Podcasts about neurological

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Medical specialty dealing with disorders of the nervous system

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  • May 17, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about neurological

Show all podcasts related to neurological

Latest podcast episodes about neurological

Integrative Wellness Radio
The Reality of Neurological Lyme

Integrative Wellness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 66:06


In honor of Lyme Awareness month, this week on Integrative Wellness Radio, we bring you a dedicated episode for those who have Lyme Disease. Dr. Nicole sheds light on how neurological Lyme can affect us and why this specific type of Lyme is difficult to properly identify with the limited testing that is commonly available. Listen to the whole episode to learn more! Interested in working with IWG? Book a complimentary consult call to learn more using this link: https://bit.ly/IWRcall2022  Noteworthy Time Stamps: 02:35 improper treatment implies Improper diagnosis 6:53 Dr. Nicole's personal story with Lyme 11:33 How Lyme was discovered after syphilis 21:10 Case study of a patient 24:20 Myths about Neurological Lyme 35:35 Lyme lives in your connective tissue 38:49 Looking for Neurological Lyme 49:01 Oxygen & Glucose are your brain fuel 1:01:00 It's not about killing the Lyme

Dr. Westin Childs Podcast: Thyroid | Weight loss | Hormones
Signs of Selenium Toxicity - Are you taking TOO much selenium?

Dr. Westin Childs Podcast: Thyroid | Weight loss | Hormones

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 9:13


The list of warning signs and symptoms of selenium toxicity. Are you taking too much selenium? Here's how to find out: Selenium is a very important micronutrient for your body. It is included in certain proteins, called selenoproteins, that enable your cells to function properly, reduce inflammation, and produce antioxidants. Many people suffer from selenium deficiency which leads them to use selenium supplements. That's all good but what happens when they take too much? They may end up with minor signs of selenium toxicity. True selenium toxicity is rare, but a slight amount of selenium toxicity isn't uncommon and can occur if you accidentally take too much selenium in your supplements! This is often a problem for patients with thyroid disease because they know that using selenium can help reduce thyroid gland inflammation. Minor symptoms of selenium toxicity include: - Hair loss - Brittle nails - Fatigue - GI problems - Joint pain - Nausea These are more common than the serious symptoms but let's include the more serious symptoms as well: - Neurological problems - Paralysis - Selenosis (selenium poisoning) So, how much selenium should you take? The RDA for selenium is around 40-55mcg per day. My recommendation is 100-200mcg per day. Some doctors recommend 400-600mcg per day (probably only good for a short period of time and to treat very specific conditions). The best way to avoid selenium toxicity is to do 2 important things: #1. Check your supplements for selenium! See if you are accidentally taking too much using the guidelines above. #2. Pay attention to how much selenium you are getting from food (organic versions have more nutrients) Food sources high in selenium include: Brazil nuts, fish, ham, pork, beef, chicken, eggs, brown rice, oatmeal, spinach, bananas, But note that nutrients vary based on where plants were grown/harvested and whether or not they are organic. Do you have any of the signs of selenium toxicity? Let me know! Download my free thyroid resources here (including hypothyroid symptoms checklist, the complete list of thyroid lab tests + optimal ranges, foods you should avoid if you have thyroid disease, and more): https://www.restartmed.com/start-here/ Recommended thyroid supplements to enhance thyroid function: - Supplements that everyone with hypothyroidism needs: https://bit.ly/3tekPej - Supplement bundle to help reverse Hashimoto's: https://bit.ly/3gSY9eJ - Supplements for those without a thyroid and for those after RAI: https://bit.ly/3tb36nZ - Supplements for active hyperthyroidism: https://bit.ly/3t70yHo See ALL of my specialized supplements including protein powders, thyroid supplements, and weight loss products here: https://www.restartmed.com/shop/ Want more from my blog? I have more than 400+ well-researched blog posts on thyroid management, hormone balancing, weight loss, and more. See all blog posts here: https://www.restartmed.com/blog/ This video is for general informational, educational, and entertainment purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, treatment, diagnosis, prescription, or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Childs and you. You should not make any changes to your medications or health regimens without first consulting a physician. If you have any questions please consult with your current primary care provider. Restart Medical LLC and Dr. Westin Childs are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis, or any other information, services, or product you obtain through this website or video. #thyroid #hypothyroidism #hashimoto's

MEM Cast
Episode 109: A neurological approach to Bilateral Leg Weakness

MEM Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 20:44


We often encounter patients presenting with bilateral leg weakness in emergency department, ward and clinic. If we have a good systematic approach , we will be more confident to reach differentials and outline a management plan.

The Lancet Neurology
Mark Hallett on functional neurological disorder

The Lancet Neurology

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:43


Mark Hallett (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD, USA) discusses his Review, published in the June issue of The Lancet Neurology, on functional neurological disorder, and talks about new subtypes of this disorder, diagnostic challenges, and how education is important.Read the full article:Functional neurological disorder: new subtypes and shared mechanisms

Evidence Based Radio
Evidence Based Radio, 5/06/22: COVID, Mysterious Hepititis, and Neurological News

Evidence Based Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 58:28


Theme song: "Widgeon" by Birdboy Purchase the full song at http://smarturl.it/birdboy! Listen to the live broadcast, every Friday at 6pm – only on Valley Free Radio, WXOJ-LP 103.3fm or streaming on valleyfreeradio.org Look for Evidence Based Radio on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, or stream on Evidencebasedradio.com This podcast part of the Planetside Podcast Network. Visit Planetsidepodcasts.com to find other Planetside Productions!Support Evidence Based Radio by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/evidencebasederrata Send us your feedback online: https://pinecast.com/feedback/evidencebasederrata/c36bb3cc-3fad-4bc4-9831-101f2ea36929

Rooks Health Podcast
The Management of Progressing Neurological Conditions With Dr Gita Ramdharry (PhD)

Rooks Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 43:58


A discussion about the world of Neurology in healthcare serves as both an insightful episode on how patients are currently being treated to how well-equipped are clinicians. We discuss a few conditions such as Parkinson's disease, myositis, MS, Charcot Marie tooth and many more Neurological conditions The management of progressing neurological conditions in healthcare and physiotherapy can often be complex so we try and explain what current research on neurological conditions details. Make sure to check out www.rookshealth.com for more information and a deeper dive into this episode and more health and wellness topics To read more blog posts on each podcast episode check https://www.rookshealth.com/podcast/ Find out more information about this podcast and more health debunk tips on social media @Rookshealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/rookshealth Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rookshealth/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Rookshealth Pinterest : https://www.pinterest.co.uk/rookshealth/ Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/rookshealth)

Kyle Winkler Video Podcast
Susie Larson on Prevailing through Pain

Kyle Winkler Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 30:37


Susie Larson knows pain. She's battled sexual trauma, Lyme disease and Neurological disorder. She shares how she prevailed through it all to raise a family, write books and host a daily radio show.

Chronically Well
Anything is Possible: Recovering from Neurological Lyme and Providing Hope as a Pelvic Floor Therapist with Denise Nichols

Chronically Well

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 49:17


Intuitive Public Radio • IPR •••
82. Food Forests Everywhere, Regenerative Nourishment, & Useful Neurological Discernments (28 April 2022)

Intuitive Public Radio • IPR •••

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 10:00


https://t.me/IntuitivePublicRadio/10217 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/intuitive/support

Health Science Starts Here
Neurological Visual Impairment in Children and BLVS

Health Science Starts Here

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 24:08


In this podcast, we talk with Fabiana Perla, Chair of the Department of Blindness and Low Vision Studies (BLVS) at Salus University, Katherine Alstrin, EdD SPED| TVI/COMS, Adjunct Faculty in the Department of BLVS, and Staci Wills, MS, Ed, COMS, a teacher of students with visual impairments. They talk to us about the Neurological Visual Impairment in Children course and its uniqueness to Salus and the BLVS field. To learn more about this course and BLVS at Salus, you can visit salus.edu/blvsTo learn more about our podcast series, visit salus.edu/podcastsReferencesChang, M. Y., & Borchert, M. S. (2020). Advances in the evaluation and management of cortical/cerebral visual impairment in children. Survey of ophthalmology, 65(6), 708-724. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0039625720300497IDEA. Definition of a Child with a Disability: https://sites.ed.gov/idea/regs/b/a/300.8 IDEA. Determination of Eligibility for Special Education: https://sites.ed.gov/idea/regs/b/d/300.306IDEA. Eligibility Determinations for Children Suspected of Having a Visual Impairment Including Blindness under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: https://sites.ed.gov/idea/files/letter-on-visual-impairment-5-22-17.pdfMcDowell, N. (2021). A review of the literature to inform the development of a practice framework for supporting children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI). International Journal of Inclusive Education, 1-21. https://www-tandfonline-com.libsalus.idm.oclc.org/doi/full/10.1080/13603116.2020.1867381?scr oll=top&needAccess=trueSalus NVI LiveBinder: https://www.livebinders.com/play/play/2360226?tabid=dc33f40a-f9bf-3fe3-bb2c-5214654c979f

Owens Recovery Science
Discussing BFR in Neurological Populations and Adolescents

Owens Recovery Science

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 54:54


In this episode the guys discuss two recent papers that build off of previous podcasts. The first article discussed is the use of BFR in Adolescents after ACLR. We previously chatted with the authors of this paper on our episode from June 23, 2020 titled "BFR in Kids!?!" The second paper discussed is a recent survey that was published looking into the use of BFR in persons with neurological conditions. We previously chatted with the primary author of this paper Mark Mañago, PT, DPT, PhD, NCS on November 18, 2020 Intro sound bite from: Trick or Treat (instrumental) by RYYZN https://soundcloud.com/ryyzn Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/l_trick-or-treat Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/uNPXJ9CDzbc

Scaleup Valley Podcast
219- Closing The Access And Quality Gap In Neurological Care With The CEO Of Neura Health

Scaleup Valley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 41:23


On this episode of the Scaleup Valley podcast, Mike Dias speaks with Elizabeth Burstein, Co-Founder & CEO at Neura Health Key Takeaways Navigating the complexity of the healthcare system How to identify core problems to solve in a very broad market? How to serve chronic ill patients in a careful and personal care The right moment to hire a Medical Director. (CMO) Tips on fundraising

Just Ingredients
55- Dr. Ashley Mayer, Neutral Sided Information About Children's Vaccines

Just Ingredients

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 54:03


Dr. Ashley Mayer, NMD, is a practicing physician, taking care of families for the past 12 years. In 2014, she founded Dr. Green Mom®, a now global brand passionate about foundational healthcare for children. As a leader in the field of Vaccine Safety and Awareness education, Dr. Mayer teaches parents how to not only recognize and manage current risk/benefit of their child's vaccine schedule, but also how to support the child's Neurological and Immune Systems through the vaccination process. VaccineStrategy.com launched in 2019, empowering parents to make informed vaccine decisions because the current vaccine schedule is not a one-size-fits-all for our children. Dr. Mayer has diligently kept up with a National Medical Freedom Healthcare Provider List for parents needing access to providers who believe in Medical Freedom and Informed Consent. Dr. Mayer's true passion lies in formulating safe, natural products for Mothers, Infants, and Children. Your child's healthcare begins in the womb, so mamas need to take care of themselves, too! You may find more information at DrGreenMom.com. In today's episode, Dr. Mayer and I have a neutral conversation about vaccines. She answers common questions like what vaccines are, how they are made, and how they differ for certain illnesses. Dr. Mayer teaches how to prepare for your children's vaccines, and how to detox afterward if preferred. Instagram: @drgreenmom Website: https://drgreenmom.com/ Shop the Just Ingredients Sale on April 25 - 26 for 20% off select products, and free shipping on orders over $100 at https://justingredients.us/

UnitedHealth Group Weekly Dose Podcast
5 Costliest Health Care Conditions

UnitedHealth Group Weekly Dose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 15:12


UnitedHealthcare's Center for Advanced Analytics aims to improve well-being by engaging with clinical-intervention programs. These programs work to address social determinants of health for people in employer-sponsored benefit plans. In this week's episode, Craig Kurtzweil, leader of UnitedHealthcare's Center for Advanced Analytics, discusses: What the five costliest conditions are.The significant drivers behind those conditions. How preventive care can assist in lowering costs. Read the full report here. 

