Podcasts about cd baby

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Other Record Labels
Indie Labels Need Advocates!

Other Record Labels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 9:30


You can learn more about the folks at 3tone Music by going to http://otherrecordlabels.com/distro You can email my buddy Rupert at 3tone, rupert@3tonemusic.co.uk   Indie Labels Need Advocates.  In the same way that our artists need our support and cheerleading, labels need someone supporting us, and fighting for our position. I've been on the hunt for a digital distributor that is empathetic to the needs of small, independent record labels. Someone who is aware of our unique needs, and who can give us something different than what an indie artist can get for themselves with DistroKid, Amuse, or CD Baby.  This has been really important to me, to find someone who knows we exist and respects our existence, regardless of how small our catalogs or operations are. Some distributors are out of reach for smaller indies, and some don't offer services advanced enough.  So, for the past 2 years,  I've been nurturing this relationship with a distributor called 3tone Music. You've probably not heard of them, aside from some of our conversations in our Facebook Group. But I've been personally testing them out with my releases for a few years.   You can learn more about the folks at 3tone Music by going to http://otherrecordlabels.com/distro

Nick Warren - StoryHacker
1108: The CD Baby Email

Nick Warren - StoryHacker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 4:22


Classic marketing example from Derek Sivers, who wrote this joyful email in 20 minutes. ------------------- The Stories Mean Business podcast with Nick Warren. One Idea A Day, Every Day. Get deeper into business storytelling: https://storiesmeanbusiness.com/storybusiness/ https://storiesmeanbusiness.com/podcast

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2495: How to Do What You Love & Make Good Money AND Quitting Something You Love by Derek Sivers

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 11:23 Very Popular


Derek Sivers shares two short posts covering how to do what you love while making good money, and how to quit something you love Episode 2495: How to Do What You Love & Make Good Money AND Quitting Something You Love by Derek Sivers Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original posts are located here: https://sive.rs/balance & https://sivers.org/quit Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 2 - Episodes 301-600 ONLY
2495: How to Do What You Love & Make Good Money AND Quitting Something You Love by Derek Sivers

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 2 - Episodes 301-600 ONLY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 11:23


Derek Sivers shares two short posts covering how to do what you love while making good money, and how to quit something you love Episode 2495: How to Do What You Love & Make Good Money AND Quitting Something You Love by Derek Sivers Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original posts are located here: https://sive.rs/balance & https://sivers.org/quit Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY
2495: How to Do What You Love & Make Good Money AND Quitting Something You Love by Derek Sivers

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 11:23


Derek Sivers shares two short posts covering how to do what you love while making good money, and how to quit something you love Episode 2495: How to Do What You Love & Make Good Money AND Quitting Something You Love by Derek Sivers Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original posts are located here: https://sive.rs/balance & https://sivers.org/quit Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Evolve
Episode 33: Whitewashing Biblical Characters

Evolve

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 54:34


From the time she was a young girl, Rev. Wil Gafney knew something was wrong. Every major biblical figure, in both art and popular culture, was represented as white. Now a scholar and Episcopal priest, Gafney paints a more accurate picture of our Afro-Asiatic forebearers, making a case that engaging with the racist history of biblical criticism and western art is key to forging a more just future. Gafney also briefly discusses her love of sci-fi and Star Wars and tries to dissect the animus aimed at black actors that ventured into the Star Wars universe. She also discusses her love of Hebrew, praying in synagogues and connection with Jewish community, and some of the fraught nature of inter-religious interactions. Though the discussion isn't High Holiday-themed per se, the content seems apt for the days of awe as it challenges all of us to question our assumption and, perhaps, to atone for harm caused intentionally or unintentionally. Theme song, “Ilu Finu” by Rabbi Miriam Margles. Her album This is the Day is available for purchase at CDBaby: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/miriammarglesandthehadarensemb Visit our home on the web — Evolve: Groundbreaking Jewish Conversions: http://evolve.reconstructingjudaism.org Subscribe by Email at http://subscribebyemail.com/evolve.fireside.fm/rss Read these show notes on the web at https://evolve.fireside.fm/1 This podcast is produced by Reconstructing Judaism. Visit us at ReconstructingJudaism.org (https://ReconstructingJudaism.org). Special Guest: Rev. Wil Gafney, Ph.D..

Un Cafe con Engel
GUIA COMPLETA Para SUBIR Tú MÚSICA a Las PLATAFORMAS DIGITALES Con CD Baby (Tutorial En Español)

Un Cafe con Engel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 25:45


En este video te enseño paso a paso Como reclamar tu perfil de Spotify para artista lo que en consecuencia activa la verificación en Spotify automáticamente sin importar cuantos seguidores tengas. ► Mi Instagram : @engelsevem ► Conoce mis Canales en YouTube!! ○ Mi canal de música : Engel Seven ○ Fotografia y Visuales : Engel Seven Pro ○ Vlogs de un modo de vida : Engel Seven Europa

The JB&I Show Podcast
Why I Use CD Baby | @Landon Austin - The Independent Artist Academy | The JB&I Show | Isaac M | EP1

The JB&I Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 14:44


Why I use CD Baby for music distribution, is my response to Landon Austin. First I want to say I think that he is a very talented artist who is very knowledgeable. I just don't agree with his review of CD Baby. Episode 1 of 16 for season 3. We will be talking about music, movies, TV Shows and even fitness and such like that. Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFAj... Join me for a good discussion and/or good music. * https://linktr.ee/isaacm28 1) http://www.midind-ime.com 2) https://myfitwatch.net 3) https://isaacm.hearnow.com You are AWESOME! Never forget that. #YouTubeBlack #isaacm #lofimsuic #talkshow #music #isaacmiddleton #calmingmusic #teamfirehawk #enjoymusic #teamfirehawkelite #middleton #isaacm #myfitwatch

INDIE ARENA | MUSIC BIZ PODCAST
CD Baby Market Development | Indie Week Creator Darryl Hurs [Interview]

INDIE ARENA | MUSIC BIZ PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 23:50


Director, Market Development in Canada, CD Baby Darryl Hurs (CD Baby / Indie Week) has a 25+ year history in the music business including launching and running one of Canada's largest emerging artist showcase festivals and conference, Indie Week Canada. Darryl currently is the director of market development in Canada for CD Baby. During COVID he has begun holding multiple online conferences and events including SCREEN x SCREEN music and tech conference (FEB 2021) and indie101 (APR 2021). Darryl has also negotiated numerous sponsorship and partnership agreements including those with Jack Daniels, Jagermeister, CD Baby, SLAIGHT MUSIC, and more. Past positions include graphic design/branding for Live Nation as a freelancer. Work included corporate rebranding, event marketing assets, work for known artists such as U2, Nickelback, Madonna, Beyonce, Jay-Z and Dave Matthews and the launching of VIPNATION.com. Darryl also has past experience as a booker for one of Toronto's top live music venues (The Rivoli) where he has either worked with or booked shows for Glen Matlock (Sex Pistols), The Trews, Matt Mays, Matthew Good, Hozier, Young the Giant and many more. In the past two years Darryl has also launched three new online music and tech conferences Music Pro Summit (Sept 6- 8), SCREENxSCREEN (Feb), and indie101 (May). Indie Week also hosts a weekly music education event Indie Weekly. https://www.indieweek.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/elevatemusicbusiness/message

Evolve
Episode 32: Rethinking the Circumcision Part 2, with Rabbi Kevin Bernstein

Evolve

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 56:34


A friend once told Rabbi Kevin Bernstein that he's the most anti-circumcision mohel they'd ever met. Bernstein isn't against circumcision; he's performed hundreds of brit millah ceremonies. But he is sympathetic to people's concerns, questions and downright discomfort with it. In this episode, the veterinarian turned Reconstructionist rabbi offers a Reconstructionist take on this most ancient of Jewish conventual ceremonies. He responds to critics who question the continued relevance and, yes, the safety of circumcision, including our two prior guests, novelist Gary Shteyngart and business consultant Max Buckler. And he attempts to demystify the process and explain what happens at a brit millah ceremony. Theme song, “Ilu Finu” by Rabbi Miriam Margles. Her album This is the Day is available for purchase at CDBaby: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/miriammarglesandthehadarensemb Visit our home on the web — Evolve: Groundbreaking Jewish Conversions: http://evolve.reconstructingjudaism.org Subscribe by Email at http://subscribebyemail.com/evolve.fireside.fm/rss Read these show notes on the web at https://evolve.fireside.fm/1 This podcast is produced by Reconstructing Judaism. Visit us at ReconstructingJudaism.org (https://ReconstructingJudaism.org). Special Guest: Rabbi Kevin Bernstein.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.

