we open up with the top retail stories that caught our attention this past week, with a big focus on what we can take away from Black Friday and Cyber Monday performance as the threat of Omicron looms, more profitless prosperity from Allbirds as they report their first quarterly earnings as a public company, and Amazon's rise to parcel delivery supremacy. About Karen KatzKatz, who is a graduate of the University of Texas, is the former chief executive, president and director of the Neiman Marcus Group. She stepped down from the role in January 2019. Since 2014 she has also been on the board of directors at Under Armour.Katz has worked in a number of key executive and leadership roles at Neiman Marcus since joining the group as a merchandise manager in 1985. Most recently she has leveraged Neiman Marcus' brick and mortar assets to launch an omni-channel strategy that includes merging planning and buying teams for all departments and integrating customers' online and in-store experiences with in-store apps and personalised web dashboards.Under Katz, Neiman Marcus acquired luxury e-commerce site MyTheresa.com, the Munich-based luxury e-tailer. She also expanded MyTheresa's e-commerce offerings to bolster the Neiman Marcus omni-channel strategy and oversaw the opening of the retailer's first New York City flagship in 2018, a seven-story retail project situated in the Hudson Yards in Manhattan's far West Side. About Steve SadoveBetween 2002 and 2013, Mr. Sadove held positions of increasing responsibility with Saks Incorporated, serving as its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer from 2007 to 2013.Prior to joining Saks, Mr. Sadove built a distinguished marketing and consumer products career spanning more than 25 years and held senior positions at companies including General Foods (now Kraft) and Bristol-Myers Squibb Company as President of Clairol. He led Clairol to become the number one hair care business in the United States, relaunched the Herbal Essences brand into a $700 million business and completed the sale of the beauty care business to Procter & Gamble. Mr. Sadove is also a founding partner of JW Levin Management Partners, a private equity firm.Mr. Sadove is a former Chair of the National Retail Federation and serves as an advisor to Mastercard. He serves on numerous community and civic boards including Hamilton College as Chairman of the Board of Trustees and AmeriCares. About Oliver ChenOliver Chen has joined Cowen and Company's Equity Research department as a Managing Director and Senior Equity Research Analyst. He covers over 30 stocks in the Retail & Luxury Sectors.Oliver is a graduate of Georgetown University, The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and is a CFA Charterholder. He also serves on the PhD Retail Research Review committee at the Wharton School's Jay H. Baker Retailing Center. Mr. Chen was recognized in the Wharton School's “40 Under 40” brightest stars alumni list in 2017.Most recently, Mr. Chen was recognized on the 2018 and 2017 Institutional Investor All-America Research team as a top analyst in the retailing/department stores & specialty softlines sector. Mr. Chen was also selected as a preeminent retail influencer as he was named to the National Retail Federation (NRF) Foundation's “2019 List of People Shaping Retail's Future.” Considered an “industry expert,” Mr. Chen frequently appears as a speaker/panelist at key industry events.Steve Dennis is an advisor, keynote speaker and author on strategic growth and business innovation. You can learn more about Steve on his       website.    The expanded and revised edition of his bestselling book  Remarkable Retail: How To Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Disruption is now available at  Amazon or just about anywhere else books are sold. Steve regularly shares his insights in his role as a      Forbes senior contributor and on       Twitter and       LinkedIn. You can also check out his speaker "sizzle" reel      here.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest venture for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

On the Brink with Andi Simon
294: Doug Brown—The Agony Of Selling Can Become The Astounding Success Of A Superstar

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 35:26


Learn how to amp up your sales process for amazing success!  In our podcast today, Doug Brown and I are going to help you sell better. As CEO of Business Success Factors, Doug has amazing ideas about how the sales process really works, and how to help you make yours deliver the results you have always wanted it to. We will also dig into the emotional blocks that hold people back from becoming the sales success they are meant to be. As you know, I am always looking for people to help you see, feel and think in new ways. Doug is just the guy for us today. In this current business environment, I really urge you to take a listen. Watch and listen to our conversation here Some of the areas we discuss include: Hiring sales superstars Optimizing your sales process And what I think is so important: conversational intelligence so you can overcome objections About Doug Brown Doug started working for his family's business at the age of three. Since then, he has started and built over 35 companies. During college at Northeastern University, Berklee College of Music, and Salem State University, he supported himself by selling music equipment to colleges, universities, corporations and some of the world's biggest bands such as Aerosmith, Boston, The Eagles and others. Over the years, Doug has consulted, coached, advised and trained thousands of people in businesses in 47 US states and 14 countries. Some of these companies include Enterprise Rent- a-Car, Nationwide, Procter & Gamble and CBS Television. He has also served as an independent president of Sales and Training for companies run by Tony Robbins, Chet Holmes and Russ Whitney. As the creator of Sales Revenue Growth University, Doug teaches sales revenue growth strategies to companies who are serious about their sales growth. He is also a vocalist and the author of the international bestselling book, Win-Win Selling: Unlocking the Power of Profitability by Resolving Objections. You can connect with Doug via LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, his blog, his podcast or his website BusinessSuccessFactors. Or you can email him at doug@businesssuccessfactors.com. For a deeper dive into how to maximize sales, here are our recommendations Blog: 4 Ways Inbound Marketing Might Change Your Sales Process Podcast: How To Explode Your Sales With Intuitive Technology Podcast: How To Turn Your Salespeople Into Sales Heroes Podcast: Capture, Convince And Close More Customer Sales Additional resources for you My best-selling new book: "Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business" My award-winning first book: "On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights" Simon Associates Management Consultants website  

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
The secrets on how multi billion dollar companies run their advertising with Scott Mautz

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 58:21


The secrets on how multi-billion dollar companies run their advertising with Scott Mautz   Scott Mautz is a high-octane speaker expert at igniting peak performance and deep employee engagement, motivation, and inspiration. He's a Procter & Gamble veteran who successfully ran several of the company's largest multi-billion dollar businesses, an award-winning/best-selling author, faculty at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business for Executive Education, a former top Inc.com columnist (over 1 million monthly readers), and a frequent national publication and podcast guest.

Orbitals

Think the science behind sponges must be boring? You're so, so wrong. Shrink down to the microscopic level with us and take a walk among sponges designed to keep bacteria alive, clean with just water, and literally cut through your holiday cleaning. Solutions is made with funding and featuring scientists from 3M, Ascend Performance Materials, Baker Hughes, BASF, Dow, DuPont, Procter & Gamble, PPG, Royal DSM, SABIC, Solvay, and W. L. Gore & Associates, none of whom influenced any editorial decisions.

The Design Business Show
The Design Business Show 166: Aligning Your Soul's Mission Through Website Design with Nora Zimerman

The Design Business Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:02


Nora Zimerman is a Designer and Creative Director offering Soul Branding and Website Design. She creates branded website experiences that capture the true essence of a business whilst honouring their Soul's Mission. She has a talent for fully reflecting the Soul of a business onto the online space. Her clients are Teachers, Leadership coaches, Multidimensional Healers, Lightworkers and organisations delivering and supporting deep transformation and consciousness for the benefit of all. Her unique Soul Brand Alignment Method supports clients in birthing a truly aligned branded look and feel for their websites. Her extensive experience in corporations and Design agencies combined with her spiritual path and embodied feminine practices provides a potent combination of Design, Strategy and Spirituality to the Branding and Website process. She is an avid swimmer, loves singing, dancing and walking in the Surrey hills. She is also a Women's Temple facilitator and from time to time creates awesome party playlists. She is originally from Argentina and has lived in the UK for over 30 years. She lives in Surrey, UK and is a mum to two adult children.   Here's what we covered on the episode: Nora's Background in Design    How Nora and I were introduced by Lacy Boggs who was on Episode 92 of The Design Business Show   From a young age Nora knew she wanted to be a graphic designer, but there was no graphic design degree in Argentina so she settled for architecture because it was the closest thing and she had grown up around that field because her father was an architect Nora completed three years of architecture school and then began to look for other opportunities and says she did some advertising work One summer Nora's mom told her they were planning to offer a graphic design degree at The University of Buenos Aires and suggested Nora to come back to pursue it, and she did  Nora talks about being part of the new graphic design program at the university and what her experience was like  One day Nora caught a ride with 2 other men on campus and they decided to create their own studio together  Their studio was called The Reform, and Nora shares that they did a lot of well-known work for different brands and touches on the government changes Argentina was going through at the time which opened up many opportunities for them  Nora shares that the dad of one of her partners acted as their account manager and would bringing clients to them; through word of mouth people heard about their studio and started commissioning them to do work  At the studio, Nora was a designer and says they were doing point of sale, packaging, logo design, really anything they could really since they were just starting out  Nora shares that she had a job designing a rock and roll magazine and talks about how fun it was seeing all the musicians come for photoshoots and watching them play live  The studio came to an end when Nora and her partners were finishing up university While traveling, Nora met her ex-husband who was british and ended up coming to the UK knowing very little english  To learn english, Nora enrolled in a master's degree at Chelsea College of Arts because she thought it would be more beneficial to learn and talk to people about what she loves versus taking english lessons at night  Nora applied for an in-house design studio job at Procter & Gamble in the UK and worked for them nearly 15 years  One benefit to working at Procter & Gamble Nora says is that she was able to see all the marketing being done for big brands and saw how they were operating instead of just being isolated to design  Nora tells us what kind of work she did at Procter & Gamble and shares that she would write guidelines for use for many different brands which she loved doing  Towards the end of her time at Procter & Gamble, Nora felt misaligned with the products they were selling  From Freelancing to Running a Business  What moved Nora to start freelancing was her busy, unsustainable lifestyle as a single mom of 2 kids who was out working and commuting each day  About 6 years ago, Nora decided to take her design work a little more seriously and now runs her own business Nora shares that marketing her own business was challenging at first because she explains that design work is very behind the scenes and it wasn't really in her nature to promote it  Something Nora tells her clients is, no one else is going to be offering what you offer in the same exact way you do, so don't listen to all of the self doubt you may be having - remember to have a clear voice and make sure you're aligned with what you are saying   Nora realized she wanted to really collaborate with clients instead of just being an implementer of their ideas or her ideas only  When collaborating with clients, Nora really likes to fully understand the brand, understand why people are attracted to them and allow the clients to drop in and connect to the essence of their offer  Because Nora trained in women's temple facilities and ran women's circles, she began to use some of her practices for women to drop inside and really feel what if felt like to be with clients  Nora explains that what they're doing is translating the in-person experience to the online space  What women's temple training is — Nora explains that it is focused on becoming very present and attuned to what's aligned in the moment so people can become attuned to their gifts, their service and what they are here to do     Nora's Design Process  How Nora's process for her program starts with 4-6 weeks of a discovery and inquiry phase where her clients go through some video meditation and answer questionnaires — Nora shares that she got the method she uses from her mentor Michelle    Nora explains that she uses a combination of the practices she's learned to create her own in-depth process for working with clients and designing websites   How Nora works with established businesses who are upgrading, it may be through their website or through a new vision they've had or because they had a spiritual awakening and want a change     After Nora's clients go through the discovery and inquiry phase, they then prepare for the photoshoot and dive deep into what they want to communicate with the photos   Once Nora has all the material, she designs the website — Nora explains that some people want to know how to use their website so she creates tutorials for them and some people don't want to know, so she sets them up with a developer who will be supporting them and their business  Nora shares that her website design process takes a minimum of 3 months but her group program takes only 10 weeks and says her group program uses the same methodology   Tips for Creating a Successful Website  As the year comes to an end, Nora shares that she's excited to launch some of her group program client websites and she's also excited for the launch of her own website  When you're thinking about your website, Nora says to remember that it's there to create a connection, it needs to be easy to navigate, understand and the person landing on your website needs to understand why they would be a good customer or not  Nora shares three things she thinks a website needs to have for it to be successful: connection, clarity and alignment with the business  Another offer Nora has is one on one strategy sessions to help people get through the blocks they may be experiencing  If you are on any social media platform, Nora urges you to treat that platform like a website and says if you're looking to create your own website, pick existing websites you like and think about why you feel connected to them  Nora says don't be too worried about using your own words or your tone of voice because your website must be aligned with who you are   Check out Nora's website, where she offers a free masterclass which is all about aligning your soul's brand to your mission or service  Links mentioned   The Design Business Show 092 with Lacy Boggs    Nora's Website    Nora's Free Masterclass    Like what you heard?  Click here to subscribe + leave a review on iTunes. Click here to download my Sales Page Trello Board Let's connect on Instagram!

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional
455. Gaurav Bhatnagar and Mark Minukas Discuss Their New Book, Unfear

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 33:54


Gaurav was a consultant with McKinsey and a leader in their Organization Practice in North America. Before McKinsey, he worked in marketing for Pepsi Cola International and Procter & Gamble in Europe, the Middle East, and India, and he has counselled and coached hundreds of senior leaders as they lead their organizations through transformation, with a special focus on coaching them on personal mastery, difficult conversations, and strategic thinking. Mark is an engineer by training, he began his career as a Navy officer and member of the US Naval Construction Battalion. He is also a McKinsey alum and has worked across multiple industries, including financial services, high tech, biotech manufacturing, IT services, and governmental offices. Read more about their book at https://unfearbook.com/. Key points include: 05:24: Gaurav's work in cultural transformation 08:32: The art and science of achieving standing breakthrough results 13:27: Identifying and moving through fear 26:16: Freeing the angel in the stone Unleashed is produced by Umbrex, which has a mission of connecting independent management consultants with one another, creating opportunities for members to meet, build relationships, and share lessons learned. Learn more at www.umbrex.com.

