Podcasts about warhol

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

American artist

  • 507PODCASTS
  • 661EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 12, 2022LATEST
warhol

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about warhol

Latest podcast episodes about warhol

El Vuelo de Yorch
Blondie T05 #15 El Vuelo de Yorch - Acceso anticipado

El Vuelo de Yorch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 60:00


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Acceso anticipado para Fans - Blondie fue un fenómeno, la fusión del espíritu del New York punk y el de Warhol, la estrella teñida de platino que encarnó como ninguna otra todas las vertientes del sex and drugs and rock and roll. Blondie era una apisonadora mediática: estaban en todas partes, tuvieron ese toque que convertía cada canción en un himno y cada directo en una fiesta irrepetible, merced al carisma de su cantante: la Marilyn Monroe virada al punk que la década de los New York Dolls necesitaba. Casi 50 años después de su creación, ¿qué nos queda por descubrir de su cantante? Como ella misma asegura: “Siempre es mejor dejar al público con ganas de más”.Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de El Vuelo de Yorch. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/460808

Museum Confidential
Live From Aspen: Why Warhol Persists

Museum Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 29:31


We haven't done a live audience show in ages. So when the invitation came to travel to Aspen, Colorado for the opening of a new Andy Warhol show at the Aspen Art Museum, we jumped at the opportunity. ANDY WARHOL: LIFETIMES is a career-spanning show originated at the Tate Modern. The AAM invited Los Angeles-based artist Monica Majoli to re-conceptualize the presentation. It's invigorating. This chat features Majoli, Assistant Curator Simone Krug, and the Museum's Director, Nicola Lees.  

Gravity
98. Finding the Purpose of Purpose & What to Do With Expectations with Elizabeth Martinez

Gravity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 59:08


This week, Gravity is guest hosted by Yohannan Terrell, CEO at Warhol & WALL ST. and Director of the Columbus Fashion Initiative, where he's working to modernize and democratize Columbus' massive fashion industry. He's also an incredible thinker and inquisitive conversationalist.  But wait, there's more! This special episode brings two amazing guests for the price of one because, joining Yohannan for this discussion of life and legacy is the President and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Ohio, Elizabeth Martinez. Elizabeth was born premature and given only 24 hours to live. She believes that early ability to defy the odds has set the tone for her purpose and identity throughout her life.  Born in Puerto Rico, her family moved with her to The East Coast. She's since developed an inspiring career, recently launching the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America's Hispanic Mentoring Initiative, which has evolved into the model now used by agencies throughout the country.  This episode gets into what makes a person, be it an urge to live up to expectations or a desire to shatter them. They discuss the ways our life experiences culminate when we find the right outlet for ourselves professionally and emotionally. Most importantly – this is still Gravity after all – they discuss the meaning of purpose and what it looks like to move humanity forward with intentionality.  What Yohannan asks: [04:00] Tell us a little about you and your beginnings. [09:27] How did growing up in Puerto Rico affect you?   [13:40] How did your experiences bring you to your current role in life? [17:50] What are some impact moments you've had in life? [28:40] How does the online world create a challenge for the next generation? [44:50] How much of a role does purpose play in your life? To learn more about intentional living, and for the complete show notes, visit: https://gravityproject.com/ (gravityproject.com) Resources: https://www.linkedin.com/in/yohannanterrell/ (Yohannan on LinkedIn) https://www.bbbscentralohio.org (Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Ohio) Gravity is a production of http://crate.media (Crate Media).

All the Hacks
Stacking Benjamins and Modern Money Management with Joe Saul-Sehy

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 67:42


Former financial advisor turned podcast host Joe Saul-Sehy joins Chris to discuss modern money management. They talk about why you should abandon trendy investment opportunities and what you should replace them with, why your wealth can grow faster if you don't diversify your investments, and how emergency funds can save you money. They also share plenty of tax and investing hacks. Joe Saul-Sehy (@averagejoemoney) is the creator and host of the award-winning podcast Stacking Benjamins and a co-host of the Money with Friends podcast. He is the co-author of the newly published book Stacked: Your Super-Serious Guide to Modern Money Management.  Joe's career in media started when he was The Money Man on Detroit's local TV station WXYZ. Previously, he was a financial planner and Certified Financial Planner™ for over 15 years.  Full show notes at: https://allthehacks.com/stacking-benjamins-joe-saul-sehy Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Joe Saul-Sehy: Website | Twitter | LinkedInJoe's Podcasts: Stacking Benjamins | Money with FriendsJoe's Book: Stacked: Your Super-Serious Guide to Modern Money ManagementOther Books Mentioned:The 7 Habits of Highly Effective PeopleMom and Dad, We Need to Talk: How to Have Essential Conversations with Your Parents About Their FinancesInvestopedia: Modern Portfolio Theory | Efficient FrontierMaximizing Deductible Interest Expense Articles: SVB | Andersen Full Show NotesWho is Joe Saul-Sehy? [00:12]Why he decided to write a book (and how it all started with The Hardy Boys' Detective Handbook). [02:14]Why you should narrow investment opportunities to make sound financial decisions. [09:21]Where you can find investment opportunities aligned with your goals (stock market alternatives). [14:26]2 Red flags to look out for when evaluating investment opportunities.[19:24]The upsides to making boring investments like farmland. [21:24]Why you get wealthier faster if you DON'T diversify. [24:37]Should you hire a financial advisor (the stories of Walt Disney and Mary Barra). [29:54]Questions to ask before hiring an advisor. [34:21]What most people don't optimize enough. [35:42]How an emergency fund can SAVE you money. [36:37]Do you need disability insurance? [42:55]Joe's experience filing a homeowner's claim after a robbery. [46:07]What you need to know about taxes as a new investor (and how you can qualify for preferential tax treatment). [50:20]How to financially support your aging parents. [55:02]Should you use leverage? [59:23]How to connect with Joe Saul-Sehy. [1:07:59] SponsorsThis episode is brought to you by Masterworks. Masterworks is an alternative investing platform that gives you access to one of the most exclusive and overlooked investments in history: blue-chip art. Masterworks lets regular people invest in paintings by legends like Banksy Basquiat and Warhol without spending millions. In fact, I used masterworks to invest in a 15 million dollar Picasso the other day. Here's how it works: Masterworks will buy a painting they think will appreciate well over time, then they securitize that painting with the SEC, so you can invest in it instead of buying the whole thing. Once they sell the painting, later on, you get your share of the proceeds. It's that simple. In 2020 and 2021, masterworks sold two paintings that appreciated by over 30%. They have over 280,000 users and demand is as high as ever. But I partnered with them to give you all priority access by going to https://allthehacks.com/masterworks (see important disclosures at masterworks.io/disclaimer). This episode is also brought to you by BlockFi. BlockFi is the company I use to store all my crypto and I think they provide huge value because. Whether you buy your crypto with them or transfer in what you already have, you can start earning interest on all of it, which is a great way to earn some passive income with almost no effort. And that also includes stable coins based in us dollars where you can earn 9% without having your savings fluctuate with the crypto markets. This is where I store the cash I used to keep at a high yield savings account. Since opening my account, I've already earned thousands of dollars of interest.BlockFi also has a rewards credit card that instead of earning points or miles gives you Bitcoin back on every purchase you make offering 3.5% back in the first three months and 1.5% percent back after that. If you want to check out BlockFi, you can get an exclusive bonus of up to $250 free when you sign at https://allthehacks.com/blockfi. Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

Gay Travel Today with Sagitravel
601 - ENCORE-Warhol Whole New Perspective at Tate

Gay Travel Today with Sagitravel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


601 - ENCORE-Warhol Whole New Perspective at Tate

Top 2000 a gogo
#10 - Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick & Bob Dylan (S03)

Top 2000 a gogo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 33:36


In deze aflevering gaat het over de invloed van kunstenaar Andy Warhol op de popmuziek. En over de driehoeksverhouding tussen Warhol, zijn muze Edie Sedgwick en Bob Dylan. 

Broken Silicon
132. Intel Alchemist Launch, Nvidia's Shady 2021, AMD Mindshare, Windows 11 Flops

Broken Silicon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 158:19


Tom & Dan look back on 2021 to discuss the biggest stories, & their lasting impressions going into 2022. They also discuss ARC & Win11. [SPON: Get 10% off Tasty Vite Ramen with Code “brokensilicon” at: https://bit.ly/3oyv4tR] [SPON: brokensilicon = -30% off Windows, dieshrink = -3% off Everything: https://biitt.ly/shbSk] 0:00 Interview Advice, Underrated Games from 2021 we recommend (Intro Banter) 9:20 The Game Awards Thoughts 11:50 Ray Casting Sound (Corrections & Omissions) 13:56 Q1 - Did Tiger Lake arrive too late? Was Cezanne a bigger deal than Renoir? 19:44 Did Ampere improve laptop performance? Was the 3060 12GB improperly reviewed? 27:18 The Legacy of Nvidia CMP Mining Cards & LHR 33:18 Q2 - Intel Enthusiasm hits Rock Bottom with Rocket Lake 45:20 Debunking "Zen 3+ Warhol" and the 4700S using XBOX - We learned a lot... 53:30 AMD FSR - Is it actually living up to expectations by the end of the year? 1:03:40 June 2021 – Raptor Lake, Zen 4, Bergamo – Which mega leak was a bigger deal? 1:09:25 Q3 - Threadripper Leaked then Cancelled, Nintendo Switch 2 1:21:43 PlayStation 5 Pro, RDNA 3, RDNA 4Leaks - Putting Future Pricing in Perspective 1:33:57 Intel ARC December Leak - Should we be worried about it's launch? 1:49:09 Nvidia Halting Ampere Production and losing their ARM Acquisition 2:01:59 Windows 11 is a Complete Flop - We need to talk about it. 2:08:51 Alder Lake Market Share, i3-12300 Performance, RTX 3080 12GB (Wrap Up) 2:18:31 AMD Monet, Lowest Common Denominator, Designing for Ray Tracing (Final RM) https://www.platinumgames.com/official-blog/article/10021 https://twitter.com/kopite7kimi/status/1343462867811495937 https://www.techspot.com/review/2200-amd-ryzen-5900hx/ https://hexus.net/tech/news/cpu/147255-amd-unveils-ryzen-mobile-5000-series-cezanne-processors/ https://www.techpowerup.com/gpu-specs/geforce-rtx-3080-mobile.c3684 https://www.techspot.com/review/2254-geforce-rtx-3080-laptop/ https://youtu.be/wvKCQTWEep0 https://youtu.be/msmmdMrKPuY https://youtu.be/sg__YdXbRtI https://www.techspot.com/review/2211-geforce-rtx-3060/ https://www.techspot.com/review/2222-intel-core-i9-11900k/ https://youtu.be/9-Txn8A9LUA https://twitter.com/mooreslawisdead/status/1372992263165513728 https://youtu.be/3qA-72lFC6U https://youtu.be/BKYSFeL2fBw https://twitter.com/ExecuFix/status/1397173117487828992 https://youtu.be/YCRoo0tqJL4 https://youtu.be/HDnwT5h472c https://youtu.be/cUJtIK94Djc https://www.eenewsautomotive.com/news/nvidia-announces-new-superprocessor-autonomous-cars https://youtu.be/9sUM29iMO5w https://youtu.be/T1KdV-lwMMY https://twitter.com/mooreslawisdead/status/1400367814440013826 https://www.techpowerup.com/289568/windows-11-a-flop-survey-claims-less-than-1-upgraded-microsoft-improves-start-menu https://www.statista.com/chart/3864/windows-10-adoption/ https://videocardz.com/newz/gigabyte-confirms-geforce-rtx-3080-12gb-rtx-3070ti-16gb-and-radeon-rx-6500-xt-through-eec-filing https://videocardz.com/newz/nvidia-geforce-rtx-3090-ti-to-launch-on-january-27th-rtx-3070-ti-on-january-11th https://videocardz.com/newz/nvidia-geforce-rtx-3050-to-be-announced-on-january-4th-launches-january-27th https://videocardz.com/newz/nvidia-geforce-mx550-might-be-the-first-ampere-card-with-2gb-gddr6-memory-15-faster-than-mx450 https://wccftech.com/intel-entry-level-core-i3-12300-core-i3-12100-alder-lake-desktop-cpu-benchmarks-leak-out-strong-single-core-performance-run-cool-under-65w-power-usage/ https://www.cpu-monkey.com/en/cpu-amd_ryzen_5_5600x-1750 https://wccftech.com/intel-cpus-report-highest-share-for-the-entirety-of-2021-thanks-to-alder-lake-but-amd-ryzen-cpus-retain-their-dominating-lead/ https://wccftech.com/samsung-begins-sampling-24-gbps-gddr6-memory-chips-for-next-gen-gpus/ https://wccftech.com/evga-gpu-firmware-boosts-geforce-rtx-3080-ti-crypto-mining-performance-by-up-to-21/ https://wccftech.com/https-wccftech-com-the-riftbreaker-interview-talking-about-ray-tracing-next-gen-and-more/

Todo Que Ver
EP 23: Todo Que Ver Con Lo Imprevisto

Todo Que Ver

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 74:58


Ale García, Miguel Alejandro, Adrian Murra y Fernando Veloz platican sobre lo imprevisto en la cultura pop (Y la vida diaria).Hablamos de:Breaking Bad, La Historia sin fin, how I met your mother, Zelda, Armageddon, This is us, Buscando Un Amigo para el fin del Mundo, Mork, Majoras Mask, Tim McGraw, Live Like You Are Dying, Taylor Swift, andy Warhol, Toy Story, El Cuento de la Criada, Ana Frank, Patch Adams, Pay It Forward, Las Lluvias de Castamere, Nine, My Sister's Keeper.Recomendaciones:Ale: Live Like You Were Dying (Tim Mcgraw) canciónMiguel: El Misterio de Soho (Pelicula)Adrian: Sex Life Of College Girls (Serie Hbo Max)Fer: The Great (Serie Starz Play) 

The Opperman Report
The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote Scum (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 60:05


The authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history. Valerie Solanas is one of the most polarizing figures of 1960s counterculture. A cult hero to some and vehemently denounced by others, she has been dismissed but never forgotten. Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the infamous SCUM Manifesto, Solanas became one of the most famous women of her era. But she was also diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and spent much of her life homeless or in mental hospitals. Solanas's SCUM Manifesto, a sui generis vision of radical gender dystopia, predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed. It has sold more copies and been translated into more languages than nearly all other feminist texts of its time. And yet, shockingly little work has investigated the life of its author. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about Solanas's life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing, and her elusive personal and professional relationships. Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

The Opperman Report'
The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote Scum (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 60:05


The authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history. Valerie Solanas is one of the most polarizing figures of 1960s counterculture. A cult hero to some and vehemently denounced by others, she has been dismissed but never forgotten. Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the infamous SCUM Manifesto, Solanas became one of the most famous women of her era. But she was also diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and spent much of her life homeless or in mental hospitals. Solanas's SCUM Manifesto, a sui generis vision of radical gender dystopia, predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed. It has sold more copies and been translated into more languages than nearly all other feminist texts of its time. And yet, shockingly little work has investigated the life of its author. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about Solanas's life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing, and her elusive personal and professional relationships. Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

Quest Of The Art Life
Warhol and Basquiat

Quest Of The Art Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 15:08


Subscribe / Follow the show! Patreon.com/bsmitty instagram.com/photographiliacpod bsmitty.com instagram.com/ogbsmitty

Salotto Monogatari
Special Monogatari 72 - Confronti: Arancia Meccanica e Vinyl

Salotto Monogatari

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 46:34


In occasione dell'uscita in sala del restauro in 4k di "Arancia Meccanica" di Kubrick, ne approfittiamo per confrontarlo con "Vinyl" di Warhol, anch'esso adattamento del romanzo di Anthony Burgess Partecipanti: Marco Grifò Dario Denta Anchor: https://anchor.fm/salotto-monogatari Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2QtzE9ur6O1qE3XbuqOix0?si=mAN-0CahRl27M5QyxLg4cw Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/it/podcast/salotto-monogatari/id1503331981 Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xNmM1ZjZiNC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== Logo creato da: Massimo Valenti Sigla e post-produzione a cura di: Alessandro Valenti / Simone Malaspina Per il jingle della sigla si ringraziano: Alessandro Corti e Gianluca Nardo

Millionaire Mindsets
From 10K Months to 10K Days w/ @Justannalisa

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 56:45


On this episode we're joined by special guest Annalisa. During this episode, we discussed how she hit 6 figures in her VA company in less than 6 months, going from $10k months to $10k days, how to know when it's time to hire a VA, when to leave the 9-5, scaling your company and more! For more information follow her on Instagram @justannalisa & on Twitter @justannalisa the show on Instagram @millionaire.mindsetspod and your hosts @xaviercmiller and @deannakent. This week's Sponsors: Are you ready to start investing in Real Estate but are in need of some guidance? Then we have the perfect solution! Purchase our Real Estate Investing Course to learn everything you need to know to make an informed purchase and earn passive income! It's on sale for $50 Don't miss out! https://millionaire-mindsets-academy.teachable.com/p/the-real-estate-beginner-s-guide If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $50! Sale ends soon! https://millionaire-mindsets-academy.teachable.com/p/xavier-miller-s-official-crypto-guide Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: Want to make money working remotely? Interested in starting a low-cost business that can be done from your phone? Want to create your own hours and become your own boss? Then sign up for this Virtual Assistant Bootcamp brought to you by Elevated Assist. You can make 4-figures/month working part-time or full-time as a virtual assistant. Use Special Code “Mindset” for a discount. https://gumroad.com/a/154621043/qRFBk Do you want to make money as a social media manager as well? Start a new stream of income that promotes a healthy work-life balance, and can be done ANYWHERE. Seriously, right from your phone. Click the link to get started! https://gumroad.com/a/372724851/qthjU Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT (Rental Course Only) https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147501184/cU62TRHT (Ultimate Rental Car Blueprint Bundle Deal) If you're interested in starting your own Walmart Automation Store to make $5-15K in passive income per month contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com

Podcast Pompidou
Pompidou – donderdag 9 december 2021

Podcast Pompidou

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 49:23


Het SMAK in Gent heeft heel wat Pop Art in huis. Naast werken uit de eigen collectie zijn er ook topstukken van Warhol, Lichtenstein en Wesselman te zien uit de privé-verzameling Matthys-Colle. En daar is directeur Philippe Van Cauteren erg gelukkig mee. De Amerikaanse conceptuele kunstenaar Sol LeWitt had een bijzondere band met België, ontdekte Jeroen Laureyns in het Joods Museum. Christophe Vekeman leest een klassieker van de Albanese schrijver Ismail Kadare: De generaal van het dode leger.

All Of It
Andy Warhol, Catholicism, Identity, and his Art

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 18:09


Growing up in Pittsburgh, Andy Warhol was raised as a devout Catholic. Even after he moved to New York City and lived as openly gay man, he never abandoned his faith and would regularly attend Mass. Andy Warhol: Revelation, a new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, explores the complicated relationship between Warhol's faith and his art. Lead curator Carmen Hermo, as well as José Carlos Diaz, chief curator of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, speak with us about the intersections between Warhol's identity, art, and faith. Andy Warhol: Revelation runs through June 19, 2022

Millionaire Mindsets
Retired Before 30 w/ Beez

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 54:08


On this episode we're joined by special guest Beez! Beez is an author, entrepreneur, investor and retired government contractor from VA. During this episode, we discussed how she retired before the age of 30, buying a Rolex with crypto, how to figure out if a coin is valuable, importance of DeFi, yield farming, why you never have to sell your assets and more. For more information follow her on Instagram @Capital.SB & on Twitter @Capital_SB the show on Instagram @millionaire.mindsetspod and your hosts @xaviercmiller and @deannakent. This week's Sponsors: Are you ready to start investing in Real Estate but are in need of some guidance? Then we have the perfect solution! Purchase our Real Estate Investing Course to learn everything you need to know to make an informed purchase and earn passive income! It's on sale for $99! Don't miss out! https://parkhill-capital.teachable.com/p/parkhill-capital-s-guide-to-purchasing-your-first-investment-property If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $97! Sale ends soon… here https://www.guide2crypto.com/ Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: If you're interested in starting your own Walmart Automation Store to make $5-15K in passive income per month contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT (Rental Course Only) https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147501184/cU62TRHT (Ultimate Rental Car Blueprint Bundle Deal) If you're interested in learning how to become a Home Inspector, click the link below to join Cousin Nita's workshop https://www.cousinnita.com/p/how-to-b...

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney
#274 Scott Lynn- CEO of Masterworks on Creating a Billion Dollar Brand Disrupting the Art World

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 49:20


Scott Lynn is the founder of Masterworks. Masterworks is an investing platform that for the first time ever, investors can purchase and trade shares in multi-million dollar works of art by artists like Picasso, Monet, and Warhol. Scott's entrepreneurship journey started when he was just 15 where he built what became the most popular game on the internet during the dot com boom. He didn't stop there and has founded multiple companies and knows what it takes to built a business. This episode dives deep on Scott's decision making process, how he operates as a CEO and what it takes to succeed in a fast growing startup! Scott was originally on Episode #137. Watch on YouTube Transcript  Get exclusive access to Masterworks by clicking HERE Subscribe to my Momentum Monday Newsletter Connect with us! Whatgotyouthere Sponsors Masterworks NuSkool Snacks Collagen Protein Bars https://nuskoolsnacks.com/

DS Vandaag
Bonus: Radar. Er zijn foute, heel foute maar ook gewoon goede westerns

DS Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 35:25


Deze week in Radar: over goede en ‘foute' westerns en het succes van popart.  Een western met alleen maar witte cowboys is een historisch incorrecte fantasie. Daar wijst filmkenner Steven De Foer ons deze week fijntjes op  in Radar. Hij verklaart zijn liefde voor de western maar maakt ook kritische bedenkingen bij het genre én bij The harder they fall, een Netflixfilm van Jeymes Samuel waarin alle cowboys zwart zijn.  En dan: Warhol en co. Weinig kunststromingen zijn zo populair en werden zo gecommercialiseerd als popart. Kunstredacteur Geert Van der Speeten legt uit waarom popart ons blijft prikkelen en maakt je warm voor een expo in het SMAK waar je maar liefst vijf sleutelwerken van Warhol kunt gaan bekijken.   Journalist Steven De Foer, Geert Van der Speeten en Filip Van Ongevalle| Presentatie Lise Bonduelle| Redactie Lise Bonduelle en Cathérine De Kock | Eindredactie Cathérine De Kock| Audioproductie Pieter Santens| Muziek Brecht Plasschaert | Chef  Podcast Bart Dobbelaere | Extra geluidsfragmenten The power of the dog (Jane Campion), The harder they fall (Jeymes Samuel), Stagecoach (John Ford), The searchers (John Ford), Birth of a nation (D.W. Griffith), Gone with the wind (x), Cheyenne autumn (John Ford), The revenant (Alejandro González Iñárritu), True grit (Ethan en Joel Coen), News of the world (Paul Greengrass), Trouble (Gus van Sant).  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Random Badassery
No Comfort in Broken Music