Evolve
Episode 31: Rethinking the Circumcision Part 1, with Gary Shteyngart and Max Buckler

Evolve

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 69:46


Popular culture and Jewish humor are rife with circumcision jokes. Remember Mel Brooks explaining the practice to Robin Hood and his Merry Men? Seinfeld and Shakey the Mohel? Yet serious examinations of circumcisions and brit millah and what it means today — and why non-Orthodox Jews keep up the practice — are much harder to come by. In this first of a two-part series, we talk with critics — if not outright opponents — of circumcision. The first needs no introduction: Bestselling novelist and memoirist Gary Shteyngart. His New Yorker article about his own botched circumcision as a 7-year-old sparked conversation across the Jewish world and beyond. And Max Buckler, a business strategist who has been increasingly active and vocal on the issue. We discuss circumcision from the perspective of morality, Jewish tradition, medicine, gender norms and the rights of parents and children. We even address the question of whether circumcision decreases male sexual potency and pleasure. And we explore alternative rituals to mark the covenant between God and the Jewish people. Warning, this episode contains graphic descriptions of male genitalia and includes a discussion on how racism plays a role in the history of circumcision in the U.S. Still with us? Stay tuned, next month we'll talk to a Reconstructionist mohel. Theme song, “Ilu Finu” by Rabbi Miriam Margles. Her album This is the Day is available for purchase at CDBaby: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/miriammarglesandthehadarensemb Visit our home on the web — Evolve: Groundbreaking Jewish Conversions: http://evolve.reconstructingjudaism.org Subscribe by Email at http://subscribebyemail.com/evolve.fireside.fm/rss Read these show notes on the web at https://evolve.fireside.fm/1 This podcast is produced by Reconstructing Judaism. Visit us at ReconstructingJudaism.org (https://ReconstructingJudaism.org). Special Guests: Gary Shteyngart and Max Buckler.

Female Entrepreneur Musician with Bree Noble
Music Release Schedule And Strategy with Darryl Hurs of CD Baby & Indie Week

Female Entrepreneur Musician with Bree Noble

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 38:46


Dreams ARE Real
Ep 188: Embracing life as a walking Venn Diagram with Sandra Bargman, Creator of The Edge of Everyday.

Dreams ARE Real

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 96:26


Sandra Bargman is a walking Venn Diagram and the Creator of the Edge of Everyday. She explains that her true ‘know thyself' core lies at the center of her worlds as an actor and singer, interfaith minister, and presentation coach. After finding success in show business, but not being content with one track to follow, Sandra went to school to become a minister and dove deep into the world of coaching before her path led her to combine all 3 careers into one fully expressed and vibrantly fulfilling movement.   About the Guest: SANDRA BARGMAN has been described as a walking Venn Diagram. She is a 35+ year professional actor, singer, voice artist, (AEA/SAG/AFTRA), a seminary trained and ordained Inter-spiritual minister, award winning ritual designer and spiritual counselor, and a presentation leadership coach - the overlapping heart center of these concurrent paths being the ancient Greek maxim “Know Thyself”. Her solo show, The Edge of Everyday, garnered a Broadway World award nomination. The live CD recording can be found on Amazon and CD Baby. She hosts the weekly podcast, The Edge of Everyday, on TalkRadio.NYC. You can find Sandra at www.SandraBargman.com and all over social media. Links: Website: www.sandrabargman.com Podcast: https://www.talkradio.nyc/shows/the-edge-of-everyday Email: RevSandraBargman@gmail.com   About the Host: Dan McPherson, International Speaker, Business and Personal Development Coach, and CEO of Leaders Must Lead, is on a mission to help Creatives and Entrepreneurs create and grow profit and understand that Dreams ARE Real. With more than 25 years' experience in corporate roles leading teams of up to 2000 and responsible for more than $150M in revenue, Dan is a recognized expert in leadership, sales, and business strategy. Through his Leaders Must Learn Mastermind, Dreams ARE Real Podcast, Foundations of Success Training, and powerful 1-1 coaching, Dan helps hundreds of entrepreneurs around the world from musicians and artists to chiropractors, coaches, retailers, and beyond experience success and accomplish their goals. To learn more about Dan or to follow him on Social Media, you can find him on: Website: www.leadersmustlead.com Leaders Must Lead Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leadersmustlead Free Coaching Assessment: https://leadersmustlead.com/free-coaching-assessment Dreams are Real Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/365493184118010/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leadersmustlead/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/leadersmustlead YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZXypDeFKyZnpeQXcX-AsBQ   Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to my podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a note in the comment section below! Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app. Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to me and greatly appreciated. They help my podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes the show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.

Making Kayfabe
The Mad King Reigns Supreme

Making Kayfabe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 67:42


This week, Dylan dives into an Eddie Kingston booking, and shows how AEW could use this ultra-popular wrestler more effectively.  It's damn-near undoubtable these days that Eddie Kingston can talk interest into ANY storyline - so how would he fare going up against some of AEW's absolute best?   00:08:06 - Catch up on Eddie Kingston in AEW 00:17:42 - The Fantasy Booking 00:48:41 - Kayfabe Tombola 01:01:17 - Outro   WANT TO SUPPORT MAKING KAYFABE? We're on Patreon! Subscribe today for as little as £5 / $7 per month to unlock 18 exclusive Making Kayfabe re-bookings, with more coming each month. www.patreon.com/makingkayfabe   Making Kayfabe is presented, written and produced by Bryce Kitcher & Dylan Copeland. It is edited by Bryce Kitcher using Mixcraft 5. EXCELLENT episode art by Tyler Mortimer @ Blank Page Digital - https://www.instagram.com/blankpage_digital/ & twitter.com/dyslexic_tweets   TWITTER: www.twitter.com/MakingKayfabe EMAIL: makingkayfabe@gmail.com   Our standard Intro/Outro Music is Digital Dream (Azureflux Remix) by Starbox www.freemusicarchive.org   The music for breaks between show segments is Old Video Game Music” by  David Fesliyan www.fesliyanstudios.com   Unique intro music is Cold World (Eddie Kingston Instrumental) by CDBaby - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAr9De1H_ng   Booking background music is "Final Fantasy VI LoFi Remix" by Béo! (https://soundcloud.com/ohbeobeats/final-fantasy-vii-lofi-remix)   Thanks pardnah, Bryce & Dylan

Mi Disquera
CDBaby: Distribución musical todo-en-1 (entrevista con Mario Sánchez)

Mi Disquera

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 55:23


CDBaby es una de las distribuidoras de plataforma abierta más grandes a nivel mundial. Su excelente cobertura, servicio y sistema de costos transparente y sencillo le han ganado esa posición. En México, Mario Sánchez encabeza CDBaby, y aquí lo tenemos en entrevista para hablar de los temas más relevantes para los artistas independientes en el mundo hispanohablante. Además de ser especialista en distribución digital, Mario es músico, compositor y director artístico, conocido sobre todo por su trayectoria con la banda mexicana Austin TV. Hablamos con Mario sobre temas como: Problemas o retos que tienen los artistas independientes en cuanto a la distribución de su música y la labor necesaria para manejar su proyecto de forma profesional Marketing y mejores prácticas en Spotify y YouTube Cómo aprovechar al máximo las plataformas de streaming y sus recursos para artistas Redes sociales Cómo funciona la atención al cliente en CDBaby Opción de administración editorial bajo SongTrust Cómo maneja CDBaby temas técnicos como: agregar colaboradores en tus canciones, publicación de covers, actualización de metadatos o créditos

Women We Should Know
The Edge of Everyday with Sandra Bargman

Women We Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 43:37


Lesley was recently joined by actor, singer, Inter-spiritual Minister, philosopher and provocative thinker, Sandra Bargman for a fascinating conversation about life and its many facets. Having realized herself as a Walking Venn Diagram, Sandra dives into the understanding of the polarities of life, the light and the dark, the sacred and the profane of everyday. She shares poignant perspectives on her commitment to sharing her Voice as we all navigate crossroads of Humanity. From the stage to her recent commitment to be a leader in the renaissance of Salon culture, Sandra discusses the many means and platforms from which she delivers her understandings and messages. The listener will be charmed by the story of the how Sandra's understanding of her relationship with the edge was birthed during a road trip with her beloved, thus came her recognition of walking through life as an edgewalker. From developing one woman shows, to podcasting, to converting a building on she and her husband's Catskills property into the salon space called The Plum, Sandra skips right past the common and traditional to walk the edge of her life. Sandra Bargman is a creative soul, intuitive communicator, and energetic servant. It started at three years old, when she marched into the family kitchen, hands on her hips and announced that she was here on “a mission”! Every career choice She's made has ultimately rested on the ancient Greek maxim of “Know Thyself”, the directive that is at the heart of every artistic, spiritual and leadership journey. Sandra holds a BFA from Carnegie-Mellon University in drama and music and have had a happy 35+ year career as a professional actor, director, teacher and presentation coach. She's performed on the stages of Broadway national tours, off-Broadway, and beyond and continue to work in the industry. In 2007, Sandra was ordained as an Inter-spiritual Minister from The New Seminary for Interfaith Studies and holds an advanced certification from One Spirit Interfaith Seminary in Spiritual Counseling. Unaffiliated with any single religious tradition. Sandra's helped clients of all faiths and traditions (including none) in pursuing deeper self- understanding in their personal quest to 'Know Thyself”. Sandra helps others understand and accept the inevitability of change. In 2014, she started my own company, Sacred Stages, LLC, which is dedicated to encouraging everyone to discover the timeless universal truths of Spirit/The Sacred/The Divine through the venue of live theater, music, workshops, and ritual design. Sandra's one-woman show, The Edge of Everyday, garnered a Broadway World award nomination. The live CD recording can be found on Amazon and CD Baby. Watch video version HERE   Website:  www.sandrabargman.com Linkedin:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/sandrabargman/ Instagram:  @SandraBargman @theplumatth2live Twitter:  @SandraBargman Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sandra.bargman/