What Day Is It?
Dr. Sasha Hamdani, MD - ADHD Misconceptions, Signs + Symptoms Of ADHD And How To Advocate For Your Neurological Health

What Day Is It?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 49:50


Whether you have ADHD, know someone who has it or are curious about how ADHD presents itself... this episode of WDII is for you! Bailey + Jacci chat with board-certified psychiatrist and ADHD clinical specialist Dr. Sasha Hamdani to find out the facts, myths and everything in between. WE'RE DISCUSSING: + how/when to get diagnosed with ADHD + signs and symptoms of ADHD + the types of ADHD + ADD vs. ADHD and if they're different + why women have gone undiagnosed for so long + the dangerous role social media plays when it comes to ADHD + if there are predispositions that make someone more likely to have ADHD + so so much more ——— Follow along at @whatdayisitpodcast SHOP OUR MERCH Join our Facebook Group Checkout our Amazon Shop Don't forget to follow the hosts @baileyjst and @jaccirai Questions, comments, feedback? Email us whatdayisitpodcast@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Becker’s Healthcare -- Spine and Orthopedic Podcast
Dr. Tung Ha, a neurological surgeon with Fourth Corner Neurosurgical Associates

Becker’s Healthcare -- Spine and Orthopedic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 21:40


Dr. Tung Ha, a neurological surgeon with Fourth Corner Neurosurgical Associates, joined the podcast to talk about spine tech, challenges and where spine techniques are headed.

Chicago Psychology Podcast
Hypnosis, Neuroloscience, and Reveri with David Spiegel, MD

Chicago Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 54:09


Dr. Spiegel is Willson Professor and Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of the Center on Stress and Health, and Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where he has been a member of the academic faculty since 1975, and was Chair of the Stanford University Faculty Senate from 2010-2011. Dr. Spiegel has more than 40 years of clinical and research experience studying psycho-oncology, stress and health, pain control, psychoneuroendocrinology, sleep, hypnosis, and conducting randomized clinical trials involving psychotherapy for cancer patients. On this episode of the Psychology Talk Podcast, Dr. Spiegel discussesa new, interactive hypnosis application, Reveri. Reveri is unique in that, unlike many meditation and hypnosis applications available to consumers, it allows you to interact with it, and adjust accordingly to your needs. Dr. Spiegel and Dr. Hoye discuss, among other things: •Neurological correlates of hypnosis•The development of the Hypnotic Induction Profile by Dr. Spiegel's father, Herbert Spiegel•Aspects of hypnotizability •The role of absorption in hypnosis. •Dr. Spiegel's research Listen in to expand your mind, and change your perspective on mind-body medicine!The Psychology Talk Podcast is a unique conversation about psychology around the globe. Your hosts Dr. Scott Hoye and licensed clinical professional counselor Kyle Miller talk about psychology with mental health practitioners and experts to keep you informed about issues and trends in the industry. They also tackle mental health trends and issues in their home: Chicago.https://psych-talk.comhttps://www.instagram.com/psychtalkpodcast/

Truth Be Told
Minuteman Report Ep. 64 - What have they done to us?

Truth Be Told

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 10:12


Last week, we took a closer look at the new report about what the Pentagon knows about the affects of UFO and Alien encounters on humans. Today, we take a closer look at three of the neurological disorders that have been linked to these types of occurrences. Be sure to like and share this episode! Subscribe to never miss a new episode! Tune into MINUTE MAN REPORT, hosted by Robert Hensley, live on Mondays at 3P PT/6P ET, and check out TRUTH BE TOLD TRANSFORMATION hosted by Bonnie Burkert, live on Wednesdays at 3P PT/6P ET and Tony Sweet with the original TRUTH BE TOLD on Fridays Live at 3P PT/6P ET!Learn more about TRUTH BE TOLD online at www.truthbetoldworldwide.comBe sure to stop by the SHOP page to get official TRUTH BE TOLD merchandise!

Heroes of Reality
Episode 158: Protecting our Children's Neurological Health and Happiness

Heroes of Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 58:57


Shazi Visram is an entrepreneur and mother committed to bettering the world through business that is socially, financially, and environmentally enlightened. She is the Founder of Happy Family Brands, which she led to become the #1 organic baby food company in the US market with disruptive innovations that have democratized organic food for new families, despite her very humble beginnings. Shazi is also the Founder and CEO of Healthy Baby, which is the culmination of a life's work dedicated to protecting children's neurological health. Healthy Baby is a safe space for families to find the knowledge, community, and products to build connected minds and bodies during baby's early years, a time when they are making one million neural connections every second. As an advocate of social entrepreneurship, Visram is actively engaged as an investor and advisor to companies innovating for a brighter future. Visram serves on the board of Environmental Working Group (EWG), the Board of Overseers at Columbia Business School and Columbia College, in addition to being a Founding Member of Columbia's Alumnae Legacy Circle. In 2013, she was acknowledged by President Barack Obama as "not only an outstanding businesswoman, but also a leader that all of us can emulate." In 2018, Visram proudly received Columbia University's University Medal of Excellence “for her gifts as a leader, her optimistic spirit, and determination”.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
The cost of covid on important neurological research

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 20:29


From brain recovery and sleep research to epilepsy in tamariki Maori - nearly 100 neurological research projects have been disrupted due to Covid. 1 in 5 Kiwis are affected by conditions like dementia, stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson's, brain injury, and over 700 more. The pandemic has disrupted researchers working on preventions, treatments and cures in 92 different projects, with some losing a year's worth of lab work. The Neurological Foundation has come up with over $1.2m to support researchers during the lockdowns, and to provide funds to get those projects back up and running. Kathryn speaks with Dr Thomas Park, who's researching glioblastoma - an agressive brain and spinal cord cancer, and Dr Deidre Jansson who's researching the impact of poor sleep on brain repair and recovery.

The Benzo Free Podcast
Benzodiazepine-Induced Neurological Dysfunction (BIND) — An Introduction

The Benzo Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 59:00


Share this post with others: What do we call this condition so many of us have been dealing with for so long? Benzo withdrawal? Protracted Withdrawal? Persistent Benzo Withdrawal? Benzo Toxicity? Benzo Brain Injury? Or something completely different? In today's episode of the podcast, we introduce a new term to many of you — Benzodiazepine-Induced Neurological Dysfunction (BIND). We look at what it means, where it came from, and why we believe it's important? We also answer a couple of questions and share a benzo story. Hope you enjoy it. Welcome to Episode #99 Hello everyone. This is a slightly different episode as you may have noticed. Today we introduce a new term for what so many of us are going through. Benzodiazepine-Induced Neurological Dysfunction. Or BIND. We're hoping it may catch and it will be included in some upcoming research papers. We also answer a few questions from our mailbag and share a benzo story. Thanks for listening in. Video ID: BFP099 Chapters 00:00  INTRODUCTION02:24  The Overwhelm05:57  Podcast Schedule06:19  Benzo Newsletters08:53  MAILBAG08:56  More Symptoms After Last Dose?13:48  Pins and Needles Common?17:21  BENZO STORY25:18  FEATURE: What Is BIND?25:59  Definitions, Terms & Confusion30:01  Benzo Survey Publication33:14  Alliance Sponsorship35:10  The Nosology Paper37:36  Why this Term? Will it Stick?40:44  BIND vs. Withdrawal43:02  Physiological Changes44:16  Changing Terminology46:14  Doctors See WD, not BIND47:02  Progress Being Made48:16  Helping Out Helps53:20  MOMENT OF PEACE Episode Resources The following resource links are provided as a courtesy to our listeners. They do not constitute an endorsement by Benzo Free of the resource or any recommendations or advice provided therein. BENZO SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS— Benzodiazepine Action Work Group (BAWG): https://corxconsortium.org/work-groups/benzodiazepine— The Alliance for Benzodiazepine Best Practices: https://benzoreform.org— Benzodiazepine Information Coalition (BIC): https://benzoinfo.com SUPPORT INFO— The Ashton Manual — https://easinganxiety.com/blog/ashton-manual— BIC: “What Is Benzodiazepine Protracted Withdrawal?” — https://www.benzoinfo.com/protracted-withdrawal-syndrome MEDICAL REFERENCES— Ashton, H. (1995). Protracted withdrawal from benzodiazepines: The post-withdrawal syndrome. Psychiatric Annals, 25(3), 174-179. https://doi.org/10.3928/0048-5713-19950301-11/.— Ashton H. Protracted withdrawal syndromes from benzodiazepines. J Subst Abuse Treat. 1991;8(1-2):19-28. doi: 10.1016/0740-5472(91)90023-4. PMID: 1675688. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1675688.— Pétursson H. The benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome. Addiction. 1994 Nov;89(11):1455-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.1994.tb03743.x. PMID: 7841856. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7841856. Site Links VISIT US ONLINE— WEBSITE: https://www.easinganxiety.com— YOUTUBE (Easing Anxiety): https://www.youtube.com/easinganxiety— YOUTUBE (Benzo Free): https://www.youtube.com/benzofree PLEASE LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK— COMMENT: On this video in YouTube— COMMENT: On the blog post on our website— FEEDBACK FORM: https://www.easinganxiety.com/feedback— EMAIL: feedback@easinganxiety.com SUPPORT US— Make a Donation: https://www.easinganxiety.com/donate Podcast Summary This podcast is dedicated to those who struggle with side effects, dependence, and withdrawal from benzos, a group of drugs from the benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine classes, better known as anti-anxiety drugs, sleeping pills, sedatives, and minor tranquilizers. Their common brand names include Ambien, Ativan, Klonopin, Lunesta, Valium, and Xanax. Feedback We'd love to hear from you! The Benzo Free Podcast is a community podcast and we need your input to help it grow and improve. You can tell us what you think in the following ways: Fill out our Feedback Form at https://www.easinganxiety.com/feedbackEmail us at feedback@easinganxiety.