Motley Fool Money
Stocks for Thanksgiving and the Power of Habit

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 38:37


It's our Thanksgiving Special! Host Chris Hill and Motley Fool analysts Ron Gross and Jason Moser explain why they're thankful for The Trade Desk, Costco, Home Depot, and Lowe's. We discuss why investors might want to avoid Peloton, Zillow, and Avis Budget Group. And since no Thanksgiving is complete without dessert, we dig into a few slices of humble pie and talk Under Armour, Verizon, and Macy's. Ron and Jason share why the Energy Select Sector SPDR and Roblox are on their radar, as well as investing resources for anyone hoping to learn more about finance. Plus, we talk Procter & Gamble, Target, and toothpaste when we revisit our conversation with Charles Duhigg, bestselling author of The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - On Leadership and Pearls of Life with Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann (Part 2)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 20:10


In the second part of this Oncology, Etc. episode Drs. Patrick Loehrer (Indiana University) and David Johnson (University of Texas) continue their conversation with Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann, exploring the prominent leadership roles she held, from first female Chancellor at UCSF to CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and member of Facebook's Board of Directors. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: education.asco.org | Contact Us Air Date: 11/18/21   TRANSCRIPT SPEAKER 1: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. PAT LOEHRER: Hi, Everybody. I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm director of the Centers of Global Health at Indiana University, Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center. DAVE JOHNSON: And I'm Dave Johnson. I'm Professor of Medicine here at UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas. So Pat, we're back for another episode of the award winning "Oncology Et Cetera." PAT LOEHRER: Just seems like last month we were here time, you know? Time just flies. DAVE JOHNSON: Exactly. Before we get started, you were telling me about an interesting book you were reading-- something about friends or something. Can you elaborate? PAT LOEHRER: Sure, sure, yeah. This book I picked up-- actually, my wife picked it up. It's called First Friends. It's written by Gary Ginsburg. It's a really interesting book. It was-- basically talks about-- it probably has about eight or nine presidents but the importance of having a friend that guides him. And these were people that were, in many ways, unelected people that were close to the presidents that helped change the face of what we see today, and some of them are stories of really good friends and some of them are, I think, opportunistic friends. But it gives you a background of people like Madison and Lincoln and Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. It's actually a fun read. DAVE JOHNSON: I'll definitely put it on my reading list. It sounds like a pretty exciting one. Well, speaking of influential people, we're really excited to jump back into our interview with Dr. Helman. In our last episode, we covered her early life and career, her work in Uganda, her views on global oncology, and her experiences in private practice and industry. In the next half of our interview, we'll learn more about her incredible career and her multiple leadership roles. Let's start by hearing about her time as chancellor of UCSF. PAT LOEHRER: Let me transition a little bit. What I'd like to do is talk a little bit about your leadership. One Of the next big roles you had, you became chancellor at UCSF, correct? SPEAKER 2: Mm-hm. PAT LOEHRER: And so as Dave said, I think you were the first woman in that role. SPEAKER 2: I was. PAT LOEHRER: You were a groundbreaker from that capacity. So now instead of working for people-- obviously, I understand that there's people you work for when you're chancellor too, but tell a little bit about that transition from industry back into academics and how that felt in the role of being a leader and then maybe the responsibility of being the first female chancellor. SPEAKER 2: There were parts of being the chancellor at UCSF, I would say most parts of it, that I just thought were fantastic. I loved being back at a hospital and clinics. Just the way the hospital and clinical enterprise at UCSF works, the chancellor is the board. And so once a month, you'd have neurology or cardiology come and tell you about what had happened, quality control, things that had gone on and I would have done that all day long. I mean, it was just so interesting. It was so important to run a great clinical enterprise that getting back closer to patients and medicine I thought was fantastic. The other thing was the educational enterprise, and UCSF, as you know, has medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, nursing. I always tell people, no undergraduates, no English majors, no marching band. And the other chancellors reminded me, no athletic director, which apparently is a very good thing. So UCSF is a very special and unusual place. And I loved the science. I would show up at research seminars and things like that as often as I could. So there were so many parts of being at UCSF that I thought were just off the charts great. The hardest thing about being at UCSF-- being the first female chancellor, I think, was challenging but not in ways that you might expect. I was used to being a woman leader in medicine and biotech, which was unusual. So being the only woman in the room, being the first, wasn't new to me. But the thing that was hard on our family was there are roles for the spouse of the chancellor that fit more neatly into more of a classic female role, hosting things. There was a tea party for the wives of the faculty that the wife of the chancellor typically had. And for some reason, Nick didn't think that that suited him. We sort of laughed about that. DAVE JOHNSON: He can't make tea? SPEAKER 2: He can't make tea to save his life. And he's a strong introvert, which made it worse. I will tell you, some of the under-recognized, underreported people in life are spouses of chancellors and presidents of universities. And talk about unpaid labor-- my goodness! And so we sort of struggled with how did Nick show up, what did that look like. Because we didn't have any role models for what that looked like. I still laugh that Bill Clinton said he would be First Laddie. So when you have a pattern recognition, life is easier. And then being one of 10 chancellors at the UC system, I struggled a little bit with the UC Regents just because it felt-- I became chancellor in 2009, and we had some fiscal realities that we were dealing with. And the pace of the UC Regents and the format of the UC Regents, I actually made a proposal for UCSF to kind of break off from the other 9. And that was not well-received, got me in the newspaper. And I did not do that again. People saw it as disloyal and not very smart. But all in all, I thought then and think now that our public universities are absolutely-- they're treasures in America. And I was really proud to be a part of it and hope that I had made a contribution. DAVE JOHNSON: Speaking of leadership, what was it like to be CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation? What caused you to step away from chancellor to philanthropy? PAT LOEHRER: It's not a step down. It's not a step down, basically. DAVE JOHNSON: It is not a step down. SPEAKER 2: So I would say a couple of things. First of all, Bill and Melinda pushed me hard to take the job. I was not looking to change. My husband worked at the Gates Foundation for a couple of years on HIV. So they knew us, and they knew Nick better than me. But they knew both of us. We awarded Melinda the University medal at UCSF. And to my great surprise and happiness, she accepted and came. I later think that she was using that as a reason to talk to me about the CEO job, but she got a twofer. And I was really compelled by the mission. Who wouldn't be? I was really compelled by the mission and the chance to get back into global health after the experience I had had in Uganda. But I'll tell you, it is the ambition of the Gate Foundation, the scope of the Gates Foundation, the resources, and the need to get something done. I tell you, it is hard work. It is really hard work-- from China to India to all of the continent of Africa and then US education. Throw that in on top of things. So I was thrilled to be a part of driving the agenda and the mission. Some really talented people who are working very hard at the Gates Foundation-- I was surprised, especially on US education, with the amount of pushback. And I worked really hard to be successful at working with Bill, who's known as a tough character and lived up to that mutation. DAVE JOHNSON: Good to know, just in case he calls Pat or me. PAT LOEHRER: Yeah, yeah, I'm not going to get a medal at UCSF either. So that's a-- DAVE JOHNSON: You never know, Pat. PAT LOEHRER: It's a non-starter. And this may not apply to you, but there's a lot of maybe disproportionate number of women who feel they suffer from this imposter syndrome. To be honest, Dave and I have talked about that. We both feel in that syndrome too. But along the way, I mean, if you think about growing up in Reno, Nevada, and suddenly now being a chancellor and head of the Gates Foundation, the National Academy of Science, was there ever this sense of the, wait a minute, you know, what's going on? Is this real? SPEAKER 2: For me, there has always been that sense. There has always been that sense, and I look at it as I hope there always will be that sense-- that the kind of need to demonstrate your value. And there's a part of the imposter syndrome that is humility and not overestimating what you can do. And so on my best days, I think that leads me to say I've got to work with really terrific people. My job is to bring out the best in others. If I lead, it's because there's a great thing we're going to accomplish, and I can help people see where we're going together. And so I definitely have had imposter syndrome. But the one thing that I probably overused and kind of grew to like too much was the thing of people underestimating me and then proving them wrong. That gets a little wearying after a while. It's like, OK, we're going to waste some time while you decide whether I'm worthy or whether I can do this. And let's not waste that time. Why don't you assign to me-- give me some confidence, and I'll live up to that. And I mentioned Art Levinson was my boss for most of the time I was at Genentech. And he had no time for imposter syndrome. He was like, look, how many promotions do you have to get before you think, OK, I can get this done? He thought that was sort of-- he just didn't have time for it. We have things to do, and he had jobs to get done. And one of the things I loved about him is he would constantly push me to say, you're capable of more than you think you are, which I think is the sign of a fantastic manager, which he was and is. And so I've tried to push myself to do that. And the thing is, like, you can do this. Come to me for help. We'll make sure you succeed, but don't underestimate yourself. And I think that's a consequence of imposter syndrome is both wasting time proving yourself and not taking on something that you think, actually, let me give that a try and stack the deck in favor of succeeding. And so I think that's the thing that-- there's a certain fierceness that I've always had that I like about myself that, like, of course we will succeed. Failure is not an option. Of course we will succeed. And I think that comes from working on things that I value a lot and care about a lot. PAT LOEHRER: You have been on a number of different boards, including Pfizer as well as Facebook. And in that capacity, you've seen a lot of leaders. Can you talk a little bit about the strengths and the weakness of various leaders as well as serving on the boards and the capacities of the different companies? SPEAKER 2: Yeah, well, first, let me say I know ASCO is actually a really good about being careful about conflicts of interest and things like that, and I am too. So when I became chancellor at UCSF and then CEO at the Gates Foundation, I avoided being on life sciences boards. And so I got asked a lot by Biotech and pharma boards to be on their boards. Initially, I joined Procter Gamble's board, where I served for, I think, about six years. And then I joined Facebook's board. And those were both fantastic experiences. And I actually joined the boards for two very different reasons. One, P&G's board, I wanted to learn about branding and consumers. And I felt like in medicine, I didn't really learn about consumers or branding as much as I needed to or might. And then Facebook's board I joined because as Dave mentioned, I was with Charles Sawyers. We wrote the precision medicine report for the National Academy. And I really love-- to this day, I love the concept of using the social network to connect people. There was sort of an infamous story or famous story-- it's actually a good story-- of patients with a certain form of myeloma who found each other on Facebook and went to Genentech and said, make a new medicine for those of us with this genetic abnormality. And we'll all enroll in a trial. And so these connections to me felt really powerful on precision medicine. And so getting to work with CEOs at Procter and Gamble, the CEO Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook, I do see the really different attributes of leaders. But when you're a board member, you see those attributes of leaders with a very different lens. What's the return to shareholders? How does the community think about them? What's the impact-- and increasingly for Facebook, what's the impact on the world? What's the impact on our social discourse and our ability to have a free and fair election? A lot of those things became much more operative on the Facebook board while I was on the board and really tough social issues that continue to this day. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah, so we could go on for another hour, hour and a half, but I have one question to ask you which may seem a little bit silly in retrospect. But if you could look back on your youthful self at 21 or 22 knowing what you know now, with all the things that you've done during the course of your career, what advice would you give yourself? And perhaps I'll addend that by saying what advice would you give particularly to young women in the medical profession who are trying to balance that work-life balance that everyone talks about and worries about and struggles with, quite frankly. SPEAKER 2: I'll give you one thing I should have done better and one thing that I think I did well. So the advice on the one thing I should have done better, I think slow down a little bit and take a bit more time for fun and enjoyment. I was extremely worried about money when I was in college, and being number two of seven-- every summer, I worked. I remember at one point in medical school, I had three weeks off, and I got a job for those three weeks at a deli making sandwiches. And I went to college for three years, crammed it into three years so I wouldn't have to pay for the fourth year. So I just think that I could have taken on more loans. I could have done some things to just dial it down a bit because you don't get those years back. And that's such a great time of your life when you're 21, 22, something like that. So I wish I'd have just slowed down a bit and not been so driven for those seven years of university and medical school that I really just either worked or studied all the time. The thing that I feel like I did well, and I would say this to anybody who's going into medicine, is there's so many opportunities. There's so many wonderful things to do. But whoever your spouse is, whoever your partner in life is, take the time and energy to make sure that's the right person for you. I feel so blessed. Actually, my husband, who I've mentioned several times in this discussion, Nick, was my roommate in San Francisco when I was an intern, like real roommate. And we've been roommates ever since. And we're very compatible. He's one of seven kids too. It's another Catholic school kid. And we just have fun together and support each other. And there's no way I could have taken these crazy jobs or done the kinds of things I've done without Nick. So having a wonderful, supportive partner makes everything better. DAVE JOHNSON: That definitely resonates with Pat and me. We're both very blessed to have wives and spouses of, for me, it's 52 years. I can't remember, Pat. Yours is close. PAT LOEHRER: I had my first date with my wife 50 years ago, yeah. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: OK, so you guys know what I'm talking about. PAT LOEHRER: Absolutely. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. PAT LOEHRER: Yeah. DAVE JOHNSON: Go ahead, Pat. PAT LOEHRER: I was going to ask a question that you probably may have already answered there, but Bob Woodward just came out of an interview with Colin Powell. One of the last questions he asked him was if he could reflect on that one person that was a moral compass for him. And so for you, that one person, alive or dead, that has been not the most powerful person you've met but the one that's really influenced you the most in terms of giving you direction, who would that be for you? SPEAKER 2: Probably, if I look at through line the entire time I've been alive, it would be my dad. He had the ability to look at a room and find the person who was struggling and go over to them. And I really loved that about my dad. PAT LOEHRER: I love it. DAVE JOHNSON: One last question. So we're at the top of the hour, and I know you're a very busy person. Pat and I love to read, but we're also documentary fiends and whatnot. We're interested. What have you read recently that really resonated with you? Do you have a recommendation for us? SPEAKER 2: I will say during the pandemic, I've gotten back into reading biographies, which I love. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: So I did the Caro, Lyndon Baines Johnson, which, Master of the Senate is really good. But my favorite book of the last two years is The Code Breaker, Walter Isaacson's book about Jennifer Doudna. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: One of the things I love about Walter Isaacson is he teaches you science through his biographies. Like, I think I understand relativity based on his Einstein biography, which is great. But The Code Breaker is really super good. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah, we both read it. We couldn't agree with you more. PAT LOEHRER: Love it. Love it. DAVE JOHNSON: So Sue, again, it's been a real honor to have you as our guest, and we really appreciate the time you've taken. Thank you so much, and we hope you enjoy the beautiful weather in Alamo California, and I hope it does turn green and the rain continues for you. SPEAKER 2: Thank you so much. It's been my pleasure. Thank you both. DAVE JOHNSON: Take care. SPEAKER 2: Bye. DAVE JOHNSON: I want to take the moment to thank our listeners for tuning in to "Oncology Et Cetera," an ASCO educational podcast where Pat and I really will talk about anything and everything. So if you have an idea or a topic you'd like to share with us and like for us to pursue, please email us at education@asco.org. Thanks again, and keep in mind that Pat is a giant in oncology, but he's a short instructor. Thanks, everybody. SPEAKER 1: Thank you for listening to this week's-- to make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org.

Monetization Nation Podcast
How to Adapt to Disruptions in a Changing Marketplace

Monetization Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 21:06


Mitch Joel is an entrepreneur, a frequent keynote speaker, and has written books such as Six Pixels of Separation. He speaks frequently to groups like Google, Walmart, Starbucks, Microsoft, Procter & Gamble and Twitter. In today's episode, we're going to discuss how to adapt to disruptions in a changing marketplace.  Read more at https://monetizationnation.com/blog/how-to-adapt-to-disruptions-in-a-changing-marketplace/

Jerry Royce Live - Worldwide
The Inspiration Hour with Luz Ep #15 - Denise Soler Cox (award-winning activist filmmaker & Top 100 podcaster

Jerry Royce Live - Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:21


Bio: After going from a stay-at-home-mom to award-winning activist filmmaker, Top 100 podcaster, and to sought-after Fortune 500 speaker, Denise Soler Cox uses her experience to transform lives through storytelling. In 2014 she Co-Founded Project Eñye a multimedia production company whose purpose is to transform how we think about culture, identity, and what it means to belong. In September 2020 Denise was recognized as a “Featured Host” by Apple Podcast North America for her podcast “The Self-ish Latina” with listeners in 32 countries. Denise has been invited to speak on over 150 stages including two TEDx talks and has worked with some of the world's most recognized brands like Microsoft, Facebook, LinkedIn, JP Morgan Chase, Salesforce, Procter & Gamble, Dow Jones, Eli Lilly, Starbucks, and VaynerMedia to name a few. Renowned Harvard Professor Marshall Ganz uses Denise's film “being eñye” as part of his Public Narrative course as an example of “The story of us.” Her work has been published as a contributor in Huffington Post. She has been featured in Forbes as a “Trailblazing Latina” and also on CNN, CNN Money, Chicago Tribune, Fox News Latino, HOLA, ABC, CBS, and NBC. Denise has a combined audience of 97k followers across all platforms. She is currently in production with her second feature-length documentary about secret-keeping in the Latinx community (2022) and also working on a forthcoming book about Belonging (Winter 2021).