Random Badassery

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 0:41


I think I’ve always wanted to be a more anal person than I actually am. I’ve tried to be the person who puts every task immediately into an app, schedules it, and adds the perfect emoji (the important part.) I allowed myself to obsess over minimalism and Marie Kondo, trying to transform my home into the clean white soulless void of an Apple store. I feel in love with the ideas of Zettlekasten and Roam Research where every fart and hiccup in my brain is meticulously connected to all the others like a perfect meth-smoking spider’s web. I wanna meditate every day, take clod showers, get in my reps, nail my macros, and hustle hustle hustle. I want to use footnotes. But honestly, I just don’t give that much of a fuck about any of it. My real life is a maelstrom of monotony and chaos. I spend my days reading books, scribbly sloppy notes on paper, and hoping I can read them when I sit down to right one of these posts. I count days by how many clean pairs of underwear I have left until I’m forced to do laundry. My living space leans more towards piles than it does toward organization. My analytical mind is easily distracted by emotion, novelty, cartoons, and hormones.Oh well. That’s who I am. I improve what I can, and move along with the rest.As I write this I’m watching the screen saver on my Apple TV as it shows slow-motion drone footage of people on a beach and carnival rides on a pier (likely Santa Monica.) I hate the way it makes me feel. I look at it and I don’t see tomorrow. I don’t think “I can’t wait to go to the beach again.” I look at it and I see the past. I see something lost. I see a world that feels like something we may never make our way back to. I’m sure you feel it too. It’s not every day, but it’s there: the part of our brain that wonders if hugging, and crowded festivals, and movie theaters will ever feel normal again. Or will the trepidation and caution forever follow us?Oh well. That’s life. Improve what we can, and move along with the rest.“there’s a gun in the room”I’m sure you noticed the audio file above. I’m sure some of you thought it was a podcast. I wonder how many of you were unable to scroll onward without clicking it first. I would have.I’ve been playing my guitar a lot recently, and have been sending 1-2 minute little pieces to my friend Johnny (who will probably be the first person to open this and read it. Hi Jon.) I went down a rabbit hole for an hour the other day looking at looping pedals until it hit me: “I have an iPhone.” So I’ve been screwing around with laying guitar pieces in Garageband for iOS.The audio above is one of those pieces. I like playing with dissonance—which can come across as jazz. I think to some degree it does here, which is why I tried to play with the timing in each guitar line (of which there are five,) and make it feel a little broken and discombobulating. In the lead line, I even threw in a bend (which is more blues than jazz.) And the keys for each line are different. I wanted to see how they would weave together, going in and out of harmony.All of this was going through my head but don’t get the idea that I was sitting and planning out every note. I’ve always been more instinctual than technical. I think the reason I’ve never been the kind of guitar player who can sit down and strum an Eagles song or solo like Slash is that music is more of an experiment for me. “What happens is if do this and do this?” This often leads to awful results (the song above might be an example of that to you.) It’s not about writing songs, it’s about exploration. It’s curiosity not product. Charlie Kaufman not Aaron Sorkin.Almost everybody knows by now how much I love the Rolling Stones, but I’ve never been interested in making music that sounds like the Stones (in fact I’ve never even bothered to learn how to play any of their songs.) My own music always veers more towards Sonic Youth, John Cage, Captain Beefheart, Harry Partch, everything post-punk, and The Velvet Underground. Somehow, even I forgot about that.I intend to explore my weirdo nature more. Expect more broken music.the velvet undergroundSpeaking of music, I finally sat down and watched the Apple TV+ documentary on The Velvet Underground. I loved it. It’s exactly what I needed. I’m glad Todd Haynes was the one who directed this. The standard music documentary format would have been very un-Velvet Underground. I can think of no better director than Haynes whose first film was the Karen Carpenter story told via Barbie dolls. His use of split-screen here makes sure that nothing ever feels standard or boring (especially at the beginning where he uses Warhol’s copious footage of the band members staring non-stop into the camera.)La Monte Young & John Cale were creating drones (referring to long musical notes, not the flying quad-copters that watch you when you’re naked in the swimming pool.)We found that the most stable thing we could tune to was the 60 cycle hum of the refrigerator because 60 cycle hum was, to us, the drone of western civilization. — John CaleI’ve long been fascinated by the drone of the microwave often harmonizing my voice to it as I waited for something to cook.I looked up La Monte Young but couldn’t find any recordings of him. I did find Noël Akchoté playing guitar arrangements of some of his compositions.The bass line for “The Ostrich” by The Primitives (basically Lou Reed, John Cale, and some friends) sounded really familiar.Then I placed it. It seems Sebadoh borrowed it for “Flame.”christineI read Christine by Stephen King. I’m a latecomer when it comes to King. Before this year the only thing by him I had ever read was On Writing. Having read The Shining earlier this year and now having read Christine, I think I’ve discovered what makes King such a tremendous writer. He does the work. Stephen King comes up with the most ridiculous concepts (teenage nerd falls in love with a dilapidated car which over time possesses him,) yet rather than descending into camp, he accepts the concepts. He doesn’t criticize the ideas, he embraces them and embodies them. “If this was real, what would it look like.” He fills the books with so much character and detail that even the most absurd concepts become legitimate.the righteous mindI read The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt. Here are some key points:People bind themselves into political teams that share moral narratives. Once they accept a particular narrative, they become blind to alternative moral worlds.We have intuition (the elephant) and reasoning (the rider.) The rider is not in control like a pilot is over a plane; the rider serves mostly to understand the actions of the elephant. Our reason writes the story of our intuitive action. Rather than appealing to someone’s reasoning (as we normally do,) we should find a way to appeal to their intuition. Lead the elephant and the rider comes along.The foundations of morality:care/harmliberty/oppressionfairness/cheatingloyalty/betrayalauthority/subversionsanctity/degradationThe liberal foundation favors care, liberty, and fairness with care being the most favored. The libertarian foundation favors liberty & fairness with liberty being the most favored. The conservative foundation favors all six equally.Nonetheless, if you are trying to change an organization or a society and you do not consider the effects of your changes on moral capital, you’re asking for trouble. This, I believe, is the fundamental blind spot of the left. It explains why liberal reforms so often backfire, and why communist revolutions usually end up in despotism. It is the reason I believe that liberalism—which has done so much to bring about freedom and equal opportunity—is not sufficient as a governing philosophy. It tends to overreach, change too many things too quickly, and reduce the stock of moral capital inadvertently. Conversely, while conservatives do a better job of preserving moral capital, they often fail to notice certain classes of victims, fail to limit the predations of certain powerful interests, and fail to see the need to change or update institutions as times change.media biasAfter reading all of these political books I’ve been thinking a lot about the inherent biases of our media sources. In the process, I discovered this tremendous website called Media Bias / Fact Check. You can look up any media source and it will show you it fits on the left/right spectrum as well as the factual/not factual spectrum.Personally, I like to get differing perspectives (without dipping into extremism and outright falsehoods.) Some of my favorite media sources are: Reuters: least biased / very high factualThe Economist: least biased / high factualThe Christian Science Monitor: least biased / high factual Newsweek: left-center / high factual Business Insider: left-center / high factual Texas Monthly: left-center / high factual The Wall Street Journal: right-center / mostly factualThe Spectator World: right-center / mostly factualReason: right-center (libertarian) / high factualbtwI had intended to write a bunch more but this is so long already. I think I will post a supplemental in a few days. If I continue writing as much as I have been lately, then this may become ongoing (no promises.)debatable ideasDebatable Ideas is a weekly curation of the ideas that stand out to me from the week. That can mean something I see truth in, something worth contemplating, something questionable, something I'm bothered by, something ridiculous, something that I think is false, or something that will make you shake your phone like you caught a snake while waiting in line at Starbucks. It's up to you to decide what you think—and politely discuss in the comments.The ideas are numbered for easy reference. addition, if you run across any fascinating, horrifying, insane, bonkers, and entertaining ideas, please direct me to them in the comments.Judaism was the foundation of my childhood. As a child, I attended Jewish day school and Jewish summer camp and regularly celebrated Shabbat and the Jewish holidays. Some of my most enduring childhood memories are at the Shabbat dinner table, where my parents and their friends would discuss world affairs and important societal issues. There were always multiple viewpoints expressed. My mother is a rabbi, and my parents always taught us that such disagreements were the essence of living Jewishly—to argue, as the rabbis taught, for the sake of heaven. Jew vs. JewInformation vacuums are common in breaking-news events in the social-media era. In the early moments after a mass shooting or a natural disaster, or in the unknown moments after the polls close but before votes are tabulated in an election, there is a higher demand for definitive information than there is supply. These moments offer propagandists, trolls, pundits, politicians, journalists, and anyone else with an internet connection the opportunity to fill that vacuum with … something. It’s a treacherous situation, where rumor, speculation, and disinformation have the power to outpace verified information. Traditional breaking-news events tend to have a short half-life but, as we’ve found with COVID coverage, information gaps can last weeks or months. Sometimes, the definitive information we want (when will the pandemic end?) is basically unknowable, or too hard to pin down. The Omicron Information VacuumThe collapse is inevitable: Virtually every world power that ever existed has eventually declined, failed, and disappeared. The Soviet Union had survived for nearly 70 years, the British Empire for more than 400, and ancient Egypt for almost 30 centuries. But even though the land of the pharaohs was long crowned with success, its decline and destruction were unstoppable. History tells us it’s not a question of whether a world power will eventually be destroyed but rather a question of when. Secrets and Lies That Brought Down Empires // Ideas and Discovery Magazine - Dec 2021In other words, pretty minimal changes to get a tractor working on Mars. So if you want to imagine the future in ten years, picture a big Martian construction site busy with people in spacesuits driving John Deere tractors around. It is, in other words, frontier work. The aesthetics of human space colonization is Firefly, or the grit of the original Star Wars, not the sleek bureaucratic competence of Star Trek. NASA and SpaceX are establishing the first Martian city by 2030 Get full access to Graphorrhea at cahall.substack.com/subscribe

Milkcrates & Microphones
Milkcrates&Microphones S5 Ep23.(Feat.Harmon Warhol on Rittenhouse trial+ Dress or no dress?)

