Podcasts about Syd Barrett

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Best podcasts about Syd Barrett

Latest podcast episodes about Syd Barrett

Caropop
Robyn Hitchcock

Caropop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 67:32


Robyn Hitchcock has been writing surreal, catchy, muscular, gentle, haunting, melodic pop rock songs from his late-'70s/early '80s work with the Soft Boys through his excellent new album, Shufflemania! He still sounds young yet digs into aging and mortality in his music and this conversation. He also discusses whether he absorbs or echoes such influences as Syd Barrett and John Lennon, how his collaboration with XTC's Andy Partridge worked, what his live-performance pet peeve is and whether inspiration more often finds him or forces him to seek it out. Hitchcock remains as inventive, imaginative and thoughtful as they come.

Arroe Collins
Classic Rock Report David Gilmour March 7 2016

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 1:09


David Gilmore talking about the way Pink Floyd creatively explored while recording. He recalls the origins of Pink Floyd's epic song inspired by founding member Syd Barrett, "Shine on You Crazy Diamond." The occasion of going into a rehearsal room and just jamming was something we did a lot of in the early years and a lot of our early music came out of that. And a lot of ‘Shine on You Crazy Diamond' came out of that and a lot of the Wish You Were Here album and the Animals album all came out of those sort of sessions where we would just go and kick ideas around in a rehearsal room till something started making sense.” On Sunday, his birthday, he posted a new video for the song "In Any Tongue" from his solo album Rattle That Lock. It's the fourth clip for the album, following "Today," "The Girl in the Yellow Dress" and "Faces of Stone." Like "The Girl in the Yellow Dress," it's animated, but this one is in black, sepia and white. You can find it on YouTube.

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews

Today is the 77th anniversary of the birth of Pink Floyd founder Syd Barrett. Joining me to talk more in depth about this brilliant but troubled soul is Philip Waters from Pink Floyd Collectors!

Un Día Como Hoy
Un día como hoy 6 de enero

Un Día Como Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 7:55


Un día como hoy, 6 de enero: 1412, nace Juana de Arco. 1832, nace Gustave Doré. 1872, nace Aleksandr Skriabin. 1946, nace Syd Barrett. 1831, fallece Rodolphe Kreutzer. 1949, fallece Victor Fleming. 1993, fallece Dizzy Gillespie. 1993, fallece Rudolf Nuréyev. 1999, fallece Michel Petrucciani. Conducido por Joel Almaguer Una producción de Sala Prisma Podcast. 2023.

C86 Show - Indie Pop
Flesh for Lulu & Wasted Youth - Rocco Barker

C86 Show - Indie Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 91:54


Rocco Barker - Flesh for Lulu & Wasted Youth - in conversation with David Eastaugh Nick Marsh (vocals and guitar) and James Mitchell (drums) formed the band and soon recruited Rocco Barker (originally from Wasted Youth, guitar and vocals), and Glen Bishop (bass), taking their name from an American cult movie. After a well received John Peel session, they signed to Polydor Records in 1983, and soon thereafter, bassist Glen Bishop left to join Under Two Flags, and was replaced by Kevin Mills (formerly of Specimen). Wasted Youth were an English post-punk band from London, England, active between 1979 and 1982, which blended post-punk/pre-Goth with dark acoustic strains of the sort associated with Nick Drake and Syd Barrett. The line-up of the band was Ken Scott (vocals and guitar), Rocco Barker (guitar), Nick Nicole (synth), Darren Murphy (bass) and Andy Scott (drums)

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll
Pink Floyd: From The Gates To Atom Heart, Mother - REDUX

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 38:58


So many amazing bands were finding their start and inspiration in the mid to late 1960s! From the premise put forth early in this episode of the members as an architectural firm, having met in school, through their formation and the hazy era of early psychedelia, The Imbalanced Brothers tell the tale of the formation and foundation of Pink Floyd! Ride along through all of the name changes, musical paths, up to their "Atom Heart Mother" album!The door for the next phase is wide open!We love our sponsors!!! Please visit their web sites, and support them because they make this crazy show go:Boldfoot Socks   https://boldfoot.comCrooked Eye Brewery   https://crookedeyebrewery.com/Don't forget that you can find all of our episodes, on-demand, for free right here on our web site: https://imbalancedhistory.com/  

InObscuria Podcast
Ep. 156: Floydian Slips

InObscuria Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 92:38


It's time again to set the controls for the heart of the sun and celebrate our co-host: Robert Harrison's birthday! Space out with us as we absorb a collection of songs that evoke the essence and vibes of his favorite band: Pink Floyd. While not obscure at all (they have 2 albums that are diamonds!), we shine on with snippets of similar sounds and themes by somewhat more modern bands from the 90s until today. What is it we do here at InObscuria? Every show Kevin opens the crypt to exhume and dissect from his personal collection; an artist, album, or collection of tunes from the broad spectrum of rock, punk, and metal. Robert is usually forced to test his endurance, but this week is all about songs firmly in his big bang zone. Our hope is that we turn you on to something that was lost on your ears, even with this collection of great dance songs sounding similar to one of the biggest selling rock acts of all time.Songs this week include:The McBroom Sisters – “What Do You Want From Me”from Black Floyd(2020)Porcupine Tree – “The Jokes On You” from Up The Down Stair (1993) King Buffalo – “Mammoth” from Regenerator (2022)RPWL – “Masters Of War” from The RPWL Experience (2008)Thee Oh Sees – “Carrion Crawler” from Carrion Crawler / The Dream (2011)North Atlantic Oscillation – “Ceiling Poem” from Grappling Hooks (2010)Anathema – “Your Possible Pasts / Goodbye Cruel World” from Alternative 4 (1998)Check out Robert's amazing fire sculptures and metal workings here: http://flamewerx.com/Please subscribe everywhere that you listen to podcasts!Visit us: https://inobscuria.com/https://www.facebook.com/InObscuriahttps://twitter.com/inobscuriahttps://www.instagram.com/inobscuria/Buy cool stuff with our logo on it!: https://www.redbubble.com/people/InObscuria?asc=uIf you'd like to check out Kevin's band THE SWEAR, take a listen on all streaming services or pick up a digital copy of their latest release here: https://theswear.bandcamp.com/If you want to hear Robert and Kevin's band from the late 90s – early 00s BIG JACK PNEUMATIC, check it out here: https://bigjackpnuematic.bandcamp.com/

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
"Pink Floyd: Every Album, Every Song"/Richard Butterworth [Episode 98]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 60:46


