Podcasts about fundamentally

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Best podcasts about fundamentally

Latest podcast episodes about fundamentally

The Network of Awareness
The Process of Self-Evaluation

The Network of Awareness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 103:08


In Season 5 Episode 44 ORRA speaks with guest Ahban from the TheBOCC about the importance of Self-Evaluation of one's spirit. Fundamentally, evaluation affirms what is good and right, while it seeks to redirect that which is deficient and unacceptable. Salvation occurs through the work of the Holy Spirit in a person's heart convicting of sin (self evaluation) and leading to repentance and faith in the Messiah.

The Acid Capitalist podcasts
How to Make $1 Million Shorting Tesla

The Acid Capitalist podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 94:24


Mark B. Spiegel @StanphylCap joins the Acid Capitalist for the conversation you've all been waiting for...DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME! ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Leave a five star review and comment here:  podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-acid-capitalist-podcasts/id1511187978THIS IS NOT INVESTMENT ADVICE!!00:00:00 - Intro00:02:41 - Ambivalence 00:07:00 - the edge? 00:10:30 - Tesla tales 00:13:22 - Fundamentally flawed? 00:25:10 - Narrative v Reality 00:30:33 - The Bull Case00:33:54 - The trend is your friend00:39:53 - Chart Madness 00:46:51 - Long value 00:57:62 - Seeing tomorrow 01:00:00 - Gold, gold you're making me old01:09:00 - About Mark @StanphylCap 01:10:00 - Lessons   01:14:00 - DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME 01:22:32 - Risk v Reward 01:26:00 - Portfolio ideas01:29:12 - Cut your head off! 01:32:00 - Be humble and flexible  THIS IS NOT INVESTMENT ADVICE!!

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How the trauma of mass shootings fundamentally change American communities

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 6:04


This week's mass shootings in California, plus two others in just eight days, left 25 people dead and wounded 15 others. They also left many people to cope with the trauma of these attacks. Jennifer Carlson is studying the impact and aftermath of gun violence for the National Science Foundation. She joined Geoff Bennett to discuss how these shootings fundamentally change communities. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Resolve's Gestalt University
ReSolve Riffs with David Cervantes of Pinebrook on the Increasing Importance of Political Economy

Resolve's Gestalt University

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 76:09


Our guest this week was David Cervantes, founder of Pine Brook Capital Management. With a rich and diverse background within the investment industry, in the last few years David has dedicated his time to managing his family office and has been developing a macroeconomic framework that considers the objectives and incentives of policymakers as the primary economic drivers. Our conversation included topics such as: Empirical economic analyses and insights from the ‘school of hard knocks' Fundamentally, a process of elimination – determining first what not to do Less theory, more data Where his approach materially diverges from traditional economics Cognitive Perspective – treating models with respect, but never reverence Macroeconomics is basically ‘political economy in drag' A dynamic process of incentives and decisions made by political actors The role of ‘timing luck' (or misfortune) A stroll down history lane – from WWII and the Great Society to the present A closer look at the gargantuan US federal budget deficit Current backdrop – an ‘inflationary supernova' fueled by fiscal impulse The Fed's current reaction function Home prices, OER and how they affect CPI Why interest rate volatility matters significantly more than absolute levels How interest rate vol spills over into the risk premia continuum And much more This is “ReSolve's Riffs” – live on YouTube every Friday afternoon to debate the most relevant investment topics of the day, hosted by Adam Butler, Mike Philbrick and Rodrigo Gordillo of ReSolve Global* and Richard Laterman of ReSolve Asset Management Inc.   *ReSolve Global Inc. refers to ReSolve Asset Management SEZC (Cayman) which is registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a commodity trading advisor and commodity pool operator. This registration is administered through the National Futures Association (“NFA”). Further, ReSolve Global Inc. is a registered person with the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority.  

The React Show
A Fundamentally New React: My Journey with React Server Components

The React Show

Play Episode Play 40 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 37:11 Transcription Available


React Sever Components are going to change so much of how we use and write React programs. In this episode we start to dive into Server Components and my journey using them to build an app.LinksAftershow On PatreonMy Book - Foundations of High Performance ReactEdited by: The Podcast Editorthereactshow.comManufacturing MattersInsights and interviews discussing trends, innovations, and advanced automation technologyListen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

No Parachute
We Are Not Fundamentally Screwed Up

No Parachute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 6:24


The Zeitgeist
Rea Dulcetta and Anton Restuta - Sharky.fi Co-Founders, EP 17

The Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 35:23


Rea Dulcetta and Anton Restuta - Co-Founders of Sharky.fi join Brian Friel on the latest episode of The Zeitgeist. Sharky.fi is the first escrow-less, decentralized NFT lending protocol on Solana that brings DeFi liquidity to NFTs. Are you NFT-rich but SOL-poor? Sharky.fi allows you to instantly borrow SOL by using the NFTs in your wallet as collateral. For lenders who want to earn yield on their SOL, Sharky.fi allows users to offer loans for specific NFTs in a collection and earn yield in return.In this episode, Rea and Anton share their journey into web3, how Sharky.fi works, their views on NFT royalties, and their vision for the future of NFT-backed lending.Show Notes:01:10 - Background / Origin Story 02:57 -  Why Solana and NFTs? 06:54 -  What is Sharky? How does it work?09:55 -  Transition from web 2.0 to Web 3.0? 15:18 -  NFT collection 20:03 - State of royalties on Solana26:24 -  Sharky's roadmap and vision for the future31:44 -  A builder they admire in the Web3 ecosystem34:10 -  Learn more about Sharky Full Transcript:Brian (00:06):Hey everyone and welcome to the zeitgeist, the show where we highlight founders, developers, and designers who are pushing the Web 3.0 Space forward. I'm Brian Friel, developer relations at Phantom and I'm super excited to have on today the founders of SharkyFi, Rea and Anton Sharky is the leading NFT lending protocol on Solana. Rea and Anton, welcome to the show.Rea (00:29):Hi, so excited to be here.Anton (00:31):Hey everyone. Thank you for having us.Brian (00:33):I'm super excited to have you guys on, I think we actually first met way back last summer. We were all working out at the Solana Labs office in San Francisco. For those who have never been there, it's a really cool environment where a bunch of ecosystem teams are huddled together, iterating on ideas. You guys were very early to this concept of NFT lending and since then you guys have just exploded in success. Before we dive into all things Sharky, I'd love to know a little bit about you guys in particular. Who are you guys, and how did you come to start working on this idea of Sharky in the Solana Labs office in San Francisco?Rea (01:10):Oh, yeah. Well, that's a pretty long journey, but yeah, I've always been a fan of startups. I think I started engaging in startups even when I was in college. I started hacking using my college student manual labor to really hack for free back then. And I really fell in love with the idea of being able to have so much impact. And I think that you can have impact anywhere if you're passionate about what you're doing. But there's something that's really intrinsically beautiful about being able to touch something so closely, be able to talk to someone about the problems they're having and then actually solve that. Do all parts of that. Being more than just a full-stack developer, being a full-desk founder where you do the design, you have to walk through the customer stories. So I found that entire thing really exciting.(01:59):So I've been bouncing around startups since and Anton and I actually co-founded a startup before this for engineers because we really like the idea of giving back. And Sharky is another way that we're giving back to another community. We're really, really proud to be part of the NFT Degen crowd and this is some way that we can actually give NFTs lasting power. We can give NFTs this sort of financial backbone that it needs to really be this asset that people don't have to take so lightly and think of as just JPEGs. So I'm really excited to be contributing to that cause.Brian (02:33):That's awesome. So Rea, you graduated from CalTech, I see you were the former founder of Slack community and then as you mentioned, you co-founded a startup with Anton. Both of you guys do have an engineering background. Anton, I'd love to know from you what brought you guys over from working in Web 2.0 Together? What was it about Solana and NFTs that made you guys think this is a problem we're solving?Anton (02:56):Yeah, so I had also pretty long journey before I came to Solana. I'm originally from Ukraine. I started way back when as just an engineer working there. I remember pretty well how board startup was pretty scary for me. It felt like, "Oh, it's a whole different world. I don't know if I'll ever be ready to help my own startup and things like that." Then I moved to the United States, moved to Bay Area and Silicon Valley and all of this became way easier and way more tangible. And I started working at a lot of early-stage startups, kind of preparing myself for the journey. Then co-founded my first company and then I met Rea after work we were working on again one of the startups and we met just engineers and we faced some problems in that company as engineers that we were unsolved and we thought, well how about we just hacked something over weekend and also had another common friend, mutual friend and was like, "Well, let's hack it together. It seems fun. Maybe we can solve this problem."(03:59):Most of the stories like that, it grew slowly, we got our first customer, we sold our own problem, and somebody wanted to pay us for it. Then we started thinking, "Well, maybe it's going to be a business." And we grew it to a pretty substantial profitable company. Our goal was to try building a company, try running a startup, try working together, but keep it small, keep the company small in all the separations. And I think we succeeded on that. And since then, I kind of worked a little bit on other Web 2.0 companies, worked on education, passionate about education, and we've been in crypto as an investor for quite some time. And I think last year in August, I think that's where I first heard about Solana, maybe in July.(04:48):But August when I seriously read about it, I listened to podcast with Anatoly (Yakovenko), was impressed with just general intelligence and thinking behind how conceptualization of ideas and the grand vision I get similar wipes, how that I got from Steve Jobs when I first listened to his presentations, and I wanted to build here and try how it feels. And I think I pitched Solana in kind of this whole space to be at, and we came to Miami for Solana's second hacker house, kind of met a bunch of people in the ecosystem, fell in love with all the people we met and the energy around. And that's where a decision was made to, well, how about we found the company here. And by that time, we already were passionate about NFTs and saw them as the future, if anything would bring crypto to the real world. I think the first theme of concept that is likely to do it is NFTs.(05:47):And it felt good to be early in that journey. It felt good to kind of try and build something fundamental. And I think financial products are very fundamental for NFTs and that's kind of how we got to it. And we were not sure at first, we were all very confused kind of how things work in general and not how technology works I guess how dynamics of building Web 3.0 companies works. That was definitely a new and very, very interesting journey. But yeah, that's how we met and that's how we started.Brian (06:18):Yeah, I love that. And so you guys had this key early insight that Solana was unique. You mentioned listening to Natoli, getting those Steve Job vibes, but then also that NFTs were really what was bringing it into the mainstream a little bit more. At the time that I met you guys, pursuing this financialization of NFTs was basically unheard of in Solana. I'd definitely say that was a contrarian bet and then now that's worked out pretty well. Could you walk through for the uninitiated, what is Sharky? What is it that you guys are doing for people? How does all of this work under the hood?Rea (06:54):So what we do is allow you to take all these JPEGs in your wallet and basically use it as a credit card. If you're willing to put the JPEG on the line, then you get access to a lot more of that liquidity. So anytime people say, "I'm rich in JPEGs, but illiquid AF." This is what Sharky comes into play, you can take those NFTs that you have and actually put them as collateral in a loan and then you can take out that money and do whatever you want with it and then you pay back that loan and then you get an NFT back.(07:32):Now, traditionally this requires you to actually put your whatever, if you're using a physical object, your grandmother's heirloom ring, you would have to put it in a safe box somewhere and not have access to that during the time that you have access to the money. But what we actually have done is allowed you to be able to do this in wallet. So you keep your NFTs in your wallet, you don't actually have to send them away somewhere and never see them again. You hold onto the NFT during the loan, and you just can't move it around, so it's locked in your wallet. So the escrow is effectively staying in your wallet and then when you pay back the loan, then the NFT gets unfrozen and you can do whatever you want with it.Anton (08:11):Yeah, and I guess the second side of what Sharky is about is we also allow you to be a lender. We'll allow you to lend money versus borrowing them. So in the traditional world, it's either you go to a bank and bank lends your money or maybe you go to some pawn shop and that small pawn shop lends your money. There is not really a lot of opportunity to be a lender just as an individual. And that's what Sharky also allows and that's one of the most talked about features I would say. You hear lots of stories on Twitter, Twitter threads, basically how to make money in the bear market, and usually Sharky comes up. So as a lender you can lend money. I would say you need to be somewhat knowledgeable about the space. You don't have to be an expert, but at least be aware of what's going on. And you can make a pretty substantial yield with Sharky in the current volatile market. But yeah, so that's that we're kind of creating this two-sided market in a sense. Rea (09:09):Brian, aren't you a lender?Brian (09:11):I have tried it out. It is a pretty interesting novel phenomenon. We have a few folks at Phantom who I would say are, I don't know if the term whale is right because it's Sharky, but giant sharks, I guess. But...Rea (09:23):Whale sharks.Brian (09:25):I am curious because to build all this, you mentioned that building a Web 3.0 company is pretty different from your previous Web 2.0 ventures. It's not just a consumer app that you guys are building, which is already hard enough trying to build a two-sided marketplace, get these consumers. You guys also had to build the plumbing and the protocol for all this to happen as well. Talk a little bit about that, the difference between your guys' success and Web 2.0 and what lessons you guys had to learn to bring that knowledge into Web 3.0.Rea (09:56):I think one of the biggest shockers when we came to Web 3.0 is seeing the amount of traction that people were having with no product or even the semblance of one people were raising from community and raising from VCs with, “I have a plan”, and sometimes that plan isn't even very well thought out, but I mean I attribute that to the infancy of the space at the time. I think at the beginning of any bubble that's still inflating, there's just sort of dumping money in and it's exciting. Everyone's euphoric on that whole experience. And now I would say this ecosystem, it's been only a few years, but for most people in this space, it's only been one year. And it's already mature to the point where I see lots of founders that were famous, no longer around, or lots of products that were literally the epitome of – that was your role model when you grew up on Solana.(10:55):And that's also not no longer around. And I think what you see is some of the lasting teams who are continuously building and that's something that I have to hats off to everyone who sort of stuck through the storms on this. But even beyond that, something that I'm noticing is all of that hype and that big rush of raising before pre-product and all of that. That is no longer the extreme meta that we're seeing. We're seeing people having to prove yourself a little bit more, but what I think is also I guess coming to some of the pros I see in Web 3.0 is it's so much more of a community atmosphere to build in. I think previously there was a lot more in Web 2.0 we see more under isolation or you kind of go heads down until you either make it or break it.(11:38):Whereas in Web 3.0 there's a lot more of this open communication. I would say it's almost more similar to if you ever participated in a kickstarter campaign for everyone out there who's Web 2.0 and doesn't understand Web 3.0 yet, you see this continuous discourse while they're sort of raising from the community and having this conversation back and forth. And there's a little log of how the founders are going about this. "Oh, today we had production issues, so sorry about that." But we really nailed a prototype on this other thing. We finally got some of our supply line issues figured out. And that open communication, that transparency is so important, and I dare say a lot of times we kind of idolize some of these tech founders whether Web 2.0 or Web 3.0, but they're human, and their teams are also human and they're really worth learning from.(12:27):So a lot of times you have these stories and you hear and the more transparent a team is, the more you actually get to be a part of that process and it builds so much compassion within the ecosystem because a lot of times I think it can become you're building this thing you promised this time and you said you're going to do the deliver this exact thing, what's up with that? And I think this discourse. One, makes it much more fun to build it. And two, allows the community to be much more excited because a lot of times if you only get the finished product every quarter or whatever, you're not able to really stay continually engaged. So I think a lot of these things makes this much more of a more welcoming atmosphere to build in both for the people we're building it for and for the builders.Anton (13:10):Yeah, I would say it's hard to separate Web 3.0 building from just building and crypto space and I think this space is just very volatile. So I think another side of the story of what Web 3.0 is describing. There's a lot of apps, but there's also lots of downs. There's like market downturns or just space volatility. There's always things that are hard to predict. You wake up every morning and you kind of read the news, Twitter and all kinds of things can happen positive and negative.