Down Dog Athletics Podcast
Q+A: Why nutrition is 90% of certain goals, RPE, neurological food associations, and our Will Smith + Chris Rock thoughts

Down Dog Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 50:45


In this episode, we breakdown answers to your questions from clients & the Facebook group: Why do people say nutrition is 80 or even 90 percent of goals? How do I use RPE to go lighter or heavier with weight? Why do I crave foods I see in commercials when I am watching sports? Is it connected? As a comedian himself, Jake shares his thoughts on Chris Rock & the two discus mental health and the box masculinity needlessly fits inside This podcast is part of the Mindful Muscle 30-Day Challenge. For $0.23 cents a day, you can get access to this transformational program that starts on April 11th.    Head over to the Mindful Muscle 30 Day Challenge for more info. -------------- Listen to other top rated podcasts: Ep 43 - Have an Alpha Mindset with Sam Tooley Ep 3 - Live Better Co "Retired at 34" - Eric Hinman is an IRONMAN athlete, investor, and entrepreneur Subscribe to catch every episode. --------------- COACHING. Wanna take the quickest and easiest route to changing how you look and feel forever? The E4 Fit team is accepting applications now to work with us 1:1. Serious inquiries only pls. Check out the details and book a call here. FREE MINDFUL MUSCLE FACEBOOK COMMUNITY. Want to see the exact methods we use with our clients everyday? Join the Mindful Muscle Facebook group and you'll instantly gain access to our E4 Fit Training App, one of our recipe collections, and our mini-course. In addition to those resources, we go live every week with live trainings and Q+A so you can learn the best approaches to fitness, fat loss, and optimal health. Sign up for the Free Training here. -------------- Say hi on social: Instagram  Facebook E4 Instagram YouTube

About Mansfield
Consumer Advice Series - More Neurological Causes of Migraines

About Mansfield

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 10:57


With Dr. Joseph Adams from Calibration Chiropractic + Functional Health, we talk about:More neurologic causes of migrainesGetting dizziness during migrainesMansfield's foremost expert on migraines.Dr. Joseph AdamsCalibration ChiropracticMansfield, Texaswww.CalibrationMansfield.comAbout Mansfield PodcastNews, talk and information about Mansfield, Texaswww.AboutMansfield.com

A Neuro Physio Podcast
Paul Fink - Father, Motivational Speaker, Podcast host, Stroke Survivor

A Neuro Physio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 51:31


Paul Fink survived a large left fronto-temporo-parietal brain haemorrhage secondary to an AVM aneurysm at the age of 34. His attitude to life is one we should all learn from and it continues to help him achieve his goals 8 years on. Paul's new podcast My Stroke of Luck aims to share this wisdom. What he's doing for the stroke community and what he teaches us about providing rehab is impressive.10.06 Intro12:35 Current work - public speaking, blog, podcast15.04 Impact of Paul's blog on stroke survivors18.14 Paul's stroke & rehab experience24.46 Resilience, My Stroke of Luck podcast32.40 Global aphasia38.30 Dealing with a negative mindset42.43 Giving back to the stroke community47.58 Paul's current rehabPaul's websitePaul's Podcast on apple podcasts

True Healing with Robert Morse ND
Dr. Morse's Q&A – Eczema, Osteoporosis, Neurological and More #600

True Healing with Robert Morse ND

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 90:41


To have your question featured in a future video, please email: questions@dmhhc.com

Parra CALD
28 March 2022 COVID Update Information and neurological data on the four dose of COVID 19 Vaccine

Parra CALD

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 25:20


28 March 2022 COVID Update   Information and neurological data on the fourth dose of the Covid-19 vaccine booster. 內容: 關於接種第四針新冠疫苗加強劑的資訊及翳學數據。   Parramatta Libraries Health Awareness Talks in Cantonese Language. In partnership with Australian Chinese Medical Association. Health talks to promote better understanding and awareness of common health issues and related services in the Chinese Australian community.   Presented by Professor Stephen Li. Chemical Pathologist | Clinical Lipidologist | Chartered Manager Director Core Pathology & Clinical Chemistry, Pathology West, NSW Health Pathology Director Westmead Hospital Lipid Clinic Chair, Community Health, ACMA Honorary President and Foundation Fellow, ACMA  

Pear Healthcare Playbook
Lessons from Elizabeth Burstein, Neura Health, Closing the access and quality gap in neurological care

Pear Healthcare Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 36:00


This week, we're super excited to have Elizabeth Burstein, CEO and Co-Founder at Neura Health. Founded in 2020, Neura Health is a virtual neurology clinic with a mission to improve the access and quality of neurological care: increase convenience, improve outcomes, and lower costs. Neura Health's platform connects patients to neurologists, with built in neurology-specific symptom monitoring and condition-specific diagnostic tests. The company's first app focus is on chronic headache and migraine. Prior to founding Neura Health, Liz was the Head of Product at Maven Clinic and Director of Product at ZocDoc. Neura Health recently announced that they raised a $2.2M seed round with Pear VC, Norwest Venture Partners, Global Founders Capital, Index Ventures, and Next Play Ventures.

About Mansfield
Consumer Advice Series - Neurological Migraine Triggers

About Mansfield

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022


Continuing our series on migraines with Dr. Joseph Adams, DC, MS and how the five senses (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell) all have a factor in triggering migraines.Dr. Joseph AdamsCalibration ChiropracticMansfield, Texaswww.CalibrationMansfield.comAbout Mansfield PodcastNews, talk and information about Mansfield, Texaswww.AboutMansfield.com

Intuitive Public Radio • IPR •••
57. Signals Between Beings; Neurological Repair, Communications, & Planet Waves (15 March 2022)

Intuitive Public Radio • IPR •••

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 16:05


Since 2014 or thereabouts (with some intermittent signal interference... to say the least), we've been following the work of Eric Francis Coppolino and the Planet Waves platforms he and his team have built over the years. Our ability to say what we most need to say has been compromised by the neurological injuries we're still repairing. Part of the way we are able to repair them at all is the Intuitive Public Radio toolsets we're using to share our processing, teach from our experiences, and come to understand better all of us together what has happened. We're encouraged by responses we've received. Groups are truly and deeply benefiting as we grow this conversation. It's still challenging to feel into and talk about. But we're experiencing the strength being restored. We'll keep going. Tune in and share your thoughts: https://t.me/IntuitivePublicRadio Reach out to Max directly: https://t.me/maxmorris 57. Signals Between Beings; Neurological Repair, Communications, & Planet Waves (15 March 2022) More of our programs can be found here: ••• Anchor FM: https://anchor.fm/intuitive ••• Bitchute: https://bitchute.com/intuitivepublictv ••• Website: https://Intuitive.pub Support Intuitive Public Radio & Intuitive community network successes: https://Intuitive.community/support Join our public chat: https://t.me/joinchat/U-Ncl_gYJqWbiAA- Links & comments: https://t.me/Ideaschema/2058 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/intuitive/support

Just Fly Performance Podcast
Dr. Mark Wetzel on Neurological Strength, Emotional States, and Isometric Mastery

Just Fly Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022


Today's show welcomes back chiropractor and neurology expert, Dr. Mark Wetzel.  Mark has been on this show numerous times talking about the effectiveness of long isometric holds, as well as digging into many aspects of their performance. So often in the training and performance field, we just look at exercises, sets and reps, but then don't desire to dig into the nuance of those movements we are programming.  With isometrics, we can certainly get results by simply having athletes hold positions indiscriminately, but we can multiply those results by understanding the underlying mechanisms that help make isometrics more effective. One of the beautiful things about isometric holds is that the lack of movement brings one's awareness to a high level, and one's ability to focus on things like breathing, posture and muscle tensioning, on a higher level.  One's mental and emotional state has an extremely close correlation with the length of time that you can hold the movement. Holding isometrics for extended periods of time also has an impact on the fascial lines of the body, and even the meridian lines (if your belief system takes you that far).  Isometrics are truly a “total body”, functional experience. On today's show, Mark Wetzel gives his thoughts on how a positive mental state can increase one's ability to hold an isometric position (or increase muscle-endurance in general).  He'll speak extensively on the postural and muscle-tone aspects of holding an isometric, as well as speak on the connections made between the fascial/meridian lines, electric signals, an organ function.  Finally, Mark gives his take on what he feels “neurological” strength truly is, and how this is manifested in a program. Today's episode is brought to you by SimpliFaster and Lost Empire Herbs. For 15% off your Lost Empire Herbs order, head to lostempireherbs.com/justfly. View more podcast episodes at the podcast homepage. Timestamps and Main Points: 5:24 – Mark's thoughts on the mental and emotional aspects of fatigue (and perceived fatigue) during a difficult or taxing movement such as an isometric 14:34 – What it means to be “in position” as an athlete gets into an isometric hold 24:47 – Why some athletes have a lot of trouble “pulling down” into an isometric position, and discussing the use of “constraints” such as a band around the shin, to help an athlete pull down into an isometric 34:19 – Using a one-arm bench press hold to help improve the pushing ability and breathing of individuals who struggle with isometric pushup holds 42:01 – What “good posture” means for Mark 47:05 – Mark's take on organ health, meridian lines and reflexes, particularly in light of utilizing isometric exercises 57:52 – What it means to have “neurological strength” from a Mark's perspective as a chiropractor with neurological training 1:05:35 – Depth jumps and drop landings as an assessment of neurological efficiency “When I am in those moments (of fatigue) I try to bring up some sort of happiness or joyful emotion to try and take my mind off of it” “The “fear based” mentality is almost a traditional way of training” “Posture comes back to the breath; typically when people have bad posture it is because they have bad breathing mechanics” “When you do a bunch of calf rebounds in a row, your body will position you in a way that (you have to be in to keep breathing under fatigue)” “You can accomplish so much in an isometric exercise by focusing on “where is my breathing”” “I always back up (a chiropractic adjustment) with exercise” “The meridian lines are all connected to an organ” “What's cool about an isometric is that you are creating a lot of tone throughout the whole body” “If the brain is telling a muscle to stay weak, then it is going to stay weak no matter what you do” “The more you can stay calm, breathe, smile to yourself while you are going through that discomfort,

The Ted Broer Show - MP3 Edition

Does Fauci work for Pfizer? Has a new variant been discovered? Neurological diseases through the roof? What was Tavistock? Who was Timothy O'Leary? Ted does a 20 minute rant on who we are in Christ! Don't fall for the Mind kontrol! Stand firm in Christ! Be vocal in your faith! Why has real estate been so inflated? It's the illegal immigration! Ted quotes Emerson. Plus much more! This is a high energy green show. It is a must listen! - Episode 1707

OARsome Morning Show
OARsome Morning Show - 14-03-2022 - Neurological Foundation Give the Greenlight campaign - Rich Easton

OARsome Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 7:55


Neurological Foundation Give the Greenlight campaign - Rich Easton outlines a campaign to get brain researchers back on track after the disruptions caused by the pandemic.