Pink Floyd are one of the most innovative, enduringly successful bands in history. Their influence is incalculable. 1973's ‘Dark Side of the Moon', though far from the first concept album, established a new model for quasi-symphonic, long-form investigations into the human condition: a record of thoughtfully poignant lyrics and some of the most elegant, powerful, genre-defining rock music ever made. Formed in 1967 Roger Waters, Rick Wright and Nick Mason, helmed by the tragically brilliant Syd Barrett, fused English pastoral whimsy with electrifying instrumental voyages through inner and outer space. Their gigs at underground clubs, such as UFO and Middle Earth, are the stuff of psychedelic legend. Between 1968 and 1971, Barrett replaced by David Gilmour, their sonic inquiries were never braver: some delivered instantly; others revealed their treasures slowly; all played crucially distinctive parts in rock's development. During the 1970s, the music matured as the messages darkened. While Floyd continued to prove that emotional weight and cathartic release can be forged from deceptively modest arrangements, the band's live spectaculars reached a pitch of technical complexity and extravagance none has matched. With insightful analysis, objectivity and ironic wit, Richard Butterworth appraises afresh Pink Floyd's official recorded canon, from “Arnold Layne” to ‘The Endless River'.Richard Butterworth's grown-up career began in advertising, first as a paste-up artist, later as a graphic designer. Settling on copywriting, for years he reaped the pleasures, pains and penury of freelancing. As a lifelong believer in the healing and redemptive power of music, however, he knew that humankind's highest art-form would eventually saddle up and ride him into the sunset. Today Richard lives in Cornwall, UK with his partner Sue, two golden retrievers, a tenor saxophone and a justifiably ancient laptop computer, on which he still writes about the music he loved before he was a grown-up.Purchase a copy of "Pink Floyd: Every Album, Every Song" in the UK through Burning Shed: https://burningshed.com/richard-butterworth_pink-floyd-on-track_bookPurchase a copy of "Pink Floyd: Every Album, Every Song" in the US through Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Pink-Floyd-every-album-song/dp/1789522420Listen to a playlist of the music discussed in this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/7I9TkxwdvzYPqdyOTCIaqC?si=c955b77e9b13412fThe Booked On Rock Website: https://www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/bookedonrockpodcastSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent bookstore here: https://www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Music: “Whoosh” & “Nasty” by Crowander (https://www.crowander.com)

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock is Lit: Richard Fulco, Author of 'We Are All Together', On The Summer of Love & The Long Hot Summer of 1967, with Woodstock Photographer Elliott Landy

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 72:16


In this episode of Rock is Lit, Richard Fulco, author of the new novel ‘We Are All Together', is here to take us on a rockin' jaunt through the late 1960s, where we'll encounter several iconic players on the music and literature scene from that era. If you're a fan of the Summer of Love and all the trimmings that go with it, you'll love his novel and this episode. Later, Elliott Landy drops by to talk even more about the 1960s music scene, a period he should know a lot about since he's been photographing rock stars since the mid-60s. Best known for his classic rock photographs, Elliott Landy was one of the first music photographers to be recognized as an “artist.” His celebrated works include album cover photographs for Bob Dylan's ‘Nashville Skyline', The Band's ‘Music From Big Pink' and ‘The Band' album, and Van Morrison's ‘Moondance'. He's also taken portraits of such rock icons as Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, etc. He was the official photographer of the 1969 Woodstock Festival. And . . . Elliott has a new book out, entitled ‘Photographs of Janis Joplin On the Road & On Stage', featuring 129 photos, including 100 unpublished, accompanied by Janis's own words from recorded interviews by David Dalton of ‘Rolling Stone' magazine. HIGHLIGHTS:Richard Fulco and I talk about Syd Barrett's descent into mental illness and his exit from Pink Floyd1967: The Summer of Love—music, culture, vibe—but for African Americans, 1967 was known as The Long Hot SummerRichard's music career when he was in his twentiesThe story and characters in ‘We Are All Together'—Syd Barrett as inspiration behind the character DylanThe Beatles' performance on the ‘Ed Sullivan Show' in 1964The quest for fame and having “IT”The American Dream and racism and toxic ChristianityCharles MansonThe Merry PrankstersThe significance of the title of the novel and its connection to The BeatlesAndy Warhol, The Factory, The Velvet Underground with Nico, Lou Reed and their role in the novelThe depiction of the Monterey Pop Festival in the story, especially the performance of Janis Joplin with Big Brother and the Holding CompanySome of the other icons who make cameos in the novel: Pete Townshend, Eric Burdon, Jann Wenner, Neal Cassady, William S. BurroughsWhat the Jack Kerouac classic novel ‘On the Road' means to Richard and meThe Monkees as a gateway drug to The BeatlesElliott Landy and I talk about How Elliott's concern about the Vietnam War brought him from a job as a photographer on a Danish film set back to America in the mid- to late 1960s to photograph peace demonstrationsHow a Country Joe and the Fish light show at The Anderson Theater in NYC's East Village started Elliott on a new career path photographing musiciansSeeing Janis Joplin, Tim Buckley, and Albert King perform the very first show at the Fillmore East on March 8, 1968Hanging out with Janis Joplin after a NYC gigElliott's style as a “fly on the wall” photographerShooting the album covers of The Band's ‘Music From Big Pink' and ‘The Band', Bob Dylan's ‘Nashville Skyline', and hanging out with guys in the town WoodstockHis experience as the official photographer at Woodstock in 1969 and the spirit of Woodstock and the 1960s MUSIC AND MEDIA IN THE EPISODE IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:(Royalty Free Music) “Summer of Love” by Roy Edwin Williams“The King is Half-Undressed” by Jellyfish“Dock of the Bay” by Otis Redding“See Emily Play” by Pink FloydRoger Waters talks about Syd Barrett on the Joe Rogan Experience“Four” by Sonny RollinsClip of Muhammad Ali explaining his anti-draft, anti-Vietnam War stance“I Am the Walrus” by The Beatles“Ball and Chain” performed by Janis Joplin with Big Brother and the Holding Company at Monterey Pop Festival“Heroin” by The Velvet Underground with Nico‘The Monkees' Theme Song“Itchykoo Park” by The Small Faces“I Feel Like I'm Fixin' to Die Rag” by Country Joe and the Fish“Morning Glory” by Tim BuckleyCountry Joe and the Fish chant at Woodstock 1969“To Be Alone With You” by Bob DylanWavy Gravy at Woodstock“Woodstock” by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young“Down on Me” Janis Joplin with Big Brother and the Holding Company LINKS: Richard's website, www.richardfulco.comRichard on Twitter and Instagram, @RichardFulco Link to clip of Roger Waters talking about Syd Barrett on the Joe Rogan Experience, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BcKrk5tFnE&t=66s Elliott's website, www.elliottlandycomElliott on Instagram, @elliott_landy_photography Christy Alexander Hallberg's website: https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/Christy Alexander Hallberg Twitter, @ChristyHallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg Instagram, @christyhallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSnRmlL5moSQYi6EjSvqagLink to Christy Alexander Hallberg's short story on Janis Joplin, “Third Party,” published by ‘Eclectica', https://www.eclectica.org/v20n4/hallberg.html

What the Riff?!?
1973 - March: Pink Floyd "The Dark Side of the Moon"