(13:44):And unlike Web 2.0 companies that move much slower, everything moves faster and if everyone moves faster, it doesn't mean everything is just better. It just means in the condensed time you'll experience these ups and downs. And to me, it's definitely a more challenging aspect I guess as a founder I feel like I needed to step up in terms of mental health and mental stability even more than usual and don't let myself to be too high or too down and try to be more even here that less reactive and more strategic and it's sounds generic but it's real. This pain is real, and the hardship is real.Brian (14:27):Yeah, one year in the crypto ecosystem is living 10 or 20-years in traditional markets, just compressing those ups and downs not only in the market but also as a founder, journey, and all of that as well. I definitely resonate with that. One other thing just on this topic of differences between Web 2.0, Web 3.0 is that you mentioned the community buy-in aspect, you have this community that's rabid. If you haven't seen Sharky's Discord, you go in there at any time you guys have a product update, it's like there's a stadium in there that's going crazy. But in addition to all that, you guys made a pretty interesting decision. You guys, not only are you this protocol for lending NFTs, you also created your own NFT collection. Talk a little bit about that. What is this NFT collection? Why did you guys decide to launch this?Rea (15:18):We are an NFT centric company, so it only made more sense to completely Degen-ify ourselves. I mean there are also business aspects to which I'll let Anton dive into the more boring parts, but I think that has just been just so fun. I mean our entire team is really creative and for me, I've been a part of many NFT projects, whether as a consultant on the team or just help with some of the strategy there, but never taken something that's really fully our own. And we considered hiring other artists, but since we had people that actually are artistic and on our own team, like myself included or championing that effort, it was just really fun to actually take something, give back to the community in a wholly different way than we have in the past with our tech without products. But now actually being able to take our art to the next level and to put it out there with the Sharky standard, that was really, really fun.Anton (16:14):So there are several aspects of why. One, we planned this from the beginning when we started the company. We thought we would do an NFT sale sometime around August and we did this in October. So we were not even that far in our estimation in obviously this aspect of fundraising, kind of public fundraising and you get extra funds for company runway operations, all of that. But it is also what we thought would be useful, but we didn't realize how useful. It's one of the best growth mechanisms for the company because you build in so many incentives for people to promote your company without you doing this. It's kind of like this network snowball effect and that's very powerful. I think all of our metrics pretty much doubled within just two weeks of intense... I wouldn't say promotions because we didn't do promotions of us announcing that we're going to have an NFT collection and how it's all going to work and just trying to sell that vision, pretty much within two weeks we got more customers than we ever had gotten.(17:20):So that's just a very powerful growth strategy. And a lot of companies run NFT projects as a fundraiser before they have a product. I think it's also super useful and nice, but it accelerates growth basically if you do have a product. And third aspect, we want to embrace building in Web 3.0, and I think building in Web 3.0, the major difference from Web 2.0 is building together with your users, users/ investors and that social building is impossible without aligning incentives and alignment of incentives. It basically allows everybody to be part of the journey, allowing everybody to invest, to be holder, to get benefits from platform growth. And that's what we ultimately wanted to do, and experience how it feels to truly build Web 3.0 company, truly build community and succeed with community together.(18:09):So yeah, I guess NFT is not the only way to do it. Realizing and talking through the ideal process would feel somewhat similar but not exactly. I think the NFT community is unique in that it is formed by more, I guess, demanding investors, some smaller, less experienced, but also much more focused on being involved, versus just basically observing the company. So those are the reasons why I would say.Rea (18:37):I would just add that beyond all of the very reasonable or good reasons that we've already said, the community every single day was like when NFT. So I think that was also a pretty big driver for us.Brian (18:49):Fair, definitely fair. It's pretty wild when you go on Twitter, and you just see someone that you've never interacted with before wearing your NFT as a profile picture. In your guys' case you have these cute little baby sharks that are going to power up as the protocol evolves. They're definitely pretty cool. But yeah, I agree it's a pretty wild and unexplored lever for growth when you have users who just are continually showing their allegiance and buying in with displaying these NFTs month, after month, after month. It's pretty wild to see.(19:21):Now that you guys have your own NFT collection, I have to ask you guys, the hard-hitting question that the Solana ecosystem is pondering right now is, what is your take on the state of royalties on Solana? So for those who don't know, every NFT sale traditionally has paid out a percent royalty to the creator, it's baked into the tokens metadata, but this was not enforced programmatically. It required some sort of social buy-in by the marketplace or whoever was selling it. And now months into this NFT journey that's coming under fire, what have you guys seen in Sharky that informs your opinion on what's the state of royalties on Solana?Anton (20:03):Yeah, I think we're in this state where we're trying to figure out how to make it work. So clearly, how it was working before is not sustainable. So right now, it's kind of like everything is broken and with really building and rebuilding, I think incentive systems and also technology, how to make it all possible. I think Sharky's stance is that there needs to be a choice at the time of creating a collection allowing holders to decide whether they want to invest into something where they have to pay royalties or not. I think it's not great to do it retroactively, kind of remove royalties from project creators or introduce royalties to holders when they didn't agree to them, and the choice wasn't possible before. And right now, we have quite a few approaches that make it possible. None of the technical solutions are perfect. So unfortunately, we will have to choose some trade-offs.(21:00):Whatever we choose, we have to support two things. One, we should allow existing collections to migrate all at once without making it to be a holder's decision. So basically, the choice that I described before, allowing holders to decide what projects they want to invest in. Unfortunately, we'll have to kind of reinstate this and make everybody re-decide that if... Let's say as Sharky, we want royalties because it's part of our benefits for holders, part of benefits for the team as well. But maybe some holders don't want royalties, so they would have to exit the project at that point in time and that would be a decision. But what I don't want to happen, what I think would be really bad for the space, if all holders would have to decide one by one whether they want to upgrade their NFT to be royalties enforced or not. I think that should be a choice for creators, for collection owners.(21:52):So that's one aspect of it. Otherwise, it'll be a fractured ecosystem. It'll be kind of like, oh, within the same collection, some sharks from our collection support royalties, some don't. And there'll be confusion all over the place. And second, there is this debate right now. So basically, for context, all of the solutions involve some kind of whitelisting and blacklisting protocols that NFTs allow you to interact with in some sense. In my worldview, the approach with blacklisting is much more forgiving. Imagine if we go with a whitelisting approach, I think there will be a negative consequence for the ecosystem. Let's say Solana Hackathons. I want to experiment and build a new protocol and deploy it to main net and demonstrate how it works. If that protocol is not whitelisted, I cannot demonstrate this using any popular NFTs that use this royalty enforcement because I need to go through approval, I need to get some DAO or some authority or somebody to get my protocol approved.(22:48):And I think that extra hoop, that extra step, just would stagnate innovation and would create a lot of roadblocks, but it'll be in the sense, some kind of perfect solution excluding that because then we can only trade on these whitelisted marketplaces or at least the protocols and everything is great. But I think the trade-off is very significant. Versus if we go with a blacklisting approach, then we can just say, "Hey, you're not allowed to trade with these protocols that are not respecting royalties and the trade-off there will be like, there would be a lot of attempts and protocols (created) to work around royalties short-term and as a space we would have to play the catch up game. We'll have to keep blacklisting them, and keep kind of finding solutions for that. But I think it's better, I think it's better than the alternative because we're still open for innovation. We are kind of permissionless by default, if that makes sense, and require less authority, less authority on decisions. So not a lot of solutions allow for those two. And I don't know where we land in this space, but that's our viewpoint, I guess, on this year.Rea (23:50):I was also going to add that with royalties, you also kind of have this free rider problem if you allow everyone to pick and choose what they want to pay. Because whether it's a team that's not really doing anything and then they're just collecting royalties and you kind of feel bad, they're like, "Oh man, we're all paying and they're just sitting on their asses, that's so messed up." Versus a team that's really actively putting out content or new ways for you to earn or whatever it is that the team is doing. And then you have a bunch of people that don't pay for that and then a bunch of people who think it's worthwhile. So they pay for that. The creators aren't really getting paid for their work and the people that aren't paying for that anyway are also receiving the benefits. So what is the incentive to be a good actor in this case?(24:37):So I think that there are some ways that we've thought about within Sharky about how we incentivize, and people who are not caring about these benefits don't need to have these benefits and they don't want to pay for these benefits. But the people who do care about these benefits can actually be a part of the contributing community. So I think this is a problem that really requires a tailored approach according to what your company or project is doing. And I think I would just like to see more people put more intent towards this, whether you're just a part of the ecosystem, someone who's buying and selling flipping NFTs or a team.Brian (25:08):I think that's a great-nuanced take, which we don't always hear on the crypto Twitter side of things, but I agree it's definitely in this state right now whereas you said, Anton, we kind of have a way to just wipe a clean slate and rebuild this. And there are a lot of benefits to this Web 3.0 ecosystem where it is permission lists by default and people like you guys can come in and build a protocol idea without having to ask anybody's permission and keeping that spirit alive, I think is pretty important.(25:37):So I want to look ahead a little bit, what do you guys see as the future for Sharky? So today, Rea, we started this podcast, you said if you have JPEGs and you're JPEG rich but cash poor, you can lend these things out, you risk losing the NFT, but you can get immediate liquidity on the flip side of that. There's some speculators who think that they'll be able to make a pretty good ROI, assuming that the market holds up. Obviously not financial advice, very, very risky, but that's the current state of things today. As you guys look out about the long-term potential for what NFTs could be, what financialization of NFTs could be lending of these things, what excites you guys? What's on the roadmap and on the vision for Sharky?Anton (26:24):Yeah, it's a good question. So I think we'll be releasing a series of new products next year. So that's one exciting thing. Basically, applying our learnings to make the product better. One of the big ones is mortgages, or Buy Now, Pay Later. We've already been seeing experiments in this space with that. And yeah, basically the overall goal is to allow you to finance JPEGs on the entire spectrum of that. Whether you hold this JPEG or maybe you don't yet hold this JPEG, maybe you just want to get it, but you don't have enough funds to get it or maybe you want to just buy with leverage and buy several. So we want to release that product to the market, allowing you to basically pay a down payment and get an effect. You pay the full price of the NFT later, but still start being a holder immediately. Imagine you can join MonkeDAO and only pay 20% of the price and kind of see what's it about.(27:24):And maybe if you don't like it, you can sell it back but you only invested a fraction, or for any other benefits, you can look at the community or you can just trade. There's two different aspects. Deciding whether you want to be a holder or just trade in with leverage, which we believe will be a pretty popular use case as well. Obviously, there's a lot of nuance with our existing product and we are adding more features to that, but I think one of the things that I'm excited about is not directly a Sharky product feature, but it's more experimenting with user experience in this space. And we've been trying to pioneer at least some approaches and try to see how we can establish new norms. Right now, every interaction with a DeFi protocol on Solana on other chains, I call it click approve UX.(28:12):Basically, you do some meaningful action and then you need to approve a transaction in your wallet. What we want to experiment with is to build a different kind of experience that allows you to interact with protocol and look ahead, do actions, several of them, and then approve it all at once. Basically, making this experience more smooth and fluent. And that's kind of a UX pattern that we are developing. I'm personally very excited about releasing it and seeing how users will accept it, and see whether other protocols and other products will also try to do something similar. And on the NFT side of things, we are releasing our gamified revenue share program. It's not a passive revenue share, it's kind of requires users to actively contribute to the platform, engage with our product and with our NFTs and with that we will share some portion of upside with them. So that's coming pretty soon. And for the next year there's a lot of secret strategies and secret features for our holders that we will release over time. Did I miss anything, Rea, do you think? Like anything major?Brian (29:20):Anything for the clamoring Discord channel that is asking when, when, when any hidden nugget you can drop in here.Rea (29:28):I was like, "Are we going to drop some alpha?" Yeah, I mean I think that there's probably some other further development. I should probably check with the marketing team before I say anything crazy. But there's further development on the NFT that I think the community already knows about and that involves more goodies for the people who are really excited about sharks and love the art style. So there's a lot there. And yeah, I think that's it.Anton (29:54):Yeah. And like you mentioned something about the future of NFTs, how we see that. I think it's very interesting to see the first attempts to bring NFTs to real world assets and tie them together in some ways. And we're already talking to teams who are trying to do that. So our vision is to stay in the space of JPEGs, but also branch into the space of where NFTs start representing assets that could be your car or any collectibles and stuff like that, and provide financial infrastructure there. It'll be a pretty different product because the market is different, volatility is different, but fundamentally it's kind of the same type of incentive systems.(30:36):Fundamentally it's like lenders. Some people could be lenders, people could be borrowers, with just a different structure and maybe different terms of loans. So we definitely want to be in that space as well. And that also requires us to not just build a protocol, but requires us to gain expertise in those specific domains. Because lending is not created equal. What works for NFTs, and JPEGs may not work for collectibles, may not work for houses or cars. It requires different risk models and probably slightly different products. So yeah, that's kind of the vision for the next three to five years is expanding to those areas as well.Brian (31:13):Yeah, that's exciting. I think we can all kind of picture a world where one day those assets are represented on-chain. Obviously, the frictionless nature of transferring those makes a lot of sense. But as you noted, it's important to stay in-the-now and be realistic that right now there's a lot of JPEGs,  and I'd say that you guys are handling that use case pretty well. This has been an awesome discussion. One closing question we always love to ask our users, and I want to hear this take from both of you is who is a builder that you admire in the Web 3.0 ecosystem?Anton (31:45):Yeah, it's really hard to pick one. I would say top of mind is the Tensor team, Tensor founders. So I think both of them are pretty amazing builders. It's impressive to me how just two of them, how much they built and how quickly in this space. And not just with Tensor. I was following their journey before, and they built lots of cool things for the ecosystem and they also just have a good intent. Things they built, they try to align those incentives with just like what's good for the space. Not just like, "Oh, let's build a cool product." There's plenty of really good builders in Solana that just like to build things, but the reason I'm highlighting that team, I think they have a combination of both. They're really good builders but also built things that are very, very important and useful for the space and make the space better. So that's my take. It's Richard  and Ilmoi from Tensor Trade.Brian (32:42):Yeah, Tensor Trade, the real-time NFT trading platform. Rea, your take.Rea (32:48):Yeah, like Anton said, it's pretty hard to pick one. I think if I had to hat tip to my origins, I learned a lot of my early technical knowledge on Solana from Brett, who's now at Star Atlas. And he's done a lot of, I think, open-source work that is just a lot of the necessary work that goes into making the ecosystem something, who builds for the builders, is kind of how I think about him.(33:16):And so he is also been really fun to talk to about the different, if you want to look sort of long and far at what's going to happen to the technology down the line and what are some of the upcoming scalability issues, roadblocks that Solana faces, if you want to just get a pulse on that to be able to build with that in mind so you're not constantly building to catch up. You always have really good conversations with Brett, and I just really like that he's also someone who you can tell is genuinely passionate about the space. He's working on his own time to learn more and also to contribute more. And a lot of times when something happens in the ecosystem, if no one knows what's going on, you can still go talk to him about it. And he always, we can always theory craft and it's always a good time.Brian (34:02):Oh, that's great. Well, Rea and Anton, this has been an awesome conversation. Thank you so much for your time. Where can people go to learn more about Sharky?Rea (34:12):Well, the Sharky.fi is a really good place to start. You can look at the beautiful order books. We've recently rolled out some performance improvements, so that's going to be really fun. And I think nothing creates a better impression than making money. So go and make some money. Not financial advice.Anton (34:31):You can read over white paper on the homepage. Kind of gives you a high-level overview. Otherwise, if you just type “Sharky lend Twitter” in Google, you'll see threats that are written by the community. At this point we've seen more than 10 just not even sponsored by us in any way. Just some lender supporters describe how to use Sharky. And I think those are the best to learn because it's through the eyes of real users and there are even YouTube walkthroughs of how to open Sharky. Yeah, it's a pretty rich ecosystem already.Brian (35:05):Awesome, thank you so much. Anton and Rea, founders of SharkyFi.Anton (35:09):Yeah, thank you for having us. It was a pleasure.