True Healing with Robert Morse ND
Dr. Morse's Q&A – Colonoscopies, Neurological Case, Eckankar, and More #598

True Healing with Robert Morse ND

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 101:11


To have your question featured in a future video, please email: questions@dmhhc.com

Breaking The Lines Audio Podcasts
Tactics Room Episode 13: Penalty shootouts, deep analysis on the psychological, neurological, and its physiological factors

Breaking The Lines Audio Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 56:45


We've all seen our share of penalty shootouts over the last few weeks... In Episode 13 of The Tactics Room, Will Fowler (@WillFowler5) goes under the hood of the shootout and analyzes why they're more than just putting the ball on the spot and shooting from twelve yards. The psychological, neurological, and physiological factors constantly at play make the penalty shootout one of the most intriguing -- and most difficult to understand -- displays that world football has to offer. Works cited (included in bio): Jordet, 2009. https://bit.ly/3JGsA3A Choking theories. https://bit.ly/3JIyv8C Van der Kamp, 2007. https://bit.ly/3sT4zj7 Jordet, 2007. https://bit.ly/3sW4WcP Loss aversion. https://bit.ly/3v3xYtt The Psychologist. https://bit.ly/3v3bd9i Jordet, 2020. https://bit.ly/3gXorw3 Wood and Wilson, 2010. https://bit.ly/3sUwVcU --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/breaking-the-lines/message

Good Day Health
DJVH - JACK - Startling Facts About The First Year Of Your Child's Life

Good Day Health

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 30:56


03/02/22 - Host Doug Stephan and Dr. Jack Stockwell, www.forbiddendoctor.com Phone: 866-867-5070 begin with news about the "bio sludge" that is seeping up through the soil in Maine. Next, we meet Dr. Martin Rosen and his wife, Dr. Nancy Watson, co-authors of "It's All About The Head." https://peak-potential-institute.mykajabi.com/its-all-in-the-head The book is not only invaluable to parents (whether it's their first or fifth born), giving them knowledge and direction when making health care decision for their child, especially in the first year. As chiropractic pediatric specialists they wrote this book for parents and other health care professionals, to help guide you in determining what is truly normal and what warning signs you should look for that may be affecting your baby's current health or future health potential.

Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)
Province says there is no mystery neurological illness cluster in New Brunswick, but some are demanding more answers.

Information Morning Moncton from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 18:29


Dorothy Shephard is New Brunswick's Health Minister. Steve Ellis's father is one of 48 people originally thought to be part of a cluster of unexplained neurological illnesses in the province.

A Neuro Physio Podcast
Professor Steven Wolf - UL rehab, Asking Why, Future of Neuro rehab

A Neuro Physio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 60:07


Our discussion with Dr Steve Wolf from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. A true legend of the field he shares with us snippets of his illustrious career, his newest research including vagus nerve stimulation to induce cortical neurplasticity, and his predictions for the future of neuro rehab.3.53 Introduction5.35 Career Pathway8.15 History of physio in the US10.40 Suspended from PT school14.16 PhD - EMG biofeedback for muscle co-activation16.55 Foundations of CIMT18.45 Posturography - Tai Chi - Falls prevention studies23.30 Mechanisms of neuro PT intervention24.03 Steve's must-have attributes in the field26.25 Vagus nerve stimulation35.00 Upper limb outcome measures39.31 Personalised care41.29 Telerehab & technology - the future45.36 Patients of today expect tech50.51 Physio - Patient partnership52.55 Peer support as a rehab tool53.52 Imaging - in PT curriculum & to demonstrate treatment effectivenessSteve's Emory University profile http://www.rehabmed.emory.edu/faculty.bios/wolf-steven.htmlResearchGate page https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Steven-L-Wolf-2098857052

The Intern At Work: Internal Medicine
127. The Gift of Life - Organ Donation after Neurological Death

The Intern At Work: Internal Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2022 13:38


This week we discuss the clinical criteria required to diagnose neurological death, and the steps to caring for the neurologically deceased organ donor. 

PN podcast
Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes: a practical approach to diagnosis and management

PN podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 34:24


Dr Amy Ross Russell, Neurology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, interviews Dr Sophie Binks and Professor Sarosh Irani, from the Oxford Autoimmune Neurology Group, about their recent paper about a practical approach to diagnosis and management of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. Read the latest Editor's Choice paper on the Practical Neurology website (https://pn.bmj.com/content/22/1/19) and the February print issue of the journal. The paper is also discussed by Practical Neurology editors, Dr Phil Smith and Dr Geraint Fuller, in their latest podcast: https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/editors-highlights-of-the-february-2022-issue?in=bmjpodcasts/sets/pn-podcast Please subscribe to the Practical Neurology podcast via all podcast platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify, to get the latest podcast every month. If you enjoy our podcast, please consider leaving us a review or a comment on the Practical Neurology Podcast iTunes page (https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/pn-podcast/id942932053). Thank you for listening.

OTCQB Podcast
Alpha Cognition Inc.

OTCQB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 8:06


Alpha Cognition Inc. (OTCQB: ACOGF) is a clinical stage, biopharmaceutical company dedicated to developing treatments for under-served neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's Dementia and ALS. CEO Michael McFadden joins us to break down the types of neurodegenerative diseases that are targeted in the company's programs.   View Podcast Transcript for Alpha Cognition

Alabama's Morning News with JT
Dr. Mark Sherwood 020722

Alabama's Morning News with JT

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 4:19


Healthy Living Expert Dr. Mark Sherwood discusses how even mild cases of COVID-19 can lead to long-term neurological damage.

The Preventive Medicine Podcast
Prevention in Neurological and Psychiatric Crises – Stephen Trevick, MD

The Preventive Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2022 70:06


Prevention can be practiced in almost any scenario - all the way from primary prevention to quaternary prevention in end-of-life situations. Furthermore, there are various social aspects that also play a role in prevention such as improving outcomes due to improved communication with patients and families or not isolating psychiatric patients and preventing a future crises. In this episode I speak with Dr. Stephen Trevick a triple-board certified physician in neurology, psychiatry, and neurocritical care about how a preventive approach can have a large impact even in an ICU setting. We talk about keeping people out of the neuro-ICU, talking to patients and families regarding critical situations, end-of-life discussions, and even dive into the prevention of psychiatric crises. This episode has a lot of concepts that might not sound related to preventive medicine at first but still play a critical role in improving the quality of life of patients and families. Hopefully you enjoy this episode! Dr. Trevick has no social media! Show Outline: You have a broad range of interests and are triple board certified, how do you use your knowledge on a day to day basis? Given the many hats that you wear, what does preventive medicine mean to you? Boring questions first: How do you keep yourself out of the neurocritical care unit. what risk reducing practices reduce the risk for neurological catastrophes? (Can decide whether or not you want to talk about this one since it's mostly pretty straightforward) We've talked about more common outpatient type mental illness topics on the podcast before but never about acute psychiatric needs. What is the difference between “poor mental health” and “psychiatric crisis?” How do psychiatric crises develop and how do we reduce the risk for them? Is it all about medication? Communication and support? Some psychiatric illnesses leave patient's isolated by the medical system, how can we as physicians communicate with these patients when they have seemingly become “closed off?” In medicine we often do a poor job of communicating medical events and prognosis to both patients and family, can improving this communication improve a patient's quality of life? Whether from a psychiatric or neurological diagnosis, patient's families may experience significant grief. What is the physician's role in that grief response? If someone recognizes you in the hospital starbucks line and asks you “how do I get healthy?” What do you tell them in 2 minutes? Join our Mailing List HERE: Mailchimp

A Neuro Physio Podcast
Professor Prue Morgan - Adults with Cerebral Palsy, Clinical teaching tips

A Neuro Physio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 53:57


Professor Prue Morgan is head of department at Monash University, Melbourne - Australia. She is a self professed yes person and expert in adults with cerebral palsy. We discuss her career journey, her passion for cerebral palsy and teaching philosophy.4:45 – Career path8:00 – Why cerebral palsy10:40 – Drop of in care for adults with CP11:50 – Filling the gaps in CP care13:00 – Keeping the passion14:20 – Neuroplastic potential vs compensate for success16:05 – key principles of working with CP18:30 – Team and importance of seating and positioning21:40 – Fatigue in CP23:30 – Barriers to participation in CP26:25 – Resources to assist CP knowledge for therapists30:15 – Prue's PhD34:00 – Transitioning into Academia35:30 – Teaching tips for successful student placements40:15 – Value of observation43:00 – Importance of feedback to grow and learn44:55 – Developing evaluation skills in students46:20 – Committee work and taking opportunitiesPrue's Monash Uni profilePrue's research output

The Sonography Lounge
EP17. Ultrasound Technology Update - Neurologica (Samsung) - Liver Analysis and More with Courtney Ernst

The Sonography Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 24:01


The Sonography Lounge Hosts Lori and Trisha dive get the low-down on new technology updates with Neurologica (Samsung) Ultrasound systems, including their Liver Analysis technology, S-Shearwave™ Imaging™, ShadowHDR™, and more. This episode features guest, Courtney Ernst, the product manager of the radiology segment of Neurologica. Neurological (a division of Samsung): https://www.neurologica.com/ultrasound-radiology-systems   CME and Cross-training resources: Gulfcoast Ultrasound Institute (Training materials and programs): www.gcus.com   Societies and Certification Agencies: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: https://www.acog.org/ American College of Radiology: https://www.acr.org/ Sonographer / Physician: American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS): www.ardms.org Physicians: Alliance for Physician Certification & Advancement (APCA): www.APCA.org Point of Care Healthcare Providers: Point of Care Certification Academy (POCUS): www.pocus.org Sonographer / Physician: Cardiovascular Credentialing International (CCI): www.cci-online.org  American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine: https://www.aium.org/   Want to become a Sonographer? Find an accredited long term Ultrasound Program:  https://www.caahep.org/Students/Find-a-Program.aspx

