Podcasts about Yuan

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Best podcasts about Yuan

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Latest podcast episodes about Yuan

The Dividend Cafe
The DC Today - Tuesday, January 31, 2023

The Dividend Cafe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 6:31


ASK DAVID “Would you mind giving me your Cribb note version of your expectations on the USD's devaluation now that Saudi Arabia (and probably others) are willing to trade oil for other currencies than the US dollar? If you expect a significant currency related (not just inflation related) devaluation, do you have an idea of how we can offset that?” ~ D.M. The main thing to say is that: Saudi has not yet done it, it will take a while to happen, it may happen at very small levels, and we do not expect a significant devaluation from this alone. We do believe it is a shot across the bow geopolitically, but not in fundamental forex (yet). The major thing for investors to understand is not that the collapse of the dollar is imminent (I wish I had one dollar for every time someone has suggested that or fretted over it in front of me over the last 25 years, for I would surely have a great deal of very spendable and exchangeable and useable dollars). Rather, it is that China is desperately seeking international legitimacy for their Yuan. The rest of this subject is mostly noise. Links mentioned in this episode: [TheDCToday.com] https://bahnsen.co/3JMMeP1 DividendCafe.com TheBahnsenGroup.com

The Real Investment Show Podcast
The Fed Calls for More Rate Hikes (1/19/23)

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 47:36


(1/19/23) The Fed Whisperer says there are more rate hikes coming, despite the weight of inflation on markets & the economy. Retail Sales in December were off more than 1% (and 70% of the economy is consumer-driven). Stil to come will be the recessionary effect on earnings, as well as the lag effect of rate hikes. Debt Ceiling Deadline: There will be no default; the Crypto crunch; meanwhile, the same Fed rhetoric: More Rate Hikes to come. When will the Fed stall, and for how long, before the "pivot?" Where to invest as the Fed continues? The Value of the US Dollar: A weaker dollar is better for Commodity purchases; bonds and stocks are pricing-in a Goldilocks environment; stocks vs ETF's? The issue of volatility is what hampers Crypto-currency; the Yen and Yuan swing +/- 2% in one day! Gold vs Dollar theories. SEG-1: The Fed Whisperer: More Rate Hikes Coming SEG-2: Why There Will Be No Default SEG-3: Where to Invest as the Fed Continues Rate Hikes SEG-4: Is the End of the Dollar Impossible? Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist Lance Roberts, CIO, w Portfolio Manager, Michael Lebowitz, CFA Produced by Brent Clanton, Executive Producer -------- Watch today's show on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRBozglgA_Q&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1 -------- The latest installment of our new feature, Before the Bell | "Has Inflation Already Been Beaten?" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxKWW2vFu7U&list=PLwNgo56zE4RAbkqxgdj-8GOvjZTp9_Zlz&index=1 -------- Our previous show is here: "ETF's vs Stocks: Where are the Investing Opportunities this Year?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkOoIAE7EV8&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=2 -------- Articles mentioned in this podcast: "Treasury Bonds FAQ:" https://realinvestmentadvice.com/treasury-bonds-faq "The “Pain Trade” Is Higher For Now" https://realinvestmentadvice.com/the-pain-trade-is-higher-for-now/ -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- SUBSCRIBE to The Real Investment Show here: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealInvestmentShow -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #InvestingAdvice #FederalReserve #USDollar #InterestRates #RateHikes #Recession #Inflation #InvestingOpportunities #Markets #Money #Investing

Lance Roberts' Real Investment Hour
The Fed Calls for More Rate Hikes (1/19/23)

Lance Roberts' Real Investment Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 47:35


(1/19/23) The Fed Whisperer says there are more rate hikes coming, despite the weight of inflation on markets & the economy. Retail Sales in December were off more than 1% (and 70% of the economy is consumer-driven). Stil to come will be the recessionary effect on earnings, as well as the lag effect of rate hikes. Debt Ceiling Deadline: There will be no default; the Crypto crunch; meanwhile, the same Fed rhetoric: More Rate Hikes to come. When will the Fed stall, and for how long, before the "pivot?" Where to invest as the Fed continues? The Value of the US Dollar: A weaker dollar is better for Commodity purchases; bonds and stocks are pricing-in a Goldilocks environment; stocks vs ETF's? The issue of volatility is what hampers Crypto-currency; the Yen and Yuan swing +/- 2% in one day! Gold vs Dollar theories. SEG-1: The Fed Whisperer: More Rate Hikes Coming SEG-2: Why There Will Be No Default SEG-3: Where to Invest as the Fed Continues Rate Hikes SEG-4: Is the End of the Dollar Impossible? Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist Lance Roberts, CIO, w Portfolio Manager, Michael Lebowitz, CFA Produced by Brent Clanton, Executive Producer -------- Watch today's show on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRBozglgA_Q&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1 -------- The latest installment of our new feature, Before the Bell | "Has Inflation Already Been Beaten?" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxKWW2vFu7U&list=PLwNgo56zE4RAbkqxgdj-8GOvjZTp9_Zlz&index=1 -------- Our previous show is here: "ETF's vs Stocks: Where are the Investing Opportunities this Year?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkOoIAE7EV8&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=2 -------- Articles mentioned in this podcast: "Treasury Bonds FAQ:" https://realinvestmentadvice.com/treasury-bonds-faq "The “Pain Trade” Is Higher For Now" https://realinvestmentadvice.com/the-pain-trade-is-higher-for-now/ -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- SUBSCRIBE to The Real Investment Show here: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealInvestmentShow -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #InvestingAdvice #FederalReserve #USDollar #InterestRates #RateHikes #Recession #Inflation #InvestingOpportunities #Markets #Money #Investing

Things Have Changed
The End of U.S. Dollar Dominance?

Things Have Changed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 24:46


The dollar tumbled to a nine-month low against the euro this past week, after data showed U.S. inflation was easing, prompting bets that the Federal Reserve will be less aggressive with rate hikes going forward. But this isn't new.. The greenback's share of global foreign-exchange reserves has extended a two-decade decline, but it's still used more than all other currencies combined. For decades, the dollar has been the worlds most important currency. You buy energy in dollars, you pay back debts in dollars, and most of world trade is done in dollars. This gives the United States a unique amount of influence which some countries acknowledge is a challenge. Recently, developing countries including Brazil, Russia, India & China have been steering away from the surging US Dollar, in their global transactions. China, the worlds biggest trading partner, could also start demanding “Yuan” for it's exports instead of dollars - I mean they're starting to do that already! BRICS (Brazil, Russia, Inida, China, and South Africa) recently hinted at a plan to “dethrone” the dollar. A system of trade between the countries that could reduce the importance of the dollar for more than 40% of the world population. The dollar will remain the worlds reserve currency for a while but as the United States sanction countries that do not align with its political agenda, it becomes increasingly clear that dollar dominance comes at the risk of US policy alignment. Will we see the US dollar become less relevant? So today, on Things Have Changed, we're going to talk about the US Dollar declines, why the rest of the world celebrates when this happens & the possibility of the US Dollar becoming less dominant as new contenders around the globe emerge! Support the show

Macro Musings with David Beckworth
Paul Tucker on *Global Discord: Values and Power in a Fractured World Order*

Macro Musings with David Beckworth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 58:13


Paul Tucker is a 33-year veteran of the Bank of England, where among other positions, he served as both a member and deputy governor of the Monetary Policy Committee. Currently, Paul is a research fellow at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard. He is also a returning guest to the podcast, and rejoins Macro Musings to talk about his new book, *Global Discord: Values and Power in a Fractured World.* Specifically, David and Paul also discuss China's push for reserve currency status, how to sell international legitimacy to the general public, the geopolitical advantage of trade deals, and much more.   Transcript for the episode can be found here.   Paul's Harvard profile Paul's website   David's Twitter: @DavidBeckworth Follow us on Twitter: @Macro_Musings   Click here for the latest Macro Musings episodes sent straight to your inbox! Check out our new Macro Musings merch here!   Related Links:   *Global Discord: Values and Power in a Fractured World Order* by Paul Tucker   *Unelected Power: The Quest for Legitimacy in Central Banking and the Regulatory State* by Paul Tucker   *Quantitative Easing, Monetary Policy Implementation, and the Public Finances* by Paul Tucker   *Biden Needs Allies to Keep China and Russia in Check. Here's How to Do it.* by Sebastian Mallaby

The Academic Life
The Climate Change Scientist: A Conversation with Dr. Shuang-ye Wu

The Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 61:15


What is the difference between global warming and climate change? This episode explores: What led Dr. Wu into STEM, and to the study of climate change. Why the term global warming is misleading, and potentially confusing. Why weather around the world is getting more extreme. What she foresees for the future, and what we can do to change that. Why human choices matter on much a larger scale than most people realize. A discussion of the article “Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal”. Today's article is: Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal by Dr. Shuang-ye Wu, which provides an overview of the record-breaking heat and historic floods of 2022. Dr. Wu discusses how the new abnormal is increasingly seen as the new weather pattern, why it's dangerous to normalize this, and what we can do change it. “Welcome to the New Abnormal” was published in The Conversation on September 21, 2022. Our guest is: Dr. Shuang-ye Wu, who is a climate scientist. Dr. Wu uses climate models to project future climate change and its potential impacts on the hydrological cycle, including precipitation, extreme storms and flood risks. She also collaborates with researchers in ice core science and stable isotope geochemistry investigate climate and environmental change in the past ten thousand years. Dr. Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2000 where she studied environmental geography. She joined the University of Dayton department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences in 2004 after completing three-year post-doctoral research at Pennsylvania State University. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles in high-impact scientific journals, and received close to two million dollars in external funding for her research. Dr. Wu teaches a variety courses mainly in the field of climate change, environmental geosciences, and Geographical Information Systems. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode may also be interested in: The Conversation article: 2022's US Climate Disasters: A tale of too much rain and too little The Conversation article: For a Flooded Midwest Climate Forecasts Offer Little Comfort Bedaso, Z., & Wu, S. Y. (2020). Daily precipitation isotope variation in Midwestern United States: Implication for hydroclimate and moisture source. Science of The Total Environment, 713, 136631. Yuan, W., Wu, S. Y., Hou, S., Xu, Z., & Lu, H. (2019). Normalized Difference Vegetation Index‐based assessment of climate change impact on vegetation growth in the humid‐arid transition zone in northern China during 1982–2013. International Journal of Climatology, 39(15), 5583-5598. Wu, Y., Ji, H., Wen, J., Wu, S.-Y., Xu, M., Tagle, F., Duan, W., Li, J. (2018). The characteristics of regional persistent heavy precipitation events over eastern monsoon China during 1960-2013. Global and Planetary Change, 172, pp.414-427. Welcome to The Academic Life! Join us here each week, where we go inside the academy to learn directly from experts. We embrace a broad definition of what it means to lead an academic life, and are inspired by today's knowledge-producers working inside and outside the academy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/academic-life

New Books in Environmental Studies
The Climate Change Scientist: A Conversation with Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 61:15


What is the difference between global warming and climate change? This episode explores: What led Dr. Wu into STEM, and to the study of climate change. Why the term global warming is misleading, and potentially confusing. Why weather around the world is getting more extreme. What she foresees for the future, and what we can do to change that. Why human choices matter on much a larger scale than most people realize. A discussion of the article “Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal”. Today's article is: Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal by Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, which provides an overview of the record-breaking heat and historic floods of 2022. Dr. Wu discusses how the new abnormal is increasingly seen as the new weather pattern, why it's dangerous to normalize this, and what we can do change it. “Welcome to the New Abnormal” was published in The Conversation on September 21, 2022. Our guest is: Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, who is a climate scientist. Dr. Wu uses climate models to project future climate change and its potential impacts on the hydrological cycle, including precipitation, extreme storms and flood risks. She also collaborates with researchers in ice core science and stable isotope geochemistry investigate climate and environmental change in the past ten thousand years. Dr. Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2000 where she studied environmental geography. She joined the University of Dayton department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences in 2004 after completing three-year post-doctoral research at Pennsylvania State University. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles in high-impact scientific journals, and received close to two million dollars in external funding for her research. Dr. Wu teaches a variety courses mainly in the field of climate change, environmental geosciences, and Geographical Information Systems. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode may also be interested in: The Conversation article: 2022's US Climate Disasters: A tale of too much rain and too little The Conversation article: For a Flooded Midwest Climate Forecasts Offer Little Comfort Bedaso, Z., & Wu, S. Y. (2020). Daily precipitation isotope variation in Midwestern United States: Implication for hydroclimate and moisture source. Science of The Total Environment, 713, 136631. Yuan, W., Wu, S. Y., Hou, S., Xu, Z., & Lu, H. (2019). Normalized Difference Vegetation Index‐based assessment of climate change impact on vegetation growth in the humid‐arid transition zone in northern China during 1982–2013. International Journal of Climatology, 39(15), 5583-5598. Wu, Y., Ji, H., Wen, J., Wu, S.-Y., Xu, M., Tagle, F., Duan, W., Li, J. (2018). The characteristics of regional persistent heavy precipitation events over eastern monsoon China during 1960-2013. Global and Planetary Change, 172, pp.414-427. Welcome to The Academic Life! Join us here each week, where we go inside the academy to learn directly from experts. We embrace a broad definition of what it means to lead an academic life, and are inspired by today's knowledge-producers working inside and outside the academy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in World Affairs
The Climate Change Scientist: A Conversation with Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 61:15


