On Brand with Nick Westergaard

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On Brand is a podcast about the art and science of brand building. Each week host Nick Westergaard of Brand Driven Digital interviews thought leaders or those working for innovative brands like Ben & Jerry’s, Maker’s Mark, the Minnesota Vikings, The Onion, Salesforce, and Whole Foods. For show notes and more, please visit http://onbrandpodcast.com.

Nick Westergaard


    • Jan 30, 2023 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 28m AVG DURATION
    • 445 EPISODES

    4.8 from 71 ratings Listeners of On Brand with Nick Westergaard that love the show mention: brand builders, nick's podcast, woodruff, thank you nick, i've gained, branding, statements, founder, jonathan, tactics, trends, marketing, building, stand, interviewer, class, date, gave, clear, subject.



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    Latest episodes from On Brand with Nick Westergaard

    B2B Brand Building with Linda Fanaras

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 29:04


    Linda Fanaras is CEO/Strategist of Millenium Agency, where she helps B2B brands develop integrated campaigns that get results with her innovative approach of transforming market research into powerful campaigns. This isn't always easy—especially when it comes to B2B. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Linda Fanaras Linda A. Fanaras, CEO/Strategist of Millennium Agency, is an award-winning executive marketer with exceptional leadership and communication skills, relationship-building expertise, and a proven track record in executing strategic marketing campaigns that improve marketing ROI and CLV. Linda is highly experienced in brand analysis and structure, positioning and messaging that engages, the development of integrated digital marketing campaigns, and the formulation of creative concepts for B2B manufacturing and software technology. Focused on motivational and positive inclusive leadership skills, she drives marketing teams to achieve exceptional results. Episode Highlights What do B2B brands need to do differently in branding and marketing today? I thought I'd start with a softball! However, Linda knocked it out of the park. “B2B brands need to remember to focus on the end user. And that's often a business rather than a specific consumer demographic.” “From there, focus on getting your language and story down.” Linda stresses that marketers need to continue to test this through ongoing surveys and focus groups. How can marketers stay sane in the new year? Marketers have to be organized and strategic.” And creative to boot! That's not always an easy combo. That's why Linda notes that it's important for marketing leaders to understand their team and what motivates them. What brand has made Linda smile recently? “Lazy One—creators of stylish PJs, robes, and slippers.” I love learning about new brands. Especially ones that can help me get comfortable as I think about all of the challenges marketers face today! To learn more, go to mill.agency and connect with Linda on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Recession Survival for Brands with John O'Melia

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 32:02


    John O'Melia serves as Chief Customer Officer at Contentsquare. His Customer Success team works to ensure that brands of all shapes and sizes are able to understand what's happening with their brands online and, more importantly, why. We discussed all of this during our conversation on the On Brand podcast. About John O'Melia John O'Melia was previously the CEO of Seal Software, which was acquired by DocuSign in 2020. He has also held senior leadership positions in Customer Success and Sales at EMC. Earlier in his career, he was a partner at Coopers & Lybrand/PwC where he oversaw global projects in multiple industries. Over the course of his career, he has always sought to truly understand customers' needs and aspirations associated with their investment in technology and to ensure they realize the maximum possible return. John joined Contentsquare in early 2021 as Chief Customer Officer. His Customer Success team works to ensure all customers harness the full power of Contentsquare's technology to drive significant business value. Episode Highlights Making the digital world more human. When I asked John for Contentsquare's elevator pitch that's how he answered—helping customers make the digital world more human by understanding “what's happening and why it's happening.” What can companies do today to make their brand recession-proof? “There are two things,” John notes. First, you have to be truly data-driven.” He went on to cite a stat that only 7% of companies are data-driven. The second thing is a little harder. “You have to fit on customer experience,” John explained. “You have to look beyond just checking the box. Is your brand really known for this?” What brand has made John smile recently? John shared a story that made him (and me!) smile with a brand in a … “unique” industry: Lovehoney. To learn more, check out the Contentsquare website and connect with John on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Developing Your Brand Soundtrack with Tom Höglund

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 32:54


    Tom Höglund is one of the founding team members at Epidemic Sound, which helps connect brands with the music they need to tell their stories. But when it comes to music rights, complexity lurks around every corner. He shared this story and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Tom Höglund Tom Höglund is one of the founding team members at Epidemic Sound and has been responsible for several different functions at the company as it has scaled, reaching a $1.4B valuation in 2021. Tom developed Epidemic Sound's innovative digital rights model, which paves the way for creators — everyone from YouTubers to small businesses to the world's largest brands—to use restriction-free music to take their content to the next level. Tom is also an early-stage investor in companies primarily geared towards creator monetization and B2C and B2B SaaS solutions. Episode Highlights “The future of content creation will be fragmented,” Tom said of video's prevalence in both branded content and creator content. “We want to provide world-class music to anyone brave enough to tell their story.” “Complexity ensued …” I had to point out this moment in Tom's story, as music rights and usage is a complex topic for anyone who's not a trademark attorney. Epidemic Sound wanted to develop something as simple to use as an ATM. “Video without sound is like food without taste.” Tom shared this powerful quote from one of his co-founders, which drives home just how important sound is to the content we create. What brand has made Tom smile recently? “It's an obvious brand for a non-obvious reason—Twitter!” Tom went on to talk about the story playing out at Twitter under Elon Musk. From sinks to firings, neither of us was sure what the genre of this smile-worthy moment is. To learn more, check out the Epidemic Sound website and connect with Tom on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Founding Hedley & Bennett with Ellen Marie Bennett

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 32:31


    Ellen Marie Bennett is the founder and chief brand officer of Hedley & Bennett. If you're a foodie, you've seen Hedley & Bennett aprons on some of the world's best chefs. I saw one on Stanley Tucci and knew if I was going to be a serious home cook, I had to have one. Ellen shares how she created this brand 10 years ago—at the age of 24—this week on the On Brand podcast. About Ellen Marie Bennett As a 24-year-old line cook, Ellen Marie Bennett couldn't stand the kitchen staff's poorly designed, cheaply made aprons. So when her head chef announced he was ordering a new batch, she blurted out, “Chef, I have an apron company”—even though she had no company, no business plan—just a glimmer of a design idea and a business license. Through hustle and a willingness to leap into the unknown, time and time again, she built that first order into a multi-million-dollar company called Hedley & Bennett, making aprons and kitchen gear worn by many of the world's best chefs and home cooks everywhere.   Episode Highlights “Your listeners have to be thinking, ‘A whole interview about aprons?!'” Ellen jokingly suggested. “This has nothing to do with aprons. This could be aprons or protein powder or whatever your product is.” “I wanted to be the Nike of the culinary world.” Mission accomplished. And that's no small mission! Ellen talked about wanting to create a connection with her customers and community like Nike has with theirs. That feeling when someone puts something on feels that they can do anything. Chasing perfection vs. learning. Ellen notes that it's dangerous to wait for perfection to launch a new product, stressing the importance of “embracing the long and winding road.” Learning from customers. “Everything we added to our products we learned from chefs,” Ellen explained that focus groups aren't everything. “There's no one way to build a brand.” How do you know when to expand the brand? Recently, Hedley & Bennett has expanded into knives, thermometers, and towels. But how did they know when to expand? “We learned that we're not just an apron brand. We're a culinary brand,” Ellen explained. “And one of our brand pillars is that it needs to be pro-grade.” It has to be chef-quality. What brand has made Ellen smile recently? Ellen was moved to smiles and tears by a recent trip to Mexico to deliver holiday gifts to children through the foundation This Is About Humanity. Ellen shared more about the good work they do and how they get a majority of the money they raise into the hands of people who need it most. To learn more, go to the Hedley and Bennett website and follow the brand on TikTok. You can also follow Ellen and follow the adventures of her family and her pet pig (!) on Instagram. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Excellence in the New Year with Tom Peters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 39:21


    Happy New Year from the On Brand podcast! To celebrate this fresh start to an exciting new year, we have one of our favorite guests joining us once again—the one, the only Tom Peters! Tom is the “one and only” of many things when it comes to management thinkers but he's the only guest who's appeared four times on the On Brand podcast. Tom shared how to kick off a year of excellence this week on the On Brand podcast. About Tom Peters Called “the Red Bull of management consultants,” Tom Peters is a leading business management guru and founder of the Tom Peters Company. He continues to be in constant demand for lectures and seminars. In 2017, he received a Lifetime Achievement Award from Thinkers50 and the Jack Covert Award for Contribution to the Business Book Industry from 800-CEO-READ. Peters is the bestselling author of seventeen books, including In Search of Excellence (with Robert H. Waterman, Jr.), which is often cited as among the best business books ever written. His latest book is Tom Peters' Compact Guide to Excellence. Episode Highlights “Same message 20 times. I refuse to give up.” Tom wrote this inscription to me on the inside cover of his 20th book—Tom Peters' Compact Guide to Excellence. “With my very first book, I put excellence on the field. The message is still fundamentally the same.” However, in these challenging times, it's a message that's as relevant as ever. 80% of people don't feel connected to their jobs. “The effective leader can instill engagement,” Tom explained, noting that the most important thing leaders do is hiring and promoting the right people. “It's not easy but we can do things to make it easier.” Mayo Clinic has the right idea. Among the attributes they look for in new hires are the number of times someone says “we” vs. “me.” This isn't new. As Tom said, “It started with Dr. Mayo in nineteen-effing-fourteen!” If you missed my recent interview with Dr. Richard Winters, head of leadership at the Mayo Clinic, be sure to check it out now. What brand has made Tom smile recently? Tom took a long pause before providing us with a great smile story. Granted, that smile came from the general direction of the bathroom. “Whenever you open a new roll of toilet paper … you can never get that first piece off. Well, Cottonelle has figured it out.” Tom and I both think they should join us on the On Brand podcast to unpack their toilet paper excellence! To learn more, go to tompeters.com. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Building Global Brand Loyalty with Jill Ong

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 31:29


    Jill Ong is Managing Director of ACE and has spent her career on the global advertising stage–working with iconic brands like Converse and Adidas. We talked about all of this and more—including brand building during a recession—this week on the On Brand podcast. About Jill Ong Jill has spent her whole career of 22 years in advertising working on iconic brands like Converse, Beats by Dre, and Sonos. She has deep expertise on global businesses and the APAC region, with work experience spanning China, New York, Hong Kong, and Singapore. She moved to New York in 2010 during the Big Recession and has been in the Anomaly/ACE family ever since. As Managing Director of ACE, she's charged with inspiring and nurturing people and optimizing operations across ACE. On a sabbatical in Puerto Escondido 5 years ago, Jill decided to challenge her lack of sporting ability to learn surfing. Despite her poor swimming skills and getting a black eye after getting hit by a surfboard on her first day out, she has persevered and has since surfed the breaks of Bali, West Java, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Johannesburg, and Mexico. Episode Highlights An All-Star brand. “Converse is the best brand I've ever worked on,” Jill began, citing a global campaign all about reinforcing the meaning of this iconic brand. “Converse is all about being scrappy and creative.” Global brand building starts with the customer. “And customers are so different—down to where they're at in terms of lifecycle with your brand in different parts of the globe.” How do you build a brand during the recession? “Budgets will be tight. You have to be strategic about how you communicate that—think twice about that Super Bowl ad and what it says about your brand.” However, Jill also noted that recessions are times when brand loyalty can be built. What brand has made Jill smile recently? Jill brought not one but two brands. “I watch a lot of TV for work but it's also a guilty pleasure. I love the Progressive ads on Hulu about not becoming your parents.” She also shared a smile for Belvedere vodka's new ad showcasing a different side of Daniel Craig. To learn more, check out the ACE website and connect with Jill on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Naughty and Nice Brands of 2022 with Matt Williams

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 35:38


    This week we have a special holiday episode of the On Brand podcast with the “Naughty and Nice Brands of 2022.” This seasonally appropriate snapshot of brand behavior was developed by the smart folks at Brand Federation. The consultancy's Chief Growth Officer Matt Williams joined me to discuss which brands have been naughty and nice this year. About Matt Williams Matt Williams is Chief Growth Officer for Brand Federation, a brand strategy consultancy in Richmond, Virginia. Prior to joining Brand Federation in 2019, Williams was CEO of the Martin Agency, one of the world's most recognized advertising agencies, where he managed strategy development for world-class brands like GEICO, OREO, UPS, Discover Financial, Walmart, and more. Williams also is a Clinical Professor in the marketing department at the Mason School of Business at William & Mary. He teaches in the MBA program and is the developer and Faculty Director of the school's Online Masters in Marketing. The Naughty List 2022 was the year of billionaires behaving badly. Here are a few of the ones we talked about. Twitter, Elon Musk—The world's richest man, Elon Musk, created a $44 billion cash bonfire by buying and systematically destroying Twitter. “The ‘Chief Twit,'” as Williams called Musk, “deserves a boulder size lump of coal.” FTX, Sam Bankman-Fried—Good virtual eye contact; work to bring your hands up and into gestures to reinforce key points. Brands built on false promises don't stand long. Matt and I further discussed what this meant for “the brand of crypto.” Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes—Holmes, a self-made billionaire who served as CEO of Theranos, built the company into a promising brand—on a foundation of lies. It collapsed because of dishonesty, lack of transparency, and overall bad behavior at the top, and it earned Holmes an 11-year prison sentence this year. How about some nice brands and billionaires? The Nice List “The words 'nice' and ‘billionaires' aren't typically heard together,” joked Matt as we began our discussion of the other half of the list. However, several billionaires and brands used their powers for good this year. Patagonia, Yvon Chouinard—Patagonia's founder, Yvon Chouinard, built a worldwide brand known for sustainability. This year, Chouinard transferred his ownership in the outdoor apparel company, valued at $3 billion, to a trust designed to protect the company's independence and donate its profits – often north of $100 million annually—to protecting our planet. Brands built on purposeful behavior endure. Dolly Parton, Doggy Parton—Country music icon and entrepreneur Dolly Parton launched her Doggy Parton collection of pet dog accessories, merging her love of animals with her can-do philanthropy. A portion of every sale supports animal rescue efforts. Jeff Bezos even recognized the power of Dolly Parton, writing her a check for $100 million to spend on charitable causes. Eileen Fisher, Eileen Fisher—“Fashion isn't always nice,” Matt began. However, Fisher built a fashion empire that supported more realistic apparel for women of every age and body type. And instead of taking her company public, she began transferring ownership to employees in 2006. Today, as Fisher steps away from the brand's leadership, employees own nearly half the company. What brand has made Matt smile recently? As always, with the list focus of this annual episode, I was worried that I'd taken all of Matt's “smiles.” However, he assured me that he had one left. And a timely one at that with the World Cup—USA soccer. “They represent great brand behavior by seeking pay equity for their women's team.” To learn more about Matt Williams, check out the Brand Federation website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Video Brand Storytelling with Tony Gnau

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 28:08


    Tony Gnau is the founder of T60 Productions and author of the new book Light, Camera, Impact. His work is focused on helping brands of all shapes and sizes tell better stories through video. We discussed all of this and more, this week on the On Brand podcast. About Tony Gnau Tony Gnau is the Founder and Chief Storytelling Officer at T60 Productions. He's a three-time Emmy Award-winning journalist, has led T60 Productions to win 18 Telly Awards for its corporate videos, and is the author of the book Lights, Camera, Impact: Storytelling, Branding, and Production Tips for Engaging Corporate Videos. Finally, he is a former USC Trojan football player, Star Wars geek, and a devoted husband and father. Episode Highlights “There are a bunch of hurdles with video!” Tony laughed as we began. I confessed to being challenged by DIY video. Video is a part of everything. But how do we use it better? “Video is a tactic but it's a tactic that needs its own strategy.” What brand videos does the video guy like? I couldn't wait to ask Tony this. “GoPro does such a great job with user-generated content.” He also pointed us to J.Crew which creates engaging behind-the-scenes videos about how they chose colors. What brand has made Tony smile recently? Tony told us about the videos from Milwaukee Tool Company that feature the organization's own in-house rock band. To learn more, go to TonyGnau.com and the T60 Productions website. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Leading Through Story with Katie McCleary

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 30:56


    Katie McCleary is a storyteller, professor of leadership, and co-author of the book Bridge the Gap. As founder of the nonprofit 916 Ink, she helps transform underprivileged youth into confident authors. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Katie McCleary Katie McCleary is a storyteller, professor of leadership, and a lover of people. She is co-author of Bridge the Gap, which Inc. Magazine named 1 of 3 business books to read in 2022. Her work has been featured by Forbes, PBS, Shondaland, New York Post, and more. Katie hosts NPR CapRadio's leadership podcast, “The Drive,” in partnership with The American Leadership Forum. She is also the founder of 916 Ink, a nonprofit that has transformed over 4,500 youth into confident authors who know the power of their voice and story. Mashable named her as a “Real Miss America” for her projects in low-income communities. She teaches leadership in the master's program at Pacific University and is passionate about amplifying people's personal stories to create positive change. Episode Highlights “Leadership is everywhere,” Katie began. “It's a personality choice‚ where you lean in to understanding. You have to schedule time to get to know your people.” It can even be 20 minutes. How to bridge the gap in a polarized world? Story helps here as well. “If I know your story, I can't deny your humanity.” We spend so much time at work, it's important to create communities of belonging here as well. What's one thing you can do to better connect with others? “Before your next networking event or meeting, go to the bathroom and wash your hands with cold water. The cold water resets your nervous system and provides you with a moment to check in with yourself.” What brand has made Katie smile recently? “I love Short Story.” Not simply short stories (she loves those too) but the box program with clothing for petite women, which also includes personal touches like handwritten notes. To learn more, go to HowToBridgeTheGap.com and check out the work that 916 Ink is doing. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    How MailChimp Shows Up Authentically

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 31:40


    Mark DiCristina is the Vice President of Brand Experience at Mailchimp, where he focuses on ensuring that the brand shows up for customers in authentic and truthful ways. We covered everything from their famous sponsorship of the Serial podcast to their innovative and, again, authentic user experience during our conversation this week on the On Brand podcast. About Mark DiCristina Mark DiCristina is the Vice President of Brand Experience at Mailchimp. He and his team are responsible for ensuring that Mailchimp's brand shows up in thoughtful and authentic ways. During his time at Mailchimp, Mark spearheaded many of the brand's largest marketing initiatives such as the launch of Wink, Mailchimp's in-house agency, and has been fundamental in the creation of Mailchimp's creative ad campaigns; most recently Guess Less, Sell More. Mark was responsible for the company's first major ad campaign, “Did You Mean Mailchimp?” which won the Cyber Grand Prix at the 2017 Cannes Lions Festival, and the legendary “MailKimp” ad on NPR's “Serial” podcast, which landed mentions on “Saturday Night Live,” “The Colbert Report” and “Funny or Die.” Before joining Mailchimp, Mark worked as a production manager at Paste Magazine and was named one of AdAge's 40 Under 40 in 2017. Episode Highlights “Mail … kimp?” We all remember that infamous sponsorship message at the beginning of the original season of Serial, which was famously included in SNL's sendup of the podcast. That's why I had to ask Mark for a bit of an oral history of how this zeitgeist-making moment happened. One of MailChimp's biggest lessons from this moment? “We kept quiet and didn't insert ourselves into it. We just let it happen.” While this advice sounds easy enough, more often than not most marketers look for ways to create more content and conversations around these special moments—which can ruin them. Where do you start with brand experience? Brand experience can be vast. “You have to start with empathy for the customer. Pushing that send button can be a big moment. Same with the moment after you hit send.” That's why MailChimp has some fun with these moments with the messages in their interface. “We want to show up as a brand in a way that makes people feel like someone's home.” What brand has made Mark smile recently? Mark pointed to a big one—Yvon Chouinard, who recently made headlines by declaring that his company Patagonia had a single stakeholder—planet Earth! To learn more, go to the MailChimp website or connect with Mark on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Power of Polarization with Tom Suharto

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 29:27


    Tom Suharto leads global strategy at Forsman & Bodenfors where his clients include Volvo, Crocs, Baileys, and H&M. Prior to that, he was at Wieden+Kennedy working on iconic brands like Nike and Disney. We discussed all of this and more, this week on the On Brand podcast. About Tom Suharto Tom Suharto leads global strategy at Forsman & Bodenfors, one of the most creatively awarded agencies of the past decade. His clients at Forsman include Volvo, Polestar, Crocs, Goldman Sachs, Baileys, and H&M, to name a few. Before joining Forsman, Tom spent a decade at Wieden+Kennedy, starting in their Shanghai office where he helped to launch Shanghai Disneyland and led strategy on Nike China. Then in Portland, Oregon, where he worked on Nike Women and Just Do It campaigns, helped launch Samsung flagship phones, and led strategy on Facebook Groups. Episode Highlights The Crocs brand is certainly having a moment … Following a recent trip to New York where my daughter was most excited about visiting the Crocs store (!), I had to talk to Tom about his work with Crocs. “With the pandemic, people started prioritizing comfort and Crocs leaned into that. And being unapologetic about being who you are.” The power of polarization. “We talk a lot with Crocs about polarization—how you want people to (ideally) love you or (not-so-ideally) hate you.” But you want that strong emotional response. The staying power of Just Do It. This work is cited so often, I wanted to dig deeper with someone who worked with this campaign while at Wieden+Kennedy. “For something like this to work, you need context. There needs to be a moment to meet. You also have to know your audience.” For Nike, this has always been the voice of the athlete. “That's why Just Do It works.” “Strategy in turbulent times is about prioritizing,” Tom shared of the uncertainty around a pending recession. “But brands adding value to people isn't going out of style—even in a recession.” What brand has made Tom smile recently? “I'm going to share a brand that made my kids smile, which, in turn, made me smile.” Just like my Crocs story! Tom told the story of the IRL “MrBeast Burger” that he and his kids love at the American Dream mall in New Jersey. To learn more, check out the Forsman & Bodenfors website and connect with Tom on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Inspiring Positive Change with Lesley Bielby

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 33:47


    Lesley Bielby literally wrote the book on agency account planning—Super Strategist. A 30-year veteran of the world of advertising, she's now Co-CEO of DiMassimo Goldstein, a leader in Positive-Behavior Change marketing. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Lesley Bielby Lesley Bielby is the Co-CEO of DiGo (DiMassimo Goldstein), the industry-leading agency in Positive Behavior Change marketing, and has authored the only modern guide in account planning, Super Strategist: The Art and Science of Modern Account Planning. A 30-year veteran in the world of advertising, she was one of the British account planners to cross the pond in the turn of the century, to bring the discipline to America. In addition to DiGo, Lesley has led and been a part of a number of agencies including Hill Holiday, McKinney and Silver, Digitas, and MMB. Episode Highlights What is Positive Behavior Change marketing? You know me—I love definitions. Turns out, Positive Behavior Change marketing is exactly what it sounds like. Marketing that inspires a positive change in the life of the consumer. Lesley shared an example from her agency's work with Better Help. The role of research. First, it must be truly integrated. “It's about identifying holes at the brand level and what's needed to fill those holes.” “Creative is still king,” Lesley notes, adding that in today's shape-shifting advertising and marketing industry, it's important to ground the work in research and insights. What brand has made Lesley smile recently? I couldn't wait to hear what I was sure was a research/insight-driven smile from Lesley. And she delivered with a story about the latest campaign from UK-based Pot Noodle. To learn more, check out the DiMassimo Goldstein website as well as Lesley's book Super Strategist. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Mayo Clinic Approach to Leadership

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 30:55


    Dr. Richard Winters is an emergency physician and director of leadership development at the Mayo Clinic. In addition to working with leaders internally at Mayo, Dr. Winters delivers programs that help healthcare leaders worldwide. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Dr. Richard Winters Dr. Richard Winters is an emergency physician at the Mayo Clinic. As director of leadership development for the Mayo Clinic Care Network, Dr. Winters delivers programs that train leaders at all levels of healthcare organizations worldwide. As an executive coach, Dr. Winters provides coaching for Mayo Clinic leaders. Winters graduated from the Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine in 1994 and returned to Mayo Clinic in 2015. Previously, Winters served as managing partner of a democratic physician group, department chair of an emergency department, president of an 800-physician medical staff, and CEO/founder of a startup managed care organization that struggled to survive amidst the complex relationships among hospital, physician, patient, competitors, and insurance providers. He lives in Rochester, Minnesota, with his family. Episode Highlights So, you worked in healthcare during the past few years … I believe “Gah!” was how I phrased my less-than-eloquent opening query about working in emergency medicine during COVID-19. “Healthcare has always been a place of volatility and uncertainty,” Dr. Winters explained. Helping the helpers. As a leadership coach at Mayo, Dr. Winters's work could be described in connection to the Mister Rogers quote about “looking for the helpers.” He's charged with helping the helpers, “Ensuring that each level has the resources they need.” “Leadership is culture,” Dr. Winters detailed. “It's not just the placards and screensavers. You have to walk the talk.” For the Mayo Clinic, this goes all the way back to the founders and continues today at every level. What brand has made Dr. Winters smile recently? “Song Tea from San Francisco,” is a brand that Richard loves as it makes him feel connected to the world. To learn more, go to his website and connect with him on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Power of Language in DEI with Beth Livingston

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 32:47


    Beth A. Livingston is a professor, consultant, author, and speaker focused on human resources, gender & diversity, and the management of work & family—all in the service of the employee experience. She's also a colleague of mine at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business and co-author of the new book Shared Sisterhood. We discussed all of this and more, this week on the On Brand podcast. About Beth A. Livingston Dr. Beth Livingston is the Ralph L. Sheets Associate Professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business. She's also an internal advisor with the Healthier Workforce Center of the Midwest, a NIOSH Center of Excellence, and the faculty director of the Dore-Tippie Women's Leadership program. After receiving her Ph.D. from the University of Florida, and her MBA from the University of Kentucky, she began her career at Cornell University in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations before moving to the Midwest. She studies and teaches human resource management, gender & diversity, and the management of work and family in the service of employee well-being. Her research has been highlighted in the New York Times, NPR, and the Harvard Business Review, and she has been published in multiple top academic journals. Dr. Livingston has also done executive education, speaking engagements, and consulting for companies and non-profits such as Accenture, John Deere, Yves Saint Laurent Beauty, HNI/Allsteel, and Hollaback! (now Right to Be) and is the co-author of the book Shared Sisterhood, published by Harvard Business Review Press. Episode Highlights “Everything you know—about marketing, managing, leading—has changed.” It's been a busy two years for Beth Livingston, who studies remote work and DEI issues in the workplace. “People and organizations are ready to learn more about this." Thinking and doing. With big issues like gender and race, action both thinking and action are critical in driving change. “We talk a lot about doing in the book,” Beth notes. “There are thinking, feeling, and doing questions at the end of each chapter.” What's one thing you can do right now on these big issues of gender and race? I thought I'd asked Beth a hardball question but she knocked it out of the park with not one but two things you can do. “The lowest hanging fruit is looking at where you get your news and who you follow on social media. The second thing you can do is look around at work.” What brand has made Beth smile recently? After a recent trip to New York, Beth and her daughter shared several smiles over the Playbill brand as they saw four Broadway shows. To learn more, check out Beth's website and connect with her on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Building Creative Teams with Patrick Holly

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 33:56


    Patrick Holly has worked for agencies like R/GA and brands like Apple, Uber, and Harley Davidson, where he served as brand director. Currently, he's Upwork's Executive Creative Director leading a team of writers, art directors, designers, and strategists who are changing the way the world thinks about work. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Patrick Holly Patrick Holly is a multidisciplinary creative whose career has run the gamut from agencies like R/GA and AKQA, to brands like Apple and Uber, to building a content platform with Steph Curry. He currently serves as Upwork's Executive Creative Director leading a team of writers, art directors, designers, and strategists who are changing the way the world thinks about work. Prior to joining Upwork, Patrick was the brand director at Harley Davidson, overseeing content, PR, social, and brand partnerships. When Patrick is not working, he spends most of his time on two wheels or watching Sex and the City reruns with his wife and dogs in Austin, Texas. Episode Highlights Working for a brand as “effortlessly cool” as Harley Davidson. What was that like? “It was stressful!” Patrick laughed, noting that the pandemic created challenges in connecting these rabid fans without motorcycle shows. “We ended up holding a No Show on Instagram—an All-Show, No Go.” Redefining how work works. In the wake of the pandemic, Upwork launched its latest brand campaign to address one of the biggest changes in how we work since the invention of the assembly line: the shift away from full-time, in-person work to hybrid workforce models that leverage remote talent. Patrick called this “Hollywood model” while I joked that it's like building a heist team. “A brand is only as strong as the team building it,” Patrick notes. “As advertisers and marketers, our job is to stand out in a way that feels honest to the brand.” That's why the Upwork launch included a zombie musical to communicate that the old ways of work are dead. “Who better to tell you something's dead than a zombie?” What brand has made Patrick smile recently? “I'm gonna share a local Austin brand—Tito's.” The vodka brand recently captured Patrick's attention with a campaign on why they weren't creating a seltzer as other spirit brands have. Sometimes you can stand out by zipping where others zag. To learn more, check out the Upwork website and connect with Patrick on LinkedIn. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Art of Explanation with Lee LeFever

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 28:24


    Lee LeFever literally wrote the book on explanation. In addition to being the author of The Art of Explanation and Big Enough, he's the co-founder of Common Craft where he helps leading organizations simplify their explanations through guides, videos, and visuals. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Lee LeFever Lee LeFever is the co-founder of Common Craft and the author of two books: The Art of Explanation and Big Enough. Since 2007, Common Craft has won numerous awards, worked with respected brands like LEGO, Google, Intel, and Ford, and created original explainer videos that have earned over 50 million online video views. Today, Common Craft produces educational guides, ready-made videos, and digital visuals that are used by educators in over 50 countries. Lee and his partner Sachi are Common Craft's only employees and work from their home off the coast of Washington State. Episode Highlights Why is it so hard for us to explain things? “We do it every day and we can take it for granted.” Lee went on to note that, just as learning to be a better runner, you can learn to be a better explainer. The curse of knowledge gets in the way. “It curses us by forcing us to use jargon, add examples, and more.” Lee notes that it's best to err on the side of being familiar. “We're not dumbing it down, we're making it familiar.” How to make an explainer video. Common Craft has produced explainer videos that have earned over 50 million views online. All of these are grounded in solid explanations. Where do you start? “Start like you're talking to your parents—explaining what you do and why it matters.” What brand has made Lee smile recently? On a recent trip to Costco, Lee got a new Winix air purifier that connected seamlessly to his home wifi. To learn more, check out the Common Craft website and Lee's personal website for info on his books. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Positioning-Based Strategy with Todd Irwin