A Neuro Physio Podcast
Dr Annie McCluskey - Stroke rehab UL, sexuality

A Neuro Physio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 49:24


Dr Annie McCluskey is a powerhouse of the stroke rehabilitation world in Australia. She established the StrokeEd collaboration with her partner Karl Schurr (physiotherapist) as well as making significant research contributions in the areas of sexuality, intimacy and upper limb rehabilitation. We hope you enjoy this episode as much as we did recording it.4:50 – Current role6.23 – COVID story7:25 – Clinical career9.15 – StrokeEd collaboration & workshops13.35 – How the workshops can benefit people of varying experience levels15:20 – Coaching for motor skill learning20:00 – Barriers to implementation of EBP23:15 – Making change post COVID24:20 – Telerehab benefits27:50 – Models of knowledge translation31:00 – The myth of no evidence in stroke rehab33:25 – Sexuality & Intimacy post stroke39:25 – Sexuality/Intimacy PDs42:05 – Including people with post complex impairments in research44.20 – PTs & OTs should work togetherTwitter @anniemccluskey2@stroke_edFacebook Annie McCluskey StrokeEdStroke Ed WebpageAnnie's Publication List

The Science of Self Healing with Dr. Sharon Stills
Podcast #62 - All Things Psychedelic: A Gateway to Neurological Health and Resolving Trauma

The Science of Self Healing with Dr. Sharon Stills

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 56:31


Dr. Sharon Stills interviews founder of the Seattle Psychedelic Society Sebastian DeRosia about the previously taboo subject of plant-based medicine in this provocative episode. In a world where drug use has been so abused and misunderstood, Sebastian brings his expertise to the table today and answers questions such as “How much is too much?” “When micro-dosing, will I hallucinate?” “Is this really effective for healing trauma?” and more. Suitable for physicians, practitioners, and lay-people, today's episode peels back the layers of a topic which has been heretofore cloaked in mystery. You will not want to miss this conversation!

Civilianization
Episode 502: VA Presumptives and happy holidays

Civilianization

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 32:24


 Updated September 2021 1 Presumptive Disability Benefits Whatis “Presumptive”Service Connection? VA presumesthat certain disabilities were caused bymilitary service. Thisis because of the unique circumstances of a specific Veteran's military service. If a presumed condition is diagnosed in a Veteran within a certain group, they can be awarded disability compensation. What are “Presumptive” Conditions? If you are diagnosed with a chronic disease within one year of active duty release, you should apply for disability compensation. Examples of chronic disease include: arthritis, diabetes or hypertension. Or, if you served continuously for atleast 90 days and are diagnosedwith amyotrophic lateralsclerosis (ALS) after discharge, you can establish service connection for the disease. Veteransin the following groups may qualify for “presumptive” disability benefits: • Former prisoners of war who: • Have a condition thatis atleast 10 percent disabling • Depending on length of imprisonment, specific conditions are presumed  Imprisoned for any length of time: • Psychosis • Any of the anxiety states • Dysthymic disorder(or depressive neurosis) • Organic residuals of frostbite • Post- traumatic osteoarthritis • Heart disease or hypertensive vascular disease • Stroke and the residual effects • Osteoporosis, when the Veteran has posttraumatic stress disorder Updated September 2021 2  Imprisoned for at least 30 days: • Beriberi (including beriberi heart disease) • Chronic dysentery • Helminthiasis • Malnutrition (including optic atrophy) • Pellagra • Other nutritional deficiencies • Irritable bowel syndrome • Peptic ulcer disease • Peripheral neuropathy • Cirrhosis of the liver • Avitaminosis • Osteoporosis • Vietnam Veterans who were: • Exposed to AgentOrange • Served in the Republic of Vietnamor on a vessel operating not more than 12 nauticalmiles seaward from the demarcation line of the waters of Vietnam and Cambodia between Jan. 9, 1962 andMay 7, 1975 • Specific presumed conditions are: • AL amyloidosis • B-cell leukemia • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia • Multiple myeloma • Type 2 diabetes • Hodgkin's disease • Ischemic heart disease (including but notlimited to, coronary artery disease and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease) • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma • Parkinson's disease • Parkinsonism • Prostate cancer • Respiratory cancers • Soft-tissue sarcoma (not including osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Kaposi'ssarcoma or mesothelioma) • Bladder cancer • Hypothyroidism Updated September 2021 3  The following conditions, if they become greater than 10 percent debilitating within a year of exposure to an herbicide agent: • Acute and subacute peripheral neuropathy • Chloracne or other similar acneform disease • Porphyria cutanea tarda • Atomic Veterans exposed to ionizing radiationand who experienced one of the following: • Participated in atmospheric nuclear testing • Occupied or were prisoners of warinHiroshima orNagasaki • Served before Feb. 1, 1992, at a diffusion plantin Paducah, Kentucky, Portsmouth, Ohio orOak Ridge, Tennessee • Served before Jan. 1, 1974, at Amchitka Island, Alaska Specific presumed conditions are:  All forms of leukemia, except chronic lymphocytic leukemia  Cancer of the thyroid, breast, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, pancreas, bile ducts, gall bladder, salivary gland, urinary tract, brain, bone, lung, colon or ovary  Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma  Multiple myeloma  Lymphomas, other than Hodgkin's disease  Primary liver cancer, except if there are indications of cirrhosis or hepatitis B • Gulf War Veterans who: • Served in the Southwest Asia Theater of Operations • Have a condition that is at least 10 percent disabling by Dec. 31, 2026 • Specific presumed conditions are:  Medically unexplained chronic multi-symptom illnesses that exist for six months or more, such as: • Chronic fatigue syndrome • Fibromyalgia • Irritable bowel syndrome  Any diagnosed or undiagnosed illness that warrants a presumption of service connection, as determined by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs Updated September 2021 4 • Signs or symptoms of an undiagnosed illness include: • Fatigue • Skin symptoms • Headaches • Muscle pain • Joint pain • Neurological or neuropsychologicalsymptoms • Symptoms involving the upper or lower respiratory system • Sleep disturbance • Gastrointestinalsymptoms • Cardiovascular symptoms • Weight loss • Menstrual disorders • Gulf WarVeterans who: • Served in the Southwest Asia Theater of Operations orinAfghanistan on or after September 19, 2001  Manifest one of the following infectious diseasesto a degree of 10 percent ormore within 1 year of separation: • Brucellosis • Campylobacterjejuni • Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) • Nontyphoid Salmonella • Shigella • West Nile virus • Malaria (or when accepted treatisesindicate the incubation period began during a qualifying period of service)  Manifestto a degree of 10 percent ormore at any time after separation: • Mycobacteriumtuberculosis • Visceral leishmaniasis • Gulf War Deployed Veterans who: • Served any length of time in the Southwest Theater of Operations during the Persian Gulf War, or • Served any length of time in Afghanistan, Syria, Djibouti or Uzbekistan on or after September 19, 2001 and • Manifests one of the following to any degree within 10 years from the date of separation from military service: o Asthma o Rhinitis o Sinusitis, to include rhinosinusitis 

A Neuro Physio Podcast
Ann Rahmann - Older Adults, Vestibular, Aquatic Rehab

A Neuro Physio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 56:37


Ann is the ultimate clinical expert with decades of clinical experience and a desire to keep bettering herself time and time again. Her latest venture is in the APA Gerontology fellowship specialisation training program. She already has her PhD, a Grad Cert in Physio and is an APA Titled Gerontological Physio. She has held multiple academic university and clinical lead roles, and is on the faculty for Vestibular Education Australia. Her clinical passions are older adult, vestibular and aquatic rehabilitation and this episode does not disappoint on any of those fronts.4:01 – Career pathway8:10 – Juggling part time roles9:20 – Current role10:25 – Under-dosing exercise in older adults14:00 – Patient beliefs, anxieties and our role17:30 – Risk aversion in hospital23:10 – How Ann maximises therapy in her unit24:50 – Hydrotherapy for older adults29:10 – Registrar training for APA Fellowship36:50 – Driving clinician level research43:35 – Importance of vestibular “phone a friend”45:10 – Central vestibular dysfunction48:10 – Tips for teaching vestibular pathophysiology54:10 – Ann's vestibular courses6 day vestibular competency course2 day introduction to vestibular courseemail: ann.rahmann@uqconnect.edu.auTwitter: @AnnRahmPT

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Finding Neutral with Kevin McCarney