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 39:49


Arguably the biggest album of the entire rock era, Pink Floyd's eighth studio album would propel them to superstardom.  The Dark Side of the Moon is one of the most acclaimed records in history, and it is commercially unmatched in its longevity.  It topped the US Billboard Top LP's and Tape chart, and charted for 962 weeks in total!Pink Floyd at this time was David Gilmour on guitar and vocals, Roger Waters on bass and vocals, Richard Wright on keyboards, and Nick Mason on percussion.The Dark Side of the Moon was envisioned as a concept album focusing on different types of pressure like greed, conflict, and death.  It also included examination of mental health issues - as would much of Pink Floyd's discography - inspired by the problems experienced by former front man Syd Barrett.  While singles were released, we strongly recommend listening to the album in totality to get the best experience out of it.Bruce brings us this monster album, and friend of the show Mike Fernandez joins us in Wayne's absence. TimeThis was released in the US as the second single from the album (after Money).  Roger Waters wrote the lyrics.  David Gilmour and Richard Wright share lead vocals - unusual for Richard Wright.  The sounds of clocks were recorded by Alan Parsons in an antique store as a quadrophonic test, but the sounds fit so well with the theme of this track that the band included it.  All four principal members were credited with songwriting, and this would be the last time this would happen in the band's history.The Great Gig in the SkyThis track follows Time, and is basically an instrumental with some spoken words at the front.  The band went around the studio asking people questions and Gerry O'Driscal's response is recorded on this track.  Female vocalizations are provided by Clare Torry, a session vocalist that Alan Parsons brought in.  She wasn't really told what to sing, but was told, "There's no lyrics.  It's about dying - have a bit of a sing on that, girl."  Brain DamageRoger Waters is on lead in this song, with Gilmour providing backing vocals.  This and other insanity-themed lyrics are based on Syd Barrett.  The lyric, "And if the band you're in starts playing different tunes" has a historical basis, as Barrett would play a different song than the rest of the band on more than one occasion toward the end of his tenure with the band.  EclipseThis final track is actually a different song from Brain Damage, but is commonly played with it on rock radio stations because there is no break between the two on the album.  The song reflects the ying and yang of life - good and bad, life and death, light and dark.  "And everything under the sun is in tune, but the sun is eclipsed by the moon." ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:Theme to the television game show $10,000 PyramidDick Clark would serve as the initial host of this game show which started in March 1973.   STAFF PICKS:Crocodile Rock by Elton JohnBrian initiates the staff picks with the first number 1 song in the U.S. for Elton John.  The song has a 50's throwback sound, with lyrics that tell about a time when the singer danced the Crocodile Rock with Susie.  It was inspired by Australian band Daddy Cool and their song “Eagle Rock.”The Cisco Kid by WarRob's staff pick is from War's 1972 album, “The World is a Ghetto.” It made it to number 2 on the charts.  There's a reggae feel, a little funk, and a little ZZ Top.  The song is about two cowboys, Cisco and Poncho, and their adventures.  The band wanted their music to spread brotherhood and harmony to displace greed, racism, hunger, and gangs.Stuck in the Middle With You by Stealers Wheel Friend of the show Mike Fernandez brings us one of the classic lines in rock music - “clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, here I am, stuck in the middle with you.”  Gerry Rafferty  is the founder and principal songwriter for the group.  This is Stealers Wheel's biggest hit.Danny's Song by Anne MurrayBruce wraps up the staff picks with a song Kenny Loggins wrote for his brother Danny at the birth of his son Colin.  It was first performed by a group called Gator Creek in 1970, then by Loggins and Messina in 1972.  This cover by Canadian country-pop singer Anne Murray would go to number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100. INSTRUMENTAL TRACK:Also Sprach Zarathustra by DeodatoThis funky take on the Richard Strauss piece famous for its use in "2001:  A Space Odyssey" was on the charts in March 1973.

Little bit of synergy
Scream thy last scream

Little bit of synergy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 67:10


Rolling! Season 3! Welcome back Reverend Sam as we discuss one of our nearest and dearest subjects; My pick this time, Early era Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett , Atom heart mother. Sam talks about my mother. Fronting my music while I still have the rights. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/anthony-thomas22/support

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans british games young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam wolf joker britain catholic beatles mothers lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge birmingham wright iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd pink floyd apples communists rat boyd chapman bb boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo sanford climax roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi eaten camelot gnome james joyce syd pollock jenner abbey road gog rock music cautionary tales brian wilson elektra lewis carroll relics roger waters haydn notting hill jeff beck arthurian groupies marquee sainsbury willows etta james freak out i ching opel dick clark gilmour howlin edwardian coasters walk like gk chesterton john lee hooker bo diddley wish you were here labour mp tennyson sgt pepper richard wright penny lane twink pinups pat boone anjelica huston syd barrett new left john peel allemande manfred mann nick mason free school amm jimi hendrix experience klose sdp johnny b goode pretty things shine on rubber soul girl guides liberal mps american bandstand chubby checker oar notting hill carnival ray davies psychedelic experiences harrod newport folk festival bandstand elektra records frith bacharach roky erickson steptoe tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rhymer rick wright lodgers radio london distributism entranced ewan maccoll crazy diamond fred frith quaalude incredible string band belloc pete anderson partita no rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say mike leonard emily young cloudberry interstellar overdrive dave gilmour grimble nick kent norman smith ufo club skip spence chris dennis pink fairies first girl i loved jac holzman arnold layne malcolm jones dodder smokestack lightnin tilt araiza
Subliminal Jihad
[PREVIEW] #129 - COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SUSLORDS: A Subliminal History of Cybernetics (with Jay)

Subliminal Jihad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 8:49


For access to full-length premium episodes and the SJ Grotto of Truth Discord, subscribe to the Al-Wara' Frequency at patreon.com/subliminaljihad. Dimitri, Khalid, and Jay the Neuroscientist (@The_Hague_ICC) conclude their exploration of cybernetics with a discussion of: RD Laing's “anti-psychiatry”, Laing's decade at the Tavistock Institute, Dr. Jolly West and the Haight Ashbury Free Clinic, Syd Barrett going insane on LSD despite (because of?) Laing's “guidance”, Laing and Leary, Laing vs. Stokely Carmichael, the Dimes Square Fascist Humiliation Ritual, Heinz von Foerster and Second Order Cybernetics, Foerster's Theosophist grandmother Marie Lang, the Doomsday Equation, Protestant gifted child/future Macy Conference chairman Warren Sturgis McCullough and Henry Sloane Coffin, Bertram Borden Boltwood, “The Minds of Men” documentary, Alex Gibney's stepfather Peter Sloane Coffin getting tapped into Skull and Bones by George H.W. Bush, “The Ultimate Think Tank: The Rise of the Santa Fe Institute Libertarian”, Robert Maxwell and PROMIS, Ghislaine's twin sisters Christine and Isabel Maxwell, Carl Djerassi and Alexander Djerassi, the “Friends” of Libya and Syria Conferences, Reddit power-moderator u/maxwellhill, Cormac McCarthy, Zorro Ranch, and Jeffrey Epstein bankrolling the co-optation of cybernetic thought to advance the sinister philanthrocapitalist agenda of the sicko ruling class.