No Parachute
We Are Not Fundamentally Screwed Up

No Parachute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 6:24


Screaming in the Cloud
Defining and Nurturing a Self-Supporting Community with Alyss Noland

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 33:48


About AlyssAlyss Noland is the head of Developer Relations Relations and Product Marketing at Common Room, an intelligent community-led growth platform. She previously led product marketing for Developer Experience at GitHub where she focused on open source community investment and helping engineering teams find success through development metrics and developer-focused research. She's been working in tech since 2012 in various roles from Sales Engineering and Developer Advocacy to Product Marketing with companies such as GitHub, Box, Atlassian, and BigCommerce, as well as being an advisor at Heavybit. Links Referenced: Common Room: https://www.commonroom.io/ Heavybit: https://www.heavybit.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/PreciselyAlyss Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/PreciselyAlyss TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Tailscale SSH is a new, and arguably better way to SSH. Once you've enabled Tailscale SSH on your server and user devices, Tailscale takes care of the rest. So you don't need to manage, rotate, or distribute new SSH keys every time someone on your team leaves. Pretty cool, right? Tailscale gives each device in your network a node key to connect to your VPN, and uses that same key for SSH authorization and encryption. So basically you're SSHing the same way that you're managing your network.So what's the benefit? You'll get built-in key rotation, the ability to manage permissions as code, connectivity between two devices, and reduced latency. You can even ask users to re-authenticate SSH connections for that extra bit of security. Try Tailscale now - it's free forever for personal use forever.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Logicworks. Getting to the cloud is challenging enough for many places, especially maintaining security, resiliency, cost control, agility, etc, etc, etc. Things break, configurations drift, technology advances, and organizations, frankly, need to evolve. How can you get to the cloud faster and ensure you have the right team in place to maintain success over time? Day 2 matters. Work with a partner who gets it - Logicworks combines the cloud expertise and platform automation to customize solutions to meet your unique requirements. Get started by chatting with a cloud specialist today at snark.cloud/logicworks. That's snark.cloud/logicworksCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I often wonder how to start these conversations, but sometimes it's just handed to me and I don't even have to do a whole lot of work. My guest today is Alyss Noland, who's the Head of Developer Relations Relations and Product Marketing at Common Room. Alyss, thank you for joining me.Alyss: Thanks for having me, Corey. I'm really excited to be here.Corey: So, developer relations relations. It feels like an abstraction that has been forced to be built on top of another abstraction that has gotten too complicated, so as best I can tell, you are walking around as a human equivalent of Kubernetes.Alyss: Oh, gosh, I would really hope not to be a human equivalent of Kubernetes. I think that would make me an octopus. But—Corey: Yeah, “What did you say about me?” Yeah.Alyss: [laugh].Corey: “I didn't come here to be insulted, Quinn.” Yeah.Alyss: No, like listen, I love octopodes. Which [tattoo 00:01:24] is which? So, developer relations relations. Yes, it's an abstraction on an abstraction. A really critical level, it is how do I relate? Can I relate to people that are in the developer relations profession at large?We are at the point at which this is a somewhat poorly-defined area that is continuing to grow. And there's a lot of debates in that space and so I'm really excited to be at an organization that will give me a platform to try and move the industry forward.Corey: Your relatively recent career history is honestly fascinating to me. You spent about a year and a half as a senior developer advocate at Box. And as anyone who's ever tried it knows, it's very hard to beat Box [beatboxing noises]. But you tried and went to GitHub, in which case, you basically transitioned pretty quickly from a Senior Product Marketing Manager to Director of Product Marketing, where you were the go-to-market lead for GitHub Copilot.Alyss: Yeah, that was a really interesting project to be on. I started off at the technical preview back in 2021, launching that too—it ended up being with about a little over a million, two million folks in technical preview. And it's fairly new to the market. There was nothing else—or at the time, there had been nothing else that was using a descendant of GPT-3. There was nothing else using a descendant of GPT-3 to generate suggestions for code to—there were a couple that were using GPT-2, but the amount of language coverage they had was a little bit limited, what they were suggesting was a little bit limited.And it's hard to say, like, highlight of my career, but at that point in time, I would say probably, highlight of my career to be able to work on something with that opportunity for impact.Corey: As someone who was in the technical preview and now tried to be a paying customer of it, but I can't because of my open-source work, it wound up giving it to me for free. I found it to be absolutely transformative. And I know I'm going to get letters and I don't even slightly care because it's not, “I'm going to tab-complete my application.” If a tool can do that, your application is probably not that complex. No, for me, what I find incredibly valuable is the ability to tab-complete through obnoxious boilerplate. CloudFormation, I am not subtweeting you; I am calling you out directly. You are wordy and obnoxious. Fix yourself.And especially in languages that I don't deal with day-to-day—because I'm not a full-time developer—I forget certain parameters or argument order or things like that and being able to effectively tab-complete is awesome for that use case. It's not doing my job; it's automating the crappy part of my job. And I absolutely love it for that.Alyss: Yeah, and was really interesting working on a common portion of product marketing work is that we build messaging houses. We try to identify where's the value to the user, to the organization at large, depending on, like, who it is we're trying to sell to, how does that ladder up from, like, an IoT to a manager. And so, one of the things that I got really excited about as we started to see it—and there's some great work that Dr. Eirini Kallaimvakou has published that I would definitely refer to if you're interested in diving deeper into it—is the way in which Copilot and this, like, ability to improve the boilerplate experience, improve the boring shit—automate the boring shit, if you will—is about developer satisfaction. It's not about making you build your commits faster or about having more lines of code that you like get deployed out; it's about making your jobs suck less.Corey: Well, if you spent, what was it roughly two years, give or take, at GitHub between your various roles—and yes, I'm going to pronounce it ‘GIF-ub' because that's my brand of obnoxious, so I'm going to go for it—you went to Common Room. Let's begin there. What does Common Room do, exactly?Alyss: So, Common Room is an intelligent community-led growth platform. And there's a few things kind of packed into that really short description, but the idea is that we've seen all of these product-lead grows businesses. But at a critical point, and something we've seen at GitHub, which is a product-led growth company, it's something that we've seen at Atlassian, Asana, you name half a dozen different, like, SaaS companies, self-hosted software, open-source, community is at the heart of it. And so, how do you nurture that community? How do you measure that community? How do you prove that the work that you're doing is valuable?And that's what Common Room is setting out to do. And so, when I saw—like, they're not the only person or organization in the market that's doing this, but I think they're doing it exceptionally well, and with really great goals in mind. And so, I'm enthused to try and facilitate that investment in community for more organizations.Corey: One of the challenges that I have seen of products in the community space is it tended, historically, to go in really, I guess I'll call them uncomfortable directions. In the before times, I used to host dinner parties near constantly here, and someone confide into me once—after, you know, six beers or so, because that's when people get the excitingly honest—they mentioned that, “Yeah, I'm supposed to wind up putting these dinners into Salesforce”—or whatever the hell it was—“To track the contacts we have with influencers in this space.” And that made me feel so profoundly uncomfortable. It's, you're invited here to spend time with my friends and my family. You're meeting my kids, it's, yeah, this is just a go-to-market motion and you can [BLEEP] on out of here and never come back.And I did not get that sense to be clear and I'm told the company wound up canceling that horrifying program, but it does feel like it's very easy to turn an authentic relationship into something that feels remarkably sleazy. That said, Common Room has been around for a while and I have yet to hear a single accusation that you folks have come within a thousand miles of doing that. How do you avoid the trap?Alyss: It's a slippery slope, and I can't say that Common Room creates any kind of like enforcement or silos or prevents organizations from falling into this trap. Fundamentally, the way in which community can be abused, the way in which these relationships can be taken advantage of, at least from the perception of the parties that initially built the relationship, is to take the context out of them, to take the empathy out of them, take the people out of them. And so, that is fundamentally left to the organization's principles, it's left to how much authority does community have within the business relative to a sales team. And so first, being able to elevate community in such a way to show that they are having that impact already without having to turn the community into a prospect pool is, I think, one of the critical first steps, and it's something that we've been able to break through initially by connecting things like Slack, Discord, Twitter to show, here's all these people talking about you, here's all the things that they're saying, here's the sentiment analysis, and also, now we're going to push that into Salesforce. So, you can see that this started out in community and it was fostered there. Now, you can see the ROI, you don't need to go hitting up our community contacts to try and sell to them because we're doing it on your behalf in a very real way.Corey: Part of the challenge, I think, is that—and you've talked to me about this in previous conversations we've had—that so much of community is distilled down to a sales motion, which let's be direct, it kind of sucks at, in some levels, because it's okay, great, I'm here to talk to you about how community works. Well, in the AWS community, for example, the reason that formed and is as broad and fast as it is because AWS's documentation is Byzantine and there's a sort of shared suffering that we all get to commiserate over. And whenever AWS tries to take, “Ownership,” quote-unquote, of its community, right, that doesn't actually work that way. They have community watering holes, but to my understanding, the largest AWS-centric Slack team is the Open Guide to AWS's Slack team, which now has, at last count, 15,000 people in it. I'm lucky enough to be the community lead for that project.But it was pre-existing before I got there and it's great to be able to go and talk to people who are using these things. It doesn't feel like it is owned, run, or controlled—because it's not—by AWS themselves. It's clear from the way that your product has evolved, that you feel similarly around that where it's about being aware of the community rather than controlling the community. And that's important.Alyss: Absolutely. And one of the ways in which we, like, highlight this as soon as you're in the product, is being able to show community responsiveness and then what percentage of those responses are coming from my team members. And frankly, as someone who's previously set strategy for developer relations teams, for developer communities, what I want to see is community members responding to each other, community members knowing what's the right place to look, what's the right answer, how am I ensuring that they have the resources that they need, the answers that they need. Because at the end of the day, I can't scale one-to-one; no one can. And so, the community being able to support itself is at the heart of the definition of community.Corey: One of the other problems that I've seen historically, and I'll call it the Chef problem because Chef had an incredibly strong community, and as someone who is deep in the configuration management space myself, but never use Chef, it was the one that I avoided for a variety of reasons at the time, it was phenomenal. I wound up going to ChefConf, despite not being a Chef user, just to spend time with some of the great people that were involved. The blunder that they made before they were acquired into irrelevance by progress—and to be fair, the industry changed direction toward immutable infrastructure in ways that were hard to foresee—but the problem is, they made was hiring their entire community. And it doesn't sound like that would be a bad thing, but suddenly, everyone who was talking about the product had a Chef email address, and that hits very differently.Alyss: It does. And it goes back to that point of trying to maintain those authentic relationships. And if we're to step outside of tech, I have a background prior to tech in the video game industry, and that was a similar problem. Nearly every single community-made application, extension ends up getting acquired by some organization, like Curse, and then piped full of ads, or the person that you thought you could ask or to see build some other better experience of version control software, or a Git client ends up getting consumed into a large business and then the project never sees the light of day. And frankly, that's not how you run community in my estimation.My estimation is, if the community is doing things better than you are, take notes. Product management, pay attention. That's something that is another aspect of doing developer relations is about checking in with those teams, about showing them evidence. And like, it so often ends up being qualitative in a way that doesn't change people's minds or their feelings, where people want to see quantitative numbers in order to say, “Oh, this is the business justification. Like, this is the ROI. This proves that this is the thing we should invest in.” And frankly, no. Like, sometimes it is a little bit more about stepping back and letting the organic empathy and participation happen without having to own it.Corey: There's a sense, I think that a lot of companies feel the need to own every conversation that happens around them, their product, et cetera, and you can't. You just can't, unless—to be direct—your company is failing. Just because if no one's talking about you, then great, you're the only ones talking about you. And you can see this from time to time and it's depressing as hell when you have people who work for a company all tweeting the same cookie-cutter statement, and they get zero interaction except from a bot account. It's sad.Alyss: Yeah. And I've unfortunately seen this more times than I can count in community Slacks where people just, like, copy-paste whatever marketing handed to them, and I would be shocked if they got any engagement at all. Because that's… cool. What do I know about you? Why do I care about this event? Have you personalized it to me?And yeah, you don't want the organization to be the only one talking about you. If you are then you've already failed in this, you know, product-led growth motion. You've kind of—if we want to get into the murky water of NPS, like, nobody's going and telling their friends about your product [laugh]. And the thing that's so valuable is the authentic voice. It's the, “I'm excited to talk about this and I like it enough to tell you what I like about it.” I like it enough to tell you about this use case that might never seen the light of day, but because we're having a conversation between ourselves, it can all be personalized. It can all be about what's going on between us and about our shared experiences. And that is ten times more powerful than most Twitter-promoted ads you'll ever see.Corey: So, I want to unpack a little bit about not developer relations as such, but developer relations relations because I can mostly understand—badly—what product marketing is, but developer relations relations—or as you'd like to call it developer relations squared—that's something new. I've always called DevRel to be devrelopers, and people get annoyed enough at that. What is that newfound layer of abstraction on top of it?Alyss: Well, there's several things that I'm going to end up—and I say end up; I'm six weeks into the role, so I have a lot of high hopes for where I hope this goes. And one of those is things, like, we don't have a very shared understanding and shared definition of what developer advocacy even is, what is developer relations? Does developer marketing belong under that umbrella? How should organizations approach developer relations? How should they value it? Where should it, you know, belong in terms of business strategy?And there's an opportunity for a company whose business it is to elevate this industry, this career path, if you will, where we can spend the time, we can spend the money to say, here's what success looks like. We've interviewed all these groups, we've talked with the leaders in this space that are making it their jobs to think about this. Here's a set of group-developed recommendations for how the industry should mature. Or here's an open-source set of job descriptions and requirements. And like, let's get to some level of shared understanding.So, as an example of, kind of, where I'm leading to with all of this, and some of the challenges that developer relations faces is the State of Developer Relations report that just came out. There's a significant number of people that are coming into developer advocate, developer relations roles for the first time, they have one to two years of experience, they're coming into programs that have been around for one to two years, and so what does that tell you? That tells you you're bringing in people with no experience to try to establish brand new programs, that they're being asked to by their business, and they don't have the vocabulary, the tools, the frameworks in which to establish that for themselves. And so, they're going to be swayed by, you know, the tides of business, by the influences of their leadership without having their own pre-built notions. And so, how do we give them that equipment and how do we elevate the practice?Corey: Cloud native just means you've got more components or microservices than anyone (even a mythical 10x engineer) can keep track of. With OpsLevel, you can build a catalog in minutes and forget needing that mythical 10x engineer. Now, you'll have a 10x service catalog to accompany your 10x service count. Visit OpsLevel.com to learn how easy it is to build and manage your service catalog. Connect to your git provider and you're off to the races with service import, repo ownership, tech docs, and more. Corey: It feels like so much of the DevRel discourse has turned into, one, we define it by what is not, and two, it doesn't matter how you're measuring it, you're measuring it wrong. I feel like that is, I guess we'll call it counterproductive, for lack of a better descriptor. It feels like there's such a short-sighted perspective on all of this, but at the same time, you've absolutely got to find ways to articulate the value of DevRel slash community to the business otherwise, it turns into a really uncomfortable moment when, okay, time to cut costs. Why should we keep your function over a different function? If there's not a revenue or upside or time to market or some form of value story tied to that, that the business can understand that isn't just touchy-feely, it's a very difficult path forward from there. How do you see it?Alyss: I agree with you and I've, frankly, run into this problem several times in my career, and every time I've been a developer advocate. It's, you know—and where I've found the most success is not in saying, “Here's exactly the numbers that I'm going to be constantly looking at. I'm going to try to produce this many pieces of content, or I'm absolutely not speaking at events. And that's not my job. Or I'm not writing code. That's not my job.”It's about understanding what is driving the business forward. Who do I need participation and buy-in from and where am I hoping to go? Like, what does a year out from this look like? What does three years out from this look like? At Box, we do not want to be the API governance standard. That is not our job. That's not where we sit within engineering.That's frankly, if you really want to get into it, internal developer advocacy because it can influence the impact on the community. It is not the core focus and there are probably people better equipped and better educated on the core application. Big commerce, platform ecosystem, platform flywheel developers are fundamentally a part of continuing to grow the business and how do I go make that point to sales, how do I go make that point to partners, how do I go make that point to customer success, so that I can build a function that has more than one person. And so, I think to kind of bring it back to the larger question, that is where I see our greatest challenge is that we haven't given ourselves the vocabulary or the framework to understand the level of complexity that DevRel has become in being across so many industries, and being in B2B, and being in business to developer, and being in business to consumer. No one size fits all and we need to stop trying to treat it as though it can be.Corey: I think that there is a, how to put it, a problem in terms of how Twitter views a lot of these things. Someone wound up finally distilling it down for me in relatively recent times with a very resonant quote, which was simply put, that Twitter is not where you go for nuance. Twitter is where you go to be righteous. And I realized, oh, my God, that describes a good 80% of the things I've put up there. Like when I talk about how when companies do this thing to their staff and it's crappy, I am not necessarily for a nuanced debate, although of course there's always nuance and edge cases in the rest.As a counterpoint, whenever I wind up talking about things on Twitter and speak in generalities, I get a whole bunch of people pushing back with a, “Well, what about this edge case? That renders your entire point invalid.” And, ugh, not really. It feels like one of the casualties of the pandemic has been a sense of community in a sense of humans relating to other humans. I think we're all tired of the Zoom calls from hell I got to see you a couple of weeks before this recording at Monktoberfest in Portland, Maine, and oh, my God, dealing with people face to face, it was so much richer, at least from my perspective, compared to everything that we've been able to do during the pandemic. Am I alone on that? Are you seeing this across the board? Where companies are talking about this?Alyss: I will say with confidence, you're not alone in this. Whether or not companies are talking about it is also across the board. How rich are those understandings? How rich are those conversations? Because trying to step back as a brand is not really a way.Like, having nuance, being real, been community members, like that's not a way in which I think companies can participate in a way that feels truly authentic. That's why you need faces. That's why you need people. That's why you need folks whose job it is to do this. But in terms of things are lost, like, Twitter is not the right place to be having these conversations. It's not the right place in which to necessarily relate to people, absolutely.When you get distilled down all of your interactions into oh, I've got a notification. Oh, I have a checkmark, and so I have, like, better moderation tools. Oh, like, I made a statement and I don't want to hear a solution for it. We get all of these, uncurated experiences that are so dissatisfying that it does make us miss being around people who can read body language, that can understand my immediate relationship to them in spaces that we choose to be in, whereas Twitter is this big panopticon where we can just get yelled at and yell at each other. And it loves to amplify those conversations far more than any of the touchy-feely, good news success stories.Corey: When you take a look across the entire landscape of managing DevRel programs and ensuring that companies are receiving value for it, and—by which I mean, nurturing the long-term health of communities because yes, I am much more interested in that than I am in next quarter's numbers, how do you see that evolving, particularly with the recent economic recession or correction or drawback or everything's on fire, depending upon who it is you talk to? How do you see that evolving?Alyss: It goes back to what I said earlier about, I can speak in generalities, there will be specifics to various organizations, but at a fundamental part, like, I'll kind of take a step back and maybe make some very strong statements about what I think DevRel is, in a regard, which is, without documentation, without support, you don't have a product. And if you don't have folks going out and understanding what it is your customers need, and especially when those customers are maybe all the time or sometimes developers, and understanding what it is that they're saying and truly how having empathy for what's going on in their day-to-day, what task are they trying to complete, how relevant is this to them, if you don't invest in that, when that happens, you've lost the plot. And so, in those instances, unfortunately, that's a conversation with leadership team. Your leadership doesn't fundamentally understand the value and maybe it's worth it to make the argument in favor of to illustrate that without this feedback loop, without this investment in the educational journey of developers, without the investment in what is going on in our product, and where have we allowed ourselves to remain ignorant of what is happening in the day-to-day of our users. We need those folks.Product managers are in sprints, they're in standups. They're doing, like, strategic planning and their yearly planning. We need a group who is rewarded to care about this but also is innately driven to do so as well. And that's not something that you can make. And it's not something that we otherwise see. It's part of why we have such an absence in good developer marketing is because marketers aren't paid well enough to ever have learned the skills to be developers, and so there's no skills transfer.Corey: One last topic that I want to get into something you've only been doing for a short while, but you've become an advisor at Heavybit, which is a VC firm. How did that come about and what do you do?Alyss: So currently, I—I'll do the super-high level. What I do right now is I host office hours with seed startups and Series A that are in the dev tool space. And we generally talk about developer relations, a little bit in developer marketing go-to-market strategies. And it's super enriching for me because I love hearing about different experiences and problems and, like, areas of practice. But it was really interesting, and a little bit of a make-your-own-luck-and-opportunity type deal.Where I live in Austin, Texas; I do not live in the Bay Area, I don't have all those connections, I've been a bit distant from it. And I saw someone who had accepted a role that I had interviewed for, end up in some of their content. And I was like, “They're doing a great job. They definitely deserve to be there, but I also had similar qualifications, so why should I also be there?” And I found someone, his name's Tim, on LinkedIn, who runs their events. And I reached out and I said, “Hey, Tim, how would you like a new advisor?” And so, Tim responded back and we—Corey: Knock knock. Who's there? It's me.Alyss: Yeah, exactly. It's—and it was just, I want this thing to happen. How do I make it happen? I ask.Corey: And what does it day-to-day that look like? How much time does it take? What do you do exactly?Alyss: Yeah. I mean, right now, it's about five hours every quarter. So, I spend anywhere between 30 minutes to an hour with various organizations that are a part of Heavybit's portfolio, talking with them through their motion to go general availability, or they want to start participating in events, or they want to discover what are the right events for them to—or, like, DevOpsDays, should we participate in that? Should we hire a DevRel person? Should we hire a product marketing person? Just helping them sort wheat from chaff in terms of, like, how to proceed.And so, it's relatively, for me, lightweight. And Heavybit also gives us the opportunity to contribute back in blog posts, participate in podcasts and be able to have some of those richer conversations. So, I have a set of bookmarks, so there's over 100, bookmarks long, that is fully curated across several different categories. That was my first blog post was diving into a few of those where I think are critical areas of developer relations. What are some of the conversations on DevRel metrics? How do I think about setting a DevRel strategy for the first time? How do I do my first DevRel hire? And so, I wouldn't even call it a second job. It's more of a getting to, again, enrich my own experience, see a wider variety of different problems in this space and expand my own understanding.Corey: I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you view the world, and basically just come along for the ride as you continue to demonstrate a side of tech that I don't think we get to see very often, where can they find you?Alyss: I am@PreciselyAlyss on Twitter, as well as Twitch. Aside from that, I would not recommend looking for me.Corey: Excellent. Always a good decision. I will put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:00]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Alyss: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Alyss Noland, Head of Developer Relations Relations and Product Marketing at Common Room. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry, insulting comment belittling community and letting the rest of us know by observation just why you've been thrown out of every community to which you've ever been a part.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
If a Woman Lit Shabbat Candles Before Praying Minha

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 2:01


The Halachic authorities debate the question as to whether a woman may pray Minha on Friday afternoon after she lit the Shabbat candles. Ideally, a woman who normally recites Minha every day should recite Minha on Friday afternoon before she lights the Shabbat candles. Lighting the Shabbat candles constitutes the formal acceptance of Shabbat, and so Minha, which is a weekday prayer, should be recited prior to candle lighting. The case under discussion is where a woman who normally prays Minha every day forgot to recite the prayer before lighting the Shabbat candles on Friday afternoon. Assuming the sun has not set, and thus the time for Minha has not passed, may she still recite Minha, or is it too late for her to pray Minha, since she has already accepted the onset of Shabbat?The Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909) rules that a woman may not pray Minha once she lit the Shabbat candles and accepted Shabbat. This is also the position of the Mishna Berura (commentary by Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933), in Siman 263 (Se'if Katan 43). Hacham Ovadia Yosef, however, disagrees, and allows a woman to recite Minha in this case. His primary argument relates to a distinction between an individual's formal acceptance of Shabbat, and that of a congregation. When a congregation accepts Shabbat in the synagogue, such as by declaring "Bo'i Kalla" in the Kabbalat Shabbat service, this constitutes a definitive acceptance with respect to all Halachot. An individual's acceptance of Shabbat, however, as in the case of a woman lighting the Shabbat candles, is not absolute. Under certain circumstances, such as when a woman forgot to recite Minha before candle lighting, she may consider Shabbat as having not yet begun, and may thus recite Minha.Additionally, Hacham Ovadia notes, the weekday Amida recited at Minha on Friday afternoon is not necessarily at odds with the observance of Shabbat. Fundamentally, the weekday Amida may be recited even on Shabbat. The Sages formulated a different, briefer Amida prayer for Shabbat in order not to overburden us with a lengthy prayer service on Shabbat, but essentially, the weekday Amida is appropriate for Shabbat, as well. Therefore, in the case of a woman who forgot to recite Minha before candle lighting, she still has the opportunity to recite Minha after candle lighting, even though she has already accepted Shabbat.Summary: A woman who generally recites Minha should recite the prayer on Friday afternoon before candle lighting. Nevertheless, if she forgot to pray Minha before candle lighting, she may recite it afterward (assuming, of course, that she remembers before sunset).