LawNext
Ep 144: MyCase CEO Jim McGinnis Discusses Recent Acquisitions, Future Product Roadmap

LawNext

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 35:43


It has been a year of notable developments for the practice management company MyCase. After starting the year with the arrival of a new CEO, Jim McGinnis, the company went on to make two significant acquisitions — of case management platform CASEpeer and document automation software Woodpecker — and this week is holding its first-ever customer conference, where McGinnis announced a third acquisition — of cloud-based legal accounting platform Soluno — and a roadmap of new features that includes native accounting.    On this episode of LawNext, McGinnis joins host Bob Ambrogi to bring us up to date on everything happening at MyCase, discuss the company's recent acquisitions and what they mean for customers, and share details on the company's product roadmap and longer-term vision.    Before joining MyCase in January 2021, McGinnis was EVP/GM of Wolters Kluwer's Tax and Accounting North America Professional Segment, where he helped build CCH Axcess as a leading SaaS solution in the accounting profession. Earlier, he was vice president at Intuit, where he led marketing and product management for the professional division and led the accountant segment as part of Intuit's QuickBooks business. He has also held senior leadership positions at Activision, PepsiCo, and Procter & Gamble.   Thank You To Our Sponsors This episode of LawNext is generously made possible by our sponsors. We appreciate their support and hope you will check them out.  Paradigm, home to the practice management platforms PracticePanther, Bill4Time, and MerusCase, and e-payments platform Headnote. Woodpecker, legal document automation for solo and small firms.   A reminder that we are on Patreon. Subscribe to our page to be able to access show transcripts, or to submit a question for our guests.

One Woman Today
The Humanness of Work with Nancie McDonnell Ruder

One Woman Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 43:28


The Humanness of Work with Nancie McDonnell RuderIn today's episode, Jeanie chats with the founder and CEO of Noetic Consultants, Nancie McDonnell Ruder. Listening to this episode, you'll quickly learn that Nancie and her team are so much more than marketing strategy and research and training. She takes such a personal and textured approach to her clients and to the world around her. Jeanie and Nancie dive into the ingredients of a good day, as well as a tough day. They share personal rituals and practices that help keep them on the course of their own evolution and growth and happy life.With over 20 years experience in marketing strategy, marketing training, branding and consumer research, Nancie loves building brands and helping people get better equipped to do so. She began her professional career with the Leo Burnett Company in Chicago, Illinois, where she served clients such as Procter & Gamble, Eli Lilly, The Gap, Lexmark Computers and Hoerchst Marion Rousseau. She launched Noetic Consulting in 2002 with the mission to “equip the people who build the brands using consumer research, brand strategy, training and other services and tools”. Through Noetic, Nancie has provided strategic guidance to clients large and small, including: AT&T, Discovery Channel, Georgetown University, McCann Worldgroup, Nike, Vail Resorts, Samsung Electronics, SC Johnson, Baywa Renewal energy and others. This is a very personal and practical conversation that you're sure to enjoy!4:14 Jeanie shares how she met Nancie5:35 Nancie's personal philosophy10:05 Nancie describes her ideal day & routines 15:52 Nancie's difficult day described 18:10 How to shift your energy19:21 Noetic's Core Values25:44 A proud moment from Nancie's 19 & 3/4 years in business28:22 Nancie reflects on a unique client and learning experience from her past30:45 Nancie & Jeanie discuss their support circles39:42 Embracing a mentality of learning vs fear Connect with Nancie McDonnell Ruder:https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancieatnoetic/ Subscribe: Warriors At Work PodcastsWebsite: Jeaniecoomber.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/986666321719033/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeanie_coomber/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanie_coomberLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeanie-coomber-90973b4/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbMZ2HyNNyPoeCSqKClBC_w

CAN A PLAYA PLAY?
Is there hope for our Constitutional Republic?

CAN A PLAYA PLAY?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 61:00


Robert Viney is a former nuclear powered submarine officer, US Naval Academy graduate, and Cold War and Vietnam War Veteran. He served as a Marketing Executive at Procter & Gamble, Chief Marketing Officer, at Arm & Hammer Household Products, and SVP, CMO, COO for several digital marketing startups. Robert authored a chapter for the book “When Core Values are Strategic”.   Following a 30-year career as a business executive, he founded a small business and executive coaching practice and taught leadership at the University of Cincinnati.  He volunteered in several community service non-profit organizations and taught several courses in the adult lifelong learning programs at Miami University, and the Universities of Cincinnati and Dayton.  The leadership and business growth challenges in these roles provided the background for the approach he used to analyze the problems in our politics and government processes today and develop innovative solutions.   Important links:    Book website not yet launched (www.citizenrules.org is owned)Previous blog link: www.newdirectionpolicies.blogspot.comBook purchase link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1789049539Book Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/citizenrules.orgAuthor email: bobviney70@gmail.com  

IseeRobots Radio
Geekfest Rants Ep.457: Trek and Empire Posters - Revenge versus Vengeance

IseeRobots Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 46:56


It's time for posters of the month.  Join Carlos today at GeekFest Rants as he tackles two new posters:  Star Trek the Motion Picture (Rainbow Poster) and Procter & Gamble's free with purchase Empire Luke poster.  Then we continue with our dual franchise theme by visiting the little known battle between Revenge and Vengeance....that is Revenge of the Jedi versus The Vengeance of Khan.  Who lost the war and ended up changing their name?  Spoiler alert!  They both did.

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth
Maximizing your digital advertising spend

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 33:43


TakeawaysJK Lloyd, President and founder of Eruptr, estimated that 20% of hospitals in 2011 had used search engine marketing at all. Relative to other industries, hospitals have been slower to jump into digital advertising.Digital advertising grew 12.2% in 2020 and continues to grow, with ad spending projected to surpass the 200 billion mark in the upcoming year.Healthcare and pharma still only represent a small portion of the media mix across industries. In 2021, these segments represented just 7.2% of the display advertising pie and 6.4 % in 2021. While this statistic only accounts for display (as opposed to search and programmatic — still a relatively small piece of the pie.Digital advertising may not be as effective as marketers think. Almost half of all internet traffic is generated by bots, with one-third of advertising dollars wasted on ad click fraud. Global businesses are expected to lose $44 billion to ad fraud by 2022.Apple is making updates that limit marketers targeting capabilities by giving users more control over their preferences.Several large advertisers have made deep cuts in their digital ad budget — including Procter & Gamble (cut $200M), JPMorgan Chase (slashed ad reach by 99%) — and seen little or no measurable impact on their business. The multi-billion-dollar questionWith bot traffic and fraudulent activity inflating our metrics, marketers must ask themselves what they can do to reduce digital advertising waste.We need to recognize technology's limitations and adjust our strategies accordingly. For example, it's easy to overestimate a platform's targeting capabilities.Keep in mind where digital advertising should fit into your program's overall media mix, and get specific about the channel you use. For example, if the goal is awareness, video will probably deliver better results than display.If you are running an awareness campaign, however, question why you're running an awareness campaign in the first place. There are way too many campaigns where awareness is the goal and impressions are the KPI.Even Peloton started with product marketing advertising and then moved into brand advertising, video, and CTV. Evaluate your metricsImpressions and reach are not adequate measurements for campaign success because users often do not choose whether or not they see an ad. Similarly, impressions do not indicate any targeting accuracy. You could have a high number of impressions amongst a completely wrong audience.To effectively drive behavior change, our metrics need to reflect behavior change. Site visit rate, the ratio of page visits to ad impressions, can be a quality measure for consumer behavior change. Although this number may be lower than the engagement rate, it gives you a better view of consumer action resulting from your campaign.Ad platform monetization models are based on clicks, which includes accidental clicks. Accidental clicks may inflate metrics to make the campaign appear more successful than it was, ultimately driving more revenue for the ad platform.Retargeting can motivate consumer action, but it doesn't necessarily help marketers attribute consumer action to a campaign.For example, you may be served an ad for soft pretzels based on your interest in soft pretzels. After seeing the ad, if you buy a soft pretzel, the sale may be attributed to the campaign rather than your unrelated love for pretzels.This HBR article calls out the issue of correlation vs. causation and where marketers need to sharpen their skill sets.Driving consumer action requires marketers to understand consumer psychology, behavioral science, analytics, statistics, and more.By hiring experts in each of these domains and documenting learning objectives for your team, marketing leaders can bolster their team's capacity to deliver results. 

The Marketing Book Podcast
356 Positioning For Advantage by Kim Whitler

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 88:16


Positioning for Advantage: Techniques and Strategies to Grow Brand Value by Kimberly Whitler About the Book: Most of us have an intuitive sense of superior branding. We prefer to purchase brands we find distinctive―that deliver on some important, relevant dimension better than other brands. These brands have typically achieved positional advantage. Yet few professionals have had the formal training that goes beyond marketing theory to bridge the “theory-doing gap”―understanding the specific techniques and strategies that can be used to create brands that attain positional advantage in the marketplace. Positioning for Advantage is a comprehensive how-to guide for creating, building, and executing effective brand strategies. Kimberly A. Whitler identifies essential marketing strategy techniques and moves through the major stages of positioning a brand to achieve in-market advantage. Introducing seven tools―from strategic positioning concepts to strategy mapping to influencer maps―Whitler provides templates, frameworks, and step-by-step processes to build and manage growth brands that achieve positional advantage. This book presents real-world scenarios, helping readers activate tools to increase skill in creating brands that achieve positional advantage. Brimming with insights for students and professionals alike, Positioning for Advantage helps aspiring C-level leaders understand not only what superior branding looks like but also how to make it come to life. About the Author: Dr. Kimberly A. Whitler is currently the Frank M. Sands Sr. Associate Professor of Business Administration at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business.  Previously, she spent nearly 20 years in general management, strategy, and marketing roles within the consumer packaged goods and retailing industries, managing global, U.S., and Eastern European-based businesses. She spent most of her career at Procter & Gamble and more recently served as the general manager of the Breakfast Division for Aurora Foods, the CMO of David's Bridal, the country's leading bridal apparel retailer, and as an officer of PetSmart, the U.S.' largest pet specialty retailer. She has written over 350 articles as a Forbes senior contributor and has published in Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, The Washington Post, Ad Age, and numerous academic journals and other publications.  Her Forbes articles have garnered over 3,500,000 views, and she has been ranked as a Top Five influencer of CMOs, a Top 10 influencer of Tech B2B CMOs, and a Top 100 MarTech influencer. She has been interviewed, cited, or quoted over 2,100 times, including The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, The Washington Post, New York Times, NBC, ABC, USA Today, Entrepreneur, Fox Sports, Huffington Post, and a variety of international media outlets. And, interesting fact – she is an avid UVA men's basketball fan! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/positioning-advantage-kim-whitler

Ideamix Radio
Business 101 - How to Reinvent a Brand

Ideamix Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 30:00


Frederic Fekkai, CEO and founder of FEKKAI and co-founder of Bastide, joins us today to discuss his experience of reinventing a brand. After selling FEKKAI to Procter & Gamble in 2008, Frederic realized how far the buy-out removed his products from their original mission. In 2016, he and his wife co-founded Bastide, a beauty and lifestyle brand celebrating artisans from the South of France. In 2018, he bought the FEKKAI brand back making it the global authority in salon performance with clean, highly effective formulas in sustainable packaging. Listen in as Frederic discusses how brands change between owners and how he brought his brand back to what he wanted it to represent.Subscribe to Ideamix Radio and stay tuned for new episodes every Thursday. On Ideamix Radio we speak with entrepreneurs, solopreneurs, career changers, experts, and enthusiasts for insider tips that help you build the life, business, and career you want. Ideamix is the go-to destination for entrepreneurs to turn their idea into a business. Check out our website at www.theideamix.com. For comments, questions, podcast guest ideas, or sponsorship inquiries, please email info@theideamix.com.