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 48:12


Kevin McCarney is a successful entrepreneur, owner of the restaurant chain, Poquito Mas, public speaker, and mentor. He's also the author of Big Brain Little Brain. Kevin has managed to flip neuroscience into easy to digest language. You can learn about: Neurological responses in our big brain and little brain. What the Little Brain Activators and Big Brain Boosters are and how we could use them. How to “find neutral” and execute awesome communication. How to avoid little brain baggage words and make sure every day is a big brain day. Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   Find out more about Kevin below: Kevin on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-mccarney-5989a92b/ Kevin on Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigbrainlegacy Big Brain Little Brain Website: https://bigbrainlittlebrain.com Kevin on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bigbrainlittlebrain/ Keving on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/BigBrainLegacy   Full Transcript Below ----more----  Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband or friend. Others might call me boss, coach or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   Today's special guest is Kevin McCarney. He's a successful entrepreneur, restaurant chain owner, speaker, and mentor. He's also the author of Big Brain Little Brain, but before we get a chance to speak with Kevin, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: There's a communications theme in today's show. So having spoken to hundreds and hundreds of leaders around the world, we've distilled the top five communication hacks to get us going. For many of us and for many companies and industries around the world, communication has changed drastically. And for many of us, our tried and tested communications methods may no longer work as they used to. Now, this might not seem like a big deal, right? But considering how many online collaboration tools there are available, even the choice of your online tool can make a difference to how you are communicating based on quality and experience. And when we change our communications channels, we fundamentally change how we also communicate whether that's conscious or unconscious. So, in the transit to remote working, we all knew video would be an important thing. And a lot of us still try to avoid using video. If we've had a bad hair day or feeling lousy, or we just want to put some really casual clothes on, but think of how many video conference calls you've had, where most of the participants have kept the camera off, what's happening for you unconsciously? Well, Tracy Brower, author of The Secrets to Happiness at work says it's a mistake to avoid using video. And she outlines those reasons as. Video demonstrates responsibility, communicates confidence, will help build trust and rapport, will help you engage, and video can make you memorable to other people. And Tracy goes on to explain, of course, video may not be appropriate all of the time, but situations where it's preferable, take the advantage of making yourself known. When we start skipping into writing, many of our in-person conversations have turned into emails, Ms Teams messages, texts, notes, and project management apps, and intuitively we tend to send simple texts or messages. But the problem is, that you lose a lot of contexts when you turn your verbal words into text. Business Communications Expert, James Chapman explains what this means. And he says, we can't see smiles or friend expressions. We can't hear a person's voice when we read an email, we're missing the details that help us perceive the mood of the moment. All we see are blunt words, black and white. Lacking is an important visual and audrey cues, makes us fill in the gaps. So, hacks when writing? Ask don't tell, direct instructions can often seem as demands, try and avoid using exclamation points or overusing them. But if you do want to make a sentence sound upbeat or happy, then that's the right time to make a statement appear less flat, start your message with a disclaimer. If you're given feedback or addressing a difficult topic, start with a sentence that says you are writing with kindness and a smile, positivity helps. When you're communicating, explain your intent. And it might seem obvious, but there is a real short of digital body language when you were online and on our Teams or Zoom or Slack meetings. And because there are less physical cues to clarify our intent, people assign meaning to all sorts of non-verbal things that we are trying to say, but do so unconsciously. So, the hack here is by stating intent early, people understand where this comes from, where the message comes from, and it removes the ability for them to start deciphering their own meaning of what you're trying to say. Use storytelling to make your message more engaging, think of how many dull meetings you been into it where just didn't really get to understand what the desired outcome would be. The hack here is to zoom out, to think bigger before we go deeper. And sometimes we get so enamored in the deliverable. We lose sight of the larger story or the larger strategy, and we focus too much on the detail and sure detail is incredibly important, but if people understand how it connects to a bigger story, they're more likely to pay attention and more likely to take action. And finally focus on your communications by creating an experience. Jennifer McClure, CEO of UN Bridal Talent and disrupt HR said, that the adoption of a new communication tech wasn't always a strategic, it could have been. Jennifer says that a major failure of adding in new communication technologies is they're often implemented without a clear goal, which leaves holes in our internal communications and other communications tools get added to patch these up and in turn, it makes a mess of the whole communication system, but as communicators, we own it. It's up to us to create an experience that unifies the people that are paying attention. So, use one platform, but use other tools if they add value, if they don't, ditched them. That's been The Leadership Hacker news today. We always love hearing your stories. So please continue to get in touch. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Kevin McCarney is our special guest on today's show. He's a successful entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Poquito Mas chain of restaurants. He's a speaker, mentor and author, and his latest book is called Big Brain Little Brain. Kevin, we'd delighted to have you on the show. Kevin McCarney: Pleasure to be here Steve. Thank you so much for your time. Steve Rush: So, you have a really great story to tell, and I'd love to kind of get to a little bit about how you arrived and what you're doing today, because it's not a traditional route that you took and actually involved a little bit of an epiphany along the way. So maybe tell us a little bit about the backstory? Kevin McCarney: Yeah, thank you very much. Well, I grew up with a very, very big family where winning the argument was the right of passage. I had four older brothers, two younger sisters and my parents and we we're constantly arguing about different things. And I learned how to win the argument. I learned how to deal with lots of different situations because we moved so much. I think we moved eight times before it was eleven. And so, I got used to reading people before I could even read a book. And I went to work early and I got a job at Universal Studios when I was about 19 and I became a tour guide there and I thought, oh, this is really cool. All I have to do is say the same thing every day, and I'm good, right? And I don't really have to pivot very much. I don't have to think really. And so, it's like, it was fun for me, but then, it was one particular day, you know, I'm this 19-year-old snarky kid. And there was a really hot day. The trams were breaking down because it was over 110 degrees. And all of a sudden, I got a call over the speaker, Kevin, tram on the right. They're all yours. It's a group from Europe, they are not happy, good luck. So, with that, I walk down the tram and I try to make smiles and say hello to people. And they are arms crossed, brow furrow, they were just not going to look at me at all. I get to the front and the leader of the group grabs my arm. He said, take us back to the bus. We don't want to do this anymore. You can't do this to us, and I looked at him. I said, sir, that's way above my pay grade, but you're going to have to sit down because we're moving. And the driver heard me, immediately started moving the van, and this is a three-car tram. So, I have 128 people on this thing. And they're all looking at me like they're angry at me. Like I'm the one who's responsible. And so, my immediate snarky, 19-year-old self-asked the gentleman to sit down, he did, but he looked at me. He says, well fine, but we are not going to have a good time. You cannot make us laugh. We will not enjoy this. And so, I looked at this and I said, okay, in my mind, my snarky 19-year-old says, oh, this is just another argument to win. Right? I'm going to win this argument. I'm just not going to give them a good tour. I'm not going to point things out. I'm not going to show them different things that they've paid to see. I'm not going to do that. And then in the front row of the second car was a family from the Midwest who was completely sunburn like everybody else because of the time in the sun. And they had big smiles on their face and they had t-shirts from the football team that they liked. So, I could see where they were from, but they were smiling at me. And I looked at them and I didn't realize that in a split second, I just made a decision like, wow. Instead of giving a really snarky tour, I'm going to give this family the best tour I can because they're there to have a good time. And so that's what I did. And I began to give that tour to them slowly but surely the people around them came along on the tour and they all started laughing by the end of the tour. Everybody was having a good time and laughing except for the grumpy leader. But it was amazing to me that I didn't even know I had that in me. I didn't know that in a pressure situation, I pivoted from being this kid who wanted to get back at this group to somebody who wanted to make these four people happy because they were smiling. And so, the group said goodbye to me. They were very friendly. But the family waited to speak to me. The father looked at me, said, son, you really turned that group around. Because they were not happy. And I looked at the family and I said, no, you turned them around you. Your smiles gave me permission to switch completely, to a different attitude. And I said, I was going to give completely different tour. It was not going to be friendly. It was not going to be nice. But instead, I gave that tour and the mother of, I can feel her hand to this day, puts her hand on my shoulder. She said, well, I want to thank you for choosing to give us that tour because, we can never were afforded to be in California again. This is the only time and this just made our vacation. Wow, so, I had no idea the power that I had, even as a tour guide, doing my job on these people's life. Steve Rush: It's an amazing story, Kevin, isn't it? You think about the whole principle behind what makes people tick? You could have changed and made a bad day for dozens of people, right? Kevin McCarney: Oh, so many and myself included because what I didn't see until the end, there was one of my supervisors getting off the back row of the tram, because he was auditing me to see how well I was doing. So, you can imagine where my career would've gone and it's a good idea for everything in life, you know, you don't know who's listening sometimes, but in this case, it was a lesson to me. She said chose, that stuck with me for a long time. I'm trying to understand what's happening in pressure situations where you can pivot from one attitude to another one in a split second under pressure. And what I realized and I started doing so much more research on this, which was one of the Genesis of the book, I started making notes on throughout my entire career is how people handle different situations. Steve Rush: What I particularly love about the story, because you tell it in the book is, you've described throughout the book, actually this whole kind of neurological response to how people deal with communication, except you've done it from a non-medical, non textbook perspective and used your own life choices and experiences in playing it back for people to understand in simple terms, right? Kevin McCarney: Yes, absolutely. I started my own restaurant company after that, did a bunch of stuff, then started my company and I realized, okay, I'm learning this stuff myself, how I can manage any particular situation, I can handle pressure. Now, how do I teach my team how to do that? How do I teach other people how to handle these situations? And use a really important segment there, a non-medical, a non-academic language. So, it was easy for people to grasp and they could see it, rather than sounding like, oh, I'm going to use these fancy words. I want to use everyday language so that it made sense in everyday situation. Steve Rush: And I guess that's where the whole notion of Big Brain Little Brain comes from, right? Kevin McCarney: Exactly, and I did enough research to where I started asking everybody and friends of mine, physicians and stuff like that, and you know, it really comes down too, you know, when people drink, their big brain gets cut off from their little brain. The little brain is that reptilian fight or flight brain. And the big brain is that neocortex, all the smart stuff that we know, we know what the right thing is. And what you realize is do different influences, whether they're chemical or environmental have an impact on the way we communicate. Our communication is in constant state of evolution. We're learning from the people around us, but one of the things I noticed and I started really understanding is that the big brain is that brain that's in control. It's genuine, it's thoughtful, its kind, it's a good listener, and it builds trust when you communicate with the big brain. The little brain is that impulsive, sarcastic, snarky, selfish. The brain that snaps back, just a slightest provocation and a really poor listener, and it creates mistrust. And the difference between these two worlds is you're going to have a peaceful life or you're going to have a life that's going to have a lot of bumps of chaos in it. And little brain will create chaos, where big brain will try to come in and clean it up. But if you use your big brain to begin with, you have a much smoother path ahead. Steve Rush: One of the things you said at the top of the show really interested me actually, and it plays on that whole notion of how you read people before you read books. And that's kind of ironic because it turns out that you are dyslexic, and therefore actually you had to rely more on your unconscious behaviors playing out and reading people than you would've done, perhaps working around text and stuff. How much of that did you notice was developing into something over time? Kevin McCarney: You know, so much in growing up. That's exactly what I did. And one of the things that I got really good at reading and again, I didn't read my first book until I was 21. And I was convincing from a friend of mine because I was just so frustrated with the words and everything. But what I got really good was reading tone and I realized how important tone was to every communication. And tone's very difficult in a digital age because I don't think emojis quite give you the tone that they're intended. And so, what I really got to learn was, how much the tone