Instinctive Influencers
Episode 107 - Spiritual Fitness w/ Dudley Daniel

Instinctive Influencers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 74:01


Episode 107 – Spiritual Fitness w/ Dudley Daniel People tend to search for their deeper meaning, and some do it by seeking answers to questions they arrive at over years of thought. In many cases, people develop a spirituality about themselves that enables their ability to become better. This episode is not like ones we have done in the past. Instead, it takes a small glance at spiritual fitness, or the beliefs and practices that strengthen their connectedness with a source of hope, meaning, and purpose. Fundamentally, spiritual fitness is critical to developing overall wellness and should be personal. Brian takes on this challenge by looking at the life of his father-in-law, Dudley Daniel. He opens up the book of Dudley's life and explores what it was that allowed him to constantly seek spiritual fitness. Maybe there is something in the message that will help you. Let us know.   You can see more about the instinctive influencers at: Our Facebook Link - https://www.facebook.com/101influence/ Our Instagram Link - https://www.instagram.com/instinctiveinfluencers/ Our Twitter Link - https://twitter.com/101Influence   Be sure to Subscribe, Rate, and Review our show on the Facebook Page and Apple Podcast. This is how we will continue to create, broaden, and amplify content for all to learn from and grow.   The show's content is the opinions of Brian Webber & Ed Haley. These opinions do not represent the US Army or the United States in any manner. The views of anything said on this show individually represent the person making them. At no point does the US Army or the United States sponsor this show, thus having no connection to the show.   Intro & Outro Music: Cosmic Storm by A Himitsu: https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0):        http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Music promoted by Audio Library: https://youtu.be/U4wXUdhNxZk  

What Bitcoin Did
Bitcoin: A Year in Review with Matt Odell

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 155:44 Very Popular


“I'm not trying to single out you. There are many, many content creators in the space, event planners in the space, that give rosier coverage to sponsors. And then when the sponsor rugs all of their audience they say ‘no one could have seen it coming, it wasn't my responsibility.' But meanwhile, there's plenty of us that didn't do that.”— Matt OdellMatt Odell is host of the Citadel Dispatch, co-host of Rabbit Hole Recap, venture partner at Ten31 and co-founder of Bitcoin Park. In this interview, we review 2022: the attacks on privacy, the reaffirmation of self-custody, how people who were treated like gods rekted the market, and the responsibility of Bitcoin podcasters in doing right by the audience. - - - - 2022 has been brutal. First, tough lessons were learnt in trying to use Bitcoin for warranted privacy needs within North America. Then, we had our industry's very own global financial crisis when the tide went out and we saw how many of the supposed titans were swimming naked. So many people have been damaged, so many have been rekt. The collateral damage to Bitcoin is unknown, but material. So much of that damage has come from malign and selfish actions by people who knew better. They have exploited a new form of money, which was meant to circumvent systemic centralized greed and corruption, to put into practice new more brutal forms of extraction than anything we witnessed in TradFi.But, there are also those, whose actions have been made in good faith, who need to reflect on the events of the past year. We know where blame is centred, but how far does blame extend? Explicitly, what responsibilities do Bitcoin podcasters in general, and this Bitcoin podcaster in particular, have in regard to protecting and educating their audience? 2022 has been personally brutal for a whole range of reasons. But, it is now time for reflection. It is right therefore that, as a show that assesses and comments on the industry, the tables are turned and a light is shone on this show's decision-making. There is nobody better than Odell to shine that light. Fundamentally, it is the audience who will decide. I look forward to reading any comments listeners may have following one of the toughest podcasts I have hosted. - - - - This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyLedn - Financial services for Bitcoin hodlersBitcasino - The Future of Gaming is hereFidelity - Careers in cryptoLedger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletWasabi Wallet - Privacy by default-----WBD604 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

Hacker Valley Studio
Solving Fundamental Cybersecurity Problems with Maxime Lamothe-Brassard

Hacker Valley Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 24:16


Maxime “Max” Lamothe-Brassard, Founder of LimaCharlie, brings a tech-focused community perspective and a history of working at Google to Hacker Valley this week. Inspired by the internal motivation to empower others and build what didn't exist, Maxime created LimaCharlie to help security teams automate and manage security operations. In this episode, Max walks through his founder's journey and points out the problems that are begging for innovative solutions from the brightest minds in cyber.   Timecoded Guide: [01:59] Improving community & empowering practitioners [06:04] Leaving Google for LimaCharlie [10:55] Unpacking the incentivization problem of cyber  [16:21] Targeted products vs massive suites of problem solvers [21:29] Looking at a red team-less future   Sponsor Links: Thank you to our sponsors Axonius and NetSPI for bringing this episode to life! The Axonius solution correlates asset data from existing solutions to provide an always up-to-date inventory, uncover gaps, and automate action — giving IT and security teams the confidence to control complexity. Learn more at axonius.com/hackervalley For more than 2 decades, NetSPI has helped companies discover and remediate critical security issues through its platform-driven, human-delivered security test. NetSPI is much more than a pentesting company, bringing you the most comprehensive suite of offensive security solutions. Visit netspi.com/HVM to learn more.   Where would you say your passion for improving our community comes from?  From the moment Max opens his mouth to talk about cybersecurity, his passion for the global community of cyber practitioners is clear. It turns out, the community is Max's passion because he's been in so many cybersecurity roles and has experienced so many of the same issues in each position. Suffering pain and fatigue no matter the role shouldn't be the reality for today's practitioners, and Max wants to empower them to do their best, most enjoyable work.  “When I started, the goal wasn't to make the silver bullet that somehow was going to automatically save everybody, but really to just help people that were working and doing their jobs and empower them.”    How was your experience going from Google to having your own thing with LimaCharlie?  Taking the red pill of entrepreneurship wasn't as scary of an experience for Max as one might think. Instead, the product idea behind LimaCharlie existed for years before Max left Google, and everything Max has done in his career prepared him to take that risky step into doing his own thing. When push came to shove, Max was comfortable taking the risk because he knew he would always have opportunities to support the industry, even if he failed. “Really, throughout my whole career, without necessarily knowing at the time, [creating LimaCharlie] was where I was heading. Looking back, I've always been trying to build the thing that didn't exist where I was and push those limits.”    What are there problems in the community or in the industry that you don't see anyone solving yet?  A major opportunity for growth and improvement in cybersecurity is incentivization, according to Max. The debate of what's worth fixing and who should decide on prioritizing vulnerabilities leads to tension and confusion amongst practitioners. The key to this problem might just be finding that special someone to somehow access the information with the right types of models and protocols around risk evaluation. Insurance might be the easiest answer, but Max wants practitioners to explore their potential to solve these problems, too.  “The problem is that, as an industry, for us to make a risk-reward call on security vulnerabilities— it's incredibly difficult for us that are in security every day. Fundamentally, we can't even make that call ourselves.”   What is one topic of division in cyber that you wish we could all come together on?  Division is inevitable in a field that grows as fast as cybersecurity. However, if Max could dream big about a major division to solve himself, it would be that of a red team's purpose. In an ideal security world, people don't need the red team to buy them into cybersecurity. Max hopes that, over time, the industry shifts more towards the blue team, where vulnerabilities are understood as important and worth protecting against without red team demonstrations.  “I hope that, over time, we're able to move away from having to drive this idea that these things are real and they're important because people are already bought into this idea that, yes, we need to defend everything.” --------------- Links: Keep up with our guest Maxime Lamothe-Brassard on LinkedIn Learn more about LimaCharlie on LinkedIn and the LimaCharlie website Connect with Ron Eddings on LinkedIn and Twitter Connect with Chris Cochran on LinkedIn and Twitter Purchase an HVS t-shirt at our shop Continue the conversation by joining our Discord Check out Hacker Valley Media and Hacker Valley Studio

AI in Banking Podcast
How Insurance Will Fundamentally Change - with Pardeep Bassi of WTW

AI in Banking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 22:30


Today's guest is Pardeep Bassi, Global Proposition Leader of Data Science at Willis Towers Watson. He's also spent the last decade in data science leadership roles for insurance firms. Pardeep returns to the Emerj podcast platform to talk about a rising inflection point with old insurers who have data but don't know how to use it and startups that don't have data but are more agile in deploying AI solutions. He and Emerj Head of Research Daniel Faggella also discuss how insurance firms – particularly legacy institutions - can go beyond automation and predictive insights, using AI to find the right questions to ask to understand customers' risk better. For access to Emerj's Executive Cheat Sheet on AI in insurance, check out emerj.com/ins1.

BFM :: General
Why the Race-Based vs Needs-Based Debate is Fundamentally Flawed

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 44:36


Recently, Dr Lee Hwok-Aun, Senior Fellow, Malaysian Studies Programme, ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute, wrote: “Pakatan Harapan routinely disavows race-based policies, offering instead the notion of need-based policies. This commitment to need-based assistance has constructively focused attention on low-income households, but its prescription for ‘replacing' race-based programs is fundamentally flawed.” This is pretty much an extension of what Hwok-Aun has been writing for years now. Question is, why is it fundamentally flawed? Hwok-Aun joins us to share his insight.

Building While Flying
Why Companies Built by Women of Color Are The New Unicorns - Victoria Kennedy and Isabelle Seale (Seed to Harvest Ventures)

Building While Flying

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 46:56


Victoria Kennedy and Isabelle Seale are the co-founders of Seed to Harvest Ventures, a pre-seed and seed-stage fund that invests in software companies that are founded by women of color. They are product and design professionals with 10+ years of experience scaling products and teams for early to mid-stage startups. Now they are supporting founders who are historically overlooked by providing them with education, resources, and connections to scale their businesses.   In their conversation with Katie Hankinson, Victoria and Isabelle share how they started partnering together and the goals of Seed to Harvest Ventures. Throughout the episode, they explain why they chose to focus on women of color, how to fundamentally change the tech ecosystem, and the future of investing. In-flight topics: Their backgrounds and how they started partnering together The unprecedented financial opportunity of women of color Fundamentally changing the tech ecosystem Being a different VC and changing the landscape The future of investing …and more! Connect with Seed to Harvest: STH Website: https://www.seedtoharvestvs.com/ STH on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sthventures/  Victoria on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/victoria-kennedy-10/ Isabelle on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/isabelleseale/

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More
The Picture of Dorian Gray Summary and Review

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 11:07


The Picture of Dorian Gray Full Summary and Review by Oscar Wilde This novel recounts the story of a handsome, aristocratic youth by the name of Dorian Gray. He wished a spell on his portrait that he would retain eternal youth – a wish that ultimately came true. Thereafter, he indulged without restraint in his sensual desires. Time passed, and Dorian's beautiful looks were unchanged by time. Meanwhile, his portrait grew more hideous day by day. Finally, aiming to destroy the traces of his life of sin contained in the portrait, Dorian stabs the canvas with a knife, resulting in his own mysterious death. In death, Dorian's corpse transforms, becoming hideous and old. His painted portrait has its beauty restored. Overview | Chapter 1Hi, welcome to Bookey. Today for you, we will unlock the book The Picture of Dorian Gray. The book was the only full-length novel written by Oscar Wilde, the Irish dramatist and writer who settled in Britain. Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin, Ireland, into a prestigious family. His father was a surgeon, and his mother a poet and writer. Wilde was renowned for his flamboyant dressing style and his words of wit. He lived by his own rules and adopted a fearless lifestyle, restlessly moving between scandalous homosexual lovers and his respected family. Finally, due to his refusal to disavow his homosexuality, he ended up in jail. A pioneering voice in the field of Aestheticism, at the close of the 19th century ,Wilde was England's most maverick genius. Oscar Wilde flourished in a British society that was governed by strict proprieties, moral and ethical codes. Everything that anyone said and did was subject to harsh restrictions. Art and literature were subject to even greater scrutiny. Slight deviations from the norms were deemed perverse, unorthodox and unacceptable. At the time, society's prevailing view was that the value of literature and the arts lay entirely in their ability to affect people's values through their thoughts and emotions. Consequently, art would influence people's behavior. Fundamentally, literature and the arts were a tool for moral instruction. As such, the arts were deemed to command great educational utility. Wilde felt deep resentment towards this artistic ethos. He felt that this type of artwork crushed the artist's imagination and destroyed the pure beauty of art; it violated art's essence. The Picture of Dorian Gray is precisely a retaliation against such a utilitarian view of art. The novel tells the story of an aristocratic youth Dorian Gray, who is handsome in his appearance and pure at heart. But, under the seduction of a hedonist, Lord Henry Wotton, he makes a pact, trading his portrait image for his soul in exchange for eternal youth. Blessed with youth without consequence, Dorian Gray descends into an abyss of sin and evil. On account of its evocation of moral issues, the novel's publication stirred much controversy in Britain. Wilde himself was ambivalent. He never explicitly stated his own position. However, the British literary establishment dubbed the novel “a tale spawned from the leprous literature of the French decadents—a poisonous book, the atmosphere of which is heavy with the mephitic odors of moral and spiritual putrefaction—a gloating study of the mental and physical corruption of a fresh, fair and golden youth”. Thereafter, Wilde's novel was forever regarded as proof of his desire to attack and damage social mores. In the novel's preface, Wilde offered a retort to public censure. He wrote: “There is no such thing as a moral or immoral book. Books are well-written, or badly written.

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
How ChatGPT Will Fundamentally Change Business #2326

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 6:02 Very Popular


In episode #2326, we talk about how ChatGPT will change business forever. With the search landscape on the edge of revolution, OpenAI has a big voice in the conversation, and in some ways has even leapfrogged Google! Tune in today to hear about what this could mean for the future of online business. TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:20] Today's topic: How ChatGPT Will Fundamentally Change Business. [00:25] An overview of ChatGPT's history and how it was developed. [01:21] The business model that OpenAI uses. [02:07] Powerful possibilities for new ways to communicate. [03:16] Why ChatGPT is offering more than Google right now. [04:22] Using chat assistants for tasks such as caption writing. [05:09] The future of search and which platforms might dominate. [05:27] That's it for today! [05:30] Go to https://marketingschool.io/ for more resources! Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:   Subscribe to our premium podcast (with tons of goodies!): https://www.marketingschool.io/pro ChatGPT OpenAI  Y Combinator Sam Altman    Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:      Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu    

What Bitcoin Did
Doomberg on Energy

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 73:02 Very Popular


“Harnessing low-energy fuels is an entirely different challenge, as we're finding out, and Germany is finding out the hard way; look, everywhere it's tried it ends up with a more expensive grid, a dirtier grid, and a less reliable grid.”— DoombergDoomberg is an anonymous collective producing the world's most popular financial substack. In this interview, we discuss the roots of the 2022 energy crisis, why nuclear power needs to be the basis of our energy needs, and how pragmatic decision-making is needed if we're to best fulfil our energy needs. - - - - Just a few years ago energy was abundant and cheap. The oil crisis of the 1970s was a historical anomaly. The assumed understanding was that between governments, major energy companies and the markets, energy provision was becoming more reliable and cost-effective. The Russian invasion of Ukraine showed how paper-thin this impression of the energy sector was.Systemic underinvestment in energy infrastructure, particularly nuclear, has left the industry vulnerable to shocks. And Ukraine has been a heck of a shock. Long-term political strategies for energy provision have had to be rewritten in real-time. The market, unsurprisingly, has been volatile to the upside. One in three UK families are expected to be in fuel poverty in 2023.But, obviously, energy is not a discretionary spend. We all need a minimum material quantum just to survive. It is clear, now we're self-rationing energy, how vital it is to our way of life. Humans flourish with access to energy. The flipside is a retardation of civilisation. So, whilst limitless cheap energy is still decades away, can we supply sufficient energy for our society to prosper? Fundamentally, are we making the right decisions to facilitate the best use of resources? Nuclear power is both reliable, efficient, safe and direct power generation that is carbon-free. Why has investment been curtailed? Material bottlenecks mean we can't produce enough batteries for EVs. So why aren't we maximising the benefits of battery tech through use of hybrids?Ideology and nimbyism have counterproductive effects: serious harm is outsourced to the poorer areas of the world whilst leaving us with insufficient infrastructure at home. Clearly, decisions need to remove dogma and deal with the world as it is. The frustration is that we have the skills and knowledge to resolve this situation. We just need to bring pragmatism out of the dark.- - - - This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyLedn - Financial services for Bitcoin hodlersBitcasino - The Future of Gaming is hereFidelity - Careers in cryptoLedger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletWasabi Wallet - Privacy by defaultBCB Group - Global digital financial Services-----WBD599 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

The ReWire Podcast w/ Ryan Stewman
Switching Lanes | ReWire 1184

The ReWire Podcast w/ Ryan Stewman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 4:06


If you're going to change lanes in your life, you have to change the root in your thinking.  You want to get fit?  Have better relationships with your spouse?  Be more successful in business?  It all comes down to the root........... Of your thinking.   Your mindset.  Nothing changes until you change the way you think about something.  Fundamentally, we're all flawed, but we often believe we don't believe things.  We believe we're bad people.  We have self-sabatoging or self-limiting beliefs.  If you want to truly succeed in life, you have to change the way you think.  Everything you want, you are capable of having.  No matter your limitations.  No matter your handicaps.  Change your root thinking and you'll change your life.  #RiseAbove  HOW TO GET INVOLVED:  This planet is based on an algorithm and with every positive action, there is an adverse reaction.  Ryan Stewman rose and overcame a life of addiction, imprisonment, divorce, and circumstances that would break the spirit of the average human being.  He went on to create a powerful network of winners and champions in life and business creating a movement quickly changing lives one day at a time.  Learn more at: www.JoinTheApex.com   Check out this show and previous killer episodes of the ReWire Podcast in Apple Podcasts.