The TechTual Talk
I wasn't Salesforce Certified when I Started my Career

The TechTual Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 67:59


In this episode of The TechTual Talk Podcast I am joined by the lovely Kim Barnes aka lipstickandtech. We discuss everything from her undergrad experience, transitioning from helpdesk to Salesforce, how to get the right certifications, being a black woman in tech, and more. If you enjoy this episode, please subscribe to the podcast and leave a review.Kim's Information:  LipstickAndTech.com or @lipstickandtech on all socials  Store: https://www.store.lipstickandtech.com/   Free Resources:  Breaking Into the Salesforce Ecosystem: A Guide: https://lipstickandtech.com/breaking-into-the-salesforce-ecosystem-a-guide/Resources: https://lipstickandtech.com/resources/  Join the Patreon: https://patreon.com/techtualchatter Grab my ebook: https://techualconsulting.com/digitalproducts Use Riverside.FM to record your podcast: https://riverside.fm/?utm_campaign=campaign_1&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=rewardful&via=thetechtualtalk Check out the TechTual Talk Podcast: https://thetechtualtalk.com Song:  Need You Artist : Rachael Marks Album: Need You Licensed to YouTube by: CD Baby (on behalf of Freya Rae Music)Support the show

The Unstarving Musician
Kevin Breuner On Small Town Poets, CD Baby, Music Distribution And DIY Musician Education (Ep 232)

The Unstarving Musician

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 50:13


Kevin Breuner of CD Baby joins me in this episode to discuss music distribution, education for the DIY musician, his journey with CD Baby, his band Small Town Poets, and the DIY Musician podcast. CD Baby started out as a place where musicians could circumvent the middleman by selling music CDs direct to fans. It has since evolved into an artist-services platform that helps independent musicians to distribute, promote, and monetize their music outside of the major-label system. Kevin recently celebrated 16 years with CD Baby. When he joined the company, his job was to talking artists. Now he's SVP of Engagement and Education. Kevin also started DIY Musician podcast and he's part of the team that heads up the DIY Music Conference, which returns in August 2022, following a hiatus that was driven by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this conversation, Kevin and I talk about remote work, the return of his band Small Town Poets, CD Baby (of course), education overwhelm that indie artists face, recent changes in the music industry, music distribution and more. Follow Kevin on Instagram @KBreuner. Hear the DIY Musician Podcast at Podcast.CDBaby.com. Support the Unstarving Musician The Unstarving Musician exists solely through the generosity of its listeners, readers, and viewers. Learn how you can offer your support. Mentioned in this Episode Visit UnstarvingMusician.com for links related to this episode. This episode is powered by Podcast Startup, the learning platform for creators with a voice. Podcast Startup covers tech, production, editing, marketing and more. I know what it feels like to be slowed down by challenges revolving around fear, procrastination and tech, yet I've recorded and published over 260 podcast episodes. To learn more about Podcast Startup and to get free podcasting startup tips right to your inbox, go to UnstarvingMusician.com/PodcastStartup. This episode was powered by Music Marketing Method, a program for independent musicians looking to grow their music career. Music Marketing Method was created by my good friend Lynz Crichton. I'm in the program and I'm learning tons! I'm growing my fan base and learning about many ways that I'll be earning money in the new year. It's also helping me grow this podcast. How cool is that? To lean more and find out if Music Marketing Method can help your music career, visit UnstarvingMusician.com/MusicMarketing. Resources The Unstarving Musician's Guide to Getting Paid Gigs, by Robonzo Music Marketing Method – The program that helps musicians find fans, grow an audience and make consistent income Podcast Startup – The podcast learning platform for creative voices Bandzoogle – The all-in-one platform that makes it easy to build a beautiful website for your music More Resources for musicians Pardon the Interruption (Disclosure)  Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. This means I make a small commission, at no extra charge to you, if you purchase using those links. Thanks for your support! Visit UnstarvingMusician.com/Podcasts for related links, episode transcripts and past guests. Sign up for the Unstarving Musician email newsletter at UnstarvingMusician.com Stay in touch! @RobonzoDrummer on Twitter  and  Instagram @UnstarvingMusician on Facebook  and  YouTube

Evolve
Episode 30: Warm and Welcoming?

Evolve

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 57:11


Have you ever heard a Jewish organization refer to itself as “warm and welcoming” but, on some level, fail to live up? Walked into a Jewish space and felt like you might as well have been invisible? Or yearned to see LGBTQ Jews, Jews of Color, interfaith families, those with disabilities and so many other fully embraced and at home in Jewish communities? Then listen to Bryan's conversation with Miriam Steinberg-Egeth and Warren Hoffman, Ph.D., about their book “Warm and Welcoming: How the Jewish Community Can Become Truly Diverse and Inclusive in the 21st Century.” The two, longtime friends and collaborators, explain how the book came together and what they hope it accomplishes. The authors argue that “warm and welcoming” is not a state to achieve but a constant process. Theme song, “Ilu Finu” by Rabbi Miriam Margles. Her album This is the Day is available for purchase at CDBaby: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/miriammarglesandthehadarensemb Visit our home on the web — Evolve: Groundbreaking Jewish Conversions: http://evolve.reconstructingjudaism.org Subscribe by Email at http://subscribebyemail.com/evolve.fireside.fm/rss Read these show notes on the web at https://evolve.fireside.fm/1 This podcast is produced by Reconstructing Judaism. Visit us at ReconstructingJudaism.org (https://ReconstructingJudaism.org). Special Guests: Miriam Steinberg-Egeth and Warren Hoffman.

Living the Dream with Curveball
Living the dream with country music singer songwriter Gary Pratt

Living the Dream with Curveball

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 24:37


Gary Pratt is a singer, a songwriter, but most of all, an energetic country entertainer who connects with his audience. Gary is a 2021 International Singer Songwriter Association Award Winner and a Josie Music Award Nominee. His last two songs have hit number one on the International Itunes Chart. He grew up in the small, old coal mining town of Slickville, Pennsylvania. In addition to being the front man for several local bands in the Pittsburgh area, he has had the experience of hitting the Nashville club and showcase scene. He has had the pleasure of singing at the Tennesee State Fair, Rocky Gap Music Festival and CMA Fest. Gary has been the opening act for such greats as Dwight Yoakum, Pam Tillis, Lorrie Morgan, Ronnie Milsap, Neal McCoy and Crystal Gayle to name a few. His current recording project, "Something Worth Remembering", is dedicated to his brother who recently passed. The album is a combination of Gary's originals and songs written by credited Nashville writers. The title track was written by Grammy Award Nominee Tony Arata, who wrote Garth Brooks' "The Dance". This project has been in the making for over a year. It was recorded at Tonic Studios with Engineer Doug Kasper, Producer Bryan Cole and Musician/Artist Adam Ernst. Excited about this new album, Gary invited MTS Male Vocalist Matt Westin and Female Vocalist Savannah Snider to help out on a few songs. Savannah and Gary recorded the duet he wrote, "To Find Us", at Omni Studios in Nashville. It was the first time Gary and Savannah actually met and they are now making plans to write together in the future. Gary is forever thankful to God for walking with him through life, paving this music journey and for putting the gift of music in his heart. Not only has music been an outlet emotionally and has helped Gary through some rough times, it has brought family together and has introduced him to some of the most amazing people he is proud to call friends. His latest singles, "A SONG YOU CAN DRINK A BEER TO" and "COUNTRY TO THE BONE" are playing on Nashville (WNHE), LA, New York and Las Vegas radio stations! Google and see the many News Articles and Interviews all over the world! Gary's music albums can be purchased at Spotify, Amazon Music, Tidal, Deezer Itunes, Cd Baby, or call 724-834-7499. His very first CD "Gary Pratt" can only be purchased by calling the phone number above. Check his videos out on Youtube and ask ALEXA to play his music. You can also go to www.garyprattmusic.com

The Stephanie Little Radio Show
Weekend News Report Buffalo Shooting Incident OMG

The Stephanie Little Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 54:04


On this podcast episode, my take on what has happened over the weekend in Buffalo, NY. A young 18 year old white male shot 13 people, 11 killed & mostly black. All because of some racist idealogy amongst other things. Plus a song I wrote & produced from my STephySTephy The Project Enough Said Digital CD titled "What You Think About That" available online retailers such as Apple Music, Amazon music, Google Music, CDbaby, Emusic, Rhapsody to name a few.