Milkcrates & Microphones

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 116:57


Milkcrates & Microphones returns with season 5 episode 23 featuring Stockton artist and fellow podcaster Harmon Warhol. We're also joined bey Vince "nicca" Camarillo but we first pay tribute to Young Dolph who was recently killed. we play a song and talk about the impact he had on the music industry. We also discuss the Travis Scott concert tragedy, would you want to be robot humanoid and live forever? We also dive into whats new with Harmon and what he's working in musically. Matt asks a deep question that he fails to answer himself, Sig lets us know how he makes woman honor him and Kid Cuddi wears a dress and matt does not approve. All that plus the MCMP originals with this week in hip hop and song picks of the week. Follow Harmon Warhol on Instagram @ https://www.instagram.com/harmonwarhol/?hl=en Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/thaharmonwarholshow/ spotify @ https://open.spotify.com/artist/3wAUnEM5He5ON4EvhSQse9 youtube @ https://www.youtube.com/user/HarmonWarhol and follow Milk and Mics on instagram @ https://www.instagram.com/milkandmics/?hl=en facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/milkandmics/ youtube @ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5Jmk_m0_zhxjjYRHWDtvjQ buy MCMP merchandise @ https://milkandmics.bigcartel.com  

The Thriving Artist
Virtual & Analog Art—Daniel DiGriz

The Thriving Artist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 16:13


“We're going to need more art—all of it—to solve the world's challenging problems. Creative intelligence is what it takes to inject life into the culture, to drive effective leadership, to drive new ideas. We don't have to choose. We can have one foot in the world of visceral taste and touch and another foot in the digital world without having to split ourselves in half.” ​​​​This is a bite-sized The Thriving Artist™podcast episode with Daniel DiGriz's perspective on art news and cultural change. As you may know from previous episodes, Daniel peruses the art news of The New York Times. This time, a couple of headlines really stood out! The first one is 50 years of Taking Photography Seriously. The synopsis: When the Photographer's Gallery opened in London in 1971, few saw the medium as suitable for exhibitions. Today everyone does. The second article is Hands Off the Library's Picture Collection! The synopsis: Cornell Spiegelman and Warhol browse the famous collection of images in the New York Public Library. Now a century of serendipitous discovery will come to an end if the collection is closed off to the public. This episode is courtesy of Shirley Lemmon. Support this podcast

The Week in Art
Fraud: how corrupt is the art world? Plus, Warhol's Catholicism and Moscow's new museums

The Week in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 59:12


This week, we look at the case of the art dealer Inigo Philbrick, who pleaded guilty to fraud in a New York court last week: is the art world, as his attorney claimed, “corrupt from top to bottom”? Georgina Adam, editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper gives her response. For this epsiode's Work of the Week, we talk to Carmen Hermo, the curator of the exhibition Andy Warhol: Revelation at the Brooklyn Museum, about a painting in the show, New York Post (Judge Blasts Lynch) (1983), and what it tells us about Warhol's Catholicism. And as GES-2 House of Culture, the V-A-C Foundation's huge cultural centre in a former power station transformed by architect Renzo Piano, opens in Moscow next week, and the Garage Museum in the Russian capital announces its expansion into a landmark Modernist building in Gorky Park, we talk to Anna Bronovitsksya, architectural historian and professor at the Moscow Architecture School about these museums and the wider political situation in which they are being constructed. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Millionaire Mindsets
Dropping Bombs with Brad Lea

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 66:36


On this episode we're joined by special guest Brad Lea. During this episode, we discussed why you need to promote more, how to become more confident, why you need to lower your goals, getting rid of negative friends, hitting 9 figures in business, becoming a entrepreneur at 30, how to add value to anyone, and more. For more information follow him on Instagram & Twitter @TheRealBradLeaFollow the show on Instagram @millionaire.mindsetspod and your hosts @xaviercmiller and @deannakent. This week's Sponsors: Are you ready to start investing in Real Estate but are in need of some guidance? Then we have the perfect solution! Purchase our Real Estate Investing Course to learn everything you need to know to make an informed purchase and earn passive income! It's on sale for one day only! Don't miss out! https://parkhill-capital.teachable.com/p/parkhill-capital-s-guide-to-purchasing-your-first-investment-property If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $160.00! Sale ends soon… here https://www.guide2crypto.com/ Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT If you're interested in learning how to become a Home Inspector, click the link below to join Cousin Nita's workshop https://www.cousinnita.com/p/how-to-b...

Millionaire Mindsets
The Blueprint 3 w/ Xavier Miller and Deanna Kent

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 48:53


This episode is #3 of our Blueprint series here on the show. Today we answered questions from our audience via Twitter and Instagram. We discussed whether you should grind it out while you're young or pace yourself, how to be more disciplined, the most important thing you can do in your 20s, how to network and meet like minded people, how to maximize your time to the fullest, delayed gratification, how to build a team for your business, when to take profits on your investments, investing in Crypto and more! Follow the show on Instagram @millionaire.mindsetspod and your hosts @xaviercmiller and @deannakent. This week's Sponsors: Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $160.00! Sale ends soon… here https://www.guide2crypto.com/ (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT If you're interested in learning how to become a Home Inspector, click the link below to join Cousin Nita's workshop https://www.cousinnita.com/p/how-to-b...

Tank Magazine Podcast
Tina reads “Space: the final frontier for extreme wealth” by Masoud Golsorkhi

Tank Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 9:44


Tina reads “Space: the final frontier for extreme wealth” by Masoud Golsorkhi From the second half of the 20th century onwards, the market for contemporary art has expanded exponentially beyond what anyone could have imagined, but what is it expanding into? Millions of square metres of white gallery walls: from Bauhaus to Warhol, the vacant space speaks in the language of luxurious waste. Tina reads from Masoud Golsorkhi editor's letter from the “Narrative” issue of TANK, “Space: the final frontier for extreme wealth”. 

Marketplace All-in-One
What a real (or fake) Warhol sketch tells us about the idea of artistic authenticity

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 8:31


A New York art collective called MSCHF says it got an early sketch by artist Andy Warhol, made 999 copies of it, mixed in the real drawing with the fakes, then sold all 1,000 without knowing which was the real Warhol sketch. Blasphemy? Maybe not, according to the art critic and Warhol biographer we spoke to. The electric vehicle maker Rivian makes its debut on the Nasdaq. The BBC reports from the COP26 climate conference regarding a draft agreement from the United Nations.

Marketplace Morning Report
What a real (or fake) Warhol sketch tells us about the idea of artistic authenticity

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 8:31


A New York art collective called MSCHF says it got an early sketch by artist Andy Warhol, made 999 copies of it, mixed in the real drawing with the fakes, then sold all 1,000 without knowing which was the real Warhol sketch. Blasphemy? Maybe not, according to the art critic and Warhol biographer we spoke to. The electric vehicle maker Rivian makes its debut on the Nasdaq. The BBC reports from the COP26 climate conference regarding a draft agreement from the United Nations.

Cities and Memory - remixing the sounds of the world

"I worked on the recording of the Chinese invasion of Vietnam in  18th February 1979. I mixed it with Uh Yes Uh No, the voice of Andy Warhol  from Jeff Gordon, Art Voices.  Gordon's interviewed Warhol but then he erased the questions and just left the “yes” and “no” answers. Warhol would talk a loved recordings of people's voices. Gordon claims that his favorite was Jacqueline Kennedy's because it was like a whispering breath. Somehow this tragic announce of the Chinese invasion of Vietnam is made by a very gentle voice which made me think of this piece: Uh Yes Uh No. (Source UbuWeb Sound)" Composition by Giovanna Iorio. Part of the Shortwave Transmissions project, documenting and reimagining the sounds of shortwave radio - find out more and see the whole project at https://citiesandmemory.com/shortwave

Millionaire Mindsets
Lessons in Luxury Watches w/ Alfred Greene

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 58:46


On this episode we have luxury watch dealer, Alfred Greene, join us on the show. Alfred is a member of the Timepiece Gentlemen Team based here in Dallas, Texas. We discussed how he got in the watch industry, how watches can be good investments, good starter watches, what makes a watch valuable, why “Plain Janes” hold their value compared to “Bust Downs,” how to make sure you're buying an authentic piece and more. For more information follow him on Twitter @AlfredGreene94 This week's Sponsors: Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! To Join Eric's 6 week Body Transformation Challenge for a chance to Win $1k in cash prizes click here https://commandoathletix.com/products... If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $160.00! Sale ends soon… here https://www.guide2crypto.com/ (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT If you're interested in learning how to become a Home Inspector, click the link below to join Cousin Nita's workshop https://www.cousinnita.com/p/how-to-b...

The SEGA Lounge
167 - David Warhol of Realtime Associates

The SEGA Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 89:34


Joining KC this week is industry legend David Warhol, developer in the early days of Intellivision and founder of Realtime Associates, responsible for many games released on SEGA systems, including Bug! and its sequel, Bug Too! Mr. Warhol tells us many stories of his career in video games and even how RTA was, at one point, supposed to develop a 3D Sonic game for the Saturn. Realtime Associates website: http://www.rtassoc.com   Full show notes: https://www.thesegalounge.com/167-davidwarhol   Theme song of The SEGA Lounge by OSC. You can buy it at 'name your price' by going to https://opussciencecollective.bandcamp.com/album/megane-hatsune-miku-project-diva 60-Second Game music: "Tea Time" by Ofshane Follow The SEGA Lounge on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thesegalounge Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thesegalounge Check us out on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesegalounge Find KC on social media: https://bio.link/kcradioman

Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences
Have you been reading Dickens all wrong? Maybe, says Robyn Warhol

Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 31:30


Distinguished Professor of English Robyn Warhol researches a variety of subjects, from narrative theory to Regency and Victorian novels to feminist theory to television narrative. She sees great parallels between binge watching tv shows and reading Victorian novels straight through, something that contemporary readers couldn't do. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week's Voices of Excellence

Tab Talk
TT6: Live From NFT NYC

Tab Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 87:19


Destruction by duplication - Museum of Forgeries via Colin Landforce 1 $20k Warhol mixed in with 999 perfect duplicates $250 for a “Possibly real Warhol” Destruction by duplicate https://moforgeries.org/ Yang Ming Mt Lab on Behance via Oren Schauble Behance as a social media replacement Art direction & Brand sourcing https://www.behance.net/gallery/126790983/-YANG-MING-MOUNTAIN-LAB? Vidtao Youtube ad library via James Camp Ads libraries Clever back-end is they own a YT media buying agency https://vidtao.com/ Colin's F1 Rant via Colin Landforce F1 is completely unfair DRS and KERS https://www.formula1.com/ How to build a small town in Texas via Oren Schauble Grids, character and materials. https://wrathofgnon.substack.com/p/how-to-build-a-small-town-in-texas Meta via James Camp Bullish on the space? Can oculus be it? A web2 giant stepping into web3 https://about.facebook.com/meta/

FantasyPros - Fantasy Football Podcast
Week 8 Rapid Reaction & Fantasy Takeaways (Ep. 789)

FantasyPros - Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 70:24


Dan and Pat react to Week 8's NFL action and recap each Sunday afternoon game! Sponsors: Masterworks - Investing is a lot like building a winning fantasy team. Masterworks is the first company to let you invest in multimillion-dollar works by Banksy, Warhol, and more. They've got more than 200,000 members and a long waitlist, but you can jump to the front at masterworks.io/fantasy. DraftKings - The Official Daily Fantasy Partner of the NFL -- is putting you in the center of the action for Week 4. Download the DraftKings app NOW and use code FANTASYPROS. This week, new customers can get a free shot at MILLIONS of dollars in total prizes. Enter code FANTASYPROS to get a FREE shot at MILLIONS in total prizes with your first deposit! AirMedCare - If a medical emergency arises, AirMedCare Network provides members with world class emergency air transport services to the nearest hospital with NO out of pocket expenses. Visit airmedcarenetwork.com/fantasypros and use offer code FANTASYPROS to get up to a $50 Visa or Amazon gift card with a new membership. Timestamps: Trust or Bust - 0:01:47 I Am Confused By Your Opinion, Sir - 0:08:40 GB vs. ARI - 0:11:47 TEN vs. IND - 0:18:47 MIA vs. BUF - 0:24:13 CIN vs. NYJ - 0:30:17 PIT vs. CLE - 0:34:58 PHI vs. DET - 0:40:17 LAR vs. HOU - 0:42:59 SF vs. CHI - 0:47:40 NE vs. LAC - 0:52:06 JAC vs. SEA - 0:55:17 TB vs. NO - 1:00:46 WAS vs. DEN - 1:04:47

Millionaire Mindsets
27 year Old Real Estate Investor Closes 1300+ Deals w/ Donovan Ruffin

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 60:10


On this episode we're joined by Donovan Ruffin, a 27 year old Real Estate Investor and serial entreprenuer. We discussed how he's closed over 1,300+ real estate deals before age 30, how he consistently does 45 deals a month, retiring his mom at age 23, what makes a great leader, tax advantages as a real estate investor, shutting down his Million Dollar Company instead of selling it and more. For more information follow him on Instagram @TheDonovanRuffin This week's Sponsors: Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! To Join Eric's 6 week Body Transformation Challenge for a chance to Win $1k in cash prizes click here https://commandoathletix.com/products... If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $170.00! Sale ends soon… here https://www.guide2crypto.com/ (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT If you're interested in learning how to become a Home Inspector, click the link below to join Cousin Nita's workshop https://www.cousinnita.com/p/how-to-b...