A Rational Fear
A Rational Year — The best sketches and selected bits from 2022

A Rational Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 61:27


covid-19 christmas god tv jesus christ netflix president coronavirus australia europe china earth apple uk france voice spoilers magic british kingdom ms writing australian merry christmas girls gardens mom dad festival abc utah harry potter uber pizza black friday world cup mcdonald britain melbourne brexit daddy mac cd gm shit hulu concerts joe rogan ipads minister fifa conservatives americas qatar audible true crime infrastructure ikea daughters dms prime minister coco visual gop victorian siri sovereignty parliament brisbane bloody boris johnson great britain protein queensland mummy royals transport bits cobra gb nsw substack pearson tasmania new south wales goods canberra westminster liberals gold coast vaughn itv fifa world cup navarro uv vanilla rational ishmael disgusting sina general electric theresa may sham north shore sti mcleod barabbas downing street suffice conservative party fracking venn burr fundamentally mcpherson dammit miko scott morrison tories coincidentally sketches franz kafka king charles stis wentworth sydney opera house liberal party prime ministers joe cocker gst hells angels basket case wallabies darrel south australian macpherson emir cata andy griffith triple j anthony albanese dol undercover boss mog man booker prize special envoy foxtel reluctantly goins jeremy hunt national party fisher price australia post alan jones melbourne international comedy festival nissen best comedies comic sans pds home secretary mauna kea southern ocean dangerous ideas no christmas josh frydenberg medibank appleseed transcribed your majesty law reform sydney harbour bridge lnp lmp australian podcast awards my little pony friendship walkley ray martin mark latham southern highlands authorised paul keating political donations wangaratta snagit adelaide fringe festival acma morison john houston new south wales government rosie batty jacob riis come november services tax bridget mckenzie don watson kate mcclymont john hewson mark no malcolm roberts come april centerlink mctell streetsville live trace kara schlegl
What Bitcoin Did
Debt, Deficit, Spending & Tax with Dominic Frisby

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 89:21 Very Popular


“In a libertarian society where the government doesn't do anything the responsibility falls on citizens to do stuff, at the moment, that responsibility is the state's; so, with freedom comes responsibility.”— Dominic FrisbyDominic Frisby is a British author, comedian, voice actor and musical curator. He also produces one of the top 20 financial substacks. In this interview, we discuss a range of issues highlighting how dire our current economic situation is, and if sound money and libertarianism are the solutions, the responsibilities this imposes on us as free citizens. - - - - The global economy is in serious trouble. Our guests know it. Regular listeners know it. Yet many are ignorant of the dangerous predicament we're in. This is despite significant evidence of the coming crisis being available to anyone wishing to look. Portents of things to come abound: rising deficits, unsustainable debt, high inflation and crumbling public services. And there is no political incentive to resolve the situation. This does not mean that governments aren't preparing. For starters, there are tremors in the bedrock of the global reserve currency system. China is discreetly hoarding gold. Russia is seeking to utilize digital currencies. The number of countries adding their name to a new BRICS' based reserve system is growing. The multi-polar world is being built. Then there are the less explicit but equally concerning plans in the traditionally democratic west. If, as expected, the global economy significantly weakens, the public response could destabilise society. There is always more than one path out of any situation, but authoritarian policies are more appealing to those seeking to maintain control. Implementation of schemes designed to control society will require mendacious actions. CBDCs will be sold as benign technology advancements enabling more efficient payment mechanisms between the state and the individual. The risks are clear. Fundamentally, our freedoms will depend on the monetary basis we adopt. These are crucial times. It's up to us to continue to raise the alarm.- - - - This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyLedn - Financial services for Bitcoin hodlersBitcasino - The Future of Gaming is hereFidelity - Careers in cryptoLedger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletWasabi Wallet - Privacy by defaultBCB Group - Global digital financial Services-----WBD598 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

Immigrant Finance Podcast™
153. How to Stop Feeling Guilty Wanting Profit

Immigrant Finance Podcast™

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 35:33


The word "profit" can feel a bit triggering, bringing up negative narratives about the evil harms of capitalism, industrialization, and the patriarchy. In our own lives, we can feel guilt and shame for wanting "more" - or essentially, profit - more money, more time, more boundaries, more freedom, etc... Even if we are broke, living paycheck to paycheck, not getting paid what we deserve, not charging for our work, or undercharging. We can also feel resentment toward those who are making surplus, and assume they must be "bad." What causes that? Fundamentally, it's a misunderstanding of what profit and abundance truly mean. This is something I've struggled with myself for years. Here's the thing. Believing profit is a bad thing only keeps you in survival mode. But when you understand why the concept of profit is so misunderstood, you'll know how to shift perspectives quickly the next time you feel guilty for wanting more. In this episode, let's dig in to learn: How to stop feeling guilt for wanting more money How to feel in integrity desiring more What to do when you want to feel good asking for money How to finally shift negative thoughts around profit and embrace abundance in your life going forward Listen to episode 153: "How to Stop Feeling Guilty Wanting Profit" if you're ready to avoid feeling guilt around wanting more and feel good asking for it! Thank you for listening to The Business of Purpose podcast! *Learn more about the Illuminate Digital™️ Social Impact Online Business Accelerator: https://www.illuminatedigitalaccelerator.com *Download my free guide on the 7 Strategies to Make a Bigger Impact & Make More Money! http://internationalempowerment.ac-page.com/impact *Connect with me on instagram @adinaappelbaum and @immigrant.finance for sparks of inspiration. *Subscribe to The Business of Purpose podcast & share the show with someone who needs to hear it.

Secrets of the Soil Podcast with Regen Ray
49: Regeneration is fundamentally about regenerating relationships with John Kempf

Secrets of the Soil Podcast with Regen Ray

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 54:13


Regeneration is fundamentally about regenerating relationships, whether that's regenerating relationships between plants and their soil microbiome, whether it's regenerating relationships between livestock and the landscape, regenerating relationships between people who manage the farm and the community, whatever it might be. It's fundamentally about regenerating relationships.  ---------- Who is John Kempf? John Kempf is the founder of Advancing Eco Agriculture, a regenerative agronomy consulting company, and KindHarvest.ag, an agriculture social network. John is the host of the Regenerative Agriculture podcast, and is known for developing crop nutrition management systems that increase yields and profitability while reducing the need for fertilizers and pesticides.  ---------- Website : advancingecoag.com Facebook: facebook.com/advancingecoag Instagram: instagram.com/advancingecoag/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/AdvancingEcoAg LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/advancing-eco-agriculture/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/@AdvancingEcoAgriculture  Buy Our Merch: https://secretsofthesoil.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation
947: Cultivation Story: [Japanese Minghui] Fundamentally Changing Myself

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 11:52


A Japanese practitioner improves and grows through Fa study, and discerning emotion from compassion. Original Article from Minghui.org: "[Japanese Minghui] Fundamentally Changing Myself”

FICC Focus
Fundamentally Triggered, EM Rally Fueled By Repositioning: EM Lens

FICC Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 21:29


In this month's EM Lens & Look-Through podcast, BI Chief EM Fixed Income Strategist Damian Sassower is joined by Christian Lawrence, Head of Cross-Asset Strategy at Rabobank. Lawrence reflects on valuations amid the ongoing position squeeze, and shares his year-ahead outlook for emerging market rates and FX. Latin America stands out as the region is rife with risk premia that is tightly correlated to thematic macroeconomic variables.

Interviews by Brainard Carey

Georg Óskar (b.1985, Iceland) currently works and lives in Oslo, Norway. He graduated with a Diploma in Fine Arts from Akureyri School of visual arts in 2009 and subsequently obtained his MFA from the Faculty of Fine Art, Music and Design in Bergen, Norway, in 2016. Since then, Oskar has exhibited internationally in various countries, including United States, Spain, Germany, China, Switzerland, Norway and Iceland, to name a few. Fundamentally, his practice is regarded as a visual diary of his personal observations of the mundane, specifically in nature and people. His works are composed in a unique manner to allow multiple entry points for viewers, prompting them to reflect on the complexities of contemporary life. Infused with a distinct twist, Oskar's narratives are often sarcastic but always offer genuine observations of his lived and built environment. A sense of levity and innocence is located within his narratives and murkiness of his palette, to operate as a ‘psychological counteract' that enables him to maintain a bemused distance from the profane, the dark, and the obscene. Georg Óskar, Romeo and Juliet, 2022, Oil on canvas, 200 × 150 cm Georg ÓskarThe end of Everything, Oil on canvas, 200 × 250 cm Georg Óskar, Drowning little bit Everyday, 2022, Oil on canvas, 200 × 150 cm

Demystifying Science
Resonant Structures of the Mind - Dr. Joseph Arpaia & Dr. Lobsang Rapgay

Demystifying Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 115:53


Fundamentally, this is a conversation about applied consciousness. We talk about the way that the "self" emerges from the resonant "structures" of the mind. These antennae decide the way that external stimuli are processed and integrated into experience, and so serve as the roots from which conscious experience springs. We talk about what happens when the antennae are tuned to a destructive resonance, the meditation industrial complex, the radical act of changing your mind, and much, much more. Support the scientific revolution with a monthly donation: https://bit.ly/3lcAasB #mindfulness #consciousness #demystifysci Check our short-films channel, @DemystifySci: https://www.youtube.com/c/DemystifyingScience Join our mailing list https://bit.ly/3v3kz2S PODCAST INFO: Anastasia completed her PhD studying bioelectricity at Columbia University. When not talking to brilliant people or making movies, she spends her time painting, reading, and guiding backcountry excursions. Michael Shilo also did his PhD at Columbia studying the elastic properties of molecular water. When he's not in the film studio, he's exploring sound in music. They are both freelance professors at various universities. - Blog: http://DemystifySci.com/blog - RSS: https://anchor.fm/s/2be66934/podcast/rss - Donate: https://bit.ly/3wkPqaD - Swag: https://bit.ly/2PXdC2y SOCIAL: - Discord: https://discord.gg/MJzKT8CQub - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DemystifySci - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/DemystifySci/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/DemystifySci MUSIC: -Shilo Delay: https://g.co/kgs/oty671

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
3.26 Fall and Rise of China: Taiping Rebellion #3: Heavenly Kingdom of Tianjing

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 50:53


Last time we spoke Hong Xiuquan had gathered a rabble of peasants, named them the god worshippers and declared war upon the Qing dynasty. He gave titles to his closest comrades forming the North, South, East, West and Flank Kings who led the great Taiping armies on a march towards the secondary capital of China, Nanjing. Countless cities fell the Taiping and the Qing desperately tried to encircle and quell the menace. But the Taiping never stayed in any given place long enough to be captured and even when they were dealt significant losses, they simply moved on and recruited more and more to their cause. Their armies grew exponentially and so did their conquests until they reached the secondary capital of China, Nanjing. Nanjing was put through a brutal siege and taken, her citizens put to the sword and now the Taiping held a grand capital city.   #26 This episode is The Taiping Rebellion part 3: The Heavenly Kingdom of Tianjing   Welcome to the Fall and Rise of China Podcast, I am your dutiful host Craig Watson. But, before we start I want to also remind you this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Perhaps you want to learn more about the history of Asia? Kings and Generals have an assortment of episodes on history of asia and much more  so go give them a look over on Youtube. So please subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry for some more history related content, over on my channel, the Pacific War Channel where I cover the history of China and Japan from the 19th century until the end of the Pacific War.   14 years after his first vision, Hong Xiuquan alongside an incredible 2 million followers had captured the secondary capital of China, Nanjing. Hong Xiuquan, the heavenly king, Yang Xiuqing the East King and the surviving Taiping leadership had developed their military based on the work of the late Feng Yunshan and their combined experiences from the march from the Thistle Mountains all the way to Nanjing. Much like the military structure the new capital would have 4 families linked to every corporal's family and 25 family units linked under every sergeant. These communities would build the public granaries, chapels for worship and so forth. The sergeants would dwell in chapels, the corporals would take their family and those families under their command to sabbath to worship. Every sabbath day, all senior officers, from generals to captains would visit one of the great churches of the sergeants to pray and work hard obeying the Ten commandments.    By day people would work the land, all serving in some form, whether it was pottery, ironwork, carpentry, masonry, whatever according to their skills. The land under Taiping rule was divided up amongst all with one full share for every man and women aged 16 and older and half a share for children below 16. All of the land was graded according to its productivity and when land was insufficient for the peoples needs, the people were moved to land that was plentiful. Of the products of labor, each corporal saw to it that every family under him had food, but all the rest went to the public treasuries. Sergeants checked the books and tallied the accounts, presenting records to superiors “ for all people on this earth are as the family of the Lord their God on High, and when people of this earth keep nothing for their private use but give all things to God for all to use in common, then in the whole land every place shall have equal shares, and every one be clothed and fed. This was why the Lord God expressly sent the Taiping Heavenly Lord to come down and save the world.”   The public treasuries would give gifts to every family at times of birth, marriage and death according their needs, but never in excess of one thousand copper cash or one hundred catties of grain. Surpluses had to be maintained incase of famine or war. Every family unit with a living male head had to give a soldier to the army, but the Taiping would not take widowers, widows, orphans or childless, nor weak or sick. With births came new families and every 5th family gave a new corporal, and every 25th a new sergeant and so on. All officers and officials, even the highest would be reviewed every 3 years and promoted or demoted according to performance. This was the system pushed out upon Nanjing when it was taken. As you can imagine it was a goliath task to meet these demands, thus the system could not actually be implemented all at once, but they were diligent to starting the listing and recording keeping to establish it. Not everyone flocked eagerly to the Taiping ranks. Many households were reluctant to register their members and hid for weeks, countless fled Nanjing.    The Taiping burnt down countless Taoist and Buddhist architecture, smashed statues and image and stripped or killed priests. Everyone was to conform to the new Taiping religion. Notably though the Chinese Muslims in Nanjing were not attacked and their mosques were allowed to stand. One group in Nanjing that were in a position of particular ambiguity were the catholics who numbered around 200. At least 30 catholics were burned in their homes or cut down in the streets during the early chaos. The Taiping found the catholic survivors in a catholic church, but when pressed they refused to recite Taiping liturgy. The Taiping authorities gave them 3 days to comply, then they burst into the church and destroyed the cross and overturned their altar. 70-80 catholic men had their arms tied behind their backs and were given a trial before a Taiping judge and condemned to death unless they said Taiping prayers. They refused opting for martyrdom, but in the end 25 eventually recited the Taiping prayers and the rest were sent to be vanguard forces in the army. In order to push the movement, the Taiping had to seize the Nanjing printing industry to distribute their sacred texts to all the sergeants for reading and preaching. Back when the Taiping captured Yangzhou in april of 1853 they acquired printing press craftsmen, so they brought them to Nanjing.   Hong Xiuquan makes 3 major strategic decisions, the first was to select Nanjing as the new Taiping Capital now known as Tianjing, the second was to create the printing system to promote the Taiping program and the 3rd was to alter name places in China. Hong Xiuquan proclaimed henceforth the city of Beijing was to be named “Yaoxue- demon's den” and the province of Zhili “criminal's province”. When all the Manchu demons were destroyed, Beijing's name could be restored and Zhili once its people repented for their sins and began worshiping the heavenly father. “The world has long been deluded by these demonic Tartars, and it is imperative that they be soon destroyed. But before we destroy these people, we must first destroy their bases. And before we can destroy the power of their bases, we must first destroy the bases' names.” Emperor Xianfeng by definition was the leader of earthly demons and Hong Xiuquan changed his name that meant “united in glory” to have a dog component added and he also did this to terms referring to Manchu.   The Taiping followers in Nanjing were told the time to end sexual separation had not come yet, any men who forced themselves on women, whether they be veterans or new would be executed. Those who worked as prostitutes would not only be executed, but also their families. Male homosexuality was severly punished, if partner were both aged 13 or older they would be beheaded. If you were under 13 you could be spared unless it was proven you were an active partner. The city of Nanjing was divided similar to what the Taiping did in Wuchang, with blocks for men and those for women and children. Those skilled in specific types of labor lived amongst another, for example carpenters with carpenters tailors with tailors.    Hong Xiuquan had a ceremonial hat made with a fan shaped front, decorated with twin dragons and twin phoenixes. The other kings were allowed to have twin dragons as well but only one phoenix. On the upper part of Hong Xiuquans hat he alone had written “the mountains and river are unified and the heavens are filled with stars”. The 3 surviving kings each had one line embroidered on their hats; for the East king Yang Xiuqing “long phoenix perching in the clouds”, for the north king Wei Changhui “long phoenix perching on the mountain peak” and for the flank king Shi Dakai “lone phoenix perching on the peony”.   Hong Xiuquan had 10,000 people work for 6 months to built him a palace in the former site of the governor generals mansion in the center of the northern side of the main residential city. Within mere days of taking Nanjing, the Qing began counter attacks leading to the gates of Nanjing being reinforced with additional gates built in front or behind the existing ones. Cannon emplacements and palisades for gunners are created en masse. Forward defensive encampments, wooden watch towers as high as 30 or even 40 feet are created. Smaller towns surrounded nanjing are reinforced. Large swathes of area have ditches dug, palisades erected, felled, honeycombed networked of small round holes with straw placed over them and bamboo spikes underneath. Its a regional fortress built with the purpose of overthrowing the Qing.   Now until the capture of Nanjing, the Taiping had been a mobile force whose success for a large part was simply because they would seize a major city and move on before the Qing could get them. The establishment of their Tianjing Capital meant the core of the Taiping movement, its leadership and central army were now in a fixed position. The Qing could finally plan and coordinate large scale action directed at their capital. Interestingly enough, the decision to hunker down in Nanjing is what many scholars regard as the crucial reason for their eventual failure. If they had simply done what they done best and took Nanjing for perhaps a month or so and moved on to Beijing they could have very well toppled the Qing. None the less, the Taiping were in a good position in Nanjing compared to that on Beijing. It is estimated in 1853 Nanjing held 18 million taels of silver, while Beijing was depleted to a possible 3 million. The Nanjing granaries by the end of 1853 totalled 1,270,000 piculs of unhulled rice and 750,000 hulled rice, sufficient to feed the Taiping for many months. An American missionary named E.C Bridgman visited Nanjing in may of 1854 and reported “all the people we saw were well-clad, well fed and well provided for in every way. They all seemed content, and in high spirits as if sure of success”. The surrounding areas continued to supply Nanjing with grain and the Yangtze river continued to serve as its artery of communication and trade.   Now once they had Nanjing the Taiping set out to accomplish their ultimate goal, the final defeat of the Manchu demons in Beijing. But when the Taiping took Nanjing a lot of internal strife began to grow. While Hong Xiuquan was the bonafide religious and political leader to the Taiping, he was never alone and although many of the great figureheads had died, a few large ones remained. Yang Xiuqing the east king, Wei Changhui the north king and Shi Dakai the flank king were the 3 largest leaders alongside Hong Xiuquan. Yang Xiuqing established himself as the highest ideological leader, above that of Wei Changhui and in many aspects above hong Xiuquan. When Xiao Chaogui the West King died, Hong Xiuquan made a proclamation that granted Yang a supervisory power over the 4 other kings, clearly promoting him above the rest. When Xiao Chaogui died, Shi Dakai sort of filled the dead kings space in many ways and when  Nanjing was captured he was the only king constantly occupied in the field, directing and personally leading western campaigns. Hong Xiuquan as the spiritual leader, began to gradually isolate himself within his palace only acting through proclamations. Wei Changhui the north king, acted as the coordinator for the defense of the region around the capital and was responsible for food supplies. This left general administrative supervision in the hands of Yang Xiuqing who also acted as the coordinator of all military campaigns. Now Yang Xiuqing back in the early days of 1851 had coalesced the Taiping when he began in trance-like states to state he was the mouthpiece of God the father. Likewise Xiao Chaogui had these trances where he said he was the mouthpiece of Jesus, hmmmmm. Oh and there was a lot of roleplay in this by the way, when Xiao Chaogui spoke to Hong Xiuquan in a trance state he would refer to him as “younger brother” like wise Yang would refer to him as son. Both Yang and Xiao it seems were in league with another using this unique trance behavior to raise their status. But when Xiao died, there was a lot of confusion, leading Yang to stop messing around for awhile as the voice of god the father. But in december of 1853 Yang once again began to speak publicly as the voice of god. Yang began a campaign where he attempted to humiliate the heavenly king using trances as the voice of god. Yang begins a campaign to humiliate Hong where he uses the voice of god to accuse the Heavenly King of growing to be too harsh and indulgent with his power. That he is harsh to women who serve him and far too indulgent of his 4 year old son. One accusation in particular was that 4 of Hong's palace women were treated so badly that they should be released from Hong's palace and instead should live at Yang's palace. Yang says Hong orders women under him to work in rain or snow and allows his concubines to sneer and scold the other women, oh yes despite all the laws and such Hong and many of the Taiping leaders have concubines. Remember when I said the Taiping rebellion was like a proto marxist one? Yes just like any good marxist they dont live the way they preach, shots fired. Yang continues to argue the women officials are prevented from their duties by the mean concubines and that Hong Xiuquan had even kicked some of them in anger and punished pregnant concubines similarly, something that is a serious crime. You don't kick pregnant women. He follows this up saying in God's voice that the heavenly king should receive 40 blows of the rod for his derelictions. To this Hong publicly prostrated himself to receive said blows, so god would forgive him. Hong's 4 year old son is said to be too self-indulgent and willful because he plays in the rain, and smashes presents given to him…..weird. God states he must stop all of this because it will lead him to abuse the people in the future when he leads.   Yang Xiuqing did not stop at attacking Hong, he also went after two others in particular: the north king Wei Chanhui and marquis Qin Rigang, both men who had been with Hong since the earliest days at Thistle mountain. Wei was an educated man, Qin was a miner who studied military arts and proved himself a formidable strategist. For years both men handled key military assignments for Hong, Qin was regarded as the senior ranking Taiping officer after the surviving kings. Yang began to use the voice of god to humiliate Wei in many ways. Whenever his trances began, Yang's woman attendants would summon Wei at once using drum calls and if Wei was late the women would berate him. Wei was forced to kowtow to Yang when he was in trance and when Yang was in trance he moved by sedan chair while Wei was forced to walk beside it. Yang kept his attendants on Wei's ass also disturbing him. Qin had to endure similar humiliations and was forced to help carry Yangs sedan chair up the palace stairs a few times. To give some more flavor, here is one story about a clash that occurred in december between Yang and Wei.    Yang one day in public suggested that Hong had more than enough embroideries and robes in his palace and should economize for a time instead of getting more. Wei ignored what Yang said and told Hong “You, our second elder brother, are the true Sovereign of all nations of the world, and you are rich in the possession of all within the four seas; although robes and garments are sufficient, it will still be necessary to be constantly engaged in making up more.” Upon hearing this Yang responded “I beseech you, our second elder brother, to pardon this younger brother's crime and permit this younger brother to memorialize straightforwardly. If apparel were insufficient, then it would be necessary to make up more; but if it is said it is sufficient, it will be better to delay the making up of more, and then we can see the second elder brother's virtues of economy and love of man. Why should our younger brother Zheng [the North King] memorialize on the necessity of constantly making up more clothing?” To both of them Hong replied “Brother [Yang Xiu]Qing! You are certainly what the ancients called a bold and outspoken minister. And you, brother Zheng, although you may have a sincere regard for your elder brother, are not so straightforward and open in your statements as our brother Qing; for which he is to be much more commended. Later, in the reign of the Young Monarch, all who are ministers should imitate the example of our brother Qing in speaking straightforwardly as he has done this day; thus will they fulfill their duty as ministers.”   Some of the events I just talked about occur a bit later on, but I wanted to give you the idea that in the background, Yang was humiliating others and doing whatever he could to take more and more power. Now of the 5 kings, 3 survived and the administrative staffs of the former 2 simply were distributed amongst the 3 survivors. But after Nanjing was captured the kings would not be the solo ruling leaders anymore. Additional “princes” were added, they were similar to the kings, just lesser so. They held lesser rank than the kings, but were above the Taiping military rank structure. They come about at different times but there would be the Zhong price: Li Xiucheng, Ying prince: Chen Yucheng, Jun Prince: Lai Wenkwok, Fu Prince: Hong Renda, An Prince: Hong Renfa, Yong Prince: Hong Rengui, Fu Prince: Hong Renfu and the Gan Prince: Hong Rengan, yes our old friend Rengan will come to this story but much later on. It seems Yang orchestrated the creation of these princes and the multiplicity of administrative staffs to make it easier for him to weaken the authority of his most senior rivals.    Yang Xiuqing acting as commander in chief of the Taiping military sent out 4 offensives, 2 towards the north against Beijing and 2 up the Yangtze river into western China. Yang Xiuqings overall plan was to use the northern and western expeditionary forces to create a large pincer to capture the whole of northern and western China. According to Missionary Bridgman “ The Taiping had four armies in the field, carrying on active aggressive operations: 2 of these had gone northwards: they were designed to cooperate and after storming and destroying Peking, to turn westwards and march through Shanxi, Shensi, Kansuh, into Szechuan, where they are expected to meet their other 2 armies, which from Kingsi and the Lake provinces are to move up the great river and along through the regions on its southern bank'.    The northern expedition of around 80,000 men was led by 2 commanders, Li Kaifang and Lin Fengxiang who led the vanguard to take Yangchow on April the 1st. By May the 8th they left Yangchow after receiving reinforcements and advanced towards Ch'u-chou in Anhwei province. As their forces went into Anhwei and Henan province they were bolstered by local bandits, particularly the Nian rebels, who were performing the Nian rebellion simultaneously. Following the same strategy applied to the Hunan campaign and the Yangtze valley, they moved rapidly through Anhwei and Henan without leaving behind garrisons nor supply stations. At first, they did not attempt to take any city that proved to be well defended. However at Huaiqing in Henan at the border of Shanxi, they used their 80,000 strong force to besiege the prefectural city, believing it held rich military supplies.    The siege lasted 2 months, but the Taiping failed to capture it and had to move on. The delay in their march as the result of failing at Huaiqing seems to be a decisive turning point for the northern expedition as a whole. The Taiping suffered terrible losses in both shock troops and officers, while the Qing court in Beijing gained valuable time to prepare against the impending Taiping attacks. The Taiping gradually penetrated Zhili via Shanxi province and reached the suburbs of Tianjin, and it was here another large mistake was made for the second time. The Taiping could have simply marched on Beijing, but yet against chose to attack a secondary target. The northern expeditionary force was tiny compared to that of the entire Taiping army which should have been consolidated and marched upon Beijing. The Taiping were greatly hindered by northern chinas winters, because do remember most of the Taiping were from southern china. The Qing had begun a war of attrition, making sure to take away food stuffs in the path of the northern expedition. The Taiping found it extremely hard to forage and on top of this the Qing even broke dikes in the grand canal to flood the Taiping out.   Emperor Xianfeng also released what would be his greatest weapon, the Mongolian prince Senggelinqin. Prince Seng was from the Horqin left back banner of inner Mongolia and a member of the Borjiqin clan. He was a 26th generation descendant of Qasar brother to Genghis Khan. His name Sengge Rinchen was made up of two tibetan words meaning Lion and Treasure. When he was just a child he was adopted by Sodnamdorji a Jasagh “head of a mongol banner” of the Horqin left back banner and Junwang, second rank prince under the Qing dynasty. He would inherit his adoptive fathers titles during the reign of Emperor Daoguang. It was at the 1853 battle for Tianjin where Prince Seng would earn his fame.    The Taiping expeditionary force had fought its way bitterly from Nanjing to Tianjin, leaving just 80 miles between them and Beijing. Prince Seng rushed to the scene aided greatly by a valuable ally, winter. The winter ravaged the Taiping, many of them had never seen snow in their lives and this forced them to fall upon a village fortification to survive it causing an immediate stalemate. When the weather broke in spring, Prince Seng ordered his troops to build a dirt and stone wall to encircle the entire Taiping army camp from a distance while a crew of 1000 laborers spent a month digging a series of trenches to connect it, via a dry riverbed to the grand canal over 40 miles away. When they broke the dikes, the canal water rushed in flooding the Taiping camp to its rooftops, drowning a considerable amount of the army and forcing their submission. Being a Mongol, Prince Seng and those he commanded preferred the bow and arrow as their chief weapon, something they had overwhelming supremacy over the southern chinese. The Taiping could have overwhelmed Prince Sengs cavalry units, if they had western firearms, but they did not. The Taiping forces were dispersed and destroyed. Lin Fengxiang was captured at Lichen in Zhili province on march 7th of 1855 and Li Kaifang was captured at Fengkuat'un in Shandong on March the 31st of 1855. This was the ultimate end to the north expedition. Had the Taiping marched on Beijing at the rate they were going, it is argued they could have taken down the Qing. Tactical blunders, logistical issues, severe weather and the capability of Qing commanders such as Prince Seng ultimately put an end to the Taiping threat to Beijing, though they were certainly nowhere near defeated.   While the northern expedition was going on there was also a western expedition that left Nanjing on May 19th of 1853, just 11 days after the northern expedition launched from Yangzhou. The objective of the western expedition as conceived by Yang Xiuqing was to follow the Yangtze river and ultimately meet up with the northern expedition in Sichuan province. This would have resulted in a pincer maneuver that could swallow up all of western and northern China. On June 10th the western forces recaptured the vital city of Anqing which had been taken back by Qing forces. They were able to provision up from there and divided the force into several armies to march through the Yangtze valley. One army was commanded by Hu Yiguang who set out north of the Yangtze to conquer Anhwei province. Lai Hanyang took another army south to conquer Jiangxi. A 3rd mobile force led by Zeng Tianyang began to independently attack cities south of the Yangtze.    Hu Yiguang's force got as far as Luzhou, the new capital of Anhwei province at the time. Luzhou was guarded by one of the most capable Qing commanders, Jiang Zhongyuan, a Hunanese native from Xinning. He became the magistrate of Xiushi and Lishui, earning a reputation for being a great scholar and military leader. Zeng Guofan recommended Jiang for a higher office in 1850 to Emperor Xianfeng, but when he was supposed to leave for Beijing his father died and he had to return home to mourn. When the Taiping rebellion began, Jiang was appointed to assist the Grand secretary Sha-Shan-a in quelling the insurrection. Jiang began a campaign of gathering Hunanese volunteers who for the first time fought outside Hunan. It was one of the first waves of local forces led by a gentry class to fight the Taiping menace, something that influenced future Yung-Ying armies. Jiang won a great battle in Guangxi and was promoted to the rank of first class sub prefect. When the Taiping were invading Guilin in 1852, Jiang led his men from his home of Xinning to attack them. He won 3 major battles and managed to lift the Taiping siege of Guilin earning the rank of prefect. After this Jiang thwarted a Taiping naval invasion of Hunan province. He dammed the Xiang river near Suoyi ford and ambushed the Taiping Navy causing massive casualties upon them. It was the battle I mentioned where 10,000 Taiping men and Feng Yunshan perished. He thwarted the Taiping overland invasion of Hunan and besieged the Taiping stronghold of Chenzhou for a month before they fled to attack Changsha, the capital of Hunan. Jiang was one of those who helped defend Changsha earning the promotion of provincial judge of Hubei and then by 1853 assistant commander of the Qing armies in Jiangnan. He then aided in the defense of Nanchang which was besieged from June 22 to september 24th of 1853. For this he was appointed governor of Anhui which is what led him to the battle over Luzhou. When word came that the Taiping sought to attack Luzhou, Jiang rushed over with a small force to try and defend the new capital. He found himself outnumbered and outgunned, especially in siege mining technology that the Taiping had dramatically improved by this point in time. The Taiping took the city by January the 15th and in the process Jiang was wounded and he opted to commit suicide by drowning himself. The Qing lost an important capital city and one of their finest commanders who had proven himself successful at defeating Taiping using local militia forces.    Lai Hanying's army besieged Nanchang, the capital of Jiangxi from june to september of 1853, but ultimately failed to take the city. This resulted in Lai losing his command and his army divided in 2 to hit Hubei and Hunan under the leadership of Wei Jun and Shi Zhenxiang. The high point of their campaigns led to the capture of Xiangtan on April 24th of 1854. After a year of taking Nanjing, the Taipings expeditions had run out of momentum. The northern expedition was a failure, the western had gained limited success, but not enough to extend their reach to the upper Yangtze and that of western china. The Taiping riverine forces dominated the Yangtze up into Hunan allowing them to use it for provisioning, logistics and most importantly further recruiting. But the original lightning speed drive of the Taiping had faded and the Qing were beginning to recover from the blitzkrieg. Now the offensives became see-saw's which allowed the Qing more time to recover, reorganize and build up new leadership that could effectively face the Taiping menace. Being a Pacific War specialist, its very much like the situation during the Guadalcanal campaign. Prior to this, the Japanese ran rampant on offensive controlling the when and where actions would occur, but after the horrible loss at Midway and Guadalcanal, the Japanese had gone past their logistical capabilities and lost the initiative, for the rest of the Pacific War the allies controlled the initiative. This is what we call the turning point, and it was here a year after taking Nanjing and losing the window of opportunity to take Beijing that was the Taiping rebellion's turning point. It is not to say they could not win the war, but the initiative was now in the hands of the Qing.   Although the campaign to take Beijing failed and the western campaign only held limited successes near the Yangtze, the Taiping were steadily extending their territory and thus were gaining additional manpower and supplies from the greater Yangtze region. The Taiping were struggling to consolidate their gains to establish better rule. Their offensives were being hampered by both political and religious confusion, often orchestrated by the efforts of Yang Xiuqing. The Taiping structure threatened Chinese traditions and saw backlash particularly from the Gentry class. I would note the gentry and landowner types probably were not the keenist on a group who sought land/wealth redistribution haha. The Taiping were a threat to Chinese social order as much as it was a threat to the Qing rule. Thus the gentry of China began to put their resources together to help the war effort resulting in a large push to the creation of Yung-ying militia groups such as Zeng Guofan's Xiang army. On top of the external actors trying to destroy the Taiping, the Taiping were having a ton of inner conflict as well. A violent and bloody power struggle had emerged destroying the unified political and military command established under Yang Xiuqing.   Now although I spoke about the formation of the new armies, I need to go into it a bit further, especially in regards to Zeng Guofan. While I explained how Zeng Guofan created his force, I did not talk about how this all looked from the Qing dynasties point of few. In late 1852 and early 1853 a number of edicts were made by Emperor Xianfeng leading to the appointment of 43 supervisors of new local corps in the provinces of Hunan, Anhwei, Jiangsu, Zhili, Henan, Shandong, Zhejiang, Jiangxi, Guizhou and Fujian. Amongst the appointed was Zeng Guofan. The Qing government sought to have these organized smaller forces led by the gentry class so they could be loyal and relied upon. These forces were set up in each district to contest the Taiping. Zeng Guofan's Xiang army proved themselves to be highly effective, but Zeng Guofan chose to be very cautious when reporting back to the Qing court. This was because his military organizational building was strongly autonomous and could be seen as a threat to the Qing military. There had been numerous local militia groups that shifted from pro-government to banditry. The establishment of these armies was obviously a last resort means, and definitely could be a threat to the dynasty, they were not so unalike to the bandit armies created in the 17th century to fight the Daxi or Dashun armies afterall.    Zeng Guofan did not state exactly what he was doing to the Qing court, in one of his first memorial he simply reported back that he was enlisting men from the countryside to establish a large military corps at its capital to be trained. It looked like Zeng Guofan was building a personal army, one that could be led on campaigns outside its local area. He sent more memorials stating that local corpsmen could not be relied upon in critical moments and that it was better to recruit from these local corpsmen an official militia, whose rations could be paid from public funds. When he was building the Xiang army he was consciously departing from the Qing courts authorization. He realized that local defense corps that had sprung up all over China were useful against local bandits and small raiders, but they were not large nor strong enough to withstand attacks from larger organized armies such as the Taiping. The Taiping were only growing larger, more organized, better armed. They simply could not be stopped by just local corps, what the Qing needed was a mobile army that could be used for offensive campaigns throughout larger areas.   Now the way Zeng Guofan made the Xiang army was based strongly on personal loyalty, the units were recruited, led and paid for by their commander. The commanders were loyal to Zeng Guofan, thus more or less the Xiang army was a personal army at his command. Zeng Guofan also assembled a number of future leaders who would go on to create their own versions of the Xiang army. Such men were Zeng Zongtang and Li Hongzhang of Anhwei province. By the end of the century, Zeng Guofan's example led to most provinces being dominated by regional forces under military organizations over whom the Qing central government had only minimal control. In many ways Zeng Guofan was a symptom of the ailing dynasty, the Qing were gradually losing control and there was emerging a threat to the political and social order in china. Zeng Guofan say the Taiping menace as a threat to traditional chinese society. He made many proclamations stating as such. “The Taiping rebels have stolen the ways of the foreign barbarians when they distort family relations by calling all people brothers and sisters, when they declare that all land belongs to the heavenly king and that all profit also belongs to him. They force scholars to give up the COnfucian classics to read instead the so called teaching of Jesus. They wipe away our moral standards, the very way we conduct ourselves as humans, the classics, and the institutions that have existed in CHina for several thousands of years. This is not only a tragedy for the Qing dynasty but a great tragedy for the whole of “ming-chiao” Chinese tradition and causes confucius and Mencius to weep bitterly in the underworld. How could any educated person remain sitting, hands in sleeves, without doing something about it”.    Zeng Guofan kept bringing up how the Taiping destroyed Buddhist and Taoist temples, that they were angering the gods who would take revenge. To right these terrible wrongs he said he was under Qing orders to advance his troops by land and water, not just to ease the Qing monarchs but also to console Confucious and Mencius, to avenge the slaughter of millions of Chinese. Appealing to the masses, Zeng Guofan began to ask for recruits, financial support and the surrender of any who decided to join the Taiping. Now I said he paid his army handsomely compared to that of the Green standards and such, but a lot of the funds were not under Qing control. The Gentry class were strongly supporting those like Zeng Guofan. Zeng Guofan began to ask and obtain permission from the Qing government to sell certificates of academic degrees, official titles and office appointments to sell to these said Gentry. The sale of all these degrees and titles increased gentry contributions, but also increased their influence and it began to build a new gentry role in leadership.    Another major source of income for the Xiang army was new internal custom taxes introduced in 1853. And although the Qing government permitted this new tax, it held no control or supervision over it. Zeng Guofan and other commanders of regional armies were gaining control over regular provincial taxes and were using them to build their armies. The combined income from the gentry class and regional taxes made men like Zeng Guofan basically warlords. Their forces were not really governmental troops although they were fighting for said government. The other side, the Taiping failed to gain any support from the Gentry class because of their alienating religious and economic beliefs. Fundamentally the Taiping were a revolutionary group breaking the stratum of Chinese society, and a large part of that was the Chinese gentry class.    Now Zeng Guofan began with a army of just a thousand men in 1853, composing 3 battalions. When they began to really clash with the Taiping they were soon 20,000 strong with naval and cavalry units. Later on they would become 120,000 men strong and Zeng Guofan had planned to use them for a long drawn out campaign despite pressure coming from Beijing to smash the rebels. Now the first major engagement between the Xiang army and the Taiping came in early 1854 and the Taiping defeated them. But on May 1st of 1854, the Xiang army defeated the Taiping at Xiangtan forcing them to withdraw. Then in a battle at Yuzhou in Hunan in July, the Xiang army on land and river gained a major victory. This victory gained Zeng Guofan great prestige and demonstrated the effectiveness of his army. The battle cost the Taiping more than half their fleet of boats and thus the loss of control over the central Yangtze river area. It was the first serious setback for the Taiping and it reduced their perimeter of military operations. Following up this victory, the Xiang army entered Hubei province and quickly recaptured Wuchang and Hanyang by october of 1854. Soon Zeng Guofans forces began to penetrate into Hubei and Jiangxi provinces marking the failure and end to the Taiping western expedition.   I would like to take this time to remind you all that this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Please go subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry after that, give my personal channel a look over at The Pacific War Channel at Youtube, it would mean a lot to me.  The Northern expedition was a complete bust, the Taiping had lost the opportunity to claim the dragon throne. But the western expedition proved fruitful and gradually the heavenly kingdom was growing, and perhaps it could eclipse the Qing.  