DIY Musician Podcast
#300: The Indie Revolution Continues!

DIY Musician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 94:29


The DIY musician podcast has been going strong for 15 years, and this is our 300th episode! This episode is a celebration of the amazing independent artists that make up now-massive segments of the music industry. It's a celebration of all the people past and present here at CD Baby, who work tirelessly behind the scenes to level the playing field for all creators. And it's a celebration of perseverance, because there were so many times where it would have been easier to let the podcast fade away. In this episode, we'll discuss the podcast's origin stories, how the music industry has changed and how that change impacts the future.

The Business of Meetings
112: Music was My First Love with Darryl Hurs

The Business of Meetings

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 35:56


Music was My First Love with Darryl Hurs - Episode 112 We are delighted to be speaking with a legend in the music industry today! Darryl Hurs is the Founder of Indie Week in Toronto. He is also the Managing Director of Downtown Global.  Darryl has created online conferences and worked with famous bands and musicians like U2, Madonna, Beyonce, Jay-Z, and Dave Matthews. Darryl is a fascinating individual! In this episode, he tells his story, talks about music, marketing, and engagement, and paints a vivid picture of the future of conferences.  We hope you enjoy listening to today's captivating conversation with Darryl Hurs! Bio: Darryl Hurs has a 25+ year history in the music business, including launching and running one of Canada's largest music showcase festivals and the conference, Indie Week. In the past two years, he founded three new online conferences: Music Pro Summit, indie101, and SCREENxSCREEN. Recently hired as the Managing Director for Downtown Music in Canada heading the Canadian operations for Fuga, Songtrust, Adrev, Found.ee, CD Baby, and Downtown Music Services. His past positions include design and branding/marketing for Live Nation as a freelancer (projects included a corporate rebrand and logo design, launching VIPNATION.com, work for U2, Nickelback, Madonna, Beyonce, Jay-Z, and Dave Matthews) retail buyer at HMV, and booker for one of Toronto's top live music venues (The Rivoli). Growing up in Canada Darryl grew up in Edmonton. He already knew in grade six that he wanted to get into the music business. The music industry in Canada was in Toronto, so he moved there when he was older, looking to do what he does now. Darryl's story Darryl wanted to be a musician, so he studied guitar at MacEwan University in Edmonton. Then he joined a band and moved with it from Edmonton to Toronto. When the band moved back to Edmonton, Darryl remained in Toronto. He knew nobody there, so he started networking, volunteering, hustling, playing, and auditioning. He began carving out his career when he became a booker for a venue, started managing bands, and did all the promotions and bookings for the bands he was in. Then he took a desktop publishing course and started earning a living doing graphics and design.  Live Nation He landed Live Nation as a client for eight or nine years, during which time he also launched VIPNATION.Com for them, rebranded the company, and did event marketing and advertising for several famous artists. He gained experience in marketing and promoting events and engaging fans. A promotion Darryl has been the country rep for CD Baby in Canada for three years. At the end of last year, he received a promotion and is now the Managing Director for Canada for Downtown Global. Covid When Covid hit, they lost everything and started doing conferencing online. Since then, they have launched another three successful other online music conferences. They now have several different projects on the go and are on par with where they were at the start of Covid. Indie Week Darryl created Indie Week because no festivals in Toronto focused on local artists. It was a music festival and also a music conference. Just before Covid, Indie Week in Toronto was doing about 240 bands from all around the world for four nights at 24 music venues in downtown Toronto. (Before that, they were doing the UK, but they stopped when Brexit happened.) In Indie Week, they got the industry out to look at the bands and vote for the band that deserved to play at Indie Week in the UK. Then, at Indie Week in the UK, they would pick a band to bring to Canada.  Comafest Since Covid, they have partnered with a Comafest in Brazil. They have taken an artist there every year and intend to take a few artists there in August 2022. Their objective is to build the international partnerships they started online, partner with other existing festivals, and take artists to those festivals. Online conferences They plan to continue their conference online. What set their conference apart from all other conferences happening during the Covid lockdown was that they were 110% invested in doing it online.  Positive feedback They have had a lot of praise and positive feedback for their online conferences! They could get higher-level speakers because they did not have to fly anyone anywhere.  The Indie Week online Music Conference They took the music conference and broke it down into different demographics to go online. Now, Screen X Screen, which is about music and tech, happens in February each year. Indie 101 is about education, and it happens in May. Music Pro Summit hosts high-level industry discussions and takes place in September. Indie Week is their hub, so they try to bring everything together in one place and focus on international connections. Many people have said that it is one of the best online conferences they have ever attended. The platform Their platform, Whova, is open to engagement and connecting with others. All their programs are recorded and people can talk online for three months. So any attendee can still go through the speaker and attendee list and message them after the conference. People are learning how to use the platform and taking advantage of it! A community Their free weekly sessions focus on being real. The sessions have helped grow their community because people love having the connection! Value People add value. Darryl believes that if you offer help first things will happen, and if you do something that engages with people, it will become valuable. So focus on people first, and monetization later. Online is working well They are planning to stay online because it is working well. They are also looking for ways to utilize what they have done online and do something in person when the time is right to do so. The goal The goal for Indie Week is that the participants make connections that turn into a real business. Online versus face-to-face People make a mistake when they try to recreate a face-to-face event online. Indie Week is an online experience, and the organizers are making the most of it! They are not trying to do what they would normally do in person.  Valuable experience They gained valuable experience from doing four online events in one year. They learned to utilize the positive aspects of the online experience and capitalize on them. AI Darryl believes that AI will make it possible for anything to happen musically in the future! Music marketing for artists Everyone in the world is online today, so artists need to plug into social marketing. That means using Facebook ads and Instagram ads and knowing how to use the data to locate their audience and the areas where people are tuning in the most. Then they need to start feeding different ads to that market to build a story. They can also use billboard ads, magazines, and online advertising programs like Found.ee. How can artists get known? Artists should focus on what they do and how to use tools to elevate that. They should focus on where their audience is and try to get as many fans as possible to engage. Engaging audiences at conferences People need to talk less about business and more about who they are and how they are doing. Digital is global, so there is value in considering how to elevate an in-person event to online. Being inclusive is also vital.    Connect with Eric On LinkedIn On Facebook On Instagram On Website   Connect with Darryl Hurs On LinkedIn Indie Week  

Make Music Income
EP22. Who Are YOUR Trusted Music Income Specialists? Who handles the income you make from PROs, Music Distro, Content ID, Stock Music, and more.

Make Music Income

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 56:01


On this podcast: Steve talks about another great month on Motion Array and AudioJungle, first payment for affiliate marketing, broke his sales record in Production Music Tools, "The Barracuda Way", and an Artlist Originals explanation. Eric talks about teaching, his current thoughts about stock, country tracking in Nashville, a new YouTube channel schedule, and stock numbers. 18:30 - Our Trusted Music Income Specialists. Eric and Steve talk about the music income specialists they prefer to bring them music income including PROs like BMI, SOCAN, and more, Content ID collectors, Music Distributors like DistroKid, CDBaby, and more, and stock libraries that bring income. -- Monday's Money Makers Podcast - https://spoti.fi/3Bali5f -- The Make Music Income Discord (Come join for great free conversation!): https://bit.ly/3fYDSVd The Production Music Academy: https://productionmusicacademy.com Make Music Income Website: https://www.MakeMusicIncome.com -- Watch the Podcast on YouTube Channels: Make Music Income: https://www.youtube.com/makemusicincome Stevie B / Production Music Academy: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-6OyeP_Tk6G-gt5JSVKzkg -- Instagram: Make Music Income: https://www.instagram.com/makemusicincome/ Steven Beddall: https://www.instagram.com/stevenbeddall/ Production Music Academy: https://www.instagram.com/productionmusicacademy/

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson
Out on a Limb . . . with Darryl Hurs

