Podcast appearances and mentions of William Carlos Williams

American poet

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William Carlos Williams

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Best podcasts about William Carlos Williams

Latest podcast episodes about William Carlos Williams

Human Voices Wake Us
William Carlos Williams: 11 Essential Poems

Human Voices Wake Us

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 63:14


Tonight, I read eleven essential poems from the American poet William Carlos Williams (1883-1963). His poems can be found in The Collected Poems Volume I: 1909-1939, The Collected Poems Volume II: 1939-1962, and Paterson. The biographies I read from are Paul Mariani's William Carlos Williams: A New World Naked, and the essay on Williams' life at The Poetry Foundation. The poems I read are: Pastoral (1917) Danse Russe (1917) Waiting (1921) The Great Figure (1921) The Red Wheelbarrow (1923) Flowers by the Sea (first version) (1931) War, the Destroyer! (1942) Approach to a City (1946) To a Dog Injured in the Street (1954) Deep Religious Faith (1954) from Asphodel, That Greeny Flower (1955) You can join Human Voices Wake Us on Patreon, or sign up for our newsletter, by clicking here. I assume that the small amount of work presented in each episode constitutes fair use. Publishers, authors, or other copyright holders who would prefer to not have their work presented here can also email me at humanvoiceswakeus1@gmail.com, and I will remove the episode immediately. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/humanvoiceswakeus/support

Quotomania
QUOTOMANIA 355: Wallace Stevens

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 3:15


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Wallace Stevens was born in Reading, Pennsylvania on October 2, 1879. He attended Harvard University as an undergraduate from 1897 to 1900. He planned to travel to Paris and work as a writer, but, after working briefly as a reporter for the New York Herald Times, he decided to study law. Stevens graduated with a degree from New York Law School in 1903 and was admitted to the bar the following year. He practiced law in New York City until 1916.Though Stevens was focused on his legal career, he was also part of New York's literary community. He had several friends among the writers and painters in Greenwich Village, including William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, and E. E. Cummings. In 1914, under the pseudonym “Peter Parasol,” he sent a group of poems under the title “Phases” to Harriet Monroe as entries for a war poem competition hosted by Poetry magazine. Stevens did not win the prize, but Monroe published his work in November of that year.Stevens moved to Connecticut in 1916, having found employment at the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Co., where he became vice president in 1934. He had also begun to establish an identity for himself outside the worlds of law and business. His first book of poems, Harmonium (Alfred A. Knopf), published in 1923, exhibited the influences of both the English Romantics and the French Symbolists, and demonstrated a wholly original style and sensibility: exotic, whimsical, and infused with the light and color of an Impressionist painting.For the next several years, Stevens focused on his business career. He began to publish new poems in 1930, however. In the following year, Knopf released a second edition of Harmonium, which included fourteen new poems, but excluded three of the decidedly weaker ones. More than any other modern poet, Stevens was concerned with the transformative power of the imagination. Composing poems on his way to and from the office and in the evenings, Stevens spent his days behind a desk at his office, and led a quiet, relatively uneventful life.Though now considered one of the major American poets of the twentieth century, Stevens did not receive widespread recognition until the publication of The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens (Knopf, 1954), just a year before his death. His other major works include The Necessary Angel (Alfred A. Knopf, 1951), a collection of essays on poetry; Notes Towards a Supreme Fiction (The Cummington Press, 1942); The Man With the Blue Guitar (Alfred A. Knopf, 1937); and Ideas of Order (The Alcestis Press, 1935). Stevens died in Hartford, Connecticut on August 2, 1955.From https://poets.org/poet/wallace-stevens. For more information about Wallace Stevens:“The Plain Sense of Things”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/49420/the-plain-sense-of-things“Wallace Stevens”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/wallace-stevens“The Thrilling Mind of Wallace Stevens”: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/05/02/the-thrilling-mind-of-wallace-stevensThe Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/251420/the-collected-poems-of-wallace-stevens-by-wallace-stevens-edited-by-john-n-serio-and-chris-beyers-edited-by-john-n-serio-and-chris-beyers/“The Listening Booth: Wallace Stevens”: https://library.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/static/poetry/listeningbooth/poets/stevens.html“On Wallace Stevens”: https://www.nybooks.com/articles/1964/06/25/on-wallace-stevens/

EXPLORING ART
Episode 381 | Don't Apologize for Eating theFood in the Fridge.

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 26:03


In this podcast, we spoke about William Carlos Williams and his poem "This Is Just To Say".

EXPLORING ART
Episode 412 | The Forbidden Frozen Fruit

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 23:30


In this episode, Helena and Megan discuss the most well-known poem by William Carlos Williams about eating another person's plums. Would we view his work any differently if it turned out it was never a poem at all? What if it was just an apology note for being a bad roommate?

EXPLORING ART
Episode 375 | Plumbelievable!

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 23:48


In this episode of the Exploring Art Podcast, we discuss the poem “This Is Just To Say” by William Carlos Williams. We bring up topics about what constitutes something as art, as well as deliberating on a hypothetical scenario revolving around the poem. Join us for a deep dive into the world of art and how art is perceived! Music used in the podcast was a royalty-free synthwave track named Fractals, here is a link to the song. https://youtu.be/YOH7WUGBTIc

The Catholic Culture Podcast
145 - Catholic Imagination Conference poetry reading

The Catholic Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 68:16


The Catholic Culture Podcast Network sponsored a poetry reading session at the fourth biennial Catholic Imagination Conference, hosted by the University of Dallas. Thomas Mirus moderated this session on Sept. 30, 2022, introducing poets Paul Mariani, Frederick Turner, and James Matthew Wilson. Paul Mariani, University Professor Emeritus at Boston College, is the author of twenty-two books, including biographies of William Carlos Williams, John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Hart Crane, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Wallace Stevens. He has published nine volumes of poetry, most recently All that Will be New, from Slant. He has also written two memoirs, Thirty Days and The Mystery of It All: The Vocation of Poetry in the Twilight of Modernism. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA and NEH. He is the recipient of the John Ciardi Award for Lifetime Achievement in Poetry and the Flannery O'Connor Lifetime Achievement Award. His poetry has appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines, including Image, Poetry, Presence, The Agni Review, First Things, The New England Review, The Hudson Review, Tri-Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, and The New Criterion. Frederick Turner, Founders Professor of Arts and Humanities (emeritus) at the University of Texas at Dallas, was educated at Oxford University. A poet, critic, translator, philosopher, and former editor of The Kenyon Review, he has authored over 40 books, including The Culture of Hope, Genesis: An Epic Poem, Shakespeare's Twenty-First Century Economics, Natural Religion, and most recently Latter Days, with Colosseum Books. He has co-published several volumes of Hungarian and German poetry in translation, including Goethe's Faust, Part One. He has been nominated internationally over 40 times for the Nobel Prize for Literature and translated into over a dozen languages. James Matthew Wilson is Cullen Foundation Chair of English Literature and Founding Director of the MFA program in Creative Writing at the University of Saint Thomas, in Houston. He serves also as Poet-in-Residence of the Benedict XVI Institute for Sacred Music and Divine Worship, as Editor of Colosseum Books, and Poetry Editor of Modern Age magazine. He is the author of twelve books, including The Strangeness of the Good. His work has won the Hiett Prize, the Parnassus Prize, the Lionel Basney Award (twice), and the Catholic Media Book Award for Poetry.