What is the difference between global warming and climate change? This episode explores: What led Dr. Wu into STEM, and to the study of climate change. Why the term global warming is misleading, and potentially confusing. Why weather around the world is getting more extreme. What she foresees for the future, and what we can do to change that. Why human choices matter on much a larger scale than most people realize. A discussion of the article “Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal”. Today's article is: Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal by Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, which provides an overview of the record-breaking heat and historic floods of 2022. Dr. Wu discusses how the new abnormal is increasingly seen as the new weather pattern, why it's dangerous to normalize this, and what we can do change it. “Welcome to the New Abnormal” was published in The Conversation on September 21, 2022. Our guest is: Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, who is a climate scientist. Dr. Wu uses climate models to project future climate change and its potential impacts on the hydrological cycle, including precipitation, extreme storms and flood risks. She also collaborates with researchers in ice core science and stable isotope geochemistry investigate climate and environmental change in the past ten thousand years. Dr. Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2000 where she studied environmental geography. She joined the University of Dayton department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences in 2004 after completing three-year post-doctoral research at Pennsylvania State University. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles in high-impact scientific journals, and received close to two million dollars in external funding for her research. Dr. Wu teaches a variety courses mainly in the field of climate change, environmental geosciences, and Geographical Information Systems. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode may also be interested in: The Conversation article: 2022's US Climate Disasters: A tale of too much rain and too little The Conversation article: For a Flooded Midwest Climate Forecasts Offer Little Comfort Bedaso, Z., & Wu, S. Y. (2020). Daily precipitation isotope variation in Midwestern United States: Implication for hydroclimate and moisture source. Science of The Total Environment, 713, 136631. Yuan, W., Wu, S. Y., Hou, S., Xu, Z., & Lu, H. (2019). Normalized Difference Vegetation Index‐based assessment of climate change impact on vegetation growth in the humid‐arid transition zone in northern China during 1982–2013. International Journal of Climatology, 39(15), 5583-5598. Wu, Y., Ji, H., Wen, J., Wu, S.-Y., Xu, M., Tagle, F., Duan, W., Li, J. (2018). The characteristics of regional persistent heavy precipitation events over eastern monsoon China during 1960-2013. Global and Planetary Change, 172, pp.414-427. Welcome to The Academic Life! Join us here each week, where we go inside the academy to learn directly from experts. We embrace a broad definition of what it means to lead an academic life, and are inspired by today's knowledge-producers working inside and outside the academy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in American Studies
The Climate Change Scientist: A Conversation with Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 61:15


What is the difference between global warming and climate change? This episode explores: What led Dr. Wu into STEM, and to the study of climate change. Why the term global warming is misleading, and potentially confusing. Why weather around the world is getting more extreme. What she foresees for the future, and what we can do to change that. Why human choices matter on much a larger scale than most people realize. A discussion of the article “Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal”. Today's article is: Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal by Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, which provides an overview of the record-breaking heat and historic floods of 2022. Dr. Wu discusses how the new abnormal is increasingly seen as the new weather pattern, why it's dangerous to normalize this, and what we can do change it. “Welcome to the New Abnormal” was published in The Conversation on September 21, 2022. Our guest is: Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, who is a climate scientist. Dr. Wu uses climate models to project future climate change and its potential impacts on the hydrological cycle, including precipitation, extreme storms and flood risks. She also collaborates with researchers in ice core science and stable isotope geochemistry investigate climate and environmental change in the past ten thousand years. Dr. Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2000 where she studied environmental geography. She joined the University of Dayton department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences in 2004 after completing three-year post-doctoral research at Pennsylvania State University. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles in high-impact scientific journals, and received close to two million dollars in external funding for her research. Dr. Wu teaches a variety courses mainly in the field of climate change, environmental geosciences, and Geographical Information Systems. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode may also be interested in: The Conversation article: 2022's US Climate Disasters: A tale of too much rain and too little The Conversation article: For a Flooded Midwest Climate Forecasts Offer Little Comfort Bedaso, Z., & Wu, S. Y. (2020). Daily precipitation isotope variation in Midwestern United States: Implication for hydroclimate and moisture source. Science of The Total Environment, 713, 136631. Yuan, W., Wu, S. Y., Hou, S., Xu, Z., & Lu, H. (2019). Normalized Difference Vegetation Index‐based assessment of climate change impact on vegetation growth in the humid‐arid transition zone in northern China during 1982–2013. International Journal of Climatology, 39(15), 5583-5598. Wu, Y., Ji, H., Wen, J., Wu, S.-Y., Xu, M., Tagle, F., Duan, W., Li, J. (2018). The characteristics of regional persistent heavy precipitation events over eastern monsoon China during 1960-2013. Global and Planetary Change, 172, pp.414-427. Welcome to The Academic Life! Join us here each week, where we go inside the academy to learn directly from experts. We embrace a broad definition of what it means to lead an academic life, and are inspired by today's knowledge-producers working inside and outside the academy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
The Climate Change Scientist: A Conversation with Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 61:15


What is the difference between global warming and climate change? This episode explores: What led Dr. Wu into STEM, and to the study of climate change. Why the term global warming is misleading, and potentially confusing. Why weather around the world is getting more extreme. What she foresees for the future, and what we can do to change that. Why human choices matter on much a larger scale than most people realize. A discussion of the article “Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal”. Today's article is: Looking Back on America's Summer of Heat, Floods, and Climate Change: Welcome to the New Abnormal by Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, which provides an overview of the record-breaking heat and historic floods of 2022. Dr. Wu discusses how the new abnormal is increasingly seen as the new weather pattern, why it's dangerous to normalize this, and what we can do change it. “Welcome to the New Abnormal” was published in The Conversation on September 21, 2022. Our guest is: Dr. Shuang-Yu Wu, who is a climate scientist. Dr. Wu uses climate models to project future climate change and its potential impacts on the hydrological cycle, including precipitation, extreme storms and flood risks. She also collaborates with researchers in ice core science and stable isotope geochemistry investigate climate and environmental change in the past ten thousand years. Dr. Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2000 where she studied environmental geography. She joined the University of Dayton department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences in 2004 after completing three-year post-doctoral research at Pennsylvania State University. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles in high-impact scientific journals, and received close to two million dollars in external funding for her research. Dr. Wu teaches a variety courses mainly in the field of climate change, environmental geosciences, and Geographical Information Systems. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode may also be interested in: The Conversation article: 2022's US Climate Disasters: A tale of too much rain and too little The Conversation article: For a Flooded Midwest Climate Forecasts Offer Little Comfort Bedaso, Z., & Wu, S. Y. (2020). Daily precipitation isotope variation in Midwestern United States: Implication for hydroclimate and moisture source. Science of The Total Environment, 713, 136631. Yuan, W., Wu, S. Y., Hou, S., Xu, Z., & Lu, H. (2019). Normalized Difference Vegetation Index‐based assessment of climate change impact on vegetation growth in the humid‐arid transition zone in northern China during 1982–2013. International Journal of Climatology, 39(15), 5583-5598. Wu, Y., Ji, H., Wen, J., Wu, S.-Y., Xu, M., Tagle, F., Duan, W., Li, J. (2018). The characteristics of regional persistent heavy precipitation events over eastern monsoon China during 1960-2013. Global and Planetary Change, 172, pp.414-427. Welcome to The Academic Life! Join us here each week, where we go inside the academy to learn directly from experts. We embrace a broad definition of what it means to lead an academic life, and are inspired by today's knowledge-producers working inside and outside the academy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Multipolarista
China 'counters US dollar hegemony' with gold reserves, Argentina yuan currency swap deal

Multipolarista

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 52:12


China is advancing the global movement toward de-dollarization. Beijing's central bank is boosting its gold reserves while signing currency swap deals in yuan with countries like Argentina, encouraging the use of renminbi instead of US dollars. VIDEO: https://youtube.com/watch?v=bdASCjEeJ0I Sources and more information here: https://geopoliticaleconomy.com/2023/01/08/china-dollar-gold-reserves-argentina-yuan Russia dropping US dollar for Chinese yuan – and fast: https://geopoliticaleconomy.com/2022/12/26/russia-us-dollar-chinese-yuan IMF admits US dollar hegemony declining, due to rise of Chinese yuan, sanctions on Russia: https://geopoliticaleconomy.com/2022/03/31/imf-us-dollar-decline-china-russia How Argentina has been trapped in neocolonial debt for 200 years: An economic history: https://geopoliticaleconomy.com/2022/12/18/argentina-neocolonial-debt-history

Brave Dynamics: Authentic Leadership Reflections
Kai Yuan Neo: Engineer to CEO, Edtech Localization Playbook, Build vs. Sell in Boom vs. Bust

Brave Dynamics: Authentic Leadership Reflections

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 35:27


Kai Yuan Neo is the founder and CEO at Rocket Academy, a live-online coding bootcamp based in Singapore that helps career switchers become software engineers. Launched in 2020, Rocket has trained over 1000 students in its intro coding courses and over 100 students in its career conversion Bootcamp course. To date, 100% of Rocket's Bootcamp graduates have received software engineering offers within 6 months of applying, from companies such as Grab, Ninja Van, Zendesk, Foodpanda, Circles. Life and Decathlon. Prior to Rocket Academy, Kai studied Computer Science at Stanford University and worked as a software engineer at Meta, Alibaba, Nuna, and ErudiFi. He loves reading autobiographies, playing guitar, and enjoying a nice cup of tea with friends. Show notes at: www.jeremyau.com/blog/kai-yuan-neo

PodCasts – McAlvany Weekly Commentary
Petro-Dollar May Someday Face Petro-Yuan

PodCasts – McAlvany Weekly Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 58:37


McAlvany Weekly Commentary Central Banks To Target The Middle-Class To Slow Economy Extreme Interest Rate Volatility In China & U.S. In 2022 Visit mcalvany.com To See Our New Look & Latest Updates The post Petro-Dollar May Someday Face Petro-Yuan appeared first on McAlvany Weekly Commentary.

World Alternative Media
2023: END OF THE DOLLAR? - New CASHLESS World Reserve Currency PLANNED For Coming Year!

World Alternative Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 20:45


SIGN UP WITH PATRIOT GOLD HERE: https://www.patriotgoldgroup.com/i/youtube-alternative CALL THIS NUMBER: 888-565-1505 GET HEIRLOOM SEEDS & NON GMO SURVIVAL FOOD HERE: https://heavensharvest.com/ USE Code WAM to get FREE shipping in the United States! NGANIC CBD OIL! Get organic HIGH QUALITY CBD HERE: https://shareasale.com/r.cfm?b=1312822&u=3368756&m=85768&urllink=&afftrack= GET YOUR APRICOT SEEDS at the life-saving Richardson Nutritional Center HERE: https://rncstore.com/r?id=bg8qc1 LION ENERGY: Never Run Out Of Power! PREPARE NOW! https://rdm.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=223&aff_id=1682 Josh Sigurdson reports on the end of the dollar as Russian President Medvedev says he expects the dollar to lose its reserve status in 2023 and for oil to skyrocket in price. This comes as countries like Saudi Arabia move into the BRICS system and look to trade oil in Yuan. The BRICS system of course is digital. The US dollar is going digital in 2023 as well. This is a wakeup call to everyone to get prepared now. It's blatantly obvious that the agenda is to force us into a new world reserve currency system that is cashless that will dictate our lives to us via a carbon credit score just as the Great Reset entails. Stay tuned for more from WAM! BUY A TOWER GARDEN AND SAVE MONEY HERE: https://shareasale.com/r.cfm?b=580941&u=3368756&m=52284&urllink=&afftrack= GET TIM'S FREE Portfolio Review HERE: https://bit.ly/redpilladvisor And become a client of Tim's at https://www.TheLibertyAdvisor.com STOCK UP ON STOREABLE FOODS HERE: http://wamsurvival.com/ OUR GOGETFUNDING CAMPAIGN: https://gogetfunding.com/help-keep-wam-alive/ OUR PODBEAN CHANNEL: https://worldaltmedia.podbean.com/ Or SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/5JWtlXypfL8iR8gGMg9MME Find us on Vigilante TV HERE: https://vigilante.tv/c/world_alternative_media/videos?s=1 FIND US on Rokfin HERE: https://rokfin.com/worldalternativemedia FIND US on Gettr HERE: https://www.gettr.com/user/worldaltmedia Follow us on Parler HERE: https://parler.com/Joshfsigurdson See our EPICFUNDME HERE: https://epicfundme.com/251-world-alternative-media JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER HERE: https://www.iambanned.com/ JOIN our Telegram Group HERE: https://t.me/worldalternativemedia JOIN US On BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/gzFCj8AuSWgp/ JOIN US On Flote: https://flote.app/JoshSigurdson JOIN US on Rumble Here: https://rumble.com/c/c-312314 FIND WAM MERCHANDISE HERE: https://teespring.com/stores/world-alternative-media FIND OUR CoinTree page here: https://cointr.ee/joshsigurdson JOIN US on SubscribeStar here: https://www.subscribestar.com/world-alternative-media We will soon be doing subscriber only content! Follow us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/WorldAltMedia Help keep independent media alive! Pledge here! Just a dollar a month can help us alive! https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2652072&ty=h&u=2652072 BITCOIN ADDRESS: 18d1WEnYYhBRgZVbeyLr6UfiJhrQygcgNU World Alternative Media 2022