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 47:33 Transcription Available


Question: How can you build a rich creative life based on referrals and going out on a limb? Guest: Darryl Hurs, Owner/CEO, Indie Week; Managing Director, Downtown Canada; Director, Market Development, Canada, CD Baby; Educator, Harris Institute In this episode, Darryl Hurs shares his journey from studying music, working in retail at HMV, and being in a band to building a dynamic life in digital arts and music business through the reach of the people he has met and putting himself out there, even if he was uncomfortable.  His work of getting and giving work to others launched his own early work for Live Nation in launching VIPNATION.  His life ever since has all been about referrals and reaching out.  He built Indie Week from booking venues and creating discovery opportunities for new music.  He threads together stories of expanded risk-taking from one group of skills and people to bigger opportunities -- and how the referral is at the core of building his work in the world. BioDarryl Hurs has a 25+ year history in the music business including launching and running Indie Week (one of Canada's largest music showcase festivals and conferences). In the past two years, he has founded 3 new online conferences: Music Pro Summit, indie101, and SCREENxSCREEN.  Darryl recently has been hired as the Managing Director for Downtown Music in Canada heading the Canadian operations for FUGA, Songtrust, Adrev, Found.ee, and CD Baby. His past positions include design and branding/marketing for Live Nation as a freelancer (projects included a corporate rebrand and logo design, launching https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2FVIPNATION.com%2F%3Ffbclid%3DIwAR1JJoXtUf8frYUUJXLSFq4B192UiBfCCXIMQ_infOWA6ceUBHf09cMUFOY&h=AT3PF4tMKiuFYznYiaNVzLn54IXvbG67ZIMbfAqu8L2__QsrZpG4zoZ9Y0RkzAuA3PKQI4iyUi8i_53dhkuQ1laPfkJT18LHbBEzQrauDgpD86EXi9k9_3xpUnnUdhyqNxVnvLsQ2eIpS8jv7A (VIPNATION.com), work for U2, Nickelback, Madonna, Beyonce, Jay-Z and Dave Matthews), retail buyer at HMV, and booker for one of Toronto's top live music venues (The Rivoli). Linkshttps://www.indieweek.com/ (Indie Week) https://indie101.com/ (Indie 101) http://musicprosummit.com/ (Music Pro Summit) http://www.screenxscreen.com/ (Screen x Screen) https://www.downtownmusic.com/ (Downtown Music) Twitter: https://twitter.com/darrylhurs (DarrylHurs), https://twitter.com/indieweek (IndieWeek), https://twitter.com/downtownmusic (Downtown Music) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/darryl_hurs/ (Darryl_Hurs), https://www.instagram.com/indieweek/ (Indie Week), https://www.instagram.com/downtownholdco/ (Downtown Music) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/darryl.hurs (Darryl.Hurs), https://www.facebook.com/indieweek/ (Indie Week) https://www.linkedin.com/in/darrylhurs/ (LinkedIn) Our Mission Through our guests' stories, we aim to inspire current and future change agents who are creatives, entrepreneurs, researchers, or community leaders who are seeking inspiration and support around creative innovation — changing the ways we create, collaborate, engage, change lives, and build communities. Your Host: Gigi Johnson, EdD I run transformative programs, speak/moderate, invest, advise, and produce multimedia on creativity and technology.  I taught for 22 years at UCLA, where I ran the Center for Music Innovation and the podcast "Innovating Music," built four industry-connecting programs, and taught undergraduates, MBAs, and executives about disruption in creative industries.  Before UCLA, I financed media M&A at Bank of America for ten years. Connect with Us https://maremel.com/creative-innovators-podcast/ (Our Website) How to submit a Creative Innovator Guest: https://maremel.com/creative-innovators-podcast/guest-information/ (Information Page) Subscribe to our newsletter http://eepurl.com/bugPcj (here). Join our Patreon community https://www.patreon.com/creativeinnovators (here).

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson
Music + India . . . .plus Ritnika Nayan

Creative Innovators with Gigi Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 29:29


Question: How do you connect independent artists and music business in India as a young woman? Guest: Ritnika Nayan, Managing Director, Downtown India; Owner: Music Gets Me High Ritnika Nayan shares stories about her passion: helping indie artists succeed and make money through various avenues that they might have been neglecting.  She does that in her main role: Managing Director for Downtown India.  That passion also connects her early love of Broadway musicals to working on college concerts at Hofstra, music festivals in India, building her own company, wellness work, ukulele covers, and writing a book and teaching future music industry leaders in India.   Bio Ritnika Nayan is the Managing Director for Downtown India representing CD Baby, Fuga, Songtrust, Downtown Music Services, Found.ee, and Adrev in the country. She is also the owner of the company Music Gets Me High and the author of Indie 101 – The Ultimate Guide to the Independent Music Industry in India.  Throughout her 21 years of experience in the music industry, she has worked with artists like Maroon 5, Nickelback, Guns & Roses, Manu Chao, Nucleya, Advaita, Jalebee Cartel and also consulted on festivals like Sula Fest, Ziro festival of Music, Wonderflip fest and more. Ritnika has also set up India's first stand-alone Music Business Certification course at SACAC, Delhi, and conducts workshops on various aspects of the Industry under MGMH Academy. She is an avid speaker at conferences globally including TEDx and has won various awards including the contribution to the creative industry award by the University of Westminster, UK and the Young Music Entrepreneur runner-up award by the British council and more. Mentioned Links: https://ritnika.com/about-me/ (https://ritnika.com/about-me/) https://ritnika.com/ (https://ritnika.com/)  https://www.linkedin.com/in/ritnika/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ritnika/) https://twitter.com/ritnika (https://twitter.com/ritnika) https://www.facebook.com/ritnikan (https://www.facebook.com/ritnikan) MGMH YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/mgmhindia (https://www.youtube.com/user/mgmhindia) SAC Certificate in Music Business Management: https://www.sac.ac.in/certificate-course-music-business-management/ (https://www.sac.ac.in/certificate-course-music-business-management/)  Indie 101: The Ultimate Guide to the Independent Music Industry in India: https://www.amazon.com/Indie-101-Ultimate-Independent-Industry-ebook/dp/B074279X8M Our Mission Through our guests' stories, we aim to inspire current and future change agents who are creatives, entrepreneurs, researchers, or community leaders who are seeking inspiration and support around creative innovation — changing the ways we create, collaborate, engage, change lives, and build communities. Your Host: Gigi Johnson, EdD I run transformative programs, speak/moderate, invest, advise, and produce multimedia on creativity and technology.  I taught for 22 years at UCLA, where I ran the Center for Music Innovation and the podcast "Innovating Music," built four industry-connecting programs, and taught undergraduates, MBAs, and executives about disruption in creative industries.  Before UCLA, I financed media M&A at Bank of America for ten years. Connect with Us https://maremel.com/creative-innovators-podcast/ (Our Website) How to submit a Creative Innovator Guest: https://maremel.com/creative-innovators-podcast/guest-information/ (Information Page) Subscribe to our newsletter http://eepurl.com/bugPcj (here). Join our Patreon community https://www.patreon.com/creativeinnovators (here). Sponsored and Produced by the https://maremel.com/ (Maremel Institute)

Evolve
Episode 29: Special Live Episode: Addressing Global Climate Disruption Through Torah

Evolve

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 51:02


What if the central purpose of the Torah is to ensure was to ensure that people live in harmony with the environment and other living things? That is exactly what Rabbi David Seidenberg teaches, and he believes that Jews have strayed from the Torah's message for thousands of years. Seidenberg also believes Jews can return to the Torah's teaching and play a key role in combating climate change – before it is too late. Seidenberg spoke with podcast host Bryan Schwartzman live from B'Yachad: Reconstructing Judaism together, the movement-wide convention, in late March in Northern Virginia. This is the first Evolve podcast episode in front of a live audience. We took questions from the audience, had some sound interference from the next room but, through technical marvel, managed to record a crisp episode. And we delved deeply into Judaism and the environment, addressing questions like: does the Torah view animals as people? Is there any way to summon optimism regarding the state of a natural world confronting climate change caused by humans? Have humans always wrecked the environment and are we capable of change? Theme song, “Ilu Finu” by Rabbi Miriam Margles. Her album This is the Day is available for purchase at CDBaby: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/miriammarglesandthehadarensemb Visit our home on the web — Evolve: Groundbreaking Jewish Conversions: http://evolve.reconstructingjudaism.org Subscribe by Email at http://subscribebyemail.com/evolve.fireside.fm/rss Read these show notes on the web at https://evolve.fireside.fm/1 This podcast is produced by Reconstructing Judaism. Visit us at ReconstructingJudaism.org (https://ReconstructingJudaism.org). Special Guest: Rabbi David Seidenberg.