is the message of what you're saying, because you can say the same words in a different tone and they mean something completely different. Steve Rush: Right. Kevin McCarney: I walked into my house one time, 19-hour day. I just want to get in there, sit down and grab some water and relax. And there's 25 choir kids jumping up and down and singing at the top of their lungs. I hadn't known about this meeting, but I opened the door and it's like, okay, what have we got going here? Right. That's what I said, because I had trained myself in situations. But can you imagine if I walked in and went, okay, what do we have going here? Same exact words, but the message to the audience is completely different. And I can tell you, my daughters appreciated the first tone because that's the one I used. And what you really understand, especially as a parent, but also with employees. The tone is the message. And if you can control your tone, you can control the conversation. You can maneuver any conversation. And the most important part of that is that tone is usually the first thing that begins to escalate in a conversation that turns it into a confrontation. Steve Rush: Yeah. Kevin McCarney: I had four, older brothers, I had to get good at this, right. So, I got really good at managing my tone and pulling other people into my tone instead of following them into their little brain tone. Steve Rush: And you call out in the book actually, little brain activators and big brain boosters, right? Kevin McCarney: Yes, that's correct, yeah. Steve Rush: Got it. So, what are they and how would we use them? Kevin McCarney: Little brain and in the book, we have the little brain words in that, but it really comes down too, what people think about you is the last impression that you made on them. So, if you're thinking about, oh, I want to use this company for doing some editing or something and you're thinking, oh, you know what, let me think about which company, and you go to that company and your first thought is going to be the last impression that person made on you, not the first impression, but the last impression. So, if the last impression was that person's rude or disrespectful or abrasive, you're going to be switching to, you know what, let me look at somebody else because what happens is, when we get activated and it could be something as minor as somebody disrespecting our favorite football team and all of a sudden, we think, well, I have to fight for my football team and I have to say something back or it could be cutting off in traffic. Somebody cuts you off and I have to go after them or just somebody being loud in a movie theater. And I think that these are all little everyday situations that if we allow them to annoy us, it gives little brain a lot of power over what we're going to say. So, the idea is, yes, there's going to be things that annoy you and bother you every day. And it could be all these little things. It could be anything at work. It could be things that have been piling up. But if you allow any of these everyday situations to turn that annoyance into a confrontation, then it's because you haven't taken control of that moment. And that's the whole idea buying Big Brain, Little Brain is keep Big Brain in control. Keep Little Brain out of the conversation. Steve Rush: I remember when we first met Kevin, we talked about this whole notion. One of the things that I found really inspirational is your ability to what you call finding neutral. And often that's the bit between where people are activated, triggered, other language in other walks of life. And that emotional response kicks in, is often then too late to tap into your big brain. But you find this bit in the middle called neutral. And I think that's a really essential part, then isn't it, how we then learn how to respond, right? Kevin McCarney: Exactly. And as we mature, we get better at it. And the more we use neutral, the more natural it becomes for us in these situations like where, you know, I walked in and I got surprised, or you get surprised at work with somebody ambushed you with a report. They want you to do anything. But if you can get to neutral and you know, Victor Frankl who survive four different concentration camp, wrote 29 books on human behavior. He had the best line on that. She said between stimulus and response, there's a space. And in that space is our power to choose our response. Steve Rush: Right, yeah. Kevin McCarney: Very much like I chose to give a better tour. And I didn't even know about Victor Frankl at the time. We have a choice, no matter what pressure we're under, whatever somebody has done, somebody's poking us or prorogating us. We still have a choice. And we talk about the fight or flight brain all the time and media and stuff like that. Oh, it's fight or flight, but it's much deeper than that. There's another part of that whole idea is neutral between fight and flight, there is neutral and between and neutral is where you get to pivot and decide where you're going to go. And flight doesn't always mean running away. Sometimes it means stepping out of the way of a problem and fighting doesn't mean you're always going to be confrontational as much as you're going to stand up for yourself if you need to. But the idea behind getting to neutral and having a neutral word and my neutral word as you heard is okay, right. I practice saying, okay, in a very positive tone of voice, because even if, no matter when I'm surprised, I'm going to use my neutral word or my neutral phrase, and we give a whole example in the book. People keep sending me their neutral words. One of them is already or oh really, or interesting, or gosh. Any of these phrases or whatever one people have. And I believe everybody has their own neutral word already. They just don't see it as a tool, and it's a wonderful tool because if you can get to neutral under pressure, it's an immediate awareness that, oh, I had better not let my little brain finish this conversation because it's going to create a problem for me that I got to clean up. That's I got to bring my big brain into here to finish this off. That's what neutral is. And more you use neutral. The more you use that neutral word, the better you're going to be, because it's going to make you stronger and stronger. Steve Rush: So, the Importance of having a neutral word is really essential, isn't it? Cause without it, I guess you would then trigger more little brain activators. Kevin McCarney: Yes, exactly. And I think that what will happen is, you fall into a little brain cycle of, oh, what's the next little brain thing I can use or say, if you don't realize, because the neutral gives you the awareness that you need in that moment. You use your little brain, somebody else is going to respond with their little brain and you just get into a little brain cliche war of talking back and forth and you're get completely off top and you get away from even the conversation you were in, you get more into a reactionary comment. Steve Rush: And without that, can you still get into neutral or does access to big brain become really difficult? Kevin McCarney: No, you can get into neutral at any point. Let's say you've gone down the road a little bit and you may one or two little snarky comments, as soon as you become aware of that, you can go, oh, you know, I probably shouldn't have said it like that. Let me rephrase that. Let me go back. And that's where big brain takes over because it really does. You're constantly evolving in that conversation. You're constantly going to have different moments of awareness, but if you can know that your neutral word is, I see, or oh really? Or you want to take some time and let's say somebody pushed pressure on you. Well, what do you think right now? And in the book, we have a section where we talk about time parachute. Giving you a little time before you answer a question. And, you know, one of the things that I don't like to do is when somebody pushes me, answer this now, right? I go, you know what, I need a little more time to ponder that. That's a really interesting thing. Let me think about that. Let me give that some more thought, let me give it the thought it deserves. Something like a time parachute, gets you out of a lot of sticky situations when you get into them. And I think it's one of those graceful exits that keeps you out of little brain. Steve Rush: It's also gets you straight to neutral. Kevin McCarney: Yes, exactly. And it's a tone of voice. As I never realized how critical it was, but if you watch any movie or any TV, you'll see how manipulative tone can be. Steve Rush: So, in the virtual world, how have you seen this change? So obviously you can hear tone, but I wondered if you could see tone through the way people are typing or the way that they are using emojis in the digital world. Kevin McCarney: Great question. It's more to difficult now than ever because tone is usually decided by the person reading the message, right? So whatever mood they're in, they're going to decide the tone that you wrote that in, whether it is not that tone or not, which is why I always tell people if they get a little brain email from somebody or the little bring text from somebody, instead of trying to out little brain them or out comment them in a text, pick up the phone and just say you know what, or say just say, you know what, can we talk? You know, can we have a conversation? Break away from that medium into a different medium? So, you can really have the time because it's hard to read tone in text, it's just almost impossible, but some people are really good at it. But most people, when it comes to the quickness of communication today, I think the internet has made everybody so fast and impulsive and how quick they think they need to respond. And one of the things we discuss is, no. You don't need to respond right away, give yourself some time, process some of the comments, especially in a business environment or even a family environment where you get an email where somebody was obviously upset or frustrated, you know, it's a good idea to ponder for a little bit before you respond to that. And it really is, go to neutral and think what's the best response I can have for this person in this moment, in this particular communication. Steve Rush: I'd never really joined the dots together actually in so much as when you receive written word, you read it in your own emotive state. Of course, you do. But actually, now you've said it out loud, it makes loads of sense. And that's why lots of people read same text and get a different message, right? Kevin McCarney: Yes, absolutely. And I've been the guilty party on several of those over the years. And I think that one of the things, and I've also been a receiver of so many where I look at something now and I really train myself. And I think that when it comes to communication, we have to constantly being the state of improving, evolving, and training ourselves to get better. We have to practice our verbal muscle memory really to get better at how we respond to different things. And I'm grateful that I've had the time to sort of focus on this for the last several years. Steve Rush: And to help that muscle memory as well in the book you call out some little brain baggage words. I just wonder if you could share to our listeners what they are and how we could maybe use them to help our communication? Kevin McCarney: Yeah, what we call out in the book, there's seven different areas of communication where all these different principles show up that I talk about, whether it's control, tone, words, time, responsibility, power, and awareness. These are the seven areas where all these things can show up, but little brain, again, little brain. These baggage words is the last impression you made. And it's the last thing you said, or the last interaction you had with that person. And so, if your little brain you're going to have under control, you're going to rude. And, you may have under tone, you may have disrespectful and words, abrasive. People know this stuff, they remember this, they remember the little brain component of your last communication, more than they remember the big brain component, because they'll remember if you were immature or snarky, they'll remember that, and a big brain, you know, legacy words, you know, you've got to work harder to make people remember those, whether it's sincerity or trusting or welcoming, considerate, it is two different worlds when it comes to what people think about you. And it really is, you know, essentially your reputation is online with every communication that you do Steve Rush: To your knowledge and experience, is the reason why we can remember little brain words more because it sits in the emotional part of our brain rather than the logical part of our brain? Kevin McCarney: Absolutely, and again, with tone, but a lot of these words are how they make us feel. And the negative feelings are definitely more prominent and it sits there a little bit longer. And, you know, I think that you can erase these words by the way, you can get rid of the negative little brain baggage words by recognizing, oh, with this person. The last time I talked to them, I think I was a little bit rude. So next time I talked to them, I'm going to start off with, you know what, hey, by the way, apologize for last time, I think I was a little snarky or something. You can just take it away. And that's the beautiful thing about, anybody that you've had a difficult communication with. You can go back and look where you may have made a mistake and you can undo it. You can erase it by, going in and literally addressing it and dealing with it so they can say, oh yeah, okay. I remember that, but he said something and he's he apologized or they said, oh yeah, it was for a different reason. The idea is, you always have control over this communication. Even if you said something wrong, you can go back and fix it. Steve Rush: So, I guess falling into the trap of little brain language, little brain words, and baggage words, that's natural behavior because we've learned that way of doing things. And we've learned a response set in response to different emotions or events. So how can we make sure that we are spending more time in the big brain? Kevin McCarney: Well, I think the first thing you can do is, every day you can take a look at where you're at and recognize it. You get up in the morning, you go, okay, what's going on today? Is anything wrong physically? Is there anything bothering you emotionally? What are some of the outside influences that might be controlling you today? And so, if you go through that and go, yeah, you know what? I got this report due and I'm of anxiety. Just go through, and there's a whole list in the book, check them off. There're eight little areas, check them off to make sure that if you know, you've got something, a situation that's going to go into little brain, you know, that going in, which means you can stay in big brain much longer. And it really is a daily checklist of making sure you can do that. The other thing I think is the most important thing is every day, wake up with the idea that if you control your tone, you control your life. Steve Rush: I like that, very powerful, the same words, different tone, different outcome. Kevin McCarney: Yeah, different outcome completely. And that's the greatest lesson, because you know, I've seen it so many times and I've given so many presentations to different groups and you watch sometimes when you talk about neutral, you see light bulbs go off. I have people practice their tones. I go, okay, say this word in an angry tone. Now say this word in a pleasant tone. And when you really use a little bit of tone training, all of a sudden you get people immediately to become aware, oh, and it's because we're not taught this in school or when we are growing up, we gather our