The Simply Fit Podcast
How To Get & Stay Motivated: Ayelet Fishbach

The Simply Fit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 66:55


In the latest episode of the Simply Fit Podcast, I have the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Ayelet Fishbach. Ayelet is a psychologist, author and professor at the university of Chicago. The topic of motivation is something that involves all of us who are living a human experience. Fundamentally we all want to achieve certain things in life and knowing how to get and sustain your motivation is an unbelievable advantage to have. Ayelet has been studying the topic of motivation for the past three decades and the insights she's gained and continue to gain could really change the game when it comes to you achieving your goals. In this episode you can expect to learn: What has surprised Ayelet the most over her past three decades of research. How to handle the inevitable dip in motivation and setbacks on your journey. Along with why you may need an anti role model as well as a regular role model. So without further ado, Ayelet Fishbach. Connect with me on Instagram: @elliothasoon Let's work together: www.ehcoaching.co.uk Get Free Workout Plans: https://bit.ly/EHWorkoutsYT Find out more about Ayelet: https://www.ayeletfishbach.com/ Read Ayelet's book: https://amzn.to/3W5BY71 Please rate us 5* on Apple Podcasts and leave us a review if you're enjoying the podcast. Don't forget to subscribe too so that you don't miss any future episodes.

Real Estate Marketing Dude
Adapting to Shift With Investors

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 41:54


Today we are talking about how investors are handling this recession. Like agents, they have to adapt to survive this market, and with the right strategy, thrive.Martin is the founder and host of the Stroudsburg Real Estate Investors club. With his leadership the group has gone from zero to over three hundred members in less than two years. He currently manages and operates a Real Estate Investing firm operating over five million dollars in assets and he helps investors get above average returns by investing passively in multifamily Real Estate with him and his team.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeHow do you make sure everyone knows your name?How are top agents thriving during a recession?Why you need to be making content and developing a brand.ResourceCheck Out Martin's WebsiteReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscripts:So how do you track new business, you constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas to real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them. Let's get started.What's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude, podcast, folks, where we chat about today is how you diversify. When the market stops transacting by 33%. What are you gonna do during this recession, this is gonna be the best opportunity that most of us will see to actually start building wealth and you don't make a lot of money when everyone else is buying houses, you make a lot of money when no one else is, because that's where the opportunity is. And if you're not adopting the mindset of becoming a real estate problem solver, right now, people are going to be eating your lunch. So what I wanted to do today was bring on a investor, not any investor, Latino investor. That's why we got on the show here, because we support our Latinos on this show. But what we're going to talk about guys is sort of how to start thinking outside the box, here's the reality, right? You're gonna, there's gonna be a lot of opportunities. And when the market shifts like there's, there's gonna be recession, people are going to be losing their houses, their jobs, and other things. And they're going to need help. And this is why every real estate investor in the country is self attaining on the sidelines right now. They're not getting in yet, but they're just sitting there. They're putting on their helmet. They're strapping on their chin strap, and they're putting in their mouthpiece, because they're about to go to freakin feast. And that's why these markets are so exciting. And real estate agents, lenders, you guys are in the best position to take advantage of this different stuff. So we're gonna get into that a little bit further right now. But without further ado, let's go ahead and introduce our guest, Mr. Martin. Perdomo. A Superdome. All right. That's correct. Port demo. All right, Martin, why don't you go ahead and tell everyone Hello, and tell him a little bit about yourself. Hey, everyone. Thanks. Thanks for having me, Mike.Really appreciate it's an honor to be here on your show and talking to your audience. I've been investing in real estate since 2007. Man I first fell in love with real estate. When I was 1616. I grew up in New York City, born and raised in Washington Heights, and those of you that are familiar with New York, that's the hood man, it's rough in the 80s and 90s. And at 16th on my 16th on my 16th birthday. My mom kicked me out for the ninth time she said it says she got home she kicked me out. And I quickly realized my sleeping in trained and and rooftops and and parks in New York City. And then the beaches in Far Rockaway Beach, that human beings needed something really important that shelter and food, right. And that's when I first fell in love with real estate, I made a decision unconsciously that I was going to own a lot of real estate, so I never have to go through that pain again. And that's what I've done. So that was, you know, that was my debt. When I made that decision. I bought my first investment I bought my first real estate piece of real estate when I was 21.And I bought my first prop my first investment in 2007. So I was a mortgage broker. And you know, I was the guy giving people those all those bad loans. subprime loans. I was countrywide days baby. Right. I remember that remember countrywide and all those never, never before in the history of real estate has a college graduate at 21 years old had the ability to make 750 to a million dollars a year just right out of college at their first entry level job. That's the type of market it was for those you guys that weren't around back then. It was crazy man. It was we were making so much money. I rememberMike being in my conference room with my sales team and telling them I didn't know what I knew now, right? Obviously, and I remember telling my people say, Hey, man, we're giving these these loans these 300,000 loan to someone making $40,000 a year. Fundamentally, it just doesn't make sense. But I wasn't intelligent enough. I wasn't smart enough astute enough to know how to look for the opportunities. I didn't know how to prepare. Like you said, when we started earlier.The real estate investors are salivating right? They're chomping at the bit right for the opportunities that are gonna come.And you know, last year I was saying the same thing like this is not sustainable people offering me $60,000 over asking over the weekend, like put a property in the market and it's like I'm like this shit doesn't make sense. Like it's like deja vu right?It's not gonna sustain long term. When I say one thing real quick why he says that you guys gonna support point I mean cut you off. The 90% of the markets never seen a market like this. Like the agents out there. 90% of them never been through this market. Because 90% of licensed real estate agents have never seen a shift. Alright, we've been on abull market for 12 1314 fucking years. Right so no one knows what to expect, including some of the top we have one of the top agents here in San Diego, I got a little Facebook's back. You're listening. I'm talking about you, bro.The market crashed up. It's like the top agent and Sandy Berg's ever gonna crash been doing business seven, eight years? Do you guys all have egg on your face? For anyone who's saying the market is crashing? Whenever it goes up like that it is unsustainable In today's internet. Today's it's not a supply and demand issue? I don't think so. They're people want to buy houses, even though they're they're overpaying for them.It's an affordability issue. Right now that that said, that's one of the reasons of why we decided so I told you told your audience earlier we flip houses, right? So we decided our strategy now is when we flip, right? Because you got to be careful when you're flipping houses in a market like this.What you're doing, you got to really understand the data. And that is one of the things that you know, I learned from 2007 After buying my first, like 100 bought my first investment 100,000 I was $100,000 underwater, within two years. Pricing property was worth I bought it for 272 75. Same property was worth 179 Two years later, and you bought in oh seven. So you got caught your pants down? Yeah, man. Yes, sir. However, I just saw a comp of that property burned out. I had college kids and they burned it down. And that saved me. But I just saw a comp, I just bought a triplex not to combat a month ago. And the appraisal comes in here. He's like, Hey, what are you gonna bring that in at? And he's like, I don't know yet. But here's my comps. I just saw come for a property two doors down from there. Same like exact square footage of that property sold for 385. So my lesson, right? Is Real Estate is very forgiving long term. Right? If don't wait to the good old saying don't wait to buy real estate, buy real estate. Don't wait. So even if I would have hung in there 14 years later, I would have I would have I would have turned around to give up. Yeah, yeah. So so so if you know, it's about that mindset of having that long term thinking in terms of long term and not just right now, when you flip properties,like some of the things that one of the strategies I do, if you don't know what you're doing, and a lot of the pretenders are already out, right? You got Redfin just left you got glass door, leftdoor,or whatever their name or open door, whatever the name of that, like glass or that's, that's a really good way tothey all got out. And I remember talking to my team Mike, last year saying, you know, those guys can compete with us. And the reason I say that those guys can compete with us is because while they have virtually unlimited funds, right, they have all this money. We're intimate in this market. Can you imagine those of us that are seasoned? Alright, think about this for a second. Those of us that are seasoned investors.What is the toughest part of the rehab process is dealing with those freaking contractors, right? That is the toughest part, right? Those contractors will eat your freakin lunch. And can you imagine what contractors if they try that shit with us? And we're local, we're here we have boots on the ground. We have a team assembled everything. What are they doing when they get a call from Zillow? Hey, I'm Zillow in California and I want to rehab they're killing those guys. Right there. They're like, can you imagine what they're doing to them so and no disrespect to them not not throwing shade on them I just on a one to one that really can't compete right with us locally, because we're local, right? They're not they're not in the business of making money. They're in the business of spending money.And they have to spend X amount of money in those hedge fund worlds, whereas the mom and pop or the individuals are actually in the business of making money. And when I never understood what all these pods is, like, why you guys like out and like the worst times to buy, like they came out in oh seven, two member they started buying and they went out right away. It's like, Dude, you got to you create the fun, like in six months from now, then you buy all the properties, you know, by him whenever I was paying peak dollars for him, that's just like, you would think that they would do like more research on like how real estate works for these high end funds, but none of them do because they're just spending money. Like a drunken sailor. It doesn't make sense to me like, like, I study the data man. And I'm like, you know, what, why would you like why are how are you guys justifying those decisions? Right? One of the decisions we made earlier this year when we saw this, all the correction and interest rates going up. Actually, late last year, I said we're going to now shift to when we do flip a property we're only going to do properties be low sub 250, right? ARV is up to 50. And that's because in our market that's considered affordable. And what I did was I went back and I studied 1981 when interest rates were 16% Right?those kind of environment that we're kind of projecting we're going into. So I studied what investors were doing that and right. And I looked at, hey, people were still buying houses. I bought my first house in 2000. And it was I paid I had an FHA loan 9.75% interest rate was my rate, people are bitching about 7% interest rate right now, I'm like, stop it, stop, like,you know, that's not my first investment. And I was a mortgage broker, and oh, seven was 7.75. Right. And I had a 740 credit score, and I was a mortgage broker, I gave myself the absolute best deal.And so we decided we're going to only buy properties that are in the affordable space, because in 1981, the investors that were making money were were were selling properties that were affordable, then we feel based on the data income and things like that, demographically, we feel that 250 Regardless of where interest rates go, we give a good product, good clean product turnkey, we're always going to have a product, we're always going to have a buyer for that. So it's about studying the market, right, Mike? Like really knowing your shit, like really just studying and understanding what it is that you mean, I can't, I can just go buy a house and throw on some paint and granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, refinish the floors and make a bunch of money. That's what that's what the novice is doing. That's how they lose money.So let's see here. Here's you guys, if you listen in to what he's saying, like real estate investors are a large part. I've been become investor friendly. First and foremost, like for all the realtors listening to this guy become investor friendly. Because that's where the transactions are gonna go. Like, would you rather work with an investor that does like 10 houses a year would you rather work with one individual buyer is going to pitch about the GFCI outlets, and their dad is going to come to the inspection and give you a heart attack. So which wild you really want to go with it? And with that you're going to have this is why I bring him on the show is because you're going to have these conversations. I got some questions for you, Martin, because there's a lot of agents and I want to get more into your strategy. But the question for you as would you like if you had like First off, I mean, investor friendly real estate agents, you really know what I'm talking about like that know their shit, like investor friendly people that are gonna go out there and source deals for you. People that did be like, Hey, yo, do you know like, the zoning in here is way under built. If you brought this to its highest and best use, you could probably do this with that. How many people are talking that way?Dude, I host the local real estate investors meet up in my market. And I talk about this exact same exact same thing you just bought up. There is a handful, maybe three in my market that I can that can have that kind of conversation with me. And not it's not the realtors fault. They're taught to stay out of trouble. In real estate agents school, they taught they're taught to be scared and this is they've taught that anything outside of a mortgage traditional 30 year mortgage or 15 year mortgages Oh, it's illegal. And they and this is what I tell Realtors when they come is learn how to provide value to a guy like me because I'm the gift that keeps on giving right? Like I'm the gift that you know I'm the guy that's gonna give you transaction after trends you want to partner with guys it doesn't have to be me but a guy like me right? Fortunately for me my wife is a realtor so I've trained her on how to think as an investoryou got you guys are probably like going to like Valentine's day talking about cash on cash return and cap ratesyeahunderstood how to speak the languageand how to provide value to like just exactly like a ton of money with with guys like us that are we're constantly buying right the you know we're not going to pitch about little GFCI outlet we're not gonna bitch about the roof and a bunch about this like we just wanted to do it makes sense we run the numbers it makes sense our students do and you sell it to us and you're going to step in and then you're going to sell it for us so it's a double whammy right that's that's Mark playing that's playing a small well most people don't think that eight investors have a bad name like really agents Oh get the investors waiting someone's getting ripped off that's not true like guys got I'm gonna rewind what happened in oh seven people are gonna need investors to bail them out. I mean, that's just what's gonna happen. Investors yes, they make money but so do you.Right? Are you are you a dick for fucking selling me a house at a 5% rate that you just put on the MLS and you just let the MLS sell? Let's be honest, right? So you have to open your eyes to this stuff you guys and that's my only goal to show today is to really get you thinking outside the box get you guys really looking at why not only do you want to become investor friendly in this upcoming market, but also work with different investors and honestly, like, Who here wants to sell real estate for the rest of their life? Nobody. Nobody can last the reason why 90% of the business hasn't been throughshift like this is because no one last in this business for more than 10 years because it can be a grueling job. And most of the people that start out and do very well become investors themselves, you would think that makes common sense. It's like sort of the natural progression of a real estate agent, learn the market, go in there, and then eventually become the investor become your own best client at the end of the day. So let's get into some of these strategies. Now just wanted to pick that up, because I want to point you guys in the right direction to head during this recession. Because just do it, trust me.Where I wouldn't had as just being a regular residential agent anymore, I just would stay away from a adept it's time. So let's get into this, you're gonna go into the buy and hold, which is attractive. A lot of investors like to make a quick buck. It's harder to find a buy and hold. Let's get into that. strategy. First. Buy and hold is different by the bind flip. Guys, I'm sure you guys understand that. But what do you look for in a buy and hold? Like, I just want to play real estate agent and you play investor? That's what you are. And I paid you What do I look for? What kind of properties are you to buy? What's the strategy in this? So when I'm looking for buy and hold, I'm looking for bigger plays. But if you know, I don't know who your audience is, let's just I just bought a triplex. Let's just Let's just Let's just look at that right, I just bought a triplex a couple blocks from here. So that's the most recent one I bought less than a month ago. And when I looked at that, I look at a couple things, right? It's a little you run the numbers differently, right? I'm looking at, I'm looking at Cap rates, I'm looking at income, I'm looking at value, add opportunity. So So those of you that don't know capitalization, what capitalization rate is capitalization rate is my rate of return on my on what that's the rate that properties are trading at,in a particular market, right. That's how you could calculate the value. So I look at a What's the rent? Was it current rent, and that particular asset? And then I look at what can I get this rent to? And what do I have to do to the place to get it to that rent? So for instance, if I have four let's just say make even even if even numbers if I'm getting $36,000 a year for let's call it $40,000, a year from that triplex currentlyperforming so it's underperforming by like 15 grand a year, right? 15 grand a year, so I can get it to 15 to 55,000 hours a year. How much money do I have to put into the property? To get it to give me that? And then what's my valuation once I increase it to that income? So it's a it's a little bit different? Beast, right? I'm running different animals, and I'm running different different numbers. And then can I exit on a refi?too, to burn it. And maybe the people know that you're people familiar with the buy, renovate,rent, refinance, and repeat. If I can borrow it, then what's my, what's my, what's my tenants? Andwhat can I refinance it out, and while they're still cashflow, so there's a lot of different moving parts. And I'm looking at, for instance, this particular one, Mike, we it was a three units or three unit. We have crappy tenants in there, places falling apart, it's way underperforming, I mean, the rents, I can get another $600 in rents, what do I have to put into it, though I have to put in there's a hole in the roof like roofs getting done tomorrow, there's a hole in the roof is just falling apart. I have no idea how people will live like that. But my value add my upside in this particular and agents pay attention if you're predominantly listeners or agents. My value add was that there is a there's a meter in the meter base electrical meter base, there's a fourth meter in the basement. It's a walkout basement. And that was grandfathered in and there was an apartment there at one time there's a kitchen and already a bathroom in there. It's full of junk right now. But that right there turns changes that whole property, I can go in there now. But a new meter, put it rewired, put new, redo the bathroom, redo the kitchen, turn it into a brand new place, right, and I go from buying that place, I'm gonna wind up putting about 60 grand in rehab into that property. Bought that place at 219. These let's call it 201 96. Let's just call it 200 200. I'm going to put 60 in and I'm going to have 260 The after we call it ARV after repair value the new valuation because I'm fourth appreciating it the new valuation of the property projected after I'm done it's $475,000. So what can I refi it out right what what can i What can I get with that right? How much equity do I have? I just created a ton of equity for myself. This particular and I have a cash flowing asset and the asset will be paid by the by the debt is paid by the residents. And I keep the assets and I still cashflow it's a win win win win situation. You got to know how to buy. I don't kind of give you the long, long view. But that's theAre the Fit kind of the 50,000 foot view of all the moving parts? When when I'm looking at buying multifamily now something that's small, I'm gonna look at it. That simple, right? Something bigger, we purchase a 57 unit earlier this year. And that one similar strategy Hey, what was the wrench wrench for 700 we pushed him all the way to $1,100 a month, we sealed the driveway, we dropped about 200,000 The property did a bunch of a bunch of things to add value to the place. And we forced appreciate it. The asset at that scale. Now we force depreciated by about $2 million in less than a year. That's a bigger scale. It's a little bit more sophisticated, but it's same same, same product Minister same process. And if agents just learned how to like if they just got educated, listen to guys like you and learn how to do things like this man, like, like, learn how to run these numbers and bring deals like this to guys like myself. Holy smokes man, like, sky's the limit for you. Your life will be so much easier. I do have a question for you, Mike, what do you rate your projections? What are you seeing?2023 is going to look like? I think it's going to change on where you're at geographically. I think the blue states are gonna get their ass kicked. Like they already are. I'm in San Diego. They're getting crushed.I think it's an affordability issue. So the high peak markets, the Phoenix, Las Vegas, all of California.The Midwest markets seem pretty safe for the time being. But yeah, it's because I don't everyone, the typical