The History of Computing
Hackers and Chinese Food: Origins of a Love Affair

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 19:37


Research into the history of computers sometimes leads down some interesting alleys - or wormholes even. My family would always go out to eat Chinese food, or pick it up, on New Year's day. None of the one Chinese restaurants in the area actually closed, so it just made sense. The Christmas leftovers were gone by then and no one really wanted to cook. My dad mentioned there were no Chinese restaurants in our area in the 1970s - so it was a relatively new entrant to the cuisine of my North Georgia town. Whether it's the Tech Model Railroad or hobbyists from Cambridge, stories abound of young engineers debating the merits of this programming technique or chipset or that. So much so that while reading Steven Levy's Hackers or Tom Lean's Electronic Dreams, I couldn't help but hop on Door Dash and order up some yummy fried rice. Then I started to wonder, why this obsession?  For one, many of these hackers didn't have a ton of money. Chinese food was quick and cheap. The restaurants were often family-owned and small. There were higher end restaurants but concepts like P.F. Chang's hadn't sprung up yet. That wouldn't come until 1993. Another reason it was cheap is that many of the proprietors of the restaurants were recent immigrants. Some were from Hunan, others from Taipei or Sichuan, Shanghai, or Peking (the Romanized name for Beijing). Chinese immigrants began to flow into the United States during the Gold Rush of California in the late 1840s and early 1850s.  The Qing Empire had been at its height at the end of the 1700s and China ruled over a third of humans in the world. Not only that - it was one of the top economies in the world. But rapid growth in population meant less farmland for everyone - less jobs to go around. Poverty spread, just as colonial powers began to pick away at parts of the empire. Britain had banned the slave trade in 1807 and Chinese laborers had been used to replace the slaves. The use of opium spread throughout the colonies and with the laborers, back into China. The Chinese tried to ban the opium trade and seized opium in Canton. The British had better ships, better guns, and when the First Opium War broke out, China was forced to give up Hong Kong to the British in 1842, which began what some historians refer to as a century of humiliation while China gave up land until they were able to modernize. Hong Kong became a British colony under Queen Victoria and the Victorian obsession with China grew. Art, silks (as with the Romans), vases, and anything the British could get their hands on flowed through Hong Kong. Then came the Taiping Rebellion, which lasted from 1851 to 1864. A Christian was named theocrat and China was forced to wage a war internally with around 20 million people dying and scores more being displaced. The scent of an empire in decay was in the air. Set against a backdrop of more rebellions, the Chinese army was weakened to the point that during the First Sino-Japanese War in 1894, and more intervention from colonial powers. By 1900, the anti-colonial and anti-Christian Boxer Uprising saw missionaries slaughtered and foreigners expelled. Great powers of the day sent ships and troops to retrieve their peoples and soon declared war on the empire and seized Beijing. This was all expensive, led to reparations, a prohibition on importing arms, razing of forts, and more foreign powers occupying areas of China. The United States put over $10 million of its take from the Boxer Indemnity as they called it, to help support Chinese students who came to the United States. The Qing court had lost control and by 1911 the Wuchang Uprising began and by 1912 2,000 years of Chinese dynasties was over with the Republic of China founded in 1912, and internal conflicts for power continuing until Mao Zedong and his followers finally seized power, established the People's Republic of China as a communist nation, and cleansed the country of detractors during what they called the Great Leap Forward, resulting in 45 million dead. China itself was diplomatically disconnected with the United States at the time, who had backed the government now in exile in the capital city of Taiwan, Taipei - or the Republic of China as they were called during the Civil War.  The food, though. Chinese food began to come into the United States during the Gold Rush. Cantonese merchants flowed into the sparkling bay of San Francisco, and emigrants could find jobs mining, laying railroad tracks, and in agriculture. Hard work means you get real hungry, and they cooked food like they had at home. China had a better restaurant and open market cooking industry than the US at the time (and arguably still does). Some of he Chinese who settled in San Francisco started restaurants - many better than those run by Americans. The first known restaurant owned by a Chinese proprietor was Canton Restaurant in 1849. As San Francisco grew, so grew the Chinese food industry.  Every group of immigrants faces xenophobia or racism. The use of the Chinese laborers had led to laws in England that attempted to limit their use. In some cases they were subjugated into labor. The Chinese immigrants came into the California Gold Rush and many stayed. More restaurants were opened and some catered to white people more than the Chinese. The Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869 and tourists began to visit San Francisco from the east. China Towns began to spring up in other major cities across the United States. Restaurants, laundries, and other even eastern pharmacies. New people bring new ways and economies go up and down. Prejudice reared its ugly head. There was an economic recession in the 1870s. There were fears that the Chinese were taking jobs, causing wages to go down, and crime. Anti-Chinese sentiment became law in the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882, which halted immigration into the US. That would be repealed in 1943. Conservative approaches to immigration did nothing to limit the growing appeal of Chinese food in the United States. Merchants, like those who owned Chinese restaurants, could get special visas. They could bring relatives and workers. Early Chinese restaurants had been called “chow chow houses” and by the early 1900s there were new Chop Suey restaurants in big cities, that were affordable. Chop Suey basically means “odds and ends” and most of the dishes were heavily westernized but still interesting and delicious. The food was fried in ways it hadn't been in China, and sweeter. Ideas from other asian nations also began to come in, like fortune cookies, initially from Japan. Americans began to return home from World War II in the late 1940s. Many had experienced new culinary traditions in lands they visited. Initially Cantonese-inspired, more people flowed in from other parts of China like Taiwan and they brought food inspired from their native lands. Areas like New York and San Francisco got higher end restaurants. Once the Chinese Exclusion Act was repealed, plenty of immigrants fled wars and cleansing in China. Meanwhile, Americans embraced access to different types of foods - like Italian, Chinese, and fast food. Food became a part of the national identity. Further, new ways to preserve food became possible as people got freezers and canneries helped spread foods - like pasta sauce.  This was the era of the spread of Spam and other types of early processed foods. The military helped spread the practice - as did Jen Paulucci, who bought Chun King Corporation in 1947. The Great Depression proved there needed to be new ways to distribute foods. Some capitalized on that. 4,000+ Chinese restaurants in the US in the 1940s meant there were plenty of companies to buy those goods rather than make them fresh. Chop Suey, possibly created by the early Chinese migrants. A new influx of immigrants would have new opportunities to diversify the American pallate.  The 1960s saw an increase in legislation to protect human rights. Amidst the civil rights movement, the Hart-Celler Act of 1965 stopped the long-standing practice of controlling immigration effectively by color. The post-war years saw shifting borders and wars throughout the world - especially in Eastern Europe and Asia. The Marshal Plan helped rebuild the parts of Asia that weren't communist, and opened the ability for more diverse people to move to the US. Many that we've covered went into computing and helped develop a number of aspects of computing. They didn't just come from China - they came from Russia, Poland, India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, and throughout. Their food came with them. This is the world the Hackers that Steven Levy described lived in. The first Chinese restaurant opened in London in 1907 and as well when people who lived in Hong Kong moved to the UK, especially after World War II. That number of Chinese restaurants in the US grew to tens of thousands in the decades since Richard Nixon visited Beijing in 1972 to open relations back up with China. But the impact at the time was substantial, even on technologists. It wasn't just those hackers from MIT that loved their Chinese food, but those in Cambridge as well in the 1980s, who partook in a more Americanized Chinese cuisine, like “Chow mein” - which loosely translates from “fried noodles” and emerged in the US in the early 1900s.  Not all dishes have such simple origins to track down. Egg rolls emerged in the 1930s, a twist on the more traditional Chinese sprint roll. Ding Baozhen, a governor of the Sichuan province in the Qing Dynasty, discovered a spicy marinated chicken dish in the mid-1800s that spread quickly. He was the Palace Guardian, or Kung Pao, as the dish is still known. Zuo Zongtang, better known as General Tso, was a Qing Dynasty statesman and military commander who helped put down the Taiping Rebellion in the later half of the 1800s. Chef Peng Chang-kuei escaped communist China to Taiwan, where he developed General Tso's chicken and named it after the war hero. It came to New York in the 1970s. Sweet and Sour pork also got its start in the Qing era, in 18th century Cantonese cuisine and spread to the US with the Gold Rush. Some dishes are far older. Steamed dumplings were popular from Afghanistan to Japan and go back to the Han Dynasty - possibly invented by the Chinese doctor Zhang Zhongjing in the centuries before or after the turn of the millennia. Peking duck is far older, getting its start in 1300s Ming Dynasty, or Yuan - but close to Shanghai. Otto Reichardt brought the ducks to San Francisco to be served in restaurants in 1901. Chinese diplomats helped popularize the dish in the 1940s as some of their staffs stayed in the US and the dish exploded in popularity in the 1970s - especially after Nixon's trip to China, which included a televised meal on Tiananmen Square where he and Henry Kissinger ate the dish.   There are countless stories of Chinese-born immigrants bringing their food to the world. Some are emblematic of larger population shifts globally. Cecilia Chiang grew up in Shanghai until Japan invaded, when she and her sister fled to Chengdu, only to flee the Chinese Communists and emigrate to the US in 1959. She opened The Mandarin in 1960 in San Francisco and a second location in 1967. It was an upscale restaurant and introduced a number of new dishes to the US from China. She went on to serve everyone from John Lennon to Julia Child - and her son Philip replaced her in 1989 before starting a more mainstream chain of restaurants he called P.F. Chang's in 1993. The American dream, as it had come to be known. Plenty of other immigrants from countries around the world were met with open arms. Chemists, biologists, inventors, spies, mathematicians, doctors, physicists, and yes, computer scientists. And of course, chefs. Diversity of thought, diversity of ideas, and diversity-driven innovation can only come from diverse peoples. The hackers innovated over their Americanized versions of Chinese food - many making use of technology developed by immigrants from China, their children, or those who came from other nations. Just as those from nearly every industry did.

Headline News
China's monthly foreign trade hits nearly four trillion yuan

Headline News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 4:45


Official data shows China's international trade in goods and services in November hit nearly four trillion yuan, down three percent over the same period last year.

One Clap Speech and Debate Podcast
The Half Hour with YuYu Yuan and Spencer Travis: Ep. 42 - Musk Buys Twitter

One Clap Speech and Debate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 38:23


The Half Hour is a current events podcast designed with the intention of helping Extemporaneous speaking competitors (and other Speech and Debate members, as well as listening for the general public) understand the importance of political, social, or economical events on a domestic and international scale.42 | Musk Buys TwitterElon Musk's purchase of Twitter comes after controversy surrounding the purchase since April. Once the deal was made in October, business decisions have led to employee cuts and resignations. Now, Musk faces possible Chapter 11 bankruptcy for Twitter. In this episode, YuYu and Spencer work to understand the importance of Elon Musk's purchase of Twitter.For sources from this Podcast and more information, visit:https://www.oneclapspeechanddebate.com/post/the-half-hour-with-yuyu-yuan-and-spencer-travis-ep-42-musk-buys-twitterWatch and subscribe to The Half Hour episodes on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx79MVh5SZHG4m8mrPiMA1gFollow Us On Social MediaThe Half Hour:Instagram - https://instagram.com/thehalfhourextemppodcast?utm_medium=copy_linkTwitter - https://twitter.com/the_half_hourOne Clap Speech and Debate:Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/oneclappodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/one_clap_podcast/YuYu Yuan:Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/yuyu.yuan927/Spencer Travis:Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/spencer_travis_/Credits and CredentialsVideo/Audio Recording: Zoom Video CommunicationsProduction Recording: OBS StudioDesign Production: Adobe ExpressHosts: YuYu Yuan, Spencer TravisProduced By: Spencer TravisEdited By: Connor McBridePublic Relations Specialist: Camila RiveraPowered By: One Clap Speech and Debate Podcast [Lyle Wiley]This podcast (or clips from this podcast) cannot be used without consent of One Clap/The Half Hour. All recordings are our own work with our own research and information put together.Get your cool One Clap Speech and Debate merchandise here: https://www.bonfire.com/store/one-clap-speech-and-debate/The One Clap December 2022 Newsletter:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Gx93CwohkSzCOAN6EZpwSnNgyJHHOq_5/view?usp=sharingSupport the show

Tradie Business School Podcast
Burnout in Business Around the Holiday Season

Tradie Business School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 62:14


It's the time of the year when not-so-joyous deadlines, not-so-exciting crunch time, and the season of momentum stopper are coming to town. Holidays are more of a dread than a celebration for most tradie business owners, which should not be the case. But what can we do? It's part of the cycle, and there's no way to break it. But you are wrong! Burnout during this season is just a product of an unhealthy habit cycle. Yes, your health is a huge part of your stress, and you can manage your business well while managing your health and turning your Christmas into a merry one! For this episode, our host Adam Spencer puts her personal dietician, Feng-Yuan Liu, into the spotlight to investigate the root reason for a dreadful Christmas and a crappy New Year for most tradie business owners. And how they can turn it around and still have a chance to celebrate this wonderful season with the people they love.  Tune in now!   Discussion Points: 00:00 Welcome to Tradie Business School Podcast 01:50 Juggling Personal Life and Business is a Real Challenge for Business Owners 04:13 Who is Yuan Liu, and Where Does All the Health Awareness Start? 05:31 Certain Western Medicine and Supplementation Does Not Promote Long-term Good Health 11:32 How Did the Nutrition for Entrepreneurial Burnout Teachings Start? 17:36 Knowing the Proper Diet That Fits You is Harder Than It Looks 21:57 What Are the Things We Usually Do That Contribute to Our Burnout? 28:20 We All Should Make Time for Our Health 34:11 Getting Aware of Poor Cortisol Management Situations 42:19 What is Adrenal Energy, and What Does It Do to Our Body? 45:20 What is Our Unhealthy Cycle of Habits When Dealing With Stress, and How Can We Break Them 59:56 Do Not Normalize the Physical and Mental Pain That You Feel   About the guest: Feng-Yuan Liu, or Yuan, has a Bachelor's degree in Nutrition and Dietetics from Monash University and over ten years of clinical experience as a dietitian. Yuan is an expert in human nutrition. Yuan utilizes bleeding-edge research for her clients to help them achieve hormonal and metabolic optimization. She believes that nutritional science is rapidly progressive and that following guidelines will not allow her clients to receive the best quality care. Her passion for nutrition and thirst for being the best and helping her clients be at their best led her to become a world-renowned dietitian and coach for small business owners striving towards peak performance.Visit the Metro Dietetics website: http://www.metrodietetics.com.au/  Resources: Visit the Tradie Business School website (https://tradiebusinessschool.com/)  Join us on our FREE Facebook Group (Tradies & General Contractors Global) You can also connect with us on LinkedIn. For more podcast episodes, visit our website at https://tradiebusinessschool.com/ or subscribe to The Tradie Business School on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Podcasts. Thank you for tuning in!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
Evening Edition: China Pushes For Oil To Be Traded In Yuan Not The Dollar

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 12:29


Chinese President Xi Jinping addressing Gulf leaders in Saudi Arabia Friday called on leaders of top oil producing countries to start trading oil using the Chinese yuan instead of the U.S. dollar. This move would cause a significant and costly hit to the dollar and other Western markets. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Gordon Chang, expert on U.S.-China relations and author of "The Coming Collapse of China" and "The Great U.S.-China Tech War", who says this could become a troubling economic change for the United States.    Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: Evening Edition' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: China Pushes For Oil To Be Traded In Yuan Not The Dollar

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 12:29


Chinese President Xi Jinping addressing Gulf leaders in Saudi Arabia Friday called on leaders of top oil producing countries to start trading oil using the Chinese yuan instead of the U.S. dollar. This move would cause a significant and costly hit to the dollar and other Western markets. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Gordon Chang, expert on U.S.-China relations and author of "The Coming Collapse of China" and "The Great U.S.-China Tech War", who says this could become a troubling economic change for the United States.    Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: Evening Edition' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Evening Edition: China Pushes For Oil To Be Traded In Yuan Not The Dollar

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 12:29


Chinese President Xi Jinping addressing Gulf leaders in Saudi Arabia Friday called on leaders of top oil producing countries to start trading oil using the Chinese yuan instead of the U.S. dollar. This move would cause a significant and costly hit to the dollar and other Western markets. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Gordon Chang, expert on U.S.-China relations and author of "The Coming Collapse of China" and "The Great U.S.-China Tech War", who says this could become a troubling economic change for the United States.    Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: Evening Edition' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

All The Asians On Star Trek
32: Peipei Alena Yuan

All The Asians On Star Trek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 68:41 Very Popular


Peipei Alena Yuan is a stunt performer, actress and filmmaker who served as the stunt double for Freda Foh Shen in the 2009 feature film Star Trek, directed by JJ Abrams. Outside of Star Trek, her long list of stunt credits includes Bullet Train, Stranger Things, The Terminal List, Obi-Wan Kenobi and The Flight Attendant, among many others. She talks about pivoting from visual effects to stunt work, her unexpected pivotal role in creating "Bully Maguire," and getting to perform a fight scene with a bucket list legend.

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen
Conqu'ring Heroes 79 - Yuan Xiao

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 12:39


Men's gymnastics Head Coach Yuan Xiao sits down with Jon Jansen to recap last weekend's intrasquad meet (1:30), talk about the leaders on this year's team (4:00), and break down the program's expectations for the upcoming season (7:00).See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rethinking the Dollar
China & Saudi Arabia Welcomes 'New Era' In Record Trade Deals & Yuan Oil Settlement | M & M Show

Rethinking the Dollar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 42:26


The dawn of a new era has started with Saudi Arabia's crown prince welcoming Chinese president Xi Jinping and hailing a "new era" in Beijing's relations with the region. The end result was the signing of 34 undisclosed trade deals, a 5G technology agreement with talks of yuan oil settlements with the Arabian nations in China. Thanks for watching the Mike & Mario Show. Subscribe & click the

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives
2023 Crypto Narratives: Interviewing The Oldest Crypto VC - Kinjal & Yuan, Blockchain Cap, Ep 223

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 49:23


*PS* we apologize for the background noise around the 17min mark. We have already tried to minimize it to the best we can, but it is still audible. Even amidst all the blowups in the bear market, great builders continue to build and great investors continue to support them. Blockchain Capital is one of the earliest and leading venture capital firms in the blockchain industry. Today, Blockchain Capital manages $2 billion in AUM, and has invested in some of the largest blockchain companies like OpenSea, 1inch and Aave.  Today on Blockcrunch, we have Kinjal Shah and Yuan Han Li, Partner and Associate at Blockchain Capital to share with us: 4 verticals they think will take off in 2023 Framework for investing in different verticals Making Web 3 development more accessible for builders Host: Jason Choi @mrjasonchoi . Not financial advice.   Timestamps: (00:00:00) – Introduction (00:01:39) – Introduction to Blockchain Capital  (00:07:48) – Exploring consumer vertical  (00:12:47) – Improving wallet UX with Account Abstraction  (00:21:30) – Unlocking more use-cases in NFTs (00:25:09) – Apps verticalizing into its own app-chain and app-rollup (00:31:03) – Making Web 3 development more accessible (00:35:23) – Layer 1 landscape & new developments (00:41:26) – Value capture of dApps vs protocols (00:44:52) – Projects to watch out for in 2023   More Resources: Guest Blockchain Capital's Website: https://blockchain.capital/ Kinjal Shah's Twitter:https://twitter.com/_kinjalbshah Yuan Han Li's Twitter:https://twitter.com/yuan_han_li Blockcrunch Blockcrunch VIP: https://blockcrunch.substack.com/ Blockcrunch Twitter: https://twitter.com/theBlockcrunch Jason Choi's Twitter: https://twitter.com/mrjasonchoi   Disclaimer: The Blockcrunch Podcast (“Blockcrunch”) is an educational resource intended for informational purposes only. Blockcrunch produces a weekly podcast and newsletter that routinely covers projects in Web 3 and may discuss assets that the host or its guests have financial exposure to. Views held by Blockcrunch's guests are their own. None of Blockcrunch, its registered entity or any of its affiliated personnel are licensed to provide any type of financial advice, and nothing on Blockcrunch's podcast, newsletter, website and social media should be construed as financial advice. Blockcrunch also receives compensation from its sponsor; sponsorship messages do not constitute financial advice or endorsement.

A History of Japan
The Joseon Dynasty

A History of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 28:51 Transcription Available


As the Yuan Dynasty fled China, two factions emerged in the Korean government - one which supported Yuan restoration and one which acknowledged the new Ming Dynasty. As a result, the Goryeo Dynasty collapsed and in its place arose the Joseon Dynasty.Support the show

The Rebel Capitalist Show
News: Did China Just Do A Deal To Buy Oil In Yuan?

The Rebel Capitalist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 12:16


Buy my stuff Come to rebel capitalist live at https://rebelcapitalistlive.comCheck out my private, online investment community (Rebel Capitalist Pro) with Chris MacIntosh, Lyn Alden and many more for $1!! click here https://georgegammon.com/pro

Anticipating The Unintended
#194 The e₹ is in Town

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 18:39


Programming Note: A lighter edition this weekend because life happened of late-night football, missed flights, and several other things. Also, we will be away for a short year-end break. Normal service will resume on Jan 8, 2023. Happy holiday season, everyone! India Policy Watch: Digital Rupee (e₹-R) Is In TownInsights on current policy issues in India — RSJThe RBI launched the first pilot for the retail digital Rupee this week. It is now among the select list of central banks that's got a CBDC pilot going. The RBI press release covers the plan for the pilot:* The pilot would cover select locations in closed user group (CUG) comprising participating customers and merchants. The e₹-R would be in the form of a digital token that represents legal tender. It would be issued in the same denominations that paper currency and coins are currently issued. It would be distributed through intermediaries, i.e., banks. Users will be able to transact with e₹-R through a digital wallet offered by the participating banks and stored on mobile phones / devices. Transactions can be both Person to Person (P2P) and Person to Merchant (P2M). Payments to merchants can be made using QR codes displayed at merchant locations. The e₹-R would offer features of physical cash like trust, safety and settlement finality. As in the case of cash, it will not earn any interest and can be converted to other forms of money, like deposits with banks.* The pilot will test the robustness of the entire process of digital rupee creation, distribution and retail usage in real time. Different features and applications of the e₹-R token and architecture will be tested in future pilots, based on the learnings from this pilot.The obvious question that comes up is how's a digital currency different from a transaction on UPI. The RBI Governor got into the explanation mode on this at the press meet.Separately, in an earlier concept note, the RBI had outlined the two different types of CBDC it would pilot as part of this process:Based on the usage and the functions performed by the CBDC and considering the different levels of accessibility, CBDC can be demarcated into two broad types viz. general purpose (retail) (CBDC-R) and wholesale (CBDC-W).CBDC-R is potentially available for use by all private sector, non-financial consumers and businesses. In contrast, wholesale CBDCs are designed for restricted access by financial institutions. CBDC-W could be used for improving the efficiency of interbank payments or securities settlement, as seen in Project Jasper (Canada) and Ubin (Singapore). Central banks interested in addressing financial inclusion are expected to consider issuing CBDC-R.Further, CBDC–W has the potential to transform the settlement systems for financial transactions undertaken by banks in the G-Sec Segment, Inter-bank market and capital market more efficient and secure in terms of operational costs, use of collateral and liquiditymanagement. Further, this would also provide coincident benefits such as avoidance of settlement guarantee infrastructure or the need for collateral to mitigate settlement risk.About 18 months back, in edition #122, I wrote a fairly detailed piece about CBDC in the context of China running a pilot for digital Yuan. It will be useful to bring that piece up to contextualise the RBI CBDC pilot.What's Money?As we have written in an earlier post, money performs three roles for us: it is a store of value, it is a medium of exchange, and it is a unit of measure. Through it, we save for the future, pay for goods and services and measure the value of very different things using a common unit. These roles mean anything that aspires to be a currency (the usable form of money) should have a relatively stable value over time and should be widely acknowledged as a store of value and unit of account among people. If it does so, the network effect takes over after a while, and it becomes a widely used currency.Throughout history, a key feature of a sovereign state was its control over the supply and circulation of money that's used within its boundaries. The royal mints, after all, have been around for more than two thousand years. As modern nation-states emerged through the 19th and 20th centuries and as global trade increased, central banks emerged to manage the monetary system and provide financial stability.There are three forms of money in any modern economy:* Banknotes: These are physical paper currency notes issued by the central bank that we all use in our everyday lives. This is a direct promise by the central bank to pay the note holder a specified sum of money. This promise is printed on all currency notes.* Bank Deposits: Ordinary people and businesses don't hoard banknotes to conduct their business. They deposit their money in commercial banks. These deposits are stored in electronic form by these banks. The banks offer two services to their customers. They convert these deposits to central bank money in the form of banknotes when you demand it at an ATM and they offer to transfer your money to someone else through a payment system that exists between banks. Unlike banknotes, your deposits aren't risk-free. They aren't backed by any sovereign guarantee. A bank will be able to convert your money into banknotes only if it is solvent and can honour its commitments. We have seen instances of a bank failing to do so in India (Yes Bank, PMC etc.).* Central Bank Reserves (“reserves”): Commercial banks have their own accounts with the central bank where they deposit their funds. These deposits are used by banks to pay each other to settle transactions between them. The reserves are the other form of central bank money apart from banknotes. These are risk-free and therefore used for settlements among commercial banks.Where does CBDC then fit in?Simply put, a CBDC is a digital form of a banknote issued by the central bank. Now you might think we already use a lot of digital money these days. Yes, there's money we move electronically or digitally between banks, wallets or while using credit/debit cards in today's world. But that's only the digital transfer of money within the financial system. There's no real money moving. The underlying asset is still the central bank money in the form of reserves that's available in the accounts that commercial banks have with the central bank. This is what gets settled between the commercial banks after the transaction.This is an important distinction. We don't move central bank money electronically. But CBDC would actually allow ordinary citizens to directly deal with central bank money. It will be an alternative to banknotes. And it will be digital.CBDC: The Time Is NowSo, why are central banks interested in CBDC now?There are multiple reasons.One, cryptocurrency that's backed by some kind of a stable asset (also called ‘stablecoin') can be a real threat as an alternative to a sovereign currency. Stablecoins are private money instruments that can be used for transactions like payments with greater efficiency and with better functionality. For instance, the current payment and settlement system for credit cards in most parts of the world has the merchant getting money in their bank accounts 2-3 days after the transaction is done at their shops. A digital currency can do it instantly. For a central bank, there could be no greater threat to its ability to manage the monetary system than a private currency that's in circulation outside its control.Two, in most countries, there's an overwhelming dependency on the electronic payment systems for all kinds of transactions. As more business shifts online and electronic payment becomes the default option, this is a serious vulnerability that's open to hackers and the enemy states to exploit. A CBDC offers an alternative system that's outside the payment and settlement network among commercial banks. It will improve the resilience of the payment system.Three, central banks need to offer a currency solution for the digital economy that matches any form of digital currency that could be offered by private players. Despite the digitisation of finance and the prevalence of digital wallets in the world today, there's still significant ‘friction' in financial transactions all around us. You pay your electricity bill electronically by receiving the bill, then opening an app and paying for it. Not directly from your electric meter in a programmed manner. That's just an example of friction. There are many other innovations waiting to be unleashed with a digital currency. Central banks need to provide a platform for such innovations within an ecosystem that they control. CBDC offers that option.Lastly, digital money will reduce transmission loss both ways. Taxes can be deducted ‘at source' because there will be traceability of all transactions done using CBDC. It will also allow central banks and the governments to bypass the commercial banks and deliver central bank money in a targeted fashion to citizens and households without any friction. The transmission of interest rates to citizens for which central banks depend on commercial banks could now be done directly.While these are the benefits of a digital currency, there are other macroeconomic consequences including the loss of relevance of bank deposits that we have with our banks. Some of these may seem speculative at the moment but these are factors to consider as things move forward. A CBDC that offers interest will mean we could have a direct deposit account with the central bank. This will also mean a move away from deposits in banks to CBDC with the central bank. Also, the nature of a bank ‘run' will change. Today a bank ‘run' means a rapid withdrawal of banknotes from a bank by its depositors who are unsure of the solvency of the bank. This takes time and is limited by the amount of money available in ATMs. In a CBDC world, the ‘runs' will be really quick and only constrained by the amount of CBDC issued by the central banks. Depositors will replace their deposits with CBDC pronto.This secular move away from deposits could increase the cost of funds of commercial banks. They will have to depend on other sources of funds than the low-cost deposits that customers deposit every month in the form of salaries to them. A reduction in deposits will reduce the availability of credit in the system. This will have a repercussion on the wider economy. It will also mean greater demand for reserves from the central bank by the commercial banks to provide credit to their customers. Central banks will increase their reserves and their balance sheets will become bigger. These are among many potential scenarios that could unfold. These are early days and it will be interesting to track the iterations of the pilots that the RBI will do as it appreciates the use cases, the design features and the policy issues involved. This is an interesting space to watch. India's track record on building national digital infrastructure in payments is second to none. It might be the one place where the promise of CBDC could turn into reality. A Framework a Week: China's PredicamentTools for thinking public policy— Pranay KotasthaneA couple of weeks back, I had linked out to a CSEP paper by Amb. Shivshankar Menon. Titled Internal Drivers of China's External Behaviour, he explains the domestic imperatives that are likely to modify China's external behaviour. In that paper, one #lightbulb framework explains the novelty of the situation that China finds itself in. Here's the text from the paper:Today, China faces an unprecedented situation at home and abroad and is therefore reacting in new ways. China is more powerful than ever before but is also more dependent on the world. This is an unprecedented combination, not known in Chinese history—not in the Han when she had to ‘buy' off the Xiongnu by marrying Han princesses off to steppe leaders; nor in the Song when she was one and sometimes the weakest power in a world of equals; nor in the high Qing when she was powerful but independent of the external world, as the Qian Long emperor reminded George III in writing. [Internal Drivers of China's External Behaviour, CSEP Working Paper, Shivshankar Menon ].We can interpret this insight visually in this 2x2 framework.The implication is that China finds itself in an unfamiliar position today and as a result, will act externally in new ways altogether. The high power-high dependence combination helps explain China's belligerence in the Himalayas and the South China Sea. It also explains the drive towards self-reliance in technology domains. The high-dependence on adversaries acts as a motivation, and high domestic power gives China the confidence (over-confidence?) to do it all domestically. Observe China's response to the US export controls on its semiconductor industry. I expected a definitive retaliation after the 20th Party Congress had reaffirmed Xi's control. But that hasn't happened. It only makes sense if China's political establishment is confident of overcoming the dependence in due course while taking advantage of it to bolster present capabilities.Advertisement: Takshashila is now accepting applications for the next cohort of GCPP. Apply now. If you like reading this newsletter, you will find the course enriching.PolicyWTF: Emigration EmbargoesThis section looks at egregious public policies. Policies that make you go: WTF, Did that really happen?— Pranay KotasthaneRina Agarwala has an excellent article in The Monkey Cage, highlighting the restrictions preventing the less-educated, poor Indians from emigrating easily. “Under India's 1983 Emigration Act, poor emigrants have to hire a government-certified recruiter, fill out piles of government paperwork, pay huge fines and hope for government approval. Unlike Ramdas Sunak's experience in the 1830s, they usually emigrate without family members on temporary visas, working under difficult conditions for little pay under the control of their foreign employer.Although these emigrants send home the largest share of India's massive remittances — an estimated $100 billion in 2022, and which have saved India through multiple financial crises and cover 40 percent of the basic needs for millions of poor households — they receive little acknowledgment or support from the Indian government.Educated emigrants, by contrast, are free to leave India as they please. Since the 1980s, the Indian government has offered them awards and special financing options for savings accounts, investments and bonds within India. The government has also encouraged their temporary return to India with business partnerships and high-level positions within the Indian government. Receiving countries are also more likely to welcome educated Indians than poor immigrants. [Is the new U.K. prime minister a paragon of immigrant success?, Rina Agarwala, Washington Post]It is indeed quite disturbing how the emigration policy came to be this way. There are good intentions behind it, of course. The government's rationale is that these entry barriers are meant to check human trafficking. That's why the restrictions on less-educated women are even more stringent than those for men. Check this out:The Emigration Act (1983) states that persons of working age who have not completed schooling up to the tenth standard are issued an ECR (Emigration Clearance Required) passport. The remaining population is eligible for an ECNR (Emigration Clearance Not Required) passport. When men having ECR passports plan to emigrate for work, they need to obtain an “Emigration Clearance” from the office of the Protector of Emigrants (PoE) before travelling to certain countries (currently, 18 in total). What's even more egregious is that a woman of age less than thirty with an ECR passport is completely banned from getting emigration clearance for all kind of employment in any ECR country.But the anticipated unintended result is that it blocks off opportunities for people who probably would improve their life outcomes the most by emigrating. I'll leave you with a link to edition #15, in which we write about this policyWTF and solutions to improve the situation.HomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters* [Podcast] Our Puliyabaazi on public libraries received a lot of listener interest. What do you make of it?* [Book] Global Value Chains and the Missing Links: Cases from Indian Industry by Saon Ray and Smita Miglani is a must-read to understand India's prospects in different sectors, given the shifting geopolitics and geoeconomics.* [Podcast] Math with CCP Characteristics. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