Autism Through Cinema
Special Guest: Sophia Rose O'Rourke on The Secret Garden (1993)

Autism Through Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 72:44


We are skipping and stimming with delight to welcome Australian filmmaker and producer Sophia Rose O'Rourke to the podcast today. Sophia talks us through her experiences as an autistic creative and how she has been using filmmaking to help discover and explore her own identity. We talk about her short film 'Danse Russe', based on William Carlos Williams' poem of the same name: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46483/danse-russe, and we spend some time dwelling on the barriers that autistic people can face when trying to make a space in the film industry. But we also celebrate the very rich strengths that the autistic way-of-thinking can bring to creative cinematic spaces. We then turn our attention the 1993 version of The Secret Garden directed by Agnieszka Holland and based on the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Sophia recalls her love of the film from childhood and the recognition she felt through the protagonist, Mary. We also reflect on the film's depiction of disability, and the power dynamics that can sometimes arise between carers and dependants. After the recording, Sophia sent us a timely article on The Conversation about autism and employment. Have a read of it here: https://theconversation.com/how-do-we-make-workplaces-work-for-autistic-people-189572  Enormous thanks to Sophia for taking the time to talk to us and for suggesting The Secret Garden. You can follow Sophia on Twitter at https://twitter.com/auntie_sophie  Do get in touch if you have any reactions to this episode!

Lost Ladies of Lit
Lola Ridge with Terese Svoboda

Lost Ladies of Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 41:09 Transcription Available


Lola Ridge was once considered one of America's preeminent poets, on par with E.E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer, and Robert Frost. We discuss the radical life and career of this early 20th century modernist poet, anarchist, and literary editor with guest Terese Svoboda, whose 2018 biography of Ridge was described as “magisterial” in The Washington Post. For episodes and show notes, visit: LostLadiesofLit.comFollow us on instagram @lostladiesoflit. Follow Kim on twitter @kaskew. Sign up for our newsletter: LostLadiesofLit.comEmail us: Contact — Lost Ladies of Lit PodcastDiscussed in this episode: Anything That Burns You: A Portrait of Lola Ridge, Radical Poet by Terese SvobodaFirehead by Lola Ridge Emma Goldman Ferrer CenterFrancisco FerrerThe Ghetto, and Other Poems by Lola RidgeSacco and Vanzetti Guggenheim FellowshipShelley Memorial AwardLost Ladies of Lit episode on Heterodoxy with Joanna ScuttsHilda Dolittle (H.D.) Lost Ladies of Lit episode on Nora May French with Catherine PrendergastOthers: A Magazine of New VerseBroom MagazineMatthew Josephson Gertrude SteinMargaret SangerEdna St. Vincent MillayKatherine Anne Porter“Street Poet” by Robert Pinsky (Slate)Sun Up and Other Poems by Lola Ridge

Words in the Air: 52 Weeks of Poetry
Love Song by William Carlos Williams

Words in the Air: 52 Weeks of Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 1:02


Sacred and Profane Love
Episode 53: Paul Mariani on Robert Lowell

Sacred and Profane Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 59:56


In this episode, I speak with the poet, critic, and biographer Paul Mariani, professor emeritus at Boston College. We discuss his new book, All that Will be New and his biography of Robert Lowell, The Lost Puritan. We discuss Lowell's life, poetry, and his struggle with the permanent things: religion, marriage, art, family. Given the influence of Hopkins on his early poems, I think this episode pairs well with episode 38 with Nick Ripatrazone. As always, I hope you enjoy our conversation. Paul Mariani is the University Professor of English emeritus at Boston College. He is the author of twenty books, including biographies of William Carlos Williams, John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Hart Crane, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Wallace Stevens. He has published nine volumes of poetry: All That Will New, Ordinary Time, Epitaphs for the Journey, Deaths & Transfigurations, The Great Wheel, Salvage Operations: New & Selected Poems, Prime Mover, Crossing Cocytus, and Timing Devices. He is also the author of the spiritual memoir, Thirty Days: On Retreat with the Exercises of St. Ignatius and The Mystery of It All: The Vocation of Poetry in the Twilight of Modernity. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim and the NEA and NEH. In September 2019, he was awarded the inaugural Flannery O'Connor Lifetime Achievement Award from the Catholic Imagination Conference at Loyola University, Chicago. Sacred and Profane Love is a podcast in which philosophers, theologians, and literary critics discuss some of their favorite works of literature, and how these works have shaped their own ideas about love, happiness, and meaning in human life. Host Jennifer A. Frey is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of South Carolina. The podcast is generously supported by The Institute for Human Ecology at the Catholic University of America and produced by Catholics for Hire.

Sacred and Profane Love
Episode 53: Paul Mariani on Robert Lowell

Sacred and Profane Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 59:56


In this episode, I speak with the poet, critic, and biographer Paul Mariani, professor emeritus at Boston College. We discuss his new book, All that Will be New and his biography of Robert Lowell, The Lost Puritan. We discuss Lowell's life, poetry, and his struggle with the permanent things: religion, marriage, art, family. Given the influence of Hopkins on his early poems, I think this episode pairs well with episode 38 with Nick Ripatrazone. As always, I hope you enjoy our conversation. Paul Mariani is the University Professor of English emeritus at Boston College. He is the author of twenty books, including biographies of William Carlos Williams, John Berryman, Robert Lowell, Hart Crane, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Wallace Stevens. He has published nine volumes of poetry: All That Will New, Ordinary Time, Epitaphs for the Journey, Deaths & Transfigurations, The Great Wheel, Salvage Operations: New & Selected Poems, Prime Mover, Crossing Cocytus, and Timing Devices. He is also the author of the spiritual memoir, Thirty Days: On Retreat with the Exercises of St. Ignatius and The Mystery of It All: The Vocation of Poetry in the Twilight of Modernity. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim and the NEA and NEH. In September 2019, he was awarded the inaugural Flannery O'Connor Lifetime Achievement Award from the Catholic Imagination Conference at Loyola University, Chicago. Jennifer Frey is an associate professor of philosophy and Peter and Bonnie McCausland Faculty Fellow at the University of South Carolina. She is also a fellow of the Institute for Human Ecology at the Catholic University of America and the Word on Fire Institute. Prior to joining the philosophy faculty at USC, she was a Collegiate Assistant Professor of Humanities at the University of Chicago, where she was a member of the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts and an affiliated faculty in the philosophy department. She earned her Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh, and her B.A. in Philosophy and Medieval Studies (with a Classics minor) at Indiana University, in Bloomington, Indiana. She has published widely on action, virtue, practical reason, and meta-ethics, and has recently co-edited an interdisciplinary volume, Self-Transcendence and Virtue: Perspectives from Philosophy, Theology, and Psychology. Her writing has also been featured in Breaking Ground, First Things, Fare Forward, Image, Law and Liberty, The Point, and USA Today. She lives in Columbia, SC, with her husband, six children, and chickens. You can follow her on Twitter @ jennfrey. Sacred and Profane Love is a podcast in which philosophers, theologians, and literary critics discuss some of their favorite works of literature, and how these works have shaped their own ideas about love, happiness, and meaning in human life. Host Jennifer A. Frey is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of South Carolina. The podcast is generously supported by The Institute for Human Ecology at the Catholic University of America and produced by Catholics for Hire.

EXPLORING ART
Episode 349 | Poem or apology?

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 21:46


It's easy to indulge and get lost in the vast area that is art and its many forms for the creatively curious. In poetry, for example, there's a wide range of different structures that we may find complex and confusing. However, not all poems have an intricate composition; one of them is the famous “This is Just To Say” by William Carlos Williams. Join us in this episode as we explore the life and work of this renowned author and analyze what makes his simplistic writing style so special. Music Credit - Adobe Stock Music Intro Author: Paul Werner Title: Celebration Audio source: Jamendo Adobe Stock Asset ID: #353742624 Outro Author: Sergii Chuiko Title: Lofi Intro For Podcast

EXPLORING ART
Episode 348 | The Curious Case of William Carlos Williams

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 19:50


In this episode, host Juan is joined by co-hosts Michelle and Vanessa to discuss the case of William Carlos Williams and the Ice Box. Williams was an American physician, writer, and poet known for his poems' imagism and modernism. Join them on this roller coaster of emotions as they decipher his poem.

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Your Book Review: Kora In Hell

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 23:52


Finalist #16 in the Book Review Contest https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/your-book-review-kora-in-hell [This is one of the finalists in the 2022 book review contest. It's not by me - it's by an ACX reader who will remain anonymous until after voting is done, to prevent their identity from influencing your decisions. I'll be posting about one of these a week for several months. When you've read them all, I'll ask you to vote for a favorite, so remember which ones you liked.]   The sense that everything is poetical is a thing solid and absolute; it is not a mere matter of phraseology or persuasion. — G.K. Chesterton I. William Carlos Williams attributes the title to his friend/rival Ezra Pound, mythological references' number one fanboy. Kora is a parallel figure to Persephone or Proserpina, the Spring captured and taken to Hades by Hades himself. Persephone as a plant goddess and her mother Demeter were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries, which promised the initiated a groovy afterlife glimpsed at by psychedelic shrooms. And Kora means maiden. Ancient Greeks called her that either because she was like Voldemort, and you were apotropaically not supposed to say her true name because this is a Mystery Cult, damn it. Keeps some of the mystery. Or because she in a way represents all of the maidens, everywhere. So, in that sense, Kora in Hell alludes to the multitude of suffering young women Williams met while working as a doctor, assisting in 1917 style home labors, and, because WWI was going on at the time and doctors were extremely scarce, as a local police surgeon. Conditions were dire:

Topic Lords
144. Vultures Who Know The Difference (Between Sugar And Aspartame)

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 72:59


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * JohnB * https://twitter.com/YouOldSoAndSo * Jesse Topics: * Wario64 * We need to bring back Dogme 95 * Seeking Mr. Eaten's Name Again * https://saint-arthur.tumblr.com/ * This Is Just To Say, by William Carlos Williams * https://poets.org/poem/just-say * Whatever happened to outdoor pop machines? * https://lovepittsburghshop.com/blogs/love-pittsburgh/may-the-pop-machine-be-with-you * Godzilla Microtopics: * A Link's Awakening speedrun that may surprise you. * Lord clouds. * What's the deal with Wario 64? * Asking Webster's Dictionary to define Wario 64. * Your source for video game deals. * How Wario64 feels about Chris Pratt voicing Mario. * Geralt in the bathtub. * Wario World for the GameCube. * The hidden origins of Wario64. * Ten rules for how to make a movie. * Lars von Trier being traumatized by a dolly shot and inventing Dogme 95. * Unintentional Dogme 95 movies. * Unboxing a Criterion Collection DVD live on the show and there's just a DVD in there. * Creative freedom, the worst constraint. * A recipe for the worst movies in the fucking world. * Dogme 95 drinking game. * Making a flag in the bucket. * The Adventure 2600 continuity. * Bats that can steal things that shouldn't be able to be stolen. * A video game quest that was very difficult and obscure until someone wrote a FAQ. * The ludonarrative consonance of following your self-destructive obsession at the same time your character follows their self-destructive obsession. * Being confused about a story beat in a video game and having to seek out a lore genius on the internet. * The Random House Annotated Fallen London. * Becoming St. Gawain's Candle. * How the icebox plums poem became a meme. * Learning about poutine on social media. * Satirical poetry in the 1960s. * Things that are Ira Glass's fault. * Extreme meminess. * Wanting a god damn plum right now. * Pictures of normal people that are considered heresy. * Deliberately making your podcast guest's audio sound bad. * Continuing to read poetry even though you're terrible at it. * Asking Siri to get you a substantial raise. * Checking the change return slots on the mobile phone bank for quarters, to do your part to sustain the soda vending machine economy. * The cost of a 510 ml bottle of pop these days. * The fastest pop machine in the world. * Joking about the day we record the show when it comes out weeks later and none of the listeners have any idea what you're talking about. * Applying the sugar tax to beverages sweetened with aspartame. * The Godzilla movie with Inspector Gadget in it. * Redheaded Stepzilla. * The three Godzilla movies that are out of print in the US. (But not on archive.org) * Having to license all the Kaiju separately. * Movies that are in the public domain because they were not explicitly labeled as copyrighted. * Public Domain Day. * The personality traits of Sherlock Holmes that are and aren't copyrighted. * The Beast at 20,000 Fathoms. * Messing up a slow-motion shot by undercranking the camera rather than overcranking, but it has to go into the movie like that because it was your only take. * Making a movie where you can do as many takes as you want but they all have to go in the finished film. * Godzilla taking some much needed time off. * Invasion of Astro-Monster. * Watching the entire Godzilla series and learning why people think Avengers: Endgame is good. * A latchkey kid in 1960s Japan overcoming his bullies by imagining that Godzilla is his friend. * A dinosaur falling in love with a lighthouse. * Empathizing with the dinosaur who is completely misunderstanding the situation. * Why the English speakers in Japanese or Korean films are such bad actors. * An island protector of these native people brought to society for reasons of Capitalism.

EXPLORING ART
Episode 313 | Sorry, I ate your Plums.

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 24:06


In this episode of Exploring Art Podcast, we will discuss the life and work of poet William Carlos Williams.

EXPLORING ART
Episode 311 | The Fridge Poem, Real or Fake?

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 10:24


Hi everyone, Ethan, Caleb, and Steph are checking in! We were excited to share our first podcast episode for Exploring Art Podcast. In this episode titled "The Fridge Poem, Real or Fake?" we will discuss the different forms of poetry, history, and most importantly, one of the pioneers of modern poetry, William Carlos Williams.

EXPLORING ART
Episode 312 | Were the Plums Worth It?

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 25:22


Let's indulge in the fruitful knowledge William Carlos Williams presents in The Icebox. Join us as we make the verdict on plums: art or simply a breakfast snack. Is Williams consumed with the guilt of eating the plums? Or is there an underlying meaning? Music: Coffeehouse by 99 instrumenals Music from Tunetank.com 99Instrumentals - Coffeehouse (Copyright Free Music) Download free: https://tunetank.com/track/5075-coffeehouse

EXPLORING ART
Episode 335 | The Plums That will be Talked about Forever

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 27:49


In this episode, my co-host and I will be talking about William Carlos Williams, who he was, how he started writing, and also we will be talking about his poem “this is just to say” which is one of his most famous poems.

The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner
A Psychiatrist Writes: An interview with Ronald Pies, MD

The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 20:26


Thanks to Ronald Pies, MD, psychiatrist, author of eight books, and occasional writing collaborator with me on Medscape.com, for appearing on "The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner." This interview was an excellent opportunity to learn more about Ron and how he balances his writing and medical careers.Please join us for this 20-minute interview where Dr. Pies explains how writing has complemented his career as a practicing psychiatrist. He shares examples of other physician writers, such as the playwright Anton Checkov and poet William Carlos Williams. Dr. Pies discusses how fiction writing can lead to increased empathy and enhance the doctor-patient relationship.Ron has also contributed for many years to PsychiatricTimes.com, where many of his articles (and a few of mine) can be found.Ron is an "old school" physician-scholar and not much into social media. To find his books, check out Amazon.com. Here are three of his thought-provoking titles:1.    Everything Has Two Handles: The Stoic's Guide to the Art of Living2.    The Three-Petalled Rose: How the Synthesis of Judaism, Buddhism, and Stoicism Can Create a Healthy, Fulfilled and Flourishing Life3.    Becoming a Mensch: Timeless Talmudic Ethics for EveryoneI look forward to interviewing Dr. Pies again after the publication of his next book!Thanks again to CompHealth, the first locum tenens company, for sponsoring this program! If you are interested in trying locum tenens, please go to www.comphealth.comhttps://comphealth.com/inquire/general/0516/comphealth?source=podcast_Brand_drwilnerFor more fascinating interviews, please subscribe to "The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner" and share with friends and colleagues.The Art of Medicine is now available on Alexa! Just say, "Play podcast The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner!" Just for fun, you can also share my scuba diving adventures on YouTube: "Underwater with Dr. Andrew."To support this program: https://www.patreon.com/andrewwilnerTo contact: www.andrewwilner.comThanks for enjoying "The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner!"@applepodcastshttps://music.amazon.com/podcastshttps://andrewwilner.buzzsprout.com/#artofmedicine #health #physician #medicine #physicianwriters #physicianauthors #mindbody #Talmud #wisdom #spiritual healing

The Commonweal Podcast
Ep. 84 - Forward & Backward

The Commonweal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 32:23


One quality of a Catholic poet is a heightened capacity to see—not just into the future, but into the past as well. On this episode, poet Paul Mariani speaks with Commonweal contributor Anthony Domestico about his latest collection, All That Will Be New.  Their discussion touches on a number of topics, including Mariani's working-class upbringing in New York City, his love of the American idiom of William Carlos Williams, and the spirituality embedded in visual art.  For further reading:  “Broken Beauty,” Paul Mariani “Inscape, Instress & Distress,” Anthony Domestico “Elegy for Our 130-Year-Old Catalpa,” Paul Mariani

EXPLORING ART
Episode 286 | The Plums, the Note, and the Art that Came After

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 26:59


Join us on our journey of examining the artwork “This is just to say” by William Carlos Williams. We also explore the imagist movement, the idea of intention in art, and whether animals exhibit the understanding of art. Does art have to be intentional, or can it be accidental?

EXPLORING ART
Episode 310 | The Plums

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 21:37


In today's podcast of Exploring Art Podcast, we will be referring to the poem by William Carlos Williams. "This is just to say" and solving what difference if any, should it make if the public found out that the poem was never meant to be published, as it was only a letter left on his friend's fridge after eating all the plums."

EXPLORING ART
Episode 293 | Don't trust a man with two first names.

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:52


In this episode of Exploring Art, we will discuss the work of William Carlos Williams, driving deep into his lifetime accomplishments and work process.

El ojo crítico
El ojo crítico - Marta Aponte y el Día de la Música - 21/06/22

El ojo crítico

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 52:59


Desdoblamos El Ojo Crítico para hacer un homenaje a creadores, festivales y trabajadores del sector en el Día de la Música y para hablar también con Marta Aponte, la escritora, traductora y ensayista puertorriqueña que acaba de publicar 'La muerte feliz de William Carlos Williams', dedicado a la madre del poeta. Además, charlamos con Manu Blanco, de Blanco Palamera y con Txun Azpilicueta, responsable de organización de Momentos Alhambra. Un Ojo Crítico en el que también dejamos tiempo para hablar del botánico y paisajista francés Gilles Clement con Use Lahoz y de la nueva Ley De Arquitectura con Íñigo Picabea. Escuchar audio

B Inspired
Writer John Yamrus Has Definitely Arrived--at Home and Abroad!

B Inspired

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 26:52


After over 50 years as a writer, John Yamrus's latest book or poetry, "Selected Poems: The Director's Cut" has hit first place in the U.S. on Amazon for Epic Poetry and is now available in a separate book internationally, translated in Albanian. This episode centers on John's latest book “Selected Poems: The Director's Cut” that weighs in at 2 pounds—almost 500 pages of minimalist poetry that serves up life close to the bone! Incisive perspectives on what life shoves in our faces on any normal day. Humorous at times. Disturbing at others. Addictive. And John's poetry is now available internationally. A volume in Albanian has been translated by Fadil who has translated the works of hosts of poet greats and written subtitles for English language movies. (Poets Fadil has translated include Ginsberg, Kerouac, Ferlinghetti, Michael McClure, Gregory Corso, Gary Snyder, Carl Solomon, Harold Norse, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, E.E. Cummings, John Fante, Frank O'Hara, Charles Bukowski, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Hemingway, Fitzgerald and others...not to mention rock lyrics by Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Tom Waits, Lou Reed and Bruce Springsteen.) Find more information about Studio B Fine Art Gallery on our website: studiobbb.org, on Studio B's Facebook page, by contacting Jane Stahl, janeEstahl@comcast.net, 610-563-7879, or stopping by Studio B. And, remember, we welcome you to connect us with people, projects, and perceptions that inspire YOU to help us continue to B Inspired!

New Books in Military History
Katrina Goldstone, "Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 80:56


The theme of exile in Irish writing often calls to mind Joyce or Beckett, but rarely does it conjure up other writers or literary networks, particularly those of the often-overlooked literary history of the nineteen thirties. Goldstone's original new study, Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War (Routledge, 2020) takes up the theme of art and exile by focusing on four Irish writers—Leslie Daiken, Charles Donnelly, Ewart Milne and Michael Sayers—and brings to light important local and global aspects of the Popular Front cultural movement. Tracing literary networks from interwar London to the Spanish Civil War and the USSR Goldstone skillfully exposes the ways that these lives overlapped and entwined, revealing the relationships between these writers and George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Nancy Cunard, William Carlos Williams, and others, thus illuminating internationalist aspects of a Leftist cultural history. This book is commendable for its discussion of how Irish literary women on the left defied marginalization, and in this way provides a framework for further study on the topic. In its examination of this neglected period of Irish literary history Irish Writers and the Thirties re-imagines Irish writing of the mid-twentieth century and will prove of great interest to scholars and students of cultural history, Irish studies, and Jewish studies, as well as to more general readers interested in the thirties. Bridget English is a scholar of Irish literature and culture, modernism, and health humanities, based at the University of Illinois Chicago. She co-convenes the Irish Studies Seminar at the Newberry Library and is the Literature Representative for the American Conference for Irish Studies. Twitter feed: https://twitter.com/bridgetrenglis2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in Intellectual History
Katrina Goldstone, "Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 80:56


The theme of exile in Irish writing often calls to mind Joyce or Beckett, but rarely does it conjure up other writers or literary networks, particularly those of the often-overlooked literary history of the nineteen thirties. Goldstone's original new study, Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War (Routledge, 2020) takes up the theme of art and exile by focusing on four Irish writers—Leslie Daiken, Charles Donnelly, Ewart Milne and Michael Sayers—and brings to light important local and global aspects of the Popular Front cultural movement. Tracing literary networks from interwar London to the Spanish Civil War and the USSR Goldstone skillfully exposes the ways that these lives overlapped and entwined, revealing the relationships between these writers and George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Nancy Cunard, William Carlos Williams, and others, thus illuminating internationalist aspects of a Leftist cultural history. This book is commendable for its discussion of how Irish literary women on the left defied marginalization, and in this way provides a framework for further study on the topic. In its examination of this neglected period of Irish literary history Irish Writers and the Thirties re-imagines Irish writing of the mid-twentieth century and will prove of great interest to scholars and students of cultural history, Irish studies, and Jewish studies, as well as to more general readers interested in the thirties. Bridget English is a scholar of Irish literature and culture, modernism, and health humanities, based at the University of Illinois Chicago. She co-convenes the Irish Studies Seminar at the Newberry Library and is the Literature Representative for the American Conference for Irish Studies. Twitter feed: https://twitter.com/bridgetrenglis2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
Katrina Goldstone, "Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 80:56


The theme of exile in Irish writing often calls to mind Joyce or Beckett, but rarely does it conjure up other writers or literary networks, particularly those of the often-overlooked literary history of the nineteen thirties. Goldstone's original new study, Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War (Routledge, 2020) takes up the theme of art and exile by focusing on four Irish writers—Leslie Daiken, Charles Donnelly, Ewart Milne and Michael Sayers—and brings to light important local and global aspects of the Popular Front cultural movement. Tracing literary networks from interwar London to the Spanish Civil War and the USSR Goldstone skillfully exposes the ways that these lives overlapped and entwined, revealing the relationships between these writers and George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Nancy Cunard, William Carlos Williams, and others, thus illuminating internationalist aspects of a Leftist cultural history. This book is commendable for its discussion of how Irish literary women on the left defied marginalization, and in this way provides a framework for further study on the topic. In its examination of this neglected period of Irish literary history Irish Writers and the Thirties re-imagines Irish writing of the mid-twentieth century and will prove of great interest to scholars and students of cultural history, Irish studies, and Jewish studies, as well as to more general readers interested in the thirties. Bridget English is a scholar of Irish literature and culture, modernism, and health humanities, based at the University of Illinois Chicago. She co-convenes the Irish Studies Seminar at the Newberry Library and is the Literature Representative for the American Conference for Irish Studies. Twitter feed: https://twitter.com/bridgetrenglis2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in European Studies
Katrina Goldstone, "Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 80:56


The theme of exile in Irish writing often calls to mind Joyce or Beckett, but rarely does it conjure up other writers or literary networks, particularly those of the often-overlooked literary history of the nineteen thirties. Goldstone's original new study, Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War (Routledge, 2020) takes up the theme of art and exile by focusing on four Irish writers—Leslie Daiken, Charles Donnelly, Ewart Milne and Michael Sayers—and brings to light important local and global aspects of the Popular Front cultural movement. Tracing literary networks from interwar London to the Spanish Civil War and the USSR Goldstone skillfully exposes the ways that these lives overlapped and entwined, revealing the relationships between these writers and George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Nancy Cunard, William Carlos Williams, and others, thus illuminating internationalist aspects of a Leftist cultural history. This book is commendable for its discussion of how Irish literary women on the left defied marginalization, and in this way provides a framework for further study on the topic. In its examination of this neglected period of Irish literary history Irish Writers and the Thirties re-imagines Irish writing of the mid-twentieth century and will prove of great interest to scholars and students of cultural history, Irish studies, and Jewish studies, as well as to more general readers interested in the thirties. Bridget English is a scholar of Irish literature and culture, modernism, and health humanities, based at the University of Illinois Chicago. She co-convenes the Irish Studies Seminar at the Newberry Library and is the Literature Representative for the American Conference for Irish Studies. Twitter feed: https://twitter.com/bridgetrenglis2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books Network
Katrina Goldstone, "Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 80:56


The theme of exile in Irish writing often calls to mind Joyce or Beckett, but rarely does it conjure up other writers or literary networks, particularly those of the often-overlooked literary history of the nineteen thirties. Goldstone's original new study, Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War (Routledge, 2020) takes up the theme of art and exile by focusing on four Irish writers—Leslie Daiken, Charles Donnelly, Ewart Milne and Michael Sayers—and brings to light important local and global aspects of the Popular Front cultural movement. Tracing literary networks from interwar London to the Spanish Civil War and the USSR Goldstone skillfully exposes the ways that these lives overlapped and entwined, revealing the relationships between these writers and George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Nancy Cunard, William Carlos Williams, and others, thus illuminating internationalist aspects of a Leftist cultural history. This book is commendable for its discussion of how Irish literary women on the left defied marginalization, and in this way provides a framework for further study on the topic. In its examination of this neglected period of Irish literary history Irish Writers and the Thirties re-imagines Irish writing of the mid-twentieth century and will prove of great interest to scholars and students of cultural history, Irish studies, and Jewish studies, as well as to more general readers interested in the thirties. Bridget English is a scholar of Irish literature and culture, modernism, and health humanities, based at the University of Illinois Chicago. She co-convenes the Irish Studies Seminar at the Newberry Library and is the Literature Representative for the American Conference for Irish Studies. Twitter feed: https://twitter.com/bridgetrenglis2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Irish Studies
Katrina Goldstone, "Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in Irish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 80:56


The theme of exile in Irish writing often calls to mind Joyce or Beckett, but rarely does it conjure up other writers or literary networks, particularly those of the often-overlooked literary history of the nineteen thirties. Goldstone's original new study, Irish Writers and the Thirties: Art, Exile and War (Routledge, 2020) takes up the theme of art and exile by focusing on four Irish writers—Leslie Daiken, Charles Donnelly, Ewart Milne and Michael Sayers—and brings to light important local and global aspects of the Popular Front cultural movement. Tracing literary networks from interwar London to the Spanish Civil War and the USSR Goldstone skillfully exposes the ways that these lives overlapped and entwined, revealing the relationships between these writers and George Orwell, Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Nancy Cunard, William Carlos Williams, and others, thus illuminating internationalist aspects of a Leftist cultural history. This book is commendable for its discussion of how Irish literary women on the left defied marginalization, and in this way provides a framework for further study on the topic. In its examination of this neglected period of Irish literary history Irish Writers and the Thirties re-imagines Irish writing of the mid-twentieth century and will prove of great interest to scholars and students of cultural history, Irish studies, and Jewish studies, as well as to more general readers interested in the thirties. Bridget English is a scholar of Irish literature and culture, modernism, and health humanities, based at the University of Illinois Chicago. She co-convenes the Irish Studies Seminar at the Newberry Library and is the Literature Representative for the American Conference for Irish Studies. Twitter feed: https://twitter.com/bridgetrenglis2 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Holy Family Podcast
Everything is Communion

Holy Family Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 12:27


You've probably heard, you are what you eat. The poet William Carlos Williams said everything we eat is the body of the Lord, which means we are all walking around eating -- and being -- Christ.

In The Moment podcast
134. Thomas H. Pruiksma with Dr. Ruben Quesada: A New Translation of The Kural

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 52:26


The Tirukkuṟaḷ, or Kural, for short, is considered a masterpiece of universal philosophy, ethics, and morality. Traditionally attributed to Thiruvalluvar, also known as Valluvar, the original text has been dated from 300 BCE to 5th century CE. The classic Tamil work is one of the most cited and translated ancient texts in existence; it has been translated into over 40 Indian and non-Indian languages and has never been out of print since its first publication in 1812. In a new translation of the Kural, Thomas Hitoshi Pruiksma brings English readers closer than ever to the brilliant inner and outer music of Tiruvalluvar's work and ideas. The work consists of 1,330 short philosophical verses, or kurals, that together cover a wide range of personal and cosmic experiences, such as — Politics: Harsh rule that brings idiots together—nothing Burdens the earth more Friendship: Friendship is not a face smiling—friendship Is a heart that smiles Greed: Those who won't give and enjoy—even with billions They have nothing Drawing on the poetic tradition of W. S. Merwin, Wendell Berry, and William Carlos Williams, and nurtured by two decades of study under Tamil scholar Dr. K. V. Ramakoti, Pruiksma's translation transforms the barrier of language into a bridge, bringing the fullness of Tiruvalluvar's poetic intensity to a new generation. In the 134th episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Pruiksma discusses his translation of the Kural with poet, editor, and translator, Dr. Ruben Quesada. Thomas Hitoshi Pruiksma is an author, poet, performer, and teacher. His books include The Safety of Edges and Give, Eat, and Live: Poems of Avvaiyar. Pruiksma teaches writing for Cozy Grammar and has received grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, 4Culture, Artist Trust, the Squaw Valley Community of Writers, the US Fulbright Program, the American Literary Translators Association, and Oberlin Shansi. Ruben Quesada, Ph.D. is editor of Latinx Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry (University of New Mexico Press, 2022) and author of Revelations (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2018), Next Extinct Mammal (Greenhouse Review Press, 2011), and translator of Selected Translations of Luis Cernuda (Aureole Press, 2008). Dr. Quesada has served as an editor for AGNI, Pleiades, and The Kenyon Review. His writing appears in Best American Poetry, Ploughshares, and Harvard Review. He is an Associate Teaching Fellow at The Attic Institute and teaches for the UCLA Writers' Program. He lives in Chicago. Buy the Book: The Kural—Tiruvalluvar's Tirukkural: A New Translation of the Classical Tamil Masterpiece on Ethics, Power and Love Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

In The Moment Podcast
134. Thomas H. Pruiksma with Dr. Ruben Quesada: A New Translation of The Kural

In The Moment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 52:26


The Tirukkuṟaḷ, or Kural, for short, is considered a masterpiece of universal philosophy, ethics, and morality. Traditionally attributed to Thiruvalluvar, also known as Valluvar, the original text has been dated from 300 BCE to 5th century CE. The classic Tamil work is one of the most cited and translated ancient texts in existence; it has been translated into over 40 Indian and non-Indian languages and has never been out of print since its first publication in 1812. In a new translation of the Kural, Thomas Hitoshi Pruiksma brings English readers closer than ever to the brilliant inner and outer music of Tiruvalluvar's work and ideas. The work consists of 1,330 short philosophical verses, or kurals, that together cover a wide range of personal and cosmic experiences, such as — Politics: Harsh rule that brings idiots together—nothing Burdens the earth more Friendship: Friendship is not a face smiling—friendship Is a heart that smiles Greed: Those who won't give and enjoy—even with billions They have nothing Drawing on the poetic tradition of W. S. Merwin, Wendell Berry, and William Carlos Williams, and nurtured by two decades of study under Tamil scholar Dr. K. V. Ramakoti, Pruiksma's translation transforms the barrier of language into a bridge, bringing the fullness of Tiruvalluvar's poetic intensity to a new generation. In the 134th episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Pruiksma discusses his translation of the Kural with poet, editor, and translator, Dr. Ruben Quesada. Thomas Hitoshi Pruiksma is an author, poet, performer, and teacher. His books include The Safety of Edges and Give, Eat, and Live: Poems of Avvaiyar. Pruiksma teaches writing for Cozy Grammar and has received grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, 4Culture, Artist Trust, the Squaw Valley Community of Writers, the US Fulbright Program, the American Literary Translators Association, and Oberlin Shansi. Ruben Quesada, Ph.D. is editor of Latinx Poetics: Essays on the Art of Poetry (University of New Mexico Press, 2022) and author of Revelations (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2018), Next Extinct Mammal (Greenhouse Review Press, 2011), and translator of Selected Translations of Luis Cernuda (Aureole Press, 2008). Dr. Quesada has served as an editor for AGNI, Pleiades, and The Kenyon Review. His writing appears in Best American Poetry, Ploughshares, and Harvard Review. He is an Associate Teaching Fellow at The Attic Institute and teaches for the UCLA Writers' Program. He lives in Chicago. Buy the Book: The Kural—Tiruvalluvar's Tirukkural: A New Translation of the Classical Tamil Masterpiece on Ethics, Power and Love Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

SOUNDWAVE
Shad Marsh

SOUNDWAVE

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 33:53


Today's guest deejay is Shad Marsh. Shad shared a mix on Soundwave a few years back. Today he shares a mix no less remarkable. His mix explores immersion and isolation. I'm writing this in the evening from my kitchen table. My patio door is open, and there's a perfect cool breeze. Shad's mix is playing in the background, and it feels like an ode to spring. I hope my neighbors are enjoying Shad's mix as music as I do. Shad lives in the mountains of western North Carolina. His radio show 2000 Years of Radio can be heard Sunday mornings on 103.3fm in Asheville, NC, and on the web. You'd be doing yourself a favor if you tuned in. Shad also shares a poem from William Carlos Williams , which you can find below. How nice is that? I may ask future guest deejays on Soundwave to share poems as well. Speaking of guest deejays, next week features a mix from Jacob Newman. See you then. Daniel Bachman “Accokeek Creek” Daniel Bachman “Blues in the Anthropocene” Porest “No Terracotta Relief” Aaron Dilloway & Lucrecia Dalt “Demands of Ordinary Devotion” Kink Gong “Bamboo Chicken” caroline “Skydiving onto the library roof” Lea Bertucci “On Opposite Sides of Sleep” "Lifeless in appearance, sluggish, dazed spring approaches — They enter the new world naked, cold, uncertain of all save that they enter. All about them the cold, familiar wind— Now the grass, tomorrow the stiff curl of wild-carrot leaf. One by one objects are defined — It quickens: clarity, outline of leaf, But now the stark dignity of entrance — Still, the profound change has come upon them; rooted they grip down and begin to awaken" —W.C. Williams --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soundwavemix/message

Me Reading Stuff
Episode 359: The New Directions Anthology of Classical Chinese Poetry, Edited by Eliot Weinberger

Me Reading Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 47:20


"I've listened to rain all my life. My hair's white now, and I still don't know night rain on a spring river." - Lu YuLINKS:More on this book and where to purchase it here: https://www.ndbooks.com/book/the-new-directions-anthology-of-classical-chinese-poetry/?source=searchMy upcoming show at Susan Inglett Gallery: https://www.inglettgallery.comMy website: www.robynoneil.comMe on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robyn_oneil/?hl=enMe on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Robyn_ONeilHandwritten Notes: https://www.instagram.com/handwrittennotesontv/Erin Whitehead's Instagram: @girlwithatail

The Sunday Poems with Ken Hada
Episode 179: Spring and All

The Sunday Poems with Ken Hada

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 5:24


Ken reads “Spring and All” plus two more from William Carlos Williams, and one from James Wright.

Parlando - Where Music and Words Meet
The Red Wheelbarrow for National Poetry Month 2022

Parlando - Where Music and Words Meet

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 1:28


A performance of William Carlos Williams short poem set to original music as we continue or observance of National Poetry Month with classic performances from the Parlando Project archives. More than 600 pieces combining various words with original music are at frankhudson.org

Quotomania
Quotomania 174: William Carlos Williams

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 1:31


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!On September 17, 1883, William Carlos Williams was born in Rutherford, New Jersey. He began writing poetry while a student at Horace Mann High School, at which time he made the decision to become both a writer and a doctor. He received his MD from the University of Pennsylvania, where he met and befriended Ezra Pound. Pound became a great influence on his writing, and in 1913 arranged for the London publication of Williams's second collection, The Tempers. Returning to Rutherford, where he sustained his medical practice throughout his life, Williams began publishing in small magazines and embarked on a prolific career as a poet, novelist, essayist, and playwright.Following Pound, he was one of the principal poets of the Imagist movement, though as time went on, he began to increasingly disagree with the values put forth in the work of Pound and especially Eliot, who he felt were too attached to European culture and traditions. Continuing to experiment with new techniques of meter and lineation, Williams sought to invent an entirely fresh—and singularly American—poetic, whose subject matter was centered on the everyday circumstances of life and the lives of common people.His influence as a poet spread slowly during the 1920s and 1930s, overshadowed, he felt, by the immense popularity of Eliot's "The Waste Land"; however, his work received increasing attention in the 1950s and 1960s as younger poets, including Allen Ginsbergand the Beats, were impressed by the accessibility of his language and his openness as a mentor. His major works include Kora in Hell (1920); Spring and All (1923); Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems (1962), which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize; the five-volume epic Paterson (1963, 1992); and Imaginations (1970). Williams's health began to decline after a heart attack in 1948 and a series of strokes, but he continued writing up until his death in New Jersey on March 4, 1963.From https://poets.org/poet/william-carlos-williams. For more information about William Carlos Williams:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Suketu Mehta about Williams, at 20:10: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-079-suketu-mehtaLynell George about Williams, at 10:50: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-021-lynell-george“William Carlos Williams”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/william-carlos-williams“Paterson”: https://www.ndbooks.com/book/paterson/

Quotomania
Quotomania 120: Marianne Moore

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2022 1:31


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Born near St. Louis, Missouri, on November 15, 1887, Marianne Moore was raised in the home of her grandfather, a Presbyterian pastor. After her grandfather's death, in 1894, Moore and her family stayed with other relatives, and in 1896 they moved to Carlisle, Pennsylvania. She attended Bryn Mawr College and received her BA in 1909. Following graduation, Moore studied typing at Carlisle Commercial College, and from 1911 to 1915 she was employed as a school teacher at the Carlisle Indian School. In 1918, Moore and her mother moved to New York City, and in 1921, she became an assistant at the New York Public Library. She began to meet other poets, such as William Carlos Williams and Wallace Stevens, and to contribute to the Dial, a prestigious literary magazine. She served as acting editor of the Dial from 1925 to 1929. Along with the work of such other members of the Imagist movement as Ezra Pound, Williams, and H. D., Moore's poems were published in The Egoist, an English magazine, beginning in 1915. In 1921, H. D. published Moore's first book, Poems (The Egoist Press, 1921), without her knowledge.Moore was widely recognized for her work; among her many honors were the Bollingen prize, the National Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize. She wrote with the freedom characteristic of the other modernist poets, often incorporating quotes from other sources into the text, yet her use of language was always extraordinarily condensed and precise, capable of suggesting a variety of ideas and associations within a single, compact image. In his 1925 essay “Marianne Moore,” William Carlos Williams wrote about Moore's signature mode, the vastness of the particular: “So that in looking at some apparently small object, one feels the swirl of great events.” She was particularly fond of animals, and much of her imagery is drawn from the natural world. She was also a great fan of professional baseball and an admirer of Muhammed Ali, for whom she wrote the liner notes to his record, I Am the Greatest! Deeply attached to her mother, she lived with her until Mrs. Moore's death in 1947. Marianne Moore died in New York City on February 5, 1972.From https://poets.org/poet/marianne-moore. For more information about Marianne Moore:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Samantha Rose Hill about Marianne Moore, at 17:05: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-171-samantha-rose-hillVivek Murthy about Marianne Moore, at 06:55: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-127-vivek-murthyMelody Wainscott about Marianne Moore, at 24:10: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-009-melody-wainscott“Silence”: https://poets.org/poem/silence-2“Marianne Moore”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/marianne-moore“The Marianne Moore Revival”: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-marianne-moore-revival

I Hate Poetry
IT‘S FAMILY!

I Hate Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 29:17


Dylan and Charlie explore "The Red Wheelbarrow" by William Carlos Williams (so good they named him twice) and "Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802" by William Wordsworth. Charlie then ambushes Dylan with a rival poem by William Blake.

SLEERICKETS
Ep 26: Death's Second Selfie

SLEERICKETS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 93:23


NB: Next week, Alice Allan of the Poetry Says podcast will be joining me to discuss the 2016 Jim Jarmusch poetry movie Paterson, but not the insanely long William Carlos Williams poem of the same name. Watch it now to pre-empt spoilers!Some of the topics mentioned in this episode:– More Alice!– Good advice from Ocean Vuong– Michael Robbins' poem “Alien vs. Predator”– Michael Robbins' review of Postmodern American Poetry– Michael Robbins' essay on atheism– Michael Robbins' book Walkman– José Ortega y Gasset's book The Revolt of the Masses– Another smart email from Coleman– An interview with Melissa Lovada-Oliva– Helena Feder's interview with Stephen Dunn– “Sun Under Wood”– Sonnet 73– Sappho 31– Catullus 51– Claudia Rankine's book Citizen– Sam Riviere's essay “In Defense of Poetic Plagiarism”Please rate, review, and subscribe! Or just recommend the show to a friend!Send questions, comments, and suggestions to sleerickets@gmail.com. Music by ETRNLArt by Daniel Alexander Smith

The Poem. The ParSHA. The Podcast.
Bereishith/ William Carlos Williams

The Poem. The ParSHA. The Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 19:33


What is our appetite? What is the hunger to know?

The SpokenWeb Podcast
Robert Hogg & The Widening Circle of Return

The SpokenWeb Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 45:35


In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a group of poets at UBC Vancouver began a little magazine: the TISH poetry newsletter. The TISH poets would later be called one of the most cohesive writing movements in Canadian literary history. In the summer of 2019, Craig Carpenter visited one of the former editors of TISH magazine —who is also his former professor of modern Canadian poetry. Based on interviews conducted during this visit and a subsequent visit in the winter of 2019, Craig has created an episode that explores his evolving relationship with his former professor and scenes from more than 50 years of literary history. Craig takes us through the relationships and the stories that formed a part of the TISH movement and the poet that Robert Hogg has become.Craig gives a heartfelt thank you to all those who took the time to offer feedback on early script drafts: Deanna Fong, Judith Burr, Mathieu Aubin, Marjorie Mitchell. Special thanks to Dr. Karis Shearer, all of his  colleagues at the UBC Okanagan AMP Lab, and, of course, to Robert Hogg.SpokenWeb is a monthly podcast produced by the SpokenWeb team as part of distributing the audio collected from (and created using) Canadian Literary archival recordings found at universities across Canada. To find out more about SpokenWeb visit: spokenweb.ca. If you love us, let us know! Rate us and leave a comment on Apple Podcasts or say hi on our social media @SpokenWebCanada.Episode Producer:Craig Carpenter is an MA student in the IGS Digital Arts & Humanities theme at the University of British Columbia (Okanagan). A poet, journalist, sound designer, and former literary editor, Craig brings a diverse set of skills to the SpokenWeb project. His thesis will explore the podcast as public scholarship and engages archival recordings of second wave TISHITES Daphne Marlatt and Robert Hogg. With particular attention to Charles Olson's 1950 essay PROJECTIVE VERSE, he is investigating the intersection of proprioceptive poetics, the embodiment of voice in performance and sound studies. Musical score by Chelsea Edwardson: Chelsea Edwardson uses music as a tool to transform stories and concepts into the sonic realm, creating experiences through sound that heal and inspire. Her background in ethnomusicology brings the depth of tone and expression that transcends culture, taking the listener to worlds beyond a physical place and into a landscape of feelings. To learn more, visit https://www.chelseaedwardson.com.Featured Guest:Robert Hogg was born in Edmonton, AB, and grew up in Cariboo and Fraser Valley, BC. Hogg graduated from UBC with a BA in English and Creative Writing. During his time at UBC, Hogg became affiliated as a poet and co-editor a part of TISH. In 1964, Hogg hitchhiked to Toronto and visited Buffalo NY, where Charles Olson had been teaching at the time. At SUNY at Buffalo, he completed a Ph.D. on the works of Charles Olson. Shortly after, Hogg taught American and Canadian poetry at Carleton University for the following thirty-eight years. Hogg currently lives at his farm located in Ottawa.Sound Recordings Featured:Archival Audio from PennSound.comShort intro clips of: Warren Tallman, Fred Wah, Daphne Marlatt, George Bowering: all from PennSound digital archives.Recording of “The Red Wheelbarrow” by William Carlos Williams: http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Williams-WC/the_red_wheelbarrow_multiple.phpRecording of “Often I am Permitted to Return to a Meadow” by Robert Duncan: https://media.sas.upenn.edu/pennsound/authors/Duncan/Berk-Conf-1965/Duncan-Robert_01_Often-I-am-Permitted_Berkeley-CA_1965.mp3Recording of “I Know a Man” by Robert Creely: http://www.writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Creeley/i_know_a_man.phpRecording of “Maximus From Dogtown I” by Charles Olson: https://media.sas.upenn.edu/pennsound/authors/Olson/Boston-62/Olson-Charles_14_Maximus-Dogtown-2_Boston_06-62.mp3Archival Audio from AMP Lab's Soundbox CollectionRobert Hogg reads at Black Sheep Books, Vancouver, 1995: https://soundbox.ok.ubc.ca/Archival Audio from KPFARobert Hogg reads at Berkeley Poetry Conference, 1965: http://www.kpfahistory.info/bpc/readings/Young%20poets.mp3

With Reason
Writing and Recovery, with Michael Rosen

With Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 44:48


The poet, author and broadcaster Michael Rosen almost died of COVID-19. He talks to Samira Shackle about that experience, described in his new book ‘Many Different Kinds of Love'. They discuss the value of kindness, touch and practical atheism, and reflect on liminality in life and literature. Plus, Michael describes his anger at the “unethical and immoral” decisions made by the British government, and urges against the dangerous devaluing of some lives over others, amidst our present pandemic. Hosts: Samira Shackle and Alice BlochProducer: Alice BlochMusic: DanosongsIf you want to access more fresh thinking, why not subscribe to New Humanist magazine? Head to newhumanist.org.uk/subscribe and enter the code WITHREASON to get a whole year's subscription for just £13.50Further reading: “Many Different Kinds of Love: A Story of Life, Death and the NHS” (2021) Michael Rosen“In A Word: Quarantine” (2020) Michael Rosen, New Humanist Magazine “In A Word: Wellbeing” (2018), Michael Rosen, New Humanist Magazine“In A Word: Deniers” (2021) Michael Rosen, New Humanist Magazine "King Lear" (c1606) William Shakespeare“A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” (1916) James Joyce“Ulysses” (1922) James JoyceThe Poetry of William Carlos Williams (1883-1963)"Alice in Wonderland" (1865) Lewis Carroll  

Callings
Charisma and Craft: A Conversation with Eboo Patel

Callings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 63:29


Eboo Patel, founder of Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), speaks passionately about work as a craft, and about the promises and pitfalls of charismatic leadership. Invoking such diverse sources as James Baldwin, William Carlos Williams, and The Grateful Dead, Patel discusses shifts in his thinking about leadership and listening as president of a non-profit over the course of the last decade. His forthcoming book explores the role of builders as opposed to critics, and he asks, how might colleges and universities help forge a new generation of builders? What can we do to help college students delve deeper into the complex problems of our time? What might students be able to accomplish, if we relieved them of our culture's demand that they “make something of themselves,” and instead encouraged them to make something for others?

What Are Poems
William Carlos Williams

What Are Poems

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2020 13:24


William Carlos Williams is explored. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jacob-davies2/support

podcasts – Yarns at Yin Hoo
Poetry as Medicine

podcasts – Yarns at Yin Hoo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2020 12:25


April is National Poetry Month.  US Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo claims, “Without poetry, we lose our way.” William Carlos Williams wrote, “It is difficult / to get the news from poems / yet men die miserably every day / for lack / of what is found there.” In this episode, I share some poems for challenging times.  Thank you to listeners Sue, Nancy and Robin for submissions of poems to read on this episode.  I invite you to find a poem for solace and comfort, or to share poems with others.

The Membership
Season 2 Episode 4: "Farming: A Hand Book"

The Membership

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2020


In this episode, Jason, John and Tim discuss Farming: A Hand Book, Wendell Berry's 1970 poetry collection. SHOW NOTES AND LINKSFarming: A Hand Book, by Wendell Berry (IndieBound | Amazon)New Collected Poems by Wendell Berry (IndieBound | Amazon | Counterpoint)A River of Words: The Story of William Carlos Williams, by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet (IndieBound | Amazon)The Hundred-Year Barn, by Patricia MacLachlan and Kenard Pak (IndieBound | Amazon)The Berry Center BookstoreWendell Berry Catalogue from Counterpoint Press (PDF)The Rabbit Room Podcast NetworkThe Membership Podcast OnlineFacebookTwitterInstagramHOSTSJason HardyFacebookJohn PattisonTwitterTim WasemTwitterIf you enjoy the show and would like to support us, head over to Patreon to pledge a small monthly donation. Donations will go toward the costs of making this podcast. Thank you.Top image via Unsplash.