real estate agents, oh, supply demand, there's demand. And they're just reading these talking points from National Association of Realtors. Right. But in reality, no one's considering gas prices, no one's considered inflation. And no one's talking about the stuff that takes the average Joe out of the market, and more concerned about what's going to happen tomorrow for their kids. And that's the reality of it. The average nope, people don't have savings. You guys like people act like there's a bunch of people have savings. No, the vast majority of people out there have are living paycheck to paycheck. And when everything goes up two or $300 up a month, like I'm sorry, you no longer think about buying that house, you think about your future kids tomorrow. So I don't think it's an a supply and demand issue. I think it's all affordability. And I personally think that our government is trying to crash the real estate market. That is many evidence of that they're trying to why they're doing it, we won't go into conspiracy theories. But point being is that it's happening. Right. So now with that, I think that as the recession hits, and the more and more stuff they do to crush the market here, there's gonna be people that are in distressed, and if I'm focusing on anything gets motivated sellers, and that's why we built owner advocate.com. So if you guys wanna check that out, go and check that out. I'm going all after motivated sellers. But I believe everyone needs to be a problem solver. Because when I do know from the last crash, if you guys been listened to show I mentioned a couple times, but we are Big Short Sale 25 to 35, close short sales a month, I was buying a percent of those and flipping them. But I didn't care about the transaction, what I focused on was just helping people. We did that for about two years in a row, largest short sale team in the country, doing the exact same stuff that I believe is about to happen. It's not going to be as bad as it was in oh seven. I don't think they'll I think they'll Don't ever let those foreclosures go to public. I think they'll transact and behind closed doors to the funds, and all the other things so that the public perception doesn't crash like it did last time. But there's going to be a million opportunities for the mom and pops because the eye buyers are now exiting. So there's our big cash buyer competition. And where you're at a smart like focusing on the lower dollar, the affordability within your issue is probably where I would play too, because no one knows what's going to happen tomorrow. So if you're rehabbing, I wouldn't go for the luxury rehabs right now, I wouldn't even touch them. I don't even think about them. I would do exactly what you just said. You want to be right. And the affordability areas. It's not supply and demand affordability. That's your issue. And nobody wants to get caught with their pants down. Because I could tell you I know I tell you so many people who have like I said, you guys, we both were both talking here. We both were around and oh seven doing the same stuff. And you just have to be a little bit careful. Now on the flip side of that, get excited because I'm not trying to paint doom and gloom. I think you'll have more opportunities. I think it'd be tonic opportunities right here in San Diego because I think it's going to crash you here. More so than like Florida.The Texas is the Florida's all the inbound states are still inbound. We have clients all over the country, and they're not as effective as much. But the Midwest states I think are going to be safe. But the high end luxury is what I'm seeing struggle right now. The higher end of your markets.Yeah, I'll share this with you. I went to a conference and I'm not gonna mention the conference name. It was in February, in Colorado, because I don't want to I don't want to put them in bad light. But it was this very same day, Mike that that Ukraine got invaded by Russia. And so I just flew into Colorado.And the news hit that morning and I was like, Okay, this is great. I mean, the biggest commercial real estate investors conference in our, in our industry, right, one of the biggest. So we're gonna talk about this stuff, you know, gas is starting to soar rightly, all these things and we're gonna talk about and I was so disappointed man.To your point ofwhat you said earlier how people are getting affected I was so disappointed that you had some really smart people there were people from Marcus Miller champ really, really intelligent people. And they were saying that interest rates going up at that time probably interest rates had just started going up, interest rates going up, gas prices going up and electricity going up to the level that it is right now. 30 40% increase in some some places in electrical and electrical that it was not going to affect multifamily apartment buildings. And I was so disappointed dude, I was so disappointed. I was like, how could you insult my intelligence? How could you insult my intelligence I flew all the way out here from from Pennsylvania to Colorado and you insult my intelligence and say that this war is not going to have an impact that interest rates is not going to have an impact in that we're just going to keep riding this gravy train. It's an absolute insult you understand what I'm saying?when gas prices go up and your average working class person gas prices are going up again have you looked at the gas pump they're going up because OPEC cuts production? Oh the elections over of course they're gonna Yeah. Right. Exactly right. So so so when when that occurs, right gas prices goes up and now regular Mom and Pop working class America has to spend another two or $300 a month Do you not think is going to impact my read collections? Do you not think is going to an electrical now you got to spend another 20 another 20 30% Extra in to heat up your apartment? Do you not think that's going to have an impact like you are foolish? If you expect me to believe that and we as Americans as individuals we have to be able to look at this stuff we got to be listened to people and discern and make our own decisions as to what makes sense and what doesn't make sense. I wouldn't I would go out and say that especially as a commercial because the same thing happened oh seven I was one of them. Markets number one that's what I got caught with my pants down Marcus I forgot about always appreciate the market doesn't go down. It was just my my inexperience you know, in the market. Like what you said earlier? Yeah, if you stick it in the long run, you're always gonna win. But there will go in and out and out. Like it's like we've been sampling the crypto right now. It's getting its ass kicked.But you have to just be ready to just no one knows the answer. But when things are going good no one ever wants to talk about what the negativity of it because the same thing happened. Same thing in the residential side. I was like, oh, Martin's gonna go you should buy right now. And I'm always like, Dude, I wouldn't freakin buy right now, this guy just paid off my old neighborhood, there was a house listed for three mil and it sold it for $1 million over list price. $1 million over list price. Insane. Like it's crazy, like, and then you would think that the people buying those houses aren't like you would think they're intelligent, and they think about this stuff. But they're just most times that people are buying in that price point they have so much money, they don't really give a shit like an extra 500 $250,000 isn't going to do much. But you're right where it's gonna hit his middle America. And it's gonna hit that middle America right when the spot that you're playing. So you're gonna hit distressed assets, plus, you're gonna be able to liquidate them and exit out of them.You know, what was the most interesting thing last year, when when we were flipping last year, I had quote unquote, investors. First of all, most of us investors, we don't buy real investors. And if this is you, I'm gonna apologize for you up front if you're an investor. Real investor knows how to find off market deals, get off market deals. You've mentioned it multiple times.When I had the funniest thing to me was when I had I sold multiple properties last year 40 50,000 over asking price Mike to quote unquote, Airbnb investors. And I'm like, holy shit how I'll be buying this property. You're gonna be buying that back in about six months. Back in a couple years, right? Because I was like, I look at that I'm saying how are you making these know how you penciling these numbers? I caught what investor buys first of all, you're not an investor. If you're paying 40 $50,000 over asking on the retail marketing, you're competing with retail buyers. Like like likeyou love and you competing with retail buyers. You're not a real investor. Right because a real investor is not competing with retail buyers. We're not buying to live retail buyers have the luxury of overpaying and falling in love with properties. We don't fall in love with properties.It is we running the numbers. The numbers gotta make sense if the numbers make sense we do with you. Yeah. Sherry non-emotional either works or doesn't. Like, that's why I like it.It works or it doesn't. And that's a problem with a lot of real estate guys, a lot of real estate agents. We investors have a bad rep amongst the real estate agent community at times that all but at times, oh because they look we lowball Well, that's how we make our money understand that we have to buy at a certain price point in order to be profitable. If we pay what mom and pops pay when they buy like a regular tradition. We can't be profitable. We can't We can't make a profit. Yep, make sense? What? Any final words here like what? You know, where do you think we're gonna go? You think you're gonna do more holes here? You're gonna do more flips when you think the markets gonna head? Back to you? Yeah, well, we're, I think that the market is headed for a correction. But I got to tell you, Mike, I got it wrong. And 2020 I got it got it wrong, right. 2020 I was preparing I'm salivating when when COVID hit. I was like, Yeah, this is it like this is it? I did, we're gonna I got it wrong and went the other way. I'm looking at the data, or the fear mongering has already been done. As you know, it's already all over the media, that rental housing market and this housing market that? Well, I gotta tell you, man, I just looked at the numbers. I spent a couple of hours this week looking at the numbers in my market, quarter over quarter. And men were steady, like, we are still steady. We are still like, like, I'm like, okay, yeah, interest rates are going up. People still buying. I'm looking, I'm comparing quarter over quarter like what's happening, comparing it to last year. And it's like, it's steady. So my advice is if you're going to be playing and you're going to be investing is don't be listening just to the media and word even. Don't even don't even listen to me, right? Like, if I'm telling you something, go do your own due diligence and research it and do your own due diligence. Pay attention to what's happening in your market prepare. Like I was saying, I got it wrong in 2020 I thought that we were going to the market was gonna blow up and I was gonna buy a ton of shit. And it was gonna be, you know, an amazing time. It didn't it went the other way market just demand went up, prices went up. Remember that?I could be wrong man. I, I looked at I'm looking at the data. And wow, the the interest rates are going up. And in some markets prices prices are coming down for sure we are seeing prices, but a crash. I don't know. You know, what I what we're doing is we're staying couple things. We're staying disciplined with our numbers. We're buying, right? And we're planning for a worst case and we're getting ready for if that crash does come, where we're going to continue to buy, what we are doing is we are staying in the game. We're not going to stop playing. We're paying attention. We're watching the data. We're being disciplined, and we're not deviating and we're not making any crazy bets right now in this market, because we don't know where the market is going. Overall, we're staying disciplined, and we're studying the market. We're watching the data closely. And we're watching where things go. We're watching what the feds are doing. Like, if you're in this business, you need to be paying attention to what the feds are doing. You need to be paying attention to what they're doing. I do you believe that there will be opportunity in the multifamily space. Becauseyou're here. Here's my thought, right? There's guys that had that bought larger multifamily bridge, in the garden bridge loan, were 90% LTV, and their margins were thin. So because those guys that were betting that the market is never going to stop and rinse, we're never going to stop going down and all that shit, right? Those guys that had thin margins, and their value add was 50 or 75 or 100 bucks. And now they're in this position where the banks the capital markets are saying wait a minute, rates are going up, we don't want to now they can't cash flow, and they can't make those numbers pencil out at these ratios, though things are gonna go going to be on sale next year, just just because of interest rates. So that just makes logical sense for me, I yeah, man that that's an error of the get those people with those bridge loans that can't refi into long term, they're gonna be in trouble. If their margins were thin, and they were betting that it was going to rents were going to continue to go the way they're in trouble. Those guys are in trouble. They're going to have to fire yourself. So I'm gonna be looking for those and I'm going to be for those larger more times. But as for the single family, think about it, brother is not like when you and I were back in oh seven, right? Where it was those two year arms right? 9.75 gonna reset in two or three or four years. We don't have that. Now, we have an inventory issue because people are not selling they have those two 3% interest rates. They're looking at this or saying we can weather this where am I going with it? Seven 600% Right, where am I going? Right? So so it's just a weird time. It's very different. And I'm just we're just preparing my advices prepare, getting cash every position but be disciplinedBe disciplined with the numbers and pay attention to where the opportunities are, where the puck is going, right? where the opportunities are good in either way, like it's around how you buy, right? It's on how you sell or when you say it's on how you buy, you got to buy, right, and you're good no matter what it is.And you guys just got to be careful. But I mean, just by listening to the show, you guys, can you see how you could reposition your brand and niche down in these times when the residential market slows down a little bit, you niche down, you find a niche. And that's what you lead gen. And you do one thing really well, real estate investors never have a listing issue. And I don't understand why agents ever do. And it's because they know where to put their solution and who to put in front of us is why I'm saying become a problem solver, guys, people are gonna need it. And there's gonna be a lot of opportunity out there. The only thing I would saythe one number and I agree with everything, the one thing I'm worried about, what I would put is that anyone who bought from 2022, first quarter to 12 months prior, and I'm talking specifically about the FHA as the VA loans and the 100% of your financing, like all those people, if the market does shift, like in California, we've already shifted 5.3%. So the cost of sale is 8%. In 5.3%, if you only put down 2%. Those people are already underwater. Yeah, that is that's the that's the one that's the thing, I can't get my head around. Becauseonce people see that they're underwater like Phogat. Done SWAK. That's what happened. That was the snowball effect that took place last time and I can't get my head around that. So yeah, the affordability but people want to buy people are out there that they need to buy. But they're like worried about the affordability aspect of it. But there will be a lot of opportunity. Regardless of how you look at it. Go ahead where you say, there definitely will be opportunities. My the other side to that though, Mike is yes, there's already people under water agreed agreed with you, we've seen a 7% drop in value here. We peaked here in we peaked here in April and April of this year here in the Poconos. And we've seen a 7% drop April to now which is a significant amount of time, and that's a lot. That's a big significant drop. However, the the other side to that is you have those people right to have those fHh vas, they still have those two 3% interest rates.So while they're on paper, on their water, on paper, they're on the water, what's their payments? And remember, what do people buy? You know, and this why they buy payment, they buy payments, so Hey, am I going to walk away because on paper, it says I'm 50,000 on water. And if I move my payment, my expenses for my family is gonna go up. So it's again, it's a tricky time. Like I've thrown that shit around in my head. Yeah. Tricky time. When when people pencil the numbers out, okay, do I walk away? My payment is 1500 for this 350,000 Not alone? If I go someplace else, what can I get for 1500? Right? What kind of Prop work? Can I rent for 1500? Why would I get and people have to do that math people will do that math. Some people will smart people will do that math.Right. And it's like, and like I said earlier, if you buy real estate and wait over the long haul, if this is you and you're listening, remember what I said I bought mine in oh seven for 2000 for 275. And oh nine that was 100,000 it was worth 179 and 2022 Property two doors down from there exact same property a duplex sold for 385. So if you hang in there over time, over time,real estate is very forgiving over the long haul. If you can think the long term can weather the storm maybethe data has shown me that and my message to your listeners if you're listening and you're that homeowner is hang in there and think of the long haul, right because you're gonna just make it worse for your neighbor for the economy for everyone. So if you couldn't hang in there, hang in there. If you're distressed now and you have to sell you have to sell because you lost your job and you have no choice that's a different that's a totally different story different conversations and you know guys like Mike and myself will buy themfor short sale, right?Well, you hang in there very interesting dude great conversation. Why don't you go ahead and give our listeners your closing thoughts where can they find you? Where can they learn more about your business some of your trainings and whatnot. Yeah, so so you guys can find me on check out my podcast Latinos and real estate investing podcast on Instagram. As the lead strategists look me up the lead strategist. I have a ton of stuff or you can check out my YouTube as well. I have a lot of content on YouTube. Lead strategist where I put a lot of my rehabs and a lot of a lot of cool stuff on there live videos of evicting tenants and things like that I show I like to share with people the real the real stuff, a lot of a lot ofguys out here like to show the fluff. I like to show the real, real deal.Open upI have a video like that with the with the actual constable putting this lady out. And it's interesting because people on the insert in the Internet are like, Oh, you're such an asshole. You're such this. What people don't know is they don't know the full story right? They know the full story like, Hey, I gave this lady two months free rent, I let her like, this is it like, you know, like people don't know the full context and the internet is kind of brutal like that. So anyways, go check it out. I have a bunch of stuff like that out there where we put it out real life stories. It's not a pretty business. It's a profitable business but ultimates a problem solving business, right? Someone you don't make really good at solving problems, someone's problems. That's all real estate is, Folks, we appreciate you listening to other episode the real estate marketing podcast if you like what you heard today, once you go check out one of our products is called owner advocate agent.com. If you need to sharpen in your listing strategy and get more investor friendly, that's where you do that. And if you need seller leads, we have all kinds of a for you. So go ahead and look at that. Check that out and keep listening to our show. You can reach us at real estate marketing do.com referral suite.com or the owner advocate.com. Appreciate you and have a good week and I'll see you guys next week. Bye. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule time to speak with a dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Woman Inc.
The Anti-Trend Branding Agency Founder who is Fundamentally Changing the way Creatives Work with Madison Utendahl, Founder of Utendahl Creative

Woman Inc.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 38:13


 Happy Friday our Woman Inc. listeners! Our guest this week is @Madison.utendahl, Founder & CCO of Utendahl CreativeUtendahl Creative is an all female, Black owned, full service branding and design agency behind cutting-edge brands like Simon Huck's Judy, Halsey's About-Face, and Lena Dunham's Good Thing Going. Madison is also a Forbes 30U30 alum and a two-time Webby Award winner who was on the founding teams of cultural phenomenons Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, 29Rooms and Museum of Ice Cream. Madison's experience being on the creative teams behind these massive cultural successes led not only to a specialty in emotional brand storytelling, but to a personal experience with burnout, leading to her present-day mission of ENDING burnout in the creative industry by starting her own agency where she is fundamentally changing the way creatives work.We hope you enjoy this episode, and as always, come back here to let us know your favorite part!

MMA Gambling Podcast
UFC 282 Main Card Betting Guide (Fundamentally Not True) | MMA Gambling Podcast (Ep.256)

MMA Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 37:27


Jeff Fox & Gumby Vreeland are back in your earholes with their UFC 282 prelim picks. Gumby comes out the gate with a typical Gumby dog pick, and he ends the episode the same way. Jeff gets in on some plus-money picks as well, including a dog that he decides on last minute during the episode. What's an 'Obi Won Shinobi the Pillow'?! The boys try to figure that out. Listen in and help out.   Apple Spotify =====================================================   SGPN Merch Store code “dallassucks” for 10% off - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET   Follow The Sports Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Jeff Fox - http://www.twitter.com/jefffoxwriter Daniel Vreeland - http://www.twitter.com/gumbyvreeland Show - http://www.twitter.com/sgpnmma   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
UFC 282 Main Card Betting Guide (Fundamentally Not True) | MMA Gambling Podcast (Ep.256)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 37:27


Jeff Fox & Gumby Vreeland are back in your earholes with their UFC 282 prelim picks. Gumby comes out the gate with a typical Gumby dog pick, and he ends the episode the same way. Jeff gets in on some plus-money picks as well, including a dog that he decides on last minute during the episode. What's an 'Obi Won Shinobi the Pillow'?! The boys try to figure that out. Listen in and help out.   Apple Spotify =====================================================   SGPN Merch Store code “dallassucks” for 10% off - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app Check out SGPN.TV   Support us by supporting our partners WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET   Follow The Sports Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Jeff Fox - http://www.twitter.com/jefffoxwriter Daniel Vreeland - http://www.twitter.com/gumbyvreeland Show - http://www.twitter.com/sgpnmma   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://sg.pn/reddit ===================================================== Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices