Podcasts about Groupon

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American worldwide e-commerce marketplace

  • 1,113PODCASTS
  • 1,507EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Groupon

Show all podcasts related to groupon

Latest podcast episodes about Groupon

Bob Sirott
Associated Bank Market Outlook: 8/8/22

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


On August 8th, 2022, Steve Grzanich shares today's potential market drivers: Quarterly earnings from Groupon, Tyson Foods, and more New York Fed’s three-year inflation expectations

The Voicebot Podcast
Evan MacMillan CEO of Gridspace on Conversational AI Analysis - Voicebot Podcast Ep 266

The Voicebot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 74:59


Evan MacMillan started Gridspace 10 years ago to tackle a tough problem faced by contact centers: analyzing their conversational data. It's an application that stands apart from most conversational AI solutions with its focus on conversational intelligence as opposed to self-service.    Before co-founding Gridspace, MacMillan was a co-founder at Zappedy, which was acquired by Groupon during the heyday of online deals communities. He earned a degree in product design from Stanford. 

Path To A Million Dollar Practice
Top Reason Why Chiropractos Should Never Partner with Groupon | EP. 365

Path To A Million Dollar Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 10:04


Swisspreneur Show
EP #256 - Kai Eberhardt: The App To Change Your Diet For Good

Swisspreneur Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 48:23


Timestamps: 3:52 - Breaking up and getting back together with McKinsey 9:36 - Gathering the Oviva team 12:01 - Certified dieticians vs nutritionists 16:52 - Working with health insurers 34:59 - Keeping in touch with your investors About Kai Eberhardt: Kai Eberhardt is the co-founder and CEO at Oviva, an app which provides personalized advice and individual support for targeted dietary changes. He holds a PhD in Physical Chemistry from ETH and previously worked for McKinsey and Groupon. Kai left McKinsey to get a taste of the startup life at the rapidly growing Group, but ended up having a mixed experience. Due to its IPO goal, Groupon cultivated unsustainable company growth, which often came at the expense of employees and customers, and was, in Kai's experience, a “ruthless” environment – which explains the crash they suffered right after going public. Kai nonetheless considers his time there a valuable personal growth opportunity. In 2014 he founded Oviva together with co-founders Manuel and Mark, and the inspiration actually came from his past: during his time as a student, Kai suffered from cancer (which fortunately was treatable), and this motivated him to help people live healthier and happier lives. Kai and his co-founders saw that dieticians weren't meeting often enough with their patients, and hypothesized that a much better way to reach these patients would be through their phone, which they already used for copious amounts of time anyway. Oviva offers not only one-to-one nutritional assessment, advice and continual support, but also nutritional tracking, through pictures that patients take of their meals with their phones, and which dieticians review. Oviva employs these dieticians and tries their best to have users be reimbursed by their health insurance providers. They mainly acquire users through their doctors, and to both doctors and health insurers Oviva shows metrics like program completion, weight loss (when relevant), a calculation of the hospital visit reduction, and also how many patients were able to go off (expensive) medications by following their dietary protocol. This proves to doctors and insurers that Oviva saves hospitals their resources and insurers their money. Memorable Quotes: "I didn't want to stay at McKinsey forever because there you never get to own anything you work on." "Nowadays integrated medicine only happens in specialist clinics, despite the fact that obesity and type 2 diabetes are absolute epidemics." If you would like to listen to more conversations on medtech apps, check out our episode with Bettina Hein. Don't forget to give us a follow on our Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Linkedin accounts, so you can always stay up to date with our latest initiatives. That way, there's no excuse for missing out on live shows, weekly give-aways or founders dinners!

The $100 MBA Show
MBA2104 Why You Should Run an AppSumo Deal

The $100 MBA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 13:39


If you sell digital products, you need to know about AppSumo. AppSumo is the GroupOn of digital deals aimed at entrepreneurs and other business people. Today, we explain how putting your own offer on AppSumo can boost your business. …in fact, we're offering our own deal on AppSumo, to help promote our SaaS business. Learn […] The post MBA2104 Why You Should Run an AppSumo Deal appeared first on The $100 MBA.