GeekNights with Rym + Scott
GeekNights 20211028 - Dune (2021)

GeekNights with Rym + Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


Tonight on GeekNights, we review Denis Villeneuve's Dune (part 1). It's Dune. It's hard to imagine doing better at Duning on the big screen than this. Recall that we discussed Dune extensively on the GeekNights Book Club.In the news, the Shiba Inu shitcoin is in the news due to a high volatility situation, you can buy 1/1000 of a Warhol for $250 after some clever people literally attempt to destroy its provenance, Facebook flees is toxic brand with a new name, Queens successfully opposed an upgraded fossil fuel power plant, and the NAACP is urging professional athletes to boycott Texas sports teams due to the extreme threat Texas has put American democracy under.

Talk Art
Nick Rhodes (Duran Duran)

Talk Art

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 63:25


SEASON 11 begins!!!! Russell & Robert meet legendary musician Nick Rhodes, the founding member of the iconic pop rock band Duran Duran.We discuss Pop Art and Roy Lichtenstein, his early trips to New York where he first met Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Debbie Harry and Francesco Clemente, his admiration for Picabia, Warhol, the 17th Century Baroque period, and classical art such as De Ribera and Caravaggio. We explore working with numerous artists for Duran Duran including David Lynch on a live concert film and notably Patrick Nagel for the Rio (1982) album sleeve, collecting art that began when he was aged 17 with his first Dali print, his thoughts on NFTs and his friendships with leading contemporary artists like KAWS and Katherine Bernhardt, buying a Picasso on an Amex card and his experiences visiting art fairs like Frieze!We hear his memories of Mr Chow's legendary restaurant with Grace Jones, Warhol and many iconic creatives, staying at La Colombe d'Or art hotel in France and the brand new Duran Duran album sleeve which he worked on with Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota. We discover his passion for photography and Polaroids, the differences between analogue vs digital, his fascination with mythology, astronomy, numerology and science which has influenced his new 'Astronomia' project with Wendy Bevan. Finally we chat about his friendship with the late Duggie Fields and his numerous visits to his favourite Ikon gallery in Birmingham.Duran Duran have sold over 100 million records, had 18 American hit singles, 21 UK Top 20 tunes and continue to perform to huge concert audiences around the world since the band first formed in 1980. Consistently fusing art, technology, fashion and a signature sense of style with their unique and infectious brand of music, singer Simon Le Bon, keyboardist Nick Rhodes, bassist John Taylor and drummer Roger Taylor have proven themselves timeless, always innovating and reinventing, to remain ahead of the curve.'Astronomia' is a collaboration between the artists Nick Rhodes and Wendy Bevan. It is a creative collision of analogue synthesizers, violins, voices and orchestral arrangements fueled by their shared attraction to the Universe. 'The Fall of Saturn'; is the first of four albums in the Astronomia project, first released back in March 20, 2021, followed by three further releases, on the equinoxes and solstices for the remainder of the year. Each individual piece is a sonic painting, a tapestry of rich textures and haunting melodies forming soundscapes with an otherworldly atmosphere. Looking to the transcendent beauty of the skies, this genre defying debut album explores the fluidity of human emotions.Follow @AstronomiaVolumes and @DuranDuran on Instagram! Duran Duran's new hit album 'Future Past', and 'Astronomia: The Fall Of Saturn', Nick Rhodes' incredible new collaboration with Wendy Bevan, are both OUT NOW from all good record stores and available to stream online! Visit https://duranduran.com/ and learn more about 'Astronomia' records here: https://duranduran.com/2021/astronomia-by-nick-rhodes-wendy-bevan/For images of all artworks discussed in this episode visit @TalkArt. Talk Art theme music by Jack Northover @JackNorthoverMusic courtesy of HowlTown.com We've just joined Twitter too @TalkArt. If you've enjoyed this episode PLEASE leave us your feedback and maybe 5 stars if we're worthy in the Apple Podcast store. For all requests, please email

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
October 26th, 2021 6am Alice Celebrity Trash

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 17:32


1,000 Warhol artworks are on sale for just $250 each but only one is real, Vinnie got his carpets cleaned, and the ‘Rust' movie is on an official hold after Alec Baldwin's shooting incident.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Millionaire Mindsets
Self Made w/ Brett Berish

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 55:47


On this episode we had the honor of speaking with the Founder & CEO of Sovereign Brands, Brett Berish. During this episode we discussed how he changed his life at the age of 30, how he sold Ace of Spades to Jay Z, knowing when it's the right time to sell a company, starting the Luc Belaire Brand and becoming the best selling French Rosé in the U.S, the importance of collaboration with other brands, the key to having longevity as a successful brand and more. For more info follow him on Instagram @BrettBerishCEO and follow the podcast at @Millionaire.mindsetspod! This week's Sponsors: Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! To Join Eric's 6 week Body Transformation Challenge for a chance to Win $1k in cash prizes click here https://commandoathletix.com/products... If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $160.00! Sale ends soon… here https://www.guide2crypto.com/ (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT If you're interested in learning how to become a Home Inspector, click the link below to join Cousin Nita's workshop https://www.cousinnita.com/p/how-to-b...

Fun Box Monster Podcast
Fun Box Monster Podcast #122 : Hell Night (1981)

Fun Box Monster Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 92:26


Wow. This slasher couldn't have been softer if it was made for the Disney Channel. Made by a porn director and there's no nudity. Made with had the star of the Exorcist but barely had a single effective scare. They even had the star of Rock and Roll High School, and yet I didn't see a single Ramone. The sad part is that if you watched a half-hour reel of the greatest hits of this movie, you'd think it was the  best horror movie ever made. Sadly, the rest of the movie is just boring kids either sitting and talking about nothing or walking silently. So grab your high test cable and winch set, twenty thousand candles, and a fist full of quaaludes and join Matt and Tristan for the slowest movie this side of Warhol's Sleep, Hell Night. 

LA Review of Books
Todd Haynes: The Velvet Underground

LA Review of Books

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 32:53


Kate, Daya, and Eric speak with director Todd Haynes about his latest movie, and first documentary, The Velvet Underground, which shows just how the legendary rock group became a cultural touchstone representing a range of contradictions. The band is both of their time, yet timeless; rooted in high art and underground culture. The film features in-depth interviews with key artistic players of the 1960s combined with a treasure trove of never- before-seen performances and a rich collection of recordings, Warhol films, and other experimental art. The result is an immersive experience into what founding member John Cale describes as the band's creative ethos: “how to be elegant and how to be brutal." Also, Kelefa Sanneh, author of Major Labels: A History of Popular Music in Seven Genres, returns to recommend I'm with the Band: Confessions of a Groupie by Pamela Des Barres.

LARB Radio Hour
Todd Haynes: The Velvet Underground

LARB Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 32:54


Kate, Daya, and Eric speak with director Todd Haynes about his latest movie, and first documentary, The Velvet Underground, which shows just how the legendary rock group became a cultural touchstone representing a range of contradictions. The band is both of their time, yet timeless; rooted in high art and underground culture. The film features in-depth interviews with key artistic players of the 1960s combined with a treasure trove of never- before-seen performances and a rich collection of recordings, Warhol films, and other experimental art. The result is an immersive experience into what founding member John Cale describes as the band's creative ethos: “how to be elegant and how to be brutal." Also, Kelefa Sanneh, author of Major Labels: A History of Popular Music in Seven Genres, returns to recommend I'm with the Band: Confessions of a Groupie by Pamela Des Barres.

Millionaire Mindsets
Building a Million Dollar Media Empire w/ Shawn Cotton

Millionaire Mindsets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 67:49


On this episode we talk with the Founder and CEO of SayCheese TV, Shawn Cotton. During this episode we discussed how he started Say Cheese TV, moving out of his parents home at age 26 with $100,000, not seeing profits from his business until year 6, becoming a millionaire, tips to build an audience, signing Spotemgotem & Kash Paige, owning 40 acres of land, why we don't take money for interviews and more. For more info follow him on all platforms @ShawnCotton and follow the podcast at @Millionaire.mindsetspod This week's Sponsors: Are you looking for a new and exciting way to not only grow your wealth but protect it? Look no further because Masterworks, Silicon Alley's newest 1 billion dollar unicorn, gives you the opportunity to invest in multimillion-dollar paintings Including works by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol! You can skip their waitlist by going to www.Masterworks.io/mindsets to get started today. Be sure to tell them the Millionaire Mindsets Podcast sent you! To Join Eric's 6 week Body Transformation Challenge for a chance to Win $1k in cash prizes click here https://commandoathletix.com/products... If you're interested in learning how to invest in cryptocurrency and make money, purchase my Official Crypto Guide today while it's on sale for $160.00! Sale ends soon… here https://www.guide2crypto.com/ (To become an official sponsor of the millionaire Mindsets Podcast and purchase advertising space, please contact us at info@millionairemindsetspod.com) Affiliates: Click here to Purchase Brian and George's course "The Car Rental Blueprint" to learn how to make 5K a month in passive income in the rental car industry. Use promo code "MMPOD" for 50% off!! https://www.carrentalblueprint.com/a/2147491641/cU62TRHT If you're interested in learning how to become a Home Inspector, click the link below to join Cousin Nita's workshop https://www.cousinnita.com/p/how-to-b...

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 2

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:23


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 2 below.  Sharon: You've arrived, it sounds like. Marc: It's kind of an affirmation. Sharon: Absolutely. Do you think the boxes would be as effective if you hadn't had this experience as a set designer or stage manager in the theater? If I sat down and made a box, I could just stick some figures in it. Do you think that really impacted your work? Marc: To answer you in an honest way, I think if I hadn't done those things—all I did before was put little seashells in boxes. I'm skirting away from your answer, so excuse me. I think because I already was someone who had been traveling around the world and already had experiences that were theatrical, because I was meeting people and talking to people standing in the middle of the street in Paris, I was already getting the idea. It was being planted. When I got involved in theater—I also did film—I saw what that was about and how everything was in a frame. A stage in a theater on Broadway, it's in a box. Sharon: That's true. Marc: It all made a lot of sense to me. There are also ironies about it for me. For example, when I talked about when I was going to high school and people would look at me and think I'm an artist, what they were doing was putting me in a box. I like to think the boxes I create are about that, but they're beyond. Once someone engages themselves in looking at it and then they end up talking to somebody, it opens up a whole other kind of thing. It breaks down that barrier that a lot of us have with each other. It came from working in theater with someone like Tom O'Horgan, who was way ahead of his time as a Broadway theater director. He did a lot of avant garde, off-off Broadway stuff. He's no longer alive. He was my best friend in the entire world. There's not a moment I don't have gratitude about that friendship, but since then I've married. I have a beautiful wife.  My wife is a filmmaker, and she and I are developing another kind of box art. I know; we don't make jewelry. I'm doing video with her. We have a series called Traveler's Ball. It's on YouTube. People can watch it if they want. It's very cutting edge. She was inspired by what I do, where I do images layered in a box. A lot of our videos have layered images. Along those lines, I have always wanted to create a box video on a small scale. A long time ago, when I first started making these things—I'm a man with a lot of information and ideas in my brain—the technology wasn't there yet. The nanos and the microscopic things, images on the head of a pin, that wasn't around when I first started. For example, I made three-dimensional, two-inch-square watches on a band. I don't have one to show you—Lisa might have one—but I made these. When I was selling on the street, I would wear one and boxes on my lapel. People would see this thing on my wrist and go, “What is that?” I would show them, and they would all go, “Wow, that's unreal! It's big, but that's amazing! When are you going to sell these?” I said, “I'm not ready to sell them yet.” I did eventually sell some. I only made two dozen of them in my life.  If you look at an Apple Watch, they finally did what I was thinking about doing in 1985. The only difference is theirs is a one-dimensional object you wear on your wrist. It is amazing to see somebody with an Apple Watch and all the different things it does, but for me, there's a missing ingredient. The missing ingredient is a point of view. A point of view is putting characters in front of something, like we are in real life; people standing on the street corner talking, meanwhile the bus is going by. I always wanted to take that idea and put it on a small scale and add the element of art to it. I didn't want it to be cookie cutter, we're making five million Apple Watches and everybody's going to have one. Not everyone's going to have a Marc Cohen version of that, and I want to keep it that way. I'm famous for a lot of things, but I'm also famous for the fact that I never like to make any of these things more than once or twice. There's something about that I only made one-of-a-kind images.  In the beginning, I used other people's images—the fine art of appropriation. There's a guy who's no longer alive who I learned a lot about; his name was Joseph Cornell. Joseph Cornell is probably the grandfather of appropriation art. Rauschenberg and Warhol, when they talk about their own art and their influences, they always bring up the name Joseph Cornell. Joseph Cornell made boxes. He handmade them himself. He was an eccentric guy who lived in Utopia, New York. Think about that: Utopia, New York. Joseph Cornell was this rather interesting guy. He was a poet. He was curious. He made all these different boxes, and you can't buy one. They're incredibly expensive. But I've had people along the way say, “You're like a modern-day Joseph Cornell.” I don't know what that exactly means. I'm a modern-day Joseph Cornell? But they talk about what I've done and what I've accomplished. It's an interesting thing for me that has followed me in this jewelry story. What else could I tell you? Sharon: I'm curious. Do people commission you and say, “It's my husband's anniversary. I want a box with us and our wedding picture with it.” Marc: Exactly. For example, Lisa Berman has a relative whose name is Virginia Apgar. Virginia Apgar is famous because she created the Apgar Score. I don't know if your viewers know what that is, but they can look it up. There was an event Lisa was going to be doing. Lisa, being an old friend of mine, I felt like I wanted to give her a memento. There's a forever stamp, and this is Virginia Apgar. Sharon: A frame with the brooch. Marc: A frame with the brooch in the middle, and all around are these images of Virginia. Warhol and Hockney did this thing where they took a person's face—I don't know if you've ever seen any of those silkscreens that Warhol used to do. I'm influenced by that too. That's how I came up with this idea of making Lisa a one-of-a-kind, object of art concept.  Sharon, I want to tell you another thing: how the box art thing really started. Originally, when I first started doing things, I started a company called Still Life. Still Life was the early stages of box art, but it wasn't in a box. It was a flat piece of plastic, circular most of the time, and it was either blue or white or green. On top of that, I would marry other things. I had little three-dimensional palm trees, and I would glue them to the surface of this round, circular piece of plastic, and then I would glue those figures I'm telling you about. I would have people at the beach. If it was a travel map, I would have people with suitcases. I had a whole series. I had like Still Life Creations Beach, Still Life Creations Travel, on and on. Still Life creation stages is how it evolved to the boxes. The point is that when I was doing Still Life, one night, I came across the idea of taking a little box and turning it into something you wear. That doorway I was speaking about earlier opened me up even further into where I am to this day. I'm still very fertile with a lot of ideas. You live in this visual world. Sharon: Right, absolutely. I love the idea that they're door openers and conversation starters that break down barriers. It's not easy to do in New York or anywhere, but I don't think New York is the conversation-starting capital of the world, let's say. Marc: Right. All the world's a stage, and all of us are players on that stage. Some people have the ability to get on that stage and act and do, while other people are off on the side watching. They're not as easily going to jump in. Ruth Bader Ginsberg whom we all love—who didn't love Ruth Bader Ginsberg? What an incredibly magnificent woman. When she was out of being a Supreme Court justice, Lisa had this idea for a show. She invited all her wearable art friends to come up with a collar idea. She mentioned it to me, and I was trying to figure out what I could do with boxes to make a collar. I'm going to try to do this carefully. Behind me— Sharon: We'll show a picture of this when we post the podcast so people can see it. Marc: Right, behind me is this. This is a series of 18 boxes in a square. I mounted it on leather. I made it in such a way that you could take this off and wear it around your neck as a necklace. My wife, who is very gorgeous—she used to be a model, among other things in her life—she wore it. Lisa has a picture of her wearing it. It's one of those objects that, if you wear it among the other incredible collars that all of Lisa's artists made, this is even more of a conversation piece because of the image of Ruth. In each box I put her most-known rulings, the titles of them. Wearing that, going to an opening somewhere, it's going to draw people's attention. That's why I keep on saying the same thing over again: every box tells a story. Sharon: Where do you get the little figures? Do you buy them at doll stores where people make doll houses, or do you go to the toy store? Marc: It used to be a trade secret. I tried in the beginning to keep everything I did very secret, but if you're a creative person and you buy one of my boxes, if you really want to know how I made it, you can take it all apart and figure it out. If they're really curious, they could look at the figures, and now that we Google everything, they could find out that the figures are made in Europe. When I first started, I bought the figures at a model train store. Model train stores have everything for making dioramas.  Sharon: They're too large for what you're doing, but I was thinking about the little plastic toy soldiers my brother used to have. Marc: Exactly. I have made boxes bigger than two inches square to be worn. That's easy to wear, but suddenly six inches to wear—that's a major statement. I used to take top hats and other hats and make a whole diorama around the hat, one-of-a-kind. I made a whole bunch of those, and I sold those pretty quickly. I made sunglasses that had a whole scene in the rim of the sunglasses. They didn't last very long because they're fragile; the wrong windstorm and they break. That's why the box, in the end, became the most utilitarian object to protect what was inside, the image and the little characters. There's meaning in that, protecting ourselves. Sharon: Where are you getting your ideas from? Are you walking down the street and seeing the World Trade Center and saying, “Oh, that would be great”? Marc: That's interesting, too. I don't live in New York City anymore. I really wish I was living in New York City. I can't afford it right now, but in the early days when I first was doing this, the mid-80s, early 90s when I was selling on the street, I would walk up and down all the fashion streets where all the storefronts are, a million different shops. There are boxes, but they have mannequins inside them. They are large versions of what I was doing on a small scale, and I would get inspired just by seeing what other window display people were doing. I would go to Barney's. Barney's uptown was amazing, the designers of the windows there. So were the windows in Tiffany. Because I'm a box artist, I see these things and they inspire me. I'd hear political news of the day, and then I'd try to match something with what was happening in the world with an image, either one I would create or one I would find and appropriate. Sharon: Do you call yourself a box artist if people ask, “What do you do?” Do you say you're an artist or a maker of jewelry? What do you call yourself? Marc: I call myself a box artist.  Sharon: A box artist. Marc: I want to call myself a box artist. First of all, I like to think I created that name. Let's put it another way. When I was doing what I was doing, people used to say, “Oh, it's a shadow box,” because that's how people can connect with the idea. Shadow boxes, if you know what they are, are mostly that. They are cardboard most of the time, and people put things in them and they create shadows against the inside of the box. When I first started making these things, everybody was asking, “What is it? What do you call it?” and I would say, “It's a box and it has a little bit of art inside of it. It's box art.” The name stuck, and every time people would come up to me, they'd say, “What's your latest box art?” When you could get on the internet and Google things, I never saw the word box art in relationship to what I do, but I also never saw the word box art in relationship to anything. Once I started using the name, and when I would make my business cards and they would say, “Marc Cohen, Box Art,” then people would have that. You know how it is. The buzz gets out, so the word eventually stuck. So, I claim box art and I claim myself as a box artist. I claim myself as a lot of other things too, but some of them I can't mention.  It's a funny journey, all of this. Now, it's Box Art Dreams. What is Box Art Dreams? Box Art Dreams is video, because that's the next level. I want to get even more intimate. I'd like the store to be even bigger in its depth and in its message. One image can do that on a certain level. For the person that's looking at it, one image can stimulate a lot of images in their head, but think about on top of it. If I have a two-inch square box and it has a little video screen inside of it, and there's a little movie in there and there are characters standing in front of it looking at it, I don't think I'm going to be able to make them fast enough. Sharon: It's an interesting idea.  Marc: That's the goal. Now, I can't do that alone. My wife is a video maker and editor. I'm plugging Julia Danielle—she's a genius at video. One of our goals is to take the wearable art idea and give it even more of an attraction. It's not just on your lapel; there's something flickering in the box. Sharon: That would be really cool, yes. Marc: If it lights up, God almighty, what people would think. That's where I'm at. Once I do that, I don't know. Then, the next is large-scale exhibition. Starting with little boxes and leading me on a journey of jewelry and art. Sharon: I do want to mention, for those who are interested, that your boxes at this stage are with Lisa at Sculpture to Wear. We'll also be posting a link and a lot of other information about today. It'll be with the podcast. Marc, thank you so much. That was just so interesting. Marc: I appreciate it. Thank you. I want to tell you I'm honored for what you're doing. Sharon: Thank you very much. I appreciate that. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 1

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:47


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 1 below.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Marc Cohen. Marc is a former actor, set designer and stage manager. He is a highly regarded artist recognized for his box art, which graces the shelves of many celebrities. The box art pieces are often worn as brooches. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today, but before we do that, I want to thank Lisa Berman of Sculpture to Wear for making it possible for Marc to be with us today. Marc, so glad to have you. Marc: As am I. Thank you for inviting me. Sharon: Great to be with you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It started with you traveling around the world from what you've said. Tell us about that and how everything worked from there. Marc: I was a 20-year-old young man and I left America, basically, on a freight ship. That's how I started the journey. I have a saying now, which is “Every box art tells a story.” The irony of that is that when I travel, because I was on the road for a very long time, going all over the world, I liked collecting things but I had no place to put them. I found these little, tiny boxes that I used to take candy out of, and when they were empty, I went, “Oh, this is a great thing to put little things inside of.” I already was starting the idea of collecting little objects that I might go back to at some point and use it as a part of the art. But I traveled; I went around the world all the way to India until 1970. Then in 1970, I decided to return to America and relocate myself within the country. Prior to that, I had left in 1966. It was during the Vietnam War.  I was raised in Southern California, so I came back to America and went back to my roots. I have a stepsister, and she had a friend named Tom O'Horgan. Tom O'Horgan is actually very famous in the theater world, primarily because he directed the show on Broadway called “Hair.” He directed many other shows after that, but that is the one he's most known for. In meeting each other for the first time, he asked me about myself, and I said, “I traveled around the world and I don't have any real direction about what I want to do next.” He said, “Well, I need a driver because I'm working on these film projects. Do you drive?” and I said, “Yeah, I drive.” So, he hired me as a driver.  During that period, which was in the mid-70s, I drove him around Los Angeles. I knew Los Angeles like the back of my hand, and we went to all these different studios and met all these different, incredibly famous people; directors, writers and the like, actors and so on and so forth. I was getting a little bit of a background, but what I didn't know at the time, not until many years later, was how I ended up becoming a curator and jewelry maker. I was influenced by the work of Tom O'Horgan. Being a set director, he did plays. The things he worked on in LA ended up getting finished, and he said, “I'm going back to New York. Keep in touch with me. Maybe there's some work for you in New York.”  About six months later, I called him on the phone. He said, “Marc, we're doing this show on Broadway. It's about Lenny Bruce and I have a great job. I'd love you to come and work on it.” I said, “Well, I've never lived in New York, but I do know who Lenny Bruce is. So yeah, I'm coming.” I went to New York and got a room at the Chelsea Hotel. It was during the time of Andy Warhol and a lot of other people living in the Chelsea Hotel. So here I am, in the middle of this incredible epicenter of activity; there was so much different art on the walls of the Chelsea Hotel back in those days, and all these Warhol people and other characters from the avant garde world in New York City. That's the background of how I got to where I got. What I mean is that as a young guy, I didn't know a lot, and I didn't have a lot of background in art per se. I was more like a young guy who was just wandering on the planet, as I said earlier.  So, here I am in New York. I'm in the middle of an epicenter of activity, and Tom says to me, “Well, we're in pre-production for the show, and there are a lot of other things I would like you to do for me.” He gave me a lot of different jobs, and I went around and did that for a while until the show went into production. During those pre-production meetings, he would meet with all these different designers. One of those designers is now a very famous set designer by the name of Robin Wagner. Robin Wagner went on to design “A Chorus Line” and a lot of other incredible Broadway productions. Robin, over the years, became one of my closest friends. The reason I bring him up is because we used to go his studio, which at the time was in a building called 890 Studios, which is owned by Michael Bennett, who was the director of “A Chorus Line.” I'd go to his studio with Tom, and he would have models of shows. I was picking up the incredibly creative process of how you put together an idea for a show and a stage. He would have little characters he would use to put on models of shows. I took note of those little figures, but I kept it hidden in the back of my brain, not knowing anything, nothing preplanned about what I was doing other than being Tom's assistant. We eventually went to Broadway with “Lenny.” “Lenny” opened. It was a big success and for about 30 years, I worked primarily with Tom O'Horgan in theater.  Sharon: Is it Tom O'Horgan? Marc: Yes, it's spelled O-‘-H-o-r-g-a-n. He was an artist. He always considered himself to be one of those people that didn't do things that are the typical Broadway. I mean, when you think about “Hair”—I didn't work on the original. I worked on a later production with Tom, but by that point, I had already worked on “Lenny Bruce,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and so many other amazing things. We did opera. Tom did a lot of things, and Tom's influences and Robin's influences are guides to what I eventually ended up becoming, which is an artist who creates wearable art.  When you think about jewelry, for me, typically jewelry would be semiprecious stones, silver, gold, pearls, all that kind of stuff. I'm not the kind of creator or designer that would even know where to start to put those things together. I love beads. In the 60s, I made my own beads and necklaces, but I didn't see that as where I wanted to go. Because of my memory of the stage and theater and stories—when I told you earlier about the boxes, during the period I was living in New York, I collected a lot of things in my little East Village apartment.  I happened to be downtown in the Soho area; I was down on Canal Street. I was walking along the street, and all the shops had things out in front of them for sale. I walked by, and there were empty boxes and lots of other things. I was just motivated to buy them, so I bought them. I brought them back to my apartment and I was sitting at my little worktable looking at all these objects. I'm thinking, “Maybe I could make something out of this. I know that this coming year, Tom has this big Christmas party, and usually he's the guy who gives everybody something unique for a present.” There I was, looking at all these things, and I looked at the little box and glued a little figure I had inside the box. For example, this is a box. It's an empty one. Sharon: Like an acrylic, plastic box. Marc: A plastic box, an acrylic plastic box. Most people would take this box. It has a lid. They would put anything in it, but they didn't think they could put a whole story together. When I put the little figures in the box like that, and it has a lid and I put it like that, then I have a box with people standing in front of it, but they're sort of looking through. What are they looking at? I started to figure out I needed to have an image to tell the story. This is the World Trade Center. Sharon: So, you're creating little worlds inside the box. Marc: Right. Since I started the idea in 1985, I have made thousands, and out of those thousands, many of them are one-of-a-kind. How I can I put it? Because of my traveling and because I'm a very sentimental guy—with these boxes, the little characters can't talk; they're little plastic figures. They only way you could tell the story, as jewelry tells a story, is by what you put behind them. So, in this case, I put the World Trade Center. I had a little character standing there looking at it. I actually made this before the World Trade Center fell down.  My meaning of all of this is that it was something in the beginning I was aware of. The one I'm wearing on my lapel—this one is a door. There's a woman standing, looking not at us; she's looking towards the doorway. Anybody who would come up and look at my work, they would say, “Wow, that is amazing! Where did you get that?” This is how it started and how I got into fashion. “Where did you get that?” and I said, “Well, I made it.” And they said, “Really? Where can I get one?” And I said, “You can buy this one.” In the beginning, I used to sell right off my lapel. I love dressing. Double-breasted suits are my favorite attire, so I would have a box on my lapel. As I said, I would go all over New York City to openings, plays and the like. At openings and galleries and museums or wherever I went, people from across the gallery, they would see me dressed and see this thing on my lapel, curious to what it is. They would walk up to me. They wouldn't even look at me; they would look right at the box and go, “Oh my god, what is that?” When I said, “Well, it's a box and I made it,” they would go, “Wow! I want it.”  It got me to the point where—this is the most interesting thing—many years later, after traveling and having lived in Israel—one of the places I did live—after about 25 years, I decided to go back there for a visit. I had friends that had immigrated to Israel, and some of my friends were there to stay. I went to visit them, and they all are in the arts. When I was there, one day they said, “Why don't we go to the Israel Museum up in Jerusalem?” I was in Tel Aviv staying with them. We go up to Jerusalem. I was wearing a box. I'm walking around the Israel Museum—this is so amazing to me—and a woman from across the room, a very tiny lady, walks up to me. She says the same thing many other people said: “Wow! What is that? Where did you get that?” I said, “Well, I made it,” as I said earlier.  The point of it is that these boxes have a story in them. For me, every story leads into another. How I mean that is that a person who I don't even know comes up to me, looks at my work; they're inspired by it; they talk about it; they tell me things about it that I've never myself, as the creator of it, imagined how significant it was or what it meant to them. As in theater, as in my relationship to Tom O'Horgan—who broke the fourth wall when he did “Hair” on Broadway—during the period I was creating these, people in New York and probably everywhere else didn't exactly walk up to each other and start a conversation with strangers. I had the object that changed all that, and I had not realized that until I started going out and wearing them.  Getting back to Israel, this woman, who I later found out was named Tammy Schatz, she was the curator of one of the wings in the Israel Museum. She invites me the next day to come and sit and talk with them, because they were planning this show and exhibition the following year called “Heroes.” So, I went back the next day. I sat with her and bunch of other people and they started telling me what they were planning. They said, “Well, you're an American, and you must know a lot about American pop culture. You know Superman and Batman and all the stuff like that,” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” Once they learned I worked in theater and designed sets—because by this point, I was not only making little box sets, I was also making large set pieces for shows. I have also done installations and the like. So, they invited me based on an illustration I sent to them. The next year, I went back to Israel, and I did this 10-feet-high, 25-feet-long three-dimensional cityscape. It was boxes, another version of boxes. It goes on and on from there, Sharon. It's always been fascinating me, how these boxes have gotten me into all kinds of great trouble. As I continue to say, every box tells a story. Sharon: We'll have pictures of the boxes when we post the podcast, but I want to describe it to people. These are small. What, two by two?  Marc: Two-inch square, three quarters of an inch deep. When you buy them, they're empty; they don't have anything except the lid and the box. I basically invented an idea; up to that point, I never saw anybody else doing what I was doing. Later on, I found that I inspired other people's creativity. There was these little boxes, and every picture tells a story. A picture's worth a thousand words. Sharon: Marc, before all this happened, before you befriended Tom and he befriended you, did you consider yourself artistic or creative? Was that a field you wanted to pursue? Marc: Kind of. I didn't literally say, “Wow, I'm an artist! I'm going to create.” When I was a young guy growing up—I grew up in Philadelphia until I was about 13. My father and mother were in the beauty business. My father was a very well-known women's hairdresser. He had his own beauty parlor. My parents were beatniks back in the 50s in Philadelphia. They were very artistic people, and all their friends were very artistic. When you're a 13, 14-year-old, it doesn't register, “Oh, I'm going to grow up to be like my parents,” but they are influences. They all wore black all the time, and as I was growing up, that was my look; I wear all black. I'm going to high school during the 60s, and it's all surfers and bleach blond hair, and here comes me with skin-tight black pants and Beatle boots and cravats. Kids who were friends, they would come up and say, “Who are you? What do you think you're doing? You must be an artist.” The idea stuck, but as I said about journeys through life, the fascinating thing for me is that I could go around the world, have all these different things happening in my 20s, return to New York and be on this journey where I'm still at.  I know your podcast has to do with why we're here: to talk about jewelry. I came up with a way for people to wear jewelry that has a story in it and it isn't just a beautiful necklace. Most of my clients over the years have been women, and women know something much more than men know about wearing an object that attracts attention. Women know how to find beautiful objects and adorn themselves, whether it's a necklace or earrings or the like. What I also found was interesting—and this actually happened; I neglected to mention this, but at one point when I stopped doing theater with Tom and only focused on making box art, I ended up becoming a street artist.  I was selling in the beginning to every major department store, and I was getting orders for thousands of boxes that I had to come up with. I was a one-man factory, so I was pulling my hair out of my head thinking, “How the hell am I going to get all these boxes out?” Eventually I discovered there's no way I can be a manufacturer of these things; they're all one-of-a-kind. I'm not going to make 12 of the same thing. A friend of my said, “There's a street fair down on Broadway. Maybe you should go there and sell on the street.” That opened a doorway, like this doorway that's on my lapel, into a world that I have never been able to look back on. What I mean by that is that once I discovered going to Soho, which was in the early stages of its evolution to become an epicenter for artists, many of them very famous—Keith Haring, David Hockney, the list is incredible of the people that were living in Soho during this period.  I went down there; on West Broadway there were very few artists, and I was one of them. I would be standing there all dressed, and people would be walking up and down the street. It was the most incredible way for them to find out if I was marketing what I had on my lapel. People would walk by, they'd see this guy with a fedora all in black, wearing a box, and they'd be curious. “What's he wearing?” They'd come up. They wanted to ask me a about them and how much they were. They would say, “I'll take that one, that one and that one,” and that used to happen to me constantly. I never could make enough. The thousands I had made that never got sold in department stores were being sold like crazy on the streets of Soho. I started to get a reputation as the box man. One of the clients that bought from me called me the box man. There were times I would go down to Soho in the early morning on Saturday or Sunday, and there were people milling around where I would stand, waiting for me. They would go, “Here comes the box man.” It was crazy.  Among all those people, some of the people that stopped and looked at my work were people like David Hockney. David Hockney actually came up to me one day, after a lot of people walked away buying my stuff, and he was looking at them real close up. He started talking to me and giving me suggestions about what I could do with them and how I could display them. He said, “You've got this little box. Where are you going to put it? Maybe you should put it in something, like a frame?” That was the most incredibly brilliant selling idea for my boxes. What I did with the frame idea, when I figured out how to do it—there are many of them behind me; they're all frames. The idea was that you can wear it, but you can also put it on your wall, and your wall can wear your art. I made it so the frame had an opening in it that the box sat inside of. If you're going out to an opening or a fashion show or something like that, “I think tonight I'll wear one of the Marc Cohens.” That was the idea, and that took off like crazy from there.  I have to also tell you I didn't have any agents. I didn't have a rep or anything like that. The only rep I had was Marc Cohen. So, it was a cool journey through art. I evolved the idea of being an artist selling on the street, where I just had an easel, to having a pushcart. It was like immigrants coming to America way, way back, my family being some of them that went to Philadelphia. My great, great grandmother, she had a pushcart on South Street in Philadelphia. It's another part of the story of jewelry. It bridged into me getting even more known.  I went back to California where I grew up. I found that in Santa Monica, they had a promenade they were developing. They actually had people with carts they rented they would put out on the promenade. I found out I could rent carts, so I rented one and came up with this idea. It actually came from people on the street. People would walk by and say, “Wow, you're like a tiny gallery with all your art.” I came up with this name, the World's Smallest Art Gallery. I took the cart and turned it into a miniature to scale, like if you went into a gallery, but it was open to the people to see it from all different sides. I had walls and characters that were larger than the ones in my boxes. They were standing looking at the art. It was all on that level; it was very interactive. People would walk by, and there would be a lot of celebrities all the time on the street. Suddenly, not only was it regular people buying work, not only David Hockney, but very famous people in Hollywood. Along the way, I reconnected with a friend of mine who was very famous, Paula Wagner. She's now very famous for being a producer with Tom Cruise; they had a company called Cruise Wagner. She's a friend of mine from all the way back to the “Lenny” days. We rekindled our friendship in LA. She knows everybody in Hollywood, and once she saw my work, she flipped out and said, “We've got to do something with this.” She hired me, and the first thing I did for her was wearable box art in a frame. It was for Oliver Stone.  Sharon: I'm sorry, who it was for? I didn't hear. Marc: Oliver Stone the director. Sharon: Oliver Stone, oh wow!  Marc: She also represented Val Kilmer and Tom Cruise and Demi Moore. Before you know it, she's asking me if I can make a box for this person, on and on. The biggest thing for me at the time was Madonna. I knew Madonna from a long time ago. When I say I knew her, I lived in New York in the early 70s and 80s, and I used to go to all these clubs. I would go to this one called Danceteria. At the time, Madonna was a coat check girl there, and eventually she did a show there, which I saw with a bunch of my friends. Then she went on to do whatever she wanted on her own.  Somehow or another, a friend of hers bought one my pieces to give to her as a gift, but this is the best part of it. I didn't know this until much later on. One night in LA, I went to this private photo exhibition; it was a photographer who had done all the photography for Rudi Gernreich, the fashion designer with those bathing suits. I'm going to the exhibition with friends. I had my box on my lapel. I'm walking around and it's a tiny, little gallery, so people don't follow each other—everybody goes wherever they're going. A bunch of people are coming that way and we're walking, walking, walking. We come to this one, most famous photograph of a topless model. I'm looking at photograph, and standing next to me is Madonna. I turn and right away, she looks at me and goes, “I have one of those boxes.” I said, “I'm the artist. I made it,” and she said to me, “I Iove that box and I have it right by my bed,” and I said, “Oh, how cool.” She asked me a few questions and I filled her in on my background. I didn't bring up the fact that I remember her from Danceteria.  Then it was like an avalanche. I got picked up by Maxfield's Clothing Store in LA when I started the frames. Everybody saw how cool it is as an art piece, but you can wear it. Maxfield loved what I was doing, and he took me on and carried my stuff in his store. This is another amazing thing: the dresser for Arsenio Hall was in the store one day buying things for him to wear on the show. I don't know whether it was a man or a woman, but they bought an outfit for Arsenio, and the salesperson said, “We just got this new wearable art piece in. You've got to see this.” They looked at it and bought one. That night on the Arsenio Hall Show—if you ever watch his talk show, there's intro music, and then the curtain goes away and he stands there; it's Arsenio Hall. On that particular night, he's standing there, wearing a collarless Armani suit, and on his jacket is a square.  From a distance you can't tell what it is. I found out this afterwards. I got the tape. It was amazing; he didn't himself know what it really was, but he came out and the camera zooms up on him. When I saw what the box was, I got a chill. It was a period where I started to not just do people standing in the box, looking at the image or looking out away from the image; it was a period where I was putting images up against the face, so it would be a three-dimensional idea. In this particular one, it was Martin Luther King. I had done part of his face in profile in the foreground, and then I had done some backdrop. It had something to do about racial issues.  I didn't just make cutesy box art. I really am not about cutesy box art. I'm very passionate about a lot of things in life. I'm very political about certain things, and I want people to have an opportunity to talk with each other about things that are meaningful, particularly where we live these days. It's important to have that doorway of how people get through it and interact with each other without being sensitive and thinking you're going to be judged by whatever they say or do. We are in a period where people have to be careful about that. So, it amazes me that this tool—because it is a tool—is, in a way, much different than things made by other jewelry designers that Lisa Berman curates or represents. That is mostly what Lisa represents, like Robert Lee Morris. I knew Robert Lee Morris personally. He's a genius and he's a friend. Thomas Mann is one of my closest friends. I'm friends with others as well because of how we interact with each other.  The image is what it's about. It's how the characters are placed within the box. Along the way, I started thinking, “I want to get out even more than what I've done. I want to try to make work even more original.” We live in a period where they have this thing called a 3D printer. It prints pretty much anything. I can create a series of my own characters, which is something I always wanted to do. I've only just started doing this. I started developing this idea, where I custom make three-dimensional boxes on this scale and a much larger scale. That's where I'm headed. I have lots of collectors. They would be more than happy if I started making little box art again. My newest work is much larger. I make boxes now that are 20 feet big, installation pieces.  Sharon: They're hard to wear. Marc: They're hard to wear, right? I know your program is primarily about jewelry. The thing about that, though, is what I am planning to do. When I do have that exhibition, the large-scale Marc Cohen box art exhibition, I will have miniatures of that exhibition, like many other people do when they market things. The Van Gogh Experience—I don't know if you've seen this, but there's a thing on the road right now that's video mapping Van Gogh's paintings on a building. When you go to the gift shop, they've marketed Van Gogh's work to death. I would do something similar as a collectable.  I had Sotheby's in London; they heard about me through our people in Israel. I was invited to do this big exhibition at Sotheby's. It's a big auction and a silent auction. I got commissioned to make three boxes with lights. There weren't any more wearable, but I did that, and it sold for the equivalent to $10,000. Suddenly, my prices are changing. The people that bought my boxes on the street from the beginning—it's embarrassing to say—but when I first started selling them, my boxes were $20. They're no longer $20. They have been selling at auction for a lot more than $20. Now there's talk about me in way that I never, ever imagined, and it's joyful. After 40 years of doing nothing but making boxes, I don't know what— This is part 1 of a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week! Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

