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Zero Percent Scared
63: Sasquatch don't play

Zero Percent Scared

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 81:53


The promised third episode of our mega Bigfoot series! In this episode, we go through the strangest stories of Sasquatches attacking, acting creepy as sh!t, or even showing INTERDIMENSIONAL talents!!  Join us, and rate the stories right along with Dr. Kelly. FYI, all references available at https://www.zeropercentscared.com Let us know what you think! Email! stories@zeropercentscared.com FYI: The best way to support the pod is by telling a friend to subscribe, you can use this link to make it cray easy: https://plnk.to/Zps Find us Online! If you like Zero Percent Scared, help us grow by spreading the word on Twitter (@ZeroScared), Facebook, or Instagram! Struggling with drug or alcohol addiction? We understand, it's ok to struggle. But please, ask for help. SAMHSA Drug and Alcohol addiction hotline Or call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) REFERENCES: Kristen Stewart Hitting Target Demographic -- gay ghost hunting reality show!! https://www.autostraddle.com/kristen-stewart-developing-ghost-hunting-reality-tv-show/ Queers love cryptids! https://www.autostraddle.com/nessie-is-my-girlfriend-what-is-it-with-queer-people-and-cryptids-420335/ Mysterious Universe - pretty good paranormal blog site https://mysteriousuniverse.org/ BFRO's account of Alberts Ostman's bigfoot adventure http://bfro.net/GDB/show_report.asp?ID=1091 The ape canyon Sasquatch attacks https://bizarreandgrotesque.com/2020/01/15/ape-canyons-bizarre-1924-bigfoot-attack/ Bigfoot attacks! https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2018/01/bizarre-and-frightening-accounts-of-bigfoot-attacks/ WJ Sheehans Terror in the Woods book series -- check these out, they're cheap and really fun https://www.amazon.com/W-J-Sheehan/e/B07H2W3KW7?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1638250291&sr=8-1    

The Running Public
Training Tuesday #95:The Fundamentals - MWLR

The Running Public

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 69:20


The Mid Week Long Run, or Medium Long Run, is one of our favorite types of runs. Get pumped to dive into this little rascal! FYI, we start with a chat about Brakken's upcoming Ultra before breaking down the Spartan World Championship race, also this coming weekend. Skip to 42:10 to get right to the MWLR talk.

Jason & Alexis
Jason and Alexis: Ice House "Ladies of the Lake"

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 4:27


Dawn has the intel that there are Ice Fishing prostitutes. The show asks Kenny what he knows about it. FYI, he's a liar and knows nothing, but it's entertaining nevertheless!

Break Things On Purpose
Itiel Shwartz

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 15:12


In this episode, we cover:00:00:00 - Introduction 00:05:00 - Itiel's Background in Engineering00:08:25 - Improving Kubernetes Troubleshooting00:11:45 -  Improving Team Collaboration 00:14:00 - OutroLinks: Komodor: https://komodor.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Komodor_com TranscriptJason: Welcome back to another episode of Build Things On Purpose, a part of the Break Things On Purpose podcast where we talk with people who have built really cool software or systems. Today with us, we have Itiel Shwartz who is the CTO of a company called Komodor. Welcome to the show.Itiel: Thanks, happy to be here.Jason: If I go to Komodor's website it really talks about debugging Kubernetes, and as many of our listeners know Kubernetes and complex systems are a difficult thing. Talk to me a little bit more—tell me what Komodor is. What does it do for us?Itiel: Sure. So, I don't think I need to tell our listeners—your listeners that Kubernetes looks cool, it's very easy to get started, but once you're into it and you have a big company with complex, like, micros—it doesn't have to be big, even, like, medium-size complex system company where you're starting to hit a couple of walls or, like, issues when trying to troubleshoot Kubernetes.And that usually is due to the nature of Kubernetes which makes making complex systems very easy. Meaning you can deploy in multiple microservices, multiple dependencies, and everything looks like a very simple YAML file. But in the end of the day, when you have an issue, when one of the pods is starting to restart and you try to figure out, like, why the hell is my application is not running as it should have, you need to use a lot of different tools, methodologies, knowledge that most people don't really have in order to solve the issue. So, Komodor focus on making the troubleshooting in Kubernetes an easy and maybe—may I dare say even fun experience by harnessing our knowledge in Kubernetes and align our users to get that digest view of the world.And so usually when you speak about troubleshooting, the first thing that come to mind is issues are caused due to changes. And the change might be deploying Kubernetes, it can be a [configurment 00:02:50] that changed, a secret that changed, or even some feature flag, or, like, LaunchDarkly feature that was just turned on and off. So, what Komodor does is we track and we collect all of the changes that happen across your entire system, and we put, like, for each one of your services a [unintelligible 00:03:06] that includes how did the service change over time and how did it behave? I mean, was it healthy? Was it unhealthy? Why wasn't it healthy?So, by collecting the data from all across your system, plus we are sit on top of Kubernetes so we know the state of each one of the pods running in your application, we give our users the ability to understand how did the system behave, and once they have an issue we allow them to understand what changes might have caused this. So, instead of bringing down dozens of different tools, trying to build your own mental picture of how the world looks like, you just go into Komodor and see everything in one place.I would say that even more than that, once you have an issue, we try to give our best efforts on helping to understand why did it happen. We know Kubernetes, we saw a lot of issues in Kubernetes. We don't try complex AI solution or something like that, but using our very deep knowledge of Kubernetes, we give our users, FYI, your pods that are unhealthy, but the node that they are running on just got restarted or is having this pressure.So, maybe they could look at the node. Like, don't drill down into the pods logs, but instead, go look at the nodes. You just upgraded your Kubernetes version or things like that. So, basically we give you everything you need in order to troubleshoot an issue in Kubernetes, and we give it to you in a very nice and informative way. So, our user just spend less time troubleshooting and more time developing features.Jason: That sounds really extremely useful, at least from my experience, in operating things on Kubernetes. I'm guessing that this all stemmed from your own experience. You're not typically a business guy, you're an engineer. And so it sounds like you were maybe scratching your own itch. Tell us a little bit more about your history and experience with this?Itiel: I started computer science, I started working for eBay and I was there in the infrastructure team. From there I joined two Israeli startup and—I learned that the thing that I really liked or do quite well is to troubleshoot issues. I was in a very, very, like, production-downtime-sensitive systems. A system when the system is down, it just cost the business a lot of money.So, in these kinds of systems, you try to respond really fast through the incidents, and you spend a lot of time monitoring the system so once an issue occur you can fix it as soon as possible. So, I developed a lot of internal tools. For the companies I worked for that did something very similar, allow you once you have an issue to understand the root cause, or at least to get a better understanding of how the world looks like in those companies.And we started Komodor because I also try to give advice to people. I really like Kubernetes. I liked it, like, a couple of years ago before it was that cool, and people just consult with me. And I saw the lack of knowledge and the lack of skills that most people that are running Kubernetes have, and I saw, like—I'd have to say it's like giving, like, a baby a gun.So, giving an operation person that doesn't really understand Kubernetes tell him, “Yeah, you can deploy everything and everything is a very simple YAML. You want a load balancer, it's easy. You want, like, a persistent storage, it's easy. Just install like—Helm install Postgres or something like that.” I installed quite a lot of, like, Helm-like recipes, GA, highly available. But things are not really highly available most of the time.So, it's definitely scratching my own itch. And my partner, Ben, is also a technical guy. He was in Google where they have a lot of Kubernetes experience. So, together both of us felt the pain. We saw that as more and more companies moved to Kubernetes, the pain became just stronger. And as the shift-left movement is also like taking off and we see more and more dev people that are not necessarily that technical that are expected to solve issues, then again we saw an issue.So, what we see is companies moving to Kubernetes and they don't have the skills or knowledge to troubleshoot Kubernetes. And then they tell their developers, “You are now responsible for the production. You are deploying? You should troubleshoot,” and the developers really don't know what to do. And we came to those companies and basically it makes everything a lot easier.You have any issue in Kubernetes? No issue, like, no issue. And no problem go to Komodor and understand what is the probable root cause. See what's the status? Like, when did it change? When was it last restarted? When was it unhealthy before today? Maybe, like, an hour ago, maybe a month ago. So, Komodor just gives you all of this information in a very informative way.Jason: I like the idea of pulling everything into one place, but I think that obviously begs the question: if we're pulling in this information we need to have good information to begin with. I'm interested in your thoughts of if someone were to use Komodor or just want to improve their visibility into troubleshooting Kubernetes, what are some tips or advice that you'd have for them in maybe how to set up their monitoring, or how to tag their changes, things like that? What does that look like?Itiel: I will say the first thing is using more metadata and tagging capabilities across the board. It can be on top of the monitors, the system, the services, like, you name it, you should do it. Once an alert is triggered, you don't necessarily have to go to the perfect playbook because it doesn't really exist. You should understand what's the relevant impact, what system it impacted, and who is the owner, and who should you wake up, like, now or who should look at it?So, spending the time tagging some of the alerts and resources in Kubernetes is super valuable. It's not that hard, but by doing so you just reduced the mental capacity needed in order to troubleshoot an issue. More than that, here in Komodor we read of this metadata label stacks, and we harness it for our own benefits. So, it is best practice to do so and Komodor also utilize this data.And for example, for an alert, say like, the relevant team name that is responsible, and for each service in Kubernetes write the team that owns this service. And this way you can basically understand what teams are responsible for what services or issues. So, this is the number one tip or trick. And the second one is just spend time on exposing these data. You can use Komodor I think, like, it's the best solution, but even if not, try to have those notification every time something change.Write those, like, web hooks to which one of your resources and let the team know that things change. If not, like, what we see in companies is something break, no one really know what changed, and in the end of the day they are forced to go into Slack and doing, like, here—someone changed something that might cause production break. And if so, please fix it. It's not a good place to be. If you see yourself asking questions over Slack, you have an issue with the system monitoring and observability.Jason: That's a great point because I feel like a lot of times we do that. And so you look back into your CI/CD logs, like, what pushes are made, what deploys are made. You're trying to parse out, like, which one was it? Especially in a high-velocity organization of multiple changes and which one actually did that breaking.Itiel: We see it across the board. There are so many changes, so many dependencies. Because microservice A talks with microservice B that speak with microservice C using SQS or something like that. And then things break and no one know what is really happening. Especially the developers, they have no idea what is happening. But most of the time also the DevOps themselves.Jason: I think that's a great point of, sort of, that shared confusion. As we've talked about DevOps and that breaking down of the walls between developers and operations, there was always this, “Well, you should work together,” and there is this notion now of we're working together but nobody knows what's going on.As we talk about this world of sharing, what are some of your advice as somebody who's helped both developers and operations? Aside from getting that shared visibility for troubleshooting, do you have any tips for collaborating better to understand as a team how things are functioning?Itiel: I have a couple of thoughts on this area. The first thing is you must have the alignment. Both the DevOps, or operation and the developers need to understand they are in this together. And this, like, base point in other organization you see they struggle. Like, the developers are like, yeah, I don't really need—like, it's the ops problem if production is down, and the ops are, like, angry at the devs and say they don't understand anything so they shouldn't be responsible for issues in production.So, first of all, let's create the alignment. The organization needs to understand that both the dev and the ops team need to take shared responsibility over the system and over the troubleshooting process. Once this very key pillar is out of the way, I will say that adding more and more tools and making sure that those tools can be shared between the ops and the dev team.Because a lot of the times we see tools that are designed for the DevOps, and a developer don't really understand what is happening here, what are those numbers, and basically how to use them. So, I think making sure the tools fit both personas is a very crucial thing. And the last thing is learning from past incidents. You are going to have other incidents, other issues. The question is, do you understand how we improve the next time this incident or a similar incident will happen? What processes and what tools are missing in the link between the DevOps and the system to optimize it. Because it's not after you snap your finger and everything works as expected.It is an iterative process and you must have, like, the state of mind of, okay, things are going to get better, or they are going to get better, and so on. So, I think this is the third, like, three most important things. One make sure you have that alignment, two, create tools that can be shared across different teams, and three, learn from past incidents and understand this is like a marathon. It's not a sprint.Jason: Those are excellent tips. So, for our listeners, if you would like a tool that can be shared between devs and DevOps or ops teams, and you're interested in Komodor—Itiel, tell us where folks can find more info about Komodor and learn more about how to troubleshoot Kubernetes.Itiel: So, you can find us on Twitter, but basically on komodor.com. Yeah, you can sign up for a free trial. The installation is, like, 10 seconds or something like that. It's basically Helm install, and it really works. We just finished, like, a very big round, so we are growing really fast and we have more and more customers. So, we'll be happy to hear your use case and to see how we can accommodate your needs.Jason: Awesome. Well, thanks for being on the show. It's been a pleasure to have you.Itiel: Thank you. Thank you. It was super fun being here.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

Confident Collective
62. Intro to Mushrooms & Microdosing with Alli Schaper, Fungi Enthusiast & Multiverse Co-Founder

Confident Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 60:33


Today we're talking to Alli Schaper, aka the Mushroom Queen. She is the Co-Founder + CEO of The Multiverse. The Multiverse is an ecosystem for all things fungi with the mission to make functional mushrooms sexy and create education and collaboration amongst the psychedelics industry. She is no doubt the expert on shrooms and has truly opened our minds about the many incredible benefits of functional, psychedelic and culinary mushrooms (which FYI: humans have been using for thousands of years.) “There's a different benefit for each mushroom individually, but overall they are incredible for immune health, skin health, gut health, and cognitive function.” - Alli Schaper Although there's been a lot of stigma around the use of functional and psychedelic mushrooms, we're now able to look at the science to direct us into understanding how they can really help us. From mental health and microdosing studies to swapping coffee for mushrooms to aid in our physical health, we got a full rundown of why mushrooms are the next big trend in wellness. “Everything you kind of need health wise - there's a mushroom for that.” - Alli Schaper Alli's team has launched the world's first functional mushroom marketplace at yourmultiverse.com, and is set to launch SuperMush, their in-house CPG brand, Fall 2021. Alli is most often caught talking about how mushrooms can save the world, and is passionate about serving as an ally in bringing the future of psychedelics to the mainstream wellness conversation. Connect with her @allischaper. “When you feel good, you want to do good. And when you feel more connected to the planet and those you share it with, you want to make an impact in the world. And that's really what mushrooms can teach us.” - Alli Schaper   What We Talk About: The difference between and benefits of functional, psychedelic and culinary mushrooms A brief overview of how mushrooms have been used on earth throughout history Western culture's view of mushrooms and how they've become a trend in the wellness industry Mushrooms and mental health studies Types of mushrooms and their proven benefits Mushrooms in relation to the CBD/marijuana industry Meet Mycelium: the powerhouse underground root system that connects everything on earth What you need to know about microdosing How mushrooms affect us internally Benefits of mushroom coffee What to look for in a mushroom supplement How to incorporate functional mushrooms in our daily lives New podcast episodes of Confident Collective drop every Tuesday.   Resources: Watch “Fantastic Fungi” on Netflix Third Wave website and podcast Double Blind magazine The Multiverse: Thrive Market for Mushrooms Alli Schaper on Instagram Michael Pollan's book: “How to Change Your Mind” Follow us on Instagram: @confidentcollective  Follow the Hosts/Founders: @kristinazias & @raeannlangas Learn more: https://www.theconfidentcollective.com/ Stay in the know with our newsletter! 

The Bike Shed
317: Burn The Ships!

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:41


Steph gives an update about RSpec focus and how she often forgets to remove the focus feature from tests. She figured out two solutions: one using Rubocop, and the other from a Twitter user, suggesting using a GitHub gist. She also suggests that if you're one of those people who misses being in an office environment, you check out soundofcolleagues.com for ambient office noise selection. Chris has been struggling to actually do any coding and is adjusting to doing more product management and shares some strategies that have been helping him. They answer a listener question about dealing with large pull requests and how it's hard to recognize a good seam to break them up when you are in the thick of one. This episode is brought to you by ScoutAPM (https://scoutapm.com/bikeshed). Give Scout a try for free today and Scout will donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy. Twitter note re: rspec-retry (https://twitter.com/jasonrudolph/status/1458416077726158852) soundofcolleagues.com (https://soundofcolleagues.com) mailcheck (https://github.com/mailcheck/mailcheck) Inertia.js (https://inertiajs.com/) Svelte (https://svelte.dev/) devise (https://github.com/heartcombo/devise) clearance (https://github.com/thoughtbot/clearance) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: CHRIS: One day, I'll grow up. It's fine. I look forward to that day. But today, I don't think it's that day. Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris. Well, in some fun news, Utah started his professional training as of this morning, which I'm very excited about. Because we've been working with him to work on being good with walking on a leash, FYI, he's not, [laughs] and also being good about not jumping on people. And essentially, being a really good roommate. And he started training today, and we are using an e-collar, which initially I was really hesitant about because I don't want it to hurt him in any way. But now that I have felt the e-collar myself and we've had a first day with it, it's going super well. I'm very excited for where this is headed. CHRIS: That's very exciting. When does he start paying rent? STEPH: Ooh. I'll have to check with him, or I guess I have set those boundaries. That's my job. CHRIS: I just figured that's a core part of being a good roommate. But maybe we've got baby steps or doggy steps to get there. But that's exciting. I'm glad [laughs] that the first day of training is going well. STEPH: Yeah, it's going great. And the place that we're going to the trainer they have horses, and mules, and goats. And so now I have a very cute video of him trying to play with a goat, and the goat was having none of it. But it's still all very cute. In tech-related news, I have an update for when you and I were recently chatting about the RSpec focus and how I mentioned that I often forget to remove the focus feature from tests. And so then that goes up to a PR, and I have to rely on a kind human to let me know, and then I remove it. Or worst-case scenario, it gets merged into the main branch. And for anyone that's not on Twitter, I just wanted to share an update because I also shared something there. But the resolution for what I was looking for there's already a rule that's written into Rubocop, but it's specifically written in the Rubocop RSpec codebase. And with that rule, you can essentially just say, hey, let me know anytime that a test is using the focus metadata, and then make sure to let me know and fail. And then if you don't want to actually include all of Rubocop into your project because Rubocop is pretty opinionated, you can still add Rubocop to your project, but you can specifically add Rubocop RSpec, and then you can say, hey, all other rules disabled by default, but then you can enable that specific rule. So then, that way, you will catch all of your focus tests. There's also another approach that someone on Twitter shared with us recently from Marz Drel. And Marz shared specifically a really nice simple GitHub Gist that documents or exemplifies that you can add an environment variable that checks to say, hey, if we're in CI mode, then add a before hook. And then that before hook will look for any examples that are using that focus metadata, and then it's going to raise. And then if we're not in CI mode, then don't do anything, don't raise, and carry on. And that's just a really nice simple addition if someone didn't want to pull in Rubocop into their project. CHRIS: Both of those definitely sound like great options. I don't think we have Rubocop on the current project that I'm working on. But I think the RSpec focus thing, the metadata one, seems like it'll work great. More generally, I just want to thank folks out there who listen to the show and then write back in like, "Hey, this is probably what you want." There was a similar thread that someone shared around the RSpec::Retry stuff that I was talking about recently and the failure mode there and trying to get that into the Junit Reporter. And so they had some suggestions around that. Jason Rudolph on Twitter reached out, sharing just his initial exploration and thoughts on how it might be possible to extend the XML reports that are generated and capture a flaky test in that way. So that's really interesting. And again, just really love that folks are listening to the things that we say and then even adding on to them and continuing the conversation. So thanks to everybody for sharing those things. STEPH: Yeah, it's incredibly helpful. And then one other fun thing that I'd love to share, and I found this out from someone else at thoughtbot because they had shared it recently. But it's a neat website called soundofcolleagues.com. And I know you've got your laptop in front of you. So if you'll go visit it, it'll be neat to see as we're talking through it. For anyone else that wants to pull it up, too, we'll include a link in the show notes. But it's a neat project that someone started where you can bump up the sounds that you would normally hear in an office. So maybe you want to bump up background noise of people or an open window. There's one specifically for printers and a coffee machine, and keyboards are on there as well. [laughs] I have discovered I am partial open window and partial rain, although rain is just always my go-to. I like the sound of rain for when I'm working. CHRIS: Gentle rain is definitely nice white noise in general. I've seen this for coffee shops, but I haven't seen the particular one. Also, yes, I definitely know how to spell the word colleague on the first of three tries. Definitely didn't have to rely on Google for that one. But yeah, nice site there. I enjoy that. STEPH: I tried the keyboard option that's on there because I was like, oh yeah, I'm totally going to be into this. This is going to be my jam. I don't think it is because I realized that I'm very biased. I like the sound of my own keyboard. So I had to shush the other one and just listen to the rain and the open window. But that's some of the fun things that are going on in my world today. What's new in your world? CHRIS: I'm just now spending a moment with the keyboard sound. It's a very muted keyboard. I want a little more clackety. STEPH: A little more clackety? CHRIS: I was assuming it would be too much clackety, and that would be the problem. But it sounds more mushy. Maybe we can pipe in some of the sound here [laughs] at this point. Or we can link to these sounds, and everyone can dial up the keyboards to 100. But I, too, am partial to the sounds of my own keyboard. But what's new in my world? This past week and I think probably even a little bit more of the prior week, I've been noticing that I've been struggling to actually do any coding, which has been interesting to observe. And again, trying to observe it, not necessarily judge it, although if that's not the thing that we want to be doing, then try and improve that. But mostly trying to observe what's going on, what is taking my time. A lot of it is product management type work. So I am spending a good amount of time trying to gather the different voices and understand what is the work to be done, and then shape that into the backlog and make sure that that's clear and ready for the team to pick up. And then, thankfully, the other two developers that are working on the project are fantastically prolific. So they're often very quickly working through the work that has been set up in front of them. And so I'm trying to then be proactive and respond to the code. But there's almost a cycle to it where I'm just staying out in front of them, but they're catching up with everything that's going on. So it's something that I'm trying again to be intentional about, name, share some of that back up with the group. If there are things that I'm doing that I don't uniquely need to be doing, then let's share as much of that knowledge as possible. But one thing that I will say is the product management, shaping the backlog work is exhausting. I am astonished by just how drained I am at the end of the day. And I'm like, I don't even really feel like I did anything. I didn't write any code, but I am just completely spent. And there really is something to when the work is clear, just doing the work, I can actually find energizing. And it's fun, and I can get in flow state. And sometimes, I'll be drained in a certain way. But the work of taking a bunch of different slack threads, and communications, and meetings, and synthesizing that down, and then determining what the work needs to look like moving forward, and providing enough clarity but then not over constraining and not providing too much clarity. And there are so many micro-decisions that are being made in there. And I'm just spent at the end of the day, and I have so much...I've always had a lot of respect for product managers and folks that are existing in that interstitial space and trying to make sense of the noise, especially of a growing company, but all the more so this week as I've been feeling some of that myself. STEPH: I totally agree. I have felt that having a strong product manager really makes or breaks a project for me where even though having technical leadership is really nice, I'd prefer someone that's really strong at the product knowledge and then helping direct where the product is headed. That is incredibly helpful. Like you mentioned, the work is exhausting. There's someone that joined the thoughtbot team fairly recently, and I was chatting with them about what type of projects they would be interested in working on. And one of their responses was, "I'd love to work on a project with a strong product manager because I have been doing that a fair amount for recent years. And I would love to get back to just focusing on coding." And so I think they enjoyed some of the work, but they just recognize it's exhausting. And I'd really like to just get back to writing code for a while. CHRIS: Yeah, I'm definitely in that space. And I think there's a ton of value to spending a little bit of time, like having any developer at some point in their career spend a little bit of time managing the backlog, and you will learn a bunch from that. But I'm also in the space of I would love to just turn on some music and code for a while. That sounds fun. There's a lot of work to be done right now. I'd love to just be in there doing the work. But sometimes, out of necessity, the defining of the work is the thing that's important. And so, I think I've been correctly assessing the most important thing. And that that has consistently for a while now been the defining and responding to the work that's in process as opposed to doing it myself. But, man, I really hope I get to dive back into the code sometime and use my clackety keyboard to its fullest extent. STEPH: Have you found any particular strategies that really help you with the product management work? CHRIS: I will say that I think this is a competency. This is a skillset and a career path that...again, I've been at plenty of organizations that I don't think respected the role as much as it should be. But it's an incredibly hard role and multidisciplinary communication at the core of it. And so I don't think I'm great at it is the thing that I'll say. So everything that follows is just to be clear; I'm not saying that I'm great at this, but I have been doing some of it. So here are some thoughts that I have. I think a lot of it is in reaction to where I felt like the work was clear. So I have a sense of what it looks like when I can go to the backlog, trust that it is in a roughly solid priority order, pick up a piece of work and immediately go to work on it. And understand what are the end-user implications of this piece of work? Where would I start on it like, how technically? What's a rough approach that I would have? And getting that level of specificity just right. So it's not overconstrained, but it's not under constrained. So having experienced that on the developer side, I try and then use that to shape some of the guidance that I'm putting into, say, the Trello tickets that I'm writing up here. We recently introduced Trello epics, which is I want to say like an add-on. And that allows us just the tiniest bit of product management, like one level up. So instead of just having cards and a list that is like, here's the work to be done, we now have an epics list that is separate to it, and it links between a card and its associated epics. So it's like project and action within that project. And just that little touch of structure there has been really, really useful to help look at like, okay, what are the big pieces that we're trying to move? And then how do they break down into the smaller pieces? So a tiny, tiny bit of fanciness in our product management tool, not Jira-like not going in that direction yet for as long as I cannot. But that little bit of structure. And then thinking about what has been useful to me as I pick up tickets. And then, as always, trying to just always be cognizant of what is the user's experience here? What problem am I trying to solve for them? What is their experience going to be? How will they know how to work with this feature? And just always asking that and then framing the work to be done in the context of that. STEPH: I like how you're adamant about a little bit of fanciness but not all the way to Jira-like. I also like how you highlighted end-users. All of that, I think, is awesome when developers are able to expand their role to experience all the other facets of building software. CHRIS: Yeah, definitely. I think that whole list of all of the different facets of where our work interacts with different groups. The more empathy or, the more experience that you can have there, the better that you'll be able to understand how to communicate there, how to express things in terms, et cetera, et cetera. So a huge fan of all of those ideas. I am ready to just get back in the code for a few minutes, though. But for now, for as long as necessary, I'll do some of this work. But I am trying to find my way to other things. In terms of actual feature work that we're working on, one of the things that we're doing right now is restructuring our onboarding. So when a user comes and signs up to the website and then subsequently has to fill out a handful of other forms, there's actually an external system that we've been working with that houses some of the core data of our application. And they have a hosted application form. So we can send the user over to them, and the user fills out the rest of the application on this other system's site. And then they get redirected back to us. And everything's got nice DNS entries for a particular subdomain and whatnot. So it looks roughly consistent. There's some branding. But it's still someone else's UI, essentially. And we were feeling enough pain from that experience. We were like; you know what? It's time. We're going to bring this back in-house. We're going to do all the forms ourselves. We're going to do a nice progressive little progress bar. You can see all the steps as you're going through onboarding. We're just going to own that more because that's a core part of the experience that we're building here. So biting the bullet, deciding to do that. But there's an interesting edge case that we run into, which is we are using Devise for authentication. Totally makes sense. We're in Rails context; there we go. It's the thing to use. But Devise exists in truly the Rails world. So like HTML ERB templates, the controllers have certain expectations as to what's going on. So thus far, we've just let that exist in that world and everything else we're building in Inertia and Svelte. But we're just now starting to feel enough of the pain, and that Devise exists in this other context. And for a while, we just kept saying, "You know what? It's not worth the effort to port it over. It's fine." Because we're using Tailwind, we have a consistent design language that we can use across them. That said, the components are drifting a little bit. And it's like, oh, this one's got a rounded corner like this, and that one's got this color. And we don't have the disabled style. But it is nice that it's not completely distinct. But we have finally decided it is time. We need to port this thing over because we feel like the onboarding and authentication type flows; they're actually a big part of the user experience or at least the first run user experience when someone's signing up to our site. So we want to own that a little bit more. One of the things that I ran into as I was trying to introduce Mailcheck, which is a library that I've talked about, I think in a previous episode...but basically, you can have it observe a field and if someone types in like, user@gmaip.com, you can like, did you mean gmail.com? And then go from there. And I think there's more subtlety. They can maybe even look up MX records and things like that. But basically validate an email address heuristically and offer the nice, very friendly to a user, "Hey, did you mean this instead?" So not a full validation that says, "No, you cannot put your email address," because maybe you have a weird one that sounds like Gmail but isn't. But that's a little bit trickier to implement both on the Devise side and then in any other place that we have an email input. And so what we want to do is port over to Inertia and Svelte, and then everything's in our nice, happy context with all our components and all the other work that we're doing. And it really does just highlight how much I've come to enjoy working with Inertia and Svelte. They are fantastic technologies. And now I just want absolutely everything to be in them. So we're finally going to bite the bullet, and I think port those over a little bit after we get the current batch of work done. But soon, soon, that's the goal. STEPH: I'm having a bit of déjà vu where I feel like there was a project that you were working on that was using Devise, and then removing Devise and replacing it with something else was a challenge. Does that ring a bell? CHRIS: Yes, that is accurate. So I had a project that I worked on where we had both Devise and Clearance was actually what was going on. There were basically two different applications that existed; one was using Clearance, the later one used Devise. But then we folded those two applications back together. And by virtue of that, I tried to unify the authentication schemes, and it was like, nope, not going to happen. And then we didn't. STEPH: And then we didn't. [laughs] I like that ending. CHRIS: Well, sometimes you don't. [laughs] STEPH: Yeah, I love that ending because it reflects reality. Sometimes that just happens. In fact, I'm going to segue for just a moment because you're reminding me that there's something I don't think I've shared with you yet. On my previous project, there was a particular feature. It was a big feature that someone had picked up and worked on. And at one point, we were essentially playing hot potato with this feature because we hadn't gotten it to the point that it was merged. There was too much that was happening in that pull request, although then we ended up merging it. But then we found lots of bugs. And it was just one of those features that we couldn't really get across the finish line. There was always something else that was wrong with it or needed to be done or needed to be considered. And we'd reach that point where Chad Pytel, who is on the project, was like, "We're either going to finish this, or we're going to throw it away." And I felt a little guilty saying this, and I was like, "I vote we throw it away. I have lots of concerns about this. We are essentially reimplementing another complex workflow. But now, we are implementing it pretty differently in another portion of the application. It's going to be hard to manage. The cost of adding this and maintaining this is a really high concern." And so he talked with the rest of the team and came back, and he's like, "Yep, we're going to throw it away." And so then he issued a PR, and we removed it. And it was one of those moments of like; this isn't great because then we have invested hours into this, and now we are taking it away. But it also felt really good that that's always an option. And that was the better option because it was either we're going to continue sinking more time into this, or we can stop it now. And then we can move on to more important work. CHRIS: Sunk costs and all that. STEPH: Yeah. I feel like it's so rare when that really happens because then we just feel dedicated to like, well, we're going to make this valuable to somebody. We're going to keep this. And in this case, we just threw it away. It's very nice. CHRIS: There's a similar anecdote that I remember. Actually, I think it's happened more than once. But very particularly, we were working on a system. And this was with our friend, Matt Sumner, a friend of the show, as well been on a few times. And Matt was working on the project. And we got to a point where we had two competing implementations of a given workflow, and we were opting to go with the new one. But there were folks that were saying, "Let's keep the code around for the old one." And Matt was like, "Absolutely not. If we do that, we might go...no, this will be bad. Then we have to maintain that code. We need to burn the ships," as he said. And he actually named the pull request burn the ships where he just removed all the code. And I was like, I like your style, man. You made a decision here. We collectively made a decision. And then this is a classic Matt Sumner move. But he did the thing that we said we were going to do. And he just held that line. And I really appreciated it. And it's a voice that I have in the back of my head often now, which is just like, no, burn the ships. If we need it, it'll be in Git history. We can recover it. But it's going to need to be handled in the interim. We don't want to have to support that code right now and for however long until we actually decide to remove it from the codebase. So let's get rid of it. And if we really need it, well, then we'll resurrect it, but for now, burn the ships. And I like that. STEPH: I like that too. I think it's one of those areas where it takes experience to feel that pain too. If you're pretty new to writing code, you're going to think, well, we can keep it around. There's no harm. And so it often has to be that sage, that person who's been around long enough and felt some pain from making that decision in prior centuries or years. And he's like, "No, we're not going to do this." The WE collective of developers who have experienced the pain from this understand that that's not a good choice. And so we're going to burn the ships instead. But it is one of those that if you're newer, you won't think that way. And I think that's totally reasonable that you wouldn't think that immediately. CHRIS: I think that tacit knowledge that oh, I've gone through this before, and I've experienced the pain, and now let me tell you about that. And let me try and share that with you because there's always the cost-benefit trade-off. Because if that code stays in the codebase, then we know it works because we've kept it around for that whole time. And so there's a nicety to that, but there's a cost, that maintenance cost. And being able to express that well and being able to say, "I've been here, and let me tell you a tale," but do it in a way that doesn't sound overly condescending or explainy or things like that. I think that's a very subtle skill and a very important one, and frankly, really hard one to get right. I'm not sure I always hit the mark on that where I'm just like, "No, can't do it. It's bad." I think it's very easy to end up in a space where you're just like, "No, it's bad." And they're like, "But why?" And you're like, "Because it's bad. Trust me." It's like, well, I feel like you do need to be able to explain the stories, the experiences that you've had in the past, the anecdotes that you've heard, the blog posts that you've read that have really informed your thinking. But I think that is a big part of what it means to continue on in this profession and be able to do the work and make those subtle trade-offs, and the it depends because, at the end of the day, it all depends. STEPH: Or you just issue a pull request and title it burn the ships. [laughs] CHRIS: Burn the ships. Indeed, that is, in fact an option. And actually, while we're on the topic of pull requests, this might be a perfect segue into a listener question that we have. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: As always, thanks to everyone who sends in listener questions. We so appreciate getting them. They help direct the conversation and give us something to chat about. So this question comes in from Bryan Robles. And Bryan writes in about large pull requests. And Bryan writes in with, "My toxic trait is large pull requests. Any tips on when you get into a place where you're fixing or refactoring something, and it ends up cascading to many more changes than you want it to? I sometimes can go back and break it up. But it's hard to recognize a good seam when you're in the thick of it." So, Steph, what do you think? Large pull requests and finding yourself in them after [laughs] certain amounts of time. STEPH: Yeah, speaking of that knowledge that often comes from experience, this is something that I'm certainly always striving to get better at. I think it does take practice. There are some things that I do that I can share. And I categorize them really into a before, and I guess midway. So there's the before I set sail and set off to deeper waters list that I will think through as I'm starting a new task, and then there's the I'm lost at sea. And then, I need to figure out how I'm going to organize this change. So in the first category, when I'm first starting off a task, I consider what sort of changes need to be made, and are there any obvious roadblocks? So an obvious roadblock may be changing or updating a model that has one relationship, and I need to change it to has many relationships. Or perhaps there's a part of the application that is untested. And before I make any changes, I need to document that existing behavior. And that really falls neatly within Kent Beck's advice where he said, "First make the change easy (warning: this might be hard) and then make the easy change." So I try to think upfront what are some of the small, incremental changes that I can make first that will then make the final change easy? And then I separate that mentally into PRs. Or I may separate it into tickets, whatever is going to help me stay organized and communicate how I'm breaking up that work. And then the other thing that I'll do is I'll consider what's my MVP? So what's my minimum viable pull request? What set of changes include just enough changes to be helpful to users or to other developers? Which, by the way, is also a helpful mindset to have when you're breaking down work into tickets. So, as an example, let's say that I need to fix some bad data that's causing a site to error. So my first step could be to write a task to fix the bad data. And then, step two, prevent bad data from being created. And then probably step three, I need to rerun the task to fix data that was created during step two. But I can think through each of those steps and separate them into different pull requests. And then there may also be the question of well, how small is too small? Like you're saying, what's a minimum viable pull request? How do I know if I am not delivering value? And that one gets a little trickier and vague. But ultimately, I will think, does it pass CI? Is this change deployable? And then I do have to define what value I'm delivering. And I think that's a common area that folks struggle because we'll think of delivering value as delivering a whole new feature or adding complete test coverage for an untested interface. But delivering value doesn't have to represent that end goal. It may be that you added one test for an untested interface. And that's still delivering really great value to your team, same for delivering a feature to a user. You may be able to speak with that wonderful product manager and find what's the smallest bit of value that you can deliver instead of the whole feature set? I think the smallest PR I can think of that I've issued is either fixing a typo or removing a focus metadata from an RSpec test. So that's my starting point. That's the before I set sail. Those are some of the things I think about. I have more for the I'm lost at sea. But what are your thoughts? CHRIS: First, that was a great summary that you gave. So I totally agree with everything that you just said. I think part of the question I would have...So Bryan wrote this in and described this as his toxic trait. So he's identifying this as something that seemingly consistently plagues him. So I would ask, is there a way that you can introduce something? Like, are there natural breaks in your day? And can you ask the question at those breaks? Like, hey, I've been working on a thing for a little while. Is there a version that I could...like, could I close off a body of work at this moment? When you break for lunch, if you go grab coffee in the morning, when you're leaving at the end of the day, use those natural breakpoints. I'm not sure exactly what you mean when you say large pull requests. But if those are spanning multiple days, in my mind, if anything starts to span more than a day, I will start to ask that question to myself. And that's a reflex that I built up over time by feeling the pain of large pull requests and putting it up, and feeling apologetic. And then having my colleagues gently, professionally kindly ask me to break it down into smaller pieces. And me saying, "I really don't want it. All right, fine, fine, fine, I'll do it." And then I do it. And it's one of those things that I never want to do in the first place, but I'm always happy to have done after the fact. But it is work. And so, if I can get better at pulling that thinking and pulling that question earlier in the process, that I think is really useful. Similarly, I will try to, again, as friendly as I can; if I notice someone mentioning the same body of work at stand up for a few days, I might gently ask, "Hey, is there a way that we can find a shippable version of a portion of that of a subset? Can we put it up behind a feature flag and get something out there just to try and keep the PR small, et cetera?" And so gently nudge in that direction. And then I think the other side of that is being very okay with one character PRs. Like, that's it. We changed one character. It turns out we need to pluralize that word, or we need one-line changes are great. That's fine. And more pull requests, in my mind, are better than fewer, larger pull requests. And so really embracing that and having that be part of the core conversation and demonstrating that throughout the team is a way to share this idea. So that's perhaps more in the process or person point of view on this as opposed to the technical, but that's part of the consideration that I would have. I am interested, and I'll bounce back to, Steph, what you were saying of now that you're out at sea, what do you do? STEPH: So I need to react positively to some of the things that you just said because you made me think of two things. One of them is I've never had someone say, "Hey, Steph, that PR is too small. Could you add some more changes to it? Could you do some more work?" I have had people say, "Hey, that PR was hard to review." But even then, sometimes getting that feedback from folks is hard because nobody really wants to say, "I had a hard time reviewing your PR." That's something that, over time, you may become really comfortable saying to someone. But I think initially, people don't want to say, "Hey, that was hard to review," or "There were a lot of changes in that. Would you break it down?" Because that's a lot of complex emotions and discussion to have there. But yeah, I just figured I'd share that I have never had someone complain that a PR is too small, and I've issued a single character change. And then I love, love how much you asked the question of what's the problem we're trying to solve? And so there's this ambiguous idea of a large PR. But what does that mean? What are the pain points? What are we actually looking to change about our behavior? And then how is that going to impact or benefit the team or benefit ourselves? And so, going back to the question of how do we measure this? How do I know I'm starting to break up my changes in a helpful way? We may need to circle back to that because I don't have answers to it. But I just really like asking that question. As for the I'm lost at sea part, or maybe you're not lost at sea, but you've caught too many fish, and the fish warden is going to fuss at you if you bring too many fish back to dock. I don't think this is a real nautical example. But here we are. CHRIS: Was that the fish warden? STEPH: Yeah, the fish warden. You know, the fish warden. [laughs] CHRIS: Sure, I do, yeah. Yeah, I know about that, well-versed in fish law. STEPH: [laughs] Got to know your fish law. If we're going to talk about pull requests, you got to introduce fish law. But I'm actually going to quote Joël Quenneville, a fellow thoughtboter, because they shared a thoughtful thread on Twitter that talks a lot about breaking up your changes and how to break up your pull requests and your commits. And I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes because it's really worth reading as there's a lot of knowledge in that thread. But one of the things that Joël says is get comfortable with Git, and it makes a world of difference. In particular, you want to get really good at git add --patch, git reset, and git rebase interactive. And that is so true for me. Once I have gotten really good at using those commands, then I feel like I can break up anything. Because often when I am helping someone break something up, it's often they want to, but they're like, "I don't know how. And this is going to take so much of my time. It doesn't feel efficient and the right thing to do." And they're probably right. If you don't know how to break it up, then it may take you too long. And maybe it's not worth it at that point. But if you can ask a friend, and they can help walk you through this process, or if you can learn on your own, that's going to be a game-changer because you will start to think about how can I separate these commits? And I can reorder them, and then issue separate PRs, or just keep them in separate commits, whatever process you're looking to improve. In fact, there's a really great course on Upcase called Mastering Git written by someone who is co-host of this podcast. And it has a lot of great videos and tutorials that will help you get really good at these Git commands and then will help you split up your commits. CHRIS: Oh yeah, I did do that. Warning: it's like three and a half hours long. But it is broken up into, I believe, 10 or 11 videos. So you can find just the ones that you want. There's a couple in the middle that I think are particularly useful talking about the object model of Git. Git is weird, unfortunately. And so I spent a bunch of time in that course. Also, thank you for the kind words, Steph. [laughs] But I spent a bunch of time in that course trying to make Git less weird or understandable. If you look under the hood, it starts to make more sense. But if you really want to get comfortable with manipulating Git history, which I think is a really useful skill for this conversation that we're having, that's the only way I found to do it, just memorizing the steps. It's always going to feel a little bit foreign. But once you understand the stuff under the hood, that's a really useful thing for being able to manipulate and tease apart a pull request and break it into different things, and port things from one branch to another, and all those fun activities. Yeah, man, that was a bunch of years ago too. I wonder what I look like in it. Huh. STEPH: I really liked that episode, the one you just mentioned, the Git Object Model. Now that you've mentioned it, I remember watching it, and it's very interesting. So yeah, thank you for making all this helpful content for folks. There's also a blog post that we can include in the show notes as well that is a really nice overview of using git interactive, and rebase, and squash and amend those types of behaviors as well. So will be sure to include both so folks can check those out. And then to round things out, one of the other things that I will do is I will ask a friend. I will ask someone for help. So we've talked about some of these behaviors, or some of these processes that we have are really built up from experience and practice. And you can watch a lot of helpful content, and you can read blog posts. But sometimes, it really just takes time to get good at it. I know, as I'd mentioned earlier, I am always still looking to improve this particular skill because I think it's so valuable. And one of the ways I do that is I will just phone a friend. And I'll say, "Hey, can we chat for a bit? I would like to show you my changes. I want to hear from you if you see something in here that's valuable that you think can be shipped independently, so that way we can get it delivered faster." Or it may be a change that's just like a test improvement or something. And we can go ahead and get that immediately released to the team, and it will benefit them. Or you may want to do this at the start of a ticket. If I am new to a project or when I am new to a project, I will often ask someone to break down a ticket with me if I'm feeling a little bit uncertain. Or just say, "Hey, do you see any clean lines of division here? I feel like there's a lot in this ticket. You're more familiar with the codebase. What would you ship? How would you ship this incrementally?" and have someone else walk through the process with you. CHRIS: Yep, the phone a friend and/or, as always, pairing is a wonderful tool in these sorts of situations. The one other thing that comes to mind for me is part of the question was about sometimes it's difficult to find a clear parting line within a larger body of work, within a larger change. And that can definitely be true. I think there are certain standouts of like is this a refactoring that can be shipped separately? Is this a test change that would be useful on its own? Is there a model change that we could break out and have just that go out? So there's a bunch of mechanical questions that we can ask and say; here's categories of things that might fit that bill. But to flip this to the other side, the question was asked by Bryan very much as an I struggle with this thing. This is my toxic trait is the phrase that he used, which I thought was really interesting. And that can be true. This can be something that if you're consistently and uniquely within the team producing these giant PRs and then folks find that difficult to review, then I think that is absolutely something to work on. But if this is something that is happening between members like, other members of the team are also finding that they keep ending up with PRs that are bigger than they expected and taking longer and harder to review, there is a question of is the codebase actually in a shape that makes it harder to do small changes? There's the phrase shotgun surgery, which refers to a codebase that is so entangled and coupled that any change requires modifying ten files just to make one small alteration. And I think that's a worthwhile question to step back and ask, actually, is it not me? Is it actually the codebase? It could be both certainly. But there is a version of your codebase is coupled in a way that means that any even small, tiny change requires touching so many different places in the code. And if that's true, that's at least worth naming and worth highlighting and maybe talking about in retro and saying, hey, this feels like it's true. So maybe we start to get intentional about refactoring, and breaking out, and starting to add those dividing lines within the code such that hopefully, down the road, small changes can, in fact, be small changes. So that is the one last thing that I would consider here. Also, anecdotally, this is just a thing that came to mind. As I've worked with strongly-typed languages, systems that have a compiler, and have a type system, and the ability for the compiler to keep an eye on the whole codebase, I've noticed that it's very easy to do this sort of thing where I just start with one small data model change, and then the compiler is like, oh, you got to go fix it here, and here, and here, and here. And I found that because the compiler is your friend and will just point you to all the places you need to make the change, it is very easy to just keep going because some of that mechanical work is happening on your behalf. And it's a wonderful facet of typed languages and of having a compiler and being able to have that conversation with the compiler. But I found that for me, it is much easier to end up in this mode where I'm like, oh no, this PR is way too large. When I'm working in a system that has types, that has a compiler, that frankly makes it a little bit easier to chase down all the places you need to make a change. So that's also a consideration. It's not necessarily a good or a bad thing, just something that I've observed that feels like it's adjacent to this conversation. But yeah, I think those are my thoughts. STEPH: Yeah, those are great points. I've certainly worked on projects where that felt very true where it's a small change, but it would cascade throughout the project. And all the changes were necessary. It wasn't something that I could split into smaller PRs. So checking if it is the codebase that's really making it hard to have small PRS is a really great idea. CHRIS: Who'd have thunk such a little question could get us rambling for so long? Oh, wait, I would have thunk that. STEPH: And so far, reflecting on the things that we've talked about so far, I think I've talked a good game of where I'm saying, "Oh, I identify the seams upfront, and then I organize and create different tickets." And that is very much not the case. That's the really ideal outcome. But often, I am in the thick of things where like you just said...and it's this moment of, oh, I've done a lot in this PR. And how can I break this up? And that does take time. And it becomes a conversation of trade-off, which is why those Git skills really come in handy because then it will lower the cost of then splitting things out for others. But for people that are struggling with creating smaller PRs, I do think it's very fair to ask your team for help. I think it's also fair that if you issued a large pull request and folks have already reviewed it, and it's gotten approved, and someone makes a comment like, "Oh, this would be great as two PRs instead of one," to say, "Awesome, thank you for letting me know. I will take that forward with me, but I'm not going to do it for this PR." I wouldn't recommend making that a habit. But just know that that is something that you can say to someone to say, "I think this one is good to go at this point. But I will keep that in mind for future PRs. And I may even reach out to you for help if I feel like I'm having trouble splitting up a PR." And bring that person into your progress and use them as an accountability buddy. They can be someone that helps you down that path towards smaller PRs. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely agree with that, although it becomes a very subtle line. Saying, "Thank you, but no thank you," in a pull request or to feedback is delicate. It's difficult. That's a whole thing. But I agree there have been times where I have either been the one making that decision or suggesting that or being like, "We probably should have broken this up. But we're far enough along now. Let's get this merged. And then we'll iterate on it after the fact." One last thing, actually. I thought I was done, but I have one more thing, which is I feel like there's a strong parallel between test-driven development and this question in that, often, I hear folks saying, "I don't know how to write tests upfront. I don't know how to do that. I know after the fact I can write tests, and I can add them after." And that can definitely be true. It can become more obvious after you've written the code how you could then write a test that would constrain that behavior that would interact with the system. But I think the useful thing that you can do there is take a moment and pause there and say, "Okay, now that I have written the test, what would it look like if I had written this in the first place?" Or if you really want to go for it, throw away the code, try again. Start with the test first and then rebuild it. That's maybe a little much. But that thing of taking these moments of maybe you don't know upfront how to break the work into smaller pieces, but then you get to the end, and you have that conversation with someone. And they highlight where some parting lines would be, or you figure it out after the fact. Stay there in that moment. Meditate on it a bit and try and internalize that knowledge because that's how moving forward, you might know how to do this in the future. So take those moments, whether it be with TDD or with pull requests, or breaking up a ticket into smaller tickets, anything like that. And spend a moment there and try and internalize that knowledge so that you have it proactively moving forward. STEPH: You know how Slack has status? I really like the idea of there being a status that's meditating on...and you can fill it in. And the example that you just provided, meditating on splitting up a pull request or meditating on how to write a test first, [laughs] I think that would be delightful. CHRIS: I, too, think that would be delightful. But with that long, adventurous answer to what seemed like a simple question, and they always do, but here we are, shall we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Chains & Gears
S4 Ep48: Episode 2: Brittany Parffrey - MTB/Crit Specialist

Chains & Gears

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 35:03


Hope everyone had a safe and wonderful Thanksgiving! With some more time on my hands I was able to get a great recording in with Brittany. Started with the dirt on a MTB that did not quite fit her, she worked her way up to big time racing to now racing for a D1 crit team. On the side she is at UTSA for graduate school, racing for the team and won this season's Collegiate Nationals for her school. Just an FYI, listen in to hear Brittany's Team Announcement for 2022. Mentioned info: Her roots, intro to bikes, D1 crits, team announcement, UTSA cycling, Nationals, and more! Our Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chainsgearspodcast/ Our Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/chainsgearspodcast/?ref=nf&hc_ref=ARShu25Wr5CLTiLrbWGT2Y7b3T0fT4hKInPfeueTY9j65DsD51rpbbZoySNVafdfZ_o Brittany's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/parf_inator/ Colavita Team: https://instagram.com/colavita_hellofresh?utm_medium 

Hard Water Fishing Show
S5E4 - Fishing Guide Colby Sabutis

Hard Water Fishing Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 82:12


In this episode of the hard water fishing show Jeff and Jason talk to Colby Sabutis, who is a ice fishing guide based in New Hampshire and Vermont.    Current Events Catch and Cook https://www.catchandcook.net/   On of my new favorite you tube channels is Jay Siemens https://bit.ly/3nQdXmh  He is also the creator of catch and cook.  A great alternative to shore lunch for cooking fish.  I had some this summer and it was excellent.  Probably even better because someone else cooked it for me. FYI no sponsorship for this, just a product I like.   Here is the video we spoke about with fly in fishing https://bit.ly/2ZtFtg8  Here is a video about first ice https://bit.ly/2ZtFtg8    Utility Trailer to ice fishing shack Listener Cody sent in some pictures of a converted utility trailer to an ice fishing shack.  These are posted over on Facebook and Instagram.   Rogers on Red Predicting fishable ice first week on December, but we will see. https://bit.ly/3I012Xc    Gear Home made ramp for ice shack Get a aluminum extension ladder, used for cheap.  Cut it down and put a series of rollers to get your shack on and off of your pickup truck.  Jason will post some pictures on our page. You can also get a winch and mounted in the front of a picket, mount the winch in the front of the pickup and then you can use it to load and unload your heavy ice shack without risk of injury.     Pickup Truck Jason gave some great advice on pickup truck buying.  If you want a fast pickup truck get a red one. The red ones are always faster than the blue ones.   Lure Storage Jeff talked about using tackle box containers and how they are making a mess.  I am thinking of changing the way I store tackle. I am thinking of getting similar smaller ones that are fully open and then put some foam in them to prevent damage.  Basically remove the cons from these two products.    What I am using right now I have one of each of these https://amzn.to/3FUgXEx  or this https://amzn.to/3FQDdPv .  This is a trophy angler box I used for my tungsten jigs  It has foam on one side and on the other we have hard plastic.  This is what I used for my smaller panfish jigs. https://bit.ly/2ZploHG  Pros 1. You can fit them in your pocket 2. They are cheap 3. You can have on per species or fishing type.  I have one for tip ups, one for pan fish and two for spoons.  Cons 1. They can get messy fast 2. The hard plastic can damage your lures   Hard Water Expo https://bit.ly/3xs8epX Attended the Hard Water expo It was a small show and I did not stay to long, but found a few new notable things.     Fish Daddy Lures https://bit.ly/3cRsJmz  Specializes in LED jigs. We had Andy from Fish Daddy Outdoors a few seasons ago, you can find the interview here  S2E9- What Food To Bring Ice Fishing and Interview with Andy from Fish Daddy Lures They have a new lure out that looked interesting the jig flare spoon, an alternative to using those glow stick spoons. https://bit.ly/3nX0s4t     Go Athletic Apparel https://bit.ly/3cP5Gcb  Got a head sock and also a neck Gater at the show. https://bit.ly/3DW5BiP  Balaclava https://bit.ly/3CWP5h9 can you eat Baklava in your Balaclava? They are made in the USA.  My plan is when I am on a snowmobile to wear these to keep warmer.   BassKhang https://bit.ly/3xquW1K  These shuttles look really cool.  Looking at them they seemed very high quality.  Maybe Jason can field test one in the future with his helix 7.  This caused Jeff to digress into talking about how it can be hard to use his Helix 7 outside on very sunny days, and how a traditional flasher may be better.    Clam x100 Pro Thermal https://bit.ly/3xsPjLz  This is a one man clam that looks like the ultimate, really like this.  The poles are huge but they don't collapse so you can move quickly.  This thing is super spendy though and super heavy.   Clam Kenia https://bit.ly/3nUBeDB  This one is another really comfy option that I look at every year.  I like that it has poles that don't have to extend and also its much lighter. Jason talks about how even on his Nanuk he does not collapse the poles because you can move quickly.   Eric Wallace Decoys https://bit.ly/3cRv0OD  Eric Wallace had these awesome decoys for spearing.  I lack the words to describe how beautiful these are. I would feel back using them on the ice.  Jeff and Jason talk about our one failed spear fishing attempt.  The water was so cloudy we could not even see the decoy in the hole.  Here is a video we spoke about https://bit.ly/3HTFiMv where his work was featured on Minnesota Bound   Listener Request Jason is requesting a picture for a better setup for his Camera.  He is not happy with his storage and how its hard to use. He would like to make it easier to deploy the camera. Please send us your idea and pictures hardwatershow@gmail.com If you have something awesome maybe we will have you on the show to tell us about it.   Guest / Legend Colby Sabutis is an ice fishing guide in NH and we are super excited to have him on the show. He tells us all about ice fishing in New Hampshire and Vermont.    Also a fly fishing guide Local Fire Department in NH Works for Woodstock inn and resort https://bit.ly/2ZpytRi  as a fishing guide https://bit.ly/3nUg9ZU  Beverages 1911 Cranberry Hard Cider  We did beverages with Colby.  Colby brought a 1911 hard cider out of New York it sounded really good.  Here is a link to the page for more information https://bit.ly/3CX1v8L  Great Lakes Brewing Company  Eliot Ness https://bit.ly/3xozrtL  Old Milwaukee  Jason continues his tour of old man beers. Species Colby targets trout a lot more than in the mid-west. When they fish in Vermont the will target Crappie, Blue Gill and Pike.   For trout we are talking about Rainbows, Brooks, Browns and Lake. Cusk AKA eel pout or Burbot.  Also maybe Toad or Lakers.  White perch and yellow perch.   What is Different about ice fishing in New Hampshire? Ice castles, are not really used, usually Bob houses are home built items.   Ice Fishing Traps? This is similar to what we would call a tip up in the Midwest.  But they are different than a beaver dam.  Heritage Laker Traps more information can be found here https://bit.ly/3FQhPKh  You can have 2-6 lines per person depending on the regulations on the lake.  Colby uses Ifish Pro also.  These seem to be coming more popular. Here is a link to Amazon https://amzn.to/2ZwMEUU . This is a tip up rig for your rod. Auger Started with a hand auger, but moved to a Jiffy.  Partnered with Eskimo fishing and have a gas auger from Eskimo now. Lures Here are a few of Colby's favorite lures. Clam Leech Flutter Spoon https://amzn.to/3nVl7G7  Pinhead minnow https://amzn.to/3p6P05k  Jason has also had some good success for Walleyes in the mid-west with this lure. Swedish Pimple https://amzn.to/3oXPTNI  Clam Dingledop https://amzn.to/3lc7uAe  Clam Epoxydrop https://amzn.to/32pyyFJ    Bait Shiner and smelt live smelt   Rods - 28 - 36 inch heavy or medium heavy ( limit creek outfitters)    - Colby uses Limit Creek rods.  Here is a link for more info. https://bit.ly/3FNcBio  - Also working with Driftwood rods https://bit.ly/32pxVvR I did not see ice rods on the website I think they might be new. - 2 in is longest rod Colby uses for Lakers.   Reel Colby uses Pflueger or Shimano spinning reels.  This Pflueger reel is one both Jason and I like.  https://amzn.to/3D8b8BH  the 20 or 30 size works nice for ice fishing.  I have started to prefer the bigger size to reduce line twist.   Line Braid with a floral leader.  6,4, or 8 lb test depending on situation.   Lake Winnipesaukee Ice Fishing Derby https://bit.ly/32D5kn1  Colby talks about a huge ice fishing derby he has participated in the past.  In 2022 its February 13-14   Electronics Garmin Striker with a boat transducer and a Lowrance hook 4  also use Navionics    Fly Fishing We also talked about fly fishing, Colby has been fly fishing for a bit over 11+ years.  Attended Orvis advanced fly fishing school.  Have been two years as a guide at the Woodstock Inn.  Colby did 100+ fly fishing tips this year!   Legend Colby tells a legend about catching over 55 Lakers in four and a half hours. Talks about how to stuff your lake trout with crab meat and bread crumbs and how great that is.   

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Mythology

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 30:09


We have always looked to the stars and the sky for the answers to life's unsolved questions. Throughout history we've turned our gaze upwards, to the heavens. All while wide-eyed and wondering whether these celestial beings can somehow communicate something more to us. We'll demystify the riveting realm of mythology on this week's episode of FYI!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe
Bridin' Dirty in DC with “Plié Pirouette Papi” Justin Glaze

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 42:18


We're coming in hot from the nation's capital with the one-and-only Justin Glaze! So hot that Justin needed an iced coffee (but KB still will do hot, thank you). Kaitlyn and the Vinos put Justin on the spot with the questions everyone needs answers to including is he dating anyone, would he date Katie again (this was on Saturday, FYI), what are his non-negotiables, his worst dating experience, what ice cream flavor he would ghost you over, and who he has left on read. KB tells her own nightmare of a date story that included a gay bar, potato skins, and a pilot (that sounds like the start of a bad joke) and the pair play a game of charades where Justin dominates the ballet moves. It all leads up to one of the best confessions we've heard in a long time and one that will make us all feel better about our own decisions we made when we were 13. And yes, we are looking for photo evidence, stay tuned on @offthevinepodcast IG…. CHINET: Chinet Brand makes premium disposable tableware for all of life's gatherings. Visit mychinet.com to find out more. CREDIT KARMA: Head to Credit Karma.com/LoanOffers to see personalized offers with your Approval Odds right now. GEICO: Go to GEICO.com, get a quote, and see how much YOU could save. It's GEICO-easy! USANA: Visit USANA.com to see each Active Nutrition product for yourself and make sure to use the promo code Podcast15 at checkout to save 15% on your Active Nutrition order. OXICLEAN: Work your magic with Oxiclean White Revive! Visit myoxiclean.com for cleaning tips and tricks. SUGARWISH: Go SugarWISH.com/VINE TO get $10 dollars off your order today. Send a Sugarwish for the holidays and let them pick exactly what they want. TRAVISMATHEW: Head over to TravisMathew.com/radio and take 20% off your TravisMathew order at checkout when you use the code “VINE20”.

Flipping Genius - THE Car Flipping podcast #CarFlipping #FlippingCars
3 Ways I am Finding Deals In This Crazy Market! (Episode 96)

Flipping Genius - THE Car Flipping podcast #CarFlipping #FlippingCars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:11


On the Flipping Genius's Car Flipping Forum – this week I asked the members “what topic would be helpful to address on future episodes of Flipping Genius?” I really appreciate all the feedback I got – and will definitely try to address every request as we move forward. FYI – that question is still open on the forum – so feel free to send your suggestion anytime. Or – if you prefer, you can write me at FlippingQuestions@gmail.com. Of course, you can find links to everything I ever talk about on the podcast at our web site www.FlippinGenius.com. Here are some of the topics requested: Mike Brooks in Georgia would like us to cover: · Bookkeeping · Getting Started – office set up · Money Management with limited funding · Developing a Business Plan Christian Lee in Utah said he would also like to learn more about · Business taxes, write-offs and deductions Mari J. Vandyck in Wisconsin wants to know more about · Affordable dealership set up – including examples of economical lot/office/overhead combinations PJ Jones in Alabama said he needs help · Finding deals that will make him money – the old ways haven't been working for him I am happy to say that I feel like we will be addressing all of these subjects in the next few episodes of Flipping Genius. In fact, my guest for either next week or the week after – we are still ironing out the dates – will be specifically addressing new dealership startups, business planning and tracking systems, accounting, record keeping and more. …While I can talk from my limited – albeit colorful– experience – my upcoming guest – I will call him Mr. Smith – since we still haven't locked down the date or how much he is charging me to be my guest– Mr. Smith carries experience, knowledge and examples of dealer setup, management, and success stories from all across the USA and Canada. I am also trying to arrange a way for our listeners and members to gain access to Mr. Smith's information and programs. …As I said, that is all under negotiation – but I feel certain we will make it so! Now – I must say that I had at least 20 members from the forum chime in on PJ's request – and received nearly that many emails this week about that subject – finding deals that are money makers in these uniquely difficult times. So, in Episode 96 of Flipping Genius, I share some new ideas – and twists on old one too – that are helping me – and will help you find profitable deals too. Join Flipping Genius's Car Flipping Forum for FREE at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/carflippingforumbyflippinggenius --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/flippinggenius/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/flippinggenius/support

Remember The Game? Retro Gaming Podcast
Remember The Game #175 - The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Part II)

Remember The Game? Retro Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 105:17


The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. I've never hidden the fact that I have very mixed opinions of this game. I played it when it came out in 1998 (pre-ordered one of the gold cartridges!), but it wasn't until this past couple weeks that I finally beat the Nintendo 64 version for the first time. Before then, I'd only ever finished the 3DS port. And going back to the original version in preparation for this podcast, I was reminded of why I can't decide whether or not I like Ocarina of Time as a whole.    The nostalgia this game triggers is off the charts. And I respect the hell out of it's legacy and what it did for 3D gaming, Nintendo, and the Zelda franchise. But I can't be convinced that it doesn't control like a shopping cart, and Navi and that stupid owl are co-favourites in the "Most annoying character ever" championship tournament.    So revisiting this game is a slippery slope. I'm not gonna come in here and crap all over a game thats beloved by so many of us, but I'm not gonna pretend it's perfect when it just isn't, either.   My buddy Bradley McCue returns to the show this week, as a card carrying Zelda fanboy, and we break down the 'yays' & 'nays' of one of the most iconic video games ever created; The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. (It's pronounced 'Oak-a-rhine-ah of Tim', FYI).   And before we risk alienating half our listeners, I sneak in another edition of the 'Remember The Game Infamous Intro'!    This week, we talk about trying to focus on a game with so many other screens around to distract you while you're playing. Someone asks why sports games seem to be getting worse every year. And are you willing to look by a game that ships full of bugs and glitches, if it's still fun to play?   PLUS, we have another round of 'Play One, Remake One, Erase One', featuring three of the "middle of the pack" Zelda games - Zelda 2, The Minish Cap, and Twilight Princess.   Are you on social media? Of course you are. So follow us!    Twitter: @MemberTheGame Instagram: @MemberTheGame Facebook.com/MemberTheGame Twitch.tv/MemberTheGame   And you can check out Bradley's movie podcast 'Little Movie Dates' wherever you get podcasts, or on Instagram @LittleMovieDates

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists
Episode 213: SupportDDS - Leveraging Remote Team Members with Brenda McNulty and Dr. Brett Wells of DentalHQ

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:09


NOTES: This week, Dr. Glenn Vo sat down with Brenda Mcnulty and Dr. Brett Wells.You all might know Brenda, Dental Group Director at Support DDS, but do you know Brett? He's the founder of Dental HQ (and also a practicing dentist).If you don't know who Support DDS is, they're one of the leaders in providing remote team members to dental practices.Brenda herself has over 30 years of experience in dentistry. She joined Support DDS after working as a dental consultant.Brenda realized early on in her career that many dentists weren't happy when they tried to delegate dental roles to employees from outsourcing agencies. After referring dentists to Support DDS time and time again, they offered her a job.Brett launched his first practice in 2008 and had trouble finding patients at first. Gradually—after lots of blood, sweat, and tears—he turned a scratch startup into a booming business.From there, Brett found his groove. First, he opened another dental practice. Then it was another, then another, and another. Now, Brett is a thriving entrepreneur and group practice owner.Currently, Brett's passion lies in smoothening operations and running businesses. In fact, that's what Dental HQ is all about! They offer a revolutionary in-house dental membership plan software platform that empowers dentists to attract and retain fee-for-service patients.Brett fell in love with Support DDS after he started running into some administrative problems. They offered the key to building the infrastructure he was looking for.However, Brett didn't turn to Support DDS right off the bat. If he had, he would have saved himself a whole lot of trouble. Brett learned the hard way how important it is to reduce turnover and keep your team engaged. Luckily, with Support DDS, it's easier than everSupport DDS offered a secure way to gain a team member who would stick through thick and thin and offer an affordable alternative to high-level administrative positions.Learn about:How are the team members from Support DDS making the lives of Brett and everyone working in his practices much easier?Brett's team gets sold to all the time, and they're often left unimpressed. Naturally, when Brenda came to their practice, their expectations were low. How did the team members not only impress Brett's team but blow them away?How much does Brett trust the team members he hired? Hint: enough to start tasking them with more responsibilities.Which tasks are slowing you down that could be outsourced to a virtual team member?Which tasks can you delegate to one of Support DDSs virtual team members? Hint: they're versatile!What's the RISE program? How does it find the gaps in a dental practice? And how does it discern how to plug holes in your bucket?How did Brenda “kick it up a notch” for Dr. Wells when it came to applying the RISE program to his practices?Why does Brett like Support DDS more than most of the other outsourcing companies? Hint: it has something to do with being able to customize the training process and tailor team members for the needs of his practices.How much does Support DDS cost? FYI: it's a flat fee.What is Dental HQ all about? How can they work in tandem with Support DDS to set your practice up for success?What's the problem with a membership plan? How can it overwhelm your team?How does Dental HQ ensure all of the perks of a membership plan while ensuring the ball never gets dropped?How are Dental HQ and Support DDS collaborating to bridge gaps for dental offices? How can they work in tandem to boost your marketing efforts?And more!Everyone is going through staffing problems right now, and many practices are spread so thin that many team members are running out of steam daily. If that sounds familiar to you, Support DDS might provide you with a solution—and Brett can attest to that wholeheartedly.   NIFTY DEAL: $250 off of the first month. GET THE DEAL: Go to: https://supportdds.com/Mention Nifty Thrifty

Smooth Jazz Weekend Radio Podcast
Smooth Jazz Weekend with Tina E. (Missing You)

Smooth Jazz Weekend Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 60:00


Bright and bursting with Funk! And in the words of the legendary Bootsie Collins: "Funk is the absence of any and everything you can think of, but the very essence of all that is" This show is the perfect blend of soul jazz and Funk...FYI..the bass players and bass lines are the star of this show! Enjoy! Set 1: Rohan Reid Song For Ivy Patrick Charles-Kush Norman Connors-Cobra Carl Cox-Elevation Joel McCray-Klassy Set 2: Darnell White-Butterfly Jazz In Pink-Sisterness Jesse Adams Jr.-Missing You Ben Tankard-How Deep Is Your Love Set 3: Brooke Alford-Closer Gerry Smoot ft Judah Sealy-Attitude Adjustment Paula Atherton ft. Nathan Mitchell-Summer Song Chan Hall ft. Tony Craddock Jr.-Stay Awhile

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
EverAthlete - Dr. Matt Smith

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:36


This week we are joined by Dr. Matt Smith, Founder EverAthlete. Matt walks us through the importance of strength training for gravel cyclists. Presented by: Competitive Cyclist Join The Ridership Episode Transcription (please excuse the typos): EverAthlete - Dr. Matt [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to the gravel rod podcast. I'm your host Craig Dalton. This week on the show, we've got Dr. Matt Smith from ever athlete coming to talk to us. About the importance. Once of strength training for cyclists.  [00:00:14] Before we jump in, we need to thank this week. Sponsor competitor. cyclist.  [00:00:18] Competitive cyclist is the specialty online retailer of road, gravel and mountain bikes, components, apparel, and accessories.  [00:00:26] Featuring some of your favorite brands like pock, Castelli, Pearl Izumi on the gravel bike side. They feature frames from evil Niner. Ibis. Really creating a big selection of gravel bikes for your perusal [00:00:41] But the real difference that competitive cyclists are the gearheads equal parts customer service cycling fanatic gear heads are former pro athletes, Olympians and seasoned cyclists. With years of experience. All available by phone, email, or chat for personal. Product recommendations and hard won advice.  [00:01:00] Last week you heard me talk about my personal experience. With Maggie. I brought her through an exercise to help me find the. Perfect gravel bike for 2022 and perfect for me not. Perfect for what they had in inventory, or really put her to the fire and asked her a lot of tough questions. About designing a bike that was going to fit the type of writing that I do as an individual. So it's not like I was building, a bike for someone.  [00:01:25] In a different part of the country or a different part of the world. She really listened to me. And as I tried to point her to bikes that I thought were flat. Flashy or good-looking. She reminded me that those bikes were all good, but based on what she told me about the riding I was looking to do. She would recommend that I  [00:01:42] key in on a couple specific bikes. And to be honest, she was spot on all the bikes that she recommended. I think it was the IBUs haka. To a lesser degree and the pivot we're spot on for the types of. Bikes that i would want to ride here in marin county. [00:01:58] One of the things that might be a concern for any product you're buying online would be returns. Competitive. Cyclists has a. A hundred percent guaranteed returns. So you can shop in confidence, whether it's a component or bike, anything you need competitive. Cyclists, this has your back. So go to competitive cyclists.com.  [00:02:16] Slash the gravel ride. And enter promo code the gravel ride to get 15% off your first full price order. And free shipping on orders of over $50. Some. Some exclusions apply to go right now and get 15% off. Plus free shipping. shipping@competitivecyclists.com slash the gravel ride. And remember that.  [00:02:37] Promo code is the gravel ride. We very much appreciate their sponsorship and appreciate that they're sending a discount your way.  [00:02:45] Would that business out of the way, let's jump right into my interview with Matt from ever athlete.  [00:02:51] Matt. Welcome to the show.  [00:02:53] Dr. Matt Smith: Thanks so much for having me. [00:02:55] Craig Dalton: I'm super excited to learn a little bit about, more about your background and about other ever athlete. As I'm about seven weeks into my first program and I'm eager to talk about my experiences, but also look forward to some of the other ride strong programs. So why don't we start off by just setting the stage for the listener a little bit about yourself and then about the. [00:03:17] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So ever athlete is now an online platform. That's dedicated to helping athletes to perform outdoors on trails in the water on bikes. W our goal is essentially to create longevity to that journey and help people improve their performance. I started out I'm a sports chiropractor and a strength coach and started ever athlete as a sports injury care clinic, actually back in 2015. [00:03:46] And since then, through the pandemic and a few other things we have transitioned into doing some in-person one-on-one work, we work with a lot of different athletes and. Different people, but, we've transitioned a lot of our efforts to the online atmosphere. [00:04:03] And I've taken a lot of the lessons that we've learned from working with high level athletes and also amateur athletes and have started creating training programs, recovery tools, and injury rehab programs online. To rewind a little bit, to give you a little bit more background about, how we started, again, we started as an injury care clinics, primarily focused on athletes and quickly. [00:04:27] Transitioned into strength training as well. We work with a variety of people, but our goal is really to meet any athlete, wherever they are on the healthcare spectrum or the health and performance spectrum, whether they're dealing with an injury or looking to make it to the Olympics. [00:04:44] That's been the premise of ever athlete since we began. And that's just been amplified in the last few years. So that's a little bit about us.  [00:04:52] Craig Dalton: That's interesting. When you started, obviously what you went through chiropractic college, did you act as a traditional sports focused chiropractic professional originally, and then see that these were all different pieces of the same puzzle you were trying to solve for your clients? [00:05:08] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So before I ever went to, I went to a school called Palmer west for grads. And before I went to Palmer and throughout my time going to Palmer I was working as a strength coach. And so I've worked in strength conditioning for about 15 years. And so when I graduated, I went to work at a pretty cool sports therapy clinic out in Austin, Texas where we were not traditional chiropractic. [00:05:34] So it was. A lot of people think about chiropractic as, if you're going into a chiropractic clinic you're coming in to get adjusted and it's a mill, I've never practiced in that way. I've always been more focused on soft tissue therapy corrective exercise, rehab work in a lot of other modalities. [00:05:53] And so from the beginning of ever athlete, we've always. W we've always worked in a non-traditional sense with people, going through soft tissue work, teaching exercises and then leveraging for the more functional training and exercise now as a preventative and wellness model. And so it's always been a little non-traditional, it's always been athlete focused. [00:06:17] Especially from the beginning phases, but initially it was a little bit more like I think of our company as a company that just solves problems for athletes. And initially we were very focused on solving solving the problems that athletes would have when they're dealing with injuries. [00:06:33] And now we're diving far more into the performance space and also preventing injuries.  [00:06:40] Craig Dalton: That's super interesting and resonates with me personally. I know the relationships I've had with the chiropractic community, the ones that have been the strongest have always been the ones that looked at my problem or my challenge holistically and never, just simply as a chiropractor, because honestly, as a athlete, I could care less about whether you call it chiropractic work, what you're doing on me, or it's stretching or strengthening or advice. [00:07:07] I just want to have that session. Get through whatever hurdle I'm going through and learn tools and techniques to prevent me from, arriving at whatever acute injury probably led me through the door in the first  [00:07:20] Dr. Matt Smith: place a hundred percent. And I think, to, to your point, I've never cared if anyone called via chiropractor, I've never really, I don't know if I fully identify as any one. [00:07:32] I don't fully identify as a chiropractor. It's certainly a part of what I do and has taught me a lot, but it's like a piece of it. And for me, the chiropractic profession, there are a ton of really great practitioners who do a phenomenal job and focus on educating people and creating self-reliance in patient groups. [00:07:52] And that was really the big thing for me, especially early on when. Transitioning out of this role of having people rely on me constantly. And, especially with our online stuff, creating more affordable avenues for people to get good high performance, health care and performance training has been a huge form of wellness. [00:08:15] Whereas a lot of times, if you're thinking about wellness from a chiropractic sense, it's, going to see your chiropractor once a week for, your entire life. And for me, just from a professional mindset, I've never wanted a hundred percent resonated with, having that be my life's work, I've always, really wanted to educate people more and provide. [00:08:36] More self-reliance through practical resources and that's really what we've evolved into has been fast-tracked due to the pandemic, but but it's been a really interesting, this project, this online platform has been this like second evolution I've ever athlete that have been very stoked. [00:08:54] Yeah,  [00:08:54] Craig Dalton: a hundred percent. It's never one single thing. And I think if for the listener, if you've got a relationship with a chiropractor that just feels like they just have to keep coming back in and they're not advising you on how to change your life or how to avoid the situation you're in. And it just becomes this weekly crutch that becomes one expensive and two, in my opinion, just not in your best in. [00:09:16] Dr. Matt Smith: A hundred percent, and a lot of those models are based off of what insurance companies will pay out for, in terms of getting reimbursed as a professional. And I've always worked outside of those lines, from the beginning, we've never been a part of the insurance game. [00:09:32] And so it's been, for me, that's forced me to provide value in a way that is. Far different than trying to fit into that type of model. And that's pushed me forward into saying how do we provide maximum value and self-reliance, and, empowerment for people not on a one-on-one basis. [00:09:53] And yeah, it's been, it's not to downplay Cairo. There's a ton of really great chiropractors out there. There's phenomenal. Hands-on practitioners. And a lot of times, people go through injuries or situations where they need some guidance. But I think the bottom line for me in terms of, what I pride myself on is teaching it's helping people become more resilient on their own. [00:10:17] And that's really been our focus with every athlete from the.  [00:10:21] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think I became aware of ever athlete probably first through Kate Courtney on Instagram, going through her exercise routine. And I'm pretty sure it predated any of the kind of ride strong and run strong and try strong programs that you've put out there. [00:10:38] So I know when I started to see those things arrive in this online platform that you guys had been working on throughout the pandemic, I guess it really spoke to me in a different way. To see these programs being very specific to me as a cyclist was just one of those pushes that helped me get off the dime and start. [00:10:58] Can you talk about why strength training is important for cyclists and why it might be important for us to back off a little bit in our riding routine, particularly in the off season, quote unquote and what we should look forward to throughout a strength training? Yeah.  [00:11:15] Dr. Matt Smith: I think, the conversation about how strength training can fit in for cyclists can go in a lot of different directions. [00:11:23] I think the, one thing to constantly come back to is the fact that sitting for long hours, Is not like it's pretty new for the human body. This is in terms of our evolution and what we're really designed for. That's not exactly in line, even though it's very fun. It's not exactly attuned to what is most healthy for us movement wise. [00:11:48] And so it's not to say that riding a bike is bad. It's just to say that there's an expense. And one of the ways that you can combat that expanse. And ensure that you can do it for longer and potentially with more effectiveness, more power is to implement some strength training. And the identification that, Hey, riding a bike, being in a flection posture pedaling for long hours, the posture that you have to be in while you're on a bike is not super beneficial for the overall. [00:12:22] Human body. And again, one of the ways that we can bring the body back into balance, bring it back to a healthier state is to implement some strength training techniques. And one of the biggest misconceptions when people start thinking about, Hey, I'm an endurance athlete. I, I don't want to train like a powerlifter and I don't want to train like a bodybuilder. [00:12:44] You know that's, those are barriers that, you certainly don't need to start becoming a powerlifter. If you're going to implement some basic strength principles as a part of your training plan. And you can have a tremendous effect. By just implementing some basic movements, getting some good hip extension, thinking about turning your glutes on and driving your hips all the way forward. [00:13:05] We sit in hip flection constantly on the bike, and that can be pretty detrimental for the low back long-term and the hips long-term. And strength training is a really great way to start. Counteracting some of the repetitive stress that you'll find on the bike and it doesn't take that much, it doesn't take a huge commitment. [00:13:22] It's the simple things that you implement over time that can have a pretty tremendous impact on your overall health, but also your performance on the bike. Yeah,  [00:13:32] Craig Dalton: that makes sense. I think most listeners have probably had one of those days where they've just spent so long on the bike. [00:13:38] By the time they got up, it was difficult to stand fully around. Yes. And that's a very acute sign that, that's the way your body feels on every ride, probably to some small degree. And I know for one I need to work at a standing desk because I just don't want to add any more sitting position in my life for the amount of time I'm actually riding. [00:14:01] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. I think that's a super smart move and, . Your comment about, seeing some Kate Courtney's exercises and some of the stuff that she'll put up on, on Instagram, and I've worked with Kate for years now. And I think even with the stuff that she puts out, it's super cool to see what an elite world-class athlete can do. [00:14:24] But I think when it comes to, the audience, who's listening to this podcast and also just like the endurance community over. There's a lot of really high level endurance athletes that are novice strength athletes. They just don't have, they haven't developed the same skill set that they have aerobically when they're in the gym. [00:14:44] And, the bang for your buck that you can get out of like really simple things that don't look cool on Instagram. Bodyweight rose and simple deadlifts or even bridges. I think that, the more exposure that we can give to like how simple it can be for people to implement, very effective tools in their training program. [00:15:03] That's a critical thing because a lot of people think, when they see Kate's stuff or they'll see some of the things that Ali. It's making a little bit more flamboyant than it needs to be. And so a lot of the programs that we put out get to the bare bones of, simple patterns that bring the body back into balance and build a more resilient system overall. [00:15:24] Craig Dalton: Yeah. For the listener, I can attest that in the beginner program, I have not. Balanced on a balance board and brought a dumbbell around my head, like Kate has done in our recent Instagram post. She was just  [00:15:36] Dr. Matt Smith: doing that 15 minutes ago in the other room.  [00:15:39] Craig Dalton: That it's awesome. And funny because I do have a balanced board, so I like dream of getting there, but time will allow that  [00:15:46] Dr. Matt Smith: to happen. [00:15:47] Yeah. And that's a great, I think that's a pretty good segue in terms of. How you parse out your time? Like how can you, everything costs when it comes to training, right? Like it costs time. It costs energy and how to be most effective for a lot of people doing some like simple stuff, not getting too overwhelmed with balance board stuff or anything like that. [00:16:10] Stuff is very effective and can be very fun. But starting with the foundational principles of just good healthy positions and movement can be. Equally, if not more beneficial and as much more accessible. So  [00:16:23] Craig Dalton: for sure. And I know when I reached out to your team originally, and I came in the front door as any other customer would, and it just said, here's the deal. [00:16:31] I, I'm a lifelong cyclist and may have done some strength training. Many years ago, but essentially I'm a beginner in this, where should I start? And the recommendation was this eight week beginner strength program, which I'm seven weeks into at this point of the recording. And it's been good. [00:16:48] We started at a very basic level, half an hour long workouts, maybe at this point, they're about 45 minutes long, but they add up and you're not asking. You've never asked me to do any massive weightlifting or anything like that. It's just been about getting these basic motions down and introducing these concepts to my body, which it's been paced out in a great way. [00:17:13] For me. I've never felt overly sore from an exercise or anything like that. It felt very appropriate and I feel a lot more confident reaching the end of this program about what's next than I did when I first start.  [00:17:25] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And that's the whole premise. It's one of the most challenging things. And I really commend you for being such an inexperienced athlete and also saying, Hey, this is a new skill set or one that I haven't visited for a long time. [00:17:42] Let me start with victories. Let's build up some victories in the bank and give myself some things that are fairly simple to do. And I'm just going to continue to hammer them out and take bite. A bite sized approach to the whole thing is really the premise behind the beginners program. It's that the program is designed to be very simple and progress over time. [00:18:06] And. And what that allows you to do is to reintegrate some of the software programs in your body and your brain that it takes to squat well, or to activate your glutes or to hold a side bridge position or whatever else. The things that you lose from not doing. And especially if you've been riding a lot for many years and have not done any strength work, that's where you get the most bang for your buck. [00:18:34] It's like integrating these simple patterns in bite ways, and then you can make it more complex and add volume and add more load over time. But that's really the premise behind the beginners programs like to be ultimately accessing. And then lead in to some of the other ride strong programs that we have that give a little bit more specific to positions that you'll find on the bike and get you a little bit more, we'll we add in little, different tempos to exercises, more load increase the stability demands and, we add difficulty in a variety of ways, but starting out with foundational movement where you're just learning good patterns. [00:19:12] And practicing those things so that you can load them more effectively later without getting injured is really what our goal was when developing that, that  [00:19:21] Craig Dalton: program. Yeah. That's certainly been one of my focuses is to really look at the instruction and make sure my body to the best of my ability. Is it a hearing to the correct shape and. [00:19:33] 'cause I know, like anytime we're adding dumbbells in that if I have poor form, if I'm curling my back, if I'm not getting the squat in the right position, that's not going to serve me well, as real weight starts to be added into the equation. Yep.  [00:19:48] Dr. Matt Smith: And one of the biggest misconceptions, I think that's out there right now is like, there's this like global agreement that strength training is good for endurance health. [00:20:01] But poor staff, poorly executed strain training could be the absolute worst thing for an endurance athlete. And, you get a lot more out of performing a good unloaded squat or lunge or hinge without heavy loads. If you just do the pattern well, you get just as much, if not more out of that than using really heavy load. [00:20:26] And having poor form or potentially hitting, faltering in your movement pattern in a way that could injure you. And coming back to Hey, what's the point of all this, the point of all this is to reintegrate healthy patterns for the body and bring it back to balance and then start to add some load to build strength and power is really where we come from. [00:20:47] Craig Dalton: So as a cyclist, one of the things I noted in this beginner strength program, which I think of your programs, that this is obviously more generic to just get me started, but there is a fair amount of upper body work that goes on. And as a weak upper body cyclist, that was, that's probably one of the bigger transitions. [00:21:06] Can you talk about why we're working kind of the upper body and arms as well as the legs and these moves.  [00:21:11] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah, in that specific program. So in the beginner strength program, the goal of the program is really just to develop not only strength, but just overall athletics. And a robust system. And so in that program specifically, it's really teaching you different patterns with the upper body so that you get a little bit more balanced. [00:21:32] And I think when it comes to, our ride strong programs and some of the upper body work that we do more specific to the bike, that stuff is critical. For a couple of different reasons, it's critical in the same way that like building up foot strength is very important for running. In the sense that that's your, it's like one of your primary contact points on the bike. [00:21:53] And if you don't control well with your provider, if you don't have strength, endurance, grip, strength and solid control of your upper body, especially in gravel riding with the. Amount of time that you're on the bike, you can start running into not only acute situations where you crash or, you just lose control of your bike. [00:22:14] But also longterm, you can just start running into poor posture on the bike, which leads to all kinds of issues, not only in the upper body, but also sometimes in the lower back in the neck. And building up a certain degree not again, not we're not doing like bicep curls and heavy bench press with our programs. [00:22:33] It's more like integrating pushups, grip strength from hanging. Pull-ups all these different things that can be very beneficial just in terms of like control, just in terms of like confidence and control on the bike and maintaining healthy posture with your.  [00:22:50] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that resonates with me. It might be a good time to take a moment and just talk about the type of equipment that is necessary to follow these programs. [00:22:59] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So we have a variety of programs up on the site, including no equipment programs. So we have we have a body weight strength program that's eight weeks long, and if you're looking for kind of a generic program to follow that will build up, lower body, upper body core strength. [00:23:17] That's a great one. If you've got nothing available, we also have kettlebell programs that just require one kettlebell that are also generic, very similar to the beginner strength program. But build up overall athleticism when it comes to our ride strong program. There's a pretty good amount of equipment that you need. [00:23:35] But any, Jim will have these things and then if you wanna, if you want to get pretty robust at home, you can a few of the things that we have in our programs, I'm actually looking up our equipment list right now, but we have everything. Many bands. So there's a little bands that you see people wrap around their legs and do like sidesteps or squats with long bands with handles are one piece of equipment that we use quite often that can wrap around a door handle, or a pole or a pull up bar. [00:24:06] We use barbells in our new restaurant. So we're currently putting out a 20 week ride strong program. It's like a slow release right now. But we do have a strength cycle in there with barbells. So barbells bumper plates, all that we use dumbbells, we use benches for box jumps and then for a few other exercises. [00:24:30] And I'm trying to think here,  [00:24:32] Craig Dalton: what else do we use? Yeah, I've I was lucky in that I already owned a TRX that was gathering dust and TRX that's right. Yeah. And the TRX was useful in that there were some modifications. So if you didn't have a pull-up bar, which I don't currently have a plan on getting you could do a TRX derivative of that. [00:24:52] And I, the, just FYI for the listener those stretch bands, I think for $29, I got a set of the long ones and the short ones that pretty much cover all my needs. And then I ended up just recently finding a deal on a barbell set. So ended up getting barbells thinking, I'm going to want it for this next stage, but you can take these things in incrementally and that's what I've been doing. [00:25:15] Just acquiring them when I have the finances to do.  [00:25:18] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And just to be clear. So last year we put out six months of rod strong program. Actually more than six months, we put out a full off season of red, strong programming that required no barbell. So it was all dumbbell work, all bands, a suspension trainer, and we have all of our. [00:25:39] The one thing that I didn't mention so far was a Swiss ball. We do Swiss balls, particularly in the registrar program. Good. Because I  [00:25:46] Craig Dalton: Got one of those and didn't see it in the beginner strength program. So I was hoping I would see it in the future.  [00:25:51] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah, you will see it. If you follow the 20, which I do recommend falling that the 20 week ride strong program that we have coming out. [00:25:58] Now, if you follow that, you'll see that in core routine. Like we like to play around particularly in like kneeling positions on the ball, using it for hamstring curls and a lot of different drills. Yeah,  [00:26:12] Craig Dalton: right on. That's actually a good segue into my question. So I've, I've, I'm fortunate that I got the bug early and I'm finishing my eight weeks sort of the beginning of December. [00:26:22] What would you recommend? I move on to it. It sounds like it's that 20 week program. And if so, could describe the journey that you've created?  [00:26:31] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And so to be clear, like what I recommend to you now, And really like the conversation should revolve around a goal. So everything that we every th the premise behind everything that we're putting out is to help people set goals and create a path from a to B and so create, do you have any races coming up in the. [00:26:54] Craig Dalton: I'm sure I will. And here's my challenge in my coachability is it's difficult for me as a family guy to plan out my race calendar. And it's often driven by balancing my desire with family obligations and, ability to travel. But so I typically end up at. Two to four gravel events, big gravel events a year, and then a smattering of local ones that I can drive to. [00:27:19] Typically they're not going to start until, March or April, I would say.  [00:27:25] Dr. Matt Smith: Okay. Yeah. Yeah. And that's that's pretty common. So if you're finishing up this beginner's program, I was looking at a calendar here and you're in the first week of December, you've got a bow. 12 to 16 weeks until you're actually racing. [00:27:43] And, you can jump into our 20 week program. I'll send you a note about this offline, but. I do recommend like our 20 week program that we're currently putting out is based on a lot of the work that we've done with pro riders and essentially have taken those concepts and made them more available to amateur and lower level competitive writers. [00:28:05] And. We start out with a six week stability phase. That's broken up into three parts. So three, two week phases, and then we go into an eight week strength cycle. That's broken up into two different four week strength blocks. And then we finished with a six week power and power endurance cycle. [00:28:27] And so the way that we've created the program, Is to allow for flexibility. So say you have 20 weeks from an event or versus having 12 weeks from an event, we can clip things out and give you a custom program to have you peaking for your event. Just based on the programs that we currently have out, and we have a few other programs outside of the 20 week program that we're currently releasing. [00:28:54] We have a five week strength and power blend. We have a six week strength and power blend and we have a 12 week progressive strength program. So there's a lot of different things that we can pull from. To basically figure out what's right for you. And this is a lot of what we're doing with people right now. [00:29:08] It's we're doing calls with people pretty often. And we include this in our membership where you can set up, you can shoot us an email and say, Hey, here's what I have going on here. My goals, do you have any suggestions for my path? And this is a lot of what we're doing day to day is trying to answer these questions for people. [00:29:24] So for you, I would recommend, jumping right in, hop right into. Our stability phase one, for this new ride strong program it'll pick up in a similar way with where you left off from the beginner strengths. And, it's in the front half of this thing it's pretty low volume. [00:29:43] It's the same concept of working on patterns. Some of the patterns in the stability phase are a little bit more specific to the bikes. You'll get that feeling a little bit more. And then the volume starts to pick up as we start getting into the later phases of the stability program and then furthermore, into the strength phase. [00:30:01] Craig Dalton: For those who are unaccustomed to strength training in their winter of their cycling season is the conflict that if you're if I'm in a power lifting phase of this program, come March and I want to go out and race. I'm just going to be too fatigued and played out to pre.  [00:30:18] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. So the way that our program works is it peaks in volume during the strength phase, because usually during that phase, like we're really timing it with a like a seasonal schedule for say, cross country, mountain biking. [00:30:34] There's a time when the writing volume is low enough to where we have an opportunity to build up in the gym and we can do a little bit more volume and can boost that there becomes a secondary time in the spring, or like the early, like late winter. We'll say where that's not the case. [00:30:53] The writing volume kicks up at. We're in full preparation mode for race season to start. And that's when the gym starts to take a back seat a little bit more and our volume needs to go down. And that's really what we do in our power, endurance phase. And we do recommend being conscious of volume. [00:31:10] Particularly if you are doing, if you're a cyclist who's competitive and you're doing a lot of time on the bike, many hours per week. Then you need to be careful with, overwhelming your system through just too much strength work. That's a huge piece of all this. And pretty much all of the, this 20 week program that we're putting out currently is very careful about volume. [00:31:33] In reference to Hey, what should I do leading up to a race. If I'm not following the direct timeline that we've written out, you can parse different things. I would take out part of the strength cycle and Mo I would like skip strength B, which is the second four weeks, and then move into the power. [00:31:49] And during. Psych part of things leading up to your race.  [00:31:52] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. And one of the fears maybe from the listener and certainly in my mind is, okay. I commit to this program. And I think in these, in the strength phase, a it might even be three workouts a week, trying to figure out how to squeeze that in with riding and riding for pleasure. [00:32:10] I think for a lot of my listeners writing as an outlet, that is, is not. Necessarily about the competitive nature of it. It's like what we crave every week to get out there and get in the wilderness. Can you just talk about, R D would you advocate lifting and riding in the same day? Is there a certain number of rides per week that you think about that athletes would typically have in their program? [00:32:35] In addition to these, the strength training routine?  [00:32:39] Dr. Matt Smith: It really depends. This is a pretty subjective. Topic, because different writers who are doing, there'll be writers who are doing high volume on the bike, but really this is like the first time that they've done any strength training. [00:32:55] Versus there are writers who are not doing as much volume on the bike who are very familiar with strength training and have that cash in the bank. And so their response to strength volumes can be. And the way that I typically like the way that we've structured this whole program is to be two days of strength. [00:33:13] And then you have, and these days are like 30 to 45 minutes in the starting phases. And then they kick up to about 45 minutes. And then we have a third session each week, which is a 20 minute core routine. And you can repeat that throughout the week whenever you'd like, so you can do it once a week. [00:33:30] You can do it twice a week. And so you can stack things to whatever makes sense for you. And part of the reason that we did that is we want to have a fairly flexible plan for people because it is, there's just such a variety of. Have, not only people's schedules, but also how they respond to training what their life off the bike looks like. [00:33:50] Nothing is going to be perfect. And so in terms of, what would be ideal, usually we'll stack strength days on very light low intensity riding day. Is historically what I've done and, I've had other writers that try and do strength and an intense ride on the same day. [00:34:11] But if you're just a recreational rider, who's doing it for the enjoyment which, everyone should be doing it for the enjoyment, but I would recommend maximize your enjoyment on the bike. Don't let any part of your training program steal that from you. Consider your strength work as like you're contributing to the longevity of you enjoying your time on the bike and don't have your strength work, be so intense that it starts pulling away from that. [00:34:39] So think of it as a long-term plan, we don't hit home runs with this program is all singles and doubles. And you really if you're starting strength work as a masters cyclist this year, consider it like a 20 year. And don't try and change everything in your first year of doing that. Dip your toes in the water. [00:34:57] Just add maybe one to two days of strength, per week. And just see, I would say two days is probably the. The like optimal range, particularly for someone who's riding quite a bit add that in and do it in a way that doesn't completely disrupt your writing schedule. Particularly if you're like very comfortable with, a fairly strict writing schedule and you know exactly how you're going to respond to that. [00:35:21] Just add a little dose of strength. Don't try and go ham on the. Yeah, that  [00:35:27] Craig Dalton: makes a ton of sense. It's been interesting for me personally, as this eight week period, it just happens to be a period where for whatever reason, I just haven't had a lot of opportunity to ride. So it's been, I don't feel like I've got that. [00:35:41] Balance yet. So as I enter this next phase and feel a little bit more compelled to get in quote, unquote, riding shape, I want to get out there more. So I'll have to circle back with the listener and inform them how I'm doing on finding that balance between the strength training and the riding I love to do for pleasure. [00:35:58] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah. And I think that you're certainly not alone in that it's a. It can be fairly tricky, especially if you haven't done strength work for a long time, or you've never done it. It's this new habit that you it's no one can address it the same way. No one can implement it the same way. [00:36:20] And so figuring out. What works best for you and playing around with, scheduling and, allowing yourself a little bit of flexibility on the front end to see how you respond to strength, work and see how you feel on big rads after that, taking the time to really observe and see what works for you. [00:36:38] Not necessarily everyone else is a critical piece to making sure that, strength and recovery work stays a part of your game plan for a long.  [00:36:47] Craig Dalton: Yeah, right on. That makes a ton of sense. And I think for the listener, check out the ever athlete website, I'll link to it in the show notes. [00:36:54] There's, as Matt's described, there's a lot of programs there that the subscription is quite affordable. From what I've seen out there, I was really pleased and I didn't get hit by some massive dollar number. So kudos to you and hope you get the volume you need. Cause I know the production values high and the effort you guys have put into designing these programs is quite substantial. [00:37:14] Dr. Matt Smith: Yeah, no, we. Our whole goal with it is to make the lessons that we've learned with different athletes and also working from an injury care perspective. Making those lessons accessible to people is that's the. That is the thing. That's the legacy that I would want to leave behind, for my career. [00:37:37] And so in terms of the dollar, the pricing of our platform will not go up from what it is. It'll probably go down at some point, but. Our goal is to make stuff accessible, particularly for people that we love hanging out with, which includes gravel cyclist, mountain bikers, road, cyclists, like we love supporting people's active lifestyle. [00:37:56] And in terms of covering our costs and all that, like w we're doing great and more than anything, it's been a really interesting project. And, we're excited to keep. Yeah.  [00:38:08] Craig Dalton: Thanks so much for all the time and insight matter, really enjoyed the conversation, hopefully for the listener, it wasn't too much of a Greg's journey to strength training. [00:38:16] I feel like I got a lot out of it, but hopefully it's translated to everybody listening and you can find your own journey.  [00:38:23] Dr. Matt Smith: Oh yeah. Hey, thanks so much for having me on Craig. This is spot cheers  [00:38:27] Craig Dalton: Huge. Thanks for Matt for joining us this week, I learned a ton on my personal journey to strength training. I actually just knocked out another exercise before recording this outro. So I'm finishing week eight and feeling good about my journey and continuing on through the winter and hopefully hitting 20, 22 much stronger as a person and as a gravel cyclist.  [00:38:50] Another huge, thanks to competitive cyclist or appreciate their support of the podcast. Remember, visit competitive cyclists.com/the gravel ride and enter the promo code, the gravel ride for 15% off your order.  [00:39:05] Finally, if you've got any feedback for the show or would like to connect with other gravel cyclists around the world. I invite you to join the ridership. Simply visit www.theridership.com to join our free community and communicate with thousands of other cyclists around the world. Until next time.  [00:39:25] Here's to finding some dirt under your wheels.  [00:39:29]   

House Of Hockey Podcast
House Of Hockey Podcast Ep 89: Miss Vermont USA & Hockey Coach Joanna Nagle

House Of Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 61:11


Breezy and Rae Rae talk to hockey coach & Miss Vermont USA 2021, Joanna Nagle. She's beauty and she's grace on and off the ice. Joanna shares how she's inspiring the next generation of girl hockey players as Miss Vermont USA, why she decided to compete in the pageant and her love of coaching hockey. Cheer on Joanna as she competes for Miss USA 2021 Monday, November 29 on Hulu and FYI network.  Follow Joanna on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/joannanagle/  https://www.instagram.com/missvtusa/ Download the DraftKings app https://tinyurl.com/DKNOVEMBER  Promo code: THPN  Shop our brand new merchandise store www.Houseofhockeypodcast.whatforapparel.com   Follow us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/houseofhockeypodcast/ https://www.instagram.com/houseofhockeypodcast/  https://twitter.com/houseofhockey_   What is the funniest thing you've witnessed or heard at a hockey game? We'd love to hear it and air it on the podcast. Call our Phone Number ‪(323) 438-2648‬ State your name Tell the story in 5 minutes or less

I SHAKE MY HEAD
Is It Ten Yet?

I SHAKE MY HEAD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 84:59


Lisa is not complaining about being off at 4pm but the drawback is she's ready for bed at 8pm!! She tired, besides everything is over and done by 8pm anyways! However, an early bed at their age doesn't seem right so they begrudgingly stay up till 10pm. It's a mess! The weather outside is frightful and really not delightful! Lisa is worried about slipping around like bambi on ice and Sam doesn't want a repeat of last winter! The ladies change their mind about Timbiebs because of the adorable commercial. Lisa was in concert with Adele and feels at times she gave her a run for her money. Really? Sam was impressed by Adele's take on being a role model for others and Lisa isn't sure why she didn't get to go grocery shopping this past weekend, she saves money! The ladies were getting chatty as they discuss Michael Buble's Christmas special, snow globes, fire and fake cat Maggie, FYI positive or negative, Holiday baking champion, FB Tuesday, Wrinkle the emotional therapy duck, the Oodie, taking up cross country skiing, Red Notice, good frozen pizza, cutting toast, Lisa's question corner, tater tots, haircut postponed, DVDs, over Oreos, new coat, Anna Duggar, what would you do for $1000, and things Lisa oughta know! The I shake my heads are indulgent and not the norm! It's just a bit of ridiculous chatter but it might just make you laugh!If you love what you hear you can support the podcast by following the links below!Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/join/ishakemyheadYou can also find us on:Twitter www.twitter.com/i_shakemyhead Instagram www.instagram.com/ishakemyheadFacebook I shake my head with Lisa and SamTik Tok i_shakemyheadBuy our merchandise at www.ishakemyhead.threadless.comWe are proud to be a part of www.podfixnetwork.com

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Chicago

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:05


The Windy City wields a wonderful whimsical world-class wealth of whatever it is you may want. It's reputation for rising from the ashes like the phoenix makes it far more fascinating and fantastic. Its sprawling skyscrapers set and surpass the standard as far as architecture is concerned. Put on your plush parkas as we pound the pavement in sensational, spectacular, sassy Chicago on this week's episode of FYI!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Youth Ministry Team Podcast
130: What Are The Questions the Next Generation Wrestles With That Every Pastor Should Consider? Interview with Kara Powell

Youth Ministry Team Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:11


Kara Powell is a veteran of researching young people and bringing practical ministry ideas to pastors and leaders in churches. Jason Ballard sat down with Kara to hear some of the latest research being released in her new book 3 Big Questions That Change Every Teenager.  They begin by highlighting why this all matters and what is at stake when we talk about discipling kids and youth in our communities. Kara highlights both the ways churches can impact the lives of young people positively, but also how young people can help transform churches. Going off research from past projects as well, Kara shares about what churches reaching young people are doing well and how pastors of kids and youth ministries are best discipling their people to follow Jesus.    Jason also explores with Kara the ways parents are the primary way of discipling young people and what it means for pastors to partner with them. They talk about ideas and tactics that have been effective at encouraging parents and building relational trust with parents that pastors can look to implement.   Dr. Kara E. Powell is the Executive Director of the Fuller Youth Institute (FYI) and Chief of Leadership Formation at Fuller Theological Seminary. The mission of FYI is to equip diverse leaders and parents so faithful young people can change our world. Named by Christianity Today as one of “50 Women to Watch”, Kara completed her PhD in Practical Theology from Fuller Seminary with a focus on Pastoral Role Expectations in 2000, an MDiv from Bethel Theological Seminary in 1994, and a BA degree with Honors from Stanford University in 1991. In addition to her roles at Fuller Seminary, Kara serves as a Youth and Family Strategist for Orange and volunteers in student ministries at Lake Avenue Church in Pasadena. She is the co-author of 3 Big Questions that Change Every Teenager, Faith in an Anxious World, Growing With, 18 Plus, Growing Young, The Sticky Faith Guide for Your Family, Sticky Faith Curriculum, Can I Ask That?, Deep Justice Journeys, Essential Leadership, Deep Justice in a Broken World, Deep Ministry in a Shallow World, and the Good Sex Youth Ministry Curriculum.   Access her new book by heading to https://fulleryouthinstitute.org/3-big-questions   This episode was recorded for the Canadian Church Leaders Podcast. You should learn more about the podcast and other great things that Jason and his team are up to by heading to www.ccln.ca   Special thanks to this episode's sponsor, Trinity Western University. Their mission is to develop godly Christian leaders: positive, goal-oriented university graduates with thoroughly Christian minds; growing disciples of Jesus Christ who glorify God through fulfilling the Great Commission, serving God and people in the various marketplaces of life. They are passionately committed to helping you discover how to be fully and faithfully present in the world and to play a vital role in God's work of healing, hope, and renewal. Learn more about this leading liberal arts university with campuses in both Canada and the USA at TWU.ca Submit your youth ministry question at youthministry.team.

The RealLife English Podcast
#260 OMG! This is How to Use Abbreviations Like a Native

The RealLife English Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:11


Today we're talking all about abbreviations in English. In case you're not familiar with this term, an abbreviation is a shortened form of a word or phrase. For example, we might say FYI instead of "for your information" or ASAP instead of "As soon as possible." You'll come across abbreviations in your work, studies, and general daily life. They're a huge part of communication, especially when texting or sending online messages or emails. In this podcast, we'll clarify the various types of abbreviations and also teach you some of the most common ones. Show notes here. .......... We're super excited to announce that we have publicly launched much anticipated RealLife English Podcast and Speaking App, which will give dedicated learners, just like you, the opportunity to listen to podcasts, not only with audio and transcripts, but also to speak English with other learners from around the world, at the touch of a button, for free. Download here .......... Sign up for the RealLife Native Immersion Course here .......... Follow us on: RealLife English (YouTube) Learn English with TV Series (YouTube) Instagram: reallife.english Facebook: RealLife English

Single You
39. How to Give Love & Loyalty More to You & Less to Him! (Guest; DJ Robinson)

Single You "The Podcast"

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 65:56


FYI; in this episode we cuss. :-) Love & Loyalty. What it means to do the 'work' and finally be happy single. Plus we'll mention what we can learn from DaniLeigh and DaBaby. Let's talk... a conversation with my cousin DJ! "Single You Academy helped me fall in love with myself by doing the work in this particular area. This has been an area of my life that caused me a lot of frustration and pain. Now I feel like I can confidently say that I love myself and show up in that in fullness." - Nikita Now, suppose you are ready to learn how to do the work to be happy single, truly. You want tools to do better in this area and you know you have nothing else to lose. You're ready to work on you. You need help to get rid of the shame you have in this area of your life, you want peace and you want to feel like you can trust yourself again. In, that case, I invite you to apply to Single You Academy. Applications for SYA will be open until we fill our 5 open spots. How will you be going into 2022. We will review applicants on a first come, first serve basis. So if you want this, go after it. Thank you again for your consideration. I look forward to learning more about you and how we might be-able to help. DM me *boundaries* or Click here to complete your application now! My DM is always open! Find me on IG here. Twitter here. Facebook here. Email = Reka@justmeReka.com My DM is always open! Xo

The 3-Day Workweek Podcast
How To Build A Waitlist For Your Group Coaching Program

The 3-Day Workweek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 11:36


If you're thinking about launching a Group Coaching Program, it's essential to get an idea if what you're putting together is actually appealing to your Ideal Clients. ...and, the best way to do that is to start building a WAITLIST for your group program! That way, you not only validate your idea, but you have a list of warm leads to start reaching out to so you can fill those spots inside your program quickly and easily. Today on the podcast, I'm sharing 5 often-overlooked strategies to help you curate a lengthy waitlist of warm leads for your group offer...even if it's not created yet! FYI...early enrollment for Scale-Up Mastermind™ is happening now, and there are some awesome early bird bonuses when you join this month! Including 3 extra BONUS months of coaching & support from me and my team to help you craft an epic group offer and successfully launch it in 2022!  Click here for more info about Scale-Up Mastermind™ if you're ready to create a highly profitable High-Ticket Group Program with our proven system so you can say “goodbye” to exhausting 1:1 work for good :-) With love, Cailen

Ventures
How Web 3.0 will impact the future of entrepreneurship

Ventures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 9:27


In this episode of Ventures, I (https://www.linkedin.com/in/wclittle/) take about ~10min to talk about my perspective on why Web 3 (i.e. decentralized ownership, blockchains, Metaverse, and the Semantic Web) will dramatically change the landscape for entrepreneurship in the future. Based on feedback from the first year of this podcast, I share a bit about my story; i.e. how building and *owning* my own Web 2.0 ventures in the 2000s is analogous to what many entrepreneurs are doing right now in Web 3 communities. New communities and networks are being created rapidly, and the markets that our children will participate in the future are almost impossible for us to conceive of today.FYI, you can watch this episode via video here. For more background on my writings and podcasts on Web 3, see https://satchel.works/@wclittle/blockchains 

Hand Me My Purse.
No. 36: Season Two Is a WRAP w/My Therapist, Dr. Demisse + Living without Fear + Gratitude Challenge is Underway.

Hand Me My Purse.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 120:29


Hey Friends & Kin!FYI:  THIS, JUST LIKE ALL EPISODES OF HAND ME MY PURSE, CONTAINS PROFANITY. THIS PODCAST IS FOR ADULTS AND CONTAINS ADULT CONTENT. Now that we've gotten that out of the way..._________So, Friends & Kin, we did it again... ANOTHER SEASON IN THE BOOKS! SEASON TWO IS A WRAP. I am so grateful for Hand Me My Purse & all of the people and energy that has come with it. I am beyond blessed. I love sharing with you and I love and appreciate all my Friends & Kin SO MUCH!!!In this episode I sit with one my favorite people - my therapist, Dr. Demisse.  We sat and spent time chatting about her favorite thing to tell me ALL THE TIME, "DO WHAT YOU WANT TO DO & DON'T DO WHAT YOU DON'T WANT TO DO!"... Dr. Demisse takes the time to break down exactly what that looks like in practice.  It seems like something that is really really easy, however - LET ME TELL YOU THAT IT IS NOT!!! It is HARD WORK, however the reward is SO WORTH THE WORK...Have you been participating in the Hand Me My Purse gratitude challenge that started on 11/11? We are going to close out 2021 on a GRATEFUL NOTE.  If you didn't start on 11/11, just join us now, START WHERE YOU ARE WITH WHAT YOU HAVE.  The goal is to create a mindset shift to end 2021 as we prepare to bring in 2022 with INTENTION! Make sure you are following me on Instagram for check-ins.I truly hope you enjoy this episode & thank you for rocking with Hand Me My Purse for the first year of her life. Yes, my podcast is a girl. The future is female & so is my podcast. Now please go leave a review, I love you for it!!! xoxox"GO WHERE YOU ARE LOVED. NOT WHERE YOU ARE TOLERATED..."MeMe's JAM No. 36Yung Pueblo.FIND A THERAPIST._______ Listen. Subscribe. Rate. Review. :Apple Podcasts.Stitcher.Spotify.Google Podcasts.Pandora.I love you guys so much & I'm honored to share my time & energy with you – ESPECIALLY IF YOU KEEP COMING BACK! I can't wait until the next time we get to do this again! And as always, "Thank you for your support..."(said exactly like the 80s Bartles and Jaymes commercials)xoxo  MeMe *****************J O I N * T H E * S Q U A DInstagramFacebookTwitterHAND ME MY PURSE. SPOTIFY PLAYLIST*********************Music:  Gloomy Tunez

Mosaic Boston
The Heart of a Man of God

Mosaic Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 64:05


Audio Transcript: This media has been made available by Mosaic Boston Church. If you'd like to check out more resources, learn about Mosaic Boston and our neighborhood churches, or donate to this ministry, please visit Mosaicboston.com. Good morning, church. Welcome to Mosaic. My name is Jan, one of the pastors along with Pastor Shane and Pastor Andy. If you're new or visiting, we'd love to connect with you through the Connection card. If you fill it out legibly, just leave it at the welcome center. With that said, would you please pray with me over the preaching of God's word? Heavenly Father, I pray that you reveal your heart to us, the Father's heart, that everything you do and everything you say comes from a place of love. Because you love so much, you allow yourself to be grieved. You do experience anger. There is a jealousy. There is a wrath, but it's all there because of your love. I pray that you make us a people that understand your heart, a people who are willing to share our hearts with you and share our hearts with one another. Only when we can do that can we encourage each other's hearts, infuse faith in hearts. Then Lord, I pray as you knit our hearts of faith together, set our hearts ablaze with your faith for the work that you have called us to, to proclaim Jesus Christ, who because of His great love for us came, lived, and died, and said, "Whoever would believe in the heart, have faith in the heart, not in the mind but in the heart." I pray, Holy Spirit, stir our hearts. I pray, engulf our hearts. We pray for anointing, a special faith, a faith for revival because we love you, because we love each other, and because we love the world, because we love people. We pray all this in Jesus name. Amen. Title of the sermon is The Heart of a Man. I am going to primarily focus on 2 Corinthians, chapter 2, 8 through 16, from our text from last week. Then as I was preparing the message for this week, I realized, "Yeah, I preached an expository sermon that exposed the text, but I didn't show you how the text exposes my heart." If you don't know how the text exposes my heart, you don't know my heart. If you don't know my heart, you can't know my faith and my vision. I'm going to read 2 Corinthians 2, 8:16. Then I'm going to meditate on what it means to share what God put in your heart. I had a question from a brother after the sermon. He said, "What do you want us to talk about in CG? The sermon was so different." I said, "2 Corinthians 2:8 through 16. Talk about what God has put in your heart." One verse... I'll go as far as I make it. "But thanks be to God, who put into the heart of Titus the same earnest care I have for you." This is the reading of God's holy, inerrant, infallible, authoritative word. May He write these eternal truths upon our hearts. If you have been at Mosaic the last month or so, you realized things are different. It's because God has something put on my heart that I don't even know what I... It took a lot of time just reflecting. It's like, what is going on in here? Because I'm naturally wired to get up here with a huge machine gun of biblical truth, and just shoot you up, sit down, worship Jesus, go home, because that's the way I'm wired. It's all mind, mind, mind, mind, mind. My mind thinks a million things at the same time. That's why I'm all about know God. SDG, Soli Deo Gloria. It's all for God's glory. Get to know God, get to know God, get to know God. Then I'm like, once you know God, GSD, GSD, GSD. Get stuff done. SDG, GSD. This is like, it's on my heart. In order to live like this, you got to know what's in there. This week, I got hacked or something. I don't know. Someone set up a fake email and a fake Facebook and asking people for money. I had to send out a newsletter. I did that. I didn't want to do that because I don't like sharing all of the demonic attack that happens over the course of the week on me, on my marriage, on my family, on the staff. It's like ah. We're moving the church toward real talk as part of our culture. Well, you got to talk. I did that. I kind of exposed. Then I was like, all right. Saturday comes along. I'm like, "Gosh, everyone knows something's up. Everyone knows something different. I'm going to send a newsletter, and no one's going to know what's up." I'm going to write a joke that's only funny to me and God, partially because I'm trying to speak from the heart, expand the heart, and no one really knows who I am unless I speak from the heart. I was talking to my wife about this. I was like, "Why can't I bring humor into the church, laughter into this church, sad times? People need to... " She's like, "Because you have a crazy laugh. You have a maniacal laugh." I laugh like that. Then she's like, "Don't do that, please." My laugh comes from the heart. What I'm saying is no one got that joke except for the people that really, really, really know me. Tyler, who runs our youth ministry... He came up to me after one of the sermon. Holy war, I think. He's like, "Bro, you freaked everyone out." He's like, "I know what you meant, but they don't know you." That really stuck with me. I'm like, "Oh, why don't they know me? Why don't they know that everything I do, is I do it because I have a big heart. I love this church. I love my family. I love my wife. I love my daughters. It's all coming out of here." I got a verse this week, John 5:4. I was like, "Yeah, that's what I'm doing. God, thank you for the anointing." John 5:4... It says an angel comes down to stir water, just stir things up. I was like, "Yeah, that's what I'm doing. I'm stirring things up, getting the church to a place of authenticity. It's just real talk all the time." Then it says for healing. I was like, oh, I've been wielding my sword. Everyone walks out of here just caught up. They're like, "What just happened to me?" I am here today just to expose a little of my heart. I've been trying to do that in this season. It's hard. It's not natural to me. I've branded myself as a Russian from New England. It's a miracle that I have any emotions at all, but I have so much in here. It's just that when I begin to share, my brain begins to glitch out. Then also, my wife doesn't like that I show emotion. I'll get into that. To really get 2 Corinthians and then why I have been doing it because St. Paul... Verse by verse by verse, he's like, "I love you. I'm proud of you. I boast about you. You're the greatest church that I have ever planted. I have so many big visions for you. I believe in you." It only makes sense because they know that he loves them. You can't have direct talk, real talk to people unless they know it's coming from a place of love because this is how I disciple my daughters. I get down to their level. When I do this, when I do this, and you're like, "He's freaking me out again," I'm just saying, I want to have a one-on-one conversation with every single one of you. I know, logistically, it's Boston. I've got an opening in February. I'm just going to pretend this is the one on one. I want to bring this voice into the culture of the church where we bare our hearts. St. Paul is speaking as a good father. He wants to be helpful. He's not criticizing to criticize. He's coaching them. If you ever played sports, even kid sports... I was at my daughter's soccer game yesterday, Elizabeth. The coach is yelling at them. He called my daughter angry Elizabeth. That's her nickname because when she's angry, she scores goals. I'm like, angry Elizabeth. She's like, "Dad, don't scream. Don't scream. You're freaking me out. You're embarrassing me." I'm like, "I'm screaming because I love you. Put your heart into your foot." She scored two goals yesterday, and her team won 5 and 0. They went undefeated in the whole year. Praise God. When I'm speaking like this, it's not because I am mad at you. I'm trying to stir your heart up for great work for God. Without real talk, there's no real life change. We can theoretically talk about God and the scriptures. We walk away, nothing changed. It's just information, information, information. That's how the world works. Scripture isn't given for information. It's given to change the heart. Scripture is supposed to change the heart. True expository preaching is exposing everything in here. Stir it up. Yes, there's sin. Yes, there's sadness. Yes, there's grieving. Yes, there's anger. There's all kinds of stuff going on in here. To really read scripture, you got to allow it to read you and to respond. People are like, "Is this different than what Mosaic is about?" Mosaic was always about this. We put it in our core values. Love Jesus, simple. By the simple, the heart... When we started the church, simple was never simplistic. It's not baby food. It's not breastfeeding. It's get to the heart of the matter because the matters of the heart are what matter. You can't get to the simplicity of Christianity if you do not know each other's heart. I know the challenge is in the city. I feel like every time I get up here, we don't know each other. There used to be a song called We Don't Talk Anymore. I used to sing it all the time. Whenever something would happen in the church, I would be like, "We don't talk anymore." That's what COVID felt like. We just stopped talking heart to heart. I would get up here. I'm like, "This is what God said. That's what God said. Just do that, do that, do that. SDG, GSD." I'm like, "How do they understand what I'm saying if they don't understand the heart?" I got to take it from God's heart. I got to download it into my heart. I got to do the hard. This is hard. This is hard. This is hard. I don't even know what I'm doing. I'm going to write. I wrote. I wrote 14 pages. Then I was like, you know what? I'm just going to stand up here and speak from the heart because I want to connect not just with your mind, but with your heart, because true faith isn't in the mind. A lot of you know God with your mind inside and out. You have books of the Bible memorized, but do you believe in your heart? Scripture says, "Confess with your mouth that Jesus Christ is Lord and believe," where? With your heart. Believe with your... from the depth. God, I love you. I talk about the love part. I'm like, love, love, love, love, love, love, love. I just assume you believe. I assume you believe. You don't truly believe unless you believe with your heart. There's stuff in the way of true faith. Sometimes I get up, and I talk about faith. I talk about the vision. My vision for the church, my vision for the world... I just want to fix everything because that's how dads think. I have fears in my heart that I don't want to be there. I have fears in my heart about my daughters. I have fears about my daughters going outside and things happening to them. Then I say, that makes me sad. That grieves my heart. It transitions to anger. Unless you stop there and say, "Is this from God? Holy Spirit, sanctify all these emotions. Holy Spirit, baptize these tears. Baptize these feelings. Baptize whatever I'm feeling." Only then can it turn into zeal and resolve to fix things. One of the reasons why I am doing what I'm doing is because I knew this was coming when we were like, okay. The 10th anniversary party... I got to meditate on what just happened the last 10 years. I'm like, I don't want to even go to... I got up. I was like, there's years of my life missing. 2017, I have no idea. Part of it is that this is the way I work. If a year is painful, if a moment is painful, if it's a moment that I'm... It feels awkward. I don't want to be here. I shut the heart off. I turn on the mind. I turn on the strength. What are we going to do about it? Then I do that for a while. Then a year goes by. I'm like, "What just happened?" For me to get back into the heart, it's very painful because it forces me to feel what I didn't feel at that very moment. Then I'm like, "What just happened, 2017? I don't want to feel any of that. I don't want to feel any of that." Partially, this is the way I work because this is the way I got through my childhood. I never bring up my childhood. I never bring up my mom because there's a lot of very sad memories in my life that shaped me to be who I am. My mom and dad moved here when my dad was 30, my mom was 27. My mom got married at 19 just to get out of her house because she was the ninth of 11 children. She's like, "This is crazy. I'm out." She just got married. She had me at 20. In her heart, I know. She had pain from her childhood. She brought that into child rearing. Then we moved to the States. Now she's a foreigner. A lot is going on there. I grew up as an immigrant kid in an inner city public school system in Rhode Island, which is how... When people talk about race and things like that, one of the things that people don't realize is I was the minority, always, in every single sense. The way I see the world is very unique than other people. My wife told me. She's like, "Why did you write that you love people? I love you so much." She was like, "Why are you using that language?" She's like, "No one believes you anyway." The reason why she says, she knows I love... The people that know me, they know I'm a loving person. Everything that I do, it comes from here. She says, "Because you walked on the street, and you're scary. You laugh like a maniac. You like to growl and things." I'm like, "Oh." My personality doesn't make sense to anyone unless they really understand the missing link. The missing link is I love Jesus. As crazy as that, I love God. I believe in God. I really believe in the God of the Bible. You don't understand how I read holy scripture unless you understand how I love, how much I love God. When I read scripture, I read scripture in 4D. I read scripture, and I see the movie in my mind as I read the words. I don't just understand the ideas. I see it. I see myself in the role. Whatever role, whatever story, I'm there. I'm inside. I always want to do the greatest thing. In the story of King David, I want to take Goliath down. In my commissioning sermon to become a pastor, I got up. I was like, "I am going to take Boston." You hear me say that right now, and you're like, "Oh yeah. That makes sense." Back then, if I could go back in time in a time machine, I would go back and eat that guy. Very different because Boston changes a man, because war changes a man. Where was I going? I called my mom. This is really important because I do not call my mom, because my mom wants to talk about feelings. I call my dad because my dad just wants to talk about stuff, get stuff done. He just wants facts. I called my mom. I haven't called my mom in so long that I didn't even know her number. Changed her number. She was in my speed dial. I was like, "Ah man. That's why." I called her. We had a nice conversation. It just felt good. I'm here to encourage you. If you want to work on heart things, call your mom. Call your mom. I called her. I missed her. I told her I missed her. We talked. We could talk for 33 minutes and 30 seconds. That's meaningful to me because I think that's the longest we've ever talked. Had a really heart conversation. She watches my sermons. She's like, "Something is off." This is why I called her. She sent me a sermon, and she's like, "This is my favorite sermon. You should listen to it." I'm like, "Oh." What did she say? I'm listening to the sermon. I'm like, "I don't even know what this guy is talking." It's a Russian sermon. He's not expositing anything. I'm all technical analysis. I'm like, "This is a terrible sermon. Get that sermon out of here." I called her. I was like, "Why did you like that sermon?" She's like, "Well, he said good things." I said, "What did he say?" She's like, "I have no idea." Then I went back, and I listened to him. I'm like, "Oh, he was just speaking from the heart, and it connected to her heart." I'm like, "Oh wow." Then I was like, "Mom, look. I'm changing things up in the church. It's kind of crazy. Everyone thinks I'm a nut, Mom. Can you please speak into this?" I'm not crazy. I just want to say. Some of you are psychiatrists. You're like, "Well, I am analyzing Pastor Jan. What is wrong with this guy?" Especially if you listen to last four or five sermons, you see just a different person up here every single time. I talked to Pastor Shane. Pastor Shane's like, "Hey, man. Everyone's freaked out. Can you just connect everything and do it in one thing?" That's what my wife says. I'm like, "All right." I called my mom. I said, "Mom, what would you recommend I do?" She said two things. She said, "Tell everyone, especially the sisters in the church, that you're not fighting them. You're fighting for them. You're fighting for their faith." I was like, "Oh, that's a good thing to say." I'm not fighting. This is what Adam should have said. "Hey, Eve, baby. You're offering me an apple. I'm going to go have a steak. I don't want to fight you about it. I'm going to go to war against the serpent who's offering you," right? That's what should have happened. Then she said this. She said, "Also, can you slow down your pace because I no speak English good." That's true. Just bear with me. I'm trying to expand. I got a big heart. I'm trying to find my range of voice. I have all kinds of something. 2 Corinthians 8:16. It's the heart. "Thanks be to God." God, thank you. Paul believes in God. When Paul talks about faith, we're saved by grace through faith. He understands. Yes, I believe in God. Yes, I believe that God puts things into a person's heart, things to do for God. "Thanks be to God, who put into the heart of Titus the same earnest care I have for you." When God saves a person, He puts into their heart not just salvation, not just forgiveness of sins. Unfortunately, that's where a lot of Christians stay. This is my challenge to you, church, my appeal to you. Do not just stay at the place of, my sins are forgiven. If your sins are truly forgiven, your heart is transformed. You have a deep passion and love for God, for people. You care. You care for people. When God saved me, He... This is why I found the newsletter so funny, because I find my life so funny. I find it ridiculous that God has placed me in the position that He's placed me. Whenever I talk about wins in my past, I'm not saying it because I'm awesome or because I'm so capable. I'm telling you those wins are important to me because it was a miracle. It was a miracle that I ended up in this country. It was a miracle that I grew up in a Christian household. It was a miracle that I got into college. Anytime I share any of that, I'm like... If you knew little pepperoni-faced me in middle school, you'd be like, "Oh." It's all a miracle. When I see things that I hope for the church in the future and they sound crazy to you, well, it's because I've seen miracles of God in my past. I've seen God work over, and over, and over. When we started the church, Pastor Andy reminded me of this in staff meeting. He's like, "Remember that time you got up in the library of the YMCA, and you said that we are starting a church that one day is going to fill Fenway Park with a worship service?" I was like, "Oh yeah, I did say that." Here's why that hit me. I'm already past that. This is the way my heart works. Because I really love, I just assume that God is going to bless us so incredibly because God loves us so much. I'm like, "Of course, we're going to fill Fenway Park." I'm already onto the church building. When are we going to build the church building for everybody? This is the way my faith works. When I said, "Hey, everyone, can you please just catch up?" I said that last week. Everyone's like, "Oh, chill out, bro." I'm saying not just catch up in knowledge. I'm saying catch up in faith, but for you to catch up in faith, you got to catch up with your heart, not just with your mind. To do that, I got to share what's on my heart. When God saved me, He really made me work to love, love Him, love His word, and love His mission. I want to do something really significant with my life because I read the Bible. It's like, I see Christians nowadays. They live biblical lives, with small, small B, small letters, biblical. If you read the Bible, the reason why that word is used in other contexts, it's like biblical... This is biblical. I'm reading the Bible. I'm like, "Why isn't my life biblical? Am I leading a life that could truly be a chapter in the Bible which is legendary?" Well, how do you live a legendary life? You do what Jesus Christ did, the greatest legend, the greatest man, the Son of God, the Son of man. He lived for people. He cared for people. He sacrificed for people. I knew I was called into ministry. I was training up for it, and then I met Tanya. I explained the legend part. One of the things that I do to live a legendary life is I live a life that would... when I tell the story so that people would just be so amazed that it's beyond. I do things where I'm like, "That wasn't me. That was the Lord. That wasn't me. That was the Lord." I'm like, "All right, Lord. I need a pastor's wife. Can you send me a pastor's wife?" I gave God a list of things, a requirement, a list. She needs to be a woman of God. She needs to know the Bible better than me. She needs to actually care about evangelism because that's what real Christians do. I threw in freckles and green eyes just for fun, just to see what the Lord would do with it. I met Tanya. I'm like, that's the one. That's the one. She didn't know it yet. I had to convince her. I did. We were called together to ministry. We went to seminary. In seminary, I thought I was going to go to Russia. From seminary, I realized Lord stirring something in my heart to go to Boston. I'm from the area. I want to go to Boston. I want to plant a church. Tanya didn't want to go. She didn't want to go. She cried. She cried her first vision trip. Well then, she's like, "You know what, baby? If you believe, I'm going to pray about it. Our hearts are bound together." Just to show you how we love each other, this is why when everyone is freaking out, when my wife and I... We just go at it. We go at it because we love each other. There's no exit ramp. There's no... It's like, we're going go duke it out because we're got to live together anyway. At home, it's the culture of real talk most of the time. I have one story to explain how different we are. Everyone assumes that Jan and Tanya are Slavic. Therefore, they're exactly the same because everyone assumes that if you're Russian, Ukrainian, whatever, from all these countries, that you're just Russian, which is kind of racist. No offense. None taken. She's from Ukraine. I'm from Estonia. I grew up here. We are very different, including our senses of humor. When I was trying to communicate with the joke thing, it's like, you really got to love someone to know what makes them laugh. She's found out what makes me truly laugh. I'll give you one example of when she made me laugh harder than I've ever laughed in my whole life. It was my 38th birthday. She got me a little gift. I take it out of the little gift bag. It's a T-shirt. It's a black T-shirt. On the front is a picture of Michael Scott. She's going to hate this story. I love the story. Under the picture, it's a very famous phrase that he says. I was dying. I was like, "This is the funniest thing I've... " to the point where she's like, "What's going on? Why is this that funny?" I was like, "Do you know what it says? Do you know what that means?" She said, "It's like when I tell you to do something and then you go do... " That's what she said. She has no idea, but she knew that was going to be funny for me. What that showed me is that woman does not get me at all, but she gets me on a level that nobody does. That's what love is. That's what love in a family is. You get to know each other's idiosyncrasies, just things that are weird about you. I say that because we have this at staff meeting. The staff of Mosaic... We have a group chat that is absolutely hilarious. None of you will get it. We get it because we have a language that connects our hearts. St. Paul says, "Look. Before you tell people about care you have for them, hey, can you tell them what's in your heart? Can you tell them how much you love before you tell them information about God?" Here, I just want to pause and talk particularly to men because this sermon is about a heart of a man. I want to address, specifically, gentlemen. Hey, I don't know if you notice, we have hearts. Ladies, just as FYI, we have hearts. We have feelings, a broad range of feelings. I have to mention that because we... Number one, we live in a culture where that's not that important. Men aren't welcome to share their feelings because that doesn't do anything because it's all about skills, and what you can do, and making money, and executing. What is the heart? It's the center of emotion. Men have emotions. We have to process and feel things. Men do it differently than ladies. Men, when we're really growing together, we're growing together because we connect our hearts. For men, it's different. Ladies... They go out for tea. They go for a walk. They read a book together or things like that. Gentlemen... We don't really connect like that. We connect, like, "Hey, man. You want to do something? What do you do? Do you build something? Hey, teach me how to build. Show me your skills. Show me what you're good at." Then shoulder to shoulder, as we're learning, our hearts are connected. We connect at a much deeper level than we would otherwise. That's why for gentlemen, community groups, sitting around the circle... I tell people that community groups are kind of the... It's the gateway drug to the church. Maybe worship service is, but what I'm saying is to go really deeper, community group is just there for you. Open the Bible. You pray together. You get connected with your hearts on mission for the Lord. Don't just share wins because if you share wins... This is a lesson I'm learning, is if you keep sharing wins, just, people think you're just super human. As a believer, we believe in the Holy Spirit, don't we? We believe that the Holy Spirit sometimes anoints people. When you share wins, when you share a vision, when you share faith, when you share from the heart, you're not saying, "I'm awesome." You're saying, "This is very important. This is very different. I want to explain this to you because that's not me. I'm actually kind of pathetic, but it's the Spirit of God in me." I'll just give you one story of when my mom... Since I'm on this throne. My mom really ministered my soul. The very first time I was called to preach the gospel, to preach God's word, I preached in my home Russian church in a tie. I got up there with a Bible. I didn't want to preach. I'm like, "God, did you want me to preach? I don't want to preach. What am I going to preach on if I don't want to preach?" I preached on Jonah because Jonah didn't want to preach either. I got up there. I had the sermon memorized because I had to preach in Russian. I got paralyzed. I turned beet red, cotton mouth, everything. If you don't understand that point, you don't understand why this is hilarious. I got down. It was the most uncomfortable sermon for everyone in the church. I got down. My mom's like, "Hey. Hey, what happened?" My dad's like, "This is what you should fix next time." Then my mom is like, "Oh, what happened?" She's like, "Oh, you're afraid. You're afraid of people." Then this is the way she does. She called everyone is село, which is a village. She's like, "They're just people. They're just people. You're a person. They're a person. Just share what's on your heart." I was like, "Oh, you can't share what's on your heart if there's fear of how you will be misinterpreted." That's the day and age that we live in. It's all just information, information, information, mind, mind, mind, mind. That's where we go to war. We don't really share what's on our heart, what's really going on because we're not sure that people will understand. One thing men don't do enough is to really talk about how they feel things. In this season where I'm trying to reshape the culture of the church, what I'm trying to do is just to bring more people in. I have a really big heart. I love all people, all kinds of people. I can relate to all kinds of people. That's why people that know me know I can connect because of my very diverse experience. I can connect with people from everywhere. That's why at this church, we have people from all over the world because one on one, I know how to speak to different people. When I get up here, all of you are in the room at the same time. I'm trying to have a one-on-one conversation. My mind just breaks. What I'm doing is I'm trying to expand the culture of the church to include speaking from the heart. To speak from the heart, you got to be honest about what's going on inside. How are you? You know what? Things kind of did not go on well. There were seasons in my life where there's deep, deep sadness, grieving, that I'm like, "Yeah, this isn't helpful to anybody. I just need to encourage everyone from God's word when I don't really want to feel." Did I get to the Tanya story yet? I've got a lot of Tanya stories. I'll tell you one story. During COVID, I choked up for the first time in a sermon because I'm like, "This." I'm preaching to a camera downstairs. Pastor Shane, Chloe handling logistics. I'm looking at the camera, empty room. It hit me, just overwhelm hit me, how long this is going to be. I just saw that this is going to be part of our life for a long time and that the church was going to be gutted through it. I got choked up. Then I went home. I forgot about it because that's what I do. I went back to work. Then Sunday comes. I preach on Thursday. Sunday comes. My wife and I... We watched the livestream in different rooms because we tried watching the livestream once together, and my wife is like, "Oh finally, I have an opportunity. I'll finally tell you everything that you should have fixed in real time." I'm like, "This isn't helping, baby. I'm going to another room." Then she saw me get choked up. Then she's like, "Never do that again. People need strong leader." If you know my wife, that's what she says. I was like, all right. I packed on 50 pounds of muscle and figured out how to grow a beard. Here I am. You're welcome, Tanya. Thank you, Tanya. This week, I had time to process. I went back to that moment. I was like, "You know what? That's messed up, that you can't share what's on your heart. How am I supposed to lead people into battle if they don't know I care so much that I'm willing to lead the charge and die? How can I say that from the heart if people don't know I really love them?" It does grieve me when sad things happen. That was a sad time in my life. I remember Julie Busby came up to me. She's like, "Hey, man. Wow. Pastor Jan does get sad." That really hit me. I'm like, "Why don't people know that?" Oh, because I'm a tremendous actor, by the way. I can get up here, and I can do the whole joyful thing. Every once in a while, men, we have to share what's on our heart, and we have to connect at a heart level because no one really cares how much you know until they know how much you care. If you care, then you can give them what you know. If you care, if they know your heart, then when you speak of what faith God puts in your heart... That's really my gift. A lot of people don't know that. My spiritual gift is faith. That's my superpower, very illogical faith. When none of the data makes sense and everyone's like, "Why are you doing what you're doing?" I'm like, "It makes me sense to me because the Holy Spirit made it make sense to me." It doesn't make sense to anyone else around until I really share my heart. That's what St. Paul says in verse 16. We're talking about Titus. Titus is his disciple. Titus became a Christian because St. Paul shared his life and heart with Titus. He's like, "Hey, Titus. Let me tell you my story." That's the most powerful way of doing evangelism, is just telling your story. Let me tell you about all the miracles God did in my life. Let me tell you who I was before I met Jesus on the road to Damascus. Let me tell you what Jesus did. He revolutionized my life. He put me in a place where I am supposed to do the same for other people, share the gospel in a way that connects to their hearts so their hearts are changed. I'm thankful for St. Paul for preaching the gospel and sharing his heart. I'm thankful for Titus for sharing what God put in his heart. I'm thankful for Jesus Christ, with whom it all starts, for coming and sharing his heart, what's on his heart, speaking truth in love because everybody knew that He loved them. Everything that He did was motivated by love to the point that He was willing to die, and He sacrificed Himself on the cross. He's like, "This is how big my heart is. Everything I do, I do it because I love God and people." Paul influences Titus, and the influence is not just with truth but with love, with his heart. He says to Titus, "Hey, Titus. Do you understand the world?" Do you understand who your master is because if you don't understand that Jesus Christ is your king, that Jesus Christ is your master, you don't understand anything. If you think you are your own master, that's when you will understand that you're not a very good master. Either you become a despite to yourself and just drive yourself to produce, produce, produce, or you allow your flesh to take over. You allow your passions, and your lust, and your greed, and everything inside that's sinful, all the evil in here, to take over, Titus. You need a master who can put everything in here in order and tell you what to do, give you marching orders. Young man, do you know who your master is? Do you know who your king is? Do you know who your God is? If not, you don't know what your purpose is in life. It's definitely not just, have a good time until you die. That's a very meaningless way to live. Movies are not made about people like that, that inspire. We're inspired by legends, by legendary movies where people submit to a greater, higher calling. Who's your master, Titus? Then once you know who your master is, hey, Titus, young man, what's God calling you to do? What's the very specific mission that God has placed in your heart? It's very specific. God does have a very specific plan for every single person. To understand your mission, you got to share that with people. You say, "I feel like this is... God was place." Share it with your community because I have people that come to me all the time. They're like, "I feel like I'm called to international missions." I ask them, and I talk about it. Then I say, "Okay, why don't you start now in the city where there's people from all over the world?" We are together, are to shape each other's mission, whatever that mission is. Before you think, gentlemen, especially young, single gentlemen... Before you get to know someone to marry, before you find a mate, you got to know who your master is. You got to know who your mission is. Then once you know your mission, then you know how to meet someone that can help you in that mission, that we're partners together, someone you can lead in that mission. Too many men are lost, young men in the nation. That's why we look to voices, young men, like Joe Rogan and Jordan Peterson, to teach you about manhood instead of looking to Jesus Christ. Those voices are helpful as long as you know that Jesus Christ is the master giving you a mission. Before you think about dating, get that ironed out. Then when you meet a girl, you're not just saying, "Hey, I'm looking for a 10, physically." I'm looking for a 10, holistically, so that we can be on mission together and be as effective as possible. Let's do another verse. We're on a run. Verse 17, "For he not only accepted our appeal, but being himself very earnest he is going to you of his own accord." His own accord because God put it on his heart. God, I'm ready. I'm ready. Put me in. Put me in. What do you want me to do? St. Paul says, "Seasoned, mature Christian." "Hey, Titus, you have eagerness to serve God. Now I got a job for you." He appeals. One of the things I noticed is that I make appeals. I'm like, "I have this vision for a church building with a school." No one really understands because no one really understands the heart. That's why I'm trying to share the heart of the Father. Before I appeal, I need you to be on the same page of, "Hey, are you asking God, 'Hey, God. What did you put on my heart? What do you want me to do? What do you want me to do?'" Then when I stand up and I make appeals, it makes sense. Church, I will make appeals. I will challenge you and not because I'm mad at you, but because I believe in you. I want the absolute best for you. If you're not sure of your specific mission, well, until God calls you elsewhere, I am here to tell you. Your mission is to take Boston. This is our town. This is what it means to be a man of God. You walk into a place. You say, "You know what? God has placed me here. I'm taking responsibility for this town." We're going to change things from the inside out. Lord really spoke to me this week when I read... For the very first time, it hit me, what's at the bottom of our license plates. What's at the bottom of our license plates? Spirit of America, Massachusetts. How's that going? Kind of demonic, if you ask me. It's a demonic spirit that's coming out of here, a spirit of criticism and condemnation, judgementalism. Certainly not a spirit of true, sacrificial, authentic, real love. God is calling us into this place to change the spirit. To change the spirit, we got to plead with God, "God, anoint us by the power of the Holy Spirit to exercise the demon," that is the spirit of America, that is Massachusetts. I welcome you into that mission. Verse 18, "With him we are sending the brother who is famous among all the churches for his preaching of the gospel." It's Titus. This brother is famous for preaching the gospel. There's no need to be famous for preaching the gospel. Some people do preach the gospel, and they're more famous for it, but that's not really the point at all. The point is always to make the gospel famous because Jesus Christ is to be famous. We are to worship and glorify Him. There's lots of lessons in that text, but the point that I want to bring out is when God calls you to something, He's going to build a team around you, brothers and sisters. The bigger the calling, the more people God is going to bring into the call. It's just a matter of finding your position on the team. Being in one position doesn't make you better or more significant than any other. Some positions are more visible than others, but they're all equally important. One person is the quarterback. Another person has to be the lineman. They're friends at the end. The wins are wins for the team. We are to be hard workers at whatever we do. This gentleman wanted to preach the gospel. He was famous for it because he did it well. One of the things that I'm telling you I'm doing is in this season, I'm pushing myself to become a better communicator of the gospel, that after 10 years, I look back, I'm like, we did some great things. We did some great things. I'm so proud of this church. I'm so proud of what we've accomplished together. I'm so proud of your sacrifice, and your service, and your generosity, of your faith, of your selflessness. I'm so proud of you. I'm doing soul-searching. For me, I'm like, "There's things I should have done differently." I'm saddened by the fact that I did not stir hard enough, partially because when I stir the church, the church stirs back, because when I switch things up, people get freaked out. They're like, "Are you crazy?" I'm switching things up. I'm stirring things up because I want more healing. One of the things I wish I had done, I wish I had stirred people up sooner. I wish I had invited people into the heart, into the vision of what we're trying to do at this church and calling people to make hard sacrifices. I'm making heart sacrifices. Staff is making heart sacrifices. People have planted their life here. I'm stirring you up, church, to make those sacrifices, to look into the heart. I stir myself up. That's what I'm trying to say. I preach the sermon. Then every Sunday night, I watch it. The last four have been riveting for me. The reason why I started switching stuff up is I got to a point where my preaching, where I would get bored watching myself. No one wants a sermon like that because it wasn't from the heart. I've been sharing what's on my heart, but I'm freaking people out because they're not used to what's on my heart. That's why this is different. I watch the game tape, what I did well. I invite feedback, but here I just want to mention something. I have concentric circles of feedback. When people send me feedback, I have a question. Are you a fellow soldier? Are you here for the long haul? Do you have vision in your heart to help us raise sons and daughters of God? Are we in this together? What are we doing? To the level that you're like, "Yeah, I'm in... " My wife... Yeah, I'm here. I'm here. I don't like when you switch things. I'll tell you. Tanya believes. She's got the gift of faith just like I do. The thing is she hears a sermon, and then she's got to go back to the guy who preached it and live with that guy. It's not that she doesn't believe in what God's doing. She's just not ready for the man that I'm becoming. If you know anything about me, I go through a season where I'm just different. I just change. There's things that never change. You get an anointing. You got a vision to do something great. She's like, "Oh, I got to live with that guy. He thinks he's going to rebuild the world." We're here. We love each other. When you give me feedback, I ask, how close are we? Tanya, Pastor Shane, Pastor Andy, Raquel, Chloe, Tyler, Caleb, my friends, my CG, my family... I receive the feedback. I receive when you coach me. I know it's hard to get through to a person like me, but I receive it, and I welcome it. I want you to know, I process all of it with the Holy Spirit and the holy scriptures. At the end of the day, I got to put it altogether. I do receive it. I do love you. We're doing this together. I receive the feedback. One thing about the staff, I just want to say. A lot of people don't understand how much we love each other. When we got beef, and you're like, "Something's up between Pastor Shane and Pastor Andy... " I'll say that hypothetical because that's not real. I just want to say the reason why we do what we do is because we love each other. We're like, "Yeah, we're called. We're called. All right." You can be direct. You can say what you need to say. You can knife battle it out sword to sword. As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another. You got to duke it out. I say, I love it. The Holy Spirit courses through our meetings. We love each other. We're just going at it a thousand miles an hour. If you were in the room, you wouldn't even understand what's going on because we have years together of relationship and love. We just communicate in ways that a lot of people do not understand. Then we pray. We hug it out. We go home zonked because if you've ever spent four hours in a room with me, you get zonked. That's just how we work. We're in this together. Verse 19, "Not only that, but he has been appointed by the churches to travel with us as we carry out this act of grace that is being ministered by us, for the glory of the Lord himself and to show our good will." Last week, we were talking about this act of grace, this generosity. The generosity isn't just money. It's being generous with your life, with your home, with your lessons. There's people in the church that... You know Christianity. You know life better than younger people or people younger in their faith. We're to share life with brothers and sisters and minister to them. Verse 20, "We take this course so that no one should blame us about this generous gift that is being administered by us, for we aim at what is honorable not only in the Lord's sight but also in the sight of man." St. Paul says everything we do, we want to honor people. We want to honor God, honor people. He's taking precautions to do that. Here, I just want to pause and say, yes, we want people to honor everything we do. They don't have to understand what we do, but they have to honor it. Honor is a very cultural aspect. Different people from different cultures come in, and they show honor in different ways. Thus, the challenge of planting a church in Boston, Massachusetts, in 2021. We come in, and we don't really know how we are to honor. What is honorable in other cultures is not honorable here. There's a melting pot even within the church as the church continues to grow, and as new people come in, and as people move away. The only way that this melting pot works is if there's someone here just stirring the pot, stirring the pot, stirring the pot, so we understand each other. That's my calling. I want to stir in a way that brings healing. I want you to know that I'm cooking with love. Everything that we're cooking here, we're cooking with love. Verse 22, "And with them we are sending our brother whom we have often tested and found earnest in many matters, but who is now more earnest than ever because of his great confidence in you." He talks about this guy who comes. He has a vision. He has a plan. St. Paul is... Let me test you. Are you ready? We in the church need to have real talk, to have hard, tough conversations because we're testing each other. We want to strengthen each other to be a church where we experience life together, have real life and have real talk because that's what leads to real faith and real love. Don't be soft-minded and hardhearted. That's what the world wants for everybody. Soft-minded... This is what you're to think, not how to think. That's being soft-minded. Hardhearted... If you don't agree with me, I don't love you. We're to be tough-minded in that, hey, is this true? Is this really true? Is this true from the perspective of God's word? Be tenderhearted even to people that we disagree with. The pushback is always, but there's always two sides to the issue. You got to equally represent both sides of the issue. Why? One person has to. The truth has to be truth. We are to be willing to engage and say, "You know what? I might be wrong. Hey, change my line. Hey, can you convince me? Show me the data? Where from scripture is what you're saying true?" There's two sides to whatever issue, but there's only one truth. I found that this is Satan's current strategy. Just keep everybody divided, divided, divided. They never talk. They never really connect on a heart level, so no one ever really understands each other. Instead of being united and building together, we are being divided and destroying each other in relationships, in families, in the nation. I've really grown in this awareness of what is happening in the world. I used to never pay attention to the politics and all this stuff partially because I'm a child of the '90s. I grew up in the United States in the '90s. You know what? I didn't even know who president was most of the time. Freshman year of college was 2001, which is absolutely different from the world today. Today everybody knows everything that is going on everywhere. Then you never want to talk about it because you don't want to hurt anyone's feelings. Then we never really take time to figure out, "Hey, what is true? Hey, what resources are you reading? What sources are you reading? Hey, let's have difficult conversation." I used to do this. I used to say, "What's the left saying? What's the right saying?" Yeah, the truth is kind of probably in the middle, until I realized, "Oh, nothing ever gets better." It's kind of all moving in the same direction. Now this is my working theory of politics in the United States. It's like fake wrestling. I grew up watching fake wrestling. This is where they hit people in the head with a chair, and drop them on a table, and things like that. You're like, "I think they're hurting each other." Well, little bit. They're a little hurting each other. They're kind of duking it out, but then they go into the locker room. They shake hands. They hug. They pick up their checks. The checks are all signed by the same person: Satan or someone. I don't know, whoever's funding them. I'm saying this to say, now that we are creating a culture of real talk from the front, I want to share something that still grieves my heart. It still grieves my heart that I have not spoken directly into difficult situations in our nation as they were happening. Primarily, I didn't do that because I was like, "They're not going to get me. The church doesn't understand." You just won't understand the perspective that is in my heart because I don't just analyze what's happening with my heart. I analyze everything that's happening with my heart, with my soul. Yeah, it grieves my soul, what happened to George Floyd. That grieves my heart. I put a lot of thought into this newsletter because I sent it at 8:46 AM. Well, 8:46 was long as the knee was on George Floyd's neck. I never really spoke into it because it wasn't really clear what was happening out there in my heart, so I never really addressed it the way I should have addressed it and said, "Hey, hey, nation, church. You can't just think about this from a position of feelings. That's what the enemy wants. The enemy wants to get you to feel something so that then you act on those feelings, and you destroy things." From a biblical perspective, we got to... Yes, that's what we feel. Let's sit here. Let's lament. Let's grieve together and then process what is it that's going on in the world. Then from perspective of the soul... You do the heart. You do the mind. Then from the soul, it's like, what does this do in my soul? Oh, that's what matters. It's people's souls. Well, that's what Satan wants us to not think about, is people's souls. Before we muster all of our strength, we got to say, "Look. We got to think about this from four-dimensional love." Love God with all your heart, soul, strength, mind. From each perspective, you look at the issue. Once you start doing that, once you start realizing that this is how God wants us to process things, through the heart, through the soul, through the strength, through the mind, and then you meld those together. After a while, you begin to see things differently than perhaps others. God's really been working this in my life because God sent me four little Tanya's who help me process things very differently. Sophia processes things with her mind. Elizabeth, with her heart. Ekaterina... It's all strength. Can I outrun you? Am I stronger than you? Can I out-eat you? We lift weights together. She loves when I pick her up from school because she's like, "My dad's stronger than the rest of the dads. Yeah." Then there's Milana who's all soul, all soul, all soul. She just wants to have a good time. She doesn't even pay attention in community group unless you mention the word fun at least once. At least you laugh at least once. I have to learn how to love each one very differently, but then when we're in the car together or at home together, they're all speaking at the same time. I have to do all of this all at the same time. That's why I have a hard time sharing what's on my heart. I have gotten better at the four-dimensional loving, of loving holistically. This is what the Lord calls us to. I'll close with this. My wife and I were having a conversation this week. The conversation was like this because I had this vision from the Lord. The vision was very, very clear. I was like, where am I going to be in 10 years? I'm going to be here. Well, if I'm going to be here, my family is going to be here. How old's my daughter? She's going to be 23. My oldest daughter is going to be 23. I asked my wife. I was like, "Where are the husbands coming from of these men? Where are the men coming from that these ladies are going to marry?" They might have the gift of singleness. Statistically, probably get married. I'd like for them to get married because I want grandkids. My wife said, "Probably coming from Russian church where they produce real men." I said, "First of all, do they? Apparently, we still have to nail that one down. Number two, why aren't they coming from Mosaic? Why aren't these sons coming from Mosaic?" She said, "They can't handle down." Mosaic, I'm welcoming you into my Father's heart so you understand what's going on in here because I think by God's grace, I have been anointed to raise daughters, spiritually. Because I've been raising daughters, I know how to raise sons. You're like, "Why do you say that?" I say, "Because most American men are raised like daughters." I'm sharing. I said it lovingly, so you can't do anything. I bring up this topic because it does stir stuff in my heart because I really wanted a son. This is why Tanya and I... With our fourth, we were like, "All right. This is a son." It was Milana. This week, I wrote a letter to my future son. When I'm speaking, I'm speaking to the spiritual sons. If you are a spiritual father, this is the vision that I'm casting. We're to raise spiritual son and spiritual daughters, men and women of God. This is what I wrote. I wrote, "Dear Son, I love you. I'm proud of you. I loved you before you were even born. I longed for you. I love you with all my heart, with all my soul, with all my strength, with all my mind. I tried to raise you the way I wish I had been raised. I revealed truths to you that have taken many hard years to learn. Here's just a few. SDG, Soli Deo Gloria. Live for God's glory alone. Only when you live for God's glory alone, audience of one, following Jesus Christ who is the man you'll become, the man, because your faith, your love casts out fear so the opinions of people are just the opinions of people. DBG... Love someone more than yourself. Don't be greedy. That's the world tell you to live for yourself. Pleasurize yourself. Just do whatever's fun. Good times. No, no, no, Son. That's not a legendary life. LFG is let's fervently go, fervently. Just everything you got. GSD is get stuff done. Actually work with your hands. We are men to serve God with our head, heart, and hands. What are we doing with our hands? DBAB is don't be a baby, brah, because to be a man of God that actually does something of significance, you got to be able to take pain. A lot of this is spiritual war that's going on. Just, body is falling left and right because you don't have the pain tolerance, so do things that are hard. Deadlift or squat, just things that are like, wow, yeah, I've been through something. Son, play games, sports. Learn strategies. Apply them to real life and real battle. Pick up your sword. Learn it inside and out. Wield it powerfully against the enemy in here, in here, Son, and then out there. I'm here to help. With love... I mean it. It's how I lost. Dad." Let's pray to our Heavenly Father. Heavenly Father, we thank you that you love us with a Father's heart. Jesus, we thank you that you are the Son of God. You came to reveal the heart of God the Father. Holy Spirit, we thank you for these holy scriptures. We thank you for the many lessons that are here. We thank you, Holy Spirit, that you don't just want us to exposit the scriptures, but you want the scriptures to expose what's going on in our hearts, in our souls, in our minds. I pray that you continue to make us a church, Lord, that's real, where we can have real talk about real life to develop real faith and all from a heart of real love, the love of Jesus Christ, in whose name we pray. Amen.

Archaeological Fantasies Podcast
Archaeological Fantasies Update, and Where Have I Been.

Archaeological Fantasies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 18:38


I felt like I needed to post some kind of update/explanation before I start launching new things. I do discuss some mental health things and just life, just FYI. But if you want to know what my future goals are for the podcast and the channel give us a listen. -=-=-=-=-=-=- Hi! I'm an archaeologist who likes games, video games, gaming, horror, the supernatural, and debunking pseudoarchaeology. Check out my vids for more on the above topics, and toss us a coin if you like what I do. Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/Archyfantasies Podcast/Website - https://archyfantasies.com/ Twitch – https://www.twitch.tv/archyfantasies YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/ArchyFantasies Twitter – @ArchyFantasies IG – @ArchyFantasies Emai – ArchyFantasies@gmail.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/archaeologicalfantasies/support

Ancient History Hound
Fantasy Dinner Guests with Helen McVeigh

Ancient History Hound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 68:28


Ever play the "who would you invite to a dinner party" game? Well, here is the ancient history and myth version.  Joining me for the first episode is Helen McVeigh and we run through her 6 picks.  You can find episode notes at ancientblogger.com which will include anything we have mentioned in the show (including Helen's book recommendations). Please rate and review if you can. FYI we do mention sexual violence (as per Greek myth). Music by Brakhage (Le Vrai Instrumental).

Horror Queers
Chucky S01E05: 'Little Little Lies'

Horror Queers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 19:14


We're back with another minisode on Don Mancini's new series, Chucky (2021)! In our spoiler-filled discussion of the fifth episode, we discuss the return of Tiffany (Jennifer Tilly) and Nica (Fiona Dourif), Bree's (Lexa Doig) big secret and that kiss! Oh, and just an FYI: we recorded this minisode before we discovered that it was Fiona Dourif playing a young Chucky so don't hold that against us! Questions? Comments? Snark? Connect with the boys on Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, Letterboxd and/or Facebook, or join the Facebook Group to get in touch with other listeners> Trace: @tracedthurman> Joe: @bstolemyremoteBe sure to support the boys on Patreon! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Smartphones

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 23:54


We communicate constantly and conveniently, check our messages, consult our calendars, get directions when driving, find out the local forecast, make a reservation at a restaurant, peruse podcasts, plus plenty of other purposeful applications, and all in the palm of our hands. We'll set out to demystify these pocket-sized portals known as smartphones once and for all, on this week's episode of FYI! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Seeing Red A UK True Crime Podcast
S6 Ep19: Finn's Law

Seeing Red A UK True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 43:50


This week, Bethan tells us about a case that changed laws and made history... Finn's Law is named after Finn, a police dog who was stabbed whilst pursuing a suspect with his handler PC David Wardell. Finn sustained serious stab wounds to the chest and head, but only criminal damage charges could be brought against his attacker. Join us as we take a deep dive into the circumstances that brought about this positive change... FYI... We were also both quite sick when we recorded this (particularly Bethan) - we talk about the Royal Family being lizards and Bethan stumbles over her words multiple times (all kept in for your entertainment!). www.patreon.com/seeingredpodcast www.beer52.com/red Download Best Fiends for free from the App store or Google Play Theme music composed by Holly-Jane Shears - www.soundcloud.com/DeadDogInBlackBag

Thinking Outside The Long Box
TOTLB S106 Barbara Dunkelman

Thinking Outside The Long Box

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 11:33


We made a very fun return to what is now referred to as, Fan Expo Denver! We've been with this comic con in Denver, since it's inception, either just as fans, but mostly as press! What started as Denver Comic Con, then Denver Pop Culture Con, has now flourished in Fan Expo Denver! And we attended their "special edition" which occurred over Halloween weekend! While we were there, we were able to speak with actor, Barbara Dunkelman! Among some awesome accomplishments, Barbara is the Creative Director for the production company Rooster Teeth. Rooster Teeth is responsible for productions like Red vs Blue, Camp Camp, and RWBY. For today's interview with Barbara, we of course focused mostly on the anime, RWBY, in which she is the voice for Yang Xiao Long. RWBY is a very popular English anime, and so popular in fact, that it has been translated from English to Japanese!! "RWBY (pronounced "Ruby") is an American anime-influenced adult computer-animated web series created by Monty Oum for Rooster Teeth. It is set in the fictional world of Remnant, where young people train to become warriors (called "Huntsmen" and "Huntresses") to protect their world from monsters called Grimm." Just as an FYI, something funky was going on with our mic, but Barbara sounds perfect, so the episode does have a strange flow to it, but we couldn't pass up on the opportunity to release Barbara's thoughts on RWBY, Rooster Teeth, and her awesome career!  SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts | Android |  Spotify | Pandora | RSS Tell us what you think!Leave us a voicemail at 970-573-6148Send us feedback and/or MP3's to outsidethelongbox@gmail.comFollow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Youtube!Support the podcast on Patreon!Credit - Doyle Daniels, Juan Muro, Gabe Llanas, Tim Huskey

National Day Calendar
November 8, 2021 - National Cappuccino Day | National STEM/STEAM Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 3:30


Welcome to November 8, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate the technology that inspires us every day.  What we know as the cappuccino was first served in Vienna coffee houses in the early 1800s. The coffee, when mixed with cream and sugar, took on a shade of brown that reminded the baristas of a monk's robes. Specifically, the shade of brown worn by the Capuchin monks. Hence, the name cappuccino. FYI, the word cappuccino means hood in Italian, and the order of monks got the name because of their hooded robes. It wasn't until post-World War II, that cappuccinos became popular worldwide. And that was due to espresso machines becoming more readily available. On National Cappuccino Day, celebrate this morning ritual that makes things much more tolerable. Boy that's true. I feel more like a capuchin monkey than a monk before I get my coffee! Science and technology are critical to our future. Plus they are just plain cool! That's why STEM and STEAM education have become increasingly popular. For those of you who aren't familiar with the terms, STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. The A was added to incorporate Art for a more well rounded curriculum. Young children are curious by nature, so introducing them to science and technology early in life can make a huge difference in their development. Even if your child doesn't focus on a career in any of these fields, STEM and STEAM education can set them on a path towards success. On National STEM/STEAM Day, take time to inspire the little ones in your life, because they are the ones who will shape our future.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Einstein

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 25:13


Most mortals marvel at this master's magnificent meticulous mind. This enigmatic eccentric genius was extremely groundbreaking. His impressive inspiring ideas instilled a sense of imagination in us for generations to come. We will look into the life of the wide-eyed wonderer known as Albert Einstein on this week's episode of FYI! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Empty The Tank
The New Borough

Empty The Tank

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 66:11


After Evan tells me my 76yo grandmother needs to be more self sufficient we dive into the fact that Americans eat in large quantities while the rest of the world deals with quality of the food they eat. What do you think the pinnacle of American food is? We then move over into the ghettoness of having to tell your employer you need time of to send time with your kid. Little tangents such as an umpire wearing j's, a guy looking like Voldemort, and Siddeeq fixing his microphone we venture into the ranking of the boroughs. We take a dive into #5 on the list which is obviously Staten Island. Siddeeq tries to throw a few bright spots in there while Evan is thoroughly repulsed. We hope this ranking stirs y'all up because we'd love to pretend to listen to why you think Staten Island is anything but last on this list. Among other things, we discuss population size of different states compared to NYC. Just an FYI, the numbers are fucking absurd.Song: Gangsta'd Up by 50 Cent and G-Unit

Hand Me My Purse.
No. 35: Scottsdale owes me NOTHING + Happy Birthday to ME + Gratitude Check-In..

Hand Me My Purse.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 70:13


Hey Friends & Kin!FYI:  THIS, JUST LIKE ALL EPISODES OF HAND ME MY PURSE, CONTAINS PROFANITY. THIS PODCAST IS FOR ADULTS AND CONTAINS ADULT CONTENT. Now that we've gotten that out of the way..._________So, Friends & Kin, ya girl received a scholarship to attend her VERY FIRST podcast conference, SHE PODCASTS LIVE. A conference specifically for WOMEN PODCASTERS & the WOMEN who make them happen. I met so many awesome people! I learned a few things & got to see people that I LOVE while I was on the WEST COAST! THAT WAS THE MAJOR BONUS!!! SCOTTSDALE OWES ME NOTHING! What an amazingly beautiful trip filled w/ALL OF THE GOOD THINGS. Happy EARLY birthday to me! My birthday month blessed me w/all of the love.  September emotionally drained me, but October filled me right back up with a LOVE SUPREME... Scottsdale, AZ. THANK YOU FOR A GOOD TIME. Los Angeles, my second home - THANK YOU FOR AN AMAZING TIME. In this episode I also do a gratitude check-in with you.  Self-Gratitude in particular.   I announce that I will be starting a gratitude challenge this month for my friends & kin to close out 2021.  I am praying that you ALL will be joining me in this mindset shift to end 2021 as we prepare to bring in 2022 with INTENTION! Make sure you are following me on Instagram for details coming soon.I truly hope you enjoy this episode & thank you for rocking with Hand Me My Purse for the first year of her life. Yes, my podcast is a girl. The future is female & so is my podcast. Now please go leave a review, I love you for it!!! xoxox"GO WHERE YOU ARE LOVED. NOT WHERE YOU ARE TOLERATED..."MeMe's JAM No. 35Episode No. 7:  Gratitude in Practice + How It Can Change Your Life.The Village Auntie.The Dopest Henna ARTist on EARTH.THE STOOP PODCAST on IG._______ Listen. Subscribe. Rate. Review. :Apple Podcasts.Stitcher.Spotify.Google Podcasts.Pandora.I love you guys so much & I'm honored to share my time & energy with you – ESPECIALLY IF YOU KEEP COMING BACK! I can't wait until the next time we get to do this again! And as always, "Thank you for your support..."(said exactly like the 80s Bartles and Jaymes commercials)xoxo  MeMe *****************J O I N * T H E * S Q U A DInstagramFacebookTwitterHAND ME MY PURSE. SPOTIFY PLAYLIST*********************Music:  Gloomy Tunez

Chakras and Shotguns
E21: Do It For The Gram (Enneagram 101)

Chakras and Shotguns

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 73:59


Mik and Jenn finally get to the Enneagram! We've been teasing it for a while, well since the trailer, but this episode jumps into the 9 types of the Enneagram and how we all are interconnected. We nerd out a little bit with some history, talk about our own experiences with self-discovery and get all into some celebrity's business.Some things we talked about in this episode: We've launched our Patreon! We're so excited to build a community with you all and create special content! You can support the show here.We talked about a foundational book that we liked when learning more about the Enneagram, THE WISDOM OF THE ENNEAGRAM by Don Richard Riso and Russ Hudson*How to find your type? Our favorite (and free!) way? We recommend reading through the descriptions on The Enneagram Institute website until you feel like someone just told all of your business (and the description reads TF out of you).One of Jenn's favorite podcasts that she listened to when first getting to know the Enneagram was The Enneacast (Apple, Spotify).  FYI, it is put together through a Christian lens.We finished up with a friendly prepping reminder to start thinking through how you're getting you and yours through winter. Want to be prepared for a winter storm? Check out Episodes….Episode 3 - Thirst Trap (water preparedness) Episode 7 - Where We Bout to Eat At? (all about food storage)Episode 11 - It's Lit (electricity preparedness)Have you checked out our new website, chakrasandshotguns.com? We've got merch and a book list and you can even stream our episodes there!*Note: As Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying Amazon purchases.

Our Brains Hurt
Best of The Jasons!

Our Brains Hurt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 66:52


HAPPY HALLOWEEN! On this episode we have a special mash-up of the best moments from our first two episodes with The Jasons. This episode was supposed to be interviews from our 1 year anniversary Halloween party we had Friday night but I fucked up and the interviews were never recorded. So enjoy these funny moments with The Jasons. FYI, there are about 15 seconds of never before heard audio, see if you can find it. We also play 4 Jasons songs! Our Sponsor PunkBox:Punk Box Website:  https://punkboxrox.com/Punk Box Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/punkboxroxPunk Box Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/punkboxrox/Show links:Our Brains Hurt Website: https://www.ourbrainshurt.com/Our Brains Hurt on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OurBrainsHurtFollow Ron on Twitter @thecaffeinepunk: https://twitter.com/TheCaffeinePunkPunk Rock Joe: https://punkrockjoe.com

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Urban Legends

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 27:21


People repeatedly propagate, promote, perpetuate, and pass them down throughout pop culture. Even though there's no substantial proof, the population prefers to spread these popular parables.  We'll uncover unreal urban legends on this week's episode of FYI!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

4 Things with Amy Brown
The Importance of Probiotics with Gut Health Expert, Tina Anderson

4 Things with Amy Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 37:34


Amy takes a probiotic daily, so she was excited to sit down with CEO/co-founder of Just Thrive, Tina Anderson, to talk about her spore-based probiotic and why a good probiotic is important to overall health. Amy switched to Just Thrive's spore-based probiotic a few months ago and has been loving it...she also takes Gut 4-tify...but they have several other products to check out. FYI: if you go to JustThriveHealth.com and enter promo code AMY that will save you 15%.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Two Lit Mamas
Episode 35: Middle Grade Horror

Two Lit Mamas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 51:27


In this Halloween episode, the Mamas admit they share a brain (FYI, it's kept in a jar in a mad scientist's lab). How do they know they share a brain? Because they each picked a Middle Grade horror book from the same author without realizing it. Fortunately, they were creeped out in the best possible way by an author who's the hottest new horror ticket in Chi-town. Plus, sinister cats! Book Chat:Scritch Scratch by Lindsay CurrieWhat Lives in the Woods by Lindsay Currie Pick 6: More scary books for your MG devil babiesThe Thirteenth Cat by Mary Downing HahnRoot Magic by Eden RoyceThe Mothman's Curse by Christine HayesNightbooks by J.A. WhiteSmall Spaces by Katherine ArdenDead Voices by Katherine Arden(Bonus) Dark Waters by Katherine Ardenwww.twolitmamas.com

Top of the Round
Recap: Book 3 by Auburn

Top of the Round

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 8:05


A BRIEF RECAP OF BOOK 3 FYI, this is very brief. There is so much lore and so many details omitted, but it's a great place to jump in!   The Auburn takes it away on recalling recent events as everyone else was too preoccupied with various, love related, problems. If you want to start listening after this, start at episode 125.   JOIN US FOR THE BOOK 4 PREMIERE PARTY ON NOVEMBER 1ST AT 6 AM, 12 PM, AND 6PM PST   KENON PEARCE AS THE AUBURN ISHNAR/KALCRIN HOMEBREW SETTING by Kenon Pearce   Sound editing and design by Jordache and Nikki Richardson   Kenon Pearce @mr_fugufish Jordache Richardson @jdash24 Nikki Ri @nikkirivo   Website: totrpodcast.com Twitter: @totrcast Facebook: @topoftheround Instagram: @topoftheround Tiktok: @totrpodcast  THANK YOU HONORARY PRODUCERS! Chris Williams   Gail Yadon Beth/Dee20 Koebaebeefboo David Biggs Wanna talk to the cast? Check out our private Discord! https://discord.gg/qshNJJfKRr Or check out our channel on the CastJunkie Discord Server! https://discord.gg/napQ3Cb   Go to our website for MERCH! https://www.totrpodcast.com/merch-store.html#/   Find/Review us on Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/top-of-the-round-808056   Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/topoftheround Buy us a cup of coffee on Ko-fi: https://ko-fi.com/topoftheround   TOTR WIKIPEDIA! https://topoftheround.fandom.com/wiki/Top_of_the_Round_Wiki Medieval Adventure by DogisReal licensed through AudioJungle/Envato - Music Broadcast License and Standard License - https://audiojungle.net/licenses/terms/music_standard/2.0  https://audiojungle.net/licenses/terms/music_broadcast_ten_million

Unpacking the Power of Power Pack
Episode 93: The New Warriors: Overview #4

Unpacking the Power of Power Pack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 105:04


    With special guest star comic and video game writer and creator, David Gallaher (@DavidGallaher): The New Warriors v1 #68 - 71 Venom: The Hunted: #1-3 The New Warriors v2 #1 We did it! We made it to the end of our New Warriors coverage. And let me just say, it is not the content, it is the pure volume of books we were covering. I just do not think that we will be doing this again. And yet we have at least two more series that we could do just like this.....Oh dear. Well, we should get on with the real reason we are here. I mean, we pay for some named talent to show up, we should talk about him. (FYI, we did not pay for him to be on.) David Gallaher is an actual comic book writer, known for Darkstar and the Winter Guard, The Only Living Boy, Box 13, and Green Lantern Corps. He is also a huge fan of the New Warriors, which is good, because Rick and Jeff need all the help they can get. Now that we are at the end of this series, we have a sick number of Warriors. They may be down one smartship, but they have a powered up Nova, the correct Speedball, and a new time manipulator. Not too shabby for a team that started with attitude and an unlimited supply of money. We really only covered these books to get a sense of Alex on another team, and we really were not impressed. Alex was more of a tool that the Warriors used, but he never was a real character. He faded into the background and was more white paint than he usually is. Speaking of background, we should talk about some of the great details in the background of these books. They were pretty incredible, funny, and foreshadowy. Yes, I just made up a word because I was making a list and I needed a third thing. Don't you judge me. I spend time and effort doing this when I really do not need to. You will cry when I am gone. Ok, done with my rant for now. But you better behave, or I will start another one! Now, where was I? Probably pontificating on a life lost, a body destroyed, and the hopes of a sequel. Well, that about wraps it up for this experiment. I am not sure how we will tackle other large runs with one Power Pack character, but it will not be like this. But we will think of something.   You can visit our webpage to see the pictures we talked about: https://jeffandrickpresent.wordpress.com/2021/10/24/the-new-warriors-overview-4/ Don't forget to support us on Patreon, https://www.patreon.com/JeffandRickPresent.  We have started to release monthly episodes for our Energizer ad greater tiers. We are covering the alternate versions mini-series that started in 2005. You can also subscribe and listen to us on YouTube!  We also have some merchandise over at Redbubble. We have a couple of nifty shirts for sale. https://www.redbubble.com/people/jeffrickpresent/?asc=u Our show supports the Hero Initiative, Helping Comic Creators in Need.  http://www.heroinitiative.org/ Eighties Action by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3703-eighties-action License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Peppy Pepe by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4205-peppy-pepe License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Presentations (bonus audio)

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 36:29


Testing 123. Selling oneself is one of the simplest yet most misunderstood skills. Let's face it, stage fright surely sucks and can even be completely crippling. Needless to say, nobody wants to screw up in front of a crowd. We're going to learn to prepare powerful, impressive, thought-provoking presentations on this week's episode of FYI.We have a special guest on board to help us tackle this intimidating topic! Please follow, @anna2nsenglish Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Presentations

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 27:09


Testing 123. Selling oneself is one of the simplest yet most misunderstood skills. Let's face it, stage fright surely sucks and can even be completely crippling. Needless to say, nobody wants to screw up in front of a crowd. We're going to learn to prepare powerful, impressive, thought-provoking presentations on this week's episode of FYI.We have a special guest on board to help us tackle this intimidating topic! Please follow, @anna2nsenglish Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Curse Free GaryVee
Understanding The Digital Economy

Curse Free GaryVee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 32:54


Today's episode is an interview that I gave on the FYI podcast. In this interview, I share several hot takes on the future of advertising, social media, and the creator economy. I shine a light on how both executives and consumers have contributed to the recent shift in COVID-era marketing strategies, why Facebook holds the key to advertising to seniors, and how gaming could be the next wave in social. Finally, I also explain the impending “trillion-dollar warfare” and the advent of social commerce 3.0. Enjoy! Let me know what you thought. Tweet Me! @garyvee Text Me! 212-931-5731 My Newsletter: garyvee.com/newsletter Check out my new NFT project: veefriends.com Join the VeeFriends Discord: https://discord.gg/veefriends Checkout my new co-hosted podcast with DraftKing's founder--Matt Kalish on all things sports, business, and alternative investing: https://linktr.ee/propsanddropspod

Top of the Round
Recap: Book 2 by Talice

Top of the Round

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 25:59


A BRIEF RECAP OF BOOK 2 FYI, this is very brief. There is so much lore and so many details omitted, but it's a great place to jump in!   Talice recounts the events following the murder she was 100% solely responsible for, up to her escape from captivity for entirely unrelated crimes. If you want to start listening after this, start at episode 85.     NIKKI RICHARDSON AS TALICE ISHNAR/KALCRIN HOMEBREW SETTING by Kenon Pearce   Sound editing and design by Jordache and Nikki Richardson   Kenon Pearce @mr_fugufish Jordache Richardson @jdash24 Nikki Ri @nikkirivo   Website: totrpodcast.com Twitter: @totrcast Facebook: @topoftheround Instagram: @topoftheround Tiktok: @totrpodcast  THANK YOU HONORARY PRODUCERS! Chris Williams   Gail Yadon Beth/Dee20 Koebaebeefboo David Biggs Wanna talk to the cast? Check out our private Discord! https://discord.gg/qshNJJfKRr Or check out our channel on the CastJunkie Discord Server! https://discord.gg/napQ3Cb   Go to our website for MERCH! https://www.totrpodcast.com/merch-store.html#/   Find/Review us on Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/top-of-the-round-808056   Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/topoftheround Buy us a cup of coffee on Ko-fi: https://ko-fi.com/topoftheround   TOTR WIKIPEDIA! https://topoftheround.fandom.com/wiki/Top_of_the_Round_Wiki Medieval Adventure by DogisReal licensed through AudioJungle/Envato - Music Broadcast License and Standard License - https://audiojungle.net/licenses/terms/music_standard/2.0  https://audiojungle.net/licenses/terms/music_broadcast_ten_million  

Poddy Break with Tim Hawkins
124 - Circumstation Nation

Poddy Break with Tim Hawkins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 82:11


Back from popular demand, more epic vocal guitar from Livy you won't want to miss! Tim describes his perfect mansion in heaven and laments the danger of caring about everything. Luke tries to predict the future of transportation and shares that his secret scammer is not yet gone. Plus, a very exciting family announcement from Tim's oldest son, Spencer! Oh, and quick sand is fake, FYI.   A big thanks to our sponsors! Butcherbox: Now offering new members a 10–16 pound turkey FREE in their first box. Just go to ButcherBox.com/TIMHAWKINS to sign up. Shipstation: Listeners can use my offer code, HAWKINS, to get a 60-day free trial, just in time for the holidays! Just go to ShipStation.com, click on the microphone at the top, and enter in HAWKINS.    

Top of the Round
Recap: Book 1 by Chaz

Top of the Round

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 18:55


FYI, this is very brief. There is so much lore and so many details omitted, but it's a great place to jump in!   Chaz rambles his way through the first leg of our adventurer's journey. Warning: Details may not be exact or relevant. If you want to start listening after this, start at episode 42.     JORDACHE RICHARDSON AS CHAZ ISHNAR/KALCRIN HOMEBREW SETTING by Kenon Pearce   Performed by Nikki Richardson, Kenon Pearce, and Jordache Richardson   Sound editing and design by Jordache and Nikki Richardson   Kenon Pearce @mr_fugufish Jordache Richardson @jdash24 Nikki Ri @nikkirivo   Website: totrpodcast.com Twitter: @totrcast Facebook: @topoftheround Instagram: @topoftheround Tiktok: @totrpodcast  THANK YOU HONORARY PRODUCERS! Chris Williams   Gail Yadon Beth/Dee20 Koebaebeefboo David Biggs Wanna talk to the cast? Check out our private Discord! https://discord.gg/qshNJJfKRr Or check out our channel on the CastJunkie Discord Server! https://discord.gg/napQ3Cb   Go to our website for MERCH! https://www.totrpodcast.com/merch-store.html#/   Find/Review us on Podchaser: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/top-of-the-round-808056   Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/topoftheround Buy us a cup of coffee on Ko-fi: https://ko-fi.com/topoftheround   TOTR WIKIPEDIA! https://topoftheround.fandom.com/wiki/Top_of_the_Round_Wiki Medieval Adventure by DogisReal licensed through AudioJungle/Envato - Music Broadcast License and Standard License - https://audiojungle.net/licenses/terms/music_standard/2.0  https://audiojungle.net/licenses/terms/music_broadcast_ten_million

The Michael Scott Podcast Company - An Office Podcast

"Also, FYI, ah, I don't technically have a hearing problem, but sometimes when there's a lot of noises occurring uh at the same time, I'll hear 'em as one big jumble. Uh, again it's not that I can't hear, uh because that's false. I can. Um, I just can't distinguish between everything I'm hearing." No, you don't have a hearing problem, we're replaying the audio from our Nate discussion! But before we do, Alex and Edwin check in to talk about life, weddings, refrigerators and anything else going on in their lives. And then we well as go through some voicemails and emails from our incredible listeners where we talk about Office characters singing karaoke, underrated show moments, and a lot more.  Peace, love, and paper, MSPC Get your next delicious bowl of guilt-free cereal at MagicSpoon.com/scott and use the code SCOTT to save five dollars off. Right now, Michael Scott Podcast Company listeners can get 15% off their Raycon order at buyraycon.com/scott Get started right now with a seventy-five dollar sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at Indeed.com/scott Support our show and become a member of Scott's Tots on Patreon! For only $5/month, Tots get ad-free episodes plus exclusive access to our monthly Mailbag episodes where we casually pick through every single message/question/comment we receive. On top of that, a portion of all show proceeds are donated every month to organizations that help fund education opportunities for minority students. Help us accomplish the mission that Michael Scott could not. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The GaryVee Audio Experience
Understanding The Digital Economy

The GaryVee Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 32:54


Today's episode is an interview that I gave on the FYI podcast. In this interview, I share several hot takes on the future of advertising, social media, and the creator economy. I shine a light on how both executives and consumers have contributed to the recent shift in COVID-era marketing strategies, why Facebook holds the key to advertising to seniors, and how gaming could be the next wave in social. Finally, I also explain the impending “trillion-dollar warfare” and the advent of social commerce 3.0. Enjoy! Let me know what you thought. Tweet Me! @garyvee Text Me! 212-931-5731 My Newsletter: garyvee.com/newsletter Check out my new NFT project: veefriends.com Join the VeeFriends Discord: https://discord.gg/veefriends Checkout my new co-hosted podcast with DraftKing's founder--Matt Kalish on all things sports, business, and alternative investing: https://linktr.ee/propsanddropspod