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast
Episode 416 – Composer Ron Jones, Dying Fandom, And Will No Compression Recordings Be A Trend?

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 48:43 Very Popular


My guest this week is Ron Jones, who's had a long career writing for some of the biggest hit television shows of our time. Ron has worked a variety of popular prime-time shows like The A-Team, Magnum P.I., Hardcastle and McCormick, Hunter, and Star Trek Next Generation, but he may be better known for his work on animated shows. These include The Smurfs, Scooby-Doo, Disney's Duck Tales, Fairly Odd Parents, and the ever popular Family Guy and American Dad. During the interview we talked about  why working on animation can be liberating for a composer, why the days before MIDI was actually easier for composers, his battle with categorizing his music on CD Baby, and much more. As you'll hear, Ron's a really funny guy with a wealth of knowledge, so we'll probably come back for a Part 2 to the conversation soon. I spoke with Ron via Zoom from his studio in Washington State. On the intro I'll take a look at the decline of fandom, and are we on the cusp of a new trend in recording?

Soundiron Podcast
Aaron Grubb on Spotify Playlists, Leveraging Cover Songs, Handling Rejection

Soundiron Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 60:34


In this episode Nathan & Craig interview Aaron Grubb - a composer/photographer who has leveraged video game music covers on Spotify to build over 105k monthly listeners and 5+ million streams. We discuss genre blending, handling rejection, cover licensing and royalties, personal projects and much more. Aaron's Linktree: https://linktr.ee/aarongrubbmusic For more info, visit our website: https://soundiron.com/ Podcast notes: * (0:00) Introducing Aaron Grubb * (2:12) Probing the Spotify market * (3:49) First Zelda song on a playlist * (5:46) Art & Distribution * (7:44) CD Baby vs others * (10:28) Leveraging a well-loved brand * (11:24) Making cover different from original * (14:00) Themed spotify playlists * (17:10) Cold pitching playlist curators * (22:51) Two years of music releases * (24:02) Hyperion Strings Solo Violins * (24:16) How you start a cover * (29:36) Branching out to other games * (32:40) Another Mulligan * (38:05) Spotify Followers * (40:34) Musical Training * (42:38) VHS + camcorders * (45:15) Being resourceful * (47:05) Advice for new composers * (54:26) Passion project * (57:21) Favorite current podcast Soundiron is a premium developer of virtual instruments and sample libraries for songwriters, composers and sound designers. They are a team of programmers, engineers, composers and instrumentalists passionate about building beautiful-sounding instrument plugins that are inspiring to play. Whether you're new to music production or a seasoned pro in the film, television, advertising, video game, or music recording industries, They've got you covered. Soundiron serves the best and brightest composers and artists in film & media today. #soundiron #musicpodcast #musiccomposer

happy podcast
060 Derek Sivers 关于创业的十个想法

happy podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 32:24


Derek Sivers 白手起家,自学编程,用不到十年时间,将亲手创立的 CDbaby 以2200万美金出售,我们可以从中学到什么经验?分享给你《Anything You Want》这本书里最棒的十个想法。 链接 Anything You Want Derek Sivers 的播客 我写的和 Derek 有关的 blog 我写过的关于 Derek 的推文 赞助 本期播客由「有知有行」app 赞助。 投资是除健康之外,每个人最应该关注的话题。我写过一些关于投资的文章,但都不够专业。如果你想系统地学习投资知识,我推荐「有知有行」app。它帮你学习投资知识,且不收费,不推荐股票,只从基本知识出发,让你学会投资的底层逻辑。你可以从投资第一课开始学习。 创始人孟岩是一位令我尊敬的财富知识分享者,我推荐他最近的公众号文章《钱、工作、投资》,和播客《无人知晓》关于品牌定位的最新单集。 happy xiao happy 的 blog happy 的 Twitter happy 的 newsletter happy 的 YouTube

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1917: CD Baby - The Tech Making The Music Business Accessible to All

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 30:39


CD Baby is an artist-services platform that makes it easy for independent musicians to distribute, promote, and monetize their music so they can thrive outside the major-label system. Built on the belief that every artist should be able to pursue their vision without compromise and have an equal opportunity to be heard, CD Baby's distribution services, self-promotion tools, and educational initiatives are designed to increase artist autonomy and empower independent artists to build their audiences without corporate assistance.  Home to over 1 million artists and more than 10 million tracks, CD Baby has paid out over $1 billion in royalties to artists since its founding in 1998. However, with all the recent startup posturing, model shuffling, and race-to-the-bottom pricing in music distribution, it's time to take a step back and think, what is the role of a music distributor?  Kevin Breuner shares his philosophy on what it means to be a music distributor in 2022. 

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2287: Moving For Good AND Goals Shape the Present, Not the Future by Derek Sivers on Personal Development

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 7:40


Two posts from Derek Sivers on personal growth and goal setting. Episode 2287: Moving For Good AND Goals Shape the Present, Not the Future by Derek Sivers on Personal Development Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original posts are located here: https://sive.rs/mfg & https://sive.rs/goals Notion is an all-in-one team collaboration tool that combines note-taking, document sharing, wikis, project management and much more into one space that's simple, powerful, and beautifully-designed. Get started for free at Notion.so Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY
2287: Moving For Good AND Goals Shape the Present, Not the Future by Derek Sivers on Personal Development

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 8:40


Two posts from Derek Sivers on personal growth and goal setting. Episode 2287: Moving For Good AND Goals Shape the Present, Not the Future by Derek Sivers on Personal Development Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original posts are located here: https://sive.rs/mfg & https://sive.rs/goals Notion is an all-in-one team collaboration tool that combines note-taking, document sharing, wikis, project management and much more into one space that's simple, powerful, and beautifully-designed. Get started for free at Notion.so Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 2 - Episodes 301-600 ONLY
2287: Moving For Good AND Goals Shape the Present, Not the Future by Derek Sivers on Personal Development

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 2 - Episodes 301-600 ONLY

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 7:40


Two posts from Derek Sivers on personal growth and goal setting. Episode 2287: Moving For Good AND Goals Shape the Present, Not the Future by Derek Sivers on Personal Development Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original posts are located here: https://sive.rs/mfg & https://sive.rs/goals Notion is an all-in-one team collaboration tool that combines note-taking, document sharing, wikis, project management and much more into one space that's simple, powerful, and beautifully-designed. Get started for free at Notion.so Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The N'Courage & N'Spire Podcast
The N'Courage & N'Spire Podcast Ep 42 A Hip-Hop Canadian Creative & Difference Maker Feat Arlo Maverick

The N'Courage & N'Spire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 99:31