information on communication by the environments we're in. And if the environment doesn't teach us, then we've got to go out and find it somewhere else. Steve Rush: So, here's the thing. It's a really interesting point you just come across. Actually, I've had this conversation with a number of people over time. What's the reason we don't teach this stuff at school? Kevin McCarney: You know, I think interpersonal communication is sometimes seen as it's not academic. And it's not something that people have paid attention too. My local school, just beginning to pay attention, because you know, everybody's talking about mindfulness, right? Well, mindfulness begins with the way you communicate. And I'm pushing them to do something along the lines of getting people to communicate. And again, not just about, you know, how to handle confrontations or things like that, but really how to communicate more effectively. And I think from an academic standpoint, they're looking at curriculum and that's all they have time to deal with. So, it's outside the curriculum, and I've spoken at a school every year, locally here to this group of kids because they want this message for that group. And it's outside the curriculum, but it's inside the school. And it's really beginning to help. I think it would be wonderful if more people could do this because you're right. I just think that the academic world is not their fault as much as they're not necessarily aware of this. And even my book, isn't going to be seen by an academic culture as, oh yeah. Even though it's laid out where you can teach this, it's going to be, they have to understand it's not based upon some academic school, this is street psychology. This is observational life psychology. And it's not about white coats and animals testing or putting wires on people. This is everyday life and it's more difficult for people to accept. Steve Rush: And ironically, the more academia we have it's put into work in everyday life, which is the, where the rubber really hits the road. So actually, what you have in absolute terms is the effect of all of that psychology going on, which I think is why it plays out so well. Kevin McCarney: Yeah, I think it does. We have to always understand that we're evolving in our communication every day and every situation and every environment we're in and we can get better at it. And I think that everybody has the ability to get at communicating. And I think that's going to be the challenge. I think that one of my favorite stories is my own story where, you know, I got much better at tone after my five-year-old daughter taught me a lesson when I was under a Christmas tree, trying to put up some lights. And I saw her walking up the steps of a ladder, and I said, Caitlyn, get down from there, right. And then she did, she kept walking up and I yelled again. Caitlyn, get down from there, raise my voice, right. And I get out from the tree and I'm about to launch a very louder, angry tone. And she looks at me and she's got an angel in her hand. She wants to put it on top of the tree. I did not see that, which is a metaphor for life. We don't see everything, you know, that we react to. And I looked at her and she looks at me and I said, Caitlyn, it's dangerous. You've got to get down from there. And this five-year-old looks at me, she goes, I like that tone better daddy. Steve Rush: Wow. Kevin McCarney: Wow. Steve Rush: How interesting is that? Kevin McCarney: Yeah, because if we're tuning into our kids, they're much more pure in their communication. They're much cleaner in their communication. They're not muddled, by all the other extra words, they know what they're reading, they're reading tone. So, it's a wonderful lesson for me. It was a wonderful lesson and it still is. Steve Rush: Yeah. Kevin McCarney: But it really comes down to, we're constantly evolving and don't ever think that we've learned enough to where we don't have to learn anymore about communicating. This is everyday communication. We still have to get better at it. Steve Rush: And it'll always be evolving because the world's changing. The way we communicate changes, the medium in which we do so changes and in therefore our response to it. So, it'll always be something that's new and fresh for us to get into, right. Kevin McCarney: Exactly, and I'm grateful. We got podcasts like yours, that are out there to get the word out to more people. Because I think podcasts have been one of the greatest things that the digital generation has created. More information, more sources of good information where people want to take the time to listen. The idea that there's taking the time to listen to a podcast. They're not just looking at something on a screen, but they're listening is fantastic because we have to train people to listen more. Because that's when they start thinking things through when they're listening. Steve Rush: Yeah, superb and thanks for endorsing our podcast as well. And the genre, because I'm with you, right. This is a means to help people and grow people's awareness. And actually, the more we can do that collectively as an entire community, then the better. Kevin McCarney: Yeah, absolutely. My goal is to get the entire world to neutral for a while. Steve Rush: Yeah. Kevin McCarney: You know, so we can pivot and be more productive. Steve Rush: So, I'm going to ask a step into neutral as we now pivot into the next part of our show. Kevin McCarney: Okay. Steve Rush: So, this is part of the show where we start to tap into your broad and extensive leadership career and I'm looking for you to kind of tap into all of that experience and think about, what would be the top three leadership hacks you could share with our audience? Kevin McCarney: Probably one of the most important is something that came out of a situation again where I had employees not talking to each other and they were grunting. And I finally sat one of them down and said, listen, there's a meeting coming up. The other, person's not going to be here. I want you to say three things that person does really well at the end of the meeting, and then end the meeting. And he did a wonderful job of doing that. And the next day after that meeting where the person who he wasn't speaking to wasn't there, but the next day he walked in and all of a sudden that person was speaking to him and being very friendly. And what we noticed is that, without her being there, he used what we now have labeled as good gossip. Good gossip is one of the greatest leadership hacks ever because you can strategically use it. It has to be honest, otherwise it won't work, but it's strategically talking nice about somebody or saying nice about somebody behind their back, because it does multiple things. In today's world, it gets back to everybody, there are no secrets anymore. You can't whisper, that doesn't make a different. People just turn up the sound. And when it comes to that internal communication of a company. Gossip is a cancer where good gossip is a cure. Steve Rush: Fantastic. Kevin McCarney: Because if you can say nice things about people behind their back, it not only makes that person to feel good, because they'll hear it, but it makes the people that are listening to you, trust you because now they're getting, oh, that's really cool that they're saying something nice about somebody because that elevates their trust level in that person. So, I would say, definitely say one of my hacks would be good gossip because it's absolutely incredibly powerful and incredibly useful. The next thing I would say is, control your tone. You know, it is probably the most important thing and practice your tone. And I think that, you know, realize that no matter what situation you're in, you always have a choice. You always have a choice. You don't have to do or say anything. You always have a choice. It's going to be to understand and really use these words, say it to yourself. How I can communicate is who I am. And how you communicate is who you are. And if you can understand it, how you communicate and that the words you use today are going to be with you forever. Especially in this environment, we're in where everybody's got a recording device on their hip. The words you use today will follow you forever. So, choose the words you want to follow you. Steve Rush: I love those. I particularly love the good gossip. I think it's just a great notion and would drive so many positive outcomes. Kevin McCarney: I saw it work and we still see it work so often. And again, watch it even amongst your own friends and watch how they respond when you're talking good about somebody who's not there. And it's a way we can train people to use good gossip because it travels the same path as gossip, exactly. But it has completely different and much more productive results. Steve Rush: So, the next part of the show, we call it Hack to Attack. So, this is typically where something hasn't worked out as well as you'd thought and would work out or maybe it's quite catastrophic, but as a result of it, there is a learning experience for you. And it's now a positive in your life or work. So, what would be your Hack to Attack Kevin? Kevin McCarney: Well, I think that the thing that has taught me the most is standing behind the counter at the restaurant for the first seven years and realizing because I was so good at winning arguments, you know, customers would come in and they would say something and I know I'm right, right. I knew that they ordered the food wrong or something. And I kept trying to win the argument with the customer. And only realize is it's not that the customer's always right. They're not, and I don't want to throw employees under the bus. Oh, the customer's always right. The customers not always right. But in the pressure of the moment, customer actually believes that they're right. And I learned that lesson a couple times when I was trying to win the argument and I saw people storm out and I realized, gosh, how do I get that person back? I don't want to win the argument. I want to win that moment. I want to win that person back. So that was part of the Genesis of what we're talking about is that, I had to learn that winning the argument is sometimes losing. And it's not that the customer's always right. Again, they're not. The customer believes though in that moment that they're right. And you have to bring them back. You have to bring them back to your reality because we're in the hospitality business, we're in the business of bringing people back to life. I realized when I was behind the counter that I'm in the business of serving people with low blood sugar. Steve Rush: Yes, it's true actually, right. Kevin McCarney: So, they walk in, they're hungry. So, they're not necessarily mentally exactly who they normally want to be. And so, if you get anything wrong, it's physiological. They're hungry. So, what I learned is, oh, okay. There's a physiological state here that I'm dealing with. I have to train all my people, how to deal with people in this age, because our job is to bring people back. I want to bring as many people back, you know, there was situation in a restaurant where a customer got completely out of control, and we were able to bring her back and to the point where she apologized. And when I tell my employees right now, I said, look, the word restaurant comes from the word restaurant it's a French word, right? And it comes from a 1765. A guy named Boulangers in Paris is the story that Marion Webster puts out there. Couldn't get into any of the food union. So, he created his own little soup and stews place, and he put a sign, at his window, come in you weary traveler. And my stews will restore you. And it's the perfect idea of what the restaurant business is all about. And I think any business, really. People are looking to be restored. They're looking for something to make them feel good, whether it's listening or whether it's eating, they're looking for something and make them feel good. So, they're going to come back to something that makes them feel good. I'm in the business of restoring people. They come in, they're hungry. Somebody was angry at work. Our job is to send them back out restored. My employees have done a wonderful job of doing that for 37 years. Steve Rush: And what's made Poquito Mas so successful Kevin? If you put communication at the heart of all of that, right? Kevin McCarney: Absolutely, communication and honesty and freshness. And just knowing that your customers are human and your employees are human and you know what? You're going to work with whatever situation comes up, it will be fine. I can't say I'm not surprised, but I'm not shocked by many things anymore. Steve Rush: Now the last part of the show. We get to give you a chance to do some time travel. You get to bump into Kevin at 21, and you get to give him some advice. So, what would it be? Kevin McCarney: Listen more than you speak, because you will learn so much more and you will know what to say when you do speak. Because my 21-year-olds self was not a great listener. And I think that listening was probably the one lesson that I learned gave me the most insight. Do that, listen, and don't be in a hurry. Steve Rush: Really powerful words, really powerful. Love it. Now, having listened to you today and knowing all the great work you do, Big Brain Little Brain, by the way, is a great read. It's packed of tools and traps you call it. So, if folks will listen to this, I wanted to copy of the book or wanted to learn a little bit more about your work Kevin, where's the best place for us to send them Kevin McCarney: bigbrainlittlebrain.com. And you can go to kevin@bigbrainlittlebrain.com. And I return all my emails and you can click on the link and get to Amazon to buy a book and please leave a review, good or bad, leave a review, whatever you feel about it. I think it's the most important thing right now is to get the word out to people. Steve Rush: And of course, unless you're in California, you're unlikely to bump into Paquito Mas. Kevin McCarney: Yes, absolutely. Paquito Mas is in LA. We've got eight locations. We've been around, like I said, 37 years and we make everything from scratch every day. Every tortilla, everything. So, it's good food. And you know, we're still in business and I feel grateful that we've survived this last year and a half. And I know that no matter what's ahead of us, we'll deal with it. Steve Rush: Yeah. Kevin, thank you ever so much for sharing your stories and helping us all find our neutral word. I think that's the goal for the day and sharing your wider experience with us and just thanks of being part of our community on The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Kevin McCarney: Well, Steve, I can't thank you enough for doing this. I listen to your stuff and it's just such so healthy to listen to a program like this. It's healthy, and I appreciate you're here Steve Rush: And I appreciate you too. Thanks, Kevin. Kevin McCarney: All right, sir. Closing   Steve Rush: I genuinely want to say heartfelt thanks for taking time out of your day to listen in too. We do this in the service of helping others, and spreading the word of leadership. Without you listening in, there would be no show. So please subscribe now if you have not done so already. Share this podcast with your communities, network, and help us develop a community and a tribe of leadership hackers.   Finally, if you would like me to work with your senior team, your leadership community, keynote an event, or you would like to sponsor an episode. Please connect with us, by our social media. And you can do that by following and liking our pages on Twitter and Facebook our handler there: @leadershiphacker. Instagram you can find us there: @the_leadership_hacker and at YouTube, we are just Leadership Hacker, so that is me signing off. I am Steve Rush and I have been the leadership hacker.