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
Blue Sky Thinking for Business Growth - Speaking Julie Brinkman, CEO of Beyond Pricing

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 34:34


Julie Brinkman, CEO at Beyond Pricing, joins Ryan in this episode to talk all about her passion for business growth and the unique strategies and capital principles she has applied to different markets across the years. She has gained a wealth of experience including a role as CEO in a HR start-up and holding senior positions in global company Groupon. Most recently she has taken Beyond Pricing from a struggling position at the peak of covid and led them to 100% YOY growth. Join Ryan and Julie in this episode for some great takeaways on capital growth and business strategy. KEY TAKEAWAYS Beyond Pricing gives short-term rental managers and owners the tools to grow revenue. The world of short-term rentals have changed during and since the pandemic. It's had to cope with these fast changes but Julie and her team have managed to stay ahead. Beyond Pricing has two distinct growth functions, product-led growth strategy and a traditional direct-sales model, depending on the client they are trying to attain. Beyond Pricing have to manage their products for vastly different spectrums of the short-term rental market, from one of the biggest property managers in the US to individuals who just have one singular property. They have to tailor their products for each of their individual client's needs. Julie spent 10 years at financial advisory firm DeloItte, she then decided she needed to work somewhere more dynamic and applied for a role at Groupon. This is where she learnt about how to manage a great sales team but also gained the passion for business growth and strategy. Julie wanted to see what she could do at a smaller business, which is when she made the decision moved to a role at the HR start-up Hirerology, before moving onto her role now at Beyond Pricing. Blue sky thinking is something Julie believes in and attributes it to a lot of success she has found in business, including at start-ups, because of the belief that anything is possible. Beyond Pricing are not a traditional subscription model business, clients subscribe to them and then they take a percentage of sales. This means they grow with the market but are also incentivised in the same way as their clients. During the pandemic, Julie and her team focused on retention and strategies that would help their clients through this difficult time. They kept their customers in mind in every decision they made. BEST MOMENTS  “We acquired them through a product-led growth strategy” “There are a lot of parallels between saas and running your own short-term rental business” “I got really addicted to growing a business, setting strategies and hitting goals” “I let my results speak for themselves” “I don't think you can run start-ups unless you think anything is possible” “Those companies that deliver real value to customers in a real way will survive” Do You Want The Closing Secrets That Helped Close Over $125 Million in New Business for Free?"  Grab them HERE: https://www.whalesellingsystem.com/closingsecrets Ryan Staley Founder and CEO Whale Boss 312-848-7443 ryan@whalesellingsystem.com www.ryanstaley.io EPISODE RESOURCES https://www.beyondpricing.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/jrbrinkman ABOUT THE SHOW How do you grow like a VC backed company without taking on investors? Do you want to create a lifestyle business, a performance business or an empire? How do you scale to an exit without losing your freedom? Join the host Ryan Staley every Monday and Wednesday for conversations with the brightest and best Founders, CEO's and Entrepreneurs to crack the code on repeatable revenue growth, leadership, lifestyle freedom and mindset. This show has featured Startup and Billion Dollar Founders, Best Selling Authors, and the World's Top Sales and Marketing Experts like Terry Jones (Founder of Travelocity and Chairman of Kayak), Andrew Gazdecki (Founder of Micro Acquire), Harpaul Sambhi (Founder of Magical with a previous exit to Linkedin) and many more. This is where Scaling and Sales are made simple in 25 minutes or less. Saas, Saas growth, Scale, Business Growth, B2b Saas, Saas Sales, Enterprise Saas, Business growth strategy, founder, ceo: https://www.whalesellingsystem.com/closingsecrets See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Procento Miloše Čermáka
Oslabení eura ukazuje, že Amerika má lepší vyhlídky než Evropa, říká investor Jan Barta (179)

Procento Miloše Čermáka

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 65:23


Jan Barta je jedním z partnerů investiční skupiny, které patří například on-line tržiště Aukro, startup vyvíjející cyklistický trenažér Rouvy či nově významný podíl v americké společnosti Groupon. A taky tříčtvrtinový podíl v mediálním firmě, které jsem před necelými deseti lety prodal svou doménu Extra.cz. Byť tehdy jsem se s Janem Bartou nesetkal, protože doménu koupil přes prostředníka. Tak jsme to aspoň dodatečně mohli probrat. Na extra.cz najdete webový bulvární magazín, a prý se mu daří báječně.Sedmatřicetiletý Jan Barta se narodil v Americe, v Česku žije od osmi let a dnes je podle Forbesu 96. nejbohatším Čechem. Povídali jsme si mimo jiné o tom, proč na něj ve čtrnácti křičel v táboře notář či jak se stalo, že mu Andrej Babiš vyfoukl zemědělské družstvo, které chtěl koupit. A proč pak prodělal 100 miliónů na nápadu prodávat v centru Prahy minerály a polodrahokamy.Zeptal jsem se ho na to, proč má ve svém twitterovém profilu citát francouzského maršála Ferdinanda Focha, který zní: “Střed oslabuje, pravice je na ústupu, situace je výtečná. Útočím.” A proč svůj blog pojmenoval podle rodného jména otce Adolfa Hitlera.Jan Barta patřil mezi ty, kteří jako jedni z prvních varovali před nástupem pandemie, a zejména na jejím počátku se snažil ovlivňovat to, jak čeští politici či obecně společnost tuhle věc řešili. Jeho koníčkem je superforecasting, takže jsme se - celkem logicky - bavili také o budoucnosti světa. A proč nemusí být nutně problém, když svět zase bude bipolární.Přeju příjemný poslech!

TRAILER | Don't use GROUPON (#84)

"Research Shows....." PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 1:07


This is a trailer for an upcoming episode where I talk about my experience using Groupon as a merchant. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/researchshows/support

Open the Pod Bay Doors
E141 - VC Panel ft: Karen Chan (Perennial), John Henderson (Airtree), Stew Glynn (TEN13)

Open the Pod Bay Doors

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 47:09


Just last month (June) Innovation Bay spent 3 days and 3 nights in Noosa, Queensland with over 100 of the country's leading VCs for our VC community Aurora's annual cornerstone event, Venture Downunder (VDU). After a learning day full to the brim with panels, discussions, keynotes and serendipitous conversations, we took the opportunity to sit down with three of the most illustrious and active VCs in the ecosystem right now to take a snapshot in time of the current state of affairs of our industry and to catch their thoughts, concerns and what they're most excited about right now.Joining Ian, around a small bar table in a quiet backroom, were:Karen Chan, Portfolio Manager, Perennial PartnersJohn Henderson, General Partner, Airtree VenturesStew Glynn, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, TEN13During VDU, Macquarie's Head of Wealth Management Investment Strategy, Jason Todd, provided attendees with an incredibly insightful, if not at times concerning, view into the current state of play. We took the podcast group's pulse on the keynote and how they see macroeconomics affecting the industry with Karen, John and Stew all wary but nevertheless optimistic about the industry at large. There was agreement that while there will be compressions throughout the market, innovation is here to stay, deals are still happening and the very best founders will continue to raise at impressive prices. We were reminded that in the last downturn companies like Slack, WhatsApp, and Groupon were born, and that this vintage could very well yield similar strong returns with the most resilient of companies pushing through.As VDU is an event to bring the Innovation Bay VC community together, the panel discusses the importance of community. Being brought together in a structured and unstructured way to learn from one another or chat “around the watercooler” is vital in this market. VCs are collaborative by nature but there is always an element of natural competition underlying. We also cover what everyone is most optimistic about - from Web3 to strong deal flow to investing in emerging markets like Africa, Latin America and Indonesia.We also had a chance for a couple of Quickfire Recommendations:Karen - Podcast: All-In PodcastJohn - Podcast: Invest Like The Best - Jeremy Grantham EpisodeStew - Podcast: 20VC - Quick Commerce EpisodeIan - Book: Why We Sleep, Matthew Walker

Le Super Daily
#Food : ces médias food qui émergent sur les réseaux

Le Super Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 20:03


Épisode 810 : Ce matin on vous parle de ces créateurs de contenus qui se transforment en médias sur les réseaux sociaux, et qui diversifient leurs business ! On parle influence marketing 2.0 !The Social FoodLeurs jnstaUn compte Instagram qui ressemble à un compte de voyage.Et pourtant, ici pas de travel mais de la food. De la Social Food.@thesocialfood187k abonnésDerrière the social food on trouve un couple : Mathieu et Sherley.Des créateurs de contenus, des influenceurs et des entrepreneurs.Leur compte Instagram est juste superbe. On dirait un compte dédié au voyage. Le photos sont sublimes c'est à suivre ! —Ils font aussi du consulting ou de la "marque blanche" pour les marques : ils font des shootings, créent des recettes, ou travaillent sur la direction artistique ou le set design.—Ils ont monté une marque d'épicerie fine. Ca s'appelle Matshi.Il ya de la sauce piquante, ds épices, des bonbons au miel…Je sais pas si c'est bon mais c'est super beau. Le packaging est super bien bossé et ils ont un petit shop en ligne : https://www.matshisauce.com/—Ils ont aussi une spécialité c'est de monter des concepts éphémères avec des chefs.Ils ont ouvert un corner glacé et gourmand : Téa Gelato pour lequel ils se sont associés avec la cheffe Lorenza LenziSourceIls avaient aussi cartonné avec leur concept Naany.Un restaurant éphémère monté avec le chef Sylvain Roucayrol autour du Naan.source——Et puis évidemment, ils ont édité un bouquin.Un livre de recettes "à la maison" source—The Social Food c'est vraiment l'archétype de ces nouveaux créateurs de contenu.On est plus dans l'influence mais dans le trend Setting, l'entrepreneuriat. A suivre de très près.—Dr Bonne BouffeAlors si votre kink c'est les smash burgers bien dégoulinants et les grosse frites bien grasses, passez votre chemin. La Dr Bonne bouffe est Diététicienne et nutritionniste. sourceElle anime un compte Instagram avec 70k abonnés Elle aide les personnes soucieuses de leur poids et de leur santé à équilibrer leur assiette sans sacrifier le plaisir.Et ben si c'est ça le truc je signe tout de suite. Sur son compte Instagram il ya des tonnes de contenus qui font vraiment envie. Brochettes de saumon Teryiaki, asperges au parmesan, bols…Le compte Instagram est très beau. Le branding est super bossé.Il faut dire que Dr Bonne Bouffe aujourd'hui c'est une marque.Une marque qui a édité avec Hachette pas moins de 6 livres sur la food.« 1 mois pour réduire la viande », « 1 m'ois pour réduire le sel », les meilleures recettes de « Dr Bonne Bouffe ».sourceDr Bonne Bouffe c'est aussi une influenceuse qui hésite pas à faire des comparatifs de marque. Elle te prend 2 produits de grande surface, 2 marques différentes et elle te dit laquelle choisir. C'est culotté quand on sait que les créateurs de contenu ont bien souvent des liens économiques avec les marques.source——Le guide ultimesource@leguideultimeC'est un vrai media Instagram dédié à la Street Food Parisienne.Ou trouver la meilleur pizza de Paris ? Quel est le glacier à découvrir avant les autres à paris ? Où manger la meilleure bouffe africaine ?Le guide ultime c'est une belle histoire.A l'origine il ya un créateur de contenu et TikTok qui s'appelle Victor Habchy. Sa spécialité les bons plans parisiens. Genre ou manger bon et pas cher.Aujourd'hui son compte TikTok culmine à 1,7M d'abonnés.Il a vraiment cartonné sur TikTok avec une une vidéo sur un restaurant à Burgers. Tu sais le fameux restaurant « Mangez et cassez-vