Podcasts about Addis Ababa

Capital of Ethiopia

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Best podcasts about Addis Ababa

Latest podcast episodes about Addis Ababa

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Jan. 21, 2023 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the renewed anti-French demonstrations in the West African state of Burkina Faso demanding the envoy from Paris leave the country; United States Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has spoken on the rising international debt crisis during a visit to Senegal; the Sierre Leone President Julius M. Bio has signed a bill into law providing equal rights for women; and the Zimbabwe state media has discussed the potential impact of re-dollarization in the Southern African state. In the second hour we review an address delivered by African National Congress Chairman Gwede Mantashe at the Free State Provincial Elective Conference for the ruling party of South Africa being held this weekend. Later we examine the recent visit of the Chinese foreign minister to several African states. Finally, we hear a briefing from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 

Hold Your Fire!
Bonus Episode: Eritrea's Long Bitter Feud with Ethiopia's Tigray

Hold Your Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 50:08


Today we're bringing you a bonus episode on Ethiopia and Eritrea from Crisis Group's The Horn podcast.The contemporary rivalry between Eritrea and Tigray goes back several decades. After an almost-17-year-long civil war starting in the mid-1970s, the Eritrean EPLF and Tigrayan TPLF jointly defeated Ethiopia's Derg regime in 1991, resulting in Eritrea's independence and the TPLF taking power in Ethiopia. Despite their joint achievement, their already-complicated relations soon started to sour. A growing power struggle, as well as unresolved territorial disputes between the two sides, led to a deadly border war lasting from 1998 to 2000. Meanwhile, an increasingly repressive Eritrean regime found itself regionally and globally isolated. A new administration in Ethiopia under Abiy Ahmed signed a peace agreement with Eritrean President Isaias Afwerki in 2018, formally ending the border war. However, this rapprochement between Addis Ababa and Asmara also appeared to pave the way for Ethiopia's civil war, with Eritrea allying with Ethiopia's federal government in the war against Tigrayan forces in northern Ethiopia that started in 2020.In this episode of The Horn, Alan is joined by Michael Woldemariam, associate professor at the University of Maryland's School of Public Policy, to take a deep dive into the long and tumultuous relationship between Eritrea and Tigray to understand Eritrea's motives and objectives in the Ethiopian conflict. They talk about the origins of the relations between the EPLF and the TPLF and their shared struggle against Ethiopia's Derg regime from the 1970s to 1991. They unpack how relations between the two sides soured in a struggle for power and authority, culminating in the deadly border clashes starting in 1998. They also discuss how Eritrean President Afwerki's motivations in the conflict in northern Ethiopia have shifted over time. Finally, they talk about how to navigate Eritrea's role while trying to end the conflict in Tigray. Please note that this episode was recorded before the 2 November truce agreement between Ethiopia's federal government and Tigray's leaders.For more in-depth analysis on Ethiopia and Eritrea, make sure to check out our Horn of Africa regional page. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Grit and Grind of Autism- Finding Light Along the Journey

Join us for a discussion about early intervention, the battle to secure services, nutrition and affirmations. Lemlem Kentiba-Paige was born to Eritrean parents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, went to high school in Dallas, Texas, and attended undergrad and graduate school in Maryland. A cyber security engineer with a master's degree in information technology, Lemlem resides with her family in Maryland.Lemlem is the loving mother of two kids. Her son who at the age of two did not speak and doctors feared had autism. For the next four years, Lemlem and her husband took their son to speech therapy, occupational therapy, and applied behavior therapy five times a week, eight hours a day. He also received additional help on the weekends. Today, their son has fully recovered and shows no signs of autism. Lemlem has written a book called “King Yosef and His Superheroes” to share her experience and to help other parents who may be going through the same experience. In her book, King Yosef and his superheroes, you will discover how Young King Yosef overcame the challenges he faced. This story is about a young boy whose challenges began with a speech delay. The speech delay caused social, emotional, and behavioral problems that led to a possible Autism diagnosis. Yosef worked very hard in speech, occupational, and applied behavioral therapy to overcome his challenges. Yosef is now able to talk and no longer has any of the challenges or signs of Autism. This book will help everyone understand the challenges children with speech delay, sensory issues and Autism diagnosis face each day. Yosef is an amazing child who loves and enjoys life to the fullest.Today Yosef is in 4th grade and doing very well in school. He was inspired by his mother and has written his first book, “The Daily adventures of King Yosef and Queen Yarah, Positive thoughts will lead to positive life”. The moral of the story in his book is no matter what you face each day, think of all the positive things in life and do not focus on the negative. Every problem has a solution. Figure out a positive solution to your problem and don't let negative thoughts ruin your day and life. Everything happens for the greater good. Think positive, Be positive.

10% Happier with Dan Harris
545: Is It Ever Enough? | Bonus Meditation with Sebene Selassie

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 6:47


Stressed about the strained economy? You're not alone. Sebene offers tools to help see the abundance we all have in our lives.About Sebene Selassie:Sebene Selassie was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and raised in white neighborhoods in Washington, D.C., she was a tomboy Black girl who loved Monty Python and UB40. She never believed she belonged. Thirty years ago, she began studying Buddhism as an undergraduate at McGill University where she majored in Comparative Religious Studies. Now, Sebene is a teacher, author, and speaker who teaches that meditation can help us remember our inherent sense of belonging, that our individual freedom affects absolutely everyone and everything, and that our collective freedom depends on each and every one of us. To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Money Worries,” or click here: https://10percenthappier.app.link/content?meditation=06cd264b-c462-4e87-8a9a-76be4093c7f2.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Africa Today
Nigeria: 30 train passengers abducted

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 24:12


In Nigeria, 30 train passengers have been abducted in Edo state, with police hunting for the perpetrators. Insecurity is a huge problem in many parts of the country, and a key concern for voters ahead of next month's general elections. Plus, after a peace deal ended the civil war and as essential services begin to be restored, young Tigrayans say they're being blocked from flying to Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa. And we have a special report from Namibia, where the government decriminalised baby abandonment three years ago, and now wants to relaunch the campaign.

Diplomatic Immunity
Understanding the African Union with Ambassador Jessica Lapenn

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 24:34


Season 5, Episode 2: This season we are talking about multilateralism. What it is, what it's good for, and also what it's not. After looking at the big picture through the lens of the United Nations in episode one, this episode takes us to the regional level. U.S. Ambassador to the African Union Jessica Lapenn joined Dr. Kelly McFarland to explain how the African Union (AU) functions, why the U.S. was the first non-African nation to establish a permanent mission to the AU, how the AU tackles issues of peace and security differently than the UN, and where regional institutions and the United Nations can best work together.    Ambassador Lapenn was sworn-in as the U.S. Ambassador to the African Union and the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa on August 27, 2019. She most recently served as the Chargé d'Affaires at the U.S. Mission in South Africa. Prior to this, she served as the Chief of Staff to the Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights at the Department of State in Washington, D.C. She was Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Kigali from 2012-2014. Ambassador Lapenn entered the U.S. Foreign Service in October 1994. Her overseas tours have included Jeddah, Riyadh, Paris, Tbilisi, Baghdad, and Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, she was the Chief of the Political Section at the U.S. Consulate General, and at the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi, she was responsible for regional refugee assistance and policy in the South Caucuses and Central Asia.   Episode recorded: November 16, 2022 Produced by Daniel Henderson and Kelly McFarland.  Episode Image: African Union Headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Solen Feyissa on Unsplash Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  Funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.  For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.    

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive
ETLF, Radio Voice of the Gospel (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia): March 23, 1971

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023


Photo by Rich Post Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Dan Greenall, who shares the following recordings and notes:Broadcaster: ETLF, Radio Voice of the Gospel, Addis Ababa, EthiopiaDate of recording: 3/23/1971Frequency: 11.890 MHzReception location: Ancaster, Ontario, CanadaReceiver and antenna: Hallicrafters S-52 using a longwire antennaNotes: Here are two brief recordings from Radio Voice of the Gospel, station ETLF, from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. In the first one, from 1971, there is significant QSB (fading) but they are in the clear. Listen for their four note drum interval signal, ID in English, and mention of the date Tuesday 23rd of March. The second recording, also in English, is from the early 1970's during a transmission to West Africa in the 25 metre band where they are heard signing off.

Africa Today
Ethiopian Airlines resumes flights to war-hit Tigray

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 25:59


Ethiopian Airlines has resumed commercial flights to the capital of the war-hit Tigray region, Mekelle, for the first time in nearly two years. We hear from excited passengers in Addis Ababa, just before they boarded the flight. And five-times Grammy award winner Angelique Kidjo is our guest editor. The singer-songwriter from Benin, talks to us about her music, the causes that concern her and the people she champions.

Gugut Podcast
EP#83 "ከመይ ሓዲርኩም!"

Gugut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 128:48


Rediet is an Ethiopian diaspora from Canada currently visiting Addis Ababa. You might know her from her highly energetic TikTok videos. On this week's episodes Rediet talked about racism, immigrant's mental health and slavery. ረድኤት በአሁኑ ጊዜ በአዲስ አበባ የሚትገኝ ከካናዳ የመጣች ኢትዮጵያዊት ዲያስፖራ ናት። በጣም ደማቅ ከሆነው የቲክ ቶክ ቪዲዮዎች ልታውቋት ትችላላችው። በዚህ ሳምንት ክፍል ረድኤት ስለ ዘረኝነት፣ ስለ ስደተኞች የአእምሮ ጤንነት እና ባርነት ተናግራለች። --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gugut/message

Real Black Consciousnesses Forum
Baron Edmond De Rothschild: The Smallhat That Created A Black Hebrew Israelite Community! (#Shem/Semites)

Real Black Consciousnesses Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 50:28


#HebrewIsraelite #zionistregime #kanyewest Email the podcast: rbcforum313@yahoo.com https://cash.app/$BlackConsciousnes Join us as we have a conversation about when a wealthy European smallhat, Baron Rothschild, sent a French small Jacques Faitlovitch into East Africa and created a Black Ethiopian Hebrew Israelite Community. According to Accidental Talmudist: Jacques Faitlovitch devoted his life to bringing the isolated Jews of Ethiopia into the larger Jewish community. Born into a religious family in Lodz, Poland in 1881, Jacques was always interested in Africa and the Far East. He attended the Sorbonne in Paris, where he studied at the School for Oriental Languages, becoming fluent in several Ethiopian dialects. Jacques' mentor was Prof. Joseph Halevy, the first European Jew to visit the remote community of Ethiopian Jews - known as the Beta Israel or Falasha - in 1869. The origin of the Ethiopian Jews is mysterious. Many experts believe they are descendants of the lost tribe of Dan. When discovered by Prof. Halevy in the 19th century, they were practicing an incomplete form of Judaism. They had the written Torah (the Five Books of Moses) and the Prophets, but did not have the Oral Torah (Talmud), an essential part of Judaism. They were not familiar with any post-Biblical holidays, such as Hanukkah and Purim. Jacques traveled to Ethiopia for the first time in 1904. He said in an interview published in Warsaw's Jewish newspaper, "They did not want to believe that I, too, am a Jew, and only after a while did I manage to prove to them that there are many more Jews in the world. Since then they have wanted to be closer to these Jews." When the interviewer asked if he thought his mission would succeed, Jacques said: "I am sure of it. So sure that I have decided to devote my life to this cause.” Jacques opened a school and synagogue in Addis Ababa to teach Hebrew, Judaism and Jewish history. He sent several young Ethiopians to study at the best universities in Europe, so they could come back to Ethiopia and share what they'd learned. Jacques spent the rest of his life traveling around the world, speaking to Jewish groups and communal institutions to raise money for Ethiopian Jews. He made eleven extended trips to Ethiopia. In 1947 he began to advocate for Ethiopian Jews to move to the newly created State of Israel. He felt that with so many Jews murdered in the Holocaust, it was vitally important to reach out to every Jew still alive, no matter how remote. During the final years of his life, Jacques lived in Tel Aviv, where he had a large collection of rare Ethiopian books and manuscripts. After his death at 74, his widow donated the house and its contents to Tel Aviv, and the house became a public library. In the 1970's, Ethiopian Jews began immigrating to Israel in large numbers. Escaping famine and oppression, many died making the perilous journey. In 1984-5, the Israeli government, assisted by the CIA, began Operation Moses, a secret mission to airlift Jews out of Ethiopia. 8000 Jews were rescued and brought to Israel. Several years later, in 1991, Operation Solomon rescued 14,500 over the course of 36 hours, on 41 flights. Today, over 120,000 Ethiopian Jews live in Israel. Only 7,000 remain in Ethiopia. Jacques Faitlovich's dream of bringing Ethiopian Jews to Israel has become a reality. So make sure you tap into this conversation and remember to like, share, and comment! Thanks! RBCF! Hashtags: #israelites #israel #hebrewisraelites #bible #israeli #tribes #iuic #tribesofisrael #truth #hebrew #israelite #judah #blacks #apttmh #yahawah #yahawashi #tribeofjudah #jerusalem #hebrews #hebrewisraelite #hispanics #jesus #god #israelinstagram #jews #nativeamericans #israeloftheday #yah #jewish #photo --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/realblackforum/message

Psychoanalysis On and Off the Couch
Psychoanalytic Fieldwork: A Woman Psychanalyst (Training Analyst IPA) Working in Eastern Africa with Dr. phil. Barbara Saegesser (Biel/Bienne, Switzerland)

Psychoanalysis On and Off the Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 49:41


"The psychoanalytic frame I have built in myself helps me to find a way to not go too near and not be too distant to a person. It is other than what we learn when we learn to be psychoanalysts. Then we have the opportunity to feel in a room where we are not in danger - it's more the patient that feels in danger. He is coming and he has fears - but we, knowing our room, our couch, we don't have many fears. But if you work as I did in an open field, in different houses, in different hospitals, in different orphanages, you are first full of fear and at the same time very curious about what happens and what can happen. It's not the same as if you are in your own practice. One of the most important things I had was my psychoanalytic setting in myself - in myself, not in the room in which I work. I can find a way that doesn't bring too much fear to the patient and at the same time finds some way to get nearer to him, to his inner problems than if I was just a friend or a religious woman."   Episode Description: We begin by discussing the depth of human pain that Barbara encountered in her work in the poorest areas of Eastern Africa. She describes how essential her psychoanalytic sensibility was to enable her attunement to the closeness/distance space that was so important for mutual safety and understanding. She gives examples of the all-encompassing role of the Koran in those with whom she worked as well as the lack of a subjective self in many of the individuals she encountered. We learn of the effects of genital mutilation and the various reactions she had in seeing such suffering. We close with her sharing with us a bit of her personal story that has led her to this work.   Our Guest: Dr. phil. Barbara Saegesser is a training analyst with the Swiss Psychoanalytical Society and a member of the IPA. She is president of the commission treating ethical problems in the Swiss Society of Psychoanalysis. Since 2005 she has worked part-time in Eastern Islamic African cities: Alexandria, Khartoum, Addis Ababa, Hawassa, Djibouti, Kampala, and Zanzibar. Her work has been in orphanages, with street boys, in baby shelters, psychiatric hospitals, and maternity wards for genitally mutilated women.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Dec. 10, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The episode features our PANW report with dispatches on the emergence of the Kingdom of Morocco as a contender in the World Cup semi-final games in Doha, Qatar; legendary Congolese and Pan-African artist Elizabeth Muidikay, popularly known as Tshala Muana, has joined the ancestors; Ethiopia is reporting that power has been restored in the Tigray province after two years of conflict; and South Africa experienced flash flooding in the Guateng province earlier today. In the second hour we listen to a briefing from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on the status of public health on the continent. Later we look at the source of corruption on the African continent and how it can be resolved. Finally, we pay tribute to soul singer Otis Redding on the 55th anniversary of his untimely death in 1967. 

10% Happier with Dan Harris
532: A Meditation for Anxiety | Bonus Meditation with Sebene Selassie

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 5:50


Sebene guides you through using physical touch points to reduce anxiety. This is a great alternative to focusing on breathing.About Sebene Selassie:Sebene Selassie was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and raised in white neighborhoods in Washington, D.C., she was a tomboy Black girl who loved Monty Python and UB40. She never believed she belonged. Thirty years ago, she began studying Buddhism as an undergraduate at McGill University where she majored in Comparative Religious Studies. Now, Sebene is a teacher, author, and speaker who teaches that meditation can help us remember our inherent sense of belonging, that our individual freedom affects absolutely everyone and everything, and that our collective freedom depends on each and every one of us. To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Working With Anxiety,” or click here: "https://10percenthappier.app.link/content?meditation=1fe8c559-04a4-4082-bf7c-e59d573c1252"See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Atlas Obscura Podcast
Fendika Cultural Center

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 11:06


The story of the Fendika Cultural Center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia is the story of Melaku Belay and his journey from homelessness to international acclaim as a community leader.READ MORE IN THE ATLAS:https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/fendika-azmari-bet

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Dec. 3, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the celebrations in Cameroun after its team defeated Brazil during the World Cup in Doha, Qatar; reports indicate that the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) have launched air strikes against the Palestinian people in Gaza; a Russian governmental spokesperson has criticized comments made by an official of the United States State Department; and the Tanzania Supreme Court recently sentenced 11 people to death for the murder of a conservationist. In the second hour we listen to an interview with a leading African National Congress (ANC) of South Africa official on the current situation inside the ruling party. Finally, we review a briefing by the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Business Drive
Ethiopia Hosts Internet Forum Despite Shutdowns

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 0:57


Ethiopia is hosting the UN's annual internet forum despite an internet blackout of more than a year in the war-devastated region of Tigray. More than 2,500 delegates from all over the world are attending the forum, which is focusing on ''connecting all people and safeguarding human rights''. The UN's decision to host the event in Addis Ababa has however raised eyebrows among internet and human rights campaigners. Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed defended blackouts, saying the internet is not water, the internet is not air'' and shutdowns were aimed at saving lives. He added that decisions were made to save lives during conflicts.

Living African
023: Substance Abuse on The Rise – With Kelem Kejela

Living African

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 57:51


Substance use continues to be a growing major public health concern in Africa. Recent studies infer an overall estimated prevalence of 42% among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa.* Unfortunately, this phenomenon is not adequately documented across many settings in the continent despite known negative health and social consequences on affected individuals and their communities.  Kelem recollects her firsthand experience with her brother battling substance abuse and mental health issues, which ultimately resulted in his sudden demise. We also talk about the high prevalence of substance abuse especially among young Africans, the associated psychosocial problems and the comprehensive intervention and treatment programs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. *Data from WHO (World Health Organization)   Meet Our Guest : Kelem Kejela is a nurse practitioner who currently works for the UN in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia as head nurse for the United Health Care center. She is a mother of two children Daniella (20yrs old – 3rd year) in university and Ben (17yrs old senior) in High school. She is a board member of two NGOs that work with young girls and people with Epilepsy and she is passionate about serving her community. Contact Our Guest: E-mail: ktk780@gmail.com   Things You Will Learn in This Episode:  [00:01 – 05:00] Introduction Getting to know our guest [05:00 – 25:00] Who was Alex? Growing up with Alex Dealing with the pressure of manhood and societal pressures The beginning of his struggle with substance abuse Sending him to rehabilitation and his relapses The situation surrounding him ending his life Giving life to Alex's story [25:00 – 40:00] Stereotypes, Therapy, & Mental Health The pressure men deal with within our society The lack of counseling and therapy for men Elaborating more on other substance abuse stories The stereotypes surrounding people with substance abuse issues How the actions of our community affect people dealing with substance abuse [45:00 – 55:00] The Prevalence of Substance Abuse Among Adolescents  What is causing the high substance abuse in Africa and Ethiopia specifically The illicit substances being abused in Ethiopia and some parts of Africa Some treatment centers and healing options available in Ethiopia The need for more awareness and regulation of prescription drugs The lack of counseling and treatment centers How to reach Kelem [55:00 – 57:00] Final Words Kelem's final words Anyoh's final words   Quotes “We all know one or two family members or people in our communities who are struggling with substance abuse and there are those who are having mental health issues compiled with substance abuse so we must talk about these issues and stop covering it up.” –  Kelem Kejela “For the street kids, there is no home. Their home is on the streets and the girls on the streets are having babies in the same conditions which will create a vicious cycle so we must find solutions to this problem. Africa as a whole needs to address this issue as a priority with peace, food security, and other lingering issues.” –  Kelem Kejela “Mental health and substance abuse are new to Africans but I honestly feel that the emergence of social media has exacerbated the use of substance abuse because the western culture has kind of romanticized the use of drugs in lyrics and movies which kind of makes it cool." –  Anyoh Fombad   LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue putting out the best content just for you! Connect with Living African Podcast: You can connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, or send us an email at hello@livingafricanpodcast.com. Check out our website www.livingafricanpodcast.com for more resources and to learn more. Connect with host, Anyoh: You can connect with Anyoh on Facebook (@anyohf), Instagram (@anyohfombad), and Twitter (@anyohfombad). Thank you for listening.

Habari za UN
Mtandao thabiti wa Intaneti kutaimarisha ukuaji jumuishi na endelevu Afrika. UN

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 0:03


Nchi za Afrika zimechagizwa kuwekeza katika kujenga mnepo wa miundombinu thabiti ya ya mtandao wa intaneti ili kutumia fursa za kidijitali na kuharakisha mageuzi ya kijamii na kiuchumi barani humo.Hayo yameelezwa na viongozi wa kimataifa wanaohudhuria kongamano la 17 la udhibiti wa mtandao IGF 2022 linalofanyika Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, wakisisitiza umuhimu wa teknolojia ya kidijitali kama zana za kuimarisha maendeleo kote barani Afrika. Katibu Mkuu wa Umoja wa Mataifa Antonio Guterres, amewaambia washiriki kuwa ingawa teknolojia za kidijitali zinabadilisha maisha na uwezo wa watu kuishi, zinakiuka kanuni na kuzidisha ukosefu wa usawa duniani kote.  Ametoa wito wa kuwa na mustakabali wa kidijitali unaozingatiahaki za binadamu kwa msingi wa mtandao thabiti ulio wazi, unaojumuisha watu wote, na salama kwa wote kulingana na mapendekezo yake ya Global Digital Compact.  Makubaliano ya Global Digital Compact yanayopendekezwa yanalenga kutoa fursa ya watu wote kuunganishwa na mtandao wa intaneti, kuziba pengo la mgawanyiko wa kidijitali na kufikia mamilioni ya watu ambao hawajaunganishwa na intaneti. Guterres amesisitiza kuwa "Fursa salama za kidijitali zinazozingatia haki za binadamu huanza na ulinzi wa uhuru wa kujieleza, na haki ya uhuru na faragha mtandaoni," akisisitiza kwamba serikali, makampuni ya kibinafsi na majukwaa ya mitandao ya kijamii yana wajibu wa kuzuia uonevu mtandaoni na taarifa potofu ambazo zinahujumu demokrasia, haki za binadamu na sayansi. "Tunahitaji kufanyia kazi mustakabali ulio salama, wenye usawa na wazi wa kidijitali ambao hauvunji ufaragha au utu," amehimiza Guterres. Waziri mkuu wa Ethiopia Abiyi Ahmed ambayo ndio mwenyeji wa kongamano hilo lililobeba kaulimbiu “mnepo wa mtandao wa intaneti kwa ajili ya mstakbali endelevu wa pamoja” katika hotuba yake ya ufunguzi amesema "Mchango wa mtandao wa intaneti katika maendeleo ya kijamii ni mkubwa, uimarishaji wa demokrasia ya ujuzi na mawasiliano, upatikanaji wa ujuzi wa ujasiriamali na fursa mpya za ajira, upatikanaji wa huduma za afya na elimu ni baadhi ya machache muhimu,". Hata hivyo, waziri mkuu Ahmed amesema kuna haja ya kutahadharishwa kwa matumaini kuhusu umiliki wa miundombinu muhimu ya kidijitali, usimamizi wa takwimu na usalama wa mtandao kwani usimamizi wa takwimu ni kuhusu kuoanisha majukumu ya mfumo wa ikolojia wa kidijitali ili kuchochea maendeleo ya kiuchumi na kulinda haki za mtu binafsi. Naye kaimu katibu mtendaji wa tume ya uchumi kwa Afrika (ECA), Antonio Pedro, amesema kupunguza mgawanyiko wa kidijitali ni muhimu katika kujenga njia mpya za ukuaji wa haraka wa uchumi, uvumbuzi, uundaji wa ajira na upatikanaji wa huduma barani Afrika. Takwimu zinaonyesha kwamba takriban watu milioni 871 barani Afrika hawajaunganishwa na mtandao wa intaneti na fursa ni finyu zaidi hasa maeneo ya vijijini, ingawa asilimia 70 ya watu Afrika wana fursa ya intaneti kupitia simu za rununu. Hata hiyo Bwana Pedro amesema ni chini ya asilimia 25 ya walio na simu za rununu ndio wanaotumia intaneti hiyo kutokana na gharama kubwa ya intaneti ya mitandao ya simu barani humo. Kongamano hilo la IGF lilianza Novemba 28  na litakunja jamvi Desemba 2. 

The Horn
Eritrea's Long Bitter Feud with Ethiopia's Tigray

The Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 49:14


The contemporary rivalry between Eritrea and Tigray goes back several decades. After an almost-17-year-long civil war starting in the mid-1970s, the Eritrean EPLF and Tigrayan TPLF jointly defeated Ethiopia's Derg regime in 1991, resulting in Eritrea's independence and the TPLF taking power in Ethiopia. Despite their joint achievement, their already-complicated relations soon started to sour. A growing power struggle, as well as unresolved territorial disputes between the two sides, led to a deadly border war lasting from 1998 to 2000. Meanwhile, an increasingly repressive Eritrean regime found itself regionally and globally isolated. A new administration in Ethiopia under Abiy Ahmed signed a peace agreement with Eritrean President Isaias Afwerki in 2018, formally ending the border war. However, this rapprochement between Addis Ababa and Asmara also appeared to pave the way for Ethiopia's civil war, with Eritrea allying with Ethiopia's federal government in the war against Tigrayan forces in northern Ethiopia that started in 2020.In this episode of The Horn, Alan is joined by Michael Woldemariam, associate professor at the University of Maryland's School of Public Policy, to take a deep dive into the long and tumultuous relationship between Eritrea and Tigray to understand Eritrea's motives and objectives in the Ethiopian conflict. They talk about the origins of the relations between the EPLF and the TPLF and their shared struggle against Ethiopia's Derg regime from the 1970s to 1991. They unpack how relations between the two sides soured in a struggle for power and authority, culminating in the deadly border clashes starting in 1998. They also discuss how Eritrean President Afwerki's motivations in the conflict in northern Ethiopia have shifted over time. Finally, they talk about how to navigate Eritrea's role while trying to end the conflict in Tigray. Please note that this episode was recorded before the 2 November truce agreement between Ethiopia's federal government and Tigray's leaders.For more in-depth analysis on Ethiopia and Eritrea, make sure to check out our Horn of Africa regional page. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Fifth Floor
Ethiopia: an end to the fighting

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 41:38


The BBC's Addis Ababa correspondent Kalkidan Yibeltal tells us about the agreement just reached between the Ethiopian government and officials from the Tigray region, to stop fighting and to allow unhindered humanitarian access. He also reflects on the challenges of reporting the civil war over the last two years. The centenary of the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb It's 100 years since the discovery of the tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun, almost intact and full of treasures, nearly 3-and-a-half thousand years after his death. Angy Ghannam of BBC Monitoring in Cairo tells us how the centenary is being marked in Egypt, and what ordinary Egyptians think of their most famous pharaoh. Vietnam's forgotten veterans Thousands of disabled Vietnamese veterans who fought for the South in the war are living in poor conditions without government support. A Catholic priest who is part of a programme which assists them was recently prevented from leaving the country. MyHang Tran of BBC Vietnamese reports on his problems with the authorities, and the plight of the veterans. The impact of the Iran protests on regional neighbours Since the start of protests in Iran, ethnic tensions have been exacerbated both inside the country and with its neighbours. Kurdish and Azerbaijani populations inside Iran are affected, as are relations with Iraqi Kurdistan and Azerbaijan. BBC Azerbaijani editor Könül Khalilova and Jiyar Gol from BBC Persian discuss recent developments. The aftermath of the Indian bridge collapse Roxy Gagdekar of BBC Gujarati has been reporting from Morbi, where the recent collapse of a pedestrian bridge left at least 135 dead. He shares impressions from two of his reports - one from the site of the bridge collapse, the other from a hospital which was visited by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (Photo: Redwan Hussein (L), Representative of the Ethiopian government, and Getachew Reda (R), Representative of the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF), shake hands on a peace agreement between the two parties in Pretoria on November 2, 2022. Credit: Phill Magakoe /AFP/Getty Images)

Clare FM - Podcasts
Wife Of Clare Man Killed In Boeing Crash Welcomes US Court Decision

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 11:22


On Wednesday's Morning Focus, Alan spoke to Naoise Ryan, wife of the late Lahinch native Michéal "Mick" Ryan. Mick was Deputy Chief Engineer at the World Food Programme when he was killed on a Boeing 737 Max Aircraft, which was travelling from Addis Ababa to Nairobi on March 10th 2019. Five months prior, on October 28th, 2018, a 737 Max crashed just minutes after leaving Jakarta airport in Indonesia, killing all 189 people on board. US federal judge Reed O'Connor has ruled that the deaths of the 346 people lost in both aviation disasters were the direct result of criminal behaviour on the part of Boeing and its leaders. His wife Naoise discussed the US court decision to treat the family of lost loved ones as crime victims.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 69 – Unstoppable Corporate Communicator with Bradley Akubuiro

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 76:23


Bradley Akubuiro's parents raised him to have a deep and strong work ethic. His father came to the United States from Nigeria at the age of 17 and worked to put himself through school. As Bradley describes, both about his father as well as about many people in extremely impoverished parts of the world, such individuals develop a strong resilience and wonderful spirit.   Bradley has led media relations and/or public affairs for Fortune 50 companies including Boeing as it returned the grounded 737 MAX to service and United Technologies through a series of mergers that resulted in the creation of Raytheon Technologies. He also served as an advisor to Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and to the Republic of Liberia post-civil war. Today Bradley is a partner at Bully Pulpit Interactive, an advisory firm founded by leaders of the Obama-Biden campaign.   As you will see, Bradley is a wonderful and engaging storyteller. He weaves into his stories for us lessons about leadership and good corporate communications. His spirit is refreshing in our world today where we see so much controversy and unnecessary bickering.   I look forward to your comments on this episode.   About the Guest: Bradley is a partner at Bully Pulpit Interactive, an advisory firm founded by leaders of the Obama-Biden campaign. He focuses on corporate reputation, executive communications, and high visibility crisis management and media relations efforts, as well as equity, diversity, and inclusion matters for clients. Bradley has led media relations and/or public affairs for Fortune 50 companies including Boeing as it returned the grounded 737 MAX to service and United Technologies through a series of mergers that resulted in the creation of Raytheon Technologies and has also served as an advisor to Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and to the Republic of Liberia post-civil war. A nationally recognized expert in his field, Bradley has been quoted by outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, and The Washington Post, and his columns have been featured in Business Insider, Forbes, and Inc. Magazine, where he is a regular contributor. Bradley is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, where he currently sits on the Board of Advisers and serves as an adjunct member of the faculty.   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Well, hi, everybody. Thank you for joining us on unstoppable mindset today, we have Bradley Akubuiro with us. Bradley is a partner in bully pulpit International. He'll tell us about that. But he's been involved in a variety of things dealing with corporate communications, and has had a lot of adventures. He deals with diversity, equity and inclusion. But most of all, before we started this, he had one question for me. And that is, how much fun are we going to have on this podcast? Well, that really is up to Bradley. So Bradley has some fun.   Bradley Akubuiro  01:56 Michael, thank you so much for having me is is going to be a ton of fun. I'm really excited. Thanks for having me   Michael Hingson  02:01 on. Well, you're you're absolutely welcome. And we're glad that you're here had a chance to learn about you. And we've had a chance to chat some. So why don't we start as often and Lewis Carroll would say at the beginning, and maybe tell me about you growing up and those kinds of things.   Bradley Akubuiro  02:18 Yeah, I'd be happy to do that. And, you know, I think it would be remiss if I didn't start off talking about my parents a little bit before I talked about myself. My dad grew up in the Biafran war in Nigeria, Civil War, Nigeria. And you know, while he was going through school, they were bombing schools, and it wasn't safe for adults to be out. And so, you know, he was the guy in his family at six years old, who was taking crops from their plantation. They grew up maybe about six hours outside of Lagos, Nigeria, and was moving, you know, some of these crops two miles away, to sell in the marketplace. And you know, at a very early age was learning responsibility, not just for himself, but for the family.   Michael Hingson  03:02 Wow. Which is something that more people should do. So what what all did he do? Or how did all that work out?   Bradley Akubuiro  03:09 Yeah. Well, you know, this was a really interesting time in Nigeria's History, where you had a lot of folks who were in this circumstance, and my dad was a really hard worker, his parents were hard workers before him, his father was a pastor. And so he had a certain level of discipline and support in his household. But, you know, he knew that he had this kind of onus on him. So grew up at a time then where not only do you have this responsibility, but a big family, brothers and sisters to take care of. He was the guy who was chosen later, you know, flash forward a few years, to come to the United States, to be able to find an opportunity here in this country, and to be able to always hopefully, give back to his family.   Michael Hingson  03:59 So he came, and How old was he? When he came here?   Bradley Akubuiro  04:03 When he got to the States, he was about 17. So came to New York City, not a lot going on there. And, you know, he had to put himself through   Michael Hingson  04:15 school. Did he know anyone? Or Was anyone sponsoring him? Or how did all that work? He had a little   Bradley Akubuiro  04:20 bit of family here, but he had to find his own way, get a full time job at a gas station, and work to figure out what this country was all about, but also how to be successful here.   Michael Hingson  04:32 Where did he stay when he got here then   Bradley Akubuiro  04:36 got a little apartment up on the kind of Washington Heights Harlem area of New York, little hole in the wall and, you know, continue to work to pay that off while he was trying to pay off school. So not easy, but at the same time, you know, a really, really great opportunity for him to kind of start fresh and create some opportunity for himself and family.   Michael Hingson  04:58 So did he tell him at least With a little bit of money, how did all that work? It's funny, he   Bradley Akubuiro  05:04 asked that question. He did come with some, but it wasn't a lot. Let's start off there. But you know, what's interesting about that is, you know, he put himself through undergrad, put himself through a master's program, you know, and was doing a PhD program over at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. And at Penn, he blew through his entire life savings and one semester. And so, you know, was on a great path. You studying engineering, and, you know, a semester and he's like, Oh, what am I going to do ended up going across the street to Drexel, where they were able to bring him in and give him a scholarship, as long as he was one a TA, which he really enjoyed doing. And he was able to put himself through the PhD.   Michael Hingson  05:50 Wow. So he started there as a freshman then   Bradley Akubuiro  05:55 started, so he went to several different schools started in New York. Yep, sorry, started in New York at Hunter College, did a master's program at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, and then came up to do his PhD at Penn. And then went to Drexel, and went to Drexel.   Michael Hingson  06:12 He moved around how, how come? What, what took him to Atlanta, for example? Do you know?   Bradley Akubuiro  06:18 Yeah, well, it was the opportunity. You know, one of the things that he had learned and had been instilled in him growing up, which he's passed on to me is, you follow the opportunity where it's and as long as you're not afraid to take that risk and take a chance on yourself and your future that will ultimately more often than not pay off in the end. And so he followed scholarship dollars, he followed the programs that would have an opportunity for him. And he went exactly where it took,   Michael Hingson  06:45 and what were his degrees in.   Bradley Akubuiro  06:47 So his master's degree was in chemistry, his PhD was chemical engineering. Wow. Yeah. What did he What did he do with that? So well, you know, the world was his oyster, I suppose, in some ways, but you know, he ended up you know, going into a couple of different companies started with Calgon, carbon and Pittsburgh, and spent a number of years there and on later on to Lucent Technologies, and fiber optics. And so, you know, he's moved on to a number of different companies, engineering roles, eventually got his MBA and has been, you know, employed a number of different places and continued over his career to work in a number of different geographies as well, whether it's like going to Pittsburgh, New Jersey, Atlanta, Massachusetts. They're now living in Rochester, New York, which I've never lived in. But it's a very charming place. It's, yeah.   Michael Hingson  07:44 It is. It is a nice place. I've been there many times. Yeah. And for customers and so on, it's a fun place to go. Well, he obviously learned in a lot of ways, some might say the hard way, but he learned to value what was going on with him, because it was the only way he was going to be successful. So nothing was handed to him at all, was   Bradley Akubuiro  08:10 it? That's right. He had a very strong family foundation. And he definitely learned a lot from his parents and from his family, and they were very close. So I think that he would say that's what was handed to him, but he certainly didn't give any get any leg up.   Michael Hingson  08:26 Right. Well, that's a good thing to have handed to you, I guess. Well, how did he meet somebody from Gary, Indiana, which is a whole different culture.   Bradley Akubuiro  08:36 Well, this becomes a love story pretty quickly. That's an article.   Michael Hingson  08:42 You can embellish how you want.   Bradley Akubuiro  08:46 Oh, my parents actually met somewhat serendipitously. They were at two different schools. My mom was going to school in Alabama, Alabama a&m. My dad was going to school at the time and Clark, Atlanta and Atlanta. So about four hours apart, Huntsville, Atlanta. My mom's roommate was dating my dad's roommate. And so my mom agreed to come with her roommate to go and visit her boyfriend at the time. She happened to meet this strapping young Nigerian man in Atlanta, and they ended up hitting it off and as fate would have it, the other two their respective movements didn't make the distance but they had a budding romance that ended up lasting now at this point several decades.   Michael Hingson  09:37 Wow. So they're, they're still with us.   Bradley Akubuiro  09:41 They're both still with us   Michael Hingson  09:42 both going strong. That is, that is really cool. So what do you think you learn from them?   Bradley Akubuiro  09:48 I learned a number of things. You know, I learned first of all, and you heard my father's story, resilience. He has learned to take whatever is thrown at been thrown at him. Be able to not only take it in stride, which I think is good, but more importantly, to turn it around and channel it and to use it to his advantage, no matter what that might be. And he's instilled that in me and my two sisters, two sisters, ones, older ones younger. And that's, that's really been important. You know, when it comes to my two parents, the things that they value a ton are education, family. And when you think about the world around you, how are you leaving it in a better place than you found it. And if you can really focus on those handful of things, then you are going to have a very fulfilling and successful life. And that's how he measured success. I've taken that away from them.   Michael Hingson  10:41 He doesn't get better than that. And if you can, if you can say that I want to make a difference. And that I hope I've made at least a little difference. It doesn't get better than that does it?   Bradley Akubuiro  10:53 That's exactly right. So then   Michael Hingson  10:55 you came along. And we won't we won't put any value judgment on that.   Bradley Akubuiro  11:02 Thank you for that we   Michael Hingson  11:03 could have for Yeah, exactly. But actually, before I go to that, have they been back to visit Nigeria at all?   Bradley Akubuiro  11:11 Yeah, absolutely. And unfortunately, the most recent time that my parents took a trip back was the passing of my grandmother, a handful of years ago. And so that brought them back. But, you know, one of the things that I'm hoping to do, and I haven't done it yet, is just spend some real time out there. I've got plenty of family that's still there. So go in and spend a little time in Nigeria that's longer than a quick in and out trip. I spent some time and we've talked about this before Michael, but in West Africa, generally in Liberia. And that was a great experience. But there's not quite like going back to where it all began with your family.   Michael Hingson  11:49 No, it's still not home. Right. Well, so you you came along. And so what was it like growing up in that household and going to high school and all that?   Bradley Akubuiro  12:03 Well, there's a couple ways to answer that. Go ahead. Well, let's put it this way, I we have a very close family bond. And so you know, when you think about the folks who have finished your senses, who laugh at your jokes, because they think it's funny, and if you hadn't told that joke, first, they probably would have told that joke, the kind of family we have. It's a great, great dynamic. And so I was very fortunate to have grown up in that household with parents who truly, truly embraced that that side. You know, it was also a tough household. You know, my parents were very strict, my father, especially coming from this immigrant mindset, and this Nigerian culture, I mentioned the value of education. What I didn't mention quite, but might have been a little bit implied, and I'll say it more explicitly is anything less than an A was entirely unacceptable. There were a number of times where I found myself on the wrong side of that. And, you know, we grew up in different times, as my parents were trying to provide the best life they could for us, and a number of different urban settings. And, you know, one, one period of life for me was particularly studying in high school, where, you know, the school district of Springfield, Massachusetts at a time graduated about 54% of the students that went through that system. And so you're thinking about one in two kids who don't make it out of high school, much less make it the college, much less have a successful and fulfilling career in life. And my father, especially, but of course, both my parents want us to do absolutely everything in their power to ensure that those would not be our statistics that we would be my sisters, and I would be able to have every tool at our disposal to be successful. And they work hard at that, despite the circumstances.   Michael Hingson  14:08 So how were they when I'm sure it happened? It was discovered that maybe you had some gifts, but there were some things that you weren't necessarily as strong as other things. How did that work out for you?   Bradley Akubuiro  14:21 I want to be very clear, the list of things that I wasn't quite as good at, especially in those days, was long enough to stun you. So you know, it we we work through it together, right? I think one of the things that I admire most about my parents now that I maybe didn't appreciate enough growing up was just the amount that they leaned in, and we're willing to be hands on and helping with our education. And so my father would give us times tables when we were in elementary school and make sure that we worked through them. And if we didn't get them quite right, we would do them again, and we do them again, and we do them again. And And I remember a time when I was in the fifth grade where my father had me up until 1am, doing math problems. And, you know, I was thinking to myself, I cannot imagine doing this with my kids, when I was at that age, and then I swore at that time that I never would, I'll tell you what my blood now I swear that I definitely will maybe not till 1am, I think there's probably a more reasonable time. But to be able to invest that level of effort into making sure that your kid has everything they need to be successful. I just have I admire the heck out of it.   Michael Hingson  15:36 I remember a couple of times, I think one when I was oh seven or eight, when we were living in California, and going back to visit relatives in Chicago, or driving somewhere. And my dad said to me, and my brother who was two years older, you guys have to learn the times tables. And we spent time driving, just going through the times tables. And it took me a little while. And a couple of times, I tried a shortcut that messed me up. But eventually I got it all figured out. And he said, when you say the times tables correctly, we'll give you 50 cents. And they did when I got the time two times tables, right? They did. And also, I was learning algebra from him. My dad was an electronics engineer. And so he really worked because I didn't have books in braille early on until I was in the fourth grade, I had to study with them to a large degree. So he taught me a lot more than the schools were teaching little kids as it were. So I learned algebra early, and I learned to do it in my head, and still do. And in high school, it got me in trouble in my freshman year, because my math teacher said, Now whenever you're doing things, you have to show your work. Well, you know, I kept trying to tell her that, for me, showing my work in Braille isn't going to do you any good. I can tell you what I do and how I do it. And she wouldn't accept that and she was going to fail me literally fail me in math. Until one day I wrote out, I think one of the problems and I think just in case she took it and went somewhere where she could find somebody to read Braille. I wrote it out correctly. But I got to see an algebra one because of that one thing. By the way, after that, I never got below an A in math. She was insistent that you had to show your work, and wasn't flexible enough to recognize that there are a lot of ways to show your work. Oh,   Bradley Akubuiro  17:35 yeah. Well, that's part of the challenge, and not to make this an entire commentary on our education system. But there are so many different ways to your point to get to the right answer. And I don't think there's nearly enough flexibility in our system in many cases, except for those who really, truly tried to find it and create that environment for their students. But at a at a you know, broader look, there isn't nearly enough flexibility to appreciate that we're going to have many different ways to get these answers.   Michael Hingson  18:04 I think that really good teachers, and there are a lot of good teachers. But I think the really good teachers make that leap and allow for flexibility in what they do. Because they recognize everyone learns differently. But the big issue is, can you learn and can you demonstrate that you learned?   Bradley Akubuiro  18:24 Yeah, well, that's what we're all striving for.   Michael Hingson  18:27 It is I was pretty blessed going through school, especially in high school, a lot of the times, I would stay after school and extra period to study in the library because again, not everything was available so that we actually had people who would read material to me or give me information that was written on boards that I didn't get any other way. And usually, the teachers would come in, we would set up days and they would come in and give me tests. And what was fun about that was we would go through the tests fairly quickly and spend most of the hour chatting and I got to know a number of my teachers that way and that was so valuable for me. One of them especially Dick herbal Shimer, I still know and you know, he's going to be what 85 I think it is this year, and he will be at five I think August 28. We still keep in touch, he came to our wedding. And he tells me that I'm getting to be closer in age to him and I point out that I'll never be as old as he is. And he tries to convince me that mathematically I'm getting closer and I say 13 years is still 13 years.   Bradley Akubuiro  19:35 Hmm, yeah, don't let them don't let them try to get you. That's   Michael Hingson  19:39 right. It's not gonna work.   Bradley Akubuiro  19:42 was gonna ask you if you had a favorite teacher because I feel like teachers, if you put together this for many years have such an incredible impact on you and how you see yourself.   Michael Hingson  19:52 I remember a lot of things from a number of my teachers and I can tell you the names of most all of my teachers. I remember in my freshman year English, our teacher was a Mr. Wilson has actually Woodrow Wilson was his name was an older gentleman. And one day we were sitting in class and he was just talking about philosophy. And he's talking about people's ethics. And he said, and I remember it that, you know, a good example is, if you need to borrow a quarter from somebody, be sure you pay that quarterback, where does that come in English? But nevertheless, those are the kinds of things that he said, and other teachers said various things, and they stick with you.   Bradley Akubuiro  20:36 Yeah, no, it's so true. I mean, for me, my favorite teacher was Darlene Kaffee. She was my fourth grade teacher, taught all kinds of, I mean, touch everything you learned in fourth grade. But the most important thing for me was, she gave me confidence in my writing ability. You know, I had always enjoyed writing, but I never really thought of myself as someone who could potentially be a writer. And she was the first person who sat me down and said, Hey, look, you submitted this assignment. And it's really good. You could be a writer one day, and you know, she had me write poems, you had me write a number of different things that weren't class assignments. But there were things that she was like, Hey, if you want to do this, then you got to practice it. And I learned so much from her. But the most important thing I took away was that confidence in my ability to do these things.   Michael Hingson  21:27 Yeah, yeah. And that's one of the most important things that good teachers can bring to us and not tear you down, because you don't necessarily do something exactly the way they do or want. But if you can demonstrate you learn that is so cool.   Bradley Akubuiro  21:42 Yeah, it is. Yeah, it is. So,   Michael Hingson  21:47 as I said, I keep in touch with declarable Shimer won his 80th birthday, I flew to Nebraska where they live and surprise him for his birthday, which was nice. That's awesome. Yeah, it was a lot of fun. And hopefully, we'll get back there one of these days soon. Meanwhile, I'll just give him a hard time on the phone.   Bradley Akubuiro  22:08 Cathy's out here listening when I'm not going to surprise you don't listen to Michael. But if I show up, then I'll have a cake or something.   Michael Hingson  22:17 Yeah, exactly. Well, so. So what was high school like for you? I think you said there were some things that happened in high school.   Bradley Akubuiro  22:26 Yeah, high school was a I mean, when you think about formative man, this was a formative experience for me. So it was between my sophomore and junior year of high school, when one of my very best friends a guy who I consider to be like an older brother to me, was shot and killed in the drive by shooting. It was devastating. You know, I had a period over a few months, where not only was he killed, and I found out about it, 45 minutes after I'd left town to take my older sister, with my family to college and 22 hours away. So this wasn't something he did every night. And I likely had been with him had we not been on that trip. But you know, he unfortunately passed that night with a 45 caliber bullet hole in his heart. You know, my experience with school with with life that I mean, it really took a turn at that point. Because not only had I lost somebody who was very close to me, but the police didn't catch the guy who did it. In fact, they caught a guy who was a friend of ours that had absolutely nothing to do with it, and put him through absolute hell, only to find out that he wasn't responsible for this, any of us could have told you that right up front. You know, that was a terrible time. You know, a couple of months later, Michael, we had another one of our close friends who was shot and killed. And the girl who was with her at the time was shot in the leg trying to get away. And you know, and another month and a half after that another one of our good friends was you know, shot in his own driveway trying to get into his car and head to the grocery store. And it wasn't safe for us. And it was a really, really challenging time, just to exist, much less to try to focus on school and to focus on other things that are going on. How could you do that? When you didn't know if when you left in the morning, you were going to be able to make it home at night?   Michael Hingson  24:32 Why was there so much crime? Well, that's   Bradley Akubuiro  24:36 a million dollar question. You know, there's so many factors that go into it. And since then, I've spent a lot of time thinking more about the kind of, you know, macro factors, but it's a very specific on the ground situation at that time was there was a gang war between two rival gangs, street gangs in the city. And my engineer who I just referred to lived right in the heart of Eastern Avenue, which is the home of the app and Springfield became there. And across State Street was Sycamore and a number of different folks and rivalries had kind of established then. And so, you know, this was not that there's ever, you know, really sensical reasons that, you know, these things happen. But this was as nonsensical as it could be, you know, people who are killing each other and dying for reasons that if you were to ask those who survived now, why they would ever pull a trigger and situation like this, they probably couldn't really tell you or maybe even remember.   Michael Hingson  25:38 So it wasn't race or anything like that. It was just the whole gang environment, mostly.   Bradley Akubuiro  25:45 Yeah, that's right. And at the time, you know, you think about the economic factors that go into this. And I talked about this in the context of Chicago all the time, because that's where I live now. And the situation is just as salient here. But if you were to be on the west side of Chicago, Northwestern most neighborhood within the city limits of Austin, you would be in one of the poorest and one of the most dangerous zip codes in the industrialized world. If you were to go two miles over to Oak Park, one of the suburbs just outside of the city. It's one of the wealthiest in the region, and it is an amazing neighborhood, and the infrastructure across the board when it comes to the education system, and the amount of money per pupil. If you were to look at the crime statistics, if you were to look at the policing, if you were to look at any measure of quality of life, it is night and day different, but it's separated by a couple of streets. And that to me is unfathomable.   Michael Hingson  26:52 It is crazy. Chris, you also have some really serious gangs back in Chicago. You know, the notorious was the cubs in the Sox, for example.   Bradley Akubuiro  27:03 That's right. And you know what the competition? beaters? You don't get in the middle of those two sets of fans?   Michael Hingson  27:09 Ah, no way. and never the twain shall meet, period. That's right. That's very many people who will say they're fans of both.   Bradley Akubuiro  27:20 I don't think that's legal, actually. Ah,   Michael Hingson  27:23 that would explain it. I'll tell you sports fans are really tough. I remember when I lived in Winthrop, mass right outside of Boston. And every year, I would on opening day, I'd be somewhere in Boston. And if the Red Sox lost immediately, basically everybody on the news and everyone else just said wait till next year. Yeah, they were done. It was no faith at all. It was amazing. And and I remember living back there when Steve Grogan was booed off out of the Patriots game one year and just I'll tell you, they're, they're amazing.   Bradley Akubuiro  28:04 Well look at the dynasties they've gotten now. Unbelievable. Although, you know, I live with a die hard. Tom Brady fan. My fiance has been a Patriots fan since the beginning. And it's been a complete complete nightmare trying to figure out are we watching the Patriots? Are we are we watching the Buccaneers? And are we Tom Brady fans are Patriots fans? You know, it's a little bit of everything in that house. But I can't ever say that I'm not happy. I am a fully dedicated supporter of all things. Somebody in SNAP, otherwise, I'm in a   Michael Hingson  28:39 lot of trouble. It is safer that way. Well, I have gained a lot of respect for Tom Brady, especially after he left the Patriots. And not because I disliked the Patriots, but because of all the scandals and the deflated footballs and all that sort of stuff. But he came back and he proved Hey, you know, it's not what you think at all. I really am good. And he continues to be good.   Bradley Akubuiro  29:03 Yeah, it's 100%. Right. Well, and that to make this, you know, given a broader topic about Tom Brady, he gets plenty of press. But you know, the fact that he was able to say, All right, you have decided that I'm done in this sport. You've decided I'm too old to play this sport, but I have not run to the end of my capability. And in fact, I've got a lot more to offer this game. And he went and he took it with someone who would respect that and the Buccaneers and he won another championship. I mean, you can't you can't make this up.   Michael Hingson  29:38 No, absolutely. You can't. And so we'll see what the Rams do this year. I liked the Rams. I grew up with the Rams, Chris, I'm really prejudiced when it comes to sports and probably a number of things because we've been blessed out here in California with great sports announcers. I mean, of course, Vin Scully, the best of all time in baseball, and I will argue that with anyone But then Dick Enberg did a lot of football and he did the rams and he did the angels. And of course we had Chick Hearn who did the Lakers, their descriptions and the way they did it, especially Vinnie just drew you in. And I've listened and listened to announcers all over the country and never got the kinds of pictures and announced me announcing and announcements that I got by listening to people in California, so I'm a little prejudiced that way.   Bradley Akubuiro  30:31 Well, and you shouldn't be you absolutely should be. And I will say this, the power of storytelling that these folks that you just described are able to wield is phenomenal. And it's a skill that I actually wish more folks had and more different industries. Because if you can tell a strong compelling story, you can make it visual, you can bring people and like that the power it has to bring people together, and to motivate them to act is just unbelievable.   Michael Hingson  31:01 Johnny most was a was a good announcer a pretty great announcer in basketball, but not really so much into the storytelling, but he had a personality that drew you in as well. Well, that counts for a lot. It does. I remember living back there when the Celts were playing the rockets for the championship. And the Celtics lost the first two games. And Johnny most was having a field day picking on the rockets and so on. But Moses Malone, Malone was criticizing the Celtics and said, You know, I can go get for high school people. And we could beat these guys. Wrong thing to say, because then the Celts came back and won the next for Johnny most really had a field day with that. That's what happens. Yeah, you don't open your mouth. Alright, so you went to Northwestern, that's a whole different environment.   Bradley Akubuiro  31:59 Totally different environment. And, you know, I gotta tell you, I owe a ton to Northwestern. The exposure, it gave me two more global mindsets, people come to that university from all over the world, all kinds of different socioeconomic backgrounds, and looking to do so many different things, the academic rigor of the institution, and the resources that were at our disposal, were so incredible that it completely changed my experience. And frankly, the outlook I had for my own self and career. How so? Well, I'll put his way I went to school, for example, at the same time, as you know, students who had some similar backgrounds to the one I did, to being in school at the same time, as you know, Howard Buffett is the grandson of Warren Buffett, and you know, Bill polti, you know, whose grandson of, you know, the polti, you know, the namesake of Pulte Homes, and you know, literally billionaire families. And so you start to realize, if you can sit in a classroom with folks like this, and with all of the opportunities that they've had, the education, they've had private schools, things along those lines, and these are good friends, by the way, you know, when you can do that, and then realize, hey, you know what, I can keep up, I can do this. And then you know, you are receiving, you know, grades professors who support you opportunities, in terms of internships, all of these things, and realms that you never even considered possible even just a year or two earlier. It truly broadens your horizons in ways that I don't even think I could have appreciated before I was into it.   Michael Hingson  33:44 Wow. And that makes a lot of sense, though. We're all we're all people. And we all have our own gifts. And the fact that you could compete is probably not necessarily the best word because it implies that there are things that we don't need to have, but you are all able to work together and that you can all succeed. That's as good as it gets.   Bradley Akubuiro  34:05 That's exactly right. And I do find compared to a lot of places, Northwestern have a very collaborative culture. I found that, you know, from faculty, the staff to students, everybody was very interested in seeing everybody succeed. And you know, we believed truthfully, that all of us could there's enough room on the boat for all of us.   Michael Hingson  34:29 What was your major journalism? No surprise being Northwestern?   Bradley Akubuiro  34:36 Yeah, I was I was a big, big, big proponent of the journalism school and actually still remain affiliated. I'm on the faculty over there and sit on the board of the journalism school and have loved every second of my time, wearing the purple t shirt.   Michael Hingson  34:52 There you go. Is my recollection. Correct? Wasn't Charlton Heston, a graduate of Northwestern?   Bradley Akubuiro  34:57 You know, I don't know the answer to that but I will wouldn't be surprised if it really seems,   Michael Hingson  35:02 it seems to me, I heard that he was doing something where he was he was doing something for Northwestern, as I recall. But that just strikes my memory.   Bradley Akubuiro  35:12 Yeah, there's some very remarkable graduates from that organization.   Michael Hingson  35:16 So you were involved, as I recall, in our conversations about and about such things in dealing with minority enrollment, and so on, and you met some pretty interesting people during your time there. Tell me about that, if you would?   Bradley Akubuiro  35:32 Yeah, no, absolutely. So my freshman year, we will actually, this was my sophomore year, we actually only brought in 81 black freshmen. And that was the lowest number in terms of black enrollment in a given year at Northwestern since the 1960s. And so, you know, the university was looking around and trying to figure out what what is it that we're doing? And where are we missing the mark? And how do we not only attract black applicants, because we were able to get folks to apply? The challenge was to actually get them to choose to matriculate. And where are we losing folks in the process. And so, you know, I had been really, really interested in participating in some of the work around minority recruitment enrollment, from the time that Northwestern had recruited me, because I recognized my background wasn't necessarily what you would consider to be orthodox for the folks that got into schools like this. But they took a real hard look at me and said, We think this guy can be successful here. And I wanted to encourage others who might not necessarily think of Northwestern as an option that was attainable to them, and I don't even know about it, to really start to understand the opportunities that could be available to them. And so I was, you know, flying to different schools, not only in the Chicago area, but back in places that looked a lot like where I grew up, and telling, you know, folks, Northwestern wants you, and you should really give it a shot. And so that was a fascinating time for me, and my own development, that space.   Michael Hingson  37:11 So what did you do for the school and dealing with the whole issue of minorities in that time?   Bradley Akubuiro  37:19 Yeah, there were a handful of things. You know, there's there's one was how do you create programs that channel some of the frustration that a lot of students who look like me had, and so a number of folks, actually, this is the spirit of college students, gotten together, you know, put up signs and decided to kind of protest. And so instead of going through, and just kind of registering our anger, what I did was work with the admissions office. And I did actually formally work as a work study student and worked on some of the stuff, it wasn't just volunteer, but take this energy that the students had, and create programs like a pen pal program, like a fly in programs, some volunteer initiatives that we can have, that would allow students who are upset about the outcomes, to help change those outcomes by direct engagement with those who might come to Northwestern, and really improve our metrics for the following year. And we were able to do that, both in the African American and Latino communities. What did   Michael Hingson  38:23 you discover? Or what did the university discover about why people might apply, but then didn't matriculate. And then how did you turn that around?   Bradley Akubuiro  38:32 Yeah, there were a couple of things. So one was, for students who are getting into places like Northwestern, very commonly, we saw that they were getting into places like University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, Harvard, a number of other universities at the same time, particularly if you were to think about the minority students who are applying and getting in, and what those schools had, that Northwestern didn't quite have, was full need blind admissions processes, which Northwestern did adopt. But the short version of this is, if you got into one of those schools, you are probably going to be able to get if this if your circumstances required a full ride. And so, you know, the economic opportunity was really significant. And you were at a disadvantage. If you were a student who was interested in going to Northwestern, or any of these other schools that was really good, but couldn't you couldn't afford to go and you're gonna go to the place that you could afford to go and maybe that's your local school, or maybe that's one of these other schools, but we had to really do something to create the funding to ensure that these folks could go to the school and do it at a at a rate that wasn't going to break the bag.   Michael Hingson  39:49 And you found ways to do that. Well, I   Bradley Akubuiro  39:52 certainly didn't do it alone, but the university   39:55 there see University found ways to do that. Yes, that's right.   40:00 We started up a commission. So a number of students, myself included, foreign petition at the time, Marty Shapiro, who was the President of University took this issue very seriously as a economic scholar, and genuinely his background is in the economics of higher education. And he started at the school as president, while I was in again, my sophomore year, as a lot of these things were kind of taking shape and taking hold. And as one of the most successful leaders that I've met, invited us in students, the leaders in the university who are focused on this, and we had asked for a taskforce to focus on this. And he set one up, and he chaired it. And it was focused on how do we create opportunities for access, particularly for this community that had need, but wanted to be here. And, you know, one of the things that he did pretty early on in his tenure, was to establish a fund that was going to be dedicated to programs to financial need to a number of different things that would directly address this community. And we built on it from there.   41:14 Wow, that's, it's great that you had a strong champion who was willing to be farsighted enough to help with that, isn't it?   Bradley Akubuiro  41:22 Absolutely. It would not have been possible without that.   Michael Hingson  41:25 So you met as I recall you saying Jesse Jackson, somewhere along the way? in that arena, especially since you're in the Chicago area? That makes a lot of sense.   Bradley Akubuiro  41:35 Yeah, you know what I'm starting to put together thanks to you hear that this was a pretty big year for me.   Michael Hingson  41:41 To see, I'm getting impressed. So I did about yourself.   Bradley Akubuiro  41:50 You know, it's funny. But yeah, there was a convergence of things. And so in this particular year, I did meet Reverend Jesse Jackson. And this started a relationship that's been incredible and life changing that remains to this day. But the way that it happened, Michael, is that there was a woman Roxana Saberi, who had been taken political prisoner by Iran, and she worked for the BBC. She had been a former Northwestern middle student. So a number of us who are part of the journalism program, Adele had decided that we were going to get together and as college students are wanting to do, we decided to protest and hopes that we would, on our campus in Evanston, get the State Department to pay more attention to this particular issue. And hopefully, it takes negotiating for her really seriously. And while I have no idea whether, at the time Secretary Clinton saw anything we were doing, my guess, is probably not Reverend Jackson, who to your point was just on the other side of Chicago did. And the connection there is Roxanne's buried, did her first interview with the BBC as a professional reporter with Reverend Jesse Jackson. And he was committed to advocating for her release. And so he actually reached out to us, via the university asked a few of us to come down and join a press conference with him, where he intended to go and negotiate for her release on humanitarian grounds. And I participated in that with another student. And it was absolutely phenomenal and led to so many doors being opened for me.   Michael Hingson  43:35 Wow, what your were you in school at the time?   Bradley Akubuiro  43:38 So this was my sophomore year. Great, great. Again, still part of the great sophomore year. Yeah, and I continue to work with Reverend Jackson, throughout the remainder of my time in college and for some period after college. But there were a number of things, but it all tied back together, because the issue that Reverend Jackson was advocating for at the time that spoke most deeply to me, was this issue of college affordability and access, and you have this program called reduce the rate, which was all about reducing the interest rate on student education loans, because we had bailed out banks. And you know, the autos and so many others, rates of zero to 1% and said, Hey, you're in trouble pass back when you're ready. We'll make it cheap and affordable for you to do that. But we never granted that level of grace to students who are supposed to be our future. And instead, we were breaking their backs was, you know, interest rates of six to in some cases, as high as 18%. Without any, you know, kind of recourse you get stuck with these things for life.   Michael Hingson  44:47 And people wonder why we keep talking about eliminating the loans today or lowering the interest rate and the reality is, as you said, students are our future and we should be doing all we can to say point that that's absolutely   Bradley Akubuiro  45:01 right. I still firmly believe that and, you know, our loan system, and frankly, the cost of education is just crippling. It's, it's, it's crazy. And this is for multiple generations. And I'm sad for what the future will look like if we can't figure this situation out.   Michael Hingson  45:23 Yeah, we've got to do something different than we're doing. And it's just kind of crazy the way it is. It's extremely unfortunate. Well, so you got a bachelor's? Did you go get any advanced degree or?   Bradley Akubuiro  45:36 Well, I did actually attend Northwestern. For a good portion, I masters that integrated the integrated marketing communications program over there. And that dovetails really well into where my career ultimately went and where it currently resides. But you know, Northwestern was the educator of choice for me.   Michael Hingson  45:57 So, career wise, so what did you then go off and do? Since you opened the door? Yeah.   Bradley Akubuiro  46:03 So you know, it's been a number of different things. And this will sound disparate, but it all comes together. I went, after working with Reverend Jackson to Liberia, and I spent time in Liberia working for the president of Liberia on postwar kind of reestablishment of a democracy, which was a big thing. And frankly, way above my paygrade, I got an opportunity to work on it, because I had spent time working with Reverend Jesse Jackson, and that will come back in a second. But there was a student who was doing his PhD program at Northwestern, who had been who is I should say, the grandson of a former president of Liberia, who had been killed in a coup in October. And I had been friends with him, I knew that I wanted to get to West Africa to do some work, particularly around education and social programs. And he connected me with his mother who had been deputy minister of education. And I had been fortunate enough to create an arrangement that I was really excited about to go to Monrovia, and Liberia, the capital city, and to spend some time working on programs out there. And when she found out that I worked with Reverend Jesse Jackson, she called the president and said, This could be a great opportunity. And they cooked up a program where I would actually champion and work on establishing a program and policy around leadership development, and capacity building for the country post Civil War, which was, again, an absolutely amazing and life changing experience, really hard.   Michael Hingson  47:45 What was the world like over there? And what was it like for you being from a completely different culture as it were than over in Liberia?   Bradley Akubuiro  47:53 Well, the first thing I'll say is, if you live in the United States, and you believe, you know, poverty, you ain't seen nothing yet. Because, you know, one of the things that you will find in countries like Liberia, and some of the places and post war, Eastern Europe and the 90s, and different kinds of places is, there is a level of resilience and a level of spirit that is built into society that comes almost entirely from experience with incredible hardship, just absolutely incredible hardship. And Liberia at the time that I was over there was amongst the, you know, five poorest countries in the world, after what had been 14 years of concrete civil war and 30 years of civil unrest. But the people that I met could not have been better spirited, and just nicer, more optimistic and incredible people.   Michael Hingson  48:52 So how long were you over there?   48:54 I was over there for less than a year and spent some time doing consulting, even after I came back to DC, but was on the ground for less than a year.   49:03 And when you came back from Liberia, what did you go off and do?   49:07 When I came back from Liberia and I want to, you know, couch this and my rationale, I had worked for Reverend Jesse Jackson on these big kind of global programs that that presidents and heads of state and you know, business leaders and all these different folks went over to Liberia and got this chance to work on, you know, kind of reinstituting a democracy and meaningful ways with the president who later on became a Nobel Prize, Peace Prize Laureate. And you know, what I came to realize, Michael, was that my opportunities were quickly outpacing my experience. And so what I said is, let's now try to find a place where I can get some of the fundamentals some of the framework for a lot of the work that I had the opportunity to do. And the place that I chose to go is Booz Allen Hamilton is a management consulting firm and you One of the largest public sector practices in the world. And so I went in with the intention of really being able to shore up my skills. And what happened? Well, hopefully they'll tell you that I was successful.   Michael Hingson  50:11 Okay, good.   Bradley Akubuiro  50:16 It was a really fascinating time to be there. You know, Booz Allen, had a lot of significant contracts. This was the time of the Affordable Care Act's passage. And so, you know, at the time that I went over, I got to work almost exclusively on ACA, and a lot is talked about in terms of the legislative kind of process to get that accomplished. But what is talked a lot less about is the actual opera operationalization of it, and what that looks like to stand up state health exchanges, and different states to actually entice somebody coming from, you know, a psychiatry program at top medical school, that choose to put on a uniform and go to a base at, you know, an Air Force base or an army base, and provide clinical care for those who are returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan. And all of these were provisions of the bill. But actually implementing those things, was a very tall order. And so I got an opportunity to really kind of roll up my sleeves and work on a lot of that work. And that was incredibly formative work.   Michael Hingson  51:22 So it was a real challenge, of course, to get the Affordable Care Act passed. I remember in 2009, I was speaking at a an event for a companies whose hospital boards and leaders of the staffs of the hospitals in the network, were getting together and I went to, to speak, and talk about some of my experiences and talk about disabilities and so on. The person right before me, was a medical expert. He was, it was a person who talked about the whole concept of how we needed to change our whole idea and environment of medical care, and what we really needed to do as a country and so on. And he had been involved in every president's investigation of how to change the medical synth system. Ever since I think he went this was 2009, I think he went back to Nixon, Oh, wow. He, he said it all came down to the same thing. And he said The best example is, he was doing this as part of the team for Bill Clinton. And they talked about what needed to be done, how to change the medical system, and everybody bought into it, and so on, until it got down to specifics of saying what it was going to cost. And that they needed to deal with some of the provisions that eventually went into the Affordable Care Act. And he said, As soon as the politicians got a hold of it, and said, This is a horrible thing, you're gonna cause too much controversy, the President's would all run. And that's why no one ever got anything accomplished. And he also said that Obama was probably going to get something passed. And he actually predicted almost to a tee, if you will, what was going to pass. And that's exactly what passed and what didn't pass. And he said, later, we'll actually start to worry about the cost of, of medical coverage in this country, but they're not really willing to face that issue yet. And he predicted we would be able to do something by 2015. Well, that hasn't really happened yet, either. And now we're maybe making a little bit of a dent. But it was very fascinating to listen to him predict, based on so many years of expertise, what was going to happen.   Bradley Akubuiro  53:46 Yeah, I mean, that's incredible. And I will say, a lot of times the policy takes a backseat to the politics on these things. And it takes so much, you know, Will and kind of moral fortitude to get in there and drive these things, particularly when there's interests on the other side of it. But you know, I'm with you. We're not quite where I think you predicted we'd be in 2015. But driving towards it now. And hopefully we'll make more progress.   Michael Hingson  54:16 Yeah, we're slowly getting there. So what did you do after Booz Allen Hamilton?   Bradley Akubuiro  54:21 Yeah, so the things that I really love the most about that work during that time that the the change in a lot of that kind of management strategy was the change communications aspects of it. And so I knew that I wanted to get more fully into communications. And so the next few jobs for me, were discretely corporate communications, if you will. And so I got an opportunity to follow a mentor to a company called Pratt and Whitney jet engine company, you know, builds jet engines from from fighter jets to, you know, the big commercial airplanes that we fly in, and love that experience. It's moved to kind of the corporate side of that company to United Technologies in time and worked on a number of different mergers and acquisitions, including the spin offs of Otis, the big Elevator Company to carry air conditioning both of these which spun off into fortune 200 publicly traded companies their own, to ultimately what became you know, the merger with Raytheon. Raytheon? Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It most recently produced Raytheon technologies. And so a really, really fascinating set of experiences for me there. And then   Michael Hingson  55:35 you along the way, also, I guess, we're part of the formation of bully pulpit international with the Obama Biden administration.   Bradley Akubuiro  55:44 You know, I wasn't part of the founding, this all kind of happened in parallel with folks who I have a ton of respect for who I now work with bully pulpit, interact was formed in 2009, with a number of folks who came out of that Obama campaign, and then White House. And it started in the kind of digital marketing, digital persuasion space, and all of the kind of, you know, really amazing tactics and strategies that they learned on that campaign, particularly, as social media was starting to become more popularized and more mass adopted, they said, how do we start to apply some of that stuff, as you think about not only other campaigns, but to foundations and advocacy groups into corporations? And you know, you flash forward 1213 years now, and this is a fully operational 250 person agency, where we're focused on, you know, how do you help organizations of all types, you know, really express their values and find their voices on these really key important issues. But also, how do leaders make really tough decisions on things like, you know, Roe v. Wade, and what that means for their employee base, and what they're going to do policy wise, and how they're going to communicate around that afterwards? On through gun reform, and what folks do if you know, you are operating, and buffalo or in Texas, when you know, some of the massacres that happened earlier this year happen. And this has been, you know, really fascinating. And I came over here after being chief spokesperson for Boeing. And it's been really fun to reunite with some old friends and folks who have been doing this kind of work for a really long time now.   Michael Hingson  57:37 So Boeing, so when did you leave Boeing   Bradley Akubuiro  57:41 left Boeing, a year, just shy of a year and a half go   Michael Hingson  57:45 around during the whole 737 Max thing?   Bradley Akubuiro  57:49 Well, you know, interestingly, you bring this up, I was brought over to Boeing, in response to the 737. Max, you know, I was asked to come over and to really think about what does a world class Media Relations organization look like? That is going to be transparent, accountable, and 24/7? Around the globe? And more than anything, after you've had, you know, two accidents on the scale that they had, you know, how do we really become more human and how we interact with all of our stakeholders, internal and external on a lot of this stuff? And that was a really, really, really challenging, but rewarding process to be part of and to help lead?   Michael Hingson  58:33 How do you advise people? Or what do you advise people in those kinds of situations, you had a major crisis? And clearly, there's an issue? What do you what do you tell corporate executives to do? And how hard was it to get them to do it?   Bradley Akubuiro  58:49 Yeah. So on the first part of that question, it really comes down to being human, you got to put yourself in the shoes of the people that you're trying to communicate with, and to, if you are a person who lost a loved one, on a plane that went down outside of, you know, Addis Ababa, and Ethiopia, if you if you were, you know, one of the people who lost your, your spouse or your kid, you know, the last thing you want to hear from a company is, you know, we did things right, from an engineering standpoint, what you want to hear from that company, is, we are so sorry that this happened. And we're going to do absolutely everything in our power to ensure it can never happen again. And here are the steps we're taking and here's what we're going to do to try to make things right and you can never completely make things right. In that circumstance. You can at least be understanding.   Michael Hingson  59:48 I remember 1982 When we had the Tylenol cyanide incident, you know about that. Yeah. And if For us, and what was the most impressive thing about that was within two days, the president of company was out in front of it. And as you said, being human, that's a corporate lesson that more people really should learn.   Bradley Akubuiro  1:00:18 Yeah, it's a difficult thing to do. Because I think, and this isn't just lawyers, but it's easy to blame it on lawyers, the natural reaction is to immediately think, well, what's my liability going to be? What are people going to think if they think that I actually did make this mistake? And how do I cover it up? And how do I try to diffuse responsibility? And that is exactly the opposite of what you should do. And this isn't just good communications. This is good leadership.   Michael Hingson  1:00:44 Good leadership. Yeah,   Bradley Akubuiro  1:00:45 that's right. And we need more people to really understand that to your point.   Michael Hingson  1:00:50 Well, and with with Boeing, it sounds like if I recall, all of the stuff that least that we saw on the news, which may or may not have been totally accurate, there were some issues. And it took a while to deal with some of that to get people to, to face what occurred that necessarily things weren't going exactly the way they really should have in terms of what people were communicating and what people knew and didn't know.   Bradley Akubuiro  1:01:15 Yeah, well, then you ask the question, how difficult was it to get the senior executives to get on board with the new approach. And what I would say is, and this goes back to some of we were talking about earlier, the top down kind of approach to this, and what's happening and the most senior role matters the most. And the CEO who came in this was after the former CEO was was like, you know, the chief legal officer, the head of that business, and a number of different executives, you keep going on, had exited the company, the new CEO, who came in they've Calhoun, currently is still the CEO, they're brought in this new wave, this refreshing new approach and culture, and was all about how do we ensure that we are being accountable, and that we're being transparent, because that is what matters in this circumstance. And so with that license to operate, it was a lot easier to come in and convince folks Well, this is how we should approach this from a media perspective, from a communications staff perspective, and across the board, with our customers with regulators, cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Because everybody was on board that this is what we needed to do. And frankly, it's the only way to not only repair our reputation, because this is 100 year old company has been at the first of so many different things historically, from an aviation standpoint, and helped truly invent modern flight. So how do you create a reputation that people expect coming out of that, but also to respect again, those who trusted the company, because when you step on a fly, you know, you know, as Michael, when you stop on a flight, you don't want to think about whether it's gonna make it to the other side or not. You want to trust that it's gonna make it to the other side and focus on what you got to do when you get there and everything else in your life. And people had for a brief period of time lost that faith. And that is what we were really trying to restore.   Michael Hingson  1:03:15 Do you think you were pretty successful at getting faith and confidence restored,   Bradley Akubuiro  1:03:20 I think we've made a good start at bone still remains a client. And I would say that the work that is ongoing is going to take time, because it takes five seconds to lose your reputation. It takes a long time to rebuild it and to regain trust. And I think the company is committed to what it needs to do to do that. But it is a journey.   Michael Hingson  1:03:44 What do you advise people today you do a lot of consulting, and you're in

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Hat Radio: The Show that Schmoozes
Avrum Schmoozes with Wimpy Waitress, Dody Gebre

Hat Radio: The Show that Schmoozes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 58:14


In show 2 of ‘The Avrum Rosensweig Show', host Avrum schmoozes with a very special person - Dody Gebre. Dody is from Ethiopia and a waitress in Toronto at the famous, Wimpy's Diner. She speaks endearingly about her place of birth, Addis Ababa, her very very large family and her experiences in Canada both as a new comer and a server. Dody is highly complementary of Canadians and insightful about her work. Listen to this elegant women share the inside scoop on tipping, challenging clients and the 8 tips for good waitressing. Remember too, to schmooze with strangers and learn more about your community and yourself! Life is good.

The Daily Update
Iranian climber competes without headscarf, Nile dam dispute - Trending

The Daily Update

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 2:04


Trending Middle East brings you the latest social media and search trends from the Middle East and around the world. On today's episode, in an apparent act of defiance, Iranian rock climber Elnaz Rekabi competes without a headscarf at the Asian Sport Climbing Championships. Media reports differ as to where Rekabi is now after the event in South Korea.   President Abdel Fattah El Sisi says Egypt is determined to do everything it can to resolve its dispute with Ethiopia over the potential effect from a hydroelectric dam Addis Ababa is building on the Nile. Cairo has long complained that the dam would reduce its share of the Nile waters.   An archaeological park unveiled in northern Iraq this week dates back more than 2,700 years to the rule of the Assyrians. The area in Faida comprises 13 monumental rock-carving reliefs in the walls of an irrigation canal. The carvings show kings praying to gods.   Saudi Arabia's King Salman said that Iran must co-operate with the International Atomic Energy Agency and the global community if it wants to revive the 2015 nuclear deal. Efforts to save the accord have faced several stumbling blocks, including Iran's continued nuclear advances and the recent crackdown on protesters.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Oct. 15, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the recent developments in the West African state of Burkina Faso where Capt. Ibrahim Traore has been inaugurated as head-of-state; the government of Uganda has declared a partial lockdown amid the spread of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in sections of the East African country; the Chinese Communist Party has begun its 20th Congress in Beijing; and some elements in Russia are saying that NATO cannot prevail in Ukraine. In the second hour we look in detail at the recently formed coalition government in Lesotho where the Revolution for Prosperity Party (RFP) won the majority of votes. We then look at the current status of Africa-United States relations. Finally, we hear a briefing from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 194:00


Listen to the Sun. Oct. 9, 2022 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features a PANW report with dispatches on the election results from the Kingdom of Lesotho where the newly-formed Revolution for Prosperity (RFP) Party has taken a strong lead in the counting; the military leaders of Burkina Faso have announced a transitional charter process which will unfold in the coming months; solidarity between Ghana and Ethiopia has been highlighted at an event held in Addis Ababa over the weekend; and the Greek foreign minister has arrived in Egypt to discuss the role of Turkey in the ongoing Libya crisis. In the second hour we look in-depth at the elections in Lesotho with analysts on the ground inside the Southern African state. South African President Cyril Ramaphosa is launching a renewal campaign to enhance electoral support for the ruling African National Congress (ANC). Also, we hear a speech delivered by President Ramaphosa to the South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU). Finally, we review a briefing from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

African Catholic Voices
Fr Joe Healey speaks on African theology, calls for Married Priests in Africa to meet the Eucharistic hunger in Africa, and a welcoming African Church for Same-Sex Persons

African Catholic Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 43:10


In this concluding discussion, Maryknoll priest, professor, communicator and small Christian community pioneer in Africa, Fr Joe Healey, celebrates the development and achievement of African theology. He calls for a more creative church in Africa and hopes for a day when the Catholic Church in Africa will begin to ordain married men as priests. He sees this as an important item to be discussed in the synodal encounter of the African continent in Addis Ababa. He also bemoans the plight of same-sex persons in Africa and calls on the Church in Africa to welcome them rather than deny their existence in Africa. 

Together by AGCI
Adoptive Moms Visit the House of Hope

Together by AGCI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 30:08


We have the opportunity to meet AGCI Ethiopia adoptive moms Kerri Dawson and Camille Bendick. They have recently returned from visiting the Tim Tebow Foundation &AGCI House of Hope in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Today we get to hear stories about what they experienced, all they learned, and why they believe this home will make a positive difference in the beautiful country of Ethiopia.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Sept. 17, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the visit by South African President Cyril Ramaphosa to the United States; the Cameroon government has enhanced security in the capital of Yaounde; Nigerian military forces say that rebels in the Sambisa Forest have been forced to flee due to flooding and aerial strikes; and the recently reelected Angolan President Joao Lourenco has promised additional reforms during his current term of office. In the second hour we look in detail at the talks between U.S. President Joe Biden and his South African counterpart Cyril Ramaphosa in Washington, D.C. ahead of the upcoming United Nations General Assembly in New York City. Finally, we hear a briefing from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Chefs Without Restaurants
Luladey Moges on Ethiopian Cooking and Her New Cookbook Enebla: Recipes From an Ethiopian Kitchen

Chefs Without Restaurants

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 42:14 Transcription Available


This week, I speak with Luladey Moges. She's the author of the new cookbook Enebla: Recipes From an Ethiopian Kitchen. Growing up, first in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa and then in the United States, she learned the art of traditional Ethiopian cuisine from her grandmother, mother, and aunts. She has long been an enthusiastic home cook, introducing the tastes of Ethiopian cuisine to her friends in North America. At the same time, her career in hospitality and fine dining management has taught her what it takes to build a balanced menu and impress discerning gourmands.People love Ethiopian cuisine for its unique combination of spices, aromas, and sociability. Dishes are served to be shared with family and friends, and unlike many cuisines, Ethiopian food has traditions of vegetarianism that make it particularly popular among meat-free cooks and diners. However, it can seem baffling to the outsider. Where can you get spicy berbere? How do you make injera? And doesn't it all take hours to prepare?In Enebla (which means let's eat!) you'll learn how to prepare aromatic wot stews, hearty tibs, breakfast scrambles, colourful salads, authentic injera sourdough flatbread, and even how to enjoy a traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremony. Key Takeaways 08:24   The Impact of Moving to the United States13:58   The process of writing a cookbook.26:22   Ethiopian Food is Kid Friendly and Delicious32:23  The Different Ways Ethiopians and Americans Prepare CoffeeLULADEY MOGESLula's InstagramBuy the Enebla CookbookCHEFS WITHOUT RESTAURANTSIf you enjoy the show, and would like to support it financially, check out our Patreon, or you can donate through Venmo or Buy Me a Coffee. Get the Chefs Without Restaurants NewsletterVisit Our Amazon Store (we get paid when you buy stuff)Private Facebook groupChefs Without Restaurants InstagramFounder Chris Spear's personal chef business Perfect Little BitesSponsor- The United States Personal Chef AssociationOver the past 30 years, the world of the personal chef has grown in importance to fulfill those dining needs. While the pandemic certainly upended the restaurant experience, it allowed personal chefs to close that dining gap.  Central to all of that is the United States Personal Chef Association.Representing nearly 1,000 chefs around the US and Canada.  USPCA provides a strategic backbone for those chefs that includes liability insurance, training, communications, certification, and more. It's a reassurance to consumers that the chef coming into their home is prepared to offer them an experience with their meal. USPCA provides training to become a Personal Chef through our Preparatory Membership.  Looking to showcase your products or services to our chefs and their clients, partnership opportunities are available. Call Angela today at 800-995-2138 ext 705 or email her at aprather@uspca.com for membership and partner info.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 194:00


Listen to the Sun. Sept. 11, 2022 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. This episode features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the growing African carbon market on the continent in light of climate change; in addition, the demand for fossil fuels in Africa has shed new light on the shifting international energy market; efforts are underway to protect the African Rain Forest in the central regions of the continent; and in South Africa a program to close the digital divide has gained media attention. In the second hour we look back on the legendary poet, playwright, composer, novelist and public intellectual Langston Hughes through rare archival audio files. Finally, we listen to a briefing from the African Center for Disease Control & Prevention (ACDC) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The John Batchelor Show
#ClassicGregoryCopley: #Ethiopia: Nine months ago in Addis Ababa: Abiy rolls back the TPLF; & What is to be done? Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 14:16


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #ClassicGregoryCopley: #Ethiopia: Nine months ago in Addis Ababa: Abiy rolls back the TPLF; & What is to be done? Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs.   https://www.voanews.com/a/us-envoy-feltman-to-visit-ethiopia-thursday-meet-with-officials-/6382650.html

10% Happier with Dan Harris
496: Why Calm Is More Effective Than Reactivity | Bonus Meditation with Sebene Selassie

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 6:10 Very Popular


Hope is a skill. Using the phrase ‘let it be' invites us to be more relaxed with life and lets us envision a better world.About Sebene Selassie:Growing up, Sebene felt like a big weirdo. Born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and raised in white neighborhoods in Washington, D.C., she was a tomboy Black girl who loved Monty Python and UB40. She never believed she belonged. Thirty years ago, she began studying Buddhism as an undergraduate at McGill University where she majored in Comparative Religious Studies. Now, Sebene is a teacher, author, and speaker who teaches that meditation can help us remember our inherent sense of belonging, that our individual freedom affects absolutely everyone and everything, and that our collective freedom depends on each and every one of us. To find this meditation in the Ten Percent Happier app, you can search for “Learn Acceptance, Spark Hope,” or click here: https://10percenthappier.app.link/content?meditation=0c9bda64-63da-44ed-8569-cfb9bd3d38cc.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Radio Vagabond
ETHIOPIA (Flashback Fridag)

The Radio Vagabond

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 24:03


Welcome to Flashback Friday. Join me in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in The Radio Vagabond's episode. I happen to be there when they celebrate the biggest religious event of the year – a celebration called Timkat.  This one was first released in July 2019.

Radiovagabond med Palle Bo fra rejse hele verden rundt

Welcome to Flashback Friday. Join me in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in this episode. I happen to be there when they celebrate the biggest religious event of the year – a celebration called Timkat.  This one was first released in July 2019.

The John Batchelor Show
#Ethiopia: Lavrov in Addis Ababa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 10:30


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Ethiopia: Lavrov in Addis Ababa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs https://www.fanabc.com/english/russian-foreign-minister-sergey-lavrov-arrives-in-addis-ababa/

New Books in Italian Studies
Ian Campbell, "The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame" (Hurst, 2017)

New Books in Italian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 112:07


In February 1937, following an abortive attack by a handful of insurgents on Mussolini's High Command in Italian-occupied Ethiopia, 'repression squads' of armed Blackshirts and Fascist civilians were unleashed on the defenseless residents of Addis Ababa. In three terror-filled days and nights of arson, murder and looting, thousands of innocent and unsuspecting men, women and children were roasted alive, shot, bludgeoned, stabbed to death, or blown to pieces with hand-grenades. Meanwhile the notorious Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani, infamous for his atrocities in Libya, took the opportunity to add to the carnage by eliminating the intelligentsia and nobility of the ancient Ethiopian empire in a pogrom that swept across the land. In The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame (Hurst, 2017), Ian Campbell reconstructs and analyses one of Fascist Italy's least known atrocities, which he estimates eliminated 19-20 per cent of the capital's population. He exposes the hitherto little known cover-up conducted at the highest levels of the British government, which enabled the facts of one of the most hideous civilian massacres of all time to be concealed, and the perpetrators to walk free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/italian-studies

New Books in Genocide Studies
Ian Campbell, "The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame" (Hurst, 2017)

New Books in Genocide Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 112:07


In February 1937, following an abortive attack by a handful of insurgents on Mussolini's High Command in Italian-occupied Ethiopia, 'repression squads' of armed Blackshirts and Fascist civilians were unleashed on the defenseless residents of Addis Ababa. In three terror-filled days and nights of arson, murder and looting, thousands of innocent and unsuspecting men, women and children were roasted alive, shot, bludgeoned, stabbed to death, or blown to pieces with hand-grenades. Meanwhile the notorious Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani, infamous for his atrocities in Libya, took the opportunity to add to the carnage by eliminating the intelligentsia and nobility of the ancient Ethiopian empire in a pogrom that swept across the land. In The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame (Hurst, 2017), Ian Campbell reconstructs and analyses one of Fascist Italy's least known atrocities, which he estimates eliminated 19-20 per cent of the capital's population. He exposes the hitherto little known cover-up conducted at the highest levels of the British government, which enabled the facts of one of the most hideous civilian massacres of all time to be concealed, and the perpetrators to walk free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

New Books in Military History
Ian Campbell, "The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame" (Hurst, 2017)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 112:07


In February 1937, following an abortive attack by a handful of insurgents on Mussolini's High Command in Italian-occupied Ethiopia, 'repression squads' of armed Blackshirts and Fascist civilians were unleashed on the defenseless residents of Addis Ababa. In three terror-filled days and nights of arson, murder and looting, thousands of innocent and unsuspecting men, women and children were roasted alive, shot, bludgeoned, stabbed to death, or blown to pieces with hand-grenades. Meanwhile the notorious Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani, infamous for his atrocities in Libya, took the opportunity to add to the carnage by eliminating the intelligentsia and nobility of the ancient Ethiopian empire in a pogrom that swept across the land. In The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame (Hurst, 2017), Ian Campbell reconstructs and analyses one of Fascist Italy's least known atrocities, which he estimates eliminated 19-20 per cent of the capital's population. He exposes the hitherto little known cover-up conducted at the highest levels of the British government, which enabled the facts of one of the most hideous civilian massacres of all time to be concealed, and the perpetrators to walk free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in History
Ian Campbell, "The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame" (Hurst, 2017)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 112:07


In February 1937, following an abortive attack by a handful of insurgents on Mussolini's High Command in Italian-occupied Ethiopia, 'repression squads' of armed Blackshirts and Fascist civilians were unleashed on the defenseless residents of Addis Ababa. In three terror-filled days and nights of arson, murder and looting, thousands of innocent and unsuspecting men, women and children were roasted alive, shot, bludgeoned, stabbed to death, or blown to pieces with hand-grenades. Meanwhile the notorious Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani, infamous for his atrocities in Libya, took the opportunity to add to the carnage by eliminating the intelligentsia and nobility of the ancient Ethiopian empire in a pogrom that swept across the land. In The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame (Hurst, 2017), Ian Campbell reconstructs and analyses one of Fascist Italy's least known atrocities, which he estimates eliminated 19-20 per cent of the capital's population. He exposes the hitherto little known cover-up conducted at the highest levels of the British government, which enabled the facts of one of the most hideous civilian massacres of all time to be concealed, and the perpetrators to walk free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African Studies
Ian Campbell, "The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame" (Hurst, 2017)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 112:07


In February 1937, following an abortive attack by a handful of insurgents on Mussolini's High Command in Italian-occupied Ethiopia, 'repression squads' of armed Blackshirts and Fascist civilians were unleashed on the defenseless residents of Addis Ababa. In three terror-filled days and nights of arson, murder and looting, thousands of innocent and unsuspecting men, women and children were roasted alive, shot, bludgeoned, stabbed to death, or blown to pieces with hand-grenades. Meanwhile the notorious Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani, infamous for his atrocities in Libya, took the opportunity to add to the carnage by eliminating the intelligentsia and nobility of the ancient Ethiopian empire in a pogrom that swept across the land. In The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame (Hurst, 2017), Ian Campbell reconstructs and analyses one of Fascist Italy's least known atrocities, which he estimates eliminated 19-20 per cent of the capital's population. He exposes the hitherto little known cover-up conducted at the highest levels of the British government, which enabled the facts of one of the most hideous civilian massacres of all time to be concealed, and the perpetrators to walk free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books Network
Ian Campbell, "The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame" (Hurst, 2017)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 112:07


In February 1937, following an abortive attack by a handful of insurgents on Mussolini's High Command in Italian-occupied Ethiopia, 'repression squads' of armed Blackshirts and Fascist civilians were unleashed on the defenseless residents of Addis Ababa. In three terror-filled days and nights of arson, murder and looting, thousands of innocent and unsuspecting men, women and children were roasted alive, shot, bludgeoned, stabbed to death, or blown to pieces with hand-grenades. Meanwhile the notorious Viceroy Rodolfo Graziani, infamous for his atrocities in Libya, took the opportunity to add to the carnage by eliminating the intelligentsia and nobility of the ancient Ethiopian empire in a pogrom that swept across the land. In The Addis Ababa Massacre: Italy's National Shame (Hurst, 2017), Ian Campbell reconstructs and analyses one of Fascist Italy's least known atrocities, which he estimates eliminated 19-20 per cent of the capital's population. He exposes the hitherto little known cover-up conducted at the highest levels of the British government, which enabled the facts of one of the most hideous civilian massacres of all time to be concealed, and the perpetrators to walk free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast
APG 534 – Egad! What a CAD!

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 179:26 Very Popular


[00:03:09] NEWS [00:03:27] Incident: PIA B772 and PIA A320 Over Iran, TCAS Saves the Day [00:15:31] TUI B738 at Aberdeen on Sep 11th 2021, Deviation from Flightpath During Go Around [00:44:51] FEEDBACK [00:45:00] Capt. Nigel - Bang Seats [00:55:27] GETTING TO KNOW US [01:12:10] PLANE TALE - The Battle Above the Somme [01:38:15] NEWS [01:38:32] Incident: Ethiopian B738 at Addis Ababa on Aug 15th 2022, Pilots Asleep [01:57:19] Accident: Angara AN24 at Ust-Kut on Aug 17th 2022, Wing Tip Strike on Landing [01:59:50] Video Shows Moment Plane Slams into Road in Orange County, Florida [02:06:21] GETTING TO KNOW US [02:18:25] COFFEE FUND [02:20:37] FEEDBACK [02:21:28] Acme FA Nanette - "Brace Position" [02:24:57] Texas Anla'Shok - WestJet 737-200 Retirement FlyBy [02:28:42] Tim Q - Midair at North Las Vegas Airport (KVGT) [02:37:51] Robert - Passenger Responds To An Onboard Medical Emergency With Acupuncture And Essential Oils [02:48:34] Gus - Update From Argentina [02:50:39] Carl - GA in Retirement? VIDEO Don't see the video? Click this to watch it on YouTube! ABOUT RADIO ROGER “Radio Roger” Stern has been a TV and Radio reporter since he was a teenager. He's won an Emmy award for his coverage in the New York City Market. Currently you can hear his reporting in New York on radio station 1010 WINS, the number one all-news station in the nation. Nationally you can hear him anchor newscasts on the Fox News Radio Network and on Fox's Headlines 24-7 service on Sirius XM Radio. In addition Roger is a proud member of and contributor to the APG community. Give us your review in iTunes! I'm "airlinepilotguy" on Facebook, and "airlinepilotguy" on Twitter. feedback@airlinepilotguy.com airlinepilotguy.com "Appify" the Airline Pilot Guy website (http://airlinepilotguy.com) on your phone or tablet! ATC audio from http://LiveATC.net Intro/outro Music, Coffee Fund theme music by Geoff Smith thegeoffsmith.com Dr. Steph's intro music by Nevil Bounds Capt Nick's intro music by Kevin from Norway (aka Kevski) Doh De Oh by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100255 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Copyright © AirlinePilotGuy 2022, All Rights Reserved Airline Pilot Guy Show by Jeff Nielsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Newshour
Ethiopia: Air strikes in Tigray region

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 48:26


Medical staff in northern Ethiopia say air strikes on the capital of the Tigray region have killed four people. The chief clinical director at Mekelle's main hospital (Kibrom Gebreslassie) said two of the victims were children who'd been in a playground. Tigrayan rebels have accused government forces of carrying out the attacks. Addis Ababa hasn't responded to the accusation but has warned people in the area to stay from facilities used by rebels. We will hear from a doctor who treated the wounded Also in the programme: Why the Iran nuclear deal has more supporters in Israel than you might imagine; and the US Department of Justice has released court papers - known as an affidavit - that convinced a judge to authorise a search of Donald Trump's estate in Mar-a-Lago, Florida. (Photo: Air strike hits Mekelle, Tigray region. Credit: Reuters)