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 35:11


    Todd Irwin is the Chief Strategy Officer and Founder of Fazer. The brand strategy agency has worked with Fortune 500 brands like Coca-Cola and Nike as well as SMBs and startups. Todd joined me this week on the On Brand podcast to discuss Fazer's positioning-based brand strategy methodology. About Todd Irwin Todd Irwin is the Chief Strategy Officer and Founder of Fazer, a brand strategy and creative agency. He has developed a compelling brand strategy methodology that delivers business-to-brand strategic alignment to position companies more competitively in markets. Todd brings 30+ years of brand strategy experience, helping big brands such as Coca-Cola, Nikon, Verizon, Walmart, Pepsi, Ann Taylor, Macy's, Olive Garden, and The New York Times, as well as a host of SMBs and early-stage funded growth companies.   Episode Highlights “Branding is a tangible asset,” Todd noted, defying the popular theory that brands are intangible—and thus not always seen as a valuable aspect of the business. “Brand is the product, the people—that's value.” This also helps tell the value story internally. High brand connection pays off. Todd cited research from Google and Gartner that showed a 500% gain in customers when they have a “high brand connection.” Workshopping brand strategy. Todd stressed that it's important to have leadership at the table. “You need the C-level, the chair, the founder. You need the vision.” What brand has made Todd smile recently? Todd came prepared. “It's easy to go to the Apples and Warby Parkers of the world,” Todd began before explaining that his smile came from the personal brand of Ken Burns after watching his recent Benjamin Franklin documentary. To learn more, go to the Fazer website. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    How to Sell Yourself with Cindy McGovern

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 31:47


    Cindy McGovern is the founder of Orange Leaf Consulting and author of the new book Sell Yourself, which helps people create authentic personal brands that they can live day in and day out. We discussed how to do this work and how it intersects with organizational brands this week on the On Brand podcast. About Dr. Cindy McGovern Dr. Cindy McGovern is the founder of Orange Leaf Consulting, which helps organizations, entrepreneurs, and individuals create dynamic and robust sales processes. Before launching her business, McGovern was a college professor of communication as well as a successful sales professional. She has worked with hundreds of organizations of all sizes and specialties across the globe and is now one of the most sought-after business and sales authorities.   Episode Highlights “Personal branding IS challenging,” Cindy clarified early on. “It's holding up a mirror. A personal brand represents who you are, how you behave, what you say, how you react to others and how they react to you. A personal brand is how you present yourself to the world.” What are the three critical components in creating a successful personal brand? Create. If you don't devote some time and thought to creating a personal brand, or if you think you don't need one, then the people you interact with will create one for you. They might not create the same one you would like to have. So it is crucial to deliberately create a brand that is authentic and that you will be able to live day in and day out. Live. Simply creating a brand will not help you at all unless you live it consistently. If your brand is “nice,” be nice—all the time. If it's “professional,” don't let your professional guard down—ever, at least in public. Sell. If you create an authentic personal brand and live it like it's who you are, it will be easy to sell others on believing you can live up to your brand. Selling your brand is the same as selling yourself. But it takes some planning, effort, and a conscious choice to rely on your brand to sell yourself. Cindy shared further detail about each during the show. How do personal brands connect with organizational brands? These two should work well together but it can be a challenging conversation. “At the end of the day, the organization is stronger for it if everyone brings their best selves to work,” Cindy notes. What brand has made Cindy smile recently? Are you ready for something shocking? Cindy smiled recently from an experience with an airline. And it was a good smile too! Learn what United did to make Cindy smile this week on the show. To learn more, check out Cindy's website and her book Sell Yourself. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Purpose-Driven Branding with David Aaker

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 35:14


    Branding expert and author David Aaker returns for his third appearance on the On Brand podcast. While he thanked me for having him back, I thanked him for continuing to create interesting work. His latest book is The Future of Purpose-Driven Branding which we discussed this week on the show. About David Aaker David Aaker, is the author of over one hundred articles and 18 books on marketing, business strategy, and branding that have sold over one million copies. A recognized authority on branding, he has developed concepts and methods on brand building that are used by organizations around the world. His latest book is The Future of Purpose-Driven Branding.   Episode Highlights Purpose vs. mission. We jumped right in with a big question that David takes on in the first chapter of his book. What's the difference between purpose and mission? “Purpose starts as a why question. Mission is a how question.” The two are related but different, which is why David addresses both in his book. Brand as a lens. I jokingly asked David how he keeps writing books. What more is there to say?? David answered on the importance of brand as a lens that you can use to examine issues like stories (the subject of his first On Brand interview) and innovation (what we chatted about during his second visit to the show). “You need branded programs to do all of these things.” The importance of signature programs. David spent a lot of the interview talking about why brands need signature programs that reinforce their social program rather than ad-hoc charitable, socially conscious activities. He points to Dove Beauty as the gold standard while also citing what Thrivent has done to support Habitat for Humanity. What brand has made David smile recently? David pointed to one of his favorite examples, the brand conglomerate Unilever. Specifically, he defended Hellman's purpose-driven work that was recently attacked in The Wall Street Journal. David makes a good—and on-brand—case for why Hellman's is on the right track. To learn more, check out his blog at davidaaker.com (his next post will be on the Hellman's issue noted above) and his new book The Future of Purpose-Driven Branding. Want more David Aaker On Brand? Check out his first appearance on signature stories and his second appearance on innovation. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Crafting Your 3-Word Message with Michelle Mazur

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 34:38


    Michelle Mazur is a messaging expert who helps brands of all shapes and sizes craft their own unique and powerful messages. This isn't as easy as it sounds. But with her “3-Word Rebellion” approach—drawing on social movements and her background in market research—Michelle helps brand builders simplify and clarify. She shares how this week on the On Brand podcast. About Michelle Mazur Dr. Michelle Mazur is a messaging expert who works with brilliant business owners who are shaking things up but having trouble talking about it. She combines the tools of successful social movements with the qualitative research skills she earned in her Communications Ph.D. to help them craft their powerful, captivating message. The author of the 3 Word Rebellion, host of the Rebel Uprising podcast and featured in Fast Company, Entrepreneur, and Inc., she knows that speaking about what you do in a clear and captivating way is the key to reaching the people you could help the most and making more money in your business.   Episode Highlights “We are terrible at describing what we do!” Michelle exclaimed as we began our conversation. Why is this? Part of it is the Curse of Knowledge but she also cited the work of Lee Lefever noting that our level of knowledge on our business or area of expertise is often Level 10. The mistake we make is addressing our audience at Level 6 when they're actually at a Level 2. The Russian nesting dolls of messaging. The metaphor was mine but Michelle's definitions for these concepts imply this hierarchy. “What is messaging? It's what you want to say. Copywriting is how you turn that into words. And marketing amplifies this—but you have to have the messaging first.” Just three words? How does this work?!? As Michelle explained, 3-Word Rebellions are everywhere. “Look at Simon Sinek and Start with Why and Tim Ferris with the Four-Hour Work Week. This has its roots in social movements such as Black Lives Matter, Make America Great Again, and Me Too. You want to create curiosity around the change you want to see in customers or your industry.” What's one thing listeners can do to get started? If you're excited about crafting your 3-Word Rebellion but don't know where to start, consider this advice from Michelle: “Listen to your clients—they're constantly talking about you. Plus, it's great when you can pull from customer language.” What brand has made Michelle smile recently? Funko Pops! I couldn't agree more—with over 20 of the fun figurines adorning my desk and the walls of the On Brand podcast recording studio. To learn more, check out Michelle's 3-Word Rebellion audio workshop and her website. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Leading Through Strategic Narrative with Guillaume Wiatr

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 36:27


    Guillaume Wiatr is the author of Strategic Narrative and the Principal/Founder of MetaHelm, a strategy consulting firm specializing in helping business leaders unlock profit and energize their team with a shared narrative grounded in their organization's purpose. His work teaches leaders how to build a strategic narrative. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Guillaume Wiatr Guillaume Wiatr is the author of Strategic Narrative: A Simple Method That Business Leaders Can Use to Make Everyone Understand Their Business, Get Behind it and Believe In It. His company, MetaHelm, guides CEOs, founders, and business owners to align teams and accelerate innovation adoption. A former big-firm strategy consultant, Guillaume has founded four ventures. He is sought after by senior executives of companies like Alaska Airlines, the Gates Foundation, Generations For Peace, AIG, L'Oréal, Spencer Stuart, GAP, Google, Microsoft, and the US and French governments. Guillaume teaches and mentors entrepreneurs at startup incubators, EMLyon international business school, and the University of Washington Master of Science in Entrepreneurship, ranked #3 in the US.   Episode Highlights Storytelling vs. Strategic Narrative. We can't resist definitions here on the On Brand podcast. As Guillaume was quick to note, businesses have many different stories. “Narratives are systems of stories that you intentionally design to bring customers on your journey.” “Strategic narrative is an act of leadership.” Of course, this work should involve the usual suspects from branding and marketing but for your narrative to shape your organization's culture the CEO has to be “holding the pencil” as you facilitate these important conversations. Guillaume reinforced this with a story from his work with Horizon Airlines. “Leadership is not a title,” notes Guillaume. “It's who shows up to participate in a conversation that has an impact on the brand.” What brand has made Guillaume smile recently? In keeping with the idea of bringing about transformation, Guillaume cited the work of Girl's Garage. To learn more, check out the Metahelm website and connect with Guillaume on LinkedIn and Twitter.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Point of Sale and Packaging with Siena Dexter

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 32:36


    As Director of Strategy at Smashbrand, Siena Dexter helps both online and offline brands refine their point-of-sale positioning and packaging. Believe it or not, in 400+ episodes, we haven't spent that much time talking about these incredibly important topics and touchpoints. Sienna and I discussed point of sale, packaging, and testing this week on the On Brand podcast. About Siena Dexter Siena Dexter is Director of Strategy and Associate Partner at Smashbrand, where she works with FMCG brands to create branding and packaging that's proven to perform at point of sale through quantifiable data. Working internationally at agencies in London, Dusseldorf, and now Idaho, Siena has positioned brands from startup challengers to multi-brand enterprises for proven commercial success.   Episode Highlights We don't talk about packaging and point of sale enough … Not to be confused with Encanto's Bruno, we don't talk about these important topics nearly enough as we're distracted by the abundance of shiny new—often digital—things in marketing today. “Direct to consumer is seeing opportunities from shelf,” Siena notes. “Testing feeds into strategy which feeds into testing,” Siena said. However, brands and agencies alike tend to keep testing at arm's length when it should be better integrated—as it is at Smashbrand—to be a more holistic aspect of your ongoing strategy. What's one thing listeners can do to help with their point of sale today? “Knowledge should be shared more,” Siena began, noting that there are two important things brands can do … “First, understand your audience and make sure they're the heroes of your story. Not your brand,” Siena cautions. “How does your purpose fit into the lives of consumers?” She also suggested that marketers should start looking at the shelves as they shop and consider the various messages and hierarchies and how they relate to one another. What brand has made Siena smile recently? Siena came prepared for this question! While she was originally going to talk about Dirtea mushroom powders and teas, she settled on a new story featuring a pair of salt and pepper shakers “pinched from Virgin Atlantic.” Listen to the episode for the full story—along with a surprising connection to our point-of-sale conversation. To learn more, check out the Smashbrand website and connect with Siena on LinkedIn.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Future of Brand Experience with Brett Hyman

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 36:08


    Brett Hyman is the president, CEO, and founder of NVE Experience Agency, which was recently named Ad Age's Experiential Small Agency of the Year. As an expert in building and activating meaningful brand experiences from consumer products to Comic-Con, I asked Brett to help us define some of the labels used (and misused) in experiential marketing during our conversation on the On Brand podcast. About Brett Hyman Brett Hyman is the president, CEO, and founder of NVE Experience Agency, a privately-owned brand experience and production company with offices in Los Angeles, New York, and London. Guided by 16 years of global agency and brand leadership experience, along with the principle that the right moment will transform someone forever, Hyman leads NVE's team of cross-industry experts to deliver culturally connected campaigns and transformative experiences for some of the world's most iconic brands and Fortune 500 companies including Amazon, Anheuser-Busch, Apple, Pandora, Lincoln Motor Co., Hennessy, Tinder, Twitter, AT&T, PlayStation, and more.   Episode Highlights “There are peaks and troughs in every brand experience,” Brett noted. “Even with going to Disney, it's not a constant peak.” You have to work to amplify the peak moments. Fans vs. the masses. You have to define who you're trying to reach with your experience—the super fans or the masses. With a recent Dungeons and Dragons activation for Paramount, NVE wanted to reach new people. Lighting Round! I asked Brett to define some of the most used and misused terms when it comes to experiential marketing. Activation—“It used to be a physical build-out. Now it's how a brand shows up for consumers.” Experience—“What consumers believe they will feel as a result of interacting with a brand.” Experiential 1.0—“What a brand is going to do.” Experiential 2.0—“How, where, and why they're going to do it—how brands show up for their customers and build a deeper and more meaningful relationship.” Integrated—“Embedding strategic insights, cultural empathy, and inclusive values into marketing.” Interactive—“Transcending the boundaries of events by allowing consumers to use technology to extend their experience.” How can a small brand build meaningful experiences? First, it doesn't have to be as big as Comic-Con. “Don't worry about making it big. Make it real.” What brand has made Brett smile recently? “It was actually one of the first things we talked about during the interview”—NVE's recent brand activation for Paramount's Dungeons and Dragons series at Comic-Con. To learn more, check out the website for Brett's company NVE Experience Agency. You can also connect with him on LinkedIn.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Immersive Brand Experiences with Gina Michnowicz

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 30:01


    Gina is CEO/Chief Creative Officer of The Craftsman Agency, where she focuses on creating magical experiences and immersive stories for brands like Disney and Microsoft. Where does one start with experiential marketing and brand experience? We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Gina Michnowicz Gina Michnowicz is CEO and Chief Creative Officer of The Craftsman Agency, where she focuses on creating magical moments through custom experiential marketing and immersive storytelling for B2B and B2C brands. With past clients including Cisco, Disney, Paramount, and Microsoft, Gina has led projects from concept to delivery of immersive digital experiences, experiential installations, websites, and bespoke advertising campaigns. Gina's work spans from marketing and sales within brands, to agencies, to management consulting. Her time in management consulting has strengthened her ability to think both strategically and creatively, leading teams to push the envelope with work that surprises and intrigues prospective clients.   Episode Highlights First things first, how do you create a magical brand experience for an already magical brand like Disney? “Oh it's everything—sometimes it's a 12” chocolate dress for Cruella,” Gina explained citing her agency's recent activation for the Disney film. The importance of being unexpected. “Especially today” Gina stressed, noting the noisy world we consumers find ourselves in. Asking questions. Gina's background as a management consultant provided great context for developing strategic brand experiences and activations. “Management consultants ask a lot of questions.” This is especially useful in determining clients' needs and what form of experience will work best. How do you measure brand experience? “You have to connect and have social be your elixir.” Gina also mentioned the importance of hashtags, ambassadors, and simplicity in executing a successful experience. What brand has made Gina smile recently? “Disney makes me smile every day,” Gina noted. She also mentioned regular smiles from the Four Seasons Maui. To learn more, connect with Gina on Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn and check out The Craftsman Agency website.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Planning for Brand Growth with Bobby Gillespie

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 30:01


    Bobby G is a brand growth consultant, author of the forthcoming book Build Your Brand like you Give a Sh*t, and the founder/principal at Propr Design, a Baltimore-based B2B brand growth agency. Bobby and the Propr team advise on and implement strategies that help B2B brands scale through better positioning, messaging, design, web, and marketing. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Bobby Gillespie Bobby G is an award-winning creative director, brand growth consultant, author of the forthcoming book “Build your Brand like you Give a Sh*t,” and the founder/principal at Propr Design, a Baltimore-based B2B brand growth agency. Founded in 2014, Bobby and the Propr team advise on and implement strategies that help B2B brands scale through better positioning, messaging, design, web, and marketing. They believe that the measure of ultimate success is enabling and empowering clients to succeed without them. Propr is built on a gritty work ethic and innovative ideas that deliver unmatched results.   Episode Highlights Success without an agency? What? How? WHY? “We love empowerment,” Bobby G notes. “We love kaizen or continuous improvement.” As the principal of a brand growth agency, I asked Bobby to define brand growth. “It's a result isn't it?” Bobby explained, laying out the need for thinking before just blindly creating. How can you build a brand that gives a sh*t? “What's one thing that you won't stand for? What will your brand fight for? What do you believe in?” What brand has made Bobby smile recently? “Not to get political but I love what John Fetterman is doing.” The Pennsylvania Senate candidate is embracing the Wendy's “burn” strategy on Twitter with his opponent. To learn more, check out the Propr Design website and connect with Bobby G on LinkedIn and Twitter. As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Optimize for Interesting with Dorie Clark

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 34:55


    Dorie Clark has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50. In addition to being a consultant for brands like Google and Microsoft, Dorie teaches at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School, and she is the Wall Street Journal bestselling author of The Long Game, Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. magazine. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Dorie Clark Dorie Clark helps individuals and companies get their best ideas heard in a crowded, noisy world. She has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50. She was honored as the #1 Communication Coach by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards and one of the Top 5 Communication Professionals in the World by Global Gurus. She is a keynote speaker and teaches for Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School. She is The Wall Street Journal bestselling author of The Long Game, Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. magazine. A former presidential campaign spokeswoman, Clark has been described by The New York Times as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.” She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, and consults and speaks for clients such as Google, Yale University, and the World Bank. Forbes has declared that “her insights connect marketing, social media, communications, learning technologies, and personal discovery to give us a blueprint for success in the future economy.” She is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School, a producer of a multiple Grammy-winning jazz album, and a Broadway investor.   Episode Highlights Leading with “the fun part” … I kicked off the interview by asking Dorie about some of her interesting activities like investing in Broadway shows and producing jazz albums. This led her to one of the big ideas of her latest book The Long Game … Optimize for interesting. “We're often told to follow our passion but many don't know what their passion is—they have passion shame.” That's why Dorie encourages people to optimize for what's interesting in their lives. If there's a seed of something you like, work to add more of that in your work. In turn, this helps you stand out as a personal brand. What if you're stuck? What if you don't know what the inserting part of your life is? Dorie had a couple of idea starters for this. “First, what did you like to do as a kid? Chances are, you still like the same things now.” You'll have to listen to the show for her other handy hacks. “I look for positive constraints in business,” says Dorie. “Constraints can make us more creative and efficient.” She then noted Parkinson's Law, which says that work will expand to fill the time allotted. What brand has made Dorie smile recently? Dorie cited the fun summer (and sustainable) shoe brand Suavs for all of the good they're doing with their innovative products. “We all consume too much plastic. It's good to see someone doing something about it.” To learn more about Dorie and to take her free self-assessment that goes with The Long Game, head to dorieclark.com/thelonggame. Want more Dorie Clark On Brand? Check out her first appearance back in 2015 when Dorie was one of the first guests on the show! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Frictionless Customer Experience with Bill Price

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 32:10


    Bill Price was Amazon's first Vice President of Global Customer Service and is the founder and president of Driva Solutions, dedicated to creating and sustaining highly effective customer contact strategies and operations, locally and globally. He is an analytics and customer experience expert with over 35 years' experience directing operations and consulting leading companies and he's my guest this week on the On Brand podcast. About Bill Price Bill Price started Driva Solutions in September 2001 to help companies achieve the delicate balance between cost containment and greater customer loyalty, co-founded the 9-country LimeBridge Global Alliance in early 2002, and is the lead co-author of three books: The Best Service is No Service, Your Customer Rules!, and The Frictionless Organization.  Bill served as Amazon's first Vice President of Global Customer Service and before that was Vice President & General Manager of MCI Call Center Services, COO & CFO with a start-up software company in San Francisco, and a Senior Engagement Manager with McKinsey & Company in San Francisco and Stockholm. Bill received his undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College and his MBA from Stanford University and lives in Bellevue, Washington.   Episode Highlights Wait, Bill started a business in September of 2001? “Actually, it was on September 1, 2001,” Bill noted, adding, “I was in Boston and ended up stuck there with my first client.” This turned out to be good for building their relationship. How to navigate challenging times like 9/11 and COVID. Beginning our conversation with a business in the aftermath of 9/11 is surprisingly relevant in looking at business today in the wake of a global pandemic. “There a lot of concern for customers. 'If we lose them—we'll lose them forever.'” What to do when you're in a consistently inconsistent environment. Bill advises brands to find their “true north” and continue moving toward it, going around or through obstacles that lie ahead. What is The Frictionless Organization? In discussing his latest book, Bill notes that you have to first define all the different forms of customer friction. His book does this in an innovative way—providing both good and bad stories (case studies) of organizations with various forms of organizational/customer friction. What brand has made Bill smile recently? After talking about both good and bad stories, Bill closed with a good story from a brand that made him smile, Les Schwab Tire Company—for their simple, ongoing efforts at building loyalty. To learn more, check out Bill's website for the book at frictionlessorg.com. Want more Bill Price On Brand? Check out his first appearance back in 2017!   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Leadership and Culture with Sunny Bonnell

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 36:59


    Sunny Bonnell is co-author of the best-selling business book Rare Breed and Co-Founder of C-suite branding consultancy Motto. No stranger to starting fires and creating ideas worth rallying around, she and her team work with founders, leaders, and teams to build innovative brands. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Sunny Bonnell Sunny Bonnell is no stranger to starting fires. As Co-Author, of the best-selling business book Rare Breed: A Guide to Success for the Defiant, Dangerous, and Different, and Co-Founder of MOTTO®, a C-suite branding partner that works directly with founders, leaders, and teams to create Ideas Worth Rallying Around™, Sunny revels in and works with brand innovators that shape our world. She is a fierce visionary, high-octane keynote speaker, and provocative columnist with Fast Company. Her palpable drive and brazen philosophy have garnered clients like Virgin, Google, Microsoft, Hershey's, and more.   Episode Highlights Why so flammable? After reading Sunny's bio, I had to ask about all of the “flammable” references. From dropping out of vet school to flipping the script on women in branding, Sunny has always worked to challenge the status quo. “If you can't find a way, you can make a way.” What does it mean to focus on C-suite branding? You know me. I love a good definition. Sunny's firm Motto works to “solve problems for people on their ascent to being iconic.” “It's an inside/out job,” Sunny says of branding today noting the “lack of education in the marketplace” around brand strategy best practices. “A lot of people are forgetting about the why, who, and what.” What brand has made Sunny smile recently? As you can see from her headshot above, Sunny loves hats. Specifically fedoras. Where does a fedora fan go for the finest hats? Goorin Brothers, of course. This iconic brand has a story that traces back to 1885. To learn more, check out Sunny's book Rare Breed and the Motto website.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Digital-First Direct Mail with Jacob Ross

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 33:01


    Jacob Ross is CEO of PebblePost, a pioneer in the practice of programmatic direct mail. Once the leading channel in sophisticated direct marketing, many cast print mailers aside in favor of shiny new digital channels. Jacob explained why this thinking is flawed and how you can embrace a smarter approach to integrated and impactful direct mail during this week's episode of the On Brand podcast. About Jacob Ross Jacob Ross brings 20+ years of adtech experience to his role at PebblePost, which invented an entirely new marketing channel: programmatic direct mail. The platform combines online signals and offline data to reach current and prospective customers at home with personalized mail. Current customers include Mejuri, Lulu and Georgia, ModCloth, and Parachute.   Episode Highlights We opened our conversation talking about the brand of direct mail. “Direct mail is both sophisticated in terms of data and modeling but it's also been labeled as junk mail.” “Advertising is eating us alive,” Jacob notes. “That's why we're seeing traditional channels like direct mail being reborn in a digital-first way.” Where to start with digital-first direct mail? “Everything has to be about the customer—what are they interested in?” Jacob also noted that successful, personalized programmatic direct mail needs to be pulled into the digital suite where its impact can be measured accordingly. Jacob shared a powerful stat: Direct mail sits in the home for an average of 17 days. That's a powerful connection to make with customers. What brand has made Jacob smile recently? Technically, Jacob mentioned Dyson earlier in the show as well but he revisited them again as we closed thanks to a new vacuum that he purchased at the brand's flagship Midtown store. To learn more, check out the PebblePost website.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Daniel Pink on the Power of Regret for Marketers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 32:12


    Daniel H. Pink is the author of the New York Times bestsellers A Whole New Mind, Drive, To Sell Is Human, When, and his latest The Power of Regret. His books have sold millions of copies, have been translated into 42 languages, and have won multiple awards. We discussed everything from the role regret plays in marketing to the power of a good visual (even on simple signage) this week on the On Brand Podcast. About Daniel H. Pink Daniel H. Pink is the #1 New York Times best-selling author of seven books—including his latest, The Power of Regret: How Looking Backward Moves Us Forward. His deeply researched works include the New York Times best sellers A Whole New Mind, Drive, To Sell Is Human, and When. His books have sold millions of copies, been translated into 42 languages, and have won multiple awards. Over the past decade and a half, he has also hosted a National Geographic Television series, studied the comic industry in Japan, created a popular MasterClass on sales and persuasion, written the liner notes for a Grammy-nominated album, and delivered more than 1,200 lectures on six continents. He and his wife have three children—two recent college graduates and a college freshman—and live in Washington, D.C.   Episode Highlights Signs are important (even bathroom signs). You could say that my interview with this New York Times best-selling author started in the toilet. Specifically, the surprisingly insightful and intuitive bathroom signs we both observed on trips to Denmark. This led Dan to the Ezra Pound quote on attaining “maximum efficiency of expression.” I was not alone in being afraid of The Power of Regret. While I've loved all of Dan's books, I was a little afraid to pick up his latest. “You are absolutely not alone,” Dan noted, adding: “Regret is something that we're taught to be afraid of in our ‘No regrets' culture.” The role regret plays for marketers. “Regrets can tell marketers a lot. If someone regrets something it also tells you something about what they value.” Be sure to listen to this entire portion of the interview for lots of tactical, practical advice for marketers on the role regret plays in consumer behavior. “Regret gives us a window into the human psyche.” Book covers and branding. As someone who values visual communication (from bathroom signs to branding), I had to compliment Dan on The Power of Regret's compelling book covering featuring a wadded-up piece of paper—possibly the ultimate symbol of regret. “I try to ask myself—what is the Nike swoosh for this body of ideas? What is the single visual representation?” What brand has made Dan smile recently? “The Economist magazine has clever covers and their slogan—great minds like a think—makes me smile.” To learn more, check out Dan's website, and be sure to sign up for his helpful newsletter and Pinkcast videos.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Writing for Humans and Robots with Maddy Osman

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 29:13


    Maddy Osman is the founder of the Blogsmith, an SEO content writing agency for B2B technology brands. An expert in content creation and strategy, she's the author of the new book Writing for Humans and Robots. We discussed all of this and her University of Iowa roots this week on the On Brand podcast. About Maddy Osman Maddy Osman is a digital native with a decade-long devotion to creating engaging, accessible, and relevant content. After teaching herself web design at age 11, she found her true passion in content creation—learning the intricacies while transitioning from technical to creative SEO marketer. Maddy's journey from freelance writer to founder and CEO of The Blogsmith yielded numerous insights to share about content creation for enterprise B2B technology brands. Her efforts earned her a spot in BuzzSumo's Top 100 Content Marketers and The Write Life's 100 Best Websites for Writers. Maddy has spoken for audiences at WordCamp US, SearchCon, and Denver Startup Week. She's also the author of the new book Writing for Humans and Robots: The New Rules of Content Style. Episode Highlights Two sides of the same coin. We began by talking about the duality of content writing in service of both humans and robots, “It's like yin and yang,” Maddy notes. Humans or robots first? I asked Maddy a hard question right off the bat. Which audience do you start with—humans or robots? “Hmmm probably robots,” she said noting that it's really more of a back and forth, push and pull dynamic. Creating brand voice. Maddy cited the Nielsen Norman report defining brand voice across four spectrums: Funny vs. serious Formal vs. casual Respectful vs. irreverent Enthusiastic vs. matter of fact Knowing where your brand falls across these can be a great start to developing your own brand voice! Maddy also shared the Blogsmith internal style guide which offers several tips as well. What brand has made Maddy smile recently? Maddy shared the smile that MatchaBar brings to her face—even if, as she noted, her wallet isn't always smiling back! To learn more, check out Maddy's website The Blogsmith, her book website (which includes a free chapter, and follow her on Twitter. Want more Maddy Osman On Brand? Check out her first appearance back in 2016!   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Public Relations Today with Robert Dilenschneider

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 33:57


    Robert L. Dilenschneider has been called “Dean of American Public Relations Executives.” As founder of The Dilenschneider Group, he provides strategic advice and counsel to Fortune 500 companies and leading families and individuals globally, with experience in fields ranging from mergers and acquisitions, crisis communications, marketing, government affairs, and international media. I couldn't wait to talk about all of this—including his new book The Public Relations Handbook—this week on the On Brand Podcast. About Robert L. Dilenschneider Robert L. Dilenschneider is founder of The Dilenschneider Group. Headquartered in New York and Chicago, the firm provides strategic advice and counsel to Fortune 500 companies and leading families and individuals around the world, with experience in fields ranging from mergers and acquisitions and crisis communications to marketing, government affairs, and international media. Prior to forming his own firm, Dilenschneider served as president and chief executive officer of Hill and Knowlton, Inc. from 1986 to 1991, tripling that Firm's revenues to nearly $200 million and delivering more than $30 million in profit. Dilenschneider was with that organization for nearly 25 years. Dilenschneider started in public relations in 1967 in New York, shortly after receiving an MA in journalism from Ohio State University, and a BA from the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Dilenschneider has been called the “Dean of American Public Relations Executives” and is widely published, having authored 17 books, including Decisions: Practical Advice from 23 Men and Women Who Shaped the World; A Briefing for Leaders; On Power, The Critical 14 Years of Your Professional Life; 50 Plus!—Critical Career Decisions for the Rest of Your Life, and Power and Influence: The Rules Have Changed. Episode Highlights Public relations today. Robert began our conversation with the two questions everyone should have in approaching a communication, “Who needs to know this and what action should they take?” “Oftentimes, your language doesn't work for your audience,” Robert cautions, noting that you have to figure out what language your audience uses. “Spend some time on lexicon,” even creating a manual with these keywords and phrases. What about crisis communication? “Crisis communication is a fantastic buzzword. I'm even recognized as a crisis communication expert. But the truth is if you've done things wrong you shouldn't need it if you've corrected what's wrong quickly and properly.” Sage advice in a crisis. Robert shared a crisis quote from Bill Dervin: “Tell it all, tell it fast.” Robert adds: “Dribbling your story is always a big mistake.” What brand has made Robert smile recently? Robert closed with a story that gave me a heartfelt smile hearing it. A dear friend of his is struggling with ALS. This friend bought one of Robert's wife's early paintings that helped her establish her career. Robert is now sending this ailing friend one of his wife's recent works. Smiles and well wishes all the way around! To learn more, check out Robert's website.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Creating Videos People Want to Watch with Zachary Slingsby

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 35:43


    Zachary Slingsby is a writer, short film creator, and founder of Human Factor Media, an award-winning branded storytelling company that has worked with leading brands and publishers to create videos people actually want to watch. We discussed thinking like a customer, planning engaging videos, and effective brand storytelling this week on the On Brand podcast. About Zachary Slingsby Zachary Slingsby is a writer, short film creator, and founder of Human Factor Media, an award-winning branded storytelling company that has worked with leading brands and publishers to create videos people actually want to watch. Zack graduated from Fordham University, received his MFA from the New School, and has published in over a dozen creative and industry publications. He believes the ingredient that makes a literary story great is the same that makes for a great video. His company is based between Nashville, where he lives, and New York City, collaborating with brands to create stories and films instead of ads and interruptions.   Episode Highlights “We're very smart as consumers. We get into trouble when we start thinking like brands,” Zack quipped at the top of the show. You have to hook your audience in the first three seconds (!) of your video. From there, it's about getting them to what he calls the next “propulsive turn.” “The way to capture attention is to put on a show.” That's what Zack noted about brands like Budweiser, MetLife, and Yeti. These brands have turned their social channels into “theatre pages.” What's a theatre page? Being a self-proclaimed word nerd, I had to ask Zack for a definition. He pointed us to MetLife's social videos, which offer small business vignettes such as the story of an immigrant starting a business. “They're only trying to engage you—there's a link to shop if you want” but that's not the primary objective. “Avoid fear-based decision making,” Zack cautions, citing brands like Lexus with their Colin Quinn comedy show and—the biggest example of all—Amazon, with award-winning shows available with Amazon Prime that help them “sell socks.” What brand has made Zack smile recently? Zach mentioned Yeti and Northface and shared a very “on brand” smile on the role the Top Gun movies have played in the experience around the real Top Gun flight school. To learn more, check out their website at HumanFactorMedia.co.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Power of Specificity with Greg Monaco

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 33:16


    Greg Monaco is a brand and story coach who strategizes with authors, entrepreneurs, executives, and artists to build compelling brands. In a career that's included agency work with Fortune 500 brands and founding a global brand consultancy, Greg understands how specificity is critical in helping brands tell standout stories. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand Podcast. About Greg Monaco As a Brand and Story Coach, Greg Monaco strategizes with authors, entrepreneurs, executives, and artists to refine their voice, build their presence, and attract dream opportunities. Greg's online network, Fearless Brands, is helping people in their pursuit of getting paid to do the work they love. Previously, Greg was a Founding Partner of Monaco Lange, an independent global brand consultancy, and was a Senior Copywriter at Ogilvy helping tell stories for clients like Girl Scouts of the USA, American Express, AT&T Wireless, and IBM to name a few. Beyond branding, Greg has enjoyed many pursuits as an architectural photographer, professional soccer player, and filmmaker. He lives in Connecticut with his wife, Jill, and their three children Aidan, Cameron, and Kylie.   On Brand Is Sponsored by Superside Superside is your one-stop shop for good design. Scale up your brand's design output the smart way with Superside's subscription service combining top-tier design talent and a streamlined platform for sharing and collaborating. Plus, you can get $3,000 worth of value just for listening to OnBrand! Sign up for an annual subscription and get one month FREE. Learn more now.   Episode Highlights From professional soccer to professional brand builder? “I started out pretty aimless after college,” Greg notes. While his varied career included a stint as a professional soccer player, he was always drawn to the creative arts—which led him to brand building. And in the agency world, creative work starts with a brief. The difference between a good brief and a bad brief. I liken briefs to the baton in a relay. At Ogilvy, Greg learned the difference between a good brief and a poor brief. I asked him to share and he answered with one word: “Specificity.” How to avoid generic brand storytelling. “You know you have a problem when you read the brief and it has a primary audience, a secondary audience, and a tertiary audience. When you try to do all of that your storytelling gets more generic.” You can't be everything to everyone all the time. That's why Greg prefers going beyond the idea of a target audience and straight to the bullseye. What brand has made Greg smile recently? As the parent of two kids heading to college, Greg shared how he was fascinated by the branding in higher ed. Specifically, how his kids connected with the brands that the various colleges and universities projected. To learn more, go to letsgomonaco.com.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Being an Inclusion-First Brand with Lauren Tucker

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 40:18


    Dr. Lauren Tucker is the founder and CEO of Do What Matters, an inclusion management consultancy designed to help marketing services agencies turn inclusion, equity, and diversity intent into impact. We discussed talent (it's not a pipeline problem), creativity (diversity helps), Walmart's Juneteenth ice cream blunder, and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Lauren Tucker Dr. Lauren Tucker is the founder and CEO of Do What Matters, an inclusion management consultancy that challenges the cultural homogeneity in the advertising and marketing communications industry by designing inclusion solutions that foster greater creativity, innovation, and growth. Frustrated with the lack of progress on diversity, equity, and inclusion in the advertising and marcom industries, Tucker left her position as the Chief Strategy Officer at Merge, one of the nation's largest independent agencies, to promote a different approach to increasing diversity in an industry that is still more than 80 percent white. On Brand Is Sponsored by Superside Superside is your one-stop-shop for good design. Scale up your brand's design output the smart way with Superside's subscription service combining top-tier design talent and a streamlined platform for sharing and collaborating. Plus, you can get $3,000 worth of value just for listening to OnBrand! Sign up for an annual subscription and get one month FREE. Learn more now.   Episode Highlights The work of changing an industry. After years in the agency business, Lauren realized that to bring about real change she had to step outside of the business itself. “You can't be a prophet in your own land.” “Advertising of all creative industries is the most conservative,” notes Lauren. “That's because it's most directly tied to business. The power exists with the clients.” Badvertising! I have a new favorite term! “There's a lot of badvertising out there today,” Lauren warns, shaking her head at transactional diversity efforts. Speaking of which ... Walmart's Juneteenth ice cream. Lauren walked us through this recent example of “diversity theatre.” While Walmart's ice cream (which they've since removed and apologized for) is transactional diversity—“diversity before inclusion”—Lauren also highlighted Target's transformational work elevating local business owners of color and helping them connect with their sales channels. What brand has made Lauren smile recently? While Lauren's breakdown of Walmart and Target's Juneteenth activities prompted both bad and good smiles respectively, she also noted the work that Alta has done in the beauty industry in raising the voices of female entrepreneurs. To learn more, check out the Do What Matters website, specifically their continually updated Resources.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Building a Sonic Identity System with Joe Belliotti

    Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 30:51


    Music industry veteran Joe Belliotti is an expert in sonic branding. While most marketers focus on visuals, brand builders today need to think about the impressions that can be made and emotions that can be evoked through music and sound. Joe and I discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Joe Belliotti Joe Belliotti is CEO of MassiveMusic North America, leading both the New York and the Los Angeles offices. He focuses on amplifying brand content and experiences through bespoke music and building equity through sonic branding and voice design. With more than 20 years of experience in the music and marketing industries, he has helped brands drive business value and shape culture. As Head of Global Music at The Coca-Cola Company, he created global and scalable platforms, partnerships, and strategies working on global campaigns including the FIFA World Cup, The Olympic Games, Share a Coke and a Song, Product (RED), and the American Music Awards. Joe also founded the Music Division and, earlier in his career, worked in talent development at the music publishing arm of Maverick (a Madonna/Warner Bros. joint venture). Throughout his career, he has worked with hundreds of artists, from emerging talent to the most iconic artists such as Queen, Drake, and Janelle Monae. On Brand Is Sponsored by Superside Superside is your one-stop-shop for good design. Scale up your brand's design output the smart way with Superside's subscription service combining top-tier design talent and a streamlined platform for sharing and collaborating. Plus, you can get $3,000 worth of value just for listening to OnBrand! Sign up for an annual subscription and get one month FREE. Learn more now.   Episode Highlights What is sonic branding? “Every single brand is making an impression with music and sound.” However, unlike visual communication, most marketers lack the vocabulary to talk about it. What should a sonic identity system include? While there are many definitions and lists, Joe cited the importance of: Sonic logo Product UX/UI Music, curated music Beyond Intel ... I noted that the sonic logo example that most of us think of is the Intel Inside tag, however, Joe noted that this is a great example as it helps build what's ultimately an invisible ingredient brand. Other examples of sonic branding? Joe cited Mcdonald's “I'm Lovin' It” and Mastercard's recent work, which reminded me of my sonic branding conversation with their CMO Raja Rajamannar. What brand has made Joe smile recently? Joe kept it sonic with a mention of the recent Infiniti ad featuring the Cat Stephens song "Wild World." To learn more, check out the MassiveMusic website.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Connecting Personal Brands to Corporate Brands with Scott Bartnick

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 28:41


    Scott Bartnick is an internationally renowned eCommerce and media expert and co-founder of OtterPR. Through their innovative strategies, OtterPR helps clients—both business leaders and brands—get meaningful media coverage. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Scott Bartnick Scott Bartnick is the co-founder of OtterPR. He is an internationally renowned eCommerce and media expert who has been recognized worldwide for his business acumen. Bartnick owns several successful eCommerce companies and has been recognized for his innovative lifestyle. Bartnick is the bestselling author of the Five-Day Startup and has been featured in Forbes, Entrepreneur, IBTimes, Yahoo, and more for his success in business. On Brand Is Sponsored by Superside Superside is your one-stop-shop for good design. Scale up your brand's design output the smart way with Superside's subscription service combining top-tier design talent and a streamlined platform for sharing and collaborating. Plus, you can get $3,000 worth of value just for listening to OnBrand! Sign up for an annual subscription and get one month FREE. Learn more now. Episode Highlights An innovative lifestyle yields many questions. Scott shared his own story inspired by Tim Ferriss's Four Hour Workweek. This adventure and approach led to Scott's book The Five-Day Startup.  “To build a business you have to build a brand.” Scott noted that you don't need tools like a website or a sales team to start a business. But this isn't scalable. To grow a business, you need to build a brand that resonates with people. Startup brands and founder brands. When these two play nicely with each other, it can lead to a big impact. However, when a founder's brand gets in the way of a startup brand's growth, it can spell disaster. OtterPR helps clients and brands optimize this relationship. What brand has made Scott smile recently? Scott actually shared a smile from one of OtterPR's clients—Law by Mike. To learn more, check out the OtterPR website.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Market Disruptor's Dilemma with Olivia Mariani

    Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 35:44


    As VP of Marketing at Curbio, Olivia Mariani leads is responsible for everything from brand to demand for the “fix first, pay later” PropTech leader. This week on the On Brand podcast, Olivia joined us to discuss the disruptor's dilemma—creating and communicating the market for innovative new products—as well as storytelling and immersive content. About Olivia Mariani Olivia Mariani is a marketing executive with a proven track record of driving bottom-line business results for companies of all sizes, with an emphasis on serving the Software as a Service industry. Olivia brings a breadth of marketing experience to the table, including demand generation, brand management, marketing operations, product marketing, digital, partner, and customer advocacy. Olivia's approach combines art (creative strategies) science (actionable data), collaborative planning (leadership style), and storytelling (incredible content) to create authentic brand experiences that drive revenue. Her marketing motto is to create a brand that taps into both the hearts and minds of its audience. Currently, she is the head of Marketing at Curbio, a venture-backed PropTech company experiencing rapid growth and quickly becoming the nation's leading home improvement solution for real estate agents and their clients. On Brand Is Sponsored by Superside Superside is your one-stop-shop for good design. Scale up your brand's design output the smart way with Superside's subscription service combining top-tier design talent and a streamlined platform for sharing and collaborating. Plus, you can get $3,000 worth of value just for listening to OnBrand! Sign up for an annual subscription and get one month FREE. Learn more now.   Episode Highlights The market disruptor's dilemma. So, you've got an innovative new product ... That's great! However, often you have the unique challenge of having to communicate a new idea that customers aren't aware of yet. Sometimes it's a new type of business or even a new industry. Olivia shared how she's worked to do just that with Curbio. “Home improvement sucks right now.” That's why there's Curbio! That said, even when customers learn what it is (the nation's leading fix-it-first, pay-when-you-sell home improvement solution for those selling homes), they still don't believe it. “People are always saying it's too good to be true.” Storytelling and the voice of the customer. Olivia's work focuses heavily on storytelling and the voice of the customer. All of this came together on Curbio's recent “Do we have to?” campaign. What brand has made Olivia smile recently? Olivia shared her amazing experiences with Outdoor Voices, an Austin-based athleisure brand. To learn more, check out the Curibo website.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Rethinking Brand Innovation with Carla Johnson

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 35:11


    Carla Johnson is one of the world's leading innovation architects and the author of the new book RE:Think Innovation. Through her company RE:Think Labs she helps brands innovate both internally and externally. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Carla Johnson As the world's leading innovation architect, Carla Johnson has partnered with brands and conferences globally to train thousands of people how to rethink the work that they do and the impact they can have. Through her company RE:Think Labs, she inspires and equips leaders to embrace change, welcome new ideas, and make innovation everybody's business.   Episode Highlights Innovation is for everyone. We kicked off the show talking and laughing about how innovation is treated as a special word. “It's for special people with special skills who dress in special clothes.” Carla went on to point out that innovation isn't just a skill—it's a mindset. “90% of innovation takes place outside the typical workday,” Carla noted. That said, in our fast-paced world, few take the time to cultivate a sense of play, which is needed in fostering an innovative mindset. Carla's five-step innovation framework. Carla shared the innovation framework that RE:Think Innovation details: Observe Distill Relate Generate Pitch What brand has made Carla smile recently? Carla shared a company that she profiled in RE:Think Innovation—Emerson. “They consistently surprise me in how they've adopted innovation internally and externally.” To learn more, go to Carla's website and connect with her on LinkedIn and Twitter.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Immersive Content Experiences with Jamie Gier

    Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 31:19


    Jamie Gier is CMO of Ceros, helping top brands like NBC Universal, United Airlines, and United Healthcare create immersive content experiences. In our always-on world, customers are looking for greater connection with their brands. This isn't easy as there's more noise than ever. We discussed how brands can stand out with immersive content, this week on the On Brand podcast. About Jamie Gier As CMO of Ceros, Jamie works with many top brands including NBC Universal, Monster.com, JP Morgan, Wall Street Journal, United Airlines, and United Healthcare to create immersive content experiences. With more than 25 years of experience, Jamie has worked with leading tech companies from healthcare to education to grow and scale by creating impactful brands, designing revenue-gathering go-to-market strategies, and leading high-performance teams. Prior to Ceros, Jamie held roles at DreamBox Learning, SCI Solutions (now R1), Microsoft, and GE Healthcare. She also served as a board member for Page Ahead, a nonprofit focused on the literacy needs of at-risk kids in Washington state, and chairs its marketing and fund development committee.   Episode Highlights “Marketing and branding sometimes have a bad reputation,” Jamie noted. This led her to deliberately seek out meaningful industries like education and healthcare. What's an example of an immersive brand experience? Jamie pointed us to Kimpton Properties and their “Summer Like You Mean It” campaign, which offered customers a literal glimpse of what their vacation could look like. Immersive content is engaging content. “You have to start with customers,” Jamie notes. “What's your customer's buying journey? What motivates them? What's their persona?” Too often, marketers start with what they want to create rather than what their customers actually need. You can't afford to make this mistake. What do marketers need to remember about story? “The customer should be the hero of your story,” Jamie notes. She also talked about the power of story to connect people citing work from Atlantic columnist Arthur Brooks and P&G. What brand has made Jamie smile recently? Jamie loves watching Shark Tank with her son and was so impressed with the startup Pluto Pillows that she bought one. When the product arrived, as Jamie notes, the packaging both surprised and delighted (SPOILER ALERT: Candy was involved). To learn more, connect with Jamie on LinkedIn.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Lessons from Political Brands with Zee Cohen-Sanchez

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 31:04


    Zee Cohen-Sanchez is the founder and executive director of Sole Strategies, a woman and minority-owned organization built by a team of political experts who specialize in strengthening grassroots campaigns at the community level. We discussed what personal brands and organizational brands can learn from political brands, this week on the On Brand podcast. About Zee Cohen-Sanchez Zee Cohen-Sanchez dropped out of grad school to begin helping with The Bernie Sanders 2016 campaign and from there ran part of AOC's field program. Now, founder and Executive Director of Sole Strategies, she's leading the charge to flip seats for progressive candidates and change the country. She's been featured in Authority Magazine, Divine Magazine, Future Sharks, and more.   Episode Highlights “Nothing is scarier than talking to other people—especially about politics,” Zee notes. However, learning is a critical first step in understanding your people and how we can help. This sounds simple but … “We're not good listeners,” Zee says of human nature, reinforcing the need of understanding those we're trying to serve (whether through politics or business). “You have to listen to be able to solve their problem. I always say, ‘You should be talking less!'” How can you build a better political brand? “The last thing that matters are things like your colors,” Zee advises. “You have to ask yourself, ‘What's your why?' Why are you doing this?” You can see this at work beyond the world of politics, as Zee cited Nike standing with Colin Kaepernick. What brand has made Zee smile recently? Zee pointed us to a great example of a strong political brand. Gary Chambers is running for senate in Louisiana and creates amazing videos that clearly define why he's running and what he wants to do for his community. To learn more, go to sole-strategies.com.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Finding the Right Marketing Team with Rob Simone

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 32:24


    Rob Simone is Partner and President of Summer Friday, a boutique agency sitting at the intersection of ideas and execution. This week on the On Brand podcast, Rob joined me for a discussion on the agency business today, founding a business during a global pandemic (!), and how to build a high-performance marketing team in one of the more challenging times to be doing that. About Rob Simone Rob Simone, based on Long Island, is Partner and President at Summer Friday, a strategy, creative, and content boutique that thrives at the intersection of big ideas and nimble execution. Simone co-founded Summer Friday in April 2020, right at the peak of the pandemic. His clients include major brands such as E*TRADE, National Grid, Cigna, and JP Morgan. Since its founding, the agency hasn't lost a single client, has retained its talent base, and has expanded business on every level.   Episode Highlights Only Robs on the Podcast. Rob opened by highlighting that my own podcast of late has been heavy on Robs with Rob Meyerson's recent appearance on brand naming. Speaking of brand names … Why Summer Friday? I had to ask Rob about his agency's quirky name (which, yes, I mistook for another guest that was going to be on the podcast!). As it turns out, this inventive name provides a glimpse into the organization's passion and culture, “Who doesn't love a summer Friday?” Defining an agency today. “We are a boutique agency and want to stay a boutique agency,” said Rob of their 35-member team. “When you get to a certain size, it's hard to focus and be nimble.” Building the right marketing team for the job. Among Rob's many accomplishments has been both founding an agency and keeping his talent in one of the more challenging times to accomplish either task. “We think of our team as family. Our UVP is culture above all.” Specialists vs. generalists. We also discussed the ongoing debate of specialists vs. generalists. What's most important in marketing today? You'll have to listen to find out the answer to this big question! What brand has made Rob smile recently? Rob went with a personal brand—José Andrés. Chef Andrés was in the news recently by showing up in Ukraine to help by doing what he does best, “feeding people who need food.” To learn more, go to heysummerfriday.com.   As We Wrap … Listen and subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon/Audible, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart, YouTube, and RSS. Rate and review the show—If you like what you're hearing, be sure to head over to Apple Podcasts and click the 5-star button to rate the show. And, if you have a few extra seconds, write a couple of sentences and submit a review to help others find the show. Did you hear something you liked on this episode or another? Do you have a question you'd like our guests to answer? Let me know on Twitter using the hashtag #OnBrandPodcast and you may just hear your thoughts here on the show. On Brand is a part of the Marketing Podcast Network. Until next week, I'll see you on the Internet! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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