The Opperman Report
Valerie Solanas: The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote SCUM (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 60:01


he authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history. Too drastic, too crazy, too "out there," too early, too late, too damaged, too much—Valerie Solanas has been dismissed but never forgotten. She has become, unwittingly, a figurehead for women's unexpressed rage, and stands at the center of many worlds. She inhabited Andy Warhol's Factory scene, circulated among feminists and the countercultural underground, charged men money for conversation, despised "daddy's girls," and outlined a vision for radical gender dystopia. Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the polemical diatribe SCUM Manifesto, Solanas is one of the most famous women of her era. SCUM Manifesto—which predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed—has sold more copies, and has been translated into more languages, than nearly all other feminist texts of its time. Shockingly little work has interrogated Solanas's life. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about her life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing and copyright, and her elusive personal and professional relationships. Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

The Opperman Report'
Valerie Solanas: The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote SCUM (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 60:01


he authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history.Too drastic, too crazy, too "out there," too early, too late, too damaged, too much—Valerie Solanas has been dismissed but never forgotten. She has become, unwittingly, a figurehead for women's unexpressed rage, and stands at the center of many worlds. She inhabited Andy Warhol's Factory scene, circulated among feminists and the countercultural underground, charged men money for conversation, despised "daddy's girls," and outlined a vision for radical gender dystopia.Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the polemical diatribe SCUM Manifesto, Solanas is one of the most famous women of her era. SCUM Manifesto—which predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed—has sold more copies, and has been translated into more languages, than nearly all other feminist texts of its time.Shockingly little work has interrogated Solanas's life. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about her life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing and copyright, and her elusive personal and professional relationships.Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

Doug Stephan presents the DJV Show
DJV Download - 09/28/21 – The Obsession with Screens

Doug Stephan presents the DJV Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 18:53


Andy Warhol said it best, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes." A woman can't seem to stop recording while her husband and a friend are swept out to sea, a TikTok challenge glorifying kleptomania, and Mark Zuckerberg putting a pause on Instagram for kids are the big topics in today's episode. We also get a look inside Jen's first date fiasco that involved oysters, but [spoiler alert] not a second date. In other news, Dog the Bounty Hunter is on the hunt for Brian Laundrie and there's a radio station in South Carolina who already switched their programming to Christmas music. This and more from today's top news and trending stories available the Daily DJV Show Download. Follow us @DJVShow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.Djvshow.com

Crime World
Crimeworld Episode 44 - The Art Detective And James Bond's Aston Martin

Crime World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 47:28


He's the art detective who hunts stolen masterpieces and who re-unites works of art with their rightful owners years after they have been looted. From lost works by artists like Picasso or Warhol to flash designer watches worth more than €100,000, Chris Marinello of Art Recovery International has brought home more than half a billion dollars worth of missing goods over his three decades in the business. Today, he tells me about his incredible career negotiating with a heady mix of rogue collectors, Nazi thieves and organised criminals looking to wash their dirty money. We talk daring heists, missing classics and the hunt for James Bond's Aston Martin.

Cafe con Victor
Historia de Internet: El formato corto, de Vine a TikTok

Cafe con Victor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 59:17


Episodio 117 y quinto de la entrega de Historia de Internet. Si en los anteriores nos hemos centrado en analizar el auge de las plataformas donde vimos aparecer a los primeros influencers, después las plataformas de vídeo como YouTube y Twitch, en éste hemos querido hablar de algo muy actual: el formato corto. Porque quizás Warhol fue muy generoso al hablar de minutos de fama, cuando quizás deberíamos hablar de segundos. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/victorabarca/message

Art World: Whitehot Magazine with Noah Becker
Andy Warhol Labor Day Special

Art World: Whitehot Magazine with Noah Becker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 178:21


Noah introduces nearly 3 hours of Warhol audio for labor day. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/noah-becker4/support