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OTs Get Paid Podcast
S2 E25 What Makes You Different - And Why It Matters

OTs Get Paid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 23:33


What makes your OT business so unique and valuable that your clients stick like glue and refer their friends? FYI, this can't be your answer: “We provide individualized service and really care for our clients.” Womp Womp. I'm just telling you straight. All OTs are caring and individualized – that's not what makes you special. You need to dig deeper – because I am utterly certain there's something more that turns your clients into lifetime fans. This week's OTs Get Paid podcast gives you a framework and clear steps to clarify the ACTUAL unique value of your OT business. Listen now, and share the love with a friend! Podcast resources and links: www.trishwilliamsconsulting.ca/podcast-resources

Light After Trauma
Episode 86: What You Need in Order for Trauma Therapy to Work with Alyssa Scolari, LPC

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 27:26


Addressing your trauma in therapy can be one of the hardest, bravest things you'll ever do. But before you do so, there are important safety measures that need to be put in place in order for therapy to be effective. Trying to process trauma without having safety and security in other areas of your life can lead to re-traumatization and an overall negative treatment experience. Tune into this week's episode to learn about what you may need to make therapy as helpful as possible.   **Every donation to Patreon for the month of March will go to Doctors Without Borders to help support those injured in Ukraine. Alyssa will personally match your donation. See the podcast Patreon and learn more about Doctors Without Borders below!** Patreon Learn more about Doctors Without Borders Check out the Light After Trauma website for transcripts, other episodes, Alyssa's guest appearances, and more at: www.lightaftertrauma.com Want to get more great content and interact with the show? Check us out on Instagram: @lightaftertrauma   Transcript   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hey everybody. Welcome back to another episode of The Light After Trauma Podcast. And if you're new here, well just welcome in general. So happy to have you, happy to be here. We've got a little bit of a shorter episode coming at you today. It's been kind of a wild week for me, so please forgive me. I have had so many appointments, just like doctor's appointments after doctor's appointments and it's all good stuff, I'm doing well, things are fine. But it has just been a lot and I've been a little overwhelmed. So I actually originally wanted to talk about something else today, but I've been getting a lot of questions from you all about really the process of starting the trauma work, meaning like working through your trauma, trying to get yourself into recovery from your trauma. And this is a really important thing to talk about. Alyssa Scolari [01:22]: And I had a lot of questions this week in my private practice and through the podcast of just like, how do I even begin to start this? And I think that's a really important question. And I don't think that it's really talked about a whole lot. I think some people think, well, you just sign up for therapy and you go and you start talking about it, but doing that can actually be dangerous. There are certain safety measures that have to be put in place for the trauma therapy to work, the trauma recovery to be effective. So that is what we were talking about today. Alyssa Scolari [02:03]: So just a few housekeeping things before we get into it. Number one, I just want to remind everybody that for the month of March, we are donating to Doctors Without Borders to help the people in Ukraine right now. So you can read more about Doctors Without Borders in the show notes. And what we're doing for this month is if you become a Patreon member, which you can sign up to be a Patreon member, again go right to the show notes, whatever you decide to donate for the month of March is going to go directly to doctors without borders and to take it even one step further, I am going to personally match your donation. Alyssa Scolari [02:46]: So I really think this is a great way to raise some money, to be able to send over and help Ukraine, because I don't know about you all, but I have been feeling so helpless and I am just kind of looking for ways to help. So again, head right to the show notes. We are donating the month of March, whoever signs up on our Patreon, whatever you decide to donate for March is going to go to doctors without borders. And then I am also going to personally match your donation. So thank you ahead of time for that up. Alyssa Scolari [03:19]: And then lastly, I wanted to thank everybody. We've got another review on the podcast. Well, a few other reviews across different platforms. I know there was one that was up on Spotify and there was another one on Apple Podcasts and I'm really excited. These reviews help so much. They help move the podcast up in the rankings. And when your podcast moves up in the rankings, it then becomes more available to people. People are more likely to see it pop up on recommendations for them if they happen to be Googling something or searching for something. And the goal is really to give people the chance to have free access to some type of mental health education and support. So your reviews go such a long way in supporting this podcast even more than the Patreon. Although the Patreon is so helpful too, because this podcast does cost quite a bit of money. There's a lot of funds that go into it. Alyssa Scolari [04:20]: So the Patreon is so helpful as well. And I just appreciate all of the support from all of you. So if you are able to sign up to become a patron, that's fantastic. And if not, no worries. If you're able to leave a review, that is also amazing. And also remember that if you haven't given us a follow on Instagram yet, please go follow us. The Instagram handle is Light After Trauma. And I also should mention that if you do decide to become a Patreon member, you can also request specific episode topics. So if there's something that I haven't talked about yet, that you would really like me to discuss, if you're a Patreon member, you absolutely can message me through Patreon and you can request specific topics. So I think that covers it for the housekeeping things. Alyssa Scolari [05:13]: So without further ado, let's get into it. So as I was saying before, in order to do the trauma work, if you are considering starting therapy, or maybe you have tried to do the trauma work before, and it just hasn't worked out, it has been too painful or too overwhelming for you, or maybe that's not the case. Maybe you're like, no, I can't even think about starting the trauma work and I wouldn't even know where to begin. I think that this is going to be really helpful for you. It was really helpful for me and it continues to be helpful for me as I understand really what I need in my life to be able to process certain events, or memories, or specific traumas. So you need a certain level of safety. And when I say safety, I'm talking about really two main types of things. Alyssa Scolari [06:13]: You need emotional safety, but you also need physical safety. And I'm going to talk a little bit more about each of those. So let's start with physical safety. I learned, and I'm sure anybody who has ever studied any kind of psychology, has learned about something called Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. And one thing at the top of this pyramid, basically what Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is, and don't quote me on this directly because it's been a little bit of time since undergrad. But basically it is this hierarchy of needs, it's this pyramid of things that you need in your life in order to have a sense of safety and in order to reach a sense of happiness and contentment in your life. Alyssa Scolari [07:03]: And one of the first things is physical safety and a sense of security. And I'm talking like you're very, very basic stuff. So like all the way at the bottom of Maslow's pyramid is like, you're psychological needs. We're talking food, we are talking water, we are talking shelter, things like that. We need those things in order to do anything in life. Alyssa Scolari [07:33]: If you are struggling with what you are going to eat, if you don't have enough money to pay for food, if you can't pay your bills, if you have credit card debt, if you are about to be kicked out, if you're about to be evicted from your home, you can't do the trauma work safely when your physical needs aren't being met. And so many people, millions of people around this world can't do the trauma work because that is the type of environment that they are living in. They are living paycheck to paycheck, if that, they are barely able to make ends meet, every single minute is a struggle or a stressor of thinking, what am I going to do next? What are we going to eat tonight? How am I going to feed, I don't know myself, my kids? And it's how am I going to pay for the doctors? Things like that. Alyssa Scolari [08:36]: I can't go to the doctors because I don't have insurance because I can't afford insurance. I can't go get my cavity taken care of. So I am in constant pain all of the time, because I can't afford a dentist. It's really bad in the United States when it comes to healthcare. Really bad. I know like in Germany, Germany and other countries, it's a lot easier to have affordable healthcare. In the United States, it is nearly impossible unless you have a job where you are given good insurance. And even then, it can be expensive depending on your deductibles and things like that. But when people are struggling just to live, just to breathe and feed themselves, when people don't have access to clean water, they can't do the trauma work. When people can't get to a doctor, but are experiencing excruciating pain, they can't do the trauma work. Not because there's anything wrong with them. God, no, that's not it at all, but because it's not safe. Alyssa Scolari [09:57]: And why is it not safe? Well, because trauma work takes so much of you and it requires you to live in your body, to work towards living in your body when the trauma that we've experienced causes us to want to disassociate and leave our bodies. It's really, really hard to just live in a body and to revisit all of our past memories and to try to integrate them with who we are now, when we don't really have a ton of protective factors. It's not like we can say, well, I was really traumatized back then, but right now, I'm safe because you're not. If you're somebody who's struggling and living paycheck to paycheck, that's not a sense of safety and security. Alyssa Scolari [10:55]: So you're already in a state where you are being traumatized by your situation in the present, or what's happening to you is re-traumatizing you from things you dealt with in the past. So if you're already in a state of not feeling safe to then go back and rehash all those memories and to ask you to be present and not dissociate would be a complete override of your system. It would just be so ... It wouldn't be right. It wouldn't be fair for anybody to ask you to do that, but it also just wouldn't be safe for people to do that. Alyssa Scolari [11:36]: I also see this a lot in people who repress their trauma and who don't ... They really don't remember their trauma. They don't remember what happened to them. I am one of those people for those of you who are new and don't really know my story. I am somebody who has repressed my trauma. I did not know anything for years. If you had asked me 10 years ago, if I thought that I had trauma, I would've been like, absolutely not. I don't really even know what that is. Are you out of your mind? And then what happened is I got married and this event happened and it was a horrible event. And I don't think I've talked about it on the podcast. And I will talk about it one day soon. I've just honestly still been processing the fallout from it myself. So I will talk about it soon, but this horrible event happened that started to trigger all of these memories in me. Alyssa Scolari [12:36]: And it wasn't just that event that caused me to remember. It wasn't just that horrible event. But I also had established a sense of safety. Before I had gotten married, I was so, so stressed out. I was in grad school. I was making such little money. I was in a job that was extremely dangerous. I was not well taken care of by my supervisors at all. They did not care. They were asking me to go into people's homes, to deal people who were very dangerous. They were asking me to go in completely alone. I was working all the time and I also was really, really sick physically. I was very sick physically. I had absolutely no space to do the trauma work. Alyssa Scolari [13:32]: And really my whole life, I was so sick with my eating disorder. Plus I also had been around people who were extremely unsafe for me. So I was not going to be able to remember what happened to me. I wasn't going to be able to process my trauma. If you are a child and you are living with a household member who is abusive, it's going to be really hard for you to acknowledge that that person is abusive because you still have to live with them. So it's not like you can go to a therapist and say, "Hey, I think I'm being abused." I mean, listen, you can. There people who do, I certainly have had plenty of children in my office who have said, "I think I'm being abused." Alyssa Scolari [14:23]: But sometimes our brains repress, our brains push things down and don't let us even know or acknowledge that we are being abused because it wouldn't be safe for us. In order to really do the trauma work, it's really important for you to be in an environment in which you are not having to stress about your physical needs, meaning you're not having to worry about somebody abusing you, you're not having to worry about how you're going to get your next meal, or you're not worried about the quality of your water, things like that. Not worried about being kicked out of your home. Those are things that are essential. Alyssa Scolari [15:07]: So here's the other thing that's needed, and that's emotional safety. And that can be kind of tricky because this isn't to say that all of your emotional problems need to go away before you do the trauma work. That would be absolutely ridiculous. But what this really means is that it's very hard to do deep trauma work if you are battling with an addiction that is hindering your ability to function in life. It's very hard to do the trauma work if you are struggling with an eating disorder. If you are malnourished, or if you are binge eating, or purging to the point where it's consuming your life, you're not going to have space to do the trauma work. If you are self-harming, it's going to be really hard to do the trauma work because ... In a sense of safety, but it's more of an emotional sense of safety. Alyssa Scolari [16:09]: It will be really hard to keep yourself safe if you are harming yourself or you are sick with an eating disorder. We can't expect that you're then going to walk into a therapist's office while you're sick with, let's say, an eating disorder and then start talking about your deepest traumatic memories. Or start processing all the emotions that have come up through your childhood trauma. It just wouldn't be safe because so many of our addictions and our self-harm strategies, including eating disorders are designed to sort of keep that trauma suppressed. So what tends to happen if we are trying to work through trauma before getting any kind of grip on self-harm, suicidality, eating disorders, addiction is that we talk about our trauma and then that causes our self-harm or our eating disorders to increase. And we tend to turn to these things even more because don't have the proper tools that we need to learn what to do with the feelings that come up when we're doing the trauma work. Alyssa Scolari [17:21]: So again, it's not realistic to expect that if you're struggling with an eating disorder, or if you struggle with self-harm, it's not realistic to expect that you are never going to have urges to self-harm. No, there were plenty of times that I had urges to self-harm and times where I even did self-harm throughout my trauma recovery. But I do know that there was a time in my therapy process where I was pushed very inappropriately so to dive into memories that I should not have been diving into because A, you really don't need to rehash the details of your trauma in order to heal. And that's a topic for another episode. But B, I was not safe enough. I was self-harming a lot. And I was essentially persuaded or coerced into going through the intimate details of many of my traumatic memories during this time. And it landed me in the hospital ultimately. Alyssa Scolari [18:44]: It was horrible and I became worse and worse and worse. And I realize now how damaging that was for me, because I didn't have the tools to be able to take good care of myself. What I needed was help on the self-harm first. And once I got help with that, and once I stopped doing that, I was able to then go back and work through a lot of my old trauma in a much safer setting. Again, that is not to say that the urges to self-harm didn't come up. Same thing with my eating disorder. I really needed to take care of my eating disorder, which I did. I, first was in treatment for an eating disorder before I knew anything about trauma. So I was taking care of that and I continued to take care of that even once I knew I had trauma. Alyssa Scolari [19:43]: That way, while I was working through the trauma, I didn't dive right back into my eating disorder to the point where I got so sick that it nearly killed me. Of course there were times where I would have a really rough day at therapy and I would binge, and it was a learning experience. But it wasn't something that was happening all the time. And my symptoms continued to improve instead of worsen. Let's say that you get your eating disorder under control or the self-harm under control, and you start the trauma therapy process. And then all of a sudden, you find yourself right back into your eating disorder in the same severity as before, or maybe even worse. That might be a sign that you might not be ready to address this part of your recovery, or maybe this specific memory, or maybe you just need a little bit more work in terms of your eating disorder. Alyssa Scolari [20:46]: I can't say for sure, obviously. I'm not you. But I am just trying to give examples of the different ways in which safety, both physical and emotional, can be really important in this role. I make sure to ask all of my clients about their safety habits. I make sure before we do any kind of trauma processing that I know that they have a sense of safety, both physical and emotional. I would never, in a million years ask somebody who has come to me, who has been self-harming to relive traumatic memories. It would be a horrible thing to do, and it was done to me, and it is a horrible, horrible feeling. Alyssa Scolari [21:38]: So I hope that this is helpful because a lot of you really have asked me a lot about this. And I also just want to say that when it comes to treatment, one size doesn't fit all. Some people can do both. Some people certainly can. I think it's rarer, but I'm a never say never kind of woman. So I do think that perhaps it can be done, but I also think that I have talked with so many people who have tried to do the trauma work, but then have said things like it was just too bad and I almost lost my life. And I tried to commit suicide or complete suicide, I should say. Just as a little FYI and the reason I'm not taking this out in editing is because I think that language is really important when we talk about suicide. And when we use the word commit, it makes it sound like people did something horrible, like they committed a crime. But when we say complete suicide, I think it takes a lot of the stigma away from it. So that's why I corrected myself there. Alyssa Scolari [22:47]: So anyway, I've had people say, "I tried to complete suicide when I started to go through the trauma work." And I think one of the first questions that I always ask people when they tell me that is like, well, tell me about your environment. Tell me about your sense of safety. Are you doing okay? Are you well fed? Are you well nourished? Are you living in a safe home? Do you have good shelter? Do you have people in your life who you can talk to? Who can support you? Who are safe people that you can trust? Do you have some sort of financial stability? Are you struggling with an eating disorder, with self-harm, with addiction? Because these are all things that need to be worked on in order for the safety to be there in trauma work. Alyssa Scolari [23:40]: And sometimes this is why people go up to inpatient. People feel like they can't keep themselves safe and they go up to inpatient and they help get themselves stabilized. And then they come back out to outpatient and then they do the trauma work. Again, not a one size fits all, but I do think it's really important to know that there are huge steps to try to take before you do the trauma work, and it can potentially be unsafe to just dive right in. With that being said, I want you all to dive in. This is what we do here. These are the things we talk about. So take those steps, do what you have to do. Not to say that everything is in your control. Financial stability is really hard to come by in this country right now. And the prices just keep rising and rising and rising. And my heart is shattered for all of us. Alyssa Scolari [24:41]: So it is not the easiest thing to do and it is not always in our control. And I do want to acknowledge that. But these ultimately are the important things to be able to start doing some sort of trauma work. And at the end of the day, if you're hearing this and you're feeling like something resonates with you and you're like, oh, maybe I'm not quite ready. If you have a therapist, please talk to your therapist about it because your therapist is going to know way better than I do. I'm not your therapist. I'm a therapist. I've got a good bit of knowledge on this subject, but ultimately nobody knows you better than you. And if you have a great therapist and you've been with your therapist for a while, there's a good chance that you're a therapist is going to know too. Alyssa Scolari [25:29]: So don't be afraid to start asking questions about this kind of stuff and make sure that you're keeping it in the back of your mind, because this work is really hard. It's some of the hardest work that you'll ever do. It's, of course, the most rewarding work that you'll ever do, but safety is so important. So with that being said, I hope that this has helped you today. I like this. I think it's a really interesting topic to talk about. And I know a lot of you have been asking about it. So I hope that this is helpful and I wish everybody a fantastic week. I am over here on the East Coast in the United States. And we got slammed with snow today, which was a little ridiculous in my opinion. But hey, it is what it is. So I hope that you all are enjoying warmer weather than what I'm having. And I am holding you all in the light. Talk to you next week. Alyssa Scolari [26:28]: Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are at lightaftertrauma and on Twitter, it is at lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you and we appreciate your support. [singing]

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 1644:05


This is Toby Sumpter with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Tuesday, March 23, 2021. And we're back… Today you will hear a bunch about Gov. Kristi Noem's partial veto of the South Dakota legislature's tranny bill. Calls continue for Gov. Cuomo to step down, and a father is in jail in Canada for using the wrong pronouns.  School year's end is in sight. Homeschoolers are evaluating; private school students know finals are coming. Math and science can be the toughest subjects for students and their parents. Instead of running to resources that disagree with your faith at every turn, how about hiring a reformed, Bible-believing, Creationist who can supplement both your child's science and math needs as well as their faith? Mr. Klunick Tutoring assists parents in their God-given responsibility to educate their children according to His word in every area of their lives by delivering science teaching built on the Bible. Visit mrklunicktutoring.com. And if you or your business would like to advertise with CrossPolitic, send inquiries to Ads@FightLaughFeast.com  Gov. Noem Partially Veto's a Bill She Said She Looked Forward to Signing https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/544241-kristi-noem-rejects-signing-transgender-sports-bill South Dakota's GOP governor declined on Friday to sign a bill from legislators in her own party that would have banned transgender girls from participating in women's high school and college sports. In a statement released on Twitter, Noem said that she was sending the bill back to lawmakers for changes, and indicated that she thought the ban should not be extended to college athletes. "Unfortunately, as I have studied this legislation and conferred with legal experts over the past several days, I have become concerned that this bill's vague and overly broad language could have significant unintended consequences," Noem wrote. "I am also concerned that the approach House Bill 1217 takes is unrealistic in the context of collegiate athletics," she added, writing that banning transgender athletes from collegiate sports would cause conflict with national college athletic associations (NCAA). Michael Ferris, CEO of Alliance Defending Freedom, Chairman of the HomeSchool Legal Defense Association, and Chancellor Emeritus of Patrick Henry College was among the first conservatives to call “Foul!”  On Facebook, Ferris wrote:  “Kristi Noem, the REPUBLICAN Governor of South Dakota, has just vetoed portions of the Save Women's Sports bill in her state.  Girls sports are saved for high school. But because of her veto men can now play women's sports in college. And she took out the enforcement clause for high school sports. It is clear that she bowed to the pressure from Amazon (which is supposed to be building a new facility in South Dakota) and the NCAA.  She was considered a shining star in the GOP with a bright future. No more.  We don't need leaders who lack the courage to stand up to the corporate bullies who want to turn our country into an amoral wasteland filled with compliant consumers.  Republican leaders count on people like us to help elect them. With leaders like this it makes the need for a new political alignment all the more acute.  South Dakota deserves better. All of America deserves better. ADDITION IN RESPONSE TO QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS: Gov. Noem's criticisms of the bill can be broken down into 3 basic points.  1. She didn't want the bill to apply to college athletics.  2. She didn't want high school girls whose rights were violated to have the right to sue.  3. She had some technical amendments about drug testing etc.  Keep in mind that after the Senate passed the bill, she tweeted that she looked forward to signing the legislation.  The normal way a friendly Governor works with the legislature on a bill is to raise concerns before the bill passes. Then the legislators can make changes if agreed. She said nothing until the bill was passed and again, she had previously promised to sign it when all these things were already in the bill.  She could have easily cured any technical problems in this fashion.  But the plain fact is she threw college athletics under the bus. And she robbed the rule protecting high school girls of any real power by taking away the right to sue.  I have worked on legislation for over 40 years. These are not the actions of a Governor who wants a robust bill to pass. She broke her promise.” That was Friday, March 19th. On Saturday, Ferris wrote on Facebook again: “More on Governor Noem's Partial Veto of the Save Women's Sports Bill Yesterday, I criticized Governor Noem's decision to not protect women's college athletes from biological males who decide to compete as females.  The Governor has tried to create the implication that the NCAA forced the state's hand. (see the photo of her tweet.)  The only way this could be true is if the NCAA required member institutions to admit transgender athletes on female teams.  The second photo is of the NCAA website. This makes it absolutely clear that the rule PERMITS universities to include transgendered athletes under certain conditions BUT IT NEVER REQUIRES ANY SCHOOL OR COACH TO DO SO.  Governor Noem was under no obligation from the NCAA to issue her veto.  This is abundantly obvious because many religious colleges are also members of the NCAA. And there is no way that it is seeking to force such religious schools to include transgender athletes on their teams.  Governor Noem was not forced to make this decision. She made it because she wanted to.  Her excuses ring hollow. There is no 50 state policy—except this: every school and state gets to decide for itself.  She originally promised to sign this bill. She changed her mind after intense pressure from business interests.  All of us are going to have to choose. Will we let corporate interests dictate the moral and social policy of this country? I say NO.” Then on Monday, Noem came out swinging with a press conference defending her decision, along with a DefendTitleIXNow.com coalition announcement. Heavy weight Former NFL Star Herschel Walker was among others on hand to defend Gov. Noem and her Defend Title IX Now coaltion.  https://www.facebook.com/govnoem/videos/302511984551411 0:50-2:00 – put simply  3:40-4:16 – feel good or do good? 5:31-7:14 Suing NCAA & Defend Title IX Now.com Rally Plug Have you registered for the Fight Laugh Feast Rally in Rapid City, South Dakota, April 29, 30, May 1? Gov. Kristi Noem was the only Governor in the Union not to overstep her authority. We want to support her and we want to encourage you wherever you are. Many churches are not meeting, many Christians feel alone. But you're not alone. So the theme of the Rally in South Dakota is Love God, Sing Psalms, Defy Tyrants. Come hear talks from Pastor Doug Wilson, Ben Merkle, Steve Deace, Sheriff Daryl Wheeler from Bonner County, Idaho, myself – and hot off the presses, Pastor Joe Boot will be smuggled out of the Canadian tundra and will also be speaking at the Rally. Gather with likeminded Christians who love freedom, confess Jesus Christ is Lord over all, and be equipped to stand firm in these insane days. Go to FLFNetwork.com/Rally and register today. Remember if you're a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member, you get a $100 off your registration.  Remember: If you have a news story you think we might need to cover, please send articles and links to news at crosspolitic dot com. And DEFT WIRE dot com. Calls Continue for Gov. Cuomo To Step Down Play 1:15-1:22 – that was New York Senator Chuck Schumer and Mayor Deblasio piled on with his own doubts:  1:41-1:48 Amid the reports that Gov. Cuomo intentionally suppressed COVID numbers in New York, after sending many infected elderly individuals to nursing homes, Gov. Cuomo has now been under attack with multiple accusations of inappropriate comments and touching among female staff and aids. Then on Friday, audio surfaced from a phone conversation three years ago, in which he threatened leaders of the progressive Working Families Party, who told him they were only very reluctantly endorsing him for governor, as only being better than the Republican alternative. To which Cuomo apparently replied: Play: 2:28-2:35 Canadian Father Arrested for Using Male Pronouns for His Son https://nypost.com/2021/03/18/man-arrested-for-discussing-childs-gender-in-court-order-violation/?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_medium=SocialFlow&utm_source=NYPTwitter From our News Inbox, several of you A Canadian man was arrested this week after violating a court order that banned him from speaking publicly about his son's gender transition. The man — whose identity is reportedly under a publication ban by a British Columbia Court of Appeals to protect his child — was found in contempt of court and arrested Tuesday for calling the teen his daughter and publicly referring to him with the pronouns “she” and “her,” according to The Post Millennial.  The teenager was born as a female and reportedly identifies as transgender and prefers the use of male pronouns. The father reportedly began litigation against the teen's mother after learning of the transition, and the matter was settled by the province's highest court earlier this year, according to Global News. The parents are separated. The high court ordered the dad to not stand in the way of the 15-year-old's hormone therapy and to try and better understand gender dysphoria, the outlet reported. He was also told to stop speaking to the media about the case and warned that his public attempts to undermine his child's wishes was a form of family violence, according to the article. His daughter has identified as male since the age of 11, and changed her name at age 12 before pursuing hormone therapy with the support of his mother, a psychologist and an endocrinologist, according to Canadian law firm Torkin Manes. “[The father's] refusal to respect [the boy's] decisions regarding his gender identity is troublesome,” Chief Justice Robert Bauman and Justice Barbara Fisher wrote in the January decision, according to Global News. The father's rejection of his son's identity has caused the boy “significant pain” that has “resulted in a rupture of what both parties refer to as an otherwise loving parent-child relationship,” justices reportedly wrote. This rupture is not in [the boy's] best interests,” the decision said, according to the outlet. “He clearly wants and needs acceptance and support from his father.” The father confirmed his legal woes on an online fundraising campaign soliciting donations. “The far left issued an arrest warrant on Thursday, March 04! I will be turning myself in on March 16!,” the man posted in a Go Get Funding page where he has raised more than $22,000 Canadian amid his legal fight. “I am fighting the far left based on a civil disobedience defense! I am now back in court for a five day criminal trial that will last at least five days . . . From April 12-16. That trial that could land me in jail for up to five years for speaking truth about state sponsored child abuse. FYI . . . I am blocked from sharing any videos at this time that oppose the sterilization of children!,” the caption continued. The dad, and his arrest, have been lauded by some ideologues who say gender is not a biological or social construct. “They've created a delusion, and they're forcing parents to live in this delusion,” the father previously said, according to The Post Millennial.  Psalm Sing in San Diego Stone Mountain Media and The Response Church will be hosting another Psalm Sing on 03/27/21 – this Saturday -- at 3pm at the Balboa Park fountain near the amphitheater in San Diego. Psalm of the Day: Psalm 148 https://www.christkirk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/18-Psalm-148-From-Heavn-O-Praise.mp3 Play Audio Praise the Lord, sun, moon, and stars. Praise the Lord, fire and hail and snow and wind. Praise the Lord, you kings and rulers and judges. Let everything and everyone praise the Lord. And do not think that this is just some pious, pie-in-the-sky wish. We know that it is a prayer that God is in the process of answering. What is the problem with this world? Fundamentally that it refuses to praise it's Maker. So when we call on the whole world to praise the Lord, we calling on the whole world to get right with its Maker. And since we know that Jesus rose from the dead to accomplish that – we know that it is only a matter of time.  This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. You can find this and all of our shows at CrossPolitic.com or on our app, which you can download at your favorite app store, just search “Fight Laugh Feast”. Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. Remember to sign up for the Fight Laugh Feast Rally. Go to FLFNetwork.com/Rally Have a great day.

Cookware Doctor
Episode 17: Cooking in Copper with Tomatoes and Acids

Cookware Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 10:56


If you wonder if copper cookware (especially tin-lined) can hold up to acidic foods, tomatoes, or, heck, even be good for baking lasagna, here's a discussion on how and why you'd be using copper cookware, safety, and care in the face of these meals. Join host and coppersmith Sara Dahmen for some foodie tips, cooking hacks, and FYI's when it comes to copper. To submit your own questions, visit https://www.housecopper.com/podcast

Sober Cast: An (unofficial) Alcoholics Anonymous Podcast AA
Joe and Charlie Big Book Workshop in one file - (12 hours) a 2013 version

Sober Cast: An (unofficial) Alcoholics Anonymous Podcast AA

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 733:15


The Joe and Charlie Big Book workshops have been popular for many years and it was one of our first posts.  I went looking for the latest version I could find and came across this one from 2013, it has great audio quality and I have combined all the files into one 12 hour workshop. FYI... this is a 220 meg file. There is a worksheet thats been around a long time that goes with this workshop and you can grab it from our google docs, if you want to check it out is here: https://tinyurl.com/joecharliew A little background on the workshops: In 1977, some AA members met in a Tulsa, Oklahoma hotel room for a discussion on The Big Book. One member asked Joe and Charlie to come to his home group to present a program on The Big Book. A taping of that presentation was made and called "The Big Book Study". Through the circulation of these audio tapes throughout the Fellowship, Joe and Charlie received invitations to present the Study at AA conventions, roundups and special events. At the AA International Convention in New Orleans in 1980, Wesley P, organized a lunch for 1,500 AA members from all over the world and gave away 100 Joe & Charlie tape sets as door prizes. Invitations exploded, and within a couple of years Joe & Charlie were presenting about 36 seminars a year worldwide. These seminars struck a deep chord within the AA members. Email: sobercast@gmail.com Support Sober Cast: https://sobercast.com/donate We have added a page of meetings that have moved online https://sobercast.com/online-meetings Sober Cast has 1800+ episodes available, visit SoberCast.com to access all the episodes where you can easily find topics or specific speakers using tags or search.

Weekly Manga Recap
Land Lock

Weekly Manga Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 147:15


They are not actually landlocked, FYI.   2:52 - Land Lock 35:11 - My Hero Academia 344 41:50 - Undead Unluck 100 47:30 - Edens Zero 181 55:45 - Akane-banashi 3 66:45 - Doron Dororon 12 79:28 - Earthchild 2 87:53 - PPPPPP 22 96:51 - Dr. Stone 231 112:56 - Mashle: Magic and Muscles 98 117:19 - The Elusive Samurai 52 126:49 - One Piece 1041 137:51 - Favorite Series and MVP 142:57 - Next Recommendation

The Chase Life Podcast
Negative Body Image: Why it has nothing to do with changing your body.

The Chase Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 50:40


Negative body image affects so many people to varying degrees. At one end we have people who feel a little self-conscious and don't like how they look around their cycle. At the other end we have the people with extreme feelings and dislike of their bodies – feelings that affect all aspects of their lives from their confidence, to their career, their relationships and even their ability to get dressed in the dark. The body positive movement will just tell you to love yourself, while others will say, “oh you'll always have to manage it because it'll always be lurking in the background” ….but where does that leave the rest of us? Episode 59 flips the script on its head and explains why resolving body confidence issues has nothing to do with changing your body and what really lies at the heart of the matter. Rachel and David delve into what gives rise to negative body image in the first place, whether it's bad or wrong to want to improve your aesthetics, the key emotional factors that must be in place if you are chasing a body transformation, and why the belief of “I've always been this way and I'll always struggle with this” is absolutely and categorically untrue. Whether you're a female chasing a body transformation, a mother with young daughters, or just a regular person who struggles low with self-confidence and a negative body image, Episode 59 is a must listen. Here's the link to Dee's video where she talks about her breakthrough in overcoming body confidence issues (FYI for our US listeners, “pants” means underwear to us Brits): https://vimeo.com/338627280/ab0ffcc71b If you have any questions for the podcast please send them to: Podcast@ChaseLifeConsulting.com If you're ready to take decisive action to resolve your struggles with binge / emotional eating, stress, overwhelm, or low self esteem, you can book in for a call at: https://calendly.com/chaselifeconsulting/chaselifeintensivecall To find out more about who we are and what we do go to: www.ChaseLifeConsulting.com

Actors 2020 Podcast
Episode 255: MUKESH MODI - Award-Winning Film Director “The Elevator”

Actors 2020 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 20:00


Season 7: In Episode 255 JOHNNY KEATTH imdb.me/JohnnyKeatth interviews MUKESH MODI the director of the film starring Eric Roberts "The Elevator:.  https://theelevatorfilm.com/ Please start Liking, Sharing, Embedding, Subscribing, Following OR Downloading where ever your listening to this free International Top Ten Podcast in #PerformingArts. Love you all. Thanks for your support. Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnykeatth/  Sign up for my blog http://bit.ly/Actors2020podcastSubscribe If you're buying or selling Real Estate in Los Angeles, start here: TeamRiley.com We are also a Nationwide Real Estate Agent referral FREE SERVICE and FYI www.JohnnyKeatth.com

HONEYPIE Talks
#56: Cowo bisa jadi korban mental abuse ceweknya?

HONEYPIE Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 39:48


Biasanya di luaran sana kan kita denger banyak cewe yang jadi korban kekerasan dari pria. Mau mental apapun fisik gitu kan? FYI, ada cowo juga yang bisa jadi korban.

the Millennial Throwback Machine
Episode 168 Part 2: Glen Campbell

the Millennial Throwback Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 50:36


This week's episode is a VERY detailed part two on Glen Campbell as I dive into his history and talk about some of the VERY interesting things that happened during his VERY Long career as both a singer/recording artist and as a session guitar player. I also talk a little bit about the history behind the songwriter that wrote this song and what inspired to write this particular song plus three of his other REALLY big hits. here's the link to last week's song just in case you wanted to listen to it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7y1hrOpVGKEPLEASE do also check out the official Premium subscription version of this podcast. would absolutely LOVE it if you could subscribe cause you would be helping me SO MUCH by doing this. I have TWO interviews up on the Premium feed up now will have two more coming up VERY soon. so PLEASE go subscribe, and just an FYI, this will be the new home for ALL upcoming and new interviews of my podcast. here's where you can do that:https://themillennialthrowbackmachine.supercast.comPLEASE do also follow me & reach out to me on Instagram as well. this is one way you can keep up with me and get in touch with me as well:https://www.instagram.com/iheartoldies/You can also follow me & reach out to me on Tik Tok as well:https://www.tiktok.com/@iheartoldiesdon't forget you can also tip & donate to me right here if you would like too:https://account.venmo.com/u/Sam-Williams-31you can also check out more of my original music right here:https://www.samwilliamsmusic.netPlease do also check out the EP I put out last year as well. I'm recording the next one right now, but for now, you can enjoy this one. if you liked this EP and you would LOVE to let me know what you thought of it, PLEASE email me at samltwilli@icloud.com, or you can also reach out to me on Instagram @iheartoldies: https://distrokid.com/hyperfollow/samlwilliams/turquoise-apricotwould also LOVE it if you could check out the two interviews I did last year. these were GREAT conversations I had with these two publications. hope to do more interviews with more publications in the future. for now, you can enjoy these ones that I did last year: https://honkmagazine.com/sam-l-williams-talks-about-his-career-path-influence-and-new-music/https://shoutoutla.com/meet-sam-l-williams-musician-songwriter-podcast-host/would also LOVE it if you could check out the official Spotify and Youtube playlists for this podcast. here you'll be able to find all of the songs I have talked about so far including some of the ones I have done in past interviews, but the songs talked about in the premium subscription interview episodes of my podcast aren't included yet, still debating as to whether or not I should add those songs to the playlist. if listening to these playlists gives you ANY good ideas as to which songs I should talk about next on my podcast that I haven't yet, PLEASE email those ideas to me at samltwilli@icloud.com, you can also reach out to me on Instagram @iheartoldies: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/21f3uBS6kU4hUF6QAC5JMjhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CS1sYR7xky8&list=PL66sgq_GAmRcXy8yKZJfVmAD14HUYj7Nfdon't forget to also CHECK out the official Music video I put out last year for Keep Her In My Back Pocket. I'm gonna shoot another music video in a few weeks, for now you can enjoy this one. if you liked this music video and you would like to let me know whatcha think of it, PLEASE email me at samltwilli@icloud.com, or you can also reach out to me on Instagram @iheartoldies:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTbmSoW6RyYdon't forget to also check out the Official Redbubble Merch store for this podcast. here you'll be able to find these super cool merch items that have my very own custom logo for this podcast. if you liked my logo and you would like to let me know whatcha think of it, or you would like to purchase something, PLEASE do that, and do let me know when you do that. you can do that by emailing me at samltwilli@icloud.com, you can also reach out to me on Instagram @iheartoldies:https://www.redbubble.com/people/60ssam95/works/36806158-keep-things-groovy?asc=u&ref=recent-ownerif you found out some REALLY cool facts about this week's artist and song and you never knew ANYTHING about this artist and song and your a millennial, PLEASE email me at samltwilli@icloud.com, you can also reach out to me on Instagram @iheartoldies:

Boy Problems Podcast
69. Euphoria's Portrayal of Addiction

Boy Problems Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 66:12


Like millions of people around the world, Jay and Shannon have been watching season 2 of “Euphoria”, an HBO series that follows a group of high school students through their experiences of identity, trauma, friendship, love, and sex. The main character, Rue (played by Zendaya), struggles with addiction, and Shannon and Jay are discussing this on the podcast today. The conversation was recorded before the season finale and covers: - their thoughts on the way addiction is portrayed in the show - the feelings and triggers each experienced while watching - examples of personal experiences that are similar to certain scenes FYI: you do not have to watch Euphoria to follow along with the conversation. Additionally, addiction is just 1 of several storylines, so this episode won't spoil the show for you if you plan to watch sometime. Extra: Head to our Patreon page for a post-season finale convo, that includes thoughts on D.A.R.E.'s criticism of the show and Zendaya's statement. Patreon.com/recoveringtoo Topics also discussed: Relationships Drug Use Recovery Shame Follow us at: Instagram: @recoveringtoo Facebook: @recoveringtoo Support Us: www.patreon.com/recoveringtoo Additional Resources: Co-Dependents Anonymous: http://coda.org/ Al-Anon: https://al-anon.org/ Nar-Anon: https://www.nar-anon.org/ National Helpline: https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline Treatment Locator: https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/boyproblemspodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/boyproblemspodcast/support

The Gut Goddess Show with Kezia Hall
Ep 191: Why….can't I shift body fat?

The Gut Goddess Show with Kezia Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 47:21


WHY CAN'T YOU SEEM TO SHIFT YOUR BODY FAT…EVEN IF YOU HAVE TRIED ALL THE THINGS? Why is ‘eating less and exercising more' a waste of time for most people? What is really going on? Well in the 3rd part of my ‘Why' series we are looking at why your body might find it REALLY hard to let go of body fat. Why- no matter how hard you try or how little you eat - you can't get over that plateau. Or why you have gained weight ‘for no reason. (FYI- there is nearly always a reason) This is something I've worked with clients on a lot in the past year so in this week's podcast, I am sharing with you the 10+ REAL reasons you are not at the body fat percentage that feels really healthy and good for you. I share with you what could be going on in your biology, what is really happening and what you can do to really nourish, heal and love your body to its healthy body weight (whatever that means/is for you) Click above to stream and listen now. Want to see BIG results in your energy, belly, skin and hormones? Then chances are you need some personalised support (hint – that is what I do!). Click here to find out more and to book your call with me. Resources Mentioned Find out more about working with me here – and book your call. Find out more on how to deal with constipation – here and here Find out about the BIGGEST mistake people make in supporting their digestion here Looking for free-from recipes? Then check out all my yummy recipe here Head to kezihall.com/blog to stream from there or subscribe to the Gut Goddess Show on iTunes and then it will delivered to your device every single week.

Project Sapient Podcast (Law Enforcement & Military Discussions)
TIL VALHALA owner Korey Shaffer & Ayman On scene at OP Airborne for Vets in FL

Project Sapient Podcast (Law Enforcement & Military Discussions)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 55:55


Special episode y'all.  Ayman went down and executed operation AIRBORNE for Vets with an incredible group of dudes - and in the process had Korey Shaffer do an episode with him.  Pete didn't go - he's still crying (whatever dude).  Just an FYI some audio may seem like its in a warehouse - cuz they were- at the badass operation Korey has going on.   LISTEN UP & ENJOY!  Check out our website: ProjectSapient.org   Email us: ProjectSapient2020@gmail.com #StaySafe #StaySapient #ENOUGH   Thanks to our thousands of listeners worldwide and check out our awesome (and NEW) supporters and sponsors  links below!    DCD Automotive which is Boch Group, NUCAR Group out of MA and Delaware.    Till Valhalla Project www.AAAPoliceSupply.com www.HavokJournal.com and  Our partners at Profiles in HAVOK Second mission  www.LiveBoston617.org  www.ODkit.com www.EagleEyeFirearmsMA.com GunTrack.app fitcops.com  22 Mohawks Joint Operation Don't forget to follow us on FB / IG  and TIK TOK (Police Podcast)    

Hand Me My Purse.
No. 40: First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage + Surviving Divorce As Black Women + Cousins Chopping It Up.

Hand Me My Purse.

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 115:59


Hey Friends & Kin!FYI:  THIS, JUST LIKE ALL EPISODES OF HAND ME MY PURSE, CONTAINS PROFANITY. THIS PODCAST IS FOR ADULTS AND CONTAINS ADULT CONTENT. Now that we've gotten that out of the way..._________I just want to acknowledge that TWO YEARS AGO on March 1st, I RELEASED THE TRAILER FOR MY PODCAST, HAND ME MY PURSE. Today's episode is pretty damn special. My baby is about to officially turn two. On April 1st of 2020 I LAUNCHED this show, officially. So this is like a soft birthday leading up to Hand Me My Purse's OFFICIAL BIRTHAVERSARY. I am feeling like a proud Mama. Thank you to everybody who has supported the show by listening, sharing it with your people, posting it on social media, leaving a review or rating the show, sending a kind word of encouragement or simply cheering me on. Y'all have no idea how much of an impact you have made on ME and on this show - this includes the listeners. Your support is the fuel that keeps this engine running. Sometimes when I am having a bad day or I get to feeling burnt out, I read reviews or a text/DM from someone about the show and it literally brightens my entire day. I am so grateful, and so humbled by your support and encouragement. You are a blessing to me. Hand Me My Purse is exactly what it is and will grow to become something FAR BEYOND MY WILDEST DREAMS, because of your simple and intentional acts of kindness. I pray God blesses each and every one of you immensely. I appreciate you and I love you so much for your support. This is a whole conversation with my cousins - about marriage, divorce and the real life situations/circumstances surrounding marriages that end in divorce. It was a real situation!!! My cousins and I discuss marriage from a realistic point of view and spill the tea around divorce, marriage and dating post the end of marriage vows. "GO WHERE YOU ARE LOVED. NOT WHERE YOU ARE TOLERATED..."MeMe's JAM No. 40FIND A THERAPIST._______ Listen. Subscribe. Rate. Review.Apple Podcasts.Stitcher.Spotify.Google Podcasts.Pandora.I love you guys so much & I'm honored to share my time & energy with you – ESPECIALLY IF YOU KEEP COMING BACK! I can't wait until the next time we get to do this again!And as always, "Thank you for your support..."(said exactly like the 80s Bartles and Jaymes commercials)xoxo  MeMe *****************J O I N * T H E * S Q U A DInstagramFacebookTwitterHAND ME MY PURSE. SPOTIFY PLAYLIST*********************Music:  Gloomy Tunez

On Brand with Nick Westergaard
Brand Naming Best Practices with Rob Meyerson

On Brand with Nick Westergaard

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 34:36


Rob Meyerson is a brand naming expert and author of the new book Brand Naming. And, as I said many times during the episode, “we don't talk about brand naming enough!” Luckily Rob does and did so for us this week. If you've had anything to do with naming, you need to listen to this episode (and check out Rob's book).  About Rob Meyerson Rob Meyerson is a namer, brand consultant, and principal and founder of Heirloom, an independent brand strategy and identity firm. Prior to founding Heirloom, Rob's previous roles included head of brand architecture and naming at HP, director of verbal identity at Interbrand in San Francisco, and director of strategy at FutureBrand in Southeast Asia. His past clients range from the Fortune 500 to Silicon Valley startups, from San Francisco to Shanghai, including brands such as Adobe, AT&T, GE, John Deere, Disney, Guitar Hero, Intel, Meta (Facebook), Microsoft, Walmart, and Yahoo. An experienced namer, Rob has created names for companies (Corelight), nonprofits (Swing Left), products (Sierra Wireless Octave), and services. Rob has written about brand strategy and brand naming for leading publications such as Entrepreneur, TechCrunch, Insider, The Guardian, VentureBeat, and Branding Strategy Insider.   Episode Highlights No respect, I tell ‘ya. No, we didn't start the show by doing Rodney Dangerfield impersonations but Rob did note the difference between the attention that logo design gets vs. brand naming. “There's a disparity in the amount of respect naming gets. People think ‘that's just a word, anyone can do that.'” How should you start the brand naming process? Like all creative work, it starts with a brief. “You need something that documents what you want the name to be, who your competition is, etc.” Brand naming best practices. After talking about the different types of names (from descriptive to abstract to compound words), Rob discussed other process best practices. His book features chapters on the important steps of trademark, linguistics, and domain checks. Brand naming quick hits … I asked Rob for a favorite brand naming example and an example of a not-so-great name. Rob really likes the Swiffer brand name. “It's a coined word that feels like a real word.” What brand name is Rob not a fan of? He pointed us to Tribune Online Content's failed TRONC brand. Beyond being a not-so-great brand name (“it sounds gross”) but they also “mishandled the launch.” What brand has made Rob smile recently? Rob is a big fan of the sparkling CBD beverage Recess. Why? “You can tell they have a lot of love for design and the name speaks to taking a break.” To learn more, go to BrandNamingBook.com (FYI - we talked about adding descriptors like this to URLs) and check out Rob's personal website. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Explaining to Austin
Ep 44 - Manifesto-ing

Explaining to Austin

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 73:33


After a years worth of bits and joking about it, Peyton actually writes a letter to Ted Kaczynski, because screw it, she's probably already on lists anyways. But first she explains 'ole Ted's strange libertarian, naturalist ideas as written in his works "Industrial Society and Its Future" and "Anti-Technology Revolution." A special welcome the FBI agents now monitoring this show. FYI: it's usually just poop jokes. Follow @E2APodcast on twitter: https://twitter.com/E2APodcast

AGAPE Podcast
Embracing New with Katherine Knapp

AGAPE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 41:33


Whether it's something NEW God is trying to lead us into in our personal lives OR the NEW that Jesus introduced to the world.. embracing it seems VERY important! If we don't do so in our personal lives we can grow stagnant, feel stuck, become frustrated.. even miss out on the future God has for us.. the future we don't even know yet exists.. and if we don't embrace (as well as fully learn about and comprehend) the NEW that Jesus introduced to the world, we end up with a convoluted mix that is detrimental to our faith and the message of the Gospel we live out and proclaim!" Ps, FYI, a tiny bit of the audio at the beginning was not recorded. Pastor Katherine shared about how she was with a team in Japan doing relief work right after a massive earthquake/tsunami hit back in 2011 when they experienced another (smaller) earthquake and people had gotten the news out on social media before the local news could even do so themselves.

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Cooking

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 30:30


What's cooking, good lookin'? Welcome to my kitchen. We are going to cook up a storm as we find out about the flavorful world of cooking. Sharpen your carving knives, because we are going to whip up a mouthwatering meal in a jiffy on this week's episode of FYI!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Wealth and Wellbeing
Money and Marriage: Financial Advice For Couples / Ep 256

Wealth and Wellbeing

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 9:57


Quickfire finance question of the day: "My husband and I are time-poor, and though I was fully across my own finances before we got together five years ago, we've since fallen into a pattern of him managing all the finances, and I feel I don't know what's going on. He is completely supportive of me being as involved as I like. What do you think is a responsible and efficient way of assigning financial roles within a relationship, balancing duplication of time and work against the value of both partners being across the partnership's financial processes and status? FYI we have fully combined our finances." Source: https://maryholm.com/nz-herald-19-february-2022/ ►BOOK A CONSULTATION WITH RYAN HERE: https://calendly.com/ryanjmelton/free-consultation RESOURCES & LINKS: ____________________________________________ ►Register to learn from leading experts in KiwiSaver, budgeting, investing and real estate: https://moneyskills.co.nz/ ►Subscribe to the NZ Guide To Financial Freedom Podcast: https://link.chtbl.com/2qrW8KRB ►Subscribe to the Accounting For The Podcast: https://link.chtbl.com/1zwvrt6i ►Get a free copy of my book 'The Dirty Secrets Of The Financial Elite' & Subscribe to my Newsletter: https://govt.us3.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=030f8337ffda9c52e663e6d74&id=73c3b2ede0 ____________________________________________ FIND ME: ►Book A Consultation With Ryan: https://calendly.com/ryanjmelton/free-consultation ► If you want to learn how to fund your income in retirement check out our company OnePlan For Retirement @ https://oneplan.co.nz/ ►Find me on Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@ryanjmelton ►On Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryanjackmelton/ ►On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ryanjmelton/

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief
February 23, 2022 | Daily News Brief | Shooting Follow Up. Land Use Navigator. Mask Mandate Lifted Statewide. Air Canada.

Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 61:30


Give us about ten minutes a day and we will give you all the local news, local sports, local weather, and local events you can handle.   SPONSORS: Many thanks to our sponsors... Solar Energy Services because solar should be in your future! The Kristi Neidhardt Team. If you are looking to buy or sell your home, give Kristi a call at 888-860-7369! And Rehab 2 Perform Today... A bit of a follow-up from the Annapolis Police on the recent shooting that sent two children to trauma centers. A new tool to track, apply, and pay for permits in the County. The State Board of Education agreed to lift the school mask mandate statewide. Air Canada is back. And we can always use some more local businesses to spotlight! Give me some leads! FYI, the audio from the press conference is tagged on at the end of today's DNB--give it a listen if you have the time--it's about 47 minutes! Back with her weekly Annapolis After Dark is BeeprBuzz. She'll keep you up to speed on all of the fantastic live music we have in the area! And as usual, George from DCMDVA Weather is here with your local weather forecast! Please download their APP so you can keep on top of the local weather scene! The Eye On Annapolis Daily News Brief is produced every Monday through Friday at 6:00 am and available wherever you get your podcasts and also on our social media platforms--All Annapolis and Eye On Annapolis (FB) and @eyeonannapolis (TW) NOTE: For hearing impaired subscribers, a full transcript is available on Eye On Annapolis  

BikePortland Podcast
Shop Talk: Joel and Barb Grover of Splendid Cycles

BikePortland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 56:09


This week we've got another installment in our Shop Talk series and I'm excited to welcome Splendid Cycles co-owners Barb and Joel Grover. This duo has been working in the local bike scene since the 1980s and came up through the ranks as employees of Bike Gallery, which was one of the largest bicycle retail chains in the country. Joel was a product analyst and buyer for many years at Bike Gallery and when cargo bikes first came on the scene in the U.S. in the mid to late aughts, he and Barb had a feeling they weren't reaching their potential being sold in traditional bike shops. So they decided to take a big risk: They left Bike Gallery in 2009 to create a shop that would sell only cargo bikes — and despite being laughed at by some of their peers, Splendid Cycles opened one year later. In 2014, four years after they opened, their business was so strong they moved from their tiny storefront on lower SE Belmont to a larger location in an industrial building in the central eastside right next to the SE 4th Avenue entrance of the Springwater Corridor path. That's where we recorded this episode (and just FYI you might notice from the audio that we did so with our masks on). Before we sat down for the interview, Barb and Joel gave me a tour of the shop and we talked about a few of the bikes they sell. We also went out front where Barb explained to me why they installed a fresh water spigot that's free and open for anyone to use 24/7. In our interview, you'll get to know a bit more about Barb and Joel, and you'll understand why they're so deeply appreciated in our community. You'll also learn how being located next to the Springwater has impacted their business, how the e-bike market has changed in the past decade, how they define the "cargo bike lifestyle", what type of people are investing it, why they only sell high-end bikes, what keeps them inspired to come into work every day, and much more. Links from this episode: https://www.splendidcycles.com/ (Splendid Cycles website) https://bikeportland.org/2022/02/07/oregon-legislator-will-propose-e-bike-purchase-incentive-bill-next-session-348197 (Oregon legislator will propose e-bike purchase incentive bill next session) (BikePortland, 02/07/22) http://www.badgerbikes.biz/about-badgerbikes.html (Badger Bikes) (wooden cargo box maker) https://blaqpaks.com/cargo (Blaq Packs) (cargo bike canopy maker) https://www.r-m.de/en-us/bikes/ (Riese & Müller) https://www.ternbicycles.com/us (Tern Bicycles) https://www.larryvsharry.com/ (Larry vs Harry) This episode was recorded on February 14th inside Splendid Cycles on SE 4th and Ivon in Portland. This podcast is a production of Pedaltown Media Inc., and is made possible by listeners like you. If you're not a subscriber yet, please become one today at http://bikeportland.org/support (bikeportland.org/support). You can listen to more episodes and find out how to subscribe at http://bikeportland.org/podcast (bikeportland.org/podcast). Our theme music is by https://www.kevinhartnell.com/ (Kevin Hartnell).

Pleasure Revolution
EP. 301 - "SEX + DEATH + WOMB CONSCIOUSNESS"

Pleasure Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 21:12


We are back with a new SEASON!!! This season is called, "The Seed", an exploration of Womb Consciousness and the Divine Feminine. So excited to be launching this very special season on Two's-day 2/22/22!!! How are sex and death connected to Womb Consciousness and what is it? I explain through my own journey into womb healing how sex and death have become teachers and guides into the portal of Womb Consciousness. You'll also be led through a letter writing prompt to your womb space (FYI, all beings, regardless of gender identity are connected to womb energy. If you have a body, you're indelibly connected. If you feel inspired to share your reflections/letters with me, send me an email at info@theonethread.com or DM me on IG @one_thread_rituals May You Savor Your Body's Expression of Joy! Start - 12m07s - Sex + Death + Womb Consciousness 13m - End - Letter to you womb writing prompt/mediation ---------------------------------------------------------------------- All music + rituals + words by Ianne Celeste Rivera Copyright © 2022 One Thread. All Rights Reserved. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pleasurerevolution/support

Actors 2020 Podcast
Episode 254: Cindy Le - Actress - VO - Model - Stunt performer

Actors 2020 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 15:00


Season 7: In Episode 254 JOHNNY KEATTH imdb.me/JohnnyKeatth interviews   CINDY LE https://www.instagram.com/ms_cindyle/ Please start Liking, Sharing, Embedding, Subscribing, Following OR Downloading where ever your listening to this free International Top Ten Podcast in #PerformingArts. Love you all. Thanks for your support. Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnykeatth/  Sign up for my blog http://bit.ly/Actors2020podcastSubscribe If you're buying or selling Real Estate in Los Angeles, start here: TeamRiley.com We are also a Nationwide Real Estate Agent referral FREE SERVICE and FYI www.JohnnyKeatth.com

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST
192. VELOFIX The Hottest Franchise in Ottawa | ADAM KOURAKUS

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 46:39


In this episode you will learn about. How serial entrepreneur Adam Kourakus, went from working for Velofix to owning the Ottawa Franchise. For such a young guy, he has done an amazing job at growing his business. FYI now is the time to get your bike all tuned up before the Spring, on the trainer or not, he'll roll up to your house and take care of it.

Critical Nonsense
160! Minding Your Business and Trash Candy

Critical Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 49:19


Where is the line between the honor of minding your own business and the honor of speaking up? And why do we buy things we know are trash? [28:49]This week, Joey, Aaron and Jess talk about bowling within your bumpers, preference vs. morality, misplaced concern, the persistence of old candy, utility vs. nostalgia, and fidget spinners. They don't talk about why black licorice is actually insanely good if you don't have a ridiculous bias against it and/or are Dutch (or from a former Dutch colony).referencesEven if you don't speak Spanish, have a look at this graph!Maybe don't drink the milk, though.Revisit our wild rollerskating prognostication from Critical Nonsense 156!Ryan Ken on minding your own businessShowtime's YellowjacketsAlso, a look back at thick conversations from Critical Nonsense 121!Podcast: You're Wrong About: The Chicks vs. The Iraq War"Say It (Don't Spray It)"The Männkitchen Pepper Cannon: The greatest (but certainly not cheapest) pepper grinder of all time.Ancient(ly disgusting) necco wafers and the dusty, industrial hell from whence they comeThe Lindy EffectUm, FYI, professional fingerboarding is a thing.Tellicherry: the ultimate peppercornLegend Adam Neely breaks down the most elegant key change in all of pop music.More magic music theory nerdery from Mr. Neely: Olivia Rodrigo vs. Paramour.The cone of transcendentally delicious black licorice ice cream that Les and his obviously superior taste receptors will absolutely fight Joey over.

Two Bi Guys
Infinite Love & the Sacred Whore with Dr. Herukhuti

Two Bi Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 66:22


Follow Dr. Herukhuti on Twitter: https://twitter.com/drherukhutiFollow Dr. Herukhuti on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr_herukhuti/Buy "Recognize: The Voices of Bisexual Men": https://www.amazon.com/Recognize-Editors-Robyn-Sharif-Williams/dp/0965388174Bodeme in Harlem: An African Diasporic Autoethnography: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233134389_Bodeme_in_Harlem_An_African_Diasporic_AutoethnographyCenter for Culture, Sexuality and Spirituality: https://sacredsexualities.org/ Two Bi Guys is now sponsored by Zencastr! You can get 30% off Zencastr for 3 months with promo code: twobiguys -- or just click this link: https://zencastr.com/pricing?coupon=twobiguys&fpr=ex42o. Start recording your own podcast or meetings today! Two Bi Guys is produced and edited by Rob CohenCreated by Rob Cohen and Alex BoydLogo art by Kaitlin WeinmanMusic by Ross MintzerWe are supported by The Gotham This week I had the privilege of speaking with another bi-con, H. Sharif Williams, also known as Dr. Herukhuti -- he is an artist, sexologist, social entrepreneur, educator, and activist whose work operates at the intersection of race, culture, sexuality and spirituality. (FYI: there was an audio issue when he begins speaking, but we fixed it after a couple minutes!)We chatted about the book he edited with Robyn Ochs, "Recognize: The Voices of Bisexual Men"; his "bodeme" identity and how & when he chooses to use labels like "bisexual"; intersectionality and marginalization within minority communities; how love is commodified under capitalism and how he recognized himself as polyamorous as a result; the holiness of sex and what it means to be a "sacred whore"; American cheese as a metaphor for being racialized as "white" in America; Dr. Herukhuti's artwork and mission behind it; his documentary "No Homo No Hetero"; and much more.

Magic Rays of Light
Hi Kids, What's for Dinner?

Magic Rays of Light

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 45:01


Presented by ScreenTimes.net Screen Times Apple TV Release Calendar Screen Times: Apple Originals Award Season Guide ScreenTimes.net - Tweet Screen Times Sigmund Judge - Severance ScreenTimes Review James Lees - Cooking with Servant: Block Party French Toast Severance Servant Sigmund Judge - Tweet Sigmund Judge Up Next | Jeen-Yuhs | Netflix Devon Dundee - Tweet Devon Dundee Up Next | Dollface | Hulu

Short and Spooky
Ep. 147 - You'll Wake the Dead

Short and Spooky

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 80:49


Okay, alright, we're doing a Fox Family Ghost Stories episode. Yeah, that's right, it's gonna be weird. But that's nothing new for Short and Spooky (The podcast about anthology shows) This week we watched an episode called "You'll wake the dead" about a trust fund kid who kills the old lady downstairs so he can open a dance club that plays shitty 90's alternative rock. Also Tom's very wasted during the record FYI... Enjoy! Please Rate, Review, Subscribe, and Tell your friends! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shortandspooky/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shortandspooky/support

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Business English

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 29:39


One needs to know the bare bones of business in order to get by. In the end, everything is a business transaction of sorts; from renting a car to romantic relationships. We'll break down the brass tacks of business English with my buddy Kyle Millar on this week's episode of FYI!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

FYI: The Murphy Brown Podcast
2.22: But First a Word From Our Sponsor

FYI: The Murphy Brown Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 60:25


Jesi and Lauren go into a very timely topic as the FYI gang deal with a boycott of one of Murphy's news stories regarding sex education for teens. Jesi takes on the history of boycotts (on both sides of the fence) while Lauren talks about the history of condoms commercials on television. And more on The Marvelettes!

HerbRally | Herbalism | Plant Medicine | Botany | Wildcrafting
LIMITED TIME ONLY | Vitalist Herbalism Practitioner Program ENROLLMENT IS OPEN!

HerbRally | Herbalism | Plant Medicine | Botany | Wildcrafting

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 2:13


Have you had a chance to check out some of the lessons from Sajah Popham's free vitalist herbalism mini-course this past week?  Those are still available until February 24th, but I wanted to let you know how you can take your learning even further (much, much further). The School of Evolutionary Herbalism just opened up enrollment for their  Vitalist Herbalism Practitioner Program.  Here are some of the topics covered in the curriculum Herbal & nutritional therapies for common ailments Holistic assessment tools, such as pulse & tongue diagnostics Materia Medica through the organ systems Anatomy & physiology Ayurvedic doshas & constitutional assessment How to build your herbal practice & create a business while serving your community  How to use the natal as a diagnostic tool through Medical Astrology and a lot more!  There are hours upon hours of in-depth video lessons, taught by Sajah.  LEARN MORE AND REGISTER That link is an affiliate link, FYI, which just means that HerbRally will receive a commission if you end up registering for the course.  That said, you won't pay anything extra, you'll just be supporting our small family herbal biz, so thank you!  If you do end up purchasing the course through our affiliate link, we're going to give you a FREE FULL YEAR of our new membership site, HerbRally Schoolhouse.  That's a $120 value, for free, just for registering for the course through our affiliate link! Also FYI, enrollment for this program only opens up once a year, so if you're ready to take your herbalism skills to a whole new level, now's the time! Last chance to sign up is February 24, 2022.  REGISTER HERE + LEARN MORE Mason and Amanda

The Addiction Connection
Episode 88 - Marijuana and COVID

The Addiction Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 21:23


This episode addresses the most recent media attention and “data” on how marijuana/cannabis can ‘prevent' and/or ‘treat' COVID. Where did this media hype originate and what did the studies actually show? (FYI don't bank on this to prevent or treat COVID!) To learn more about the doctors as well as keep up with current happenings follow us on twitter: @echocsct or email us with questions or feedback: theaddictionconnectionpodcast@gmail.com

Hand Me My Purse.
No. 39: Valentine's Day is for YOU + Sex & Expectations + Unintentional Emotional Manipulation

Hand Me My Purse.

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 133:29


Hey Friends & Kin!FYI:  THIS, JUST LIKE ALL EPISODES OF HAND ME MY PURSE, CONTAINS PROFANITY. THIS PODCAST IS FOR ADULTS AND CONTAINS ADULT CONTENT. Now that we've gotten that out of the way..._________Happy Black History Month - AGAIN!!! It's the shortest month of the year & also the year that America and some countries around the world choose to celebrate the history of Black people on this planet - particularly in the United States. It's also Valentine's Day time. It has come and gone, but it's hot on our lips and in our brains, podcasts live FOREVAAAAA!This episode is another fun time with Kandis!!! Remember Kandis from episodes No. 12 and No. 28 - we tend to have an amazingly HILARIOUS time when we are together. So trust me - LISTEN. There were a lot of truth bombs and a-ha moments, as we discussed everything about dating and Valentine's Day - from love, sex buddies, expectations for gifts, BDSM, SELF-LOVE and even UNINTENTIONAL EMOTIONAL MANIPULATION. Not to mention the ACCOUNTABILITY WE NEED TO TAKE IN HOW PEOPLE TREAT US. We talked about so many things that it would be a disservice to yourself and your momma and your future partner to not listen. We even got sidetracked a few times and talked about BBL's, Game of Thrones, Submission vs. Surrender and SO MUCH MORE.I truly hope you enjoy this episode & thank you for rocking with Hand Me My Purse for the first year of her life. Yes, my podcast is a girl. The future is female & so is my podcast. Now please go leave a review, I love you for it!"GO WHERE YOU ARE LOVED. NOT WHERE YOU ARE TOLERATED..."MeMe's JAM No. 39The Book of Tiny Prayers.FIND A THERAPIST._______ Listen. Subscribe. Rate. Review.Apple Podcasts.Stitcher.Spotify.Google Podcasts.Pandora.I love you guys so much & I'm honored to share my time & energy with you – ESPECIALLY IF YOU KEEP COMING BACK! I can't wait until the next time we get to do this again!And as always, "Thank you for your support..."(said exactly like the 80s Bartles and Jaymes commercials)xoxo  MeMe *****************J O I N * T H E * S Q U A DInstagramFacebookTwitterHAND ME MY PURSE. SPOTIFY PLAYLIST*********************Music:  Gloomy Tunez

I Survived Theatre School
Carolyn Hoerdemann

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 84:11


Intro: Boz's brain hurts, Ozark, the ordinariness of crime, drug running in Tijuana, Molly, Jerry Harris and Season 2 of Cheer, unpleasant surprisesLet Me Run This By You: I didn't do anything wrong.Interview: We talk to Carolyn Hoerdemann about Steppenwolf's From The Page to The Stage, John C. Reilly, tenacity, hyper-empaths, Oscar Wilde's fairy tales, Tarrell Alvin McCraney, feminist theatre, Pump Boys and Dinettes, Faith Wilding, Rob Chambers' Bagdad Cafe, Ominous Clam, Zak Orth, Good Person of Szechwan, European Repertory's production of Agamemnon, Danny Mastrogiorgio, Michael Moore's Roger & Me, Chicago Shakespeare Theater, the anti-memoir memoir, and Ann Dowd.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (8s):And Jen Bosworth from me this and I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? I have a place to go to do with, it's not my one bedroom with my dog and my husband, but it's still a lot of work, like an and so, and then on top of that, I mean, I just feel like literally, you know what, I texted you yesterday and you said you knew the feeling like my brain is hurting me, but not in a bad way.1 (50s):I don't have a headache. Like I don't, I just was, you know, telling our couple surface, like, I feel like I can literally hear my brain turning and growing and groaning and like working. I've never had that feeling before in my life, which is weird. But like that, that feeling of, oh, I'm doing or knowing that what it was, what it was like, I'm doing a lot of work, you know, like my brain is doing so ridiculous, but that's how I feel, but it's all like, it, it doesn't feel, you know, what it is. I'm used to doing a lot of physical work.1 (1m 32s):Like I'm used to my body doing a lot of work. Like whether it's, you know, like the jobs I've had, like even the jobs that I, when I was a therapist account, you know, a counselor at social services, like I spent a lot of my time, like moving cases of diet Coke and cause we were in like a halfway house. So like I did a lot of manual labor and lot and case management and case management management is a lot of manual labor, like taking clients to appointments. And like, so when using my brain now in this different way, like literally I wished I would have been a camera on me when I was redoing my resume and cover letter specifically for the ad industry, because it is like making something out of nothing and also using words to like basically, you know, trick people, not trick people, but you know, get them to think what you want them to think.1 (2m 27s):And you think, oh, well she's, you know, television writing. The thing about that is like, you can make up anything like television writing really. You can really say, and then pigs flew out of his asshole and then people are like, oh, that's a weird show. But when you're trying to sell yourself to a particular industry with a particular set of skills, trying to make your skills meld into the skills they want, I was like, I couldn't see. After a while I was like, I don't even know what this, like using words like in this space, you leave space is a big word now.2 (2m 59s):So Metta that you are selling yourself to an advertising1 (3m 8s):Up girl.2 (3m 10s):So the PR how I understand it is there is somebody affiliated with this that is an advocate of yours, a champion of yours. And she wants, she wants you in that industry.1 (3m 23s):Okay. Yes, you are understanding. And there's like multiple things here. So she's, she's a screenwriter that I met and she continued on with the master's program. But her big job is her. Her day job is she's like a creative director at an ad agency in the, in the copy department. Right? So she's a big wig and she edits, she's like, she's the big editor there right at this. And I guess they hop around from agency to agency. Look, I don't know how it works, but so she started this new job and she's like, I want you to come work in the copyright. She also gets a very large bonus for every person that comes on that she refers, which I good look, do what you need to do.1 (4m 6s):But I think it's like five grand per person that she brings. I that's what I'm led to believe from the website. So anyway, there's like a, and so she literally Gina. So I sent her my updated resume and cover letter letter looked great. And then she applied me for 30 jobs. So then I have two.2 (4m 27s):Wow.1 (4m 29s):So which sounds great, which is awesome. Copywriting, all different kinds of copywriting. But for each of those jobs, I have to fill out demographic form. So last night I literally was up after myself tapes one self-tape last night clicking. I am not a veteran. Yes, I am Latina. No, I'm not disabled2 (4m 53s):Online. I was going to say, why don't they have one form, but it's1 (4m 58s):Yeah. It's a different job number. Right? So like every time, oh my God. So then, and sign, you have to sign every, so I literally was like, by the time I went to that, my brain, I was like, what? I'm not a veteran. I'm not a veteran like that. I was like mumbling to myself. And so, so, but I have to say like, you know, it's a good skill to build for. Like, I think that thing about, we only use 5% of our brain. They they've like debunked that right. They've said like that. You can't, but I'm telling you my brain, just like the Grinch's heart grew three sizes that day. My brain is like literally growing three side.1 (5m 41s):I don't know if it's three sizes, but it's, I can feel my, my, my like pathways changing in terms of the skills that I'm using. So that's great. You know,2 (5m 51s):I don't know. I mean, it can't be bad. Nothing. The good news is all of this work you're doing can't lead to anything bad to something. Yeah. Not illegal, You know, honestly, it's really saying something. I finally started watching Ozark. Oh God. And I, what strikes me about it is like, oh, this is not, it's not that this could happen to anybody, but you just think about like how ordinary crime really can be, you know, and how criminals aren't all in a layer or living in a way it's just, it's just moms and dads and, and people who need it, who need money in and who needs to run around and get it right quick.2 (6m 40s):Yeah. And I don't know, I will, I'm only one, not even the full first season in, so there may be a lot of stuff that I don't know, but like, it seems to me that this Jason Bateman guy was just a regular guy who got kind of wrapped up in this criminal enterprise1 (6m 58s):Didn't happen. You, I can see like most of my clients that I saw like were knowingly doing, you know, they were like, oh, I'm going to be a drug dealer and a gang member now. And no, but there were occasionally people that got involved in like scams, you know, financial fraud that you could see how it would start off and, and, and case in point miles. And I have a friend, an older guy, friend, we won't name because this is so illegal was like, Hey, what are you guys doing over Christmas break? And we're like, we're going, doing whatever. And he's like, Hey, do you want to, I shit, you not do you, if you'd let me know if you want to make some money, driving a camper from here to Tijuana.1 (7m 41s):And I, why like, what are you talking about? He's like, yeah, we'll give you like each $5,000 of it. And I said, well, what do you mean? Why do you need the, the, the, the camper and Tijuana? And he was like, oh, there's drugs in it. There's marijuana. And I was like, no. And miles was like, absolutely not. I'm like, have you met miles? Are you boy?2 (8m 3s):Oh, not, not marijuana, I guess,1 (8m 5s):Because it's marijuana. I don't, I don't2 (8m 7s):Think it's legal. Why do they have to do1 (8m 9s):That? I don't know. I think it was like a mass quantity or something like that. I don't know. Like, you're not allowed to like traffic, like large amounts of marijuana from different countries to over the border. Like, but so, especially in Mexico, like what? So I don't know. And we were like, Myles was like, absolutely not. I mean, miles is a lawyer. Like, what are you talking about?2 (8m 34s):Well, it's funny how just one casual aside a reference can really change your whole perspective on somebody you've known for a long time. Like I thought I've been in that situation before, you know, you think, you know, somebody and then they just casually say like, well, you know, we're swingers or1 (8m 55s):The other, the other, the other day I was meeting with somebody. Totally. And this actually didn't make me think less of him, but it was just like, he's like a totally looks like a total straight laced guy. If you're going to look at him, you know, white dude, thirties, balding, whatever. And he's like, yeah, I met him like the first time I, he was talking and he was like, oh yeah, the first time we met, we did Molly. And I was like, wait, what? At first I thought, Tina that's crystal meth. And I thought, but that wasn't, that it's Molly is whatever, HBM,2 (9m 25s):Whatever,1 (9m 26s):MTMA Molly. And I, like, I was so weird and we're like old people, what is happening? It's sitting in a cafe and you're talking about Molly. I don't know. I just it's, it totally rocked my world, which is, I think why I like to write too is because I do like to write those things in where you're like, wait, what? You know? Like, like,2 (9m 53s):Yeah, I have to say just, just the thought of learning, something like that, about somebody that I know is scary to me. And it, it just made me remember that I, after you mentioned season two of cheer, I started watching it. And I forgotten about the whole thing about that guy, Jerry Harris. And it was so heartbreaking to me when that happened. Not that it's worse or better if the person is well-known, it's just, you know, he, he seemed like a person who has such a hard life and it seemed like he was finally getting some, you know, something that he really deserved.2 (10m 38s):And then, and of course, I understand that when I hurt that hurt people, hurt people. And that he was probably doing this because this has been done to him. I don't know, man, I don't, these are surprises. I don't care for, I wanted it to stand for the rug and like for these kids to go on and being abused, that's not it at all. It's just, it's so disheartening. Well, it's really1 (11m 5s):It's. So there is, so yeah, it goes beyond grief. It's like goes beyond disappointment. It's like grief. And it's also, I think for me anyway, and I don't know about for you recreates the feeling of which is what I felt all the time with my parents, which is, oh, I know these people. I can trust these people. Oh God, I'm not safe around these2 (11m 30s):People. Okay. Thank you. That's exactly what it is.1 (11m 33s):I have that experience in Los Angeles, 40 times a day. Right. We're like, I want to like someone and then they'll say some fucking shit. And you're like, okay, well this is, you're a psychopath. Okay. Right. Like I'm talking to this. There's like, I meet them all the time at co-working because you know, co-working attracts like everybody, you just have to have money to have an office here. It's not like they, you know, vet people and some I'll be having a conversation with someone who seems relatively normal. And then they'll be like, oh yeah. You know, I was like, I really admire this Japanese porn star that like really knew what she wanted in life.1 (12m 13s):And it's not that there's anything wrong with being a Japanese porn star. It's that this guy like casually dropping, you know, and then talking about the kind of porn she does in a coworking setting. I I'm like, dude, I gotta go. I gotta make a fucking resume over here. Like I don't need to, but it's it's that in with him. It's just, I was just more like, oh, you're that you're going to bring this up to a stranger. Then I'm getting better about like, what's safe and not safe. But I do think that when you invest in something like Jerry or the cheer or a parent, and then they fucking do some shit, you're like, oh great. I'm not safe with you. That's,2 (12m 50s):It's what it is. It makes the feeling of own. And then, because I tend towards misanthropy, I'm like, okay, nobody's say if you can't trust anybody, everybody's out to get you, which is not true either. But it becomes, that is my defensive posture that I immediately tack back to, you know, I could go away thinking like, oh, there's goodness in the world. And some people and humans are inherently good. And then boom, something happens and I fail. And instead of, and I don't do the opposite when somebody does something good. I don't say yes, it's P you know what I mean? I don't, I don't have the same positive connotation that when somebody does something bad, it makes me say everybody's terrible.1 (13m 34s):It's really interesting because I'm having the experience of having to, what is it? So having to have a little more caution with people, I tend to really, really, really love everybody at first. Like really like I'm like, that person is awesome, but then they start talking crazy shit. And in the past I would have dismissed it and been like, no, I'm just sensitive. Right. Or I'm just so I'm trying now to be like, no, I wasn't there. When I was in therapy yesterday, I was like, no, no. Like in that moment I felt like this is not good for me.1 (14m 16s):And if I am not going to stand up for myself and take care of myself, nobody else is. So I have to mix a little more of the caution in with my, what can be Pollyanna kind of stuff. I have to be mindful of what my instincts are telling me about somebody, because I then will end up, you know, talking about very explicit Japanese porn techniques for half an hour and then walk away feeling violated and fucked up.2 (14m 49s):Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. You know, I knew this. I ha I know somebody who's exceedingly reserved. She doesn't, I like her I'm we're friends, but she doesn't tell you anything about herself. Like, or it takes a long time. And it's just this little snip, like, as an example, I don't know how old she is. And I bring up my age all the time and I, and I think she's younger than I am, but somebody recently said, oh, actually I don't think she's. I think she's more like your age, but that's, but she's never chimed in whenever I've said anything about how old I am.2 (15m 31s):She, she, she won't tell she's, she's a mystery. And on the one hand, I think, oh, she's just, she's just protecting herself for the reason that you just said. I mean, you know, she, she knows me kind of, but it's not like she really, really knows me. Some people really wait until some people don't just give out their confidence to anybody for some people you really, and I, you know, I guess like good for her. Maybe that's the way to go. I don't know. I, I tend to be more like you, not that I love everybody, but that I assume, I assume everybody has good intentions.2 (16m 13s):And, and then it's very surprising and sad and shocking to me when they don't like the thing that happened to me last week, this fricking guy, I was at the, I was picking my son up from tennis and where I've been, where I've been. Yes. And the place has bad vibes. I, I w I don't like the place. The parking is annoying, but yeah, the parking is annoying anyway. So you're, you're not supposed to wait by the curb. The parents aren't supposed to wait by the curb and align for their kids to come out, but everybody does. Right. It's just how it goes. Cause there's nowhere to go. Right. And it's, and it's been really icy here. So even sometimes I will park whatever, but this time I'm thinking, well, it's really icy.2 (16m 57s):And I just don't want him to, it's not lit up really in the parking lot. I just don't want him to fall. So I'm waiting in line and the guy in the car behind me hunks, and I, I assume he's not honking at me. Why would he behind me? Me? I'm just, my car is just sitting there honks again. Hong's a third time. And I put my arm out, like, go, go around. I just thought maybe he didn't think he could go around me. I still honking. So I just kind of opened the door a little bit. I look behind me and I'm like, what's the deal? And he's just yelling something. So I think, okay, whatever, I'll just loop around, pull over, go through the parking lot, turn to come back. And the guy I had the right of way.2 (17m 39s):And he just zoomed in, in front of me made so that I had to slam on the same guy. So I had to slam on my brakes, but then he gets out of the car and walks up, walks over to me. Of course, I lock my doors and he's like just screaming obscenities at me. Now later on, I had the thought this of course had nothing to do with me. Of course, this is how, you know, I didn't do anything wrong. This is about a person who really wanted to kick the dog. And he found that he found somebody to, to do that with absolutely. But I tend to go through my life in kind of this bubble of like, everybody's got everybody's well-intended and maybe even he was well-intended it just, it just didn't come across in the, in this experience.2 (18m 30s):And1 (18m 32s):Did he walk away?2 (18m 34s):I said, get the fuck away from me. Get the fuck away from me. By the way, my dog was in the back of my dog, who barks at literally every leaf like Wallace.1 (18m 54s):What kind of wing man are you? You fucker anyway. Okay. Yeah. I mean, I think those experiences are very particularly about driving and cars and obviously there's a whole road rage. Like there's literally a television show about road rage, right? Like the truth really? Oh my God. Yeah. It's a horrible it's so triggering. Don't watch it, but okay. I mean, yeah, it's ridiculous. But that being said it's very, to me, what happens to me in that situation? I'm sorry, that happened to you is yeah. Like what you mentioned on social media, which is feeling completely powerless and like, it's scary.1 (19m 38s):It's out of control. It's traumatizing. It's I, it's not good. It's not good. And it is also to me that what the feeling is being ambushed, right? Like you're being ambushed by, by a fucking crazy ass and you didn't do anything wrong. See, the thing is, I get into this thing of like, I didn't do anything wrong. And again, if I can get to the core of it, which is as a kid, I literally didn't do anything wrong. And all this shit rained down upon me, this trauma and this and this in this bullying and this whatever. And it triggers that in me. Like, wait a minute.1 (20m 19s):I, all I'm trying to do is do good, protect my son, pick up my thing, do this merge into the fucking freeway. It doesn't matter. And then I get like, this is not fair. Like I get really hurt is what it is. I get hurt. I'm shocked and hurt. And then the person, there is no, there is no resolution, right? Like the guy doesn't then call you later and say, I'm so sorry I acted a Dick. Or you can't even call the police and be like, this guy acted like a Dick. We're like, they're like, well, did he threaten you? No. Did he? Then they're like, fuck yourself.2 (21m 5s):Right. To say that it's, it is linked to, you know, growing up in a dysfunctional family. I'm for myself, looking a little bit more deeply into that. And because I, and I'm not saying this is the case for you, but for me, I think that I have said that I think that I have convinced myself that I'm never doing anything wrong, you know? And, and not just say that I was doing something necessarily wrong in the situation with the sky, although actually, you know, if I could have crafted it better, I would have paid attention to the flag from really from the first time they honk, which is like, there's something wrong with this person.2 (21m 51s):Do you know what I mean? Like, and yes,1 (21m 55s):Like get away, let me remove2 (21m 57s):My instinct. My instinct is to want to fight back. In fact, I remember this time that the some concert or something like that with Aaron, it was early in our relationship. So I was in my early twenties and this guy kept whatever. He kept stepping too close to me something. And I, I pushed him and pushed him. He, and of course, what did he do? He looked at Aaron like, are you gonna like, don't do that to me. I don't want to, you know, and it's, but it's not fair. He's encroaching on my space. He's like fair. Who, who told you the thing that we're going to be fair? Like it's, you know, so I guess that's the thing is I sometimes go out in the world thinking like, I'm an, a student and therefore, you know, nothing.2 (22m 42s):I don't, I shouldn't be getting any demerits. And if I get into merit, it's not my fault. I do that a lot.1 (22m 50s):I have the same thing. Yeah. I mean, I, I do it where it's like, I, yeah, I have my version of that is like, I'm a nice person. Like I do good. I'm nice. How dare you do bad or do wrong or treat me bad. Yeah. I mean, he it's, all this stuff is so layered. And2 (23m 10s):As far back, like it takes a lot. Yeah. Yeah. It's so far back. If it took this many years for us to form this way, imagine how long it's going to take us to On the podcast we are talking to Carolyn. Carolyn has a BFA from a theater school and imitate from the school of the art Institute of3 (23m 45s):Chicago. Carolyn is a performer and a professor and a lovely and pathic, amazing human. So please enjoy our conversation with Carolyn Bournemouth.4 (24m 8s):We're not here to talk about cancer. I've got no theaters because the Rick Murphy shirt Murphy's now this is actually made by Kevin Foster, who was my, that student. But I guess so I directed a workshop that he was in. He's a wonderful man. He ended up moving to Alaska, teaching people how to climb ice mountains. And now has a wife and a baby and never left Alaska. So we had that weird connection. Cause I lived in Alaska for the summer in between my first and second year of school, which I guess is it's like another theater school story in a way. I forgot about that one.2 (24m 47s):We're here. So Carolyn Hornimann, congratulations. You survived theater school. Yes you do.4 (24m 56s):You survived it. I know. That's why I bought this very expensive mix. So I would get lots of voiceover work that I never get.2 (25m 2s):Hey, maybe this is going to be your open Amy4 (25m 4s):Visit shit. This is it. This is my ticket. This is my ticket. I love podcasts.2 (25m 10s):So you survived as a student and you teach4 (25m 13s):DePaul. I teach there. I mainly teach the non-majors, which I love, but I have directed a couple of a workshop, intro type things. But many years ago, I keep putting in proposals. They don't ask me to do again, supposedly next year, maybe I will be, which would be awesome because I have this idea to do a version of Bernhardt Hamlet with all genders and just like totally gender fluid. So2 (25m 42s):You have to submit a proposal4 (25m 44s):For a show. That's a whole nother story. I'm probably another podcast, but I have submitted proposals. But oddly enough, a couple of times I did direct. I was just asked to, and that, I guess we're going backwards to go forwards. Are we always bad and make it go forward? Right. Which is that amazing? I think it's David Ball. The book that they made us read called backwards and forwards. Do you guys think I read In HDL, you had to read this book called backwards and forwards. Anyway, I used it in my master's thesis too. Cause it's brilliant. But anyway, backwards and forwards, I was in graduate school.4 (26m 24s):Rick Murphy was like kind of very interested in what I was doing. I was doing work on performing new feminisms and he was like, what the fuck is that? What's going on at the white cards? You can curse. Oh, no podcast. And, and that's a whole nother story because actually Rick Murphy was not my teacher. I had David AVD, Collie, and I went into to Rick Murphy's office. Like I guess it was probably my senior year to ask him advice about wanting to go to London, to study his full cereals. Right. As if I hadn't already been studying for serious. Right. Cause I wanted to go to Europe and be a fancy pants, real actor. And he was like, why are you going to do that? Why don't you just stay here and find a company that does European work.4 (27m 7s):So then I was in the European repertory company for 12 years. Oh,1 (27m 10s):Oh, that's a, that's a nice long run. Is that, is that company still around?4 (27m 14s):No, that's another story.1 (27m 16s):You have so many stories4 (27m 18s):We need to have, like, I have too many stories, too many stories. I don't even1 (27m 21s):Know where to start. Well, here's where I'll start. Did you just let's get the facts? So you went to BFA at the theater school, but you got to be MFA somewhere.4 (27m 32s):Oddly enough. No, I got, what is an M a E a masters of art and art education from the art Institute of Chicago, which is funny. Cause the Goodman started at the art Institute. So I guess I'm like super Chicago already.1 (27m 45s):You did that. Okay. I wanted to get the facts down. That is why. So then I would like to start when you were a child, were you always this awesome where you just like, fuck it. I'm going to4 (27m 59s):Just be crunchy. I have cool glasses, like YouTube,1 (28m 2s):There's serial killer glasses that we have just FYI.4 (28m 7s):I am from a small town down south. And I guess in a way I knew somehow that I wanted to be an actor from like watching old Betty Davis movies with my mom,1 (28m 17s):Her like Betty Davis.4 (28m 20s):And then I, my dad died when I was a sophomore in high school unexpectedly. And I was with my English teacher who taught us Shakespeare. He was fabulous. Mr. Beaver, very eccentric man who was probably gay and was not able to be out in our little small town. And Mr. Beaver took us to another small farm town school bus to all in, to see the show that was coming in from Chicago. And it was from the page to the stage Shakespeare by step and1 (28m 55s):Walk, a little company called4 (28m 59s):John C. Riley was one of the two count of two actors. There was a man and a woman. I wish I knew who she was. I went on deep dive search last night to find out and I can't find it anywhere on the internet. Was that my computer making a noise? Oh,1 (29m 15s):I didn't hear, I didn't hear it either. So something, well, here's the thing I'm sort of in touch with John C. Riley for various weird reasons. So I might ask him,4 (29m 27s):Please ask him, oh, he's the only one that will know. It's not anywhere on the internet. And I don't talk to him, although he's very close with Rick Murphy, oddly enough. They're like buds. But so, so anyway, we're in this, you know, school editorial, I'm watching this Shakespeare show with Jonsi rally and this woman that was also amazing. I hate that. I only know the guy, right. But they had a trunk and they would pull out costumes and props from the trunk. And they went through several scenes of Shakespeare. It was, you know, like devised, wonderful, amazing theater traveling the country, like the old frickin work progress association do used to do with the federal theater, which we should still have. Thank you very much.4 (30m 7s):And I, you know, had the PR I remember holding the program to like, with like, who are these people? What did they do? Where did they go to school? Oh, theater school, DePaul university. That's one question. Okay. How old were you? Like 15 amazing. Maybe 16. Cause I looked and it said it was 86. My dad died in 85. I was 15. I was 16. So I then also had, I was the president of the thespians of Lincoln community high school in Lincoln, Illinois. And I had, we, one of the things that we got was I forgot what it was. Oh, I wish I remembered it was a fabulous name. Like it wasn't forensics theater or something.4 (30m 49s):The, the title of the magazine you would get, it was like a high school theater magazine. And you got a free subscription of that for a year. Cause you, you know, you were the president of the Philippines and it also of course had a wonderful little spread about the theater school. So then I decided it was either going to be NYU theater school. My mom wanted me to go to ISU and kept saying, John Malcovich went there. John Malcovich went there because that was only 45 minutes away from me. So she really wanted me to go there, you know, cause my dad had just fucking died and she and I had moved from the country into the town and she wanted me to stay close, but she wasn't going to say that. But I know that now that that's what she wanted. Plus it was a lot cheaper and also Webster, which is in St. Louis. I think so somehow I got into, I think ISU in Webster, but I don't remember auditioning.4 (31m 33s):I think I just like had to write an essay and say I wanted to go Tish. I didn't even, I don't think pursue it because I couldn't afford to go to New York to audition. I only auditioned at the theater school. I addition to in my junior year I got in and my junior year, I knew where I was going for my senior year of high school. That's awesome. My brother drove me there and his, he had this old convertible. I remember driving down lake shore drive with my brother. It's my brother who now has cancer. And he took me to this audition. I don't know where he went or what he did with his big, long, old, like 67 do you know, muscle car that he had. But I went in and I did the audition and I did the voice and I did the weird movement and I did my two monologues and I don't remember exactly who was there.4 (32m 16s):I think it was maybe Phyllis Gemma stuff. Maybe it was his Carol Delk person who was a movement teacher who then I never really had. But anyway, yeah, I got, I got in, I remember getting the letter. I remember standing on my stairs in my house in Lincoln, Illinois, because then, you know, you've got to actually better in the mail. There's no emails or anything. And I was standing on the stairs is my, mom's stood at the foot of the stairs and opening it and being like, and then she's like, well, you know, we'll figure it out2 (32m 47s):Time out for one second. Do you think that kids think about us opening letters? The way that we think about people opening scrolls1 (32m 55s):Or telegrams? Yeah.4 (32m 59s):I have to explain to my students with snail mail is because at the end of every quarter I send everyone a little card, just a little thank you card. I've been doing it for like 15, 16 years now. So I can't stop now that I started this tradition and I'll ask them for their snail mail and they'll be like, what's that? And then I'll have to explain to them what it is and then they'll give it to me and they'll leave off like there's zip code or the town on her. I'm like, no, you have to put everything.1 (33m 19s):So there is a, I met someone at my coworking space who is like, I think 25 and they didn't know to put stamps on letters. So he just4 (33m 34s):Imagined that he1 (33m 34s):Was going to the post box and I said, oh, you're going to the postbox. I said, oh, you forgot your stamp. He goes, what? I was like, oh my God. Anyway.2 (33m 46s):And also I have to backtrack about one of the things that John C. Reilly thing was that a DePaul production or Novus Devin4 (33m 54s):Oh seven2 (33m 55s):Will forever. Right? Okay.4 (33m 57s):It must've been one of his first jobs out of school cause it was 1986. And I was also looking because there was this amazing picture of him from Gardenia, I think in the brochure. So then not only are in the magazine that I had, I don't think I ever got a brochure in the mail. It was this magazine. I'm going to find out the name of it. Cause it was just a cool little magazine that the theater kids, theater nerd, Scott, and we, and I got it for free when I was the president of, at that speeds. And so there was this wonderful picture that was some of the, you know, lovely glorious lady like grabbing, holding onto his leg or something was very dramatic. And this story goes further because then I'm at the theater school is my freshman year and there was the God squad party.4 (34m 39s):Nobody's really talked about the gods squad a little2 (34m 41s):Bit.4 (34m 43s):So the God squad party, I don't remember who my God parent was. I don't even, I must not been very good cause I have no idea who it was, but I was at this party and John C. Riley was there.2 (34m 56s):You must've been levitating.4 (34m 59s):And Don Elko was there. There was teachers therapy for smoking and drinking with the teachers. I was like, mind blonde, what's going on? And I said, I want it to John C. Riley in the kitchen, leaning up against the kitchen sink with like a beer or something. And I was like, excuse me. I need to tell you it's still on me about why I'm here. You know? Like I got tell him2 (35m 22s):That he's4 (35m 23s):A nice guy. Remember what he said? I don't remember anything. I was just like, that's1 (35m 27s):So good that,4 (35m 29s):And this is before yeah, it was famous. Right. And he might not have even ended up being famous. This is like, I thought he was that famous from skiing. That fricking page, the stage new person traveling around tiny little rural towns of Illinois.1 (35m 45s):That's amazing.4 (35m 47s):So I would love to know what he thinks of that, that show. If he has memories of doing it, who the other,1 (35m 53s):This podcast. I mean like you'll listen, you'll listen to, if you listen to some of the podcasts, you'll hear my John C. Riley story. It's pretty, it's pretty funny.4 (36m 1s):Oh, you have one too. Okay. I've been, I went this way. I have bags. I went down deep dive last night.2 (36m 9s):I love that. A lot of people do that. A lot of people when they find the podcast go and listen to a bunch of. So what was the experience like for you? You were walking down memory lane. What was it making you feel?4 (36m 21s):Ooh, I don't know. Now it's making me want to cry. It was, you know, I was 17 and I started there. I had no idea what I'd got myself into and a lot of it, you know, really broke my heart, but I also think it may, you know, like everyone else has said it made me who I am, made me kind of a tough skinned bad-ass, but I'm also a hyper empath and have trauma. And so now I have to deal with, you know, all of that in my old age. But I did have experiences there in classes with certain teachers, with certain instructors, certain directors, I lived with five girls in a two bedroom apartment on the corner of Sheffield and Belden.4 (37m 13s):We were all poor. Nobody could afford anything else I could barely afford to go to showcase. It was only in New York that year was when they went back and forth between New York and LA I guess, or I don't think we'd even started doing LA. It was the only New York and yeah, I don't know. I mean the whole casting pool process, the whole cutting process. I mean, obviously it didn't get cut, but that was, you know, traumatic. I've heard other people talk about how they didn't really think about it or this and that. Like Eric Slater was like, I don't really think about it. And I was like, I have to say,2 (37m 45s):I hope that isn't over the wrong way. A lot of men didn't really4 (37m 47s):Think about it. I was going to say, it goes a little bit ago and I know him, I'm friends with him and sat there for a little bit of privilege there.2 (37m 55s):Just like, it's just, it's like how a fish doesn't know it's in water. Like you just don't know.1 (38m 1s):Yeah. I mean, they just are doing their set dance. Right. And everyone's dancing around them, but we sort of had to do our own thing. What do you think the tears are about? Like when you, when is it just raw motion or is there like tears for young, a young version of you? Or like it's just a lot.4 (38m 22s):I'm a very teary person. I think. I don't know exactly what it is. I'm in therapy. It's I know. I just,1 (38m 29s):I am the same way. Like I,4 (38m 32s):I get, I get overwhelmed. I get really moved just by kind of yeah. And that sort of strange and weird that I'm still there in some weird way. Like I'm an adjunct, I teach the non-majors, but I'm there. And I went back actually, Rick Murphy directed a show that I adapted for the children's theater called the selfish giant and other wild tales. W I L D E all the Oscar Wilde's fairytales and Alvin McCraney was in it. First of all, Oscar Wilde wrote, wrote, he wrote fairytales and I had actually adapted another book that somebody else ended up having the rights to.4 (39m 13s):And so Rick was like, well, you know, I know you really wanted to do that one, but if you find something else, I'll still direct it. And so I was like, okay, let's do this. And so I adapted us, grows fairytales. Awesome. For me to read, love, to read that I can find it somewhere. Might actually be a hard copy of it and I'd have to like scale or something. I don't know where it is. That was like 2002. I think there's also pictures of that. I also found which I didn't know the production history of the theater school online. You get the pictures for almost everything and they're almost all taken by John Bridges, right. Bridges, which is amazing. Cause these, I don't know why I only have these two printed out of the old whore and the sister-in-law from the good person of such one, which actually is like a happy, sad, weird story because I auditioned to be course and I was called back for it and I really wanted it.4 (40m 8s):And it was that awful time where they would post on our side of the theater school, glass doors that casting it like midnight. So we would come there while we waited and we went to the door and not only did I not get it, but one of my friends got it, of course. Cause how were, how was it not going to be your friend gets it? And, and then I see old whore and sister-in-law, and I just, I had heels on and I took them off and I started running and I like cut my feet up, running in the street crying and like old 18 years old. And your sister-in-law told her, well, that's another thing, you know, because of my voice and my larger frame, I've always been cast older.4 (40m 53s):Even in high school. I have a very traumatic story actually being in high school. And my father dying when we were doing cheaper by the dozen, which if you know the story, the dad leaves at the end and doesn't come back cause he dies and we're doing this play. And it was must have been like the end of the rehearsals right before we opened. And my director who was one of the English teachers at my high school, I remember being on the phone with her because I remember exactly where I was standing in my house. And instead of being like really sympathetic about my dad dying, she was talking about how I was the younger of three of the sisters and the girl that got the older sister, which is the part I wanted, who was the daughter of another English teacher who was always getting all the parts I wanted.4 (41m 34s):She didn't have as big of breasts. And my English teacher was like, maybe we can, you know, tape you down. And I thought, why didn't you just cast me as the older sister plus I was wearing this like beautiful, old, like 40 suit. That was my mom's was vintage suit that I loved. So it was kind of tight and probably did really show my frame. I was 15 and my dad had just died. This woman's telling me to tape my breasts down.2 (42m 7s):So yeah,4 (42m 7s):I always, I always got cast older and I can see what2 (42m 10s):He went down the road of wanting to do feminist theater. I mean, it sounds like from an early age, you were, you were made aware of double standards and beauty standards and all that kind of stuff.4 (42m 21s):1994, I think it was, I had graduated. I was auditioning. And it was when you had to look in like this paper for the auditions and there was like a line you called, oh God, I wish I could remember it. It was, you had to call this line and stay on hold forever and listen to all the audition notices. And there was an audition for pump boys and dynamics, which I was excited about. Cause I'd seen it when I was younger with my mom and I thought, oh, that's fun. And it literally said the men will be paid. And I got a fucking article in the Chicago Tribune about that.2 (42m 55s):You did. Oh, tell us about it. You just wrote about,4 (42m 60s):You know, they they're, they're like backpedaling about, it was like, well it's because the musicians they're going to get paid and the musicians are mad at first of all, now I'm thinking back like, why did the musicians have to be men? And you literally still wrote, the men will be paid. He didn't write, the musicians will be pay. So yeah. I don't know how I did it now. Now it's all kind of a blur. I just started calling places and I got a reporter from the Tribune to like talk to me and do a whole article about it.2 (43m 25s):Oh. So you're really tenacious. That's what I'm getting. I'm getting that. You get something, whether it's a goal or you're trying to write an injustice and you attach yourself to it,4 (43m 36s):Right. I'm an Aquarius moon. I know this. Isn't an astrology podcast, but I've looked at your side. I've learned in the last couple of years, I'm Scorpio, sun cancer, rising, thus the tears and then Aquarius moon, thus the righteous justice for all.2 (43m 52s):I love that. I love that you4 (43m 54s):Did tons of work after school ended up doing tons of work like in, in schools, after-school programs, writing and drama programs and things like that, which ended up taking me to go back to graduate school and get the Mae and education. But then that was like a lot of solo performance work I did too, with this woman, faith wilding, who was like, look her up. She likes started women house it, I think Cal arts and like the seventies, she has this famous piece where she rocks in a rocking chair and says, I'll, I'll wait until I'm old enough. I'll wait till I fall in the I'll wait until I'm married. I'll wait. You know, just incredible woman who taught this class called new feminisms. She taught one called body skin sensation.4 (44m 37s):I mean just, and so I was doing all this incredible work again, looking at myself and being a woman and being an actor and what the trauma that I'd been through. And then my thesis was doing a performance experiment with a bunch of young women from all over Chicago, like high school age women talking about their mothers and feminism and teaching them about feminism and1 (45m 1s):Well what, okay, so, so a question for you, first of all, I tidbit I have to share that we ha we spoke with, I think it was Joel Butler who was a stage manager and said that they would come out and walk to tease us. When we were waiting for the list to come home, they would pretend that they had news and go like the people who weren't involved. Anyway, I just have to say the whole thing was a setup. Like the whole thing was a fucking setup. So all it was like the hunger games and it was also that in itself was a play like a theatrical experience of man.4 (45m 41s):I don't really know how they do it now. It's all online.1 (45m 44s):It's all online. Yeah. They sent you an email with your casting, but I'm just saying like, when I look back, my little corner of the world was walk, walk, walk, look at the list. Feel like shit, walk, walk, walk. But there was a whole play happening around us of everyone knew what the fuck was going on. And it was part of the thing to have this sort of, yeah, it was, it was a production, it was a fucking production, a tragedy for most of us. Right? Like, and anyway, it just was interesting to hear the perspective, like everyone knew what was going on and everyone played a part is what I'm saying is what I get from the theater school. Like it was all back in the day. Anyway, it was all part of a thing.1 (46m 24s):And like, you get the idea2 (46m 26s):We're working through for some of the faculty who, you know, themselves couldn't realize their professional dreams. And you know,4 (46m 35s):That makes me so sad. I hope that it's really not1 (46m 40s):Okay. I mean, like it's not okay, but it's like, they, we, a lot of times we talk on this podcast, right. About the psychology of never fixing what you needed to fix in the first place inside of yourself gets fucking played out all over everywhere.4 (46m 54s):We are living in a new time of awakening and people being able to talk about their trauma. That was not that time. And that was also the time, like I said, where the teachers were coming to parties with us and drinking and somebody else was mentioned, somebody else was mentioning, you know, relationships between faculty and students. I only knew a couple of those instances, but yeah, the fact that they happen at all and yeah, yeah. I've found that like in my own teaching, like even, even in the last couple of years and I've been doing it for a long time, I just I've become so much more transparent. Like I talk about my own mental health issues or what's going on with me or I, I check in and check out with them every day. And it's like, what's something beautiful you saw today.4 (47m 35s):What, what are you going to do good for yourself when you leave this zoom glass, whatever, you know, like, so I think that as a culture we're evolving as facilitators instructors teachers, but yeah, we were there at a really hard, whoa time. I, for sure. I mean, you were there pretty shortly after that, but also I had some amazing experiences. I loved Betsy Hamilton. I loved John Jenkins. Jim. I still laugh. I actually had for two years cause Adam second year and fourth year, which nobody did because he randomly taught second year acting one year for some reason. And everybody had him for fourth year for what that was called, like ensemble or exit or whatever the hell it was called.4 (48m 19s):So I had him second and fourth year. He actually told me at one point, heard him out, what you're doing, why are you an actor? You should be a singer. And so then I sang in the, oh no, it was after I sang in this, it was Rob chambers thesis show Baghdad cafe. And I sang backstage live for just a couple parts of the show. Just Rob asked me to do this. I don't even remember how that all came about. And, and you know, Jim being the jazz and music aficionado called me to his office and was like, what are you doing? You should be a singer. Shouldn't be the act. But was that ever a, a w dream of yours to be a singer? I was in rock band called dominance clam I did say I did sing a lot that there was a summer.4 (49m 7s):I wasn't even 21. So I would go, I've sang it like the Metro and I wasn't really supposed to be in there and, and Zach wards and Steve Sal and all these people from my class came to see me. And yeah, I wanted to do that and I would audition for musicals and stuff after I graduated, but just like Marriott Lincoln Shire and all those like fancy places would never hire me. And I would always end up in shows where I sent, but they weren't musicals, you know? And I also think I have a little bit of trauma around singing. I started singing in my church after my dad died. I was the song leader in Catholic church. Believe it or not. And I would go out the night before and be like smoking and drinking with my friends and then sitting on the alter with like the breeze and like, like Christ, what the hell are we doing?4 (49m 55s):I would say at funerals, I sang at my mom's second wedding. I sang at my brother's wedding, my sister's wedding, my other brothers. But yeah, I say I sang a lot. I haven't really been singing recently cause I, I usually end up crying when I sing. I had a very traumatic audition, 2008. I think it was where I cried when I was singing the song. And the song was about the girl's dad a little bit on the high note and it cracked and the casting director will remain nameless called my agent and told them that they thought I had mental problems and needed help. Okay. Again, this is something that would never happen today.4 (50m 37s):Right. But it wasn't that long ago, 2008, she also said that I was dressed in appropriately. I wore a forties style suit and a pillbox hat, because that was the period of the show. How is that inappropriate? That's someone who's. And why you calling my agent how intrusive to call my agent and tell them that you think I'm. And then the funny thing about it was I had just gone through a huge breakup and had moved and gotten a new job and all this other stuff was going on, but that had nothing to do with it. And that's nobody's business and I was moved by the song. And don't you want somebody, that's just somebody who, who is scared of their own emotions, like, correct. That's all that is. Yeah. So anyway, I digressed cause that's like post theater, school drama,2 (51m 20s):But I've had auditioning. Okay. So you arrived at the theater school at a tender young age. You4 (51m 28s):17. I was 17 because I have a November birthday, 17.2 (51m 32s):And you did your whole BFA there. Tell us about some of your show experiences.4 (51m 41s):Well, the one that I was going to talk about was the good person of such one. Cause oddly enough, it's the only one that I have printed pictures of. And I don't even remember when or how I acquired them. I think I got them from John Bridges cause he took all these pictures and that one of me is the sister-in-law. I don't know that that one was like a production photo. I think that was him coming up. And he saw me in this moment and like had to get this shot. So not only was I not cast as Shantay, which I want it to be now I'm the, the sister-in-law on the old whore. So I'm like, I'm going to kill this. I had 16 lines between the two characters, my old whore. If you look at that picture, I have a blonde wig. I didn't wear a bra. I have a tube, top, a pleather red skirt. I had these hoes that had a dragon up the side.4 (52m 22s):So it looked like I had a dragon tattoo on my leg and high, high red pumps that I think were mine actually from when I was in a beauty contest in high school anyway, and I got these earrings, oh my God. I think I found those earrings too. They were Chinese lanterns like that opened up, but they were earrings and they were huge. And I smoked a cigar. Oh. And I, I don't know if you remember this or if they did this when you were there, but after shows closed, mainly the main stage shows they had like this post mortem, postpartum, whatever you call it in the lobby and everybody and they would critique. I probably blacked that right out while you sat there and just took it.4 (53m 7s):And, but I don't know if it was during that or like after that, I would just be like walking in the halls and all these teachers, some that I had and some that I hadn't yet even had made a point of coming to tell me how excellent I wasn't that. Sure. And it was not false. It was not put on. But I mean, come on. Those people did not give compliments unless they really felt1 (53m 29s):Whatever. Yeah, yeah,4 (53m 30s):No. And I was like, yeah, cause I freaking killed it. Cause I took it so seriously. I was like, I'm going to make these roles so deep and so real. And if you, if you look on the production photos, they have this screen and, and, and, and people would make shadow play on the screen at the beginning of the show to show like the street life of the pool or the Sichuan and stuff. And I got to ride a bike and I rode a bike across and you see the shadow of the girl on the bike and I'm like, I still look at that. And I'm like that.1 (53m 57s):So do you think that's, I love hearing that. That's a great story for me to hear. For some reason, it just really warm, but warms my heart, but also talks about Gina's calling you on being tenacious. But do you think that that sort of set a tone for, cause what I'm getting from you is that like you're simultaneously a, bad-ass a bit of an outsider never given your chance. Never really given the chance to maybe in terms of outside casting, do what you could really do. So then you take what you get and then you fucking kill it. Does that ring a bell4 (54m 37s):Kind of? I think so. And I think I've always been that way really. And that also being in that show, Joe sloth directed, it was Bertolt Brecht. And really got me thinking about political theater and theater for social movement and theater for change. And I really believe when I graduated and I started doing work at the European repertory company, I believed that doing theater could change the world. You don't think that anymore change sometimes, you know, it beats you down pretty hard when you, when you work and work and work and work and you have to have three other jobs. Cause you're in a theater company that doesn't pay you any money.4 (55m 17s):And I, I still like the best work of my life was at that place. I was client of Nestor and Agamemnon for three years. I mean, I, Y you know, yeah, the best work of my life, but was it going to say that there's a different, and I think it's good. There's a different culture, a different mindset. Now students now would never graduate and say, yes, I'm going to be in a school or I'm going to be in a theater company for 12 years that never pays me and I'm going to have three or four jobs. And it was nice to kind of almost like a martyr, poor theater, Jersey, Petoskey board theater mindset of like, I'm an artist. Well, of course I'm, I'm struggling and I'm poor and I'm, you know, but I'm for the oppressed. And so I must experience that.4 (55m 59s):I don't, I dunno, like it just, I wonder how much I manifested that, right. Because I, I would have auditions for TV and film stuff that I would get close to and just not get, or it took me. I was, I think, 30 when I finally gotten a show at the Goodman or no, wait, I was 30 when I got at apt in Wisconsin. I think I was even older when I got in the show at the Goodman. But anyway, yeah. You know, eventually I have done shows larger theaters, but I still will say, I mean, people that saw the stuff I did at the European rep and I was like 24, 25, but I played clouded minister and it was Steven Berkoff's choir master. So it was like the most rockstar frickin, you know, I made my own costume.4 (56m 41s):It was, it was all like fishnet. And I just like punched my hands through fish nets to make sleeves and high heels and crazy Kabuki makeup. And I stood at the top of this ladder Agamemnon. And I came out at the end with like Hershey's syrup on my hands after I'd feel them. And I was like, I mean, if you saw that as hit, you were blown away, this was three years while we did it, like in a regular run. And then it was so popular. It was so popular that we did it on Friday, Saturday nights, like late night. And then we were doing, cause we want it to be a real repertory. So at the time we were doing Agamemnon Electra, uncle Vanya, and this show called all of them are just, yes.4 (57m 32s):And we would also change this. You remind me, okay, this is what I think Steven Davis was talking about when he said he was in four shows at the same time he, he was in, he was in all those shows and yeah. So, oh my God,2 (57m 51s):That's super intense4 (57m 53s):Looking at my notes2 (57m 54s):That like, though, while you're looking at your notes, I mean, was that draining, not just the number of shows you did4 (58m 4s):The physical training. Well, also I was, yeah, I was like a waitress during the day. I mean, I had a job I had to live and I was a waitress where I could only work lunches because all the shows were at nights. So lunches weren't as busy. And if it was really slow at lunch, I mean, so I would find myself every day while I was working calculating in my head, how many tables I had to have, how many tips I had to get just to make enough for that week to pay the rent, you know? And at the time I was living with two British guys, actually, they're the ones that brought me into the European rep, my friend, Charlie, Charlie Sherman, who is a actor and director in and out of Chicago for years. I met him when I was 18.4 (58m 44s):And I worked at cafe Roma, which was down the street from the school. That was my job. Cause I also worked when I was in school. And so when other people were like, we're going to the dead show. You want to come? I was like, you get, not only do I not have money for that, but I got to work all weekend. Right. So anyway, he, he knew that I wanted to do the play Caligula and he called me up one day and he's like, oh my God, this company is already doing it. Maybe you should audition. And this was right when I got out of school. So I auditioned and I got in the chorus and like the first week, the girl that was supposed to place, Zonea had gotten a movie and left and they were like, okay, now you're the lead. And I was like, okay. And that, and that was the company that I ended up being with for 12 years.4 (59m 27s):But it was exhausting as it was. I know we did. We were also all like drinking and smoking and going to the bar every night after the show is2 (59m 35s):You is a powerful force. I was just thinking the other day, remember when you used to wake up in the morning and no matter what had happened to you the night before, and you're like, okay, well, but anyway, it's time to do it today. I haven't had that feeling in years. I haven't had that. Like I can even when some we've once a day, I'm super excited about, I don't ha I don't wake up with this body, like readiness that I remember feeling in my twenties and thirties. Okay. So look at your notes. What are you, what are some of, some of the points that you wanted to get to?1 (1h 0m 7s):So if a showcase question, I have a showcase. Cause I'm obsessed. Since I live in Los Angeles, now I'm obsessed.4 (1h 0m 12s):Oh my God, are you guys going to try to avoid? No, no, no, no, no,1 (1h 0m 15s):No, no, no. I'm obsessed with the idea of the showcase because I made such an ass out of myself at my showcase that I, we went to LA, but I know you were in New York, but what was that? I'm obsessed with the showcase experience because I think it is really one interesting, but two where DePaul lacked in so many ways to getting people to the showcase and then after the showcase.4 (1h 0m 42s):Okay, great. This was before stars and all that. So nobody was collecting money for us. You just had to, you either had the money or you didn't. And so I was able to get enough money to buy a plane ticket, but then I wasn't going to have anywhere to stay. So my friend, Sarah Wilkinson, who was also at the school, but a couple of years behind me, her boyfriend, Daniel master Giorgio, who's also been in a lot of TV shows and on, on, you know, Lincoln stage and public theater, like this dude that went to Juilliard, actually I stayed in his dorm at Juilliard on the floor cause I didn't have money to stay anywhere. And I also could only stay for like a couple of days where like other people were like staying the rest of the week or going out and partying.4 (1h 1m 23s):And I remember having like just enough money to do one of the things people were doing, which was go to a jazz club with Frick and Jim Osstell Hoff, which I did. And that was really cool. The other part of that, that was kind of messed up was in the, in the, you know, audition class that Jane alderman, God rest her soul. And I love her dearly and became closer to her. I probably more after school than during school, but in our audition class where you brought, you know, monologues, I had brought this monologue and then she loved it and wanted me to do it and was just like, that's the, when you're doing. And then I had this total panic about it and was like, I don't think this is right. I don't think this shows me in a good light.4 (1h 2m 3s):I'm going to pick something else. And I don't remember what my other second or third choice was. I did, I did have something else. And I remember calling her on the phone. I don't know if I called her office or at home. And again, before cell phones. So I remember the little window I was sitting in my apartment on the corner of Sheffield and Belden on our little phone, talking to Jane alderman, all nervous. Cause I was going to tell her I'm not doing that when it's not right for me. And she still talked me into it and I did this monologue from Roger and me, the film. Did you see it?2 (1h 2m 34s):The Michael Moore movie4 (1h 2m 36s):About the Michael Moore movie, Roger,2 (1h 2m 40s):The documentary about the auto industry. I mean, yeah.4 (1h 2m 44s):Yes. And it was the poor woman, poor white woman who sold rabbits. Pets are mate. Right? Pets are me. Got it.2 (1h 2m 55s):That's what I did. Wait a minute though. I have a feeling.4 (1h 2m 60s):So I actually became, I probably did, but I actually came from where they had tried to, to suppress and to change and to mold me into anything. But this hit girl from Southern Illinois. And then I did that. Right. And that's what I, I wore my boots. I wear my cowboy boots. I think I had my friend's jacket on my long hair. And I came out and I was like pets for me. Oh my God, mortified, mortified. And I only got, I got like a couple of calls, like one was from like a soap opera. And then another one, I don't remember. That was another weird thing. Like the same thing with the casting call we waited in, I was in somebody else's hotel room.4 (1h 3m 42s):Cause remember I didn't have a hotel. I was staying on the other side of town and the dorm room of somebody who went to Julliard. And so we're in somebody's hotel room waiting for Jim Mostel Hoff. And whoever else was with us to come in with like this list, it was literal. It was like my notes here. There was just like tiny pieces of paper with like telling us who got what calls. Some people were like, got nothing, got 10 that too, about whatever. Yeah. And, and mine were not meetings. Mine were just like, these people want you to call them or send your resume. I was like, they already got my resume. Everybody got what, what? So, you know, like I wanted to move to New York. I wanted to be a New York fancy actor, you know? So that was like really devastating too.4 (1h 4m 23s):But then I was like, well, if I don't get that, I'm going to be an amazing Chicago theater actor. And I'm going to show everybody that Chicago theater is actually better anyway.2 (1h 4m 31s):Yeah. I don't to remember VAs if I've told this on the podcast before, but remember how I did that thing or if I didn't get any meetings. And so then I snuck into administrative office at DePaul after showcase and I found a list of all of our names and everybody had gotten, everybody had agencies or agents names written next to theirs, but not everybody was told that. Yeah. Yeah. So,4 (1h 5m 5s):Oh, podcasts, then couldn't see my face gaping. Now what, what did you do? Did you tell, did you, what?2 (1h 5m 12s):I swallowed it and carried it around resentfully for the next 20 years. Yes ma'am I did my God. And you know, who knows? Maybe there was an important reason for that. Maybe it was, these are shady characters. I don't know what it would have been, but I, I know that I would have4 (1h 5m 36s):That you didn't feel. Yeah. I feel so bad for you that you didn't feel like you could, you know, go further, ask more. I don't know. Probably2 (1h 5m 44s):Carolyn it probably didn't occur to me. I'm sure it did. I'm sure. The way I thought about it was, well, this has happened now. It is over, this is the thing that it is forever such. I just, I would have never thought that way. I would have never thought to advocate for myself. I mean, I fought to find out,4 (1h 6m 4s):Snuck in there. You thought, well, enough of yourself to sneak in there,2 (1h 6m 9s):You know, whatever. That's that's for me to figure out because I, I, I that's what, but that's what I did with it. I, I took it. I took a carried it around like a shame instead of, oh, by the way, I didn't mean to blow anybody up. I just needed to say like, what's the deal? Like what happened happened, right. Yeah.1 (1h 6m 29s):I feel like it's interesting. It is. It is. It is just really, now that we have this podcast, we spend a lot of our time being like, well, yeah, what's the deal. Why did that happen? And, and what,4 (1h 6m 41s):I wonder what John Bridges or somebody like that would say about that.2 (1h 6m 46s):I I'm sure. John Bridges, who is a theater school loyalist to the end when say that, that I, that I misunderstood. He tells them he doesn't tell the truth. I'm saying, listen. And, and by that I've said a thousand times we understand that we couldn't possibly know all of the factors that went into any decisions like casting and stuff like that. And that there are certain things that happened. That felt terrible. That were for my own good, you know, but Yeah, because getting back to that whole thing about casting, I mean, I'm sure that the guiding principle in their minds was, this is what it's like, you know, you want to move to New York.2 (1h 7m 33s):I mean, Don, we had another person on here who told us living in New York. You, you you'd have to go wait in line in the morning at a theater so that you could get your audition later. And if you wanted to have, it had to be a lunchtime thing, so you could leave work. And those sl

Two Sistas
MindsetMonday - 02.14.22

Two Sistas

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 25:33


TwoSistas, MindsetMonday and it's Valentine's Day!! A very Happy Valentine's Day to Everyone!! It's amazing that yesterday was the Super Bowl and now to Valentine's Day! A look at how we shape our mindset and what it takes to focus - reaching a certain outcome sets the tone of our habits and vice versa. The tasks that we perform on a consistent basis lay the foundation to support us in our endeavors. At TwoSistas, we are starting to shake it up - tomorrow we will be broadcasting live on our Facebook page like we always do but at a different time - come celebrate TriumphTuesday, February 15, 2022 at 7:30pm EST!! Just an FYI: today we celebrated our 400th episode - we obviously love what we do which is sharing our passion of wellness through fitness and nutrition and everything in-between, the ups, the downs, our mindset, triumphs, sharing the wealth, trending and celebrating all that is possible! Every now and then, we bust out about "something about something which is really nothing about nothing" - or is that the other way around??!! We are not perfect and there is a story behind our stories. Our whole mission and purpose is to be authentic and real, sometimes raw, but it's the emotions, heartaches, and celebrations that from time to time we hope that we inspire you which is why we continue and love what we do! We would love to hear from you - share with us your thoughts, or maybe highlights from past episodes. Go to our website and leave us a voice message: www.TwoSistas.online

A Little Bit Culty
Keely Griffin on Twin Flames & Other Dumpster Fires

A Little Bit Culty

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 70:26


A Little Bit Culty –Speaking of soul-crushing scams that exploit the basic human need for love and belonging, we've got a doozy of a Valentine's Day episode for you. We're not labeling the organization at the heart of this episode a cult, but we are asking our guest Keely Griffin if loving and leaving Twin Flames Universe was the bad trip that reports published by Vanity Fair, Vice, and Daily Mail make it sound. Once a devotee of TFU, Keely shares what made the YouTubey, Facebooky spiritual community sound promising at first, just how quickly it went to the Upside Down, and how she's coming back from the whole shitshow now that she's out of its grips.Oh and just FYI, the list of what TFU officially disputes about its bad press practically writes our show notes for us: They dispute that they promote harassment and stalking. They dispute that they engage in exploitative and cult-like practices. They dispute that they coerce members into changing their gender. A Little Bit Culty, on the other hand, does not dispute that the whole TFU vibe makes us want to throw up in our mouths a little bit. Happy Freakin' Valentine's Day.~The views and opinions expressed on A Little Bit Culty do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the podcast. Any content provided by our guests, bloggers, sponsors or authors are of their opinion and are not intended to malign any religion, group, club, organization, business individual, anyone or anything.~A Little Bit Culty is proud to support the #IGOTOUT project, which empowers survivors of cultic abuse to share their stories online as a catalyst for education, prevention, and healing. Learn more at igotout.org~For more information on A Little Bit Culty and co-hosts Sarah Edmondson and Nippy “Anthony” Ames, visit our official website at alittlebitculty.com. Follow us on Instagram & Twitter @alittlebitculty~CREDITS: Executive Producers: Sarah Edmondson & Anthony Ames.Production Partner: Citizens of Sound. Producer: Will RetherfordAssociate Producer: Jess TardyTheme Song: “Cultivated” by Jon Bryant co-written with Nygel AsselinAdditional Music Score by Will Retherford See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Valentine's Day (bonus audio)

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 24:28


Love is in the air, everywhere I look around. Whether you are searching for your soul mate, or just in love with life, we'll cover the common customs associated with this heartwarming holiday. Calling all love birds: we're going to unwrap the unconventional institution known as Valentine's Day on today's FYI!If you want EXCLUSIVE bonus audio/video content along with, weekly/monthly classes, and tons of advantages; become a Patreon member at http://patreon.com/albertoalonsoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Mind Your Autistic Brain with Social Autie: THE Talk Show for Late Identified Autistics
072- Time Boundaries Workshop for Autistic & ADHD Adults

Mind Your Autistic Brain with Social Autie: THE Talk Show for Late Identified Autistics

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2022 100:07


COACHING CAFE ACADEMY IS OPEN!!!! TO LEARN MORE AND JOIN US CLICK THIS LINK: https://mindyourautisticbrain.vipmembervault.com/products/courses/view/1118424 Time is our most precious commodity. We trade it for all sorts of things from coffee with friends to working hours and household chores. Once it is gone we can never get it back. Time is a non-renewable resource. Often in Late Identified Life we find ourselves physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually exhausted and we often attribute this to a lifetime of masking and camouflaging. These are most definitely contributors, but not the entire picture. How often have you found yourself in one of these situations: -You are rushing from one place to another to get it all done, you know that “to do list” -You feel like you are doing it all and no one else is helping or even cares -You reach a point you get so overwhelmed and exhausted you lose your cool and yell at those you love for the smallest things that normally wouldn't bother you -You feel agitated, short tempered and often just plain pissed for what feels like no specific reason, it is just everything The one thing all of these feelings, experiences and situations have in common is a Time Boundary has either not been set or has been breached. When I ask coaching clients, “Were boundaries discussed in your home growing up?” The answer is usually a laugh or look of shock followed by, “No, what boundaries?” (FYI, this was my answer in the beginning) So my question to you is this….How are you setting Time Boundaries to effectively manage how you spend your time, who you spend your time with and what you do with your time both personally and professionally? And most importantly can you identify where your time is being breached by others by you? If you aren't sure about the answers to these questions that is TOTALLY OK because I didn't either in the beginning. Join the Coaching Cafe Academy team of Ali Arena and Carole Jean Whittington for a 90 minute workshop on Time Boundaries where you will learn: -What a Time Boundary is -How to identify where Time Boundaries are being breached in your life right now -How to craft your own Time Boundary -AND the most important part How to Communicate and Share your Time Boundaries with others --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/socialautie/support

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: February 11, 2022

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2022 37:51


On today's week-in-review, Crystal is joined by political consultant and urban farmer, Heather Weiner. They discuss the lawsuit against the capital gains tax in Washington, the concrete workers strike, the Harrell administration's push for hotspot policing, safety at Pike Place Market and Inslee's legislation to deal with highway encampments, and the “Tacoma Shuffle” of people returning to encampments after they've been swept because they still have nowhere else to go.    As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Find the host, Crystal on Twitter at @finchfrii, and find Heather at @hlweiner.   Resources “Superior Court Judge hears arguments in capital gains tax case” by Shauna Sowersby for The Olympian: https://www.theolympian.com/news/state/washington/article258066028.html    “West Seattle Bridge reopening could be delayed if concrete union strike continues” by King 5 Staff for King 5: https://www.king5.com/article/news/local/seattle/seattle-construction-projects-delayed-concrete-union-strike/281-2765b55a-c89d-4abd-999f-261fc711b106   “Hot Spot Policing” Twitter Thread by Erica C. Barnett: https://twitter.com/ericacbarnett/status/1490185898108936193?s=20&t=8beV9DyCMjunAtJNLMatYw    “CID community group says they don't see an improvement” by Hannah Krieg for The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/slog/2022/02/07/66263977/cid-community-watch-not-impressed-by-mayor-harrells-hot-spot-policing-strategy-in-little-saigon/comments “Councilmember Pushes “Seattle Is Dying” Narrative, Data Confirms Stop-and-Frisk Disparities, Someone Is Posting Fake Sweep Signs, and More” by Publicola Staff for Publicola: https://publicola.com/2022/02/10/councilmember-pushes-seattle-is-dying-narrative-data-confirms-stop-and-frisk-disparities-someone-is-posting-fake-sweep-signs-and-more/    “Inslee Pushes Legislation Prioritizing Homeless Encampment Removal Near Highways” by Natalie Bicknell Argerious for The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2022/02/10/inslee-pushes-legislation-prioritizing-homeless-encampment-removal-near-highways/     “'Tacoma shuffle': People return to I-705 homeless encampment days after sweep” by Lionel Donovan for King 5: https://www.king5.com/article/news/local/homeless/tacoma-encampment-remains-occupied/281-8730a985-8104-470c-b169-7dc1bdfae0cd      Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in the state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week. Welcome back to the program, friend of the show and today's co-host: political consultant and urban farmer, Heather Weiner. [00:00:52] Heather Weiner: Hi, Crystal. So happy to be here - happy Friday. [00:00:54] Crystal Fincher: Happy Friday. Well, we have a ton to talk about today - I won't - so much, so much. I wanted to start off talking about the capital gains tax case - it was passed by our legislature and people filed suit against it - conservative Republican interests filed suit against it. And there was just a court hearing a week ago in - where arguments for and against were heard about it. What is going on with that? [00:01:27] Heather Weiner: This is, I think, one of the most interesting stories if you care about education, you care about getting more childcare to people, you care about providing early learning, fixing leaky roofs in our schools. This is about $400-$500 million/year that is going to be going to all of these education projects. And in what I like to call a reverse Robin Hood move, these conservative interests are trying to steal from the children and give to the rich by taking away this capital gains tax. Now it's in court right now - it's in Douglas County Court. We expect to see a decision in the next couple of weeks - have had a lot of really interesting people weigh in on that court case - everybody from Wenatchee school teachers to the former Wenatchee Chamber of Commerce president, economists - all saying the capital gains tax is actually a really great way to balance our unfair tax code which puts the biggest burdens on the poor and the least burdens on the rich. Now here's a couple more things that have just happened today that you should know about, Crystal. The first one is we're seeing in the PDC filings that are coming in right now that there are some really bad black hat political consultants who are coming in to Washington state to help do this reverse Robin hood move. These are people who were fined the biggest fines in the nation's history for laundering campaign contributions during a previous ballot initiative here in Washington state - they were fined $18 million by my boo, Bob Ferguson. And here they are back again trying to repeal the Washington capital gains tax. The other really interesting thing that's going on is kind of this - what I think is really bad reporting. There is a Amazon exec who is moving from Medina to Dallas - I think probably 'cause the Seahawks had a horrible season and the Cowboys had a pretty good season. But what the reporters are doing is saying that the move occurred right before the capital gains tax goes into effect, so therefore that must be the reason why they're moving. There could not possibly possibly be another reason that somebody is moving to a warmer, sunnier place that has better barbecue. And so I've just been - just been kind of a little bit of a - rhymes with "witch" - to people on Twitter this morning telling them coincidence does not equal causality - just because somebody left the state before the capital gains tax goes into effect. And by the way, this is a super rich person who should be paying their share just like the rest of us. And if they are moving because of the capital gains tax, then they need to say it, take responsibility for it - that they are a tax dodger and that they do not want to take responsibility for all of the great things that this state has done for them. Am I on my soap box? Can you tell? [00:04:37] Crystal Fincher: I mean - it is logical and it makes sense - again, this capital gains tax - it's not an income tax. It is not a tax that most working people pay. This is where extraordinarily wealthy people are realizing gains - we're talking about that. And we are in a state that has no income tax FYI, so if you're arguing that people left for that reason - there are several stories where people have left to states with income taxes. It's like - I don't know if you're really doing this full analysis. But whether or not people are staying or leaving - and people continue to come to the state - it is, it has been well-documented and universally accepted and known for awhile that we have the most regressive tax structure in the nation, meaning that the people with the least pay the highest percentage of their income in taxes and the people with the most pay the lowest percentage of their income in taxes. And at a time where we see the impacts - exacerbated through this pandemic - of years and years of underfunding of education, of our social safety net, of our public infrastructure - we absolutely need everyone to be chipping in their fair share. And to continue to ask working people, who are making an income, to be paying basically to make up for super wealthy people not paying their fair share - just isn't realistic. At this point, we are basically - most of the taxpayers are subsidizing the sixth homes and the third yachts of extremely rich people with our taxes. [00:06:30] Heather Weiner: And the spaceship - and the spaceships up into the - up into the atmosphere. I mean, we are literally - actually, they do get huge tax subsidies for that. I mean, these are the same people who took tens of millions of dollars in taxpayer funds during COVID to basically pad their investment portfolios, to pad their investor rounds for these tech startups - they're producing nothing new. All they're doing is moving this taxpayer money between each other in kind of a shell game. And then they don't want to pay taxes on the gains that they have made from taxpayer money? Shame on you, shame on you - shame on you for going to Metropolitan Market and buying and spending $300 on cheese and then complaining about the people who are living in the boxes that that cheese was delivered in. Shame on you. If you want to do something about what is happening in this state with a lack of housing, with the lack of services, then you need to pay your damn share. [00:07:27] Crystal Fincher: You do need to pay your share. Absolutely. We could go on about this at length. [00:07:32] Heather Weiner: Oh boy. Boy, do I have feelings - I have a lot of feelings, Crystal. [00:07:37] Crystal Fincher: We will leave it with that for today, but I think we are both aligned and with so many other people in the state. Again, this was supported by wide margins of the public - north of 65% are really tired of our tax dollars not going - coming into our communities at the level that they should be while they are padding the corporate bonuses and fourth houses of the uber-wealthy - it just - it just isn't wonderful. [00:08:09] Heather Weiner: Can I just - you're talking about polling - for a second, I just want to do give you a quick update on polling. So I just read in The Olympian this week also that polling numbers - typically we think that Washington state is pretty just kind of knee jerk anti-tax - but we just this week approved a whole bunch of education levies. So we do want to fund education, which this capital gains tax does. And the polling, at least as reported in The Olympian, shows that any initiative to repeal the capital gains tax starts underwater. And as you and I know, as political consultants, a ballot initiative - a Yes ballot initiative - needs to start at over 60% to have any viability. So I just don't know how they're - if they're going to try to repeal this in the court, I think they're going to lose in the State Supreme court. I think they try to repeal it with the voters - I think it'll be a tough fight, but I think they might lose there too. [00:08:59] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, it is - it is certainly an uphill fight to try and repeal that. We're in a much different place than we were 15 and 20 years ago in terms of how people view their taxes. And now people have had a long time to see the effect of everyone not paying their share and seeing how many things now haven't been funded and are not happy about it. Also, there are lots of people unhappy about working conditions that have languished and lagged over the past several years - and especially during the pandemic - employers not being as responsive and protective of their employees as they need to be, or just flat out issues of pay. We've seen that with a number of unionization efforts around the country and around our area, but there actually has been - what I feel has been somewhat under-covered and that's why we're talking about it today - a strike from concrete workers and that has been going on for a while. And this week there was a press conference with Mayor Harrell and County Executive Dow Constantine talking about some of the impacts of the strike and saying the West Seattle Bridge reopening could be delayed - other projects could be delayed - if this is not solved soon. Of course, that makes everyone kind of go back into some entrenched messaging - some people are like, Well, well, those workers just, you know, get back to work already - when really this is an issue of these concrete companies needing to meet these demands to get the strike over with. What is going on with this? [00:10:41] Heather Weiner: Yeah. This is really interesting, because this is where unions have spent a lot of money and a lot of time electing people to office and this is where they expect those elected officials to stand with them. In this case, it's a public contract. There are four concrete companies who have basically - withholding great - better pay and better benefits for these people who are doing really hard physical jobs. And they're withholding that and so the concrete workers have been on strike. They've been outside for months - in the cold, in the rain - trying to negotiate this. And so this is where you - if you're an elected official - this is where you need to step up for the workers and you need to say, "The pressure is on the employers, is on these corporations, to pay fair share and get everybody back to work." I was very disappointed to see that the message instead was, "The corporations - the unions and the corporations need to go back to the table." What they're really doing there - it's an implied you're both at fault message - instead of it being the corporations need to just - they're making huge profits on these taxpayer funded projects. They need to make sure that money is coming back into the community by paying people fairly. Let me give you an example - your friend, Mayor McGinn, former Mayor McGinn, did the right thing in a similar strike situation when he was mayor. There were thousands of garbage, recycling, composting drivers who went on strike. And rather than saying they and the companies need to go back to the table, he said, "I'm going to start fining the companies millions of dollars a day for every day that they are not getting the trash picked up because that's what I can do under the contract." And he broke that strike and he helped those workers win much better wages. And that's what our elected officials should be doing right now, instead of somehow putting the onus on the workers themselves - they're sitting outside in the rain. It is not like they have a lot of power. They need to step up and help them. [00:12:55] Crystal Fincher: Certainly do. And was a fan of that action taken by former Mayor McGinn, certainly. Other mayors have done similar in the past to help address these work stoppages. And one of the things that's really critical with this is that these companies have a responsibility to deliver - what is implied is that the companies do what's necessary to maintain a functional and effective workforce. If they are not paying them effectively, that is not maintaining a functional and effective workforce. There actually is precedent and great justification for saying, Hey, you are obligated to perform. Do what you need to do, have the conversations that you need to have, come to an agreement - but you have an obligation under this contract. And saying, well, we don't feel like - on other projects, our profits are massive enough, even though they are substantial to continue doing work. And to allow this work stoppage to continue - relying on some public partners and government to also play hard ball alongside them - is just not what I think most people are hoping to see. We know workers are put in more perilous positions today than they have been in decades. And navigating just the challenges of being a concrete worker and working on a site is not an easy thing on the body, it's not an easy job to have - certainly through a pandemic it has not been a comfortable job to have. So, I do hope that the companies are encouraged to do what it takes to be good corporate citizens, to invest in their workers and in this community to get this done. But the blaming of workers is just something that I think more - most people are - see through and are tired of. [00:14:56] Heather Weiner: Yeah, I hope so. And I hope they do resolve this. I hope the companies do come to the table, do increase their wages and benefits so that they can get back to work. So that I can take the West Seattle Bridge to West Seattle again, because I - I live in Beacon Hill and boy, am I tired of that 3 minute drive turning into 35. [00:15:15] Crystal Fincher: It is a challenge. Well, this week there have been lots of conversations around public safety. One of them being - there are conversations with, between councilmembers and community members, Mayor Harrell and his administration announced a new hotspot policing strategy to address certain hotspots in the City as Erica Barnett and PubliCola covered extensively on Twitter and has been written about. This is a strategy that has been used - has been tried several times before in the past in former administrations - several former - to say, Well, let's just increase patrols in these areas, let's target some intersections, some blocks - and kind of flood them with police and patrols. And while it certainly is a visible sign that activity is happening and communities certainly don't want crime - they want to feel safe, they don't want to be victimized. And I don't think anyone wants that - that should not be happening. People do want to see action being taken to improve the safety in their communities. Whether more patrols are that action that people want to see is - certainly depends on who you ask, but it is not wanted across the board, certainly. And just the impacts of a hotspot strategy - how effective those are seems really questionable, given that this has been tried several times when SPD was smaller, when the budget was smaller, and Hey, let's hire more cops, let's increase the budget, let's invest in this hotspot strategy. And that has happened over and over and over again - yet, we're still having these same conversations about these hotspots. I certainly would hope that we would try strategy that's more in line with what data from across the country tells us actually helps to resolve crime completely. And that's getting closer to addressing the root causes and not after someone has been victimized - let's try and focus on that, let's prevent people from being victimized in the first place. It appears that Harrell is certainly moving forward with this hotspot strategy. So we will see how that turns out. But The Stranger had an article this week talking about how a CID community group was saying, Well, you've been saying that you have implemented this hotspot strategy in our neighborhood now. We don't see an improvement and we actually don't think that improvement is going to come from adding more patrol officers on our block. So it'll be interesting to see how that is responded to, what the results of this initiative are this time, and follow through what is and isn't working. [00:18:25] Heather Weiner: Yeah. I mean, we're just really - just moving people around from place to place to place. And so you have a hotspot team here, or an emphasis that they call it sometimes, and those people who are not housed still don't have any housing - you're not building any more housing - there's no place for them to go. And the people who are committing crime - fairly petty crime, but still disturbing crime - are working for much bigger syndicates of - and crime groups. And I think it was Andrew Lewis who said, Look, I really want to emphasize - I really think that we need to be spending resources on going after those kingpins, not going after the people, the pawns. By the way. I don't think he said it like that, but I think that's a brilliant analogy - I think he should be using that. [00:19:10] Crystal Fincher: I love that. [00:19:10] Heather Weiner: That was really good. Yeah - ring ring, Andrew. [00:19:13] Crystal Fincher: Well see - that's why you're a political consultant, Heather. That is why - right there. [00:19:17] Heather Weiner: Yeah. And - no, no. Yeah - anyway. Why am I a political consultant? We could talk about that next time. Well, not sure. [00:19:28] Crystal Fincher: There's a lot to be talked about, and this is happening with a backdrop of conversations that were covered and written about this week of - [00:19:35] Heather Weiner: Oh, I know - they were kind of shocking actually. [00:19:38] Crystal Fincher: Councilmember Sara Nelson basically, kind of literally pushing a "Seattle is Dying" narrative. [00:19:48] Heather Weiner: Didn't Bruce Harrell say that we weren't supposed to be doing that anymore? Didn't he literally say, I don't want to hear any more "Seattle is Dying." [00:19:55] Crystal Fincher: Well, he may have said he didn't want to hear it anymore, but a coalition of people who supported him certainly are not tired of it. And a number of those people also support Sara Nelson, who owns Fremont Brewing with her husband. And Sara invited 11 business representatives to discuss their public safety concerns at her Economic Development Committee hearing last Wednesday - this was covered on PubliCola in one of their Morning Fizz articles this week - but Nelson's committee doesn't deal with crime or homelessness, and isn't considering any legislation, but evidently Sara felt it was important to allow these business community members, and only business community members, to talk about their concerns. And again, those business owners really wanted more police - kind of at the end of the day. Sara Nelson was talking about, We're in a crisis. We need to increase the amount of police we have. We need to stop this horrible crime that is happening around the City and is out of control and the City is about to burn down - blah, blah, blah, blah. And again, to be clear, there are - people's concern about crime is absolutely legitimate. There are too many things happening that are bad. We do not want people to be victimized - I think that's really important to center. I think at the end of the day, if there was no crime, people would be happy about it, but wow is there so much data that is being ignored, really coincidentally by people who say that they want a data-driven strategy, that literally says that jailing people doesn't reduce crime at all. [00:21:47] Heather Weiner: No, if anything, it makes it worse because you're making people - [00:21:51] Crystal Fincher: There is actually evidence that it makes it worse because we don't focus on rehabilitation. We have to get in touch with the reality that if we're focused on - focusing on punishment is not the same thing as focusing on safety. We're really good at the punishment part, we're really good at making people feel pain - oftentimes it follows them for the rest of their lives as a consequence of committing crime. We're good at making some people and certain segments of our community feel good about that, other people don't feel any consequences for the types of crimes that they commit. But in this - we have to engage with the goal is - these people are reentering our communities. And they're our community members, and we have to help them reintegrate in society, and to be able to build a life - and to be productive on their own terms, to be stable in terms of housing and income, to have mental health resources available. And everything about our current carceral system destabilizes. There is no meaningful rehabilitation services provided. And the fact that you have been in the system is a red flag that people use in terms of employment and housing - that makes everything harder to do for people who are struggling to get started anyway. And at a time when people with no record, who are struggling just to be able to afford housing, imagine what it's like when you have people who just don't want to house you, who don't want to hire anyone with a record - what do you then do? We actually stack the deck against people being able to rebuild their lives and reintegrate into society. And our solutions have to be focused on that if we are going to make our communities safer. [00:23:57] Heather Weiner: Can I give you a totally - a little bit of a far-fetched conspiracy theory? So, I'm looking at the timing of this - this big push that we need more police, we need more police, we need more police, we need more officers - this is kind of what the answer is. And this is also during the time that the police union is entering into negotiations with the City. I don't think that that is - well, I don't know, it seems - I'm not saying it's causality - I was just bitching about coincidence does not equal causality, but I think that it - I don't know, it's an interesting timing issue. I also think it was really interesting that Debora Juarez took a swipe at Pike Place Market this week. [00:24:37] Crystal Fincher: That was interesting - also this week, Debora Juarez made comments talking about - she is afraid now to go to Pike Place Market because she feels that it's unsafe and that there are lots of issues around crime there, which raised a lot of eyebrows. [00:24:56] Heather Weiner: Yeah, I agree with her though. I think it is really dangerous. First of all, there's the donut place, right? That calls me in, right? Then you've got to go to the pierogi place - Piroshky's - oh my God - then that calls me in. Then there's Beecher's Cheese place - that's sucking me in. It is a really dangerous - and then they're giving out free samples everywhere. It is highly dangerous for me to go to Pike Place Market. [00:25:18] Crystal Fincher: And just so I correctly characterize Debora Juarez's words - she says she no longer goes to Pike Place Market downtown "unless it's Saturday in broad daylight" because of the "safety issues" there. Which was really interesting because Pike Place Market - one, closes at 6. And it is an area, as PubliCola points out, that is consistently bustling and full of people, which actually is one of the hallmarks of keeping places safe. I don't know if she is talking about feeling uncomfortable on her way to Pike Place Market - I am not sure, but that - if you were going to cite anything, seems like an odd citation and certainly made a lot of people raise their eyebrows and wonder - want some more clarification certainly from her, but also wonder if rhetoric is taking hold and if she is actually on those streets today or - you know that was - [00:26:28] Heather Weiner: This has always boggled my mind about the Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Businesses Association, where their talking point is to - ends up discouraging the very customers that they are trying to attract. Instead of telling everybody, Oh, it's unsafe here, don't come here. How does that help their business members? How do the Pike Place Market vendors feel about their City Councilmember discouraging people from going there? It just seems like it's not a great message strategy. And if I were them, I'd be talking about what they are doing to make it safer, what they are doing to welcome more people there. I do not want to undermine the fact that almost all the times we hear about people saying this - it's almost always women who are saying they don't feel safe. And I think that's a really valid point. If you are feeling less safe out on the streets right now as a woman, is there an increase in, particularly if you're a woman of color, is there an increase in a feeling of hostility from other - from men? What is happening out there, but putting more police on the streets and arresting more people, as you were saying, is not going to solve the problem. What's going to solve the problem is addressing - in a big way - the lack of housing, the lack of good paying jobs, the lack of economic and mental health and other health supports that people need so that they are not forced into crime. [00:27:51] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. And speaking of that - Inslee this week is pushing legislation that prioritizes homeless encampment removal near highways, which - he talked about this being very important and characterizes it as, This is how we're - we need to take care of those people who are living under the highways. It's an extremely unsafe environment, it's a hazard for them, for drivers. And a lot of times he is talking about the right of ways under or adjacent to freeways and highways. Now, this has been an area - some of these are out of sight, some of these are very visible. We all know that there are some people who are bothered by the sight of homelessness much more than the thought of people and their experiences outside in a hostile climate without shelter. But as we go through this, Inslee was talking about the need to clear these areas, for providing a budget - and in this bill, there is also money allocated for outreach services. Everybody talks about the goal of getting people into housing and in ways that we've seen before - having outreach workers working with the people who are in these encampments to get them into housing and also to track the outcomes of the people that they're working with to see - was it successful, was it not? We've talked at length about some of the issues before in this program about the current way we offer services and "offer services." And that a lot of the services that we have actually do not serve our entire unhoused population, that our current shelter system - and in many areas and in many spaces - is really hostile to people in terms of requiring people to be in by 6:30 PM, out by 6:30 or 7:00 AM. If someone has a job, actually - and there are a lot of unhoused people who are working, who have jobs and are employed that - that can conflict with your ability to be sheltered. And that then makes any particular shelter, the possibility of that impossible, keeping someone on the streets. Or they don't allow pets that people have, or they don't allow partners to be together, or there's no secure storage for people's belongings and the threat of their belongings not being secure. Or a variety of reasons or requirements that disqualify people, or make it impossible for them to hold on to the amount of stability that they currently have and not fall further and while taking advantage of those shelter services. And so while some services are available, we are seeing over and over and over again, that that does not serve a significant portion of our unhoused population. And we can keep doing the same thing and saying, Well, we offered them and they turned them down - for a variety of very legitimate reasons. And watch people continue to move around to different places and be unhoused, or we can meaningfully do it. There are different perspectives on this bill. There are organizations like the ACLU, some housing advocates and providers, who were saying this is going to make it really easy just to sweep people and without enough accountability to protect people's civil rights and to actually address this problem. Others are saying our entire goal and why we have allocated this money is to make it possible to get these folks housed. It's an interesting perspective. How do you see this? [00:31:46] Heather Weiner: Yeah, well - well, I keep seeing it as every - it all comes down to money. And I'm just going to circle it right back to where we started. It all comes down to money and the reason that - a lot of the reasons that we do not have this housing, we do not have the services - because we don't have the money to pay for it. And the reason we don't have the money is because the super rich have rigged the system so that they don't have to pay their fair share. And you're seeing more and more anger - I think people are just number one, sick and tired of being inside. They're sick and tired of it being gray, they're sick and tired of COVID, and they're looking. And when they do go outside, they see people suffering and they just get really angry. And who they should be angry at is the super rich that they can't see who are not paying into the system like they should. [00:32:28] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, that is - that certainly contributes to the problem. In this article, and I am looking and we'll link this in the show notes - this is an Urbanist article by Natalie Bicknell Argerious. A couple of things that they talk about are potentially some helpful things in that - different jurisdictions can only act on land that they own or have the rights to act on or engage with. There have been issues between the cities and the state when it comes to engaging with people in these state-owned right of ways. And confusion or complication around whether cities can even go into offer services or work with folks in these encampments and feeling that that has been largely off limits. This bill is an attempt to also address that and make it clear that the cities and state can work together, it establishes an office to basically enable that. And so we'll see what happens but there is concern, as there has been everywhere, that this will enable sweeps and kind of move people out of some areas that seem to be relatively, really low impact for the surrounding community. It is away from neighborhoods, it's away from other things. And in the case of Seattle, many aren't even visible by anyone and allowing people to find a shelter in community that works for them while being unhoused. There was also the concern and has been some freeway deaths of people who were crossing a freeway or crossing an on-ramp and being hit by cars. So, I mean, there is some - obviously we don't want people to be outside, we don't want people to be in danger - I think that is a legitimate concern. But with a legitimate concern, we need to address it with legitimate solutions. We will see how this plays out, but this - following it up with another article this week that we can talk about - talking about in Tacoma - having the situation where, Hey, they did a sweep in an I-705 homeless encampment, which is a highway through Tacoma. And starting just days later, people were returning because a sweep does not provide housing. The number one problem that has to be addressed if we're talking about homelessness is getting people housed. If a conversation about homelessness doesn't start with housing, then we're completely failing. There is no chance of actually meaningfully addressing this and we are seeing this as King 5 details it - talking about the Tacoma shuffle, which is the term that people use for, Yeah, you do this sweep, you clear an area, but people still actually don't have anywhere to go. They still don't have a home. And so they moved to another location for a little bit, they're pushed out of that location, and they're back at this one. So we're not doing anything, but just kind of moving the deck chairs around on the Titanic, just moving people around the community, and spending a ton of money to do it. The City of Seattle spent over $1 million to clear out an encampment under a freeway and install razor wire. Could we have spent that $1 million perhaps on helping people to get into stable and permanent housing? That's a conversation we have, but certainly looking at the Tacoma shuffle, looking at how this has happened so far in Seattle and other places - this is a statewide problem. And if we don't address the housing issue and not focus on - whether it's substance use disorder or mental health disorders, which are made worse oftentimes by being unhoused - if we don't start with housing and lead with housing, then we're not doing anything to address this problem. [00:36:52] Heather Weiner: Amen sister. [00:36:53] Crystal Fincher: Well, with that, we will wrap up the day. I certainly thank you for listening to Hacks & Wonks on this Friday, February 11th. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler and assistant producer is Shannon Cheng. Our wonderful co-host today was Seattle political consultant, Heather Weiner. You can find Heather on Twitter @hlweiner. That's H-L-W-E-I-N-E-R. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii - that's F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. And now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts. Just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar, be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our mid-week show delivered to your podcast feed. While you're there, leave a review, it really helps us out. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in this show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. Talk to you next time.

Everyone Gets a Trophy
Longhorns In A China Shop

Everyone Gets a Trophy

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 57:36


Paul and Kevin talk about NBC's CCP sponsored putrid Olympic ratings and ponder the depths of corporate media's disconnection from reality. Then it's on a rousing Longhorn win over Kansas. Is it coming together for Beard & Co? Obligatory Super Bowl talk ensues as they ponder Tre Hopkins NFL career and the vastly different models used to construct the Rams and Bengal rosters. FYI, Super Bowl prop bets are corruptible. Finally, what's going on at Auburn and What Would Bryan Harsin Do? The time is now for your new mortgage or refi with Gabe Winslow at 832-557-1095 or MortgagesbyGabe. Then get your financial life in order with advisor David McClellan with a free consult: dmcclellan@forumfin.com. Need a great CenTex realtor? Contact Laura Baker at 512-784-0505 or laura@andyallenteam.com. Send your questions and comments to trophymailbag@gmail.com.

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Video Games

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 23:24


People pleasantly pass the time playing these popular games. It's easy to get hooked on them because they are heavily hypnotic. They tend to transport us to another time and place where we can temporarily control our destiny. We'll uncover the vivid world of video games on this week's episode of FYI! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

The Multiorgasmic Mama: sexuality | motherhood | relationships | spirituality | intimacy | postpartum
189: 2 tools to reclaim your shadow self and break free from the matrix: Matrix free mama series 3

The Multiorgasmic Mama: sexuality | motherhood | relationships | spirituality | intimacy | postpartum

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 28:28


Have you been spiritually bypassing your shadow self in hopes of experiencing more “love and light”? FYI hot mama, your power and light is IN facing and reclaiming your shadow self.   Today, I'm giving you 2 tools based in science to reclaim your shadow self and break free from all that's keeping you stuck from living the life and legacy of freedom you desire.   Apply for Matrix Free Mama's 10 month coaching program by February 25, 2022 at https://bit.ly/matrixfreemama

Bryant and Me
Episode 81 - No End in Sight on NWSL Allegations and Abuse

Bryant and Me

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 107:49


Hey, welcome to our show. Episode 81 comes a few hours after even more allegations came out about Rory Dames and this time stretching to his time in youth soccer. There are some sensitive topics in this episode, FYI. We talk about these Red Star items: - How is Arnim still owning the team? - Walking away from a team is OK - Supporting players while not supporting the team We also talk a little about the Crew, Liverpool and Tottenham. PLUS, we answer a whole treasure trove of #AskBAM questions from YOU! We end on a high note, and have some fun, but the main conversation is difficult. We support folks in whatever decision they make towards the Chicago Red Stars, NWSL and US Soccer.

FYI - For Your Inglés
FYI - Pizza (bonus audio)

FYI - For Your Inglés

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 21:27


This mouthwatering treat has always tantalized our taste buds. The combination of crispy crust, tangy tomatoes, and melted cheese mixing together melts in your mouth as you munch away. Fire up the brick oven. We are going to prepare a piping hot pizza pie on today's FYI.If you want EXCLUSIVE bonus audio/video content along with, weekly/monthly classes, and tons of advantages; become a Patreon member at http://patreon.com/albertoalonsoSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/albertoalonso)

Stick and Hack Show
Stick & Hack Friday Funny 12.24.21

Stick and Hack Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 1:17


A joke and an FYI to get you through your day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bothering the Band
Bothering the Band - Buick Audra

Bothering the Band

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 51:16


Buick Audra is a Grammy-award-winning musician, writer, and activist living in Nashville. She is the guitarist, primary songwriter and vocalist in the melodic heavy duo, Friendship Commanders. She has a forthcoming full-length album called Conversations with My Other Voice, as well as an accompanying memoir. Not only is her music filled with courage, clarity and fire, but she is hilarious and helped us name the grocery bag in which you keep other grocery bags. FYI, it is now called a Monty.