In this episode Durell is joined by Canadian hip-hop MC, music business enthusiast and grant writer Arlo Maverick. Durell and Arlo begin the episode talking about their love of sharing information to help indie creatives navigate the music space professionally.. Durell shares that there is a difference between the music industry, the music business and the business of music. Arlo shares that people like he and Durell have experiences along their journey that can be valuable to new creatives entering into the marketplace and learning how to navigate the ecosystem. Durell and Arlo talk about how the pandemic has affected the way that creatives had to maneuver and still impact communities and touch the people. Durell shares that his home state of Florida has been open for quite some time and that the governor wasn't going to force people to be on lockdown and wear masks. Durell talks about the fact that he didn't like the way that former President Trump was shut down from having the ability to speak on his social platforms. and Arlo both agree that there is a slippery slope in shutting down important public figures like the president because it sets a bad precedent moving forward for the ability to have free speech which ultimately can affect creatives who want to get their message across and be a voice for those who have something to say.Durell and Arlo share about them both being rooted in Jamaican heritage. Durell shares that he's never had the opportunity to visit Jamaica because his father says that the parts of Jamaica where he is from wouldn't be the easiest to get around because of his disability and Arlo definitely agreed that if you want to visit the real part of Jamaica you have to get off of the resort and that most of the land in Jamaica is very hilly. Durell asks Arlo about his earliest memories of music and Arlo shares how he was first introduced to hip-hop music. He talked about his cousin playing a tape of UTFO's “Roxanne Roxanne” and he said from that day on his life was changed as he began his love affair with hip-hop music. Durell asks Arlo when he knew that he wanted to pursue music as a career and he said that for him that was high school. Arlo shares that he had a friend who had a family member that worked for BMG and really put them on game about what needed to be done on the business side if they wanted to be successful in music. Durell asks Arlo to explain the difference of what it means to be a indie hip hop creative from Canada vs. being from the United States Of America. Arlo shares that a few of the differences is the fact that creatives from the states have many more outlets to get heard as well as being a much bigger population which creates the opportunity for funding to come from record labels. He shares the reason why the Canadian government invests so much in the arts is because they aren't as many places to go and get music heard by the masses. Arlo shares that the grants are put in place so that Canadian artists are able to create the foundation for them to be able to make a living off of their creativity. Durell and Arlo talk about how expensive it is to be a professional creative and what it really takes to be successful. Durell and Arlo talk about the lack of education that many indie creatives have when they enter into the ecosystem and how most don't belong because they don't respect the grind aspect of it all. Arlo shares that he was listening to an interview from one of the founders of CD Baby and they talked about how most creatives' careers are usually broken down into two parts; the first part is where you pay to be in the music industry and the other part is now when you are bringing in more money then you are spending and that's when things are really moving to build up longevity. Arlo shares that most people only see certain export artists like Drake and some of the other well known artists and forget that there has been quality hip-hop music coming from Canada since the 1980's. He shares that another major mandatory piece that the Canadian government put in place to make sure that Canadian hip-hop creatives are getting heard is Can-Con. Can-Con is basically a creative initiative that makes sure a percentage of hip-hop music is being heard on radio and TV which creates additional opportunities. Durell and Arlo talk about the way he approaches making music and Arlo shares that one of his biggest inspirations is Kanye West. He shares that he loves the way that Kanye West is truly about creating experiences in a memorable way. Arlo and Durell talk about how hard it is for indie creatives to win awards and be recognized for their gift and if they do happen to be nominated and win that can do so much for a indie creative's confidence to keep going along in their journey because they have proof that there are people who truly love and appreciate what they do. Arlo shares that being able to win awards allows him the ability to have his success documented and people see that he puts in real work in building his success. Durell and Arlo speak on being able to enjoy the journey and how so many indie creatives drop the ball in understanding the marathon vs. the sprint.Durell and Arlo end the episode discussing his time being a part of a hip hop group called “Politic Live” and starting an indie record label called “Music For Mavericks Entertainment that helped indie creatives a platform to get their music business in order. Arlo talks about his time as a DJ at CJSR radio and how he loved being able to be a storyteller and being able to give Canadian indie hip-hop acts the opportunity to get on radio and share their stories. Arlo shares about an initiative that he started called “Hip-Hop For Hunger '' where he was able to raise money for over 10,000 pounds of food for the Edmonton Food Bank. Durell asks Arlo to explain a little bit in detail how the grant system works for Canadian artists.For more information on Arlo Maverick, please visit his Instagram:@arlomaverick

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone
Beliefs Are Helpful But Not True

Inner Archeology with Sarah Turner & Emily Pennystone

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 75:18


We are the way we are because of what we've experienced. We choose our beliefs, consciously or subconsciously, to make sense of the world and to create an identity. Once you understand that, you will have so much more control over what you choose to believe. Today, we start with a quote by CD Baby founder, author, and entrepreneur Derek Sivers that stood out to Sarah at a recent Genius Network event, which forms the topic for today's conversation: beliefs are helpful but not true. For some, the idea that there is no universal truth can be a scary one but, tuning in, you'll discover that there is value in finding the excitement and endless possibility in uncertainty! We touch on the validity of staying informed at all costs and unpack an Instagram post by emotional alchemist, Xavier Dagba, which delves into the practice of vibrational precision and peace consciousness rather than war consciousness. We also share our perspectives on embracing the unknown, affecting change with authenticity, and the incredible power of joy, plus so much more! We hope you'll join us for this impactful conversation.   Key Points From This Episode: We kick off with name changes, The Fifth Sacred Thing by Starhawk, nudity, and more! The inspiration for today's topic: a quote from Derek Sivers' Genius Network keynote speech. Why the idea that truth is subjective could spark fear in some people. The value of finding excitement and possibility in uncertainty. How caring for yourself impacts your ability to make the world a better place. Why we recommend questioning your motivations for ‘staying informed at all costs'. The benefits of protecting your energy and limiting ‘noise' so you can hear your intuition. A reminder to remain anchored and practice what Xavier Dagba calls ‘vibrational precision'. Questions to ask yourself to help you align with your internal guidance system. How you can care and choose not to despair; suffering is not virtuous! The value of reconnecting with your community where you can have the most impact. How our obsession with correctness is limiting us and the freedom in saying ‘I don't know'. What we can learn from Judaism about embracing the unknown. Peace consciousness and relating to people with differing belief systems on a human level. The important role you play when you communicate and show up in your community. How Queer Eye is a good model for affecting change in the most authentic way possible. Why the way you show up in the small moments matters just as much as the big ones. A reminder that your joy is powerful and peace consciousness is contagious. The power in acknowledging the thorns and the rosebuds as part of the human experience.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: The Fifth Sacred Thing Genius Network Derek Sivers Anything You Want Man's Search for Meaning Xavier Dagba on Instagram Xavier Dagba Instagram Post Inner Archeology Email Sarah Turner on Instagram Emily Pennystone on Instagram

My Life Now PODCAST SHOW
My Life Isn't Perfect, But My Testimony Is

My Life Now PODCAST SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 29:37


My Life Isn't Perfect, But My Testimony IsInterview with Michelle M. BrownIn this episode of My Life Now, Dallas interviews special guest, Michelle M. Brown, author of "My Life Isn't Perfect, But My Testimony Is".ABOUT THE BOOKSuffering the loss of her mother and grandmother at ages three and thirteen, the innately energetic and resilient Michelle not only survived, but the strong-willed optimist thrived against all odds.  A quick learner with keen observation skills, she grasped the lasting principles of timeless lessons and carried them with her into adulthood.  It is those lessons that gave her the courage to hold on to her faith, stand in her truth, and work through the many difficulties she would encounter throughout her life.  By doing that, she was able to overcome many obstacles and end up with not one, but many instances of a perfect testimony.ABOUT THE AUTHORMichelle M. Brown is a wife, mother, sister, and 28-year congestive heart failure survivor. She works for the federal government as an operations research analyst. She set out on a new venture as a singer-songwriter in 2013 and released her first single “Who Knew” to digital platforms in April 2016. It is available now on Spotify, Amazon Music, Sound Cloud, iTunes, CD Baby, and YouTube.Find Michelle's links:Her song "Who Knew" can be found at the links below:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Eh7Kk9Fp5khttps://music.apple.com/us/album/who-knew-single/1105613819https://www.amazon.com/Who-Knew-Michelle-Brown/dp/B01EJV8X36https://open.spotify.com/album/7lP3cFXgfRH9TiI4bYIZGRHer Social Media platforms are below:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/michellebgospel/?hl=enFacebook: http://facebook.com/MichelleBGospelTwitter: @gospel_michelleThank you for listening and supporting the My Life Now podcast show. We are excited to connect with each of our listeners on our various platforms. Below is the best way you can not only connect with us but also have an opportunity to be featured on our Podcasts.For Marketing and Publishing needs, Buscher's Social Media Marketing LLC (https://www.facebook.com/buscherssmm)

Givin Them The Business w/ Chris Gotti Lorenzo & Don Dinero
GTTB: Episode - 1 Add Ventures Music

Givin Them The Business w/ Chris Gotti Lorenzo & Don Dinero

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 20:52


Welcome to Episode 1 of "Givin Them The Business" Podcast Powered by Add Ventures Music Topic: What is Add Ventures Music? In this episode of "Givin Them The Business" Podcast, with the host Chris Gotti Lorenzo, the "Under Boss" of Murder Inc. and Legendary Latin Co-host Don Dinero sit down in the Cuban Connection Studio; to talk about the creation of Add Ventures Music a digital distribution platform for independent/creative artist. Chris Gotti explains to Don Dinero, as the creator of Add Ventures Music Digital Distribution platform and the importance behind the creation. The hurdles that Chris Gotti had to overcome are the reasons and principles which led to the creation of Murder Inc. Which still stands to be a record label to be reckoned with artist like Ja Rule and Ashanti has the crowds coming out in mass crowds. Add Ventures Music stands out from other companies like Distro Kid, Tune Core, CD Baby; by what the Add Ventures Music digital distribution platform provides the tools that independent/creative need to be successful with their business. My goal is to help independent/creative artist throughout the world by education and empowerment in the music industry by doing tours and seminars to the independent/creative artist communities. To help them learn how to own their music, monetize their talents, and become thriving entrepreneurs to ensure industry stability and supply an optimal impact for their careers. Where to find us......... YouTube Link: https: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejtbW9IRkXw Websites Add Ventures Music Link: www.addventuresmusic.com Cuban Connection Link: www.cubanconnection717.com Instagram Links: @givinthemthebusiness Hosts @chrisgotti187 @dinero717 Production Team @blackcoin.ent @shotbyishan @shotbymy9 @kingdomcomemedia @dilutedeyz Marketing @dexdiamond @officaljayelmore @kingblenn #addventuresmusic #digital #distribution #business #contracts #DefJam #MurderInc #cdbaby --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/givinthemthebusiness-podcast/support

thebuzzr pod
Rivita & Ritnika Nayan, CDBaby India

thebuzzr pod

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 24:26


Hey, y'all. I am Shay. This is thebuzzr podcast. On air indie, from my pad to yours over the airways. Today on the show, we have two guests. Singer-songwriter and producer Rivita. She lives in the United States, Los Angeles. We chat about her training and education. It spans from New York, Spain and London, United Kingdom. Rivita also gets real about life as an artist living in Los Angeles and New York City. Also joining, Ritnika Nayan, CD Baby - Director, Market Development India. We chat about the independent artist community in India and opportunities in that market. You will enjoy the show. Tracks played tonight: Speed Limit. Thank you for tuning in. Enjoy the show! Cheers! Shay https://youtu.be/ZYWSqiu3dSY From the artist: Hello beautiful people! Here is my brand new music video “Chocolate”. The music video was filmed in a hotel room in Washington D.C. just days before the 2020 Corona Virus Lockdown. The room had beautiful dark red, brown and maroon dark textures, very similar to the vibe of the song and fitting perfectly with the Chocolatey vibe I was going for. https://youtu.be/t7Dhmmi68-0 From the artist: Hello world! Here is a brand new music video for my new song "Someone Else's Arms". This music video was filmed in Los Angeles at the Coast of San Pedro. While I wrote and produced this song, I could only put it in feelings as a "sense of drowning", this imagery then led the entire production, from the mix to how the artwork was made and what's more the song's abbreviated version is SEA. This location was perfect to capture my vision. When we got there, we decided to keep things relatively simple given how personal this song it to me and taking in account our relatively small set up. This song means the absolute world to me, read more about it on Rolling Stone, India. Facebook Twitter Youtube Spotify Soundcloud Instagram Link Ritnika Nayan, CD Baby - Director, Market Development India Previous Next Contact Provided by Ritnika Nayan, CDBaby India Link Link Link Link

Song Of The Soul
The Green Trees of Ithaca

Song Of The Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 55:00


Will Fudeman's musical muse is very strongly connected to his hopes, prayers, & vision for the world. Having worked as a social worker & therapist, he is currently doing healing work with Eastern arts including acupuncture & Qi Gong. Will completes his lifework with his music, which he performs on guitar & mandolin. Spiritually/philosophically fueled by both his Jewish Identity and Taoist leanings, he sings with meaning and a promise of hope. Will has performed with a number of artists, including Cayuga Klezmer Revival. Find Will's 3 CDs on CDBaby.

Writers, Ink
The Art of Simplicity with Derek Sivers

Writers, Ink

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 60:45


Derek Sivers is a master of keeping it simple. Whether he's drafting in an ancient 70s terminal, writing concise newsletters, or living with a single minifridge, he uses simplicity as a method to stay calm, collected, and down-to-earth in his writing. Derek is well known as the founder of independent music website CD Baby. He was a musician for many years and currently publishes books independently. To purchase his latest book, How to Live, follow the link below. From Amazon.com: After making a living as a professional musician, Derek Sivers went looking for ways to sell his own CD online and ended up creating CD Baby, once the largest seller of independent music on the web with over $100M in sales for over 150,000 musician clients. Since 2008, Derek has traveled the world and stayed busy creating and nurturing creative endeavors, like Muckwork, his newest company where teams of efficient assistants help musicians do their “uncreative dirty work.” Derek writes regularly on creativity, entrepreneurship, and music on his blog: http://sivers.org/. Whether you're traditionally published or indie, writing a good book is only the first step in becoming a successful author. The days of just turning a manuscript into your editor and walking away are gone. If you want to succeed in today's publishing world, you need to understand every aspect of the business - editing, formatting, marketing, contracts. It all starts with a good book, then the real work begins. Join international bestselling author J.D. Barker and indie powerhouses, J. Thorn and Zach Bohannon, as they gain unique insight and valuable advice from the most prolific and accomplished authors in the business. In this episode, you'll discover: How to stop getting angry Why How to Live is the best book Derek's ever written How to cut 1,200 pages from your rough draft How Derek developed his minimalistic writing style Why brevity is key Links: J. D. Barker - http://jdbarker.com/ J. Thorn - https://theauthorlife.com/ Zach Bohannon - https://zachbohannon.com/ Derek Sivers - https://sive.rs/ J.'s ZIGGURAT by Mike Shinoda - https://ziggurats.xyz/#/gallery/90 Story Rubric - http://storyrubric.com Nonfic Rubric - http://nonficrubric.com Proudly sponsored by Kobo Writing Life - https://kobowritinglife.com/ Music by Nicorus - https://cctrax.com/nicorus/dust-to-dust-ep Voice Over by Rick Ganley - http://www.nhpr.com and recorded at Mill Pond Studio - http://www.millpondstudio.com Contact - https://writersinkpodcast.com/contact/ *Full disclosure: Some of the links are affiliate links. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/writersink/support

KBKabaret
KBKabaret Week Sixty Five Podcast

KBKabaret

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 56:38


KBKabaret Podcast Week Sixty Five Show Notes 56:38 A Kallaballo of Variety in Parlor City Upstate New York:  Leatherstocking Region Show contains original skits, observations, music, and even recipes Producer, Host, and Head Writer:  Bree Harvey Actors:  Bree Harvey, Kate Murray, Judy McMahon, Charles Berman, John Carey, and John Montgomery. Special Guest Voices:  David Adams and Joe Bardales Special Musical Guest:  Show Producer Bree Harvey Granny Ada:  Parlor City's Favorite Advice Columnist Episode:  Turbo Blaster Written by Bree Harvey Starring Bree Harvey and Kate Murray Beulah Dehsams Parlor City's Chef Extraordinaire Episode:  Brussels Featured Recipe: Rum Omellette Gaufres (Belgium Waffles) Moules Frites (Exclusively on KBKabaret's App.) Go to our website: http://kbkabaret.com and download today! Written by Bree Harvey Starring Judy McMahon, John Montgomery, and Bree Harvey The Party Written by Bree Harvey Starring Kate Murray, John Carey, John Montgomery, and Bree Harvey Musical Guest Bree Harvey Santa Rap/Dear Santa  (Rap) Written and Sung by Bree Harvey and Dave Rice Available through CD BABY,  iTunes, Amazon The Mattress Salesman Written by Bree Harvey Starring:  John Montgomery, Kate Murray, and John Carey Happy Times Baby Song/Lyrics/Sung by Bree Harvey Marian Librarian Written by John Montgomery Starring Kate Murray, John Carey and Bree Harvey Christmas Lullaby (Duet) Song/Lyric/Sung by Bree Harvey How Can I Help You, Radio Call-In Show Written by John Carey Starring John Carey and John Montgomery The Dead Poet Tree Written by John Carey Starring:  Joe Bardales, David Adams , John Montgomery, Judy McMahon, and Kate Murray This Is Our Time Music/Lyrics/Sung by Bree Harvey Sound Engineer and Announcer:  Charles Berman Assistant Sound Engineer:  Valentine- Terrell- Monfeuga Original Music Written By Bree Harvey Music Arranged by Cristina Dinella and Dave Rice of Basement Studios Produced by BHH Productions L. L. C. ©2016 All rights reserved

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY
2170: 6 Things I Wish I Knew The Day I Started Berklee by Derek Sivers on Creating Value & Focused Productivity

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 1 - Episodes 1-300 ONLY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:59


Derek Sivers shares 6 things he wishes he knew the day he started Berklee Episode 2170: 6 Things I Wish I Knew The Day I Started Berklee by Derek Sivers on Creating Value & Focused Productivity Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original post is located here: https://sive.rs/berklee  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 2 - Episodes 301-600 ONLY
2170: 6 Things I Wish I Knew The Day I Started Berklee by Derek Sivers on Creating Value & Focused Productivity

Optimal Living Daily - ARCHIVE 2 - Episodes 301-600 ONLY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:59


Derek Sivers shares 6 things he wishes he knew the day he started Berklee Episode 2170: 6 Things I Wish I Knew The Day I Started Berklee by Derek Sivers on Creating Value & Focused Productivity Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100M in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22M, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with over 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011 he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. The original post is located here: https://sive.rs/berklee  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Song Of The Soul
Old-Fashioned Folk Singer

Song Of The Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 55:00


Steve Suffet has the heart & the pedigree of a 100% authentic old-fashioned folk singer. Growing up near ground zero of the folk music explosion of NYC in the early 1960's, Steve has witnessed & shared the music of many others, and added his share to the conversation. Though he waited a few decades to start recording his music, Steve has 7 CDs on CDBaby.