通勤學英語
回顧星期天LBS - 太空相關時事趣聞 All about space

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 10:21


更多通勤學英語Podcast單元: 每日英語跟讀Podcast,就在http://www.15mins.today/daily-shadowing 精選詞彙 VOCAB Podcast,就在https://www.15mins.today/vocab 語音直播 15mins Live Podcast, 就在https://www.15mins.today/15mins-live-podcast 文法練習 In-TENSE Podcast,就在https://www.15mins.today/in-tense 歡迎到官網用email訂閱我們節目更新通知。   Topic: In space, at sea: tips on isolation from the pros With billions of people around the world suddenly adjusting to social distancing measures as part of the battle to slow the spread of COVID-19, some professionals who are used to confinement have some tips. From astronauts to submariners, here are some practical ways to boost your well-being and stave off cabin fever during those weeks stuck at home. 為減緩武漢肺炎的傳播,全世界有數十億人忽然得要適應政府的抗疫措施,以保持社交距離。對此,幾位習於禁足狀態的專業人士提供了一些訣竅。從太空人到潛水艇人員,以下是他們所提供的實用方法,可以讓你待在家這幾週的健康情況改善,並避免幽閉煩躁症。 ‘Have a schedule' Scott Kelly, a retired NASA astronaut, spent nearly a year aboard the International Space Station. He told AFP that mindset was crucial. “People need to have the right expectation, we don't know when this is gonna be over,” he said. “We could be in this for the long haul so your mindset needs to be: I'm living a similar thing to living in space for a year, I need to have a schedule, I need to get up at a regular time, to go to sleep at a regular time.” He also said exercise was key for both physical and mental well-being while confined. “You need to schedule time for exercise. If you cannot get out if you don't have a garden, raise the window shade, open the window and stick your head outside, make that part of daily routine.” 「按表操課」 自美國太空總署退休的太空人史考特‧凱利,曾在國際太空站待了將近一年。他告訴法新社說,心態是至關重要的。他說:「我們不知道這情況何時會結束,人們必須有這正確的預期心理」。「我們可能會處於這種狀態很長的時間,因此你的心態應該是這樣:我現在就像是要在太空生活一年,我需要有作息時間表,需要定時起床、定時去睡覺」。他還說,禁足在家時,運動對於身體和心理的健康至關重要。「你需要安排運動的時間。如果你沒有花園、不能出去,那就拉起窗簾、打開窗戶,然後把頭伸到外面,把它排程為每日例行公事之一」。 Find your mission For Vincent Larnaudie-Eiffel, a former commander of a nuclear submarine, working well in confinement means finding and investing in your own personal “mission.” Just like on board the sub, “stuck in our apartments, we all share a mission and that is to protect others, medical workers, and successfully navigate this ordeal.” He said it was important to establish a daily routine and stick to it. “You can't give in... you need to do something with this suspended time.” For Larnaudie-Eiffel and his crewmates, this involved building models or growing plants under artificial light during their spare time. “It's also important that everyone has their own space,” he told AFP. “In a submarine it might be a cramped bed-space. It's the same in a cramped apartment.” 找到你的使命 對曾任核子潛艇司令官的凡松‧拉諾迪—艾菲爾來說,在居家隔離時把工作做好,意味找到你自己的「使命」並投入其中。如同在潛艇中一樣,「我們困在公寓裡,所有人都有著共同的使命,那就是保護別人、保護醫療人員,並成功度過這嚴酷的考驗」。他說,建立一套每日例行程序並堅持下去,是很重要的。「你不能屈服……你必須用這段停擺的時間來做點事情」。對於拉諾迪—艾菲爾及其潛艇組員來說,這包括在閒暇時組裝模型,或是利用人造光種植物。「每個人都有自己的空間也是很重要的」,他告訴法新社說。「在潛水艇中,此個人空間或許是個狹窄的床位。若是身處狹小的公寓,也是一樣的道理」。 ‘Try new things' Sailor Isabelle Autissier was the first woman to circumnavigate the globe alone. This involved a lot of time to herself. But she said she never felt lonely because “I chose to be alone.” For people stuck at home she recommends using the time “to try new things, reading, listening to different music, write your journal, take photos, start drawing.” Above all it's important that people don't look too far ahead. When she was at sea, facing an indeterminate amount of time alone “the first thing is not to count the days,” said Autissier. “You can't constantly be thinking I'll get there in three months, in a month, in 10 minutes.” 「嘗試新事物」 航海家伊莎貝‧歐提西耶是第一位獨自環繞地球航行的女性。要完成此舉,她必須孤身一人很長一段時間。但她說她從不覺得孤獨,因為「是我選擇了獨自一人」。對於那些困在家裡的人,她建議可以利用這段時間「嘗試新事物、閱讀、聽不同的音樂、寫日記、拍照、開始畫畫」。最重要的,是不要想得太遠。歐提西耶說,當她在海上時,面對不知將會持續多久的獨處時間,「第一件事就是不要去數日子」。「你不能一直去想說我會在三個月、一個月、十分鐘後抵達那裡」。 ‘Morale dips are normal' Cyprien Verseux, an astrobiologist at Germany's University of Bremen, once spent over a year in a small pod with five other volunteers simulating conditions in a future mission to Mars. “It's normal for your morale and productivity to dip,” he said. “That's not a sign of weakness. Don't add guilt to your problems.” When in confinement for the experiment, Verseux wasn't allowed outside and was forbidden from communicating in real time with the outside world. “Even if we don't all react the same to confinement we can adopt good practise that makes these periods more manageable,” he said. He recommends choosing one or two activities and practising hard. “Also do your sport, light weights, do yoga, zumba... even if there's a lack of space there are solutions to stay in shape,” he said. 「士氣低落是正常的」 德國不來梅大學的天體生物學家西普揚‧維索曾與五名志願者一起,在一個小艙裡待了一年多,模擬未來火星探索任務之情境。 他說:「你的士氣和生產力下降是正常的」。「這並不表示你軟弱。不要把罪惡感再加到你的問題上頭」。 維索參與這禁足的實驗時,不能到艙外,也被禁止與外界進行即時溝通。他說:「即便我們對被禁足的反應不同,我們也可以採用一些好的做法,來使這些時間更容易度過」。 他建議選擇一、兩項活動並努力練習。他說:「你也可以做運動、減肥、做瑜伽、跳森巴舞……即使空間不足,也可以找到解決辦法來維持身材」。 Stay in touch In 2009, astronaut Frank de Winne became the first European to command the International Space Station. He said it was vital to maintain human contact, even if only electronically. “Means of communication are there, you have to make the effort and use them,” he said. The Belgian, now in quarantine on Earth, makes sure to video call his elderly mother at the same time each day. “That allows her to see me. It also creates a bit of structure for her because she knows that I'm going to call her,” he said. 保持聯繫 太空人法蘭克‧德溫勒在二○○九年成為指揮國際太空站的第一位歐洲人。他說,保持人與人之間的聯繫極為重要,即便只是透過電子的方式。「我們已經有了溝通的工具,你必須付諸行動來運用它」。比利時籍的他現正在地球上進行隔離,且每天一定會在同樣的時間跟年邁的母親視訊通話。他說:「這讓她可以看到我。這也給她一個時間框架,因為她知道我會在這時候打電話給她」。 Source article: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/lang/archives/2020/03/31/2003733674   Next Article   Topic: NASA and Tide team up to do laundry in space Tide is going to outer space. The Procter & Gamble brand is partnering with NASA to keep astronauts' spacesuits fresh, even on Mars. 汰漬正在前往外太空。這個寶鹼公司的品牌正與美國航太總署合作,維持太空人太空服的乾淨,即便是在火星。 Company and NASA scientists have created a fully degradable detergent that will clean clothes without wasting water. 該公司與NASA科學家已經創造一款完全可自然分解的洗滌劑,不用浪費水就能潔淨衣物。 Over the next decade, they'll be testing fabric care products, including Tide pens and wipes, at the International Space Station and on missions to the moon and Mars. 在未來10年中,他們將在國際太空站與登月、登火星的任務中,測試織物照護產品,包括汰漬的筆與濕紙巾。 The months or even years that astronauts spend away from Earth means that their spacesuits and clothes can become smelly and stained. Clothes have to be reworn several times before they are ejected with other waste into the atmosphere or sent back to Earth as trash. A crew member will receive 160 pounds of clothes per year through resupply shipments. 太空人離開地球數月,甚至數年的時間,意味著他們的太空服與衣物會變臭且染色。這些衣物與其他廢物被拋入大氣層或當成垃圾送回地球前,必須重複穿著許多次。1名組員每年將透過補給,拿到160磅重的衣物。   Next Article   Topic: Russia wants to return to Venus, build reusable rocket 俄羅斯希望重返金星,打造可重複使用的火箭 The head of Russia's space agency said Friday that Roscosmos wants to return to Venus and bring back soil samples and build spacecraft that will surpass Elon Musk's rockets. 俄羅斯太空機構負責人週五說,俄羅斯航太太空活動國有公司(Roscosmos)想重返金星 ,帶回土壤樣本,並打造超越(太空探索科技公司)創辦人穆斯克的火箭的太空船。 "We are making a methane rocket to replace the Soyuz-2," Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin said in an interview with state news agency RIA Novosti. 「我們正在打造一種甲烷火箭取代聯合2號火箭(Soyuz-2)」,俄羅斯航太總裁羅戈辛在接受國營「俄羅斯新聞社」訪問時說。 He said it will be a reusable space complex, noting that it will be possible to use its first stage at least 100 times. 他說,新火箭將是可以重複使用的太空綜合體,並強調第一節將有望重複使用至少100次。 "Of course we are looking at what our American colleagues are doing," said Rogozin. "But our engineers are trying to take a shortcut - not to repeat what our SpaceX colleagues are doing but surpass them." 「我們當然有在關注美國同業的進展」,羅戈辛說。「但我們的工程師正試圖抄近路—不是重複SpaceX在做的事,而是超越他們。」Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1457274; https://news.ltn.com.tw/news/world/paper/1395146   Next Article   Topic: Chinese rocket's chaotic fall to Earth highlights problem of space junk Remnants of China's biggest rocket landed in the Indian Ocean on May 9, ending days of speculation over where the debris would hit and drawing US criticism over a lack of transparency. 中國最大火箭之殘骸已在五月九日墜落印度洋,讓數天來對殘骸究竟將撞擊何處的猜測告一段落,也引起美國對此事缺乏透明度的批評。 But the fiery fate of a booster rocket, wherever it comes down, speaks to the larger issue of space debris and space sustainability, especially as space becomes a target not just for national space programs but also increasingly the private sector. Under international treaty, private space actors, who are expected to put 45,000 satellites in low Earth orbit over the next several years, are under the legal responsibility of their host nations. 火箭推進器在熊熊烈焰中的宿命,無論它掉在哪裡,都觸及太空垃圾與太空永續性這更大的問題,尤其此時太空不僅成為國家太空計畫之標的,也愈趨成為私有公司之標的。在未來幾年中,經營太空業務的私有公司將把四萬五千顆衛星送入低空地球軌道,而根據國際條約規定,法律責任是由其東道國所承擔。 Add to that an estimated 9,300 tonnes of space junk that is already orbiting the planet and the probability of space collisions and debris pollution is an issue of concern. 此外,據估計,現已有九千三百噸太空垃圾在繞著地球轉,太空中的碰撞與垃圾污染問題令人關注。 Previously, a piece of paint the size of a fingernail struck the windscreen of a space shuttle, piercing two of three layers of glass. 此前,一塊指甲大小的油漆打到一艘太空船的擋風玻璃,刺穿了三層厚玻璃的其中兩層。 The fate of Long March 5B could refocus governments and international bodies on the issue of space sustainability, and that could provide more opportunity to firms like UK-based Astroscale that are preparing to tackle the debris problem with commercial junk-collecting services. 長征五號的命運可能使政府及國際組織重新關注太空的永續性問題,而可能給像英國的Astroscale這樣的公司帶來更多機會,這些公司正準備提供收集垃圾之商業化服務,以解決太空垃圾問題。 Astroscale is currently demonstrating a vehicle called “ELSA-d” in lower Earth orbit to show that space debris clean-up is indeed possible. It is a fiendishly difficult task, especially if the target satellite is spinning and tumbling. The test is using a satellite to capture a test drone with a magnet. In time, larger objects will require a robotic arm. Astroscale正在地球較低軌道展示一種名為「ELSA-d」的運載工具,以證明清除太空垃圾的確可行。這是一項艱鉅的任務,尤其是目標衛星處於旋轉與翻滾的情況時。該測試透過衛星進行,以磁鐵來捕獲測試用無人機,最後也會需要用到機械臂來抓取較大的物體。Source article: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/lang/archives/2021/05/17/2003757510  

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP279 - Amazon, EBay, Shopify Q3 Earnings

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 58:08


EP279 - Amazon, EBay, Shopify Q3 Earnings  In Episode 257 we talked about IDFA and the impact of privacy and digital ads, and then on Episode 277 we talked about Supply chain pain (SupplyPain™). Now that we're in Q3 earnings season we're seeing those themes play out. This week we dive into the earnings calls from Snap, eBay, Shopify, and Amazon. We also discuss the Rent the Runway IPO. Episode 279 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Thursday. October 28th, 2021. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:00] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 279 the Halloween edition being recorded on Thursday October 28 2021 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:18] Hey Jason happy Halloween. Jason: [0:21] Happy Halloween to you too Scott are you a big Halloween guy I kind of imagine you are. Scot: [0:26] Am I like to dress up but once my kids became teenagers that was suddenly not cool so I haven't been dressing up since probably for probably like the last few years so. If you dress up for your son enjoy it while you can. Jason: [0:42] Come over and spend it with us Steven is happy to be your dress up beard. Scot: [0:47] Yeah he would have a Darth Sidious outfit and work to the channel visor Christmas party and scared all the look it's so so I don't do that with five and under. Jason: [0:59] Yeah you probably weren't invited back to your own company's Halloween party. Scot: [1:03] Yeah well a lot of times the wives didn't know that I was so sorry. Jason: [1:06] Yeah but the other way to think about it is that it's Christmas in October both because retailers are desperately trying to pull holiday sales and but also because Apple finally release the new Macbook Pros that you and I have been waiting for. Scot: [1:20] Yeah yeah we had some Getty conversations about that you've got the new chips and yeah and you know the Apple, the Apple launch events have gotten kind of weirder and weirder with covid like now it's like you know Tim standing in a Tim Cook standing in a giant corn field then the the camera flies around like a crow and so so those have been kind of fun to watch just for the theatrics of they're going through. Jason: [1:47] Yeah yeah no the production like despite the fact that it's all pre-recorded and stuff and you know the the production value is pretty high I I'd like to see him go the other way it should be like Tim Cook in his pj's in his kitchen being like Oh and we invented a new chip. Scot: [2:02] I miss Johnny I've saying aluminium this my favor. Jason: [2:05] Yes and as you may know aluminium is dramatically more expensive than aluminum. Scot: [2:11] Yeah and chamfered edges. Jason: [2:13] Yeah all that's gone now it's just a chunk of aluminium but I'm excited to get mine I have a little jealousy because I feel like we both ordered early on launch day and I think yours already shipped is that true. Scot: [2:29] Yeah it's somewhere on a plane from Shanghai right now I hope according to the the tracking number we'll see. Jason: [2:36] Nice nice I will be excited for your unboxing and I half expected that when you jumped on the, the conference call to record this one that you'd be wearing like a Versace like jogging suit or something because my my Google Alerts have blown up this week because get spiffy is on fire. Scot: [2:56] Yeah yeah we had a big week it's few we announced our Series be fundraising so that was a lot of fun, I think I had a record LinkedIn post I think I had something like 300 comments and so those those good it's always. Yeah it's been a kind of a crazy 18 months for us and I can definitely commiserate with our retail folks that are going through harder times now we had those common being the pandemic but got through and. It's been crazy we've since March our business has grown like eighty percent so it's been like this crazy post covid-19, perfect storm for for Mobile Car Care Bears, you have no one can hire anybody but we've been able to kind of squeak that out and then no one can get new vehicles so they're running their vehicle Vehicles longer, they don't have anyone to take them to brick-and-mortar service centers they don't have mechanics to hire so they call us if so that's been it's been a lot more fun than this time last year. Jason: [3:54] That that is awesome I'm going to assume the one slight negative is you get some good news like that you get all those those post cooking on LinkedIn and I'm assuming, every vendor under the planet has I read your news and is now pitching you for something. Scot: [4:10] Yes yeah I try to forward them all to you because, there's a lot of Executive coaching out there available that you know maybe you could use a lot of video stories a lot of AI chatbots you know I don't know how on Earth we have, the world can sustain at least a thousand AI chatbots but there are a lot of those out there yeah when trick is someone told me, if you put an emoji in your name on LinkedIn the Bots pick it up or get confused by it so that that helps give me an automatic filter so if someone kind of uses that emoji when they're kind of like hey Scott and that you know they put the Emoji then you know that it's a bot so that I just delete. Jason: [4:54] Oh my God this episode of the podcast is now like officially worth it just for that that's a pro tip. Scot: [5:00] Life hacks yeah I'm here for LinkedIn life hacks that's my that's my speciality that and saying aluminum. Jason: [5:08] Those are all good skills but congratulations I know it's non-trivial ever to get people to have their trust in you and invest and then in this climate in particular I'm sure. It was a rigorous process. Scot: [5:25] Thanks thanks and we actually added the folks at Goodyear Ventures so shout out to them I think some of their e-commerce folks listen to the show so appreciate their support. Jason: [5:34] Nice A wise choice in podcast as well so any e-commerce stuff you follow this week. Scot: [5:42] Well it has been probably one of the more interesting weeks in the land of e-commerce for a while so listeners will remember that you know. We were recording this in October so this is always an interesting time to read what's going on in the Q3 results which kind of sets us up for Q4. So we always pay particular attention during this time of year. But if blisters remember back in March of this year you and I I would like to say and I think if we voted on this would be unanimous we're basically Clairvoyant Nostradamus level of predicting things. You and I both kind of felt like the industry wasn't taking this idea if a the Apple privacy changes coming to both iOS what is it 14.5 and then later 15 added some more. It didn't seem like anyone was taking that as seriously as you and I kind of felt like it was going to hit him so he did a really big deep dive on that that's one of our more popular episodes that's 257. And then into 77 you and I again being The Clairvoyant Wonders that we are we started talking about the supply chain being way worse than folks thought it were in coined Supply pain. So we are now starting to see those two things Collide in really interesting ways that I don't. [7:02] You know I think our guesses that those would be bigger than people thought on it came true so let's walk through what that. The first one was Snapchat so they we don't usually cover them on the show but I think it kind of sets the tone here they started off their earning Seasons last week Thursday on the 21st, and they just totally whiffed on their expectations and I thought it would read this little segment from from one of the Wall Street. [7:30] Analyst. While snap was clear that changes have not impacted the efficacy of their advertising iOS 14.5 is limiting direct response advertisers ability to measure and optimize campaigns on Snapchat. Leading to reduce spending on the platform specifically the update was pushed to users in July blah blah blah blah and it restricts the advertisers ability to use their measurement tools. So basically used to be able to measure what was going on in Snapchat and you know and because it's in an app and that's largely the use cases inside of the app for advertisers they have no idea. Traffic is converting or not so that's not good especially, you know and then advertisers are into buckets you know this but just for listeners there's brand advertisers were just kind of top of the funnel building awareness in just really trying to be seen and what not, and then there's more direct response where you're really trying to measure you know I'm selling in Snapchat Maps I'm a convenience store and I want people to come in and get a slice of, and I'm measuring that conversion that just went away so that big segment of advertisers is very upset. And what Apple did is they offered this alternative I don't know the right way to say this but it's their own ad that work how do you how do you say. [8:47] Gad Network Scott ad Network I don't know I'm going to call it apples ad network but that's not the official name. So Apple said okay don't worry everyone we're going to do this privacy thing over here but we're going to give you these little tool sets so that your advertisers can see what's going on. Well those things really stink worse than anyone I ever imagined because you know they. Because they're super anonymised you have to have you have to be at this really big scale so if you're kind of a micro let's say you're not 7-Eleven your Joe's convenience store, well in Des Moines Iowa well you're never going to have enough data in there to give you anything so so it doesn't work for this vast segments of advertisers I think everyone was surprised by that, then if it does work the reporting is delayed as much as 72 hours so it's like what happened last Thursday kind of thing, so it's just a total train wreck and then on top of that to kind of pile on, snap said in addition a bunch of their brand advertisers turned off because, they just don't have any products they can sell because of the supply chain problems so so it was a double whammy for snap and the stock Plum old plummeted like, 10% the first day and has continued to slide and so it's down 20 percent as of now so that was that got everyone really squirrelly and spooked out. [10:16] What is your take on the Snapchat side. Jason: [10:18] Yeah no I mean you I think you covered it really well like in general there has been a trend where more ad dollars are shifting to more of those direct response ads so the fact that like that's the. [10:31] The side of advertising that got diminished was like extra severe because you know people were generally trying to spend more money at the bottom of the funnel than, then they had in the past these digital, platforms and especially after Google and Facebook they the bulk of their advertisers are the long tail Advertiser so they tend to be smaller people that are more impacted by these sort of like cohort models that, the Apple and Google are trying to use, um and I would just say like there is a funny thing here like the attribution always sucked and it best it's this last click attribution someone saw your ad clicked on it and then bought the thing. And so therefore your ad was worthwhile you never will know if you would have sold the thing, without that add right and they may very well have like type your name into a platform that then showed your ad right above your organic listing and. You know the the ad kind of stole the click right so. So you know there always is this dirty little secret that like attribution is not the same as incrementality. And you know now like these advertisers that used to be able to justify their spend are having a harder time because of these numbers but the other thing is mucking up is about 73% of all these digital ads are programmatically bought so. [11:56] Computer program buys it and guess what the most important impart inputs are for that programmatic algorithm its, those those ads success metrics so the fact that is delayed 72 hours it's not just an inconvenience that you know someone buying an ad isn't going to see a report for a couple days, it means you can't do this real-time bidding based on like you know hitting particular row as goals and things like that with your at so, it is a mess I would just say you know snap and Facebook you know used to be a huge competitive advantage that the bulk of their user base was in this mobile app and you know the fact that everything happened in the app was a huge benefit and now it's. It's unfortunately for them sort of biting them in the in the butt. Scot: [12:40] So so that got Wall Street very much awake about this issue and many of the reports were like we just don't know how bad Q4 is going to be because, you know iOS 15 is now out and it increasingly has turned the crank on privacy this one is really more around the efficacy of email marketing, but if you're if you're a brand you have you know and used to do a ton of direct response advertising and snap and, you know you're doing a bunch of email marketing you've just had two legs of the stool kind of taken out from underneath him so. This got Wall Street very worried a lot of the stocks kind of reacted and then that was kind of the set up this week so then we hit Monday of this week, and Facebook was next up and everyone was like losing their mind because if you think about Snapchat is largely used through the app on phones same is similarly true Facebook at least has some desktop traffic. But I believe snap doesn't have any it's just an app yeah it's got to be snap. [13:41] Sermons like okay this is going to be bad but how bad so Facebook came out and they miss their consensus numbers but they were in range with what they had kind of guided to so I wear a snap kind of thing just totally blew up everything. And then they also kind of lowered going into the fourth quarter and so there was kind of a little bit of collective sigh of relief that was like who that wasn't as bad as we thought it would be. [14:08] And they kind of said oh yeah and also we're going to change our name so everyone's like what, okay but then they did they didn't change their name at that particular time so that was kind of weird, so everyone is kind of like what is this and you know they are obsessed with this idea of the metaverse we should probably do a deep dive on this at some point but this this idea that, you know you'll kind of be able to go in and out of the seamless 3D World either with augmented reality or virtual reality and, Jason I love to talk about this future things but don't have time to get into it here, so everyone was like okay that wasn't so bad and then on Wednesday both eBay and Google announced Google surprise to the upside and, you know I believe this is because they are they own a phone platform they own a browser, so in this new world of third-party data kind of going away they're in a pretty good position because they have a lot of first-party data. Now they do have some exposure you know especially through like their ad networks and stuff but they were able to mitigate that through the bulk of their other activities. [15:18] So so that was interesting and then reading that report one thing they actually called out was that they one of the segments that was stronger than anticipated was the kind of called it e-commerce and that encapsulates. The traditional Google shopping that most merchants and brand folks will know, but then they talked about how they're having their starting to see a fair amount of success on YouTube and it wasn't clear to me I was going to ask you it wasn't clear to me what exactly they were talking about their they didn't they didn't elaborate, no is it live streaming is it some product, I think you can send a feed into YouTube now and how things bought through there so I wanted to pick your brain on that Google aspect of. Jason: [16:01] Yeah no it is getting a lot of traction and it's a there's a family of AD products on YouTube called YouTube shoppable ads and it. It's less about live streaming there's a tiny little bit of it on YouTube that's why I've streaming but it's it's being able to embed clickable links in video streams and then add pre-rolls for other people's video streams, the let you endemically buy a product and so the and the. You know the the amount of volume on those kind of add products versus like a product listing add on Google searches lower, um but the efficacy is much higher and the growth rate is is much higher so people are consuming a ton of minutes of a video on the YouTube platforms and you know now we're starting to see. Tangible examples of being able to convert those audiences into buyers so that's that's kind of interesting but it's less live streaming and more. Sort of you know embedded links in the video that that either do an endemic check out on YouTube or send you to a Retailer's e-commerce site. Scot: [17:15] Yeah yeah I definitely want to dig into that maybe we could do a deep dive on another show and kind of look at some of these cases I think it's interesting so then everyone was like holy cow this is this is awesome Google did great and then eBay announced and their their results are kind of what I would call, Punk they're just kind of like yeah you know they they weren't terrible like Snapchat and one of the nursing things is Snapchat set the bar so low that people missing consensus kind of was like, almost like a hooray it was a really weird setup I've never seen anything quite like it so it's kind of an interesting result there, so you know being being not terrible as kind of the new win oddly enough, so there gmv was down 12 percent year over year because of these tough comps, and you have a picture maybe we can talk about where you know you see this mountain last year of, do the pandemic and now women's comping against that mountain and a lot of folks especially, Pure Play anyone Pure Play retail they're not able to compliments that they're coming down their growth has slowed below to kind of where that mountain of growth was last year and eBay has fallen into that trap. [18:26] They did spend a lot of time on the call and I thought this was, Clairvoyant of you that kept talking about comping against 2019 so kind of a two year ago comp because that takes the pandemic out and makes you look better when you take that big mountain of a year Outlast in kind of in the sandwich of, the 2019 in the 2021 and when you do that they were up 9 percent so they felt like that was kind of when I don't know about that. Jason: [18:51] Yeah if you do a word cloud of all the the earnings calls this quarter two years ago will be the biggest phrase on the word cloud. Scot: [19:02] So then today was interesting because the setup was and I don't think this is ever lined up like this so in the morning we had Shopify and then in the evening we had Amazon, and when you when you when you're a public company you have to you can't you can't announce earnings while the markets open most people historically have done, you know after market close Shopify for some reason they like the morning, part of it is I think you don't compete with analyst for their time because sometimes these internet analyst. You know like on that night we had Google and eBay they'll go to the what'll happen is they'll see the press release and I'll have to decide which one of the calls they're going to go to. And they'll say they all go to Google well now you're the eBay folks in your like does anyone have a question and it's crickets and there's no Wall Street analyst. It's kind of there because they're they're all over on the you're competing for their attention, so yeah so so it creates this interesting setup in that like around eight o'clock before the market opened 8 a.m. eastern Shopify announced and this one was really super squirrelly so. Shopify has been priced for Perfection for a very long time if you look at the various ways of measuring you know they're there. [20:18] Valuation against Revenue multiples of Revenue or ibadah or any of that and you look at a chart there always way up in the upper right hand corner just way off the charts and how Wall Street has valued the. So you know so they actually came in below expectations pretty considerably on the top and bottom line. But again because of that weird Snapchat has Snap Chat setup. It was viewed as a victory which is kind of really strange because I would have guessed. Because Shopify has been so price for Perfection they were kind of set for like a ten to twenty percent correction and then you know they would get back on track, but no they were like up 8% by by missing their numbers says like super strange reaction I don't hundred percent understand. So so I think what it indicates is that folks you know Wall Street was like really worried about it because, again they don't have a ton of they're there their merchants, largely our advertising that could be like a set of these these Snapchat advertisers or they're on Facebook and those guys had headwinds and it just felt like it would be natural for them to face. [21:28] So just put some numbers on it their revenue grew 46 percent year over year and Wall Street expectation was 54% I think this may be part of it too right because, this dismiss is still, pretty pretty good compared to some of the other numbers we just went through right so a 46% grower missing 54% expectations during these tough comps has as it's not hard to shed a tear on that. [21:53] Now they did they did kind of danced around i d f a and supply chain and and for the first time that I'm aware of the client to put out a consensus like an estimate for next year and they kind of talked about a framework. Um so I think and the other trick is if you think about it they're doing that call today which is the 28th right. So in their their digital business so they should have they have a kind of a read on the quarter so so I kind of felt like the body language was maybe that. They're not the setup in the queue for is maybe getting a little bit worse than Q3 but I may be reading too much into that so I thought that was interesting and then, they did talk about the supply pain, and then finally one of the big investment areas they called out for holiday is this Shopify fulfillment Network which I thought was interesting because I keep getting conflicting information on this where I've had people tell me they've got one thing in Canada and one of the US and they're tiny and they're not investing in it then on the call they're talking about how they're really investing in it so I don't I don't know what to make of that. Any takeaways from Shopify on your side. Jason: [23:02] Yeah well if you so first of all I have a personal theory that shopify's going to be more impacted by Supply pain than some of the other big players were talking about right and that's because, they don't, they're not a retailer they don't have any fulfillment they don't sell anything to Consumers they're just an aggregation of a ton of small businesses and there's none of those small businesses individually have any leverage our resources to hedge their supply chain problems whereas, Amazon and Walmart have a lot of levers and can buy ships and moved to different ports and do all kinds of different things to mitigate, the supply chain risks and so I I do think because they're predominantly small businesses that they're going to take a bigger hit from the supply chain disruptions then. Is Amazon so Point number one the, I looked at their gmv numbers and and I have to say like in general I'm a fan of Shopify I think they solve a real problem they do it really well I think they have a ton of growth opportunity, I think they've got a bunch of smart profitable. [24:14] Accelerator businesses that they've you know kind of added to the the core platform and the one I like the most is shop pay, and you know their own payment technology is now driving 50 percent of their whole gym V so they've done a terrific job of watching this this payment technology and getting incremental revenue from that and that's you know that's much more valuable than the, thirty bucks a month or two hundred bucks a month they get for hosting because as those the small businesses grow they get to grow with them and all sorts of good things so that's my precursor, um I hate it when people compare their gmv to Amazon and other retailers because it just it's not Apples to Apples. [24:56] Shopify is gmv mostly grows because they add a hundred thousand more small businesses that are each selling a hundred thousand dollars worth of stuff right and so it's, it's not like Shopify hasn't attracted any customer Shopify hasn't sold anything it's kind of like if you said well FedEx is gmv is bigger than Amazon's or ncr's GM V which is the cash register in Walmart and Best Buy and Starbucks is much bigger than Amazon like it is but who cares right like they like NCR didn't create any of that traffic so. Let me just say like there are all these numbers where their cumulative GMB is getting very significant it's over 400 billion their gym V4 last quarter was 41 billion so that puts them at like. Was that a hundred sixty billion run rate which you know is starting to get there as I like the fourth or fifth largest e-commerce site, um and I like I think that's a false narrative that always annoys me a little bit. Scot: [26:01] They had their on CNBC and they have this stat they like to do where it took them eight years to get to a hundred billion and then a year to get to the next hundred billion or something I forget the number but. Jason: [26:12] So one one side note that the thing that always drives me nuts about their gmv as they don't give you any breakdown about churn right so you don't know. Like is that because all the their original customers are thriving and growing and making their GM V much bigger or. Did they lose all of those customers because they went out of business but they got twice as many new customers we really haven't known in their investor presentation this time they did have a cohort graphic. The kind of and it didn't have any numbers on it and you know so it's kind of hard to interpret but like. It implied that they're all cohorts are a disproportionate amount of their revenue and that their turn is less than I personally suspected, so I actually will reach out offline to Professor Dan McCarthy and see if he wants to accept the challenge of trying, to reverse into some some churn numbers from those Graphics that they provided. Scot: [27:11] Yeah that the trick they do in the software as a service world is they'll take a section of customers cohort like you know, Q 1 2019 customers and then the look at the revenue from that cohort well you could lose like eighty percent of them but the 20% survivors if they go up you know if they have sizable gmv growth their revenue swamps the unit lost of 80% that my guess is that's what they're doing. Jason: [27:36] Yeah and it's still for everyone listening it still is wildly long tail like they in this investor presentation they have a list of like the there there big Enterprise logos and it's Jim shark. Which is a. You know probably one of the bigger digital native vertical Brands but you know not not a billion dollar retailer and it's Staples of Canada right and like Staples is a good brand Canada is smaller than California so like. You know it's not like they're they're you know taking these huge Enterprise sites yet. Scot: [28:12] On CNBC they talked about how they just once Banks and that didn't really resonate with me I just can't imagine I don't know maybe it's like a side maybe it's like an international side or something. Jason: [28:22] Yeah now and I do think they have a ton of I mean they have a ton of growth in North America but the international growth I feel like is you know, huge for them and then all these payment things and, and you know they partnered with with a firm so they have buy now pay later in their payment echo system and remember, like you can now use their payment system for transactions that are not on Shopify so it's an endemic payment option on Facebook now and so it's interesting like in the long run they could get out of the web hosting business in just you know be a bigger more profitable PayPal. Scot: [28:56] Yeah sidebar there is a lot of rumors that house going to buy Pinterest and largely driven by this IDF a where everyone's trying to if you're at the bottom of the direct marketing World funnel all those people because of idea of a an unintended consequence I didn't catch up to Wood is they're all trying to walk up the to the the first party data which would be by acquiring Pinterest set very interesting you know I would say we were early. Jason: [29:26] You put in this but they came out strongly and allege that that wasn't true. Scot: [29:32] Yeah well it's interesting to Think Through like you know I do think that a lot of firms are thinking about this because the idea of a is actually causing maybe even bigger ripples than I thought. Jason: [29:43] In my world the way that plays out is everybody is like so focused on the retail media networks right so selling ads on the retail properties where they do have first party data, and it's a it's a very good practice everyone should be doing it but like. The amount of attention it's getting right now like how hot it is in the market like is way bigger than the possible upside and so you get like. Every you know Clarin as a buy now pay later service like they have an ad Network right I just like just for the the you know like if you use the clarinet app too, to maintain your installment love there there's like ads in there that they're selling to to advertisers and a personal favorite is the gap and the reason that's funny is like most of these ad networks are selling to their in what they call endemic advertisers right so if, Procter & Gamble is selling Gillette razors at Walmart than Walmart will get Procter & Gamble to buy a jet razor ad on Walmart.com it makes perfect sense, um guess what there is not at the Gap in the endemic for its first it's all Gap product right so they've gotta like they're going to get Kanye to buy an ad I guess but um, you know they've got to sell to non-endemic advertisers which is a much higher bar so it just funny how. Right there is a huge rush to first-party data right now. Scot: [31:09] You get a network and or you get an ad Network it's like Oprah giving out ad Networks. [31:15] Okay so that brings us up to this evening when Amazon released so it feels like everyone had kind of. We have breathed a sigh of relief and I was like oh Amazon's going to crush it and then Amazon and if you remember last quarter Amazon kind of had a bit of a mellow kind of slight Miss quarter. And you know the stock if you look at these these kind of there's all these different names for it like Fang and all this stuff but these kind of Mega tech stocks, a lot of them have been moving pretty aggressively so Microsoft Facebook Apple Etc especially Tesla and then Amazon has been lagging the pack and usually they're the leader of the pack so, yeah I think a lot of people were expecting kind of a beat and a Amazon to really kind of take off because it's been under pressure. That didn't happen so they actually missed expectations the revenues came in at a hundred and ten point eight billion which was below the hundred fifteen point five billion so 15% year-over-year growth which is, you know a very uh name has on Nyan kind of a result now it's better than, eBay is minus 12 percent but then again Shopify and I know it doesn't count exactly because they're adding scene for sales but you could argue I guess so is Amazon's adding third parties in here too, so it was it was a bit slower than people thought in Q2 they grew 24 percent so another big step down. [32:44] A lot of this is. [32:47] They're Mountain last year really because they focus on so many essential items and Q2 they really didn't get a bump until Q 3 q 4 so there they're comping their Compass actually harder than maybe like an omni-channel or even in eBay just because of the focus of. You have sung mask and what they called kind of Emergency Essentials last year. They peel the onion and they have this one segment called online source and that was only a 3% for the third quarter and that was a deceleration from 13% in Q2. And then this rippled to the bottom line where operating income came in at four point nine billion which was well below the 5.5 billion consensus, so that's the bad news and there was some good news do you want to cover some of that. Jason: [33:35] Yeah and side note is there a new thing called like. Like you know there are always these I'd beat and raised like you know vernacular for like you know you beat the consensus and then you you raised your guidance I feel like there's a new thing it's missing grow where like you miss all your consensus numbers but your stock still goes up. Scot: [33:56] Yeah that Shopify totally nailed that one has come very strange but they did it. Jason: [34:00] Um so yeah some of the interesting things in the in the Amazon number. I like to break down those segments you hit the you know the big segments online retail and it obviously. Had a pretty slow rate of growth by Amazon standards but an interesting subset of that is physical stores right so Amazon's got. Eight different retail formats the bulk of them is 500 Whole Foods stores and historically Amazon's physical stores is the one segment that shrinks every quarter right so going back to Q2 of 2020. Physical stores went down Thirty thirteen percent and then 10% in Q3 and then 7% in Q4 and then 16 percent of in q1 of this year and we're just we just got used to seeing that number go down and we all thought it was going down for two reasons, number one Whole Foods was kind of a distressed asset when they bought it and they haven't really improved it in any meaningful way some people would say they've. Diminished it and so like it probably is shrinking and it's the bulk of their the retail sales but then. [35:09] What Amazon has done for Whole Foods is help them sell groceries online and then of course the pandemic help them sell a lot of groceries online, but ironically Amazon doesn't count those whole food online orders as whole food sales they're not physical sales that that those dollars get attributed to Amazon online and not to Whole Foods brick and mortar, so if there's a big. Shift in mix from shopping and store to ordering for home delivery from Whole Foods that actually hurts physical retail sales so for all those reasons we're used to seeing that number go down, last quarter it bounced up ten percent and then this quarter it bounced up 12% so, I have to be honest I'm not exactly sure what's going on their part of it is e-commerce had such a big growth last year that comparatively, read the the rate of retail growth has kind of accelerated brick-and-mortar growth has accelerated a little bit and the rate of e-commerce growth while still higher than brick and mortar has decelerated so that kind of mix, you know maybe as favorable for the way Amazon does accounting for these stores maybe some of the other store concepts are, starting to get more traction like the Amazon Fresh stores perhaps I don't know but. [36:24] It's interesting to see that number going north for the first time in recent memory, of course everyone always talks about AWS being the profitable segments so they sold 16 billion dollars of AWS which was 39 percent growth which was an acceleration and growth so again, that's been kind of growing at 30% of quarter and now you know last quarter at Route 37 and 39 this quarter, um that makes a lot of sense the pandemic drove a lot more people to the cloud and online so you know it's AWS is firing up. [37:00] And then going back to the ads I talked about how big a deal retail ad networks are Will by far the biggest retail ad network is Amazon and they somewhat derogatory to me like Calder the retail ad Network other sales in the in their, and so this was their biggest quarter ever they sold a billion dollars worth of ads for the quarter which is 49 percent growth which is. Actually a significant deceleration Q2 grew at 83 percent right so this number is growing really fast. But the way to think of this is if you add up the last four quarters of their ad sales they sold 30 billion dollars worth of ads if you add up the last four quarters of AWS they sold fifty seven billion dollars worth of server services. [37:51] Think about the cost for that 57 billion dollars worth of server Services they have a bunch of silicone they make their own chips they pay a ton of electricity and they pay rent and people in all this stuff. In order to deliver that aw s right so there's a lot of cost for it to get that fifty seven billion dollars worth of sales. The the the cost of those ads is near zero right like. It's very well and so 30 billion dollars in ad sales I guarantee you is more profitable than fifty seven billion dollars in in server capacity sales and so, like its I said this last quarter but it's even more clear now that the most profitable business that Amazon is now. Um this this ad Network and in their their their investor call and he's sort of address that and he talked about the fact that like hey, we don't really. [38:49] I think internally of breaking out retail sales versus ads versus Marketplace because they are inextricably linked they all need each other, um and you know together they're a super powerful flywheel but like you know they basically recognize that like. Yeah you know we could break even or lose money selling Goods. When we're making a fortune on the 30 billion dollars of ads that we get to sell because of those goods right and and all the seller services for the marketplace half of their sales so. Like you know the the myth that that the retail pirate of Amazon's business is not profitable or less profitable than things like AWS like I think is. Is getting even more exposed and again all those those those businesses AWS and ads are are growing quite healthily at the moment. Scot: [39:42] Yeah it's interesting Colin Sebastian who's a good friend of the show and it's been on many times he pointed out for the one of the interesting. Parts of this quarter is for the first time if you think about Amazon having two pieces of product business and a service business so a Services would be a WS ads, this thing they call merchant services which is kind of FBA and some of the marketplace Revenue goes in there and subscriptions that is now for the first time the revenue from those pieces that quote-unquote Services pieces is bigger than product revenues for the first time ever, and you see it in these numbers right so online stores celebrated a couple other things accelerated but AWS and ads accelerated so it's a really interesting time where that that that kind of Tipping Point happened inside of there. Jason: [40:35] Yeah yeah for sure and then two other takeaways from the earnings call that I thought were Jewels they got asked because you talked about. Advertisers on some of these other platforms like Snap slowing down because of Supply pain right if I don't have products in stock I probably shouldn't be advertising those products, so they got a spike is other going to take it in the shorts and Q4 because advertisers are going to cut back because of Supply pain. Um and Amazon's answer was no that they're not seeing, people getting back on on ads from supplied pain they said like what is likely Gonna Hurt our comps and add sales for Q4 of this year is that Prime day was in Q4 of last year and that there's a lot of, add activity that's driven by Prime day so they said like you know what car comps. Four ads in Q4 maybe not as strong as they ordinarily would be but it's going to be because of the shifting dates of prime day not because. Advertisers are slowing down which is interesting and again Amazon's attracting. The long tail and the the head advertisers whereas like Snap is mostly getting long tail advertisers so. I found that really interesting and then Amazon also said like what. [41:53] Supply chains going to be really challenging and as a result we are incurring a lot of incremental costs but they were very strong that it wasn't going to hurt their revenue number that it was going to hurt profitability, but they felt like they had enough levers to pull and pull those levers, to ensure that they both were going to have enough inventory and that they were going to have enough fulfillment capacity, to deliver on that so they were super confident there and what they call that they said the the. Impairment that's going to be the most hard for them to overcome this quarter is not inventory it's not Logistics it's labor, right and that's the one that they felt like was the hardest for them to overcome is they've got huge turnover they're trying to hire a bunch of people and the cost to hire them are just you know skyrocketing because there's you know constrained pool of people willing to work and, and they're able to command a lot more for their their labor right now. Scot: [42:50] Yeah Jesse basically said that they're getting back in he she basically said I want to remind everybody this is a second quarter a CEO that one we have to choose short-term profit over long term customer experience we will lose money for for we will invest in long-term customer experience, Wall Street that is like we're entering into one of these investment phases usually they get kind of excited by it because usually ratchets, the orbit Amazons in up in the profit kind of spills over after about 18 months or so but there really wasn't a lot of enthusiasm this time so that was interesting, and then you know I mentioned the operating profit was about 4 billion their forecast for 4th quarter of the actually they do you know unlike most companies right now that are just like we have no idea what the heck's going to happen when I put out a fourth quarter forecast Amazon did, and they basically said the bottom line it could be between zero and two billion well that was like you know again that that's a very strong signal they're going to be spending a lot of money in the billions. And in fact they add a little color and said we see several billion dollars of additional costs related to and they put them in this order labor shortages higher wages, Global Supply Chain issues ETC but then they said they still need to hire 250,000 people for holiday and they're going to do whatever it takes because they won't be able to deliver and execute unless they have them. Jason: [44:14] He used an interesting metaphor he said like. That you know they just decided it wouldn't be customer Centric or in their long-term interest to raise prices or fees, and so he's like we really think of ourselves as a shock absorber and we are going to take the hit on all of these incremental costs for both our customers and our Marketplace sellers, um because we think in the long term that's going to strengthen the flywheel so I mean he was pretty like the you know there was not a lot of subtlety about the fact that like. You know it's going to there's going to be a lot of incremental costs to win this holiday but they're going to win the top line and not worry so much about the bottom line. Scot: [44:56] What else did you get from the Amazon call. Jason: [44:59] Those those were the big things one other thing that's interesting to me is. You know everybody's struggling to figure out digital grocery right now and saw the unit economics but there's this other tidal wave behind that that will call ultra-fast delivery and we've talked about a little bit on the show but they're all these firms. Go puff most notably but Joker and gorilla and all these firms like coming out with these. 30 minute or 15 minute delivery promises for a constrained set of products and one of the analysts ask Amazon like. You've always done really well against the your traditional retail competitors in terms of, of logistics but are you worried at all about these guys that are being like purpose-built for like a speed that's faster than your usual service level and it got a pretty arrogant answered I would say he's like. We really like our model we have a hundred and seventy eight thousand skews right now that are available for two hour or faster delivery and that's a lot more excuse to a lot more consumers than any of those companies. It was it was you know like I think obviously that is a space Amazons going to watch closely in play in but the. What's almost happening is they're just ratcheting up the service level for so many products I'm like when I you know Chicago is a advanced market for Amazon but when I put stuff in my cart now I get two options for same-day delivery. Scot: [46:29] Are you getting that like morning and then like there's like an insane one just like 4 a.m. Jason: [46:33] 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. yeah and it works like I wake up and there's stuff like at my front door. Scot: [46:39] Wow. Jason: [46:40] Pretty you know I wouldn't say perfectly but pretty reliably and so again like you know if I would have before noon there I have two windows often to pick. Products and I'm not having to go to some separate experience and Shop from some constraint set of products or things like that like I think the the universal experience in Universal cart and the move away from Amazon Prime now and all these separate experiences like, I do think in a way like Amazon is solving for ultra-fast delivery but they're just one generation more mature than any of these you know new companies. Scot: [47:14] Okay anything else there. Jason: [47:18] That is it on Amazon what did you have any other takeaways there's one other IPO that I thought was interesting this week. Scot: [47:24] Well then it was really weird because after the market closed we're all adjusting that and then Facebook's like hey everybody we're changing our name to Metta and then they put out this logo that looks like a warped eight on its side or like the infinity symbol that's been bent and you just look at it you're like I bet they spent eight hundred thousand dollars on that logo and you know there's. Jason: [47:47] Any amount of money spent on branding and Logo generation is well invested hashtag publicist. Scot: [47:52] Okay yes true true yes absolutely call Jason if you need new logo did you guys do that logo for. Jason: [47:59] I can neither confirm nor deny we did. Scot: [48:03] I love it sorry I love it. Jason: [48:03] Not because I'm being not because I'm being stealthy I just honestly don't know it's totally possible that we did. But I don't know but we certainly do a lot of great branding work including the Amazon logo so fun. Scot: [48:16] The chief the chief branding digital logo officer doesn't know what logos you're doing. Jason: [48:22] No but the way more talented people at Turner Duckworth would probably be able to tell us. Scot: [48:27] Okay cool what IPO did you say. Jason: [48:30] Yeah so have you been following their Rent the Runway IPO at all. Scot: [48:33] I have yeah. Jason: [48:35] Yeah so this is pretty interesting so. Digitally native company unlike a lot of the other digital native Brands that's kind of in the the re Commerce space right because they're they're buying a parallel and and renting it to Consumers, and they have been one of the the. Most hyped digitally native Brands because in general rental models can be like extra profitable you buy something once and you rent it a bunch of times, old Mentor mine Wayne huizenga used to do that with videos and he made a lot of money in that space and trash cans and other things. So it was interesting to both see their financials and then they actually have their IPO this week. So and it's a very. [49:23] I'll call it a bifurcated story so it's an 11 year old company they've raised over seven hundred million dollars in venture capital and their, wildly unprofitable coming into this IPO, so they lost a hundred and fifty four million dollars in 2020 they're forecasting to lose a hundred seventy 1 million dollars in 2021, um and of course they're in like the worst possible business case for covid right like they're they're renting apparel to women to wear to parties and to work, and two things no one did in 2020 is go to a party or go to work right so. [50:02] You know they historically they would have like hung their hat on having all this subscriber revenue and their subscribers basically got cut in half by covid their last 42 percent of their active subscribers the revenue drop from, hi in 2019 of 257 million 258 million in 2020 so covid really hit them. And you know you go man that it feels like they're kind of limping into the IPO and I want to talk about how that IPO went for them but two other interesting facts before we talk about that, one thing I thought was really interesting and and. Arguably like the one favorable thing and all of their financials is how they get the inventory that they're renting so, a catastrophic piece of news is that their inventory is way more fragile than I would have expected right so they they rent you know one of those garments six times and then they usually have to retire so they're not getting like. Tons of reuse about around each of these garments but thirty-six percent of their rental inventory. Is Rev share with designers so what that means is instead of buying it at the wholesale price and then them renting it a bunch of times, they're getting it free or at a very low cost from the design house and then they're sharing the profits with those those those brands. [51:26] That's frankly exactly how the video rental business grew like in the early days of Blockbuster we bought videos and rented them and later on you know we did rev share agreements with all them the movie studios and that. [51:38] Let you get a lot more inventory a lot more affordable. Um also surprising to me eighteen percent of their inventory is private label which I would have thought like a big part of the value prop of Rent the Runway was all these well-known designer Brands so I was surprised to hear they're able to get away with you know almost one out of four five garments being. [51:56] Being private label so that was interesting and then the last piece of catastrophic news is as bad as their finances look the accountants looked at it and threw up even more because, I mentioned that this inventory gets really perishable and and they have to throw it away well the what they did all their finances without including any depreciation of their inventory so, invented a new flavor of ebay.com bike ibadah before inventory depreciation and you know those if you were to actually put the depreciation on their books. The those losses I just read to you would be even much higher so. So mostly like a pretty negative look at the company going into this IPO and then I want to say they did the IPO at 21 and immediately the stock went up and they hit a high of 23 and everyone's like wow in spite of all this horrible finances. They're having a big IPO and then as the day went on the price started dropping down and now I want to say it's about 18 18 bucks and 85 cents so, you know pretty significantly down from that $23 offer. [53:16] Like Scott in your mind is like let's call it ten percent like is that a. An acceptable IPO is that a disaster does it surprise you given their finances that they were able to do an IPO at all. Scot: [53:30] Yeah and you know one of the ways I look at it is let's look at the valuation so they're doing a hundred and fifty eight million ish last year and we don't have enough data this year to kind of know there haven't really materially improved since then so let's say let's be generous and say they'll do 200 million this year they're at a billion market cap so 5x for a business that. You know has all the kind of the negatives you're outlined there. You know the they're not getting as much use of the Garment as you would think I think our friend Dan McCarthy is at MacArthur, McCartney or McCarthy McCarthy yeah he he kind of picked apart their Co hard data and it looks like they have pretty high churn, yeah I actually think it was kind of a win because that's a pretty good valuation for this snapshot in time. [54:24] Pricing IPOs is tricky because you want to kind of price it where you get a little bit of a pop but maybe ten to twenty percent up, but if you get more than at the company you're kind of sitting there saying we just sold a bunch of stock at a discount and that wasn't great now the good news is your hopefully you know you haven't sold the majority of your stock so you sold maybe 10% and I have like 90% that's worth more so it's. It's you're not going to totally cry over it cushions the blow yet going down isn't isn't a good look and it doesn't Kate that know a lot a fair amount of weakness as people you know maybe they got excited and they're coming yeah I think I'm gonna I'm going to kind of limit my maybe they sold half of it you also and I peel you're trying to place the stock with people that will hold it long term so the fact is down means that didn't really work that people were just trying to flip it for a quick buck. Jason: [55:17] Yeah one other side note like a lot of people were optimistic for this IPO because this like re Commerce model like it's you know potentially better for the environment, and looking at the economics it actually ends up that this is probably worse than like buying disposable apparel from H&M because like the the reverse Logistics of moving this stuff around so many times and then like having to throw it away pretty quickly and like you know weaning into the fashion trends and stuff becoming obsolete as new trends emerge like it all it all netted out to like it wasn't a very favorable ecologically story either. Scot: [55:58] Yeah well we'll see a for effort. Jason: [56:02] Yeah I mean my big takeaway again like there's there's going to be some interesting digital native companies but like this this myth that that is fundamentally an advantage model and that all these companies are doing great like this is one of the companies a lot of before there was any public data available everyone's like oh I think there's a billion dollars and they've got all this sticky reoccurring rental subscription Revenue so they're probably wildly popular and their costs are super low because they're renting the same garment over and over again so I this is an amazing business and then you know when you get to look under the covers why no it's not so you know I just I would just say, you can absolutely build a good digitally native business but like it's not a good business just because you're a digitally native vertical brand. Scot: [56:47] Yeah one for listeners yet as you know one of my favorite hobbies is I really love to watch The Road Show presentations but they're only out there for like a week or so all birds is on the road right now so that one is available and you have to go to Retail Road show.com and get from this list and watch it, it was one of the better ones I've seen in a long time the video they did the with the founders had like a cheekiness to it that was kind of unusual usually these. Jason: [57:16] Talking about the Auburn's one right because Rent the Runway is on there right now or was on their last week too. Scot: [57:21] Yeah it's on sadly it's faced off yeah the all birds one is really really good so I recommend folks watch that one and then I just saw that NerdWallet hit and I'm kind of interested to see how they talk about that one. Jason: [57:33] Yeah that has been entertaining TV I watch those videos on my my Peloton now. Scot: [57:41] Nice. Jason: [57:43] When I'm not listening to Amazon earning calls. Well Scott is happen again we have perfectly used up all our lot of time but hopefully people found some value in this recap and if you did as always we sure would appreciate it if you jump on the iTunes and give us that five-star review. Scot: [58:03] Yeah thanks everybody and until next time. Jason: [58:06] Happy Commercing!

Nicol Park
Episode 104: Shower Patch Kids (pt1)

Nicol Park

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 42:43


Get your spooky weekend kicked of with this weeks episode! We talk about all things Halloween, from our costumes this year to candy from around the country. Luke also unveils his new alter ego and Ben reveals his dark secret from the past year. Thanks to our amazing sponsors this week, Procter & Gamble and Nextdoor. Look out for the second part of this episode airing on Halloween itself! 

Orbitals

Polymer membranes make everything from rain jackets to medical devices. But they're also integral parts of hydrogen fuel cells, powering cars that give off nothing but water vapor. How do fuel cells work, and why aren't you driving one yet? Solutions is made with funding and featuring scientists from 3M, Ascend Performance Materials, Baker Hughes, BASF, Dow, DuPont, Procter & Gamble, PPG, Royal DSM, SABIC, Solvay, and W. L. Gore & Associates, none of whom influenced any editorial decisions.

Business with Purpose
How Make Your Dreams a Reality | EP 269: Teneshia Warner, EGAMI Group

Business with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 43:17


My guest this week is Teneshia Jackson Warner. She founded EGAMI Group in 2007 and has accumulated more than a decade of experience in multicultural marketing, project management and inspirational life coaching. As CEO, Teneshia has led the agency from a dream concept to a thriving multi-million dollar business, delivering award-winning work for major brands, such as Procter & Gamble, Verizon Wireless, Dasani, Rosa Regale, General Motors, Target, KFC, Major League Baseball, Delta and more. In 2012, Teneshia released her first book, Profit With Purpose: A Marketers Guide to Deliver Purpose-Driven Campaigns to Multicultural Audiences, which earned rave reviews as the first-of-its-kind to be focused on multicultural, purpose-driven marketing. Teneshia is the recipient of a number of career awards, including the coveted Black Enterprise Rising Star Award, Black Enterprises Forty Under 40, AdColor MVP and The Network Journals Forty Under 40 Award. She's also been featured in Entrepreneur magazine, Essence magazine and Black Enterprise, along with guest appearances on ABC News and The Steve Harvey Show for her entrepreneurial and purpose-inspired successes. 3:28 – Teneshia 101 She is headquartered in New York and is a creative at heart. Beyond being a CEO, Teneshia says she is definitely a dreamer and believes in the impossible. She loves setting her own path and even being called crazy sometimes. She is passionate about inspiring other dreamers. 4:59 – What sets EGAMI apart? Proctor and Gamble is a long-standing client, and they created a campaign to celebrate black beauty. Her team helps companies understand their brand purpose. 9:59 – Helping people fulfill their dreams Her dreamers' boot camp is a four-phase approach. Teneshia wanted to create a system that other people could follow to create their own success and follow their dreams. Phase 1 is identifying the dream and putting people through exercises to figure out where they get their best ideas. For some people, it's in nature. 17:30 – From Idea-land to reality Ask yourself what you need to do in the next 12 months to make your dream come true. What about the next 90 days? It needs to be measurable and attainable. 23:42 – Learning from obstacles Tapping into your dream warrior within is key if you're going to be on a dream journey for a long time. You need to fight the dream giants who will be in your way. Obstacles come. Are you willing to fight? 30:15 – Her next dream Teneshia wants to expand EGAMI group and its footprint and impact in the world. She wants to help dreamers globally and give them action-oriented plans. Personally, she would like to put health and wellbeing at the forefront of her life. 35:08 – Get to know you What's on her most played playlist? Some song by Prince Fictional character she wants to meet in real life? Sarah Jessica Parker from Sex and the City FEATURED QUOTES I realized I chose a career path based on earning potential with little to no regard for passion or purpose. I made myself a promise that I want to design a life where purpose and passion leads, and I want to see where it takes me. Beyond that title of CEO, I am definitely a dreamer. CONNECT: https://egamigroup.com/ ABOUT TENESHIA: Teneshia is the founder and CEO of one of the nation's most successful multicultural marketing and communications firms, EGAMI Group. Her book, The Big Stretch: 90 Days to Expand Your Dreams, Crush Your Goals, and Create Your Own Success, is a soul-searching, life-transforming, 12-week boot camp that reveals how to get from where you are to where you dream to be – in life and in business. THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNER OF THE SHOW: MamaSuds helps label-reading moms create a safe and nontoxic home for their family by creating synthetic free household cleaners. And one of those cleaner is MamaSuds Fine Linen Soap- which is the best thing since [Pumpkin] - Sliced -Bread Wash your high-quality sheets, linens, delicates, and organic fabrics with a Fine Linen Soap to keep them looking newer and softer longer. Use 3-4 capfuls for high-efficiency machines on delicate cycle, 4-6 capfuls for regular machines on delicate cycle. Head over to MamaSuds.com and use code MOLLY for 15% off your order!

daily304's podcast
daily304 - Episode 10.26.2021

daily304's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 3:33


Manufacturing companies continue to flourish in WV, with Procter & Gamble as one of its giants … and the new Port of West Virginia holds major potential for Midwest shipping.  – on today's daily304, listen here…

Wall Street Unplugged - Your Best Source for Finance, Investing & Economics

Earnings season is well underway… Netflix just reported solid earnings and continues to gain subscribers. Daniel and I discuss the streaming giant's new hit show, Squid Game, and how the company continues to be the king of great content. [2:00] United Airlines also reported a strong quarter... and foresees a coming bottom to COVID impacts. This is great news as travel returns to pre-pandemic levels. [8:40] In other airline news, Southwest decided to back off vaccine mandates. Daniel explains why this issue goes beyond airlines… and how mandates can hurt local economies. [10:40] Facebook has chosen Coinbase to roll out its crypto wallet, Novi. Daniel shares why he's bullish on the social media giant despite not being a fan of its services. [22:05]  Bitcoin hit a fresh all-time high today. The news comes on the heels of the launch of the ProShares Bitcoin Strategy ETF (BITO), which began trading this week. I explain why I expect the momentum to continue—and whether you should buy BITO. [25:45]  Next, I break down some data on why supply chain issues will continue to cause stress across the economy—particularly in one sector. [29:58] I also share some quick thoughts on Procter & Gamble's strong earnings. [33:55] And finally, there's never been a better time to get into the crypto space. And with the special offer we just released TODAY for my Crypto Intelligence advisory… you can lock in a free crypto pick. [35:16]  Enjoyed this episode? Get Wall Street Unplugged delivered FREE to your inbox every Wednesday: https://www.curzioresearch.com/wall-street-unplugged/   Wall Street Unplugged podcast is available at: --: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wall-street-unplugged-frank/ -- : https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/curzio-research/wall-street-unplugged-2 -- : https://www.curzioresearch.com/category/podcast/wall-street-unplugged/   : https://twitter.com/frankcurzio :. https://www.facebook.com/CurzioResearch/ : https://www.linkedin.com/in/frank-curzio-690561a7/ : https://www.curzioresearch.com

MarketFoolery
P&G Isn't Worried About Rising Costs

MarketFoolery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 17:16


Costs are rising for Procter & Gamble but 1st-quarter profits still came in higher than expected. Bank of New York Mellon continues a solid 2021 with 3rd-quarter beats on the top and bottom lines. Asit Sharma analyzes those stories and Walmart's potential for earnings growth.

Squawk Pod
Lessons from GameStop; AMC in the Streaming Wars; Profits for P&G

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:26


The SEC's long-awaited report on GameStop is finally here, a full 44 pages on the trading frenzy, payment-for-order-flow, and stock market “gamification.” Streaming wars are heating up as Wall Street watches subscriber growth numbers for the industry's biggest players. Interim AMC Networks CEO Matt Blank shares his own company's strategy for competing with Netflix, HBOMax, and Amazon Prime, and details a plan to bring linear content to streamers. Procter & Gamble topped analyst expectations in its quarterly report, but commodity and freight costs are weighing on the company's profits. Vice Chairman and incoming CEO Jon Moeller discusses P&G's business in China, corporate tax rates, and managing kinks in the supply chain. Plus, Covid vaccine mandates have put even more pressure on the labor force; some employers are dismissing those who refuse to get vaccinated, despite a difficult hiring environment. In this episode:Matt Blank, @AMC_TVJon Moeller, @ProcterGambleJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkin

The Real Investment Show Podcast
Stocks to Watch as the Earnings Parade Continues

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:47


NOTE: Watch the video version of this report by subscribing to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgBSGXS0vpQ&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1 (10/19/21) Earnings season is well underway, and there are companies of interest to us: Nexflix' adding of classic shows, like "Seinfeld," and investingi on new, original programming, portend for subscriber growth. UnitedAirlines has been struggling, thanks to the pandemic travel phobia, so there's room to grow. Johnson & Johnson have also been under pressure, but look at the retinue of items the offer that people need to buy. Similarly, Procter & Gamble has been doing better following a correction; also a well-diversified staples company. Transportation is an area of interest, Kansas City Southern reports today; products have to be shipped by truck and train as supply chains revive. KCS suffered a pullback, creating an opportunity to buy. - Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist, Lance Roberts -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #Netflix #UnitedAirlines #Johnson_and_Johnson #Procter_and_Gamble #Kansas_City_Southern #Stocks #Trading #Rates #Money #Markets #Finance

Social Capital
338: Looking At Your Business' Finances Through A Different Lens - with Lynn Corazzi

Social Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 29:46


Meet Lynn Lynn is the owner of Data2Profit Consulting. He helps small to medium-sized companies make more money with their data by using financial ideas and tools he learned at Procter & Gamble. He has a unique ability to help clients think big picture, while at the same time digging into the details of their results. When you feel you have a lot of numbers around but no answers, Lynn will make those numbers work as hard as you do, and turning your data into profit. There are lots of different people out there who help businesses keep their finances together. What makes you different? There are lots of part-time accountants out there, there are lots of types of bookkeepers, you get your part-time CFOs and where they're focused oftentimes on the preparation of your finances, and taking a very traditional view of here's your income state, here's how you look at it, here's your balance sheet, here's what it can tell you, what I do is take those numbers and reverse engineer them to not only be able to tell people what happened, but why it happened, and more importantly, give them recommendations about what you should think about doing next. That is a completely different perspective than I think a lot of business owners get from their accountants and their CFOs. In one of your blogs, you said that what accountants report isn't enough. Can go talk about what you meant by that? Absolutely. It really comes down to what the accountants give you is a score, right? It's where are you at, at the time. What happened last month and what were your results over the past year? And they give you that which is good, but again, it doesn't always give you an idea of what you should be doing going forward because the perspective is getting a gap financial statement. You're your business owner, and you can always say "Okay, how much profit did I make that month?" But the real question is where's the profit because you can't spend what's on the balance sheet. What is your profit, how did it get there, most importantly, where is it, and finally, when can you actually spend it? I can say that I made all this profit by selling this stuff, but if nobody's paid me for it, yet, I can't spend that money. Or if I look at my bank statement today, it may say I have $10,000 there, but it doesn't tell you five days from now you may need 15,000. So what will happen with the other 5000? It's a moving piece that if you just rely on that static perspective, without both and understanding how you got there, and where you're going, what's coming up, then you're really missing a big chunk of what's going to impact your business results. I've heard you you say that the numbers that business owner should look at are more than dollars and cents. What else should business owners be looking at? Everyone says that their sales are growing, but the question is, why or how? And again, you could look into very easily say these customers, or this particular region or this product line, but when you put that all together, who are your most valuable customers? How many most valuable customers do you have? I worked with a business for a long time and they said we love all of our customers and while that is true, everybody loves all their customers, you may not love them all equally. How many of them really depend on that? How many times are they buying? What's their average purchase order spend? How many lines are they buying? What number of products are they actually buying? When you look at your gross margins, there are seven different groups of people within your company that can impact your gross margins. Which one is it? Is as your customers? Is it your salespeople? Is it your marketing people? Is it the logistics people, the manufacturing people, the purchasing people, or is it just simply a mix? And so you really have to dissect a lot of the numbers that you look into and look at the activities that people are doing and that's really what it comes down to? How else can you look at the activities and what is occurring in your business? Because, at the end of the day, all finance and accounting do are assign numbers to the activities that people have done. How many sales calls are they doing? How many sales calls are your people making to the best customers? What are they talking about? There's a lot of qualitative information that you can mind to get an understanding of where your people are coming from. So when you really get into it, that's part of what I like to do is talk to them about the non-financial numbers that you could be or, should be looking more at in terms of the activities of your business? Can you share with our listeners one of your most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had? I'm one of those people that actually loves meeting people. In fact, my current coach has told me, "Lynn, you have to stop having as much fun." I'll talk to anybody about networking because I think people are fascinating, and there are so many different opportunities out there for people that if you're not networking, you're just really not learning as an individual about the world around you. So when you think about networking, you're really building a network of people that you meet, know, and can refer to each other. Once you get really into this, I met a banker once and she said, "Oh, you have to meet Angelica, she's forming this group called go givers." I joined and we're all basically people who help support small businesses. If they need me, they should need another accountant base, you need a lawyer, they should need a banker, they should need a coach, or are a part-time HR group. I met a part-time CFO through that group who recommended me to a client. I was able to help this client do what I was hired to do, but they also said, "By the way, you should meet Jeff. He's a specialist in r&d tax credits." All of a sudden, they hook up because now I've made the introduction and three months later, my client find out that they're going to get over $100,000 returned to them from r&d tax credits because I became that trusted business advisor who recommended somebody else. When you look at somebody, you can really help somebody in a very tangible way like that is important to me.  How do you stay in front of and best nurture the relationships you've created? That's one of the biggest challenges that I've come to realize I was not doing a great job of. I am now actively designing and building that system, and that capability. I've tried all different kinds of things on my own, and unfortunately, I've met a lot of really interesting people, and probably some of them may have been more valuable contacts, but I let those relationships drop. This was really before I began to truly appreciate the value of it. I would say right now, if you're beginning to network, figure out a way that works for you to really keep in contact with these people. I've spent a lot of time on occasion going back and realizing that it's been a long time since I have checked in with certain people, and so I have now got my sales process outlined or my contact management process outlined, and am beginning to build that. I made that early mistake of not having a great system to be able to do that so I'm playing a lot of catch-up right now.  If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of or differently with regards to your professional career? I would be more intentional and have a life plan that gave me a little more direction because I allowed myself to accept things that came my way without really exploring what else was out there. For example, when I look back and see what I really enjoy doing now, I probably would not have gotten into corporate finance. But that's where I interviewed with P&G, I did a temp job with them. They interviewed and over the next 14 years, I moved through P&G and moved up in PNG to the point where I had to ask myself if this was really what I want to do for the rest of my life? I decided that it wasn't so I went to work for a smaller company, which I did a lot of that same stuff. But then I got into marketing and sales and I found out that this is really where the fun is when you're getting closer to the customer and what they're doing. I've really gotten to the point where I believe that this is what I was meant to do. I enjoy the challenge of meeting people and finding out how I can help them. But at the same time, I could have gotten here a long time ago. Here now, I feel like this is like the second career for me. All my friends are now retiring, and I started a company three years ago. Do you have any final words of advice for our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network? You've got to own it. Not very many people come reaching out to you, and yes, there are people who are reluctant to engage in those situations. But it really is an opportunity to step out of your own little comfort zone and meet some really cool, fascinating people that otherwise you never would have. You have to get out there, and particularly, if you're a business owner, whether you are networking within your own industry segment, or a different direction, just get out and do it. Don't be afraid to be that one in the room that steps into a group of four or five other people to introduce yourself and to ask a very unique question about them. Remember, it's not all about you, And believe me, that's that was my rookie mistake. You will mess up, you will make mistakes, you will say the wrong things, but you know what? You've just got to get up and do it again and once you get comfortable with the idea, it really can be a lot of fun.   Connect with Lynn   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lynn-corazzi/  Website: https://www.data2profit.net/  Phone: 920-948-3355

daily304's podcast
daily304 - Episode 10.11.2021

daily304's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 3:31


Procter & Gamble announces goal to reduce emissions at all plants … Solar Holler flips the switch on the state's largest solar installation … and Crafts of the Coal provides ice cream treats from its traveling truck. – on today's daily304, listen here…

Human Capital Watch
Unpacking Ambidextrous Leadership

Human Capital Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 35:55


How do set up your organization to “Perform AND Transform” at the same time? How do you ensure you are leveraging what you have to maximize value extraction through relevant incremental innovation? And in parallel establish the agility for constructive disruption ahead, tapping into emerging consumer and societal challenges with new technologies and capabilities. Listen in to our first episode on the subject of ‘Learning to Lead Innovation' with our guest Kathy Fish, former CTIO of Procter & Gamble.  

Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things
What Will Be Your Legacy?

Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 42:09


In episode 621, I'm bringing back one of my favorite interviews a few months back where I chat with Emily Chang, CEO of McCann WorldGroup China and Author of The Spare Room. Over the last 21 years, Emily Chang's job—with renowned companies like Procter & Gamble, Apple, and Starbucks—has brought her and her family to eight different homes across the U.S. and China. In each of those homes, life has introduced sixteen different young people to Emily and her family. Young people who have been abused, neglected or marginalized and who were given sanctuary in the family's spare room. Listen as she chats about:   The first person she ever chose to help and give a spare room to in her home Some of the stories of the people who stayed with her and the impact it had on her How she found her social legacy How her husband and daughter also helped in all of this How social legacy has helped her live more intentionally and be better in her personal and professional life First steps you can take to find your social legacy Try our voice skill on Amazon Alexa here or Google Assistant here or by saying "Open Extraordinary Mindset."  Like our page and check out our LIVE video interviews here.

In Reality: Lessons from Leaders and Entrepreneurs

In this episode, our host John Rebecchi (M.B.A. '83), Ph.D. sat down with Eric Malka, Co-founder of Ingredients Inc, a wellness focus brand. Known for its radical transparent approach, Ingredients Inc dominated the natural, health and wellness space by listing ingredients, all of which are 100% plant-based. Prior to starting this venture, Eric and Myriam co-founded a prestigious brand, The Art of Shaving, which was acquired by Procter & Gamble in 2009. When failure is not an option, Eric and his wife embraced risk, pushed boundaries, and revolutionized the clean beauty industry. The resilient mindset has enabled the creation of successful businesses like The Art of Shaving and now Ingredients Inc. We'll learn the importance of growing a purpose driven business and what it took to succeed in launching products in the middle of a pandemic. Get in touch with Eric Malka at Ingredients Inc , Facebook and on Instagram. Support us by sharing or reviewing our podcast series. Recaps and the link to each episode can also be found on our blog, The Achievement Index. Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @nyitsom

Outside Sales Talk
Selling With A Story - Outside Sales Talk with Paul Andrew Smith

Outside Sales Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 53:56


Paul Andrew Smith is a world-leading expert on organizational storytelling and one of Inc. Magazine's Top 100 Leadership Speakers of  2018. He is a national bestselling author of several books that revolve around storytelling – his work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Time Magazine, Forbes, and more.    In this episode, Paul discusses the importance of storytelling in the sales process and how stories can get people's attention, build trust, and close a sale.   Here are some of the topics covered in this episode: Making a ‘wish list' of the stories you need to solve different issues Answering specific questions to create a great story Structuring a story and utilizing the right type of emotional engagement Building trust through authentic stories   About the Guest: Before becoming a storytelling coach, Paul was an executive at Procter & Gamble for 20 years. Paul held leadership positions in both research and finance functions, and most recently served as director of consumer and communications research. Fast forward to today, he has written multiple bestselling books including The 10 Stories Great Leaders Tell, Lead with a Story, Sell with a Story, and Parenting with a Story. His keynote speaking and training clients include international giants like Google, Hewlett Packard, Bayer Medical, Walmart, Kaiser Permanente, Ford Motor Company, Luxottica, and Procter & Gamble among dozens of others.   Website: leadwithastory.com  Email: paul@leadwithastory.com  Twitter: @LeadWithAStory  LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/smithpa9  Facebook: www.facebook.com/leadwithastory  Instagram: www.instagram.com/leadwithastory       Listen to more episodes of the Outside Sales Talk here! https://www.badgermapping.com/podcast    Start Selling More Today with Badger Maps - The #1 Route Planner for Field Sales See Badger in Action: https://www.badgermapping.com/outside-sales-talk-listener/     If you love the Outside Sales Talk podcast, you'll also love Badger's newsletters!  Our 95,000+ subscribers stay at the top of their game with actionable tips from top sales experts.   Are you in? Subscribe to Badger Maps' newsletters now!  https://www.badgermapping.com/newsletters/?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=ostdescription&utm_campaign=newsletterlp

Going Deep with Aaron Watson
494 Investing in Pipe & Shef with Craft Ventures, Michael Tam

Going Deep with Aaron Watson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:35


Michael Tam is a partner at Craft Ventures, an early-stage venture capital fund known for the development of B2B Saas startups.   Based in Los Angeles, Michael sits on the boards of Bbot, Dray Alliance, Route, Trellis, and Vendr. He also works closely with notable investment companies such as Pipe, Salted, Shef, and Sync, amongst others.    Prior to joining Craft, Michael was an investor at Crosscut, where he led investments at the seed stage. As an operator, Michael managed Uber's business in Southern California markets and launched L., a direct to consumer brand acquired by Procter & Gamble.    Michael also serves on the investment committee of the USC Marshall Fund, which invests in startups in the Southern California tech ecosystem.   In this episode, Michael and Aaron discuss how to break into venture capital, his investments in Shef & Pipe, and much more.   Sign up for a Weekly Email that will Expand Your Mind.   Michael Tam's Challenge; Reach out to someone you're afraid to. Send a cold email w/ intention.   Connect with Michael Tam Linkedin Twitter Craft Ventures Website Michael@craftventures.com   If you liked this interview, check out episode 466 with Matt Harbaugh where we discuss founding a venture fund.   Text Me What You Think of This Episode 412-278-7680 Underwritten by Piper Creative Piper Creative makes creating podcasts, vlogs, and videos easy.    How? Click here and Learn more.   We work with Fortune 500s, medium-sized companies, and entrepreneurs.   Follow Piper as we grow YouTube Instagram Subscribe on iTunes | Stitcher | Overcast | Spotify

On Your Mark, Get Set, Grow!
A Turnaround Expert's 5-Step Process for Rejuvenating Struggling Companies

On Your Mark, Get Set, Grow!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 48:39


Guest: Odmar Almeida-Filho, a coach at CEO Coaching International. Odmar has extensive global turnaround experience in consumer packaged goods, telecom and internet media technology, and consulting at companies including Procter & Gamble, Dell, Telefonica, and Amway. Quick Background: If a struggling company is in need of a turnaround, usually the CEO needs to execute a personal turnaround too. That doesn't mean completely changing who you are as a leader. But it does mean that you'll need to place a renewed emphasis on certain leadership traits in order to reorganize and reenergize your company before a bump in the road turns into a gaping pit. On today's show, Odmar Almeida-Filho explains the five-part roadmap he's used both as a CEO and as an entrepreneur coach to execute successful turnarounds that set struggling companies back on track.

Going Deep with Aaron Watson
493 Direct Mail, Marketing Campaigns, and Startups w/ Dave Fink (Postie)

Going Deep with Aaron Watson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 42:07


Dave Fink is the CEO and cofounder of Postie, a platform for making direct mail marketing campaigns as sophisticated as elite digital marketing.   Dave Fink has been building companies for the consumer internet for over 15 years. Over the last decade Dave has launched and scaled over 20 consumer-internet businesses. During the early part of his career he created performance-marketing platforms helping brands as diverse as Walt Disney World, Procter & Gamble and The Gap adapt to the rapidly changing digital media strategies available in the internet world.   Dave also established the customer acquisition strategy that successfully launched consumer brands with celebrities including Kate Bosworth, Jessica Simpson, Rachel Bilson, and Mary- Kate and Ashley Olsen.    In this conversation, Dave and Aaron discuss some basic marketing definitions, the mission behind Postie, and how Dave coaches marketing clients to success. Sign up for a Weekly Email that will Expand Your Mind.   David Fink's Challenge; Find a new hobby to get a break from work.   Connect with David Fink Linkedin Postie Website dave@postie.com   If you liked this interview, check out episode 386 with Jon Shanahan where we discuss YouTube marketing, men's fashion, and much more. Underwritten by Piper Creative Piper Creative makes creating podcasts, vlogs, and videos easy.    How? Click here and Learn more.   We work with Fortune 500s, medium-sized companies, and entrepreneurs.   Follow Piper as we grow YouTube Instagram Subscribe on iTunes | Stitcher | Overcast | Spotify

Lead Like a Woman
Ask for What You Want

Lead Like a Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 34:30


Luly B. is a business strategist, speaker, coach, mother, and best-selling Amazon author on a mission to help women define success on their own terms. She is a feisty Cuban-American mom and entrepreneur with 20 years of experience in marketing strategy, business consulting, and leadership. Drawing from her experience in the nonprofit, academic, and corporate sectors as well as her own entrepreneurial journey, Luly supports women who wear a ton of hats to get over the guilt, self-doubt, and fear that stops them from truly living happy lives. She helps them create businesses around their lifestyle and family priorities while making an impact on their clients and community. She is blessed to share her message of empowerment, leadership, and confidence with thousands of women all around the country, including clients and partners like Procter & Gamble, Macy's, and Dell. In this episode… Oftentimes, women fail to achieve their goals and attain the success they desire because of fear. They fear asking for what they want, going after their dreams, and facing reception from others. However, it's vital that women remember they're not going through the journey alone. It's important to seek out a support group, celebrate the women inside (and outside) your circle, and acknowledge the expressions of love and appreciation around you.  But how do you fully receive the love and gratitude that's being given? Luly B. is here to help. Luly guides women to connect with one another and build supportive communities. Through her BOOST Community, she helps women network, share their gifts, learn to be more confident, learn from one another, and create the type of business and life they desire. Luly B., a business strategist and speaker, is Andrea Heuston's guest in this episode of the Lead Like A Woman Show where she talks about leadership and building a community of supportive women. Luly also discusses her core values, her superpower of connection, and shares her experiences as an entrepreneur and speaker. Stay tuned.