A History of Japan
The Rise of the Ming Dynasty

A History of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 27:37 Transcription Available


As the Yuan Dynasty lost ground against rebel uprisings, a leader of the Red Turbans would eliminate his rivals until finally driving the Yuan out of Khanbaliq and founding the Ming Dynasty.Support the show

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast
Euro Market Open: Mixed APAC trade after the hawkish Wall St. handover, RBA hiked 25bp

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 2:45


APAC stocks were somewhat mixed with early headwinds from Wall St where risk assets were pressured as bond yields and the Dollar gainedDXY remained above the 105.00 level, USD/JPY extended on gains with a brief foray above 137.00, and Yuan pared back some recent gainsRBA hiked its Cash Rate by 25bps and signalled further rate hikes ahead which prompted an adjustment in CBA's forecast for the terminal rate to 3.35% from 3.10%Beijing city government said it no longer requires negative PCR test results for people entering supermarkets and commercial buildingsLooking ahead, highlights include Canadian Trade Balance, Norges Bank Regional Network, Supply from UK & GermanyClick here for the Week Ahead previewRead the full report covering Equities, Forex, Fixed Income, Commodites and more on Newsquawk

Harvard Divinity School
Prelude | “Three Stanzas of Plum Blossoms” | Tianyi Yuan, MDiv III

Harvard Divinity School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 5:24


As the nights grow longer and the days shorter, share in a virtual celebration of Seasons of Light, Harvard Divinity School's beloved annual multireligious service honoring the interplay of holy darkness and light in the world's religious traditions. Performances include choral and instrumental music, readings by HDS students, the ritual kindling of many flames, and communal prayers and songs. Explore these offerings to the season in part or as a whole. Seasons of Light is hosted by Harvard Divinity School's Office of Religious and Spiritual Life under the direction of Christopher Hossfeld, Director of Music and Ritual, and Kerry A. Maloney, Chaplain and Director of Religious and Spiritual Life. Full transcript: https://hds.harvard.edu/news/2022/12/8/audio-seasons-light

One Clap Speech and Debate Podcast
The Half Hour with YuYu Yuan and Spencer Travis: Ep. 41 - New Changes in Britain

One Clap Speech and Debate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 40:15


The Half Hour is a current events podcast designed with the intention of helping Extemporaneous speaking competitors (and other Speech and Debate members, as well as listening for the general public) understand the importance of political, social, or economical events on a domestic and international scale.41 | New Changes in BritainBritain has been struggling to keep power. After Boris Johnson's resignation, the prime minister has changed twice. The Queen's death has promoted uncertainty with the monarchy again. In this episode, YuYu and Spencer look to understand the state of Britain after its new changes.For sources from this Podcast and more information, visit:https://www.oneclapspeechanddebate.com/post/the-half-hour-with-yuyu-yuan-and-spencer-travis-ep-41-new-changes-in-britainWatch and subscribe to The Half Hour episodes on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx79MVh5SZHG4m8mrPiMA1gFollow Us On Social MediaThe Half Hour:Instagram - https://instagram.com/thehalfhourextemppodcast?utm_medium=copy_linkTwitter - https://twitter.com/the_half_hourOne Clap Speech and Debate:Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/oneclappodcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/one_clap_podcast/YuYu Yuan:Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/yuyu.yuan927/Spencer Travis:Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/spencer_travis_/Credits and CredentialsVideo/Audio Recording: Zoom Video CommunicationsProduction Recording: OBS StudioDesign Production: Adobe ExpressHosts: YuYu Yuan, Spencer TravisProduced By: Spencer TravisEdited By: Connor McBridePublic Relations Specialist: Camila RiveraPowered By: One Clap Speech and Debate Podcast [Lyle Wiley]This podcast (or clips from this podcast) cannot be used without consent of One Clap/The Half Hour. All recordings are our own work with our own research and information put together.Get your cool One Clap Speech and Debate merchandise here: https://www.bonfire.com/store/one-clap-speech-and-debate/The One Clap November Newsletter:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1FDruKXV8_jxc49NiCbz-rssiQJz9CwvU/view?usp=sharingSupport the show

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast
US Market Open: China outperforms, modest DXY resurgence & USTs lag after multiple weekend events

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 3:35


European bourses are under modest pressure, Euro Stoxx 50 -0.2%, with US futures in-fittingFollowing fairly contained APAC action though Chinese stocks outperformed amid a further easing of COVID controlsCrude benchmarks have been choppy, but are ultimately firmer post-OPEC+ and as the Russian oil cap comes into effect at USD 60/bbl.DXY bid with the Yuan and AUD outperforming while JPY is the standout laggardEGBs retain an underlying bid amid two-way action, USTs slightly softer pre-dataLooking ahead, highlights include US Final Composite/Services PMIs, US ISM Services PMI & Factory Orders.Click here for the Week Ahead previewRead the full report covering Equities, Forex, Fixed Income, Commodites and more on Newsquawk

A History of Japan
The Fall of the Mongols

A History of Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 25:31 Transcription Available


After Kublai Khan's death, the Yuan Dynasty was divided by two rival factions - one who wanted total Mongol traditional rule and one who preferred Confucian government. The economic turmoil caused by these feuding parties gave rise, in part, to the Red Turban Rebellion.Support the show

Dialogues on Applied Channel Theory
Episode 38: Strategies for Combining Source (原/yuan) and Sea (合/he) Points

Dialogues on Applied Channel Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 33:22


In this episode, Jonathan Chang and Jason Robertson describe a common point pairing strategy used by Dr. Wang.  Namely, what might be done when a presenting pattern fails to fit perfectly into categories of 'excess' or 'deficiency'.  In these situations, more of a 'regulating' treatment is called for where the channels and organs are cleared without depleting. This discussion provides a broad overview of how these patterns might look in each of the six channels.  In addition, some guidelines for creating innovative point combinations are described.  

The Naked Truth About Real Estate Investing
EP206: RE Development Projects Through TIF Bonds with Xiao Ou Yuan

The Naked Truth About Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 33:34


Today, Xiao Ou Yuan talks about investing in Tax Increment Financing (TIF) bonds and how they can give you cash flow while offering liquidity for commercial real estate developments. Start impact investing today and learn how TIF completes a project's capital stack and the growth opportunities it can bring to local communities!   Key takeaways to listen for  When can you consider a nonrated bond risky How to make money from investing in bonds The usual size of development projects that are great for TIF bonds A basic overview of bonds What to expect when purchasing TIF bonds   About Xiao Ou Yuan Xiao Ou Yuan is the Managing Director of Hageman Capital and manages the day-to-day operations, leading all bond structuring and negotiations for the Hageman Capital portfolio. Hageman Capital is a purchaser of single-site, developer-backed TIF bonds. They structure the bonds in a way that maximizes the cash available to invest in the real estate project. As a result, their structure allows for better financing by decreasing the debt burden on real estate development, enabling greater odds of success for developers, investors, and the community. Before joining Hageman Capital, Xiao was a Principal at Fifth Third Securities, a regional investment banking firm primarily focused on high-yield TIF and municipal bond transactions in the Midwest. Xiao is a graduate of Indiana University with a Bachelor of Science in Public Administration and a Master's in Public Affairs. Xiao is civically involved in many non-profit organizations in the Central Indiana community. He is an active member of the Penrod Society and serves on the boards of the Center for Performing Arts, University High School of Indiana, Reach for Youth, and Carmel Clay Public Library. Xiao also serves on the finance committee for Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site.   Connect with Xiao Website: Hageman Capital | Hageman Group LinkedIn: Xiao Ou Yuan | Hageman Capital   Connect with Us To learn more about partnering with us, visit our website at https://javierhinojo.com/ and www.allstatescapitalgroup.com, or send an email to admin@allstateseg.com.  Sign up to get our Free Apartment Due Diligence Checklist Template and Multifamily Calculator by visiting https://javierhinojo.com/free-tools/. If you want to get involved in larger projects and grow your network with like-minded people, be part of the next BDB mastermind session in Guadalajara, Mexico on February 9 - 11, 2023. To join, go to https://javierhinojo.com/mastermind/ or https://javierhinojo.com/mm-spanish/ and to apply to his BDB Mastermind, see https://javierhinojo.com/mastermind/#apply_form and answer the form.   Follow Me on Social Media Facebook: Javier A Hinojo Jr. Facebook Group: Billion Dollar Multifamily and Commercial Real Estate YouTube Channel: Javier Hinojo Instagram: @javierhinojojr TikTok: @javierhinojojr Twitter: @JavierHinojoJr

Wealth Matters By Alpesh Parmar
297: How does Tax Increment Financing work with Xiao Yuan

Wealth Matters By Alpesh Parmar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 45:06


Prior to joining Hageman Capital, Xiao was a Principal at Fifth Third Securities, a regional investment banking firm, primarily focused on high-yield TIF and municipal bond transactions in the Midwest. Xiao is a graduate of Indiana University with a Bachelor of Science in Public Administration and a Master's in Public Affairs. Xiao is civically involved in many non-profit organizations in the Central Indiana community. He is an active member of the Penrod Society, and serves on the boards of the Center for Performing Arts, University High School of Indiana, Reach for Youth, and Carmel Clay Public Library. Xiao also serves on the finance committee for Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site. *DISCLAIMER - We are not giving any financial advice. Please DYOR* (00:00 - 02:02) Opening Segment - Xiao is introduced as the guest Host - Xiao shares something interesting about himself (02:02 - 36:58) How does Tax Increment Financing work - Xiao shares what kind of assets he personally invests in and why? - Xiao also shares what exactly tax is. - He also shares the role of Hageman Capital in the TIF space - He shares what he is looking for if he tries to buy these bonds - Xiao shares the risk of an investor - Xiao shares are they coming in as debt investors or equity investors - Also, he shares what returns he targets - He also shares why Real estate investors and developers care about TIF - And he shares as well how TIF beneficial - Xiao shares also does this only works on real estate developers. - Xiao also shares does this provides tax benefits to developers or investors - He also shares that when a developer starts paying the interest - Xiao shares the risks for the developers of taking this TIF (36:58 - 44:09) Fire Round - Xiao shares if he sees an impact on the mobile home industry - Xiao shares his investment strategy - Xiao also shares his favorite Finance, real estate book, or any related book - Also Xiao shares about the website and tools that they can recommend - Xiao's advice to beginner investors - Also shared how he gives back (44:09 - 45:06) Closing Segment -If you want to learn more about the discussion, you can watch the podcast on Wealth Matter's YouTube channel and you can reach out to Alpesh using this link. Check us out at: Facebook: @wealthmatrs IG: @wealthmatrs.ig Tiktok: @wealthmatrs

The Europeans
Is China trying to police people in Europe?

The Europeans

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 35:32


When reports emerged of Chinese 'police service stations' operating in Europe, alarm bells began ringing across the continent. But what exactly is going on at these sites, and how worried should we be about them? This week we ring Yuan Yang, Europe-China correspondent at the Financial Times, to get a better understanding of how China works beyond its borders. We're also talking about Viktor Orbán's controversial scarf and the right not to be 'fun' at work. You can follow Yuan on Twitter here and read her reporting on China's offshore police stations here. This week's Isolation Inspiration: 'The White Lotus', Season 2, and The Playlist. Our interview with newly-minted astronaut Dr Meganne Christian, from February 2019, can be found in this episode: The Most Isolated Place on Earth'. Thanks for listening! If you enjoy our podcast and would like to help us keep making it, we'd love it if you'd consider chipping in a few bucks a month at patreon.com/europeanspodcast (many currencies are available). You can also help new listeners find the show by leaving us a review or giving us five stars on Spotify. 03:04 Bad Week: Scarfgate 08:09 Good Week: The right to not be fun 15:35 Interview: Yuan Yang on China's 'overseas police stations' 29:20 Isolation Inspiration: Season 2 of 'The White Lotus' and 'The Playlist' 32:22 Happy Ending: Europe's new astronauts Producer: Katy Lee Mixing and mastering: Wojciech Oleksiak Music: Jim Barne and Mariska Martina This podcast is part of the Are We Europe family. You can find more like-minded European podcasts at areweeurope.com/audio-family. Twitter | Instagram | hello@europeanspodcast.com

American Journal of Psychiatry Residents' Journal Podcast
988 Crisis Hotline with Dr. Eric Rafla-Yuan

American Journal of Psychiatry Residents' Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 61:31


Media editor Nina Bihani, MD interviews Eric Rafla-Yuan, MD. Dr. Eric Rafla-Yuan is the 2021 Jeanne Spurlock Congressional Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and an award-winning researcher in medical psychiatry, health policy, and the sociopolitical determinants of health. In this episode, they discuss the 988 crisis hotline, political advocacy, and the many roles that psychiatrists can help outside of the standard clinical role. This was recorded at APA 2022 with previous Senior Media Editor Barrington Hwang, MD

Ice Cream with Investors
What The TIF With Xiao Ou Yuan

Ice Cream with Investors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 36:16


A TIF or Tax Increment Financing is a very powerful municipal tool that can encourage economic development. If there is unimproved land that has potential, the municipality can put a TIF on it. They are allowing developers to capture future increment taxes and borrow money against that increment. So some properties may have never existed if it weren't for TIF. Join Matt Fore as he talks to the Managing Director at Hageman Capital, Xiao Ou Yuan. Listen to this episode if you want to learn more about TIF, how it works, and what Hageman Capital does with TIF bonds. Find out more about developer-backed bonds, taxpayer agreements, and more.

KPFA - APEX Express
APEX Express – 11.24.22 Lavender Phoenix’s Peer Counseling Program by and for Trans Nonbinary Asian Pacific Islander people

KPFA - APEX Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 59:58


A weekly magazine-style radio show featuring the voices and stories of Asians and Pacific Islanders from all corners of our community. The show is produced by a collective of media makers, deejays, and activists. This episode highlights Lavendar Phoenix's Peer Counseling Program. Tonight you'll be hearing interviews from Iris Yip, Phibi Loc Tran, Madhvi  trivedi-pathak, and Al.  They launched their Peer Counseling Program back in August 2022 and  This pilot came out the Trans Justice committee's Up to Us needs assessment finding around trans and non binary API people struggling with mental health and not being able to access affirming mental health support. We wanted to create a free mental healing program that was led by trans API people and did not involve the police.  About 7+ trans and non binary API members planned and organized for almost 2 years to make this pilot happen in Aug 2022. In June-August 2022 we trained 10 trans and non binary API counselors in abolitionist and disability justice based peer counseling (with the help of Project LETS and Asian American Peer Counseling).  In August 2022 we held peer counseling with 8 participants.  The majority of the organizers, counselors and participants were from our priority groups: working class, South Asian/South East Asian/PI/Central Asian. We chose these groups to prioritize those most impacted by systemic oppression in our community. One participant who received counseling said: “Both of my peer counselors were so lovely to talk to, and I felt more seen in that one session than I have in 10 years of searching for a therapist who could understand my intersectionality.” Lavender Phoenix builds transgender, non-binary, and queer Asian and Pacific Islander power in the Bay Area. We inspire and train grassroots leaders, transform our values from scarcity to abundance, and build vibrant intersectional movements. AACRE Thursdays is monthly radio show featuring an organization from the AACRE: Asian American for Civil Rights and Equality. AACRE Thursdays premiers every third Thursday of the month at 7pm. Find more APEX Express Shows here. Links: Donate to sustain our work: lavenderphoenix.org/donate Instagram: @lavphoenix Facebook: facebook.org/lavphoenix Twitter: @lav_phoenix Lavender Phoenix Transcript: [11/23/22] Peer Counseling pilot [00:00:00] Apex express Asian Pacific expression. Unity and cultural coverage, music and calendar, new visions, and voices coming to you with Asian Pacific Islander point of view. It's time to get on board the apex express.  [00:00:14] paige: Hello, welcome to acre Thursdays on apex express radio. My name is Paige Chung and tonight we'll be listening to interviews from lavender Phoenix, an organization of transgender non-binary and queer Asian Pacific Islanders fighting for community safety, healing justice. And sustainable movements in the San Francisco bay area.  [00:00:33] paige: I'm really excited tonight to showcase lavender. Phoenix is peer counseling program. Tonight. You'll be hearing interviews from Iris Yip , Phoebe loc tran, Madvi Trivedi-Pathak, and Al, all members of lavender, Phoenix. So they launched their peer counseling program back in August, 2022. And this pilot came out of their trans justice committee's needs assessment findings called “up to us”. In their findings they found out that trans and nonbinary API people [00:01:00] struggle with mental health and not being able to access, affirming mental health support. So they wanted to create a free mental health healing program that was led by trans Asian Pacific Islander people. And did not involve the police.  [00:01:13] paige: So about seven plus trans and non binary API planned organized for almost two years to make this pilot happen in August, 2022. So From June to August, 2022, they trained 10 trans and non-binary API counselors. And abolitionists and disability, justice based peer counseling. Using the help of project LETS and Asian-American peer counseling. Then in August, 2022, they held their peer counseling program with eight participants. The majority of the organizers, the counselors and the participants were from the priority groups of lavender, Phoenix, which include the working class, south Asian people, Southeast Asian people, Pacific Islander people and central Asian people. And they chose these groups to prioritize because they're the most [00:02:00] impacted by systematic oppression in their community. And one participant who receives counseling said, ” both of my peer counselors were so lovely to talk to. And I felt more seen in one session that I have in 10 years of searching for a therapist who could understand my intersectionality.”  [00:02:16] paige: So we'll first hear from Iris. Yep. And Mahdavi, and then you'll hear from Phoebe and I'll later on. And yeah, we'll hear about their peer counseling program that they launched and their reflections from it. Here is Iris Yip.  [00:02:31] Iris: So the first question is about the planning process of the pilot. So thinking about the planning process with peer counseling pilot what do you think has been going well with the process? [00:02:42] Madhvi: With the planning process? Process? I came in during a later iteration. So by the time that I entered into this space there, several folks through Healing Justice and maybe even other committees that had given their [00:03:00] input. [00:03:00] Madhvi: So it's gone through many different folks, many different perspectives have been included in the planning process, and I think that creates a really well-rounded experience. You can tell that there's a lot of consideration too, on who's been generally excluded from life spaces where gaining the tools for healing and community support and really trying to center the planning around. Amplifying and creating a space that feels welcoming for folks that are often excluded, even within our large QT API umbrella. It's nice that this is a trans centered space. This is one that is really trying to honor working class narratives to think that's a place of invisibilization often. So there's a lot of thoughtfulness that has been put into the planning process. [00:03:48] Iris: And what would you say that is the impact of that thoughtfulness and having had so many perspectives be involved in the creation of this? [00:03:56] Madhvi: I think impact is that when there has been gaps, it does end up [00:04:00] getting filled. There is an abundance of perspectives coming in. So there's this flow of thoughts that , keep it full , very thoughtful in that way. also the folks who are on, who are in this iteration of the planning and organizing. I'll come from really interesting, unique backgrounds. So you're able to see the input from each different person and it gives it a really beautiful, full experience to be able to see the ways in which the curriculums can develop the way in. And the art connecting to the flyers, that was created by a previous summer organizer too. There's just it's nice to have a history already, in this mix, being made and so many people being involved. Okay.  [00:04:45] Iris: And then thinking about the planning process again what has been difficult about the process? [00:04:50] Madhvi: Since this is a first time pilot program, there's so much beauty and potential for what seeds are being sewed in this segue of [00:05:00] wanting to make sure things feel. Evenly doable for folks who are the peer counselors in training as well as the people who are on the organizing end and so it's this chemistry situation where we're , okay. [00:05:13] Madhvi: I'm , does this feel too much too soon? Or does it feel not enough? We wanna be able to. Support folks and feeling supported to be able to do this pilot. It's new for everyone, for the organizers, for the people who are being trained, for the folks that are gonna be receiving the counseling. So there's a lot of considerations around ethics, safety, holding, these notions of what is safe? What feels the individual, in their agency and autonomy can hold and the organization too. Where are the places where lavender, phoenix, maybe impacted, Are there things around informed consent or if there is some kind of moment things that we've had conversations about, it's okay, what.  [00:05:53] Madhvi: Someone gets activated a peer counselor's not able to hold the space or they end up leaving feeling [00:06:00] activated from a session. We were thinking a lot about the chain of support, so how the organizers can support the peer counselors as they're supporting the people being counseled and then how lavender Phoenix can help the organizers. So it's just a lot of figuring it out for the first time. . And also peer counseling is really beautiful in this way where it's separate from the clinical, mandated regulations that maybe counselors who are held by, state laws are in relationship with.  [00:06:30] Madhvi: So there's more freedom here. And then also moving through that space. It's also when we're in that place of freedom, there's this underlying, I feel the state tries to instill fear in people who are trying to do this work that you're gonna fuck up or gonna do something wrong. And it's really a lot of us being , we actually know what we need to do, how to be able to maneuver out of these state based policies that rely on violence systems and give each other the tools. [00:06:57] Iris: Okay. And then last question [00:07:00] on the planning process do you have any recommendations for improving the process or [00:07:05] Madhvi: For the planning process? I think that there's really great intention to share, if people are feeling. Burnt out overexerted. And also I think that a lot of us, including myself, [laughter], I think from the , I will not really share that when it's happening, even though the language at Lavender Phoenix and the culture is ask for help when you need it. [00:07:25] Madhvi: There's so much of that. And then yet there's still this feeling of resistance or feeling , Bad about not being able to do more and pushing past, what does feel comfortable I'm wondering if there's a space for people in the planning process as organizers to kinda anonymously send feedback to staff anonymous feedback survey sort of thing, during the process to kinda gauge. People's level of feeling energized, exhausted, what maybe is needed. [00:07:56] Madhvi: And since there are people who are yeah, the working class [00:08:00] end too, of the organizing side. It would be cool if there were stipends. It is a lot of work and labor that goes into it for compensation is a cool thing. And also it's one of those things too, even saying it feels a guilt twinge or being , this is something where it's community. We're doing it for a reason outside. But it's also the, sometimes it's hard to be able to do the psych work when our own cups are emp. [00:08:26] Iris: Yeah. Great. Thank you for sharing the ation. And I think there's a of the important things there, especially around feedback. Yeah. I think anonymous feedback is to bridge that of job and how difficult it's my next set of. Is it that the sustainability you talk a little bit about, but I know that the peer counseling team has tried to do a lot of work around making the process sustainable for both the planning team and counsel. So thinking about the sustainability of the process what do you think has worked so far? [00:08:57] Madhvi: Sustainability wise, it has [00:09:00] been nice to be able to have the larger healing justice committee plug into the efforts. And there's I think five or six of us who are in the organizing peer counseling side right now, but they're , Yeah, as I shared before, there have been so many people the earlier iterations of this too. It's being able to know that you can kinda pass the torch and there's gonna be other people there. It's not all of the responsibility is on this group of five or six people. There are so many people who are down to rise to the occasion and support and be here for the next iteration too. I think that's gonna be something that's gonna help with. Long term visions of sustainability too, and knowing that there will be breath in between and there's always consent in the process too, really invitations to kind join into these efforts. Nothing feels, it feels the space to communicate. [00:09:55] Madhvi: Okay, if it's when does it end? Are we. ending there. Are we [00:10:00] continuing, it does seem there's a finite end point for this moment in time, which gives a break and that feels just good to know in terms of future planning and if the invitation to come back to help the pilot program or the program if it wants, if it grows. Something that's gonna be a larger part, for the future of lavender Phoenix. And there's that aspect, which is great. Sustainability wise, it's cool that we're not, the organizers are not doing all the trainings. I thought that was originally what it was and it felt a lot. [00:10:28] Madhvi: But we're able to resource out to people in the community who've been doing this work for a really long. Who are living their lives, Project lets folks in that word Stephanie, get to make their living off of doing this amazing disability justice work. And it's cool to be able to financially support them too in the process of feel sustainable. Even in the way that we're creating the relationships, new relationships to other orgs that haven't been part of Lavender Phoenix's network in the past. So it feels yeah, there's that way of [00:11:00] being able to be supportive, sustaining other people, other projects, other orgs, utilizing other folks' knowledge. [00:11:07] Iris: Yeah. as a follow up to that, what you think the impact has been of outsourcing, the training to project LETS rather than digging it. [00:11:16] Madhvi: Yeah, The impact has been a really great learning experience, I think for even the organizers doing this too. We get to learn alongside the peer counselors, we get to build relationships with project labs other groups too we're gonna be doing role play later. I'm forgetting what the acronym starts with aapc. And just being able to these are folks that have been doing peer counseling specifically in Asian American communities, for a good second too. So they have inside guidance, a history, a way to be able to support and navigate and offer their own wisdom. As this specific, lavender, phoenix seed is in its way of sprouting out a peer counseling. So [00:12:00] it's lovely being able to , have people who've been doing this, be able to offer feedback throughout the process to offer guidance that doesn't , feel one of those things , ah, we're starting from scratch. [00:12:10] Madhvi: No, it's it's already here. This resource is here and we're connecting to what is already, and then if, Yeah, making the changes that feel the needed transformation, maybe if it. Spaces haven't honored trans, non-binary, intersex communities, in the process of centering their spaces, That's what we're able to do better. What we're able to commit to doing better is owning those kinds of spaces and having folks within our own communities getting trained who have lived experience in that way. So just different places, orgs that have lived experience in their own ways, taking the gems and then knowing that our peer counselors have this other lived experience that maybe not as represented in other spaces. They get to add their own little non-binary flare too. Yeah. [00:12:58] Iris: And then on the flip [00:13:00] side thinking about the sustainability of this project, what do you think could make this process more sustainable? [00:13:06] Madhvi: It really feels in the future since we've already kinda done a lot of the initial connecting, getting the trainings, learnings and understandings, from this experience, going forward it's gonna be a lot less work on the organizing end since we've done a lot of research amongst all the different iterations of folks who have passed through the planning process for this. That there's just a beautiful database that is growing and growing in so many resources that are growing and growing that it's feeling very. A tangible vault of okay, this is where we're gonna go and we know where we're gonna go. Versus I'm not sure yet. It's kinda we transgressed into the place of knowing okay, these orgs are here and that helps, that feeling of sustainability and kind shortening, that place of panic of Oh, where do we go? Who do we turn to support us and who can we support to in. .  [00:13:58] Madhvi: Yeah, and [00:14:00] if we're able to keep in touch and keep those relationships strong, there may be even more places of connecting and growing and offering. People in not just the live under Phoenix community, but community, but larger communities the ability to access maybe free or, Yeah, free trainings on peer counseling and letting it be more of a widespread so to resource that it's just a really beautiful thing that folks can tap into feeling that level of agency, that feels self sustainable, too, sustainable for organizations when people , feel they're equipped. [00:14:35] Iris: Thank you for your response to that. My last two questions are about the future of the program. So first do you have any thoughts on if we should continue this program after the pilot stage and what would the impact of that be? Whether we do or not? [00:14:53] Madhvi: I think it would be really wonderful for it to be something that happens.[00:15:00] A few times a year. I know when peer support things do start out, it's smaller, shorter, and then as people can be more familiar with the process and the comfort of knowing their own agency and holding space, it feels something that it could be in many seasons throughout the year and the space of just. [00:15:21] Madhvi: Drop in support. It's something that feels a need that's always gonna be a need. And it's also to have free, culturally competent, gender expansive, aware ways of being, in listening in support. That feels a forever healing justice. Home to kinda be able to provide community. It feels important. It seems and fingers crossed, that people who are going through this training program are able to tap in deeper cuz there's a good handful of folks, I believe 16 people and those folks can be organizers in so many different renditions down the line too, having had [00:16:00] this experience and they're coming in. Yeah. I'm just so curious to hear their own feedback on this process and what they think future peer counselors would need for it to grow. I'm sure that there's gonna be maybe more, carefully cultivated, cohort experiences could be a. Powerful experience for folks. [00:16:19] Madhvi: Cause right now it does feel a little bit looser in the sense of different parts of , the summer organizer. There's a strong sense of Oh, we're building relationships with each other. That doesn't seem it exists so strongly for people who are peer counselors right now, they're showing. These spaced weekends with minimal contact with each other throughout. So maybe that could be the future, where there's a more of a cohort experience. Yeah.  [00:16:44] Iris: Yeah. The last question is, do you have new recommendations for continuing this program beyond the pilot? If it does. [00:16:53] Madhvi: Yeah, I think this cohort experience would be cool. Maybe art, kinda. Component too [00:17:00] are a, creating a space, it is something that we didn't really talk about, but there are ways of making virtual s and things that, And that could be really beautiful as part of this. I'm also curious to hear more people's stories as to why they're interested in this work. There was a little bit of that in the welcoming but just the ability to know folks a little bit more feels it could be important. And in the spirit of doing that too, it feels the training would maybe need to. be closer in time as well as instead of spaced out over several months. [00:17:36] Madhvi: I think the spacing out really helped us as the planning team. Yeah. Cause a lot of things have been figured out very as we're going, even though we tried to plan ahead, things changed. So it's okay. But that timeline that allows a sense of intimacy and connection to in a way that feels , okay, more concrete. And yeah, I think more interactive aspects too would be [00:18:00] helpful. It does feel a lot of absorbing, which is super important. And also I think when we get to the role play, we're gonna be able to witness more so of the peer counselors in the process of. Doing the embodied and the relaying aspects of this where Yeah, right now it's a lot of absorbing, taking in. [00:18:21] Madhvi: Yeah. I'm also wondering for the peer counselors in their own lives too, the way that , these interview questions have been kinda asking about sustainability. Or the planning team and all of those I'm curious too, for them, how they would need more support from us. If it feels it's even an open invitation too, I'm not entirely sure if that has been as carefully created and Yeah. So I think that would. An important thing to consider going forward. Just kinda checking in on where the individuals are too in their life and knowing that they can receive support. I , I hope that they know, in our [00:19:00] emails, there is always that space of feel free to, to connect on things anything in the reading feels activating. This is who you can reach out to and so I hope that There in a way that sometimes even when something is there in that way, it doesn't mean that people are gonna use it if there's not that trust and rapport built.  [00:19:19] Madhvi: So I feel needing to have some trust building, relationship building for people to feel safe enough to actually reach out if they dunno folks. Yeah. Okay. And actually I have one follow up to your, It's about what do you think would be the impact of having a closer connection between the counselor cohort if they had more opportunities to , interact with each other and talk in that way? , I honestly think that it. I'm just thinking about my own cohort experiences in different places. I've been able to lean on those folks, maybe more so than the people who are holding the container. There's a distance between the people who are holding the [00:20:00] container and the people who are going through the process with you, shared experiences, more maybe of the same questions, insecurities, excitement, joy and being able to have that kinda space to know okay, we're going through this together, this part of the journey. It could just help additional processing that, stronger feeling of grounded in purpose as well. Yeah.  [00:20:24] Madhvi: Great. And I totally agree, and that's my question. Yeah. Thank you for talking with me. I'm going to end the recording now. [00:20:33] paige: All right. That was the first interview with Iris yip and Madvhi. So now we're going to take a quick music break and listen to queer brown love by Leo Hegde who is on staff. I love under Phoenix. This is queer brown love by Leo Hegde.  [00:21:00] [00:22:00] [00:23:00] [00:24:00]  [00:24:20] paige: You just listened to queer brown love by Leo Hegde who is a staff at lavender Phoenix. You are listening to apex express on KPFA 94.1 and online@kpfa.org. Let's get back into these interviews by lavender Phoenix. And this next interview will be conducted by Iris Yip who will be talking to Al.  [00:24:41] Iris: This is the first question. What has gone, what has worked well with the training content?  [00:24:45] al: Yeah, so what has worked really well, I believe is Lavender Phoenix outsourcing the education to those that are actively learning and practicing. Peer [00:25:00] counseling based on their own lived experiences. I think that opportunity to collaborate with project lets created such a in depth and I. Just , how do I say this? Enlightening space for me and my peers to learn and also express curiosity, ask questions in live time with the coordinator of project lets, and process hard emotions and also bring in our own lived experiences and ask for best practices in live time. [00:25:29] al: So I just, That has been very revolutionary for me because just in multiple learning spaces that I've been in from school to workplaces to internships, people tend to cut corners around education. They think that trainings are just trainings PowerPoints, but. I think that learning from guest speakers that are actually within the realm of work, and especially for this work of working with people, I think that this will create influential impacts on each and every peer counselor.  [00:25:59] al: There's [00:26:00] no way that I feel this curriculum has been disengaging. It's been so engaging and so memorable. And I wanna say too, that I've been in different peer counseling cohorts and I've been trained on this topic area, but the content was ableist, not trauma-informed, controversial and harmful. And the content that peer counseling has been teaching me has been healing me and been helping me to expand my scope on my family, my lived experiences, and myself and my community. And it's so much more than just a training. It's a revolutionary space for sure.  [00:26:40] Iris: Awesome. Yeah. I love that. Has there been any, specific part of the training that you can share that you think has had that impact on you?  [00:26:47] al: Has that healing impact on me? Yeah I think that I've. I think this might be normal in lavender, phoenix spaces, but it's not normal for me in my other spaces in my everyday life. [00:27:00] But calling one selves in to whenever they misspoke for instance, one time the coordinator of Project LETS had said something about the word darkness and they had not caught themselves about the racist implications that, that may have because of the just how society binary things, black, white, darkness and light. And there's a lot of connotations around the words you use and using mindful language. And I didn't know that it was. Irking, I didn't know that. But then in that space, someone called them in and the speaker corrected themselves.  [00:27:34] al: And I got to watch, someone that I look up to model behavior in lifetime of what I'm learning as they're learning and seeing my educators , or my mentors facilitators, having that student always mentality too, that they're here to learn from us as well. That's groundbreaking because I have so much respect for queer elders cuz they've lived through so much stuff. But the fact that. The queer [00:28:00] elders in this space in particular want to learn from us, the youth in this space. I think that's what's really healing, because in this space, I just see a world where I really actually wanna live in. And that could make me cry because the state of the world outside of the space is really ugly. [00:28:16] Iris: That's amazing. I'm really glad this training has given me that space. I really resonated with what you said about being an environment where there's, again, mutual sense of learning and wanting to learn from each other. I think that curiosity really helps bring an open mind to these kinds of spaces.  [00:28:30] Iris: Okay. The next question is, so I think you've touched on this already, but what do you think has been the impact? Of outsourcing this, people that are really, I guess doing the work of anti ableist behavior and anti-racism, culturally competent peer counseling. What is the impact of that being in this kind of training? [00:28:47] al: I think that it's resistance in the making and movement in the making. I think that I feel very lucky to have access this knowledge because not everyone gets the chance to learn what [00:29:00] happens when someone's under psychiatric arrest? That's something that you will hear more about when you go through the project lETS training, but understanding. Because I'm coming from a place of privilege where I've never been 51 50 that I've never been arrested. I've never been on the inside doors of a psychiatric treatment facility. So speaking from that point of view and hearing from someone who has, and the harm that the state has on patients and how vulnerable patients are, I feel like that creates movement and solidarity with people who do not have lived experiences with it, but know people who have lived experiences with it and see how fucked up it is and wants to do something better and provide alternative sources and resources for care, specifically community care because . [00:29:48] al: One of the main reasons why I'm so politicized is because growing up I watch my dad struggle to get the mental health access care he needs because he has severe [00:30:00] mental psychosis that relapses annually. And I believe that the reason why it happens so repetitively and cyclically is because there's a need that's not being met and that need should met by the healthcare system in this first world country. But it's so inaccessible. It's so culturally irrelevant and dare say it's harmful, it's abusive, it's traumatizing. And so Okay. I'm going on tangents, but it's, it, I never understood what happened when my dad was hospitalized because I was always on the outside. [00:30:32] al: I was always his caretaker, wanting to find him a source for him to get care. But He was never able to really communicate to me what was happening on the inside of those doors because of language barriers, because how hard it is to talk about these things in Vietnamese culture. It's just, there's so much that separates us from being able to talk about everything he feels and everything he experiences. [00:30:51] al: There's just not words to describe how bizarre the state of there is in this country and neglect that he's faced due to war and [00:31:00] colonization. He doesn't have the words to describe what he's going through, but I can see the effects and now I know the effects. I know I have the knowledge and education of what happens behind those hospital doors and how he spends hours and hours trying to pay his hospital bills that are bizarre. [00:31:16] al: Hundreds of thousands of dollars and so I know these things now because of the space that I hear from other people. And I think that in knowing this, I'm fired up, I'm heated and I, my drive is to build community. My drive is to build actual healing spaces that, we have the potential to create as a collective. And I just don't wanna rely on the state anymore. And I want better for my dad. I want better for me, I want better for our community Now, future past, I. We can do better now with these tools that we're learning in this space and how we're opening our hearts to each other through the various pains and barriers that, that the state is trying to keep in between us all. Yeah.  [00:31:58] Iris: Yeah. Thank you for [00:32:00] sharing both so vulnerably and so passionately. Oh, no, I really love the way you are always very reflective in what you say. And I think it gives such great knowledge that I can learn from too yeah. Yeah. Awesome. Oh my God, this is great. Okay. My next question is do you think there's any other additional trainings that you would find helpful or that you think you would to learn more about that hasn't been met yet? [00:32:25] al: Yeah. So I actually went to. Bystander Intervention training led by the Safety Committee, Community Safety Committee. I feel that should have been everyone who's training to be a peer counselor should have gone to that. I feel because it was so relevant. It was basically one thing in particular that I feel , just related so much is because they gave us real life scenarios. What would you do if someone was experiencing active psychosis in the park? What would you do with your body? What would you do with yourself? Would you get other people? All these things that are relevant practice for what's coming up in this training. [00:33:00] Cuz I know that looking forward we are going to have a pilot program and the more practice that we can get, especially role play practice and especially being in person with one another and establishing those connections with one another, I think that's so crucial and yeah I, Does that answer your question? [00:33:19] Iris: Yeah, definitely. And once again, the follow up. What do you think the impact of that would be if everybody that was becoming a peer counselor would take that kind of bystand training?  [00:33:27] al: Yeah, I think that the effect of that is that we would be able to reach more people who have various learning styles because I know that for me personally, it's hard for me to learn through Zoom because I don't have a safe space to be taking my meetings. I still live in my parents house and it's really hard for me to focus sometimes and feel entirely safe. So having spaces in person for me personally is a space for me to exhale. And be a different type of present cuz I'm with people and [00:34:00] I'm sharing space — space that is established and intentionally safe or encouraged to push you to be brave. [00:34:08] al: I don't know if everyone will feel safe there, but that's definitely the intention. And just for me personally, yeah, being on Zoom kind of you can't assume that everyone can learn that way, yeah. As effectively, especially since I feel the generation that's primarily in lavender, Phoenix and the training, we grew up going to school in person. That's the probably 90 to 95% of the experience. It was just such a shift and learning these super relevant topics. All the while I'm in a space that's far back in terms of. It's just being in this house is going back in time or just being in spaces that are not lavender, phoenix it is, you're going back in time. [00:34:44] al: Racism is there, homophobia is there, all the bad things are there. But when you're with lavender Phoenix, you're just I'm in this new world that I actually have hope in. I was saying earlier, so having a central location for people to meet would be so cool. But I also know that Lavender Phoenix is so spread across the Bay area, [00:35:00] which is so cool. So I know it wouldn't work for everybody, but I don't know. Yeah. [00:35:04] Iris: Yeah. Absolutely .  [00:35:06] al: Oh, another thing too, an impact that I, a positive impact is that having those scenarios will allow us to practice these skills with various demographics and various sectors of our lives and just honestly live by what we learn. And not just practice it in work, but actually apply it and externally and internally in all facets of our lives, which I think is awesome. That's what education should be. It's for liberating the soul and for liberating the people. It's, yeah, it's not for a grade, it's not for a Certifi certificate. It's for you, and for the people. So I think that getting opportunities to practice with one another and treating it , it's more than just a training that you can just click through, that's the difference I think. Yeah.  [00:35:48] Iris: Yeah. Totally. Awesome. Okay, so next question is going to be moving a little bit away from the training content into, so I know the peer [00:36:00] counseling team has been doing a lot of work to try to make this process sustainable for both the planning team and for the counselors. So thinking about sustainability have there been things that, you've seen this program do that you think has worked to make this process more sustainable for the counselors? [00:36:17] al: Have I seen anything that makes the process seem sustainable for, Is that the question? [00:36:24] Iris: Yeah. [00:36:24] al: Remind me again is this peer counseling training program, has it been through generations already? Or is this the first cohort?  [00:36:31] Iris: This is the first time.  [00:36:32] al: Have I seen anything that [00:36:34] al: let's see. I think it's been. I think it's too soon for me to say cause I missed the first meeting because. It was an awkward transition. I had just joined Lavender Phoenix when Lavender Phoenix changed their name. So I missed all the information for the first meeting. I don't know what it, what the community building aspect that they had planned was at all. And that's how me, I could have watched the training back, but [00:37:00] it was an hour long and I didn't want to. Yeah, I would also feel fomo. I was , Oh, I missed it. I wasn't there. I think that maybe. No, I don't know how to answer this question cuz I missed  [00:37:09] Iris: Yeah, that's OK . That's ok. Yeah. Then perhaps, is there anything you can think of that Loud could implement to make this process more sustainable? And thinking perhaps in the long run. When this pilot program is actually started now and people are doing the counsel sessions.  [00:37:25] al: Yeah. I have a couple of things. Yeah. I would say since I missed the first one, I would say that I just wanna get to know people in my cohort better. I think that One thing that works in the past in my other peer counseling programs was that I established a feeling of familiarity with the people that I was learning with and why they're here and stuff that. And had a lot of focus groups and we practiced on each other for role play. Yeah, feeling less alone in this would definitely make this more, less nerve-wracking. So there's that for [00:38:00] sustainability of just cause the way that these meetings roll on, I feel not everyone can make it out to each one. So I think time should be cut away for folks to just get to know each other more besides the why are you here? But just prompt questions. [00:38:12] al: I know Lavender Phoenix can, ask some heartfelt questions and get people to open up to one another because I think that making that making it more personable will make it more sustainable. Cause, when you don't have a connection to people in a group, I don't think you're as likely to return and hold significance for it. So yeah, build building community in that way and not just for meeting. And other thing is I noticed that our meetings are quite sporadic. So I don't even really remember what I've the last time I met with the cohort, so having a more consistent pattern of meetings so that the knowledge that I learned can be processed and then added onto, but there's been so much processing time that I've almost forgotten it already. [00:38:52] al: So just having more consistent meetings for the next cohorts maybe and then for another, I know that since this [00:39:00] is a pilot program, there may be a lot of pressure around building curriculum. So I understand that's really challenging and I would say I would love to be a part of the planning process. I don't know what that would look for Lavender Phoenix and how they do things, but maybe their next court around you can have alumnis come back and be a part of the planning and the conversation. Or even right now opening up this space or opening up spaces for people in the cohort to provide active feedback since there are so many gaps between meetings, just talk to us so we can improve as we go, as opposed to wait and then improve. So more dialogue. [00:39:37] Iris: I love that. I love feedback. I think it's important as well. Okay and then now last question. Moving gone. Woo. You already shared some of this, but also thinking about the future of this program, do you have any recommendations for continuing this beyond the pilot that we're going to have?  [00:39:52] al: Yeah, please have more cohorts. That's my feedback. , I think that if Lavender Phoenix has capacity, a cohort a year would be [00:40:00] awesome or I feel very blessed to have had this opportunity, so I want it to keep going. I can't remember the days in which we were meeting, but having weekend meetings are awesome for students and people who work. Other feedback that I have for longevity and future planning maybe expand the, I don't know how many people are planning the thing, but maybe more support would help. I have no idea if they're struggling or what, but yeah, making sure that, cuz this is tough work. It's a lot of pressure to be birthing such a beautiful generation, So I hope that, on the other end of things, people are being properly supported and taken care of in terms of each other and themselves. [00:40:37] Iris: Yeah. Yeah, I the, there's one more question. There's just the follow with always the impact. So what do you think? So what will be the impact? And just what will be the impact of program, of peer counseling will be impact.  [00:40:49] al: Intergenerational community care within the, when this, within this queer, trans, non-binary, a API community I think it starts [00:41:00] here and I could see this being a force that spreads across the world. I think what we're doing is historical and we're carrying on other history legacies, And I think ultimately this saves lives. It saves lives of the people in this space, people who know the people in this space, and people that are in the space that we haven't even met. And it preserves our peoples, our stories and our powers and our energies. I'm getting emotional as to how much I love this program. It saves lives, it sets people free. [00:41:33] al: Yeah. Damn, you're not a cry. Yeah. I think the impact is be out of this world, I don't want it to end, I wanna return. I wanna keep learning. I think that's another thing too, is that as someone is in the core right now, I don't want it to end. I'd hate to see it end. I wanna keep learning. Yeah. So what does that look ? I don't know. Maybe I can return and facilitate and learn from people in the cohort. That would be beautiful.  [00:41:58] Iris: Thank you. Truly [00:42:00] amazing. And I agree from am I involvement in this process too? I really see the power of it and I really, the learning. Community. It's great. It's amazing. It's . So good. Yeah, With that, I'm gonna stop recording now.  [00:42:15] paige: All right. That concludes the second interview from lavender Phoenix. We'll be taking a short break. You're listening to 94.1 KPFA San Francisco, 89.3, Berkeley 88.1, Fresno and 97.5 in Santa Cruz. And of course, online@kpfa.org.  [00:46:56] paige: You're listening to 94.1 KPFA San Francisco, 89.3, Berkeley 88.1, Fresno and 97.5 Santa Cruz and online@kpfa.org. We're going to listen to the last interview from lavender Phoenix. That includes Iris yip interviewing Phoebe. And talking about the peer counseling program that they launched in august of 2022.  [00:47:26] Iris: So the first question our first set of questions has to do with the planning process for this pilot. And in thinking about the planning process for the peer counseling pilot, what would you say has been going well with the process?  [00:47:44] Phibi: Yeah. For what's been going well with the process? It's been nice that we've been able to go at our own pace and capacity, and we've also had lot of different learning lessons among the team that our time together. And also helping Jasmine as a staff person just check in with us from time to time has also helped [00:48:00] consolidate our ideas and moving out the process. [00:48:02] Iris: Great. And on the other hand, what would, what do you think has been difficult about the planning process?  [00:48:08] Phibi: Yeah, what's been difficult about the process is that there's actually been a lot of timeline shifts. For example, the pilot was intended to happen a one day, and then it was pushed back and then push back again. And that main thing that dragged out the process, which can be training in some context. Yeah. And then also what's been difficult is yeah, how the healing justice members involved in contributing Yeah. Cuz we weren't sure how to exactly even implement a process for folks outside of the peer counseling team in healing Justice can to support us. And it's also because, it's a novel process. It's just. Staff guided, on the side rather than a directly staff involved process. And making this part from scratch presents a lot of difficulties on the first time.  [00:48:46] Iris: Speaking on it's staff guided rather than staff involved. I think it's a, you said what do you think is the impact of that rather than that, the other way of doing it?  [00:48:56] Phibi: Yeah I think one of the positive impacts is that it takes some weight [00:49:00] off of the staff. Cause the staff carry on a lot of different responsibilities. And it helps them in that sense. And also it allows more spaciousness for different folks in the planning team to actually take on leadership in the context of makes sense for them, but passively rather than turning to the staff person for the next step, it's actually up to us to continue the process and then refer to them if we need support along the way. [00:49:19] Iris: Yeah. Great. Okay. And then, so think about the planning process question, which is, do you have any recommendations for improving the planning process? Maybe for now or for later?  [00:49:33] Phibi: Yeah, I think. Some recommendations would be to have the staff challenge us with more kinda push or challenging questions. I think I think during the time when Yuan was still the staff member for for counseling, it was someone would ask some really deep questions and I think that really helped us certify our values and also helped us stay on track. So I think times questions that challenge us I guess we wanna do this, but also , why are we doing this important? What is the meaning of it? Yeah. Yeah. And then we also kinda implementing a more formal [00:50:00] process. I think one example would be , Mocha could be a good process or just Or when we first had the pilot, when we first had the planning team set up, it's oh, we didn't actually have to have a structure. It was unstructured. And so having a more structured thing in the future would be helpful. And then also listing out all the different resources and contacts that we actually have, including different community organizations is helpful. And I guess if there's a second iteration of the peer counseling project or pilot, I guess program would be referring back to previous year's work if this could, if this goes on for multiple years yeah. [00:50:30] Iris: Yeah. Great. Okay. Next of questions to do around the sustainability of, so I know that the peer counseling team was doing a lot of work around making the process sustainable for both the planning team and the counsel. So thinking about the sustainability of this process, what do you think has worked? [00:50:48] Phibi: Yeah. Something we recently done is that we actually changed our monthly meetings from the duration of one hour to the duration of an hour and 30. And this actually allowed us to have longer checkins and actually do more relationship building. [00:51:00] Because back when we had just one hour meetings, it just felt really rushed. [00:51:03] Phibi: We had to check in super quick and then we had to do all our action items and it just felt very , limiting. And so that definit. And also recruiting more Pennington numbers definitely gave us more capacity and also more d and more experiences of folks coming in. And also having deeper and honest conversations or check-ins about the process. [00:51:21] Phibi: Where are we at? How is our capacity? Doing those type of checkings and finding the balance of , where. We should split up and do certain tasks or we should all, all come together to work on. I think that's a good balance to help those. Yeah. And so what do you think is the impact of having I guess longer and deeper, check-ins? [00:51:39] Phibi: Yeah I think having, longer check-ins allows you to settle into the space. Can be coming from anything before. And so I haven't had a deeper check in can be more real about what, where is your capacity at? And what can you more realistically take on? Yeah. [00:51:52] Phibi: All right. So thinking about the sustainability of this process again, what do you think could be done to make this [00:52:00] process more sustainable? Yeah. To make this process more sustainable? I'd say having a more solidified structure and action plan, and also making sure that we all feel really grounded in our values. And then also I check in on those values, do they still feel good? Do we change? Do we change anything? Add anything. And. Lesson that we learned was , you really have to do relationship building early on. . And it's you can't just put just the work first because then everyone will burn out. If you only do work, you need to check the balance. I wish. And something that we experimented with was working sessions. So outside of the meetings have additional time just to just chill and also do work and also just get to know each other. [00:52:36] Iris: Okay. Let's see. So next one, next set of questions is about the training content. What is thinking about the training content, is there anything that you think has worked really well in terms of the training that the counselors have been given and the peer counseling team has created? [00:52:53] Phibi: For the training content, we actually leaned a lot in the different community organizations that were in contact with. For example, the Asian [00:53:00] American peer counseling. We pulled some of their readings from the reading library to help us do work to figure out what the readings for the counselors. We both found their library and also with Project let's we we're in contact with them and we able to purchase the training for the ERs and also invite Stephanie from project lets to do a debrief, which is really nice. But also cost the budget too. And so for costed money as well. [00:53:22] Phibi: So having a balance of something that would cost money and also something that would be free as well, such as Asian American food concert, the time and also. Having a good mix of experiences and knowledge from the depend team. I know that some other folks are , they've done peer counseling before, or they even are therapists in training. [00:53:37] Iris: That's really important. Makes sense. Little more project labs this outside. And what it aepc those outside organizations that you've worked with. What do you think is an impact of kinda outsourcing some of that training to other organizations rather than having peer counsel team develop everything on their own? [00:53:54] Phibi: Yeah, I think impact one of the financial aspect of oh, you have to pay a good amount for project lots. And also but it did [00:54:00] also take some. Some pressure off of the team to to do more of  [00:54:03] Phibi: for example, I think crisis training is difficult and so I think having outsourcing that made things a lot easier. And working with folks who , have had real, hands on experience in the field before, which is why I'll talk about outsourcing think was helpful. We do have a balance. [00:54:17] Phibi: We have. Training session. That's just us. Yeah. [00:54:20] Iris: Okay. And then is there any additional training that you think maybe would've been helpful to include? Or it would be helpful to include in the future? Yeah.  [00:54:30] Phibi: Oh, and then I actually have one more answer for the previous question as well.  [00:54:33] Iris: Sorry. Yeah. Go for it. [00:54:34] Phibi: Yeah. And then also outsourcing to other organizations helps build relationships, with the other organizations too, for example, Asian American for counseling, they actually I think they were in the process trying to help other organizations start for counseling. And so it was kinda mutually beneficial and it didn't feel transactional and I felt I genuine to do this with them. And then to go back to the current question about what additional training would be helpful yeah, I think rather than outsourcing to have a [00:55:00] direct hands on training us with knowledge that we have I think that would be cool. And then also some somatic training or for example, How do you self-regulate your body when you're triggered? Those type of practices meditation or movement, I think those can help dreams.  [00:55:13] Iris: Awesome. Great. Okay. And these are the last set of questions. And this is thinking about the future of the program. So first do you think we should continue the program? What would the impact be if we did or if we didn't? [00:55:26] Phibi: I think we should continue the program. I think the only limiting factor is budget for training and just fast of the planning team at the time. I think, excuse me, I think it's hard to gauge how future peer counseling programs would be , because this palette took more than. I think two years to implement. And so for example, the next one would just be , it would just be ready to go probably a year, less than a year, season for example. And so it would take less time to do it. And so it would actually would be easier to continue the program I think cause we have the foundation already set up and would just be revising over time. [00:55:58] Phibi: I think in terms of more specific [00:56:00] impact, we'd be. We to get to train more and more folks at Lavender Phoenix. And it could even be in a similar way to how there's seasonal fundraising where folks get trained every season ish. And so eventually, if folks wanted to, good number of folks at Lavender Phoenix could be trained in prayer counseling at some point, which is really cool. And also it helps us meet our healing justice goal. And it also accomplish the task of Supporting community members along the way. [00:56:25] Iris: Awesome. Ok. And then my last question is, do you have any recommendations for continuing this program beyond the pilot?  [00:56:33] Iris: Yeah. Yeah, I think as I said, the seasonal format probably be good. But the key difference would. This pilot actually only has one session with a participant. But in the future, I think it would be great to have more than one session, multiple sessions. And impact of that would be , they see their pre more often or Yeah, more than once. Yeah, because you can't just settle everything in just one session. Usually that consistency is really helpful for folks.  [00:56:54] Iris: Yeah. Okay. Do you have anything else that you would to say? Any of these questions?  [00:56:59] Iris: I'm good.  [00:56:59] Iris: [00:57:00] Awesome. Okay, then will stop the right now. That concludes our episode if you want to organize alongside lavender Phoenix, you can join us. Follow us at L a V p H O E N I X laugh Phoenix on Instagram and find us at lavender, phoenix.org. [00:57:19]  Miko Lee: Thank you so much for joining us. Please check out our website, kpfa.org backslash program, backslash apex express to find out more about the show tonight and to find out how you can take direct action. We thank all of you listeners out there. Keep resisting, keep organizing, keep creating and sharing your visions with the world. Your voices are important. Apex express is produced by Miko Lee Jalena Keane-Lee and Paige Chung and special editing by Swati Rayasam. Thank you so much to the KPFA staff for their support have a great night.  Apex express Asian Pacific expression. Unity and cultural coverage, [00:58:00] music and calendar,  The post APEX Express – 11.24.22 Lavender Phoenix's Peer Counseling Program by and for Trans Nonbinary Asian Pacific Islander people appeared first on KPFA.