Discograffiti
63. The One-Year Anniversary Redux Of Episode 1: Pink Floyd (1967-1970)

Discograffiti

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 63:47


Including a new and essential intro with original co-host Joe Kennedy joining Dave Gebroe to chat, with emotional candor, about the long and winding road that led Discograffiti to your door. It's not been easy, that's for sure, but it's definitely been worth it. Do you have any idea how few podcasts make it to a year? Thank you so much for your support. It means literally everything. -Curated Pink Floyd episode 1 playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0Bgqta5NHvQBPqN5NqTuS1 -Syd Barrett-fronted Pink Floyd on BBC1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8suJXPXXo7M -Post-Syd lineup plays some Piper material on French TV: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkPN20Ek3Zo -Treasure trove of Syd Barrett material: https://www.sydbarrett.com -Pink Floyd - the officially unreleased Zabriskie Point soundtrack: http://albumsthatneverwere.blogspot.com/2020/03/pink-floyd-zabriskie-point-soundtrack.html CONNECT Join our Soldiers of Sound Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1839109176272153 Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/discograffiti Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/discograffitipod/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discograffiti/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discograffiti YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClyaQCdvDelj5EiKj6IRLhw Web site: http://discograffiti.com/ Patreon: www.Patreon.com/Discograffiti CONTACT DAVE Email: dave@discograffiti.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/DaveGebroe Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidgebroe/ CONTACT TODD ZIMMER: GRAPHIC DESIGN Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ToddZimmer and https://www.facebook.com/punknjunkradio Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_real_todd_zimmer/ and https://www.instagram.com/punknjunkradioshow/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/discograffiti/message

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Vintage Rock Pod: Arthur Brown Interview - THE GOD OF HELLFIRE!

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 37:57


"I am the God of Hellfire and I bring you... Arthur Brown!!!" Ok, I'm not the God of Hellfire, but HE sure as heck is! Arthur Brown is the latest legendary  guest to join Paul on Vintage Rock Pod! Arthur Brown scored a worldwide hit in 1968 with the anthem, 'Fire' and he's dazzled and bewitched fans for decades with elaborate stage shows, a hat of fire, face paint and much more - and now, in the year he turned 80 years old, he's back with more new music! Just months after releasing 'Long Long Road', he returns with the spooktacular 'Monsters Ball'! The guests  involved on the record is seriously impressive, including Deep Purple's Ian Paice, The Stooges James Williamson, Vanilla Fudge's Carmine Appice and Mark Stein, Hawkwind's Nik Turner and Alan Davey and many more!   Arthur joins me to talk about this spooky new record which features a cover of the Syd Barrett written Pink Floyd song 'Lucifer Sam' and a new version of his hit 'Fire'. We also talk about that incredible song, his crazy stage shows, his friendship with Jimi Hendrix which saw them almost form a band together, his new documentary and so much more! This is one not to miss!!Check out more of Vintage Rock Pod's brilliant interviews by following/subscribing to the Vintage Rock Pod feed on your favourite podcast app - a new interview is released every day and you can only get these on the VRP feed! 

TNT Radio
Christopher Hawley on Joseph Arthur & his Technicolor Dreamcast - 28 October 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 55:51


GUEST OVERVIEW: Christopher Hawley makes people feel good through music! The Venice, CA-based artist combines inspiring lyrics, transcendent guitar, and danceable grooves. In addition getting inspiration from the likes of Bob Marley, Johnny Cash, and Duane Allman, he identifies with and is influenced by some of the lesser known and perhaps under promoted heroes of music from the last century like Brian Jones, Grant Green, Syd Barrett, Lowell George, and J.J. Cale. Christopher has played shows everywhere from LA's Greek Theatre to the dive in your hometown.

Rock & Roll Nightmares
Waddy Wachtel: Immediate Family, Stevie Nicks, & Werewolves of London

Rock & Roll Nightmares

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 58:14


Staci and cohost Andy Garrison talk to guitarist, songwriter, producer, and session-man Waddy Wachtel, who is known for lending his talents to artists including Kim Carnes, Linda Ronstadt, The Rolling Stones, Keith Richards, Warren Zevon, and, most notably, Stevie Nicks. Waddy talks about working with those superstars and more, including giving us the scoop on the upcoming documentary, "Immediate Family" directed by Denny Tedesco, who did the amazing documentary on the Wrecking Crew. Also, Staci and Andy talk about their collaboration on the audiobook, “Rock & Roll Nightmares: True Stories, Vol 1” and share an excerpt about Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett.

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast
UAWIL #100: Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets Live in Indy

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 104:16


Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets had to wait 2 years to tour due to COVID.  But The Wolf & Action Jackson waited 27 years to see a live show together again; however, they all converged in Indianapolis on Friday, October 14.  As proud members of Panteon Podcasts, we sponsored the The Echoes Tour and worked the show while greeting our VIP Experience winner, Heather.Listen to The Wolf's journey from Europe to Indianapolis and how dangerously close he was to missing the show.  Hear snippets of our interview with Guy Pratt & Gary Kemp of the Saucers (and the brilliant podcast The Rockonteurs) and the amazing night we had in Indy.  Starting with One Of These Days through to the epic Echoes the guys shared stories, had some fun with the crowd, displayed extraordinary musicianship and still came back for an encore.Thanks to all our listeners who've supported us through our first 100 shows!  We pay tribute to all our guests, fellow podcasters and friends who have joined us over the years with a fun mashup of their bumpers.  And don't worry, we've got hundreds more shows in us...Hear Ep96 for our full interview with Gary & Guy: https://podcasts.apple.com/nl/podcast/uawil-96-gary-kemp-guy-pratt-of-nick-masons/id1542993846?i=1000580988376&l=enHear Ep75 for my review from Royal Albert Hall in London: https://podcasts.apple.com/nl/podcast/uawil-75-nick-masons-saucerful-of-secrets-live-at/id1542993846?i=1000565385735&l=enUgly American Werewolf in London WebsiteTwitterInstagramYouTubeLInkTreewww.pantheonpodcasts.comWant to win front row seats to Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets in the US?Enter here to win tickets and a chance to be on a Pantheon Podcast: https://pantheonpodcasts.com/nickmasonGet tickets here: https://www.thesaucerfulofsecrets.com/

MusicBoxPete Podcast
Episode 379: Interview w/ Tyler Legare

MusicBoxPete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 22:21


On today's all new episode, we wrap up our special coverage of Summit Indie Fest that happened this past Sat. 10/22 with an interview featuring one of the performers, Haverhill, MA based singer-songwriter Tyler Legare. Tyler talks about his evolution from playing drums in our good friend Henry McIntyre's backing band and how he really found his true calling and purpose in life, and how he has since switched over to guitar. He also lets us in on his passion for art, and how his love for that seeps into his music and how in common they both are and work in tandem with one another. Tyler also shares his love for Syd Barrett of Pink Floyd, and how much Syd has influenced him and helped to uncover different facets of his own personality as well. He also talks about his creative process and how he goes about crafting tunes in the first place, plus he lets us in on what he likes to do to unwind away from making music, and when we can possibly see some music released to the public.

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews
76. Arthur Brown - The God of Hellfire!

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 37:57


"I am the God of Hellfire and I bring you... Arthur Brown!!!" Ok, I'm not the God of Hellfire, but he sure as heck is! Arthur Brown is my guest on this weeks big interview show, the man who scored a worldwide hit in 1968 with the anthem, 'Fire'! He's dazzled and bewitched fans for decades with elaborate stage shows, a hat of fire, face paint and much more - and now, in the year he turned 80 years old, is back with more new music! Just months after releasing 'Long Long Road', he returns with the spooktacular 'Monsters Ball'! The guests he's got involved on the record is seriously impressive, including Deep Purple's Ian Paice, The Stooges James Williamson, Vanilla Fudge's Carmine Appice and Mark Stein, Hawkwind's Nik Turner and Alan Davey and many more!  Arthur joins me to talk about this spooky new record which features a cover of the Syd Barrett written Pink Floyd song 'Lucifer Sam' and a new version of his hit 'Fire'. We also talk about that incredible song, his crazy stage shows, his friendship with Jimi Hendrix which saw them almost form a band together, his new documentary and so much more!This is one not to miss!!

What Difference Does It Make
Guy Pratt and Gary Kemp hold a Saucerful of Secrets

What Difference Does It Make

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 22:31


We continue our two-part look at Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets with two guys from the band. One guy is Guy Pratt. He's played with Pink Floyd, Roxy Music, Madonna, The Smiths, Echo & The Bunnymen, Tears For Fears, and the list goes on. We also have a friend of the show, Gary Kemp. You know him as the guitarist and principal songwriter for Spandau Ballet.   Currently, they are spending their time with Nick Mason, recreating the music of Pink Floyd circa 1967-1972. We get into all the secrets this week on the What Difference Does It Make podcast.  We are a proud member of Pantheon Podcasts.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
What Difference Does It Make: Guy Pratt and Gary Kemp hold a Saucerful of Secrets

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 22:31


We continue our two-part look at Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets with two guys from the band. One guy is Guy Pratt. He's played with Pink Floyd, Roxy Music, Madonna, The Smiths, Echo & The Bunnymen, Tears For Fears, and the list goes on. We also have a friend of the show, Gary Kemp. You know him as the guitarist and principal songwriter for Spandau Ballet.   Currently, they are spending their time with Nick Mason, recreating the music of Pink Floyd circa 1967-1972. We get into all the secrets this week on the What Difference Does It Make podcast.  We are a proud member of Pantheon Podcasts.

The Mistress Carrie Podcast
The Mistress Carrie 'Sit Rep' 10-17-2022

The Mistress Carrie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 4:56


This is the Mistress Carrie Situation Report! The 'Sit Rep' your daily Entertainment headlines, Industry Info, and everything ROCK, all in under 5 minutes! 10-17-2022. The Mistress Carrie Podcast, a proud member of the Pantheon Podcast Network!  FFDPFFDP IvanMIAJudas PriestFilterSyd BarrettKemikalfireFamous MonstersBlink 182David Lee RothVan HalenNew films in theaters this weekNew Releases This Week Hard Rock and Metal ReleasesFind Mistress Carrie online:Official WebsiteThe Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on PatreonTwitterFacebookInstagramYouTubeCameoPantheon Podcast Network

What Difference Does It Make
Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets

What Difference Does It Make

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 20:22


Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason is bringing early Pink Floyd music back to life by taking it on the road with his band, Saucerful of Secrets. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member steps into our virtual studios to talk about the music he created with Pink Floyd from 1967 to 1972, and the all-star band he assembled to recreate these iconic songs.Win an exclusive VIP tour experience with Pink Floyd drummer, Nick Mason, and his band Saucerful of Secrets. Details are found on the Pantheon Podcast website.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
What Difference Does It Make: Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 20:22


Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason is bringing early Pink Floyd music back to life by taking it on the road with his band, Saucerful of Secrets. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member steps into our virtual studios to talk about the music he created with Pink Floyd from 1967 to 1972, and the all-star band he assembled to recreate these iconic songs.Win an exclusive VIP tour experience with Pink Floyd drummer, Nick Mason, and his band Saucerful of Secrets. Details are found on the Pantheon Podcast website.

Cobras & Fire: Comedy / Rock Talk Show
Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets in Minneapolis 2022

Cobras & Fire: Comedy / Rock Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 44:40


Bakko is joined by regular guest Gene Vogel as they record live in the lobby of the Minneapolis stop of the Nick Mason's Saucerful Of Secrets Tour. Light conversation mixed with attendee guest commentary. Enjoy. 

I'm In Love With That Song
Pink Floyd - "See Emily Play"

I'm In Love With That Song

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 22:46 Very Popular


"See Emily Play" was only Pink Floyd's 2nd single, but it was a watershed moment in psychedelic rock history. Though Syd Barrett's body of work was relatively small, he left behind a huge legacy that's still influencing people today. This song is one of the highlights of his short and tragic career."See Emily Play" (Syd Barrett) Copyright 1967 Westminster Music Limited REGISTER TO WIN THE NICK MASON VIP TICKET UPGRADE here:http://www.pantheonpodcasts.com/nickmason  -- This show is just one of many great Rock Podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Gotta catch 'em all!  

Rock N Roll Pantheon
I'm In Love With That Song: Pink Floyd - "See Emily Play"

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 22:46


“See Emily Play” was only Pink Floyd's 2nd single, but it was a watershed moment in psychedelic rock history. Though Syd Barrett's body of work was relatively small, he left behind a huge legacy that's still influencing people today. This song is one of the highlights of his short and tragic career.“See Emily Play” (Syd Barrett) Copyright 1967 Westminster Music Limited REGISTER TO WIN THE NICK MASON VIP TICKET UPGRADE here:http://www.pantheonpodcasts.com/nickmason  — This show is just one of many great Rock Podcasts on the Pantheon Podcasts network. Gotta catch 'em all!  

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Ugly American Werewolf in London: Gary Kemp & Guy Pratt of Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets Interview

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 54:29


We are proud to welcome 2 legends of music - Guy Pratt & Gary Kemp.  Gary may be best known from his days as the guitarist & lead songwriter of Spandau Ballet but you may also know him as an actor (The Bodyguard).  Guy Pratt took over for Roger Waters on bass in Pink Floyd and has worked with superstars like Michael Jackson, Madonna, David Gilmour and so many more. Not only are they inspirations because of their musical talents but they host an extraordinary podcast, The Rockonteurs.  We chatted with them about their current tour of the US with Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets and what it's like to play music from Pink Floyd's pre-Dark Side catalog.  You'll find them quick with a joke but also very sincere as Guy talks about singing Rick Wright's parts on stage, Gary following in the footsteps of Syd Barrett, David Gilmour and David Bowie & the fun they have on the Rockonteurs.This is a special show for us as we've wanted to have Guy on since we reviewed Pink Floyd's Delicate Sound of Thunder on episode 3.  PInk Floyd fans may also want to download Episode 69 on A Momentary Lapse of Reason and Episode 75 on Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets live at Royal Albert Hall in London.We're excited to sponsor this tour, see below on how you can win a VIP experience with 2 FRONT ROW SEATS and be on our podcast.   We'll be at the show at Clowes Hall in Indianapolis on Friday, October 14 - get you tickets to the show and then come by to say hi to us!Ugly American Werewolf in London WebsiteThe RockonteursTwitterInstagramYouTubeLInkTreewww.pantheonpodcasts.comWant to win front row seats to Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets in the US?Enter here to win tickets and a chance to be on a Pantheon Podcast: https://pantheonpodcasts.com/nickmasonWe'll be at the Indianapolis show Friday, October 14, Get tickets here: https://www.thesaucerfulofsecrets.com/

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast
UAWIL #96: Gary Kemp & Guy Pratt of Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets Interview

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 54:29


We are proud to welcome 2 legends of music - Guy Pratt & Gary Kemp.  Gary may be best known from his days as the guitarist & lead songwriter of Spandau Ballet but you may also know him as an actor (The Bodyguard).  Guy Pratt took over for Roger Waters on bass in Pink Floyd and has worked with superstars like Michael Jackson, Madonna, David Gilmour and so many more.Not only are they inspirations because of their musical talents but they host an extraordinary podcast, The Rockonteurs.  We chatted with them about their current tour of the US with Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets and what it's like to play music from Pink Floyd's pre-Dark Side catalog.  You'll find them quick with a joke but also very sincere as Guy talks about singing Rick Wright's parts on stage, Gary following in the footsteps of Syd Barrett, David Gilmour and David Bowie & the fun they have on the Rockonteurs.This is a special show for us as we've wanted to have Guy on since we reviewed Pink Floyd's Delicate Sound of Thunder on episode 3.  PInk Floyd fans may also want to download Episode 69 on A Momentary Lapse of Reason and Episode 75 on Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets live at Royal Albert Hall in London.We're excited to sponsor this tour, see below on how you can win a VIP experience with 2 FRONT ROW SEATS and be on our podcast.   We'll be at the show at Clowes Hall in Indianapolis on Friday, October 14 - get you tickets to the show and then come by to say hi to us!Ugly American Werewolf in London WebsiteThe RockonteursTwitterInstagramYouTubeLInkTreewww.pantheonpodcasts.comWant to win front row seats to Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets in the US?Enter here to win tickets and a chance to be on a Pantheon Podcast: https://pantheonpodcasts.com/nickmasonWe'll be at the Indianapolis show Friday, October 14, Get tickets here: https://www.thesaucerfulofsecrets.com/

Discoteca Básica Podcast
T05E07: The Piper At The Gates of Dawn - Pink Floyd (1967)

Discoteca Básica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 75:13


O “OUTRO PINK FLOYD” -  Ainda liderado por seu fundador Syd Barrett, a estreia do grupo inglês é, ao mesmo tempo, um retrato multicolorido da era psicodélica e uma história coberta de tragédia. Convidado do episódio: Fernando Catatau     Assinante do Clube Discoteca Básica tem conteúdo complementar. Nesta semana, como complemento ao episódio sobre o "The Piper At The Gates of Dawn", LP lançado em 1967, a equipe do Discoteca Básica preparou o especial "O incrível ano de 1967".  Nele, Ricardo Alexandre faz um sobrevôo sobre o ano de 1967 por meio de álbuns, músicas e festivais que marcaram esse incrível ano. Assine agora e aproveite a degustação grátis de 30 dias: https://podcastdiscotecabasica.com/clube/    A inspiração para fazer uma boa música pode vir das coisas mais inusitadas. A MusicDot, é uma escola de música online com professores de verdade. Com uma única assinatura você tem acesso a todos os cursos. Ouvinte Discoteca Básica tem 10% de desconto. Acesse: https://musicdot.com.br/promoção/discotecabasica   Contos de fada e viagens interestelares se misturam no som do Pink Floyd original, uma das mais marcantes trilhas-sonoras da Swinging London, encapsulada no LP de estreia da banda.    Dica de artista novo: PAPISA   Discoteca Básica é uma co-produção da Parasol Storytelling e Tudo Certo Conteúdo Editorial. Apresentação: Ricardo Alexandre Roteiro e Pesquisa: Ricardo Alexandre e Sérgio Jomori Redação final: Ricardo Alexandre Direção: Ricardo Alexandre Edição: Jessica Correa Produção Executiva: Mariana Mafra Produção Executiva: Ricardo Alexandre   Saiba mais em: http://podcastdiscotecabasica.com  Support the show: https://clubediscotecabasica.com/assine See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. Support the show: https://clubediscotecabasica.com/assineSupport the show: https://clubediscotecabasica.com/assine

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
9/19/22 Roger Waters on Palestine, Assange and Ukraine

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 43:06


 Download Episode. Scott interviews Roger Waters, co-founder of the band Pink Floyd. They begin with a look back at how Waters first woke up to the plight of the Palestinians. That leads to a discussion about the persecution of Julian Assange, which Waters has been actively speaking out against. Next, they look to the war in Ukraine and discuss Waters' public back and forth with the first lady of Ukraine Olena Zelenska. Lastly, Scott brings Waters up to speed on the effort to end the war in Yemen.  Discussed on the show: The Heart of Jenin Documentary The Trial of Julian Assange by Nils Melzer  Roger Waters' Open Letter to Olena Zelenska “Kiev Must Lead the Charge for Peace” (Antiwar.com) 1833stopwar.com Roger Waters co-founded the band Pink Floyd. Waters initially served as the bassist, but following the departure of singer-songwriter Syd Barrett in 1968, he also became their lyricist, co-lead vocalist and conceptual leader until his departure in 1983. Waters has been very active in antiwar and other activism for many years. He has been outspoken against Western involvement in the war in Ukraine, a defender of Palestinian rights, and one of the leading advocates of freedom for Julian Assange. Last month, he conducted a live webinar that was co-sponsored by Antiwar.com. It is archived here. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; and Thc Hemp Spot. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
9/19/22 Roger Waters on Palestine, Assange and Ukraine

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 44:21


Scott interviews Roger Waters, co-founder of the band Pink Floyd. They begin with a look back at how Waters first woke up to the plight of the Palestinians. That leads to a discussion about the persecution of Julian Assange, which Waters has been actively speaking out against. Next they look to the war in Ukraine and discuss Waters' public back and forth with the first lady of Ukraine Olena Zelenska. Lastly, Scott brings Waters up to speed on the effort to end the war in Yemen.  Discussed on the show: The Heart of Jenin Documentary The Trial of Julian Assange by Nils Melzer  Roger Waters' Open Letter to Olena Zelenska “Kiev Must Lead the Charge for Peace” (Antiwar.com) 1833stopwar.com Roger Waters co-founded the band Pink Floyd. Waters initially served as the bassist, but following the departure of singer-songwriter Syd Barrett in 1968, he also became their lyricist, co-lead vocalist and conceptual leader until his departure in 1983. Waters has been very active in antiwar and other activism for many years. He has been outspoken against Western involvement in the war in Ukraine, a defender of Palestinian rights, and one of the leading advocates of freedom for Julian Assange. Last month, he conducted a live webinar that was co-sponsored by Antiwar.com. It is archived here. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; and Thc Hemp Spot. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fret Talk
Fret Talk Episode 266 - "Our Source who's full of Secrets (Lee Harris - Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets)"

Fret Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 73:08


Lee Harris is our source, who happens to be full of secrets. He is also part of the amazing Nick Mason's Saucerful of Secrets band, paying tribute to the Syd Barrett era of Pink Floyd. Join us for this on this very special episode of Fret Talk Podcast where Lee takes us through his fascinating journey in and around the music biz and we take a peek onto his Schmidt Array touring board and hear exactly what kind of pedal you need to aim for the psychedelic skies. Massive thanks for Lee for taking the time right before the America leg of his tour and if you are interested in finding out more visit Nick Mason's Saucerful Of Secrets (thesaucerfulofsecrets.com) for more info. For as little as two dollars a month, you can support the show and get some bonus stuff back in return. Visit www.patreon.com/frettalk to find out more Don't forget to have your online on the Fret Talk Podcast group on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/690366661155328/?ref=bookmarkssay and join in with the live streams at the PBOD Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/64533347864/ Find your host at: BudgetPedalChap www.Facebook.com/budgetpedalchap www.Instagram.com/budgetpedalchap https://www.youtube.com/budgetpedalchap or search ‘budget pedal chap' on YouTube Matt www.Facebook.com/SwitchIOM www.twitch.tv/heel_mattq www.twitter.com/heel_mattq www.instagram.com/heel_mattq Lee https://www.facebook.com/groups/64533347864/ www.pbodoom.com www.youtube.com/pedalboardsofdoom Will http://www.arocketcomplex.com/ www.youtube.com/user/ARocketComplex www.instagram.com/arcwillpowell/ Ollie www.Facebook.com/OllieMilesMusic Josh www.instagram.com/thecoronamortis --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fret-talk/message

Singles Going Around
Singles Going Around- "Luscious Soul Deviation"

Singles Going Around

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 71:17


Singles Going Around- "Luscious Soul Deviation"Pink Floyd- "Astronomy Domine"Charlie Feathers- "I Can't Hardly Stand It"The Monkees "Circle Sky"The Beatles- "Im Only Sleeping"Pretty Things- " Scene One: The Good Mr Square; She Was Tall, She Was High"The Byrds- "Lover of the Bayou"The Beach Boys- " The Trader"Syd Barrett- "No Good Trying"Ricky Nelson- "Lonesome Town"Creedence Clearwater Revival- "Cross-Tie Walker"Public Nuisance- "Magical Music Box"Flying Burrito Brothers- "Sin City"Rolling Stones- "She's A Rainbow"Jimi Hendrix- "Red House"The Beatles- "Lovely Rita"International Submarine Band- "Truck Drivin Man"Captain Beefheart- "Pachuco Cadaver"Syd Barrett- "Octopus"Creedence Clearwater Revival- "It Came Out Of The Sky"The Rolling Stones- "Let It Bleed"*All selections taken from vinyl.

The Rock Podcast with Denny Somach
Nick Mason, Pink Floyd and Beyond

The Rock Podcast with Denny Somach

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 32:22 Very Popular


From the Classic Rock Archives, an exclusive interview with Nick Mason, founding member of Pink Floyd, from 1985. Nick talks about the history of band, including the tragic Syd Barrett, how David Gilmour joined, why they didn't play Live Aid, meeting the Beatles at Abbey Road Studios while recording their first album, and more. 

That Record Got Me High Podcast
S5E246 - The Legendary Pink Dots - 'The Maria Dimension' with Allan and Barb Vest (doubleVee)

That Record Got Me High Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 59:56 Very Popular


Formed in London in 1980, The Legendary Pink Dots - led by core members Edward Ka-Spel and Phil Knight - are an uncategorizable experimental avant-rock band with over 40 albums to their credit. This week's guests, Oklahoma City husband-and-wife duo Allan and Barb Vest (doubleVee), join us to discuss their 1991 album 'The Maria Dimension', a uniquely compelling collection of neo-psychedelic tunes that sound like they were intercepted from an interplanetary radio broadcast hosted by Syd Barrett and Hawkwind. Songs featured in this episode: Home - The Legendary Pink Dots; When Dawn Comes Tonight - doubleVee; As Long As It's Purple and Green - The Legendary Pink Dots; Dark Globe - Syd Barrett; Disturbance - The Legendary Pink Dots; Chromosome Damage - Chrome; Pennies For Heaven - The Legendary Pink Dots; In The Square - The Pretty Things; The Third Secret, The Grain Kings - The Legendary Pink Dots; The End - The Doors; Flaming - Pink Floyd; The Ocean Cried 'Blue Murder', Belladonna - The Legendary Pink Dots; My Impression Now - Guided By Voices; People Who Died - The Jim Carroll Band; A Space Between, Evolution, Cheraderama, Expresso Noir - The Legendary Pink Dots; The Question's Closed - doubleVee

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with The Black Angels

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 72:08


We had the pleasure of interviewing The Black Angels over Zoom video.Austin's psych-rock legends will release their brand new album Wilderness of Mirrors on September 16 with Partisan Records. Today, the band has revealed experimental single “Firefly”, a ‘60s French pop homage which features the sultry intonations in both French and English from Thievery Corporation's LouLou Ghelichkani. The new song follows acclaimed lead single/video “El Jardín'' which features Austin Amelio from The Walking Dead and stars his son Lev.The most impactful music reflects a wide-screen view of the world back at us, helping distill the universal into something far more relatable. The Black Angels have become standard-bearers for modern psych-rock that does exactly that, which is one of many reasons why the group's new album feels so aptly named. It has been 5 years since fans have been treated to an album from the band and Wilderness of Mirrors marks a triumphant return with their foot on the pedal. The new collection expertly refines the Black Angels' psychedelic rock attack alongside a host of intriguing sounds and textures while political tumult, the pandemic, and the ongoing devastation of the environment have provided ample fodder for their signature sound and fierce lyrical commentary. Since forming in 2004 in Austin, TX, the Black Angels remain masterfully true to psych-rock forebears such as Syd Barrett, Roky Erickson, Arthur Lee and the members of the Velvet Underground, all of whom are namechecked on “The River.” The band's global influence is solidified by their beloved, long-running Levitation Festival, the veritable ground zero for the genre's past, present and future -- celebrating its 15th anniversary this year. We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com. www.BringinitBackwards.com #podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #TheBlackAngels #WildernessofMirrors #NewMusic #zoom Listen & Subscribe to BiB https://www.bringinitbackwards.com/follow/ Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! https://www.facebook.com/groups/bringinbackpod

Dem Vinyl Boyz
Dem Vinyl Boyz Ep 07 - Dark Side of the Moon

Dem Vinyl Boyz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 53:58


This week Dem Vinyl Boyz are back with another classic “‘The Dark Side of the Moon'" . Revered as one of the greatest rock albums of all time, “Dark Side” — which tackles weighty themes of greed, conflict, religion, mortality and mental illness — was first released in the U.S. March 17, 1973. Despite only reaching the No. 1 spot for one solitary week, the album continues to hold the record for the most weeks charted on the Billboard 200 (over 800 weeks!) and was a constant feature on the Billboard 200 from its initial release until 1988 – returning to the chart in late 2009 after Billboard revised its chart eligibility rules regarding older releases. It is estimated to have sold over 45 million copies worldwide, while its artistic legacy is arguably even greater. The Dark Side of the Moon is the eighth studio album by the English rock band Pink Floyd, released on 1 March 1973 by Harvest Records. Primarily developed during live performances, the band premiered an early version of the suite several months before recording began. The record was conceived as an album that focused on the pressures faced by the band during their arduous lifestyle, and dealing with the apparent mental health problems suffered by former band member Syd Barrett, who departed the group in 1968. New material was recorded in two sessions in 1972 and 1973 at EMI Studios (now Abbey Road Studios) in London. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hemma hos Strage
Janne Schaffer om sju decennier av riff

Hemma hos Strage

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 80:59


Han vill inte kallas gitarrhjälte ("det finns inget hjältemodigt i mitt liv över huvud taget") men hans karriär måste beskrivas som ett äventyr som spänner över sju decennier. Hemma hos Strage pratar Janne Schaffer om hur han byggde sin första gitarr i slöjden, om hur han spelade med Bob Marley när den blivande reggaekungen sov på en madrass i ett pannrum i Bromma, om hur han lånade ut en förstärkare till Syd Barrett, om hur han blev besviken och gick från Bruce Springsteens spelning på Konserthuset 1975, om hur han samplades av KRS-One och lät sina strängar ljuda bakom stjärnor som ABBA, Ted Gärdestad, Lee Hazlewoood, Toto och Astrid Lindgren. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

DISGRACELAND
Pink Floyd: Acid Overload, a Psychotic Breakdown, and a Crazy Diamond

DISGRACELAND

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 38:25 Very Popular


Pink Floyd's original frontman, Syd Barrett, did so much LSD that he experienced a mental breakdown just as the band began to achieve mainstream success. His drug use began as mind-altering inspiration for his art, but quickly became a coping mechanism for the demands of commercial success. He became paralyzed in front of television cameras. He detuned his guitar until it was literally unplayable and refused to perform alongside his band. Then he stopped showing up at all.To hear all episodes of Disgraceland for free, visit amazon.com/disgraceland. Show notes are available at disgracelandpod.com. Follow us @disgracelandpod on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for music news, bonus episodes, and more. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Alexander's Ragtime Band
Episode 016: Pink Floyd in Transition, 1969-1972

Alexander's Ragtime Band

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 82:57


Pink Floyd started as a psychedelic rock group, and were one of the most important bands of London's underground scene. But after Syd Barrett left the group, the band struggled to find their identity before eventually solidifying themselves as one of the greatest rock bands of all-time. The albums they recorded during this period might not all be great, but they're still a part of the Pink Floyd journey, and definitely helped the band form their legendary prog rock sound.   Elliot Long, Jeremy Parish, and James Eldred discuss these albums to find the good, the bad, and the Ummagumma.

I wanna jump like Dee Dee
S8 E3: Steve Hillage

I wanna jump like Dee Dee

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 39:57


Steve Hillage is one of music's greats - a great musician, a great innovator, a great free thinker and great experimenter whose achievements and career is just one whole wall of inspiration for doing the things that excite you and on your own terms.It's a terrific conversation, talking about how family circumstances dictated that he spend a lot of his early childhood in his own company, the inspiration that he got from Jimi Hendrix and Syd Barrett, how Kraftwerk changed his focus towards dance music and the eventual emergence of System 7, bridging age gaps and how he's been able to operate without unwanted interference.I Wanna Jump Like Dee Dee is a music podcast that does music interviews differently. I'm Giles Sibbald and I'm talking to extraordinary musicians, DJ's and producers about how they use an experimental mindset in their lives to amplify their own creativity, pursue new challenges, overcome fears and bounce back from mistakes.- brought to you by Hey Sunday, the mothership of the experimental mindset™.- podcast logo and art by Tide Adesanya, Coppie and Paste.

Blood on the Tracks
Introducing 27 Club Season 5: Ron "Pigpen" McKernan

Blood on the Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 2:46


Hey, Blood on the Tracks fans! Listen to Season 5 of the 27 Club to hear the insane details behind the life of one of rock's greatest icons — ​​Ron "Pigpen" McKernan. A founding member of the Grateful Dead. Pigpen wasn't just a member of the Dead. He was the Dead. But just like Brian Jones in the Rolling Stones or Syd Barrett in Pink Floyd, Pigpen felt his role in the Grateful Dead shrink as the rest of the band members expanded their minds and their sound. The story of Pigpen is about a major musical and cultural shift that took place as the 1960s gave way to the 1970s. It's a story of acid tests and bottles of Thunderbird, of angels from hell and a nine-fingered wizard, of busts down on Bourbon Street and shakedowns in the Haight…and of the man who tried to pull his band back down to earth as they continued to get pulled higher into the cosmos. It's a story that ends tragically...at the age of 27. Listen and subscribe to 27 Club on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coast to Coast Hoops
Introducing 27 Club Season 5: Ron "Pigpen" McKernan

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 2:46


Hey, Citizen Critic fans! Listen to Season 5 of the 27 Club to hear the insane details behind the life of one of rock's greatest icons — ​​Ron "Pigpen" McKernan. A founding member of the Grateful Dead. Pigpen wasn't just a member of the Dead. He was the Dead. But just like Brian Jones in the Rolling Stones or Syd Barrett in Pink Floyd, Pigpen felt his role in the Grateful Dead shrink as the rest of the band members expanded their minds and their sound. The story of Pigpen is about a major musical and cultural shift that took place as the 1960s gave way to the 1970s. It's a story of acid tests and bottles of Thunderbird, of angels from hell and a nine-fingered wizard, of busts down on Bourbon Street and shakedowns in the Haight…and of the man who tried to pull his band back down to earth as they continued to get pulled higher into the cosmos. It's a story that ends tragically...at the age of 27. Listen and subscribe to 27 Club on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Citizen Critic
Introducing 27 Club Season 5: Ron "Pigpen" McKernan

Citizen Critic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 2:46


Hey, Citizen Critic fans! Listen to Season 5 of the 27 Club to hear the insane details behind the life of one of rock's greatest icons — ​​Ron "Pigpen" McKernan. A founding member of the Grateful Dead. Pigpen wasn't just a member of the Dead. He was the Dead. But just like Brian Jones in the Rolling Stones or Syd Barrett in Pink Floyd, Pigpen felt his role in the Grateful Dead shrink as the rest of the band members expanded their minds and their sound. The story of Pigpen is about a major musical and cultural shift that took place as the 1960s gave way to the 1970s. It's a story of acid tests and bottles of Thunderbird, of angels from hell and a nine-fingered wizard, of busts down on Bourbon Street and shakedowns in the Haight…and of the man who tried to pull his band back down to earth as they continued to get pulled higher into the cosmos. It's a story that ends tragically...at the age of 27. Listen and subscribe to 27 Club on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

About A Girl
Introducing 27 Club Season 5: Ron "Pigpen" McKernan

About A Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 2:46


Hey, About A Girl fans! Listen to Season 5 of the 27 Club to hear the insane details behind the life of one of rock's greatest icons — ​​Ron "Pigpen" McKernan. A founding member of the Grateful Dead. Pigpen wasn't just a member of the Dead. He was the Dead. But just like Brian Jones in the Rolling Stones or Syd Barrett in Pink Floyd, Pigpen felt his role in the Grateful Dead shrink as the rest of the band members expanded their minds and their sound. The story of Pigpen is about a major musical and cultural shift that took place as the 1960s gave way to the 1970s. It's a story of acid tests and bottles of Thunderbird, of angels from hell and a nine-fingered wizard, of busts down on Bourbon Street and shakedowns in the Haight…and of the man who tried to pull his band back down to earth as they continued to get pulled higher into the cosmos. It's a story that ends tragically...at the age of 27. Listen and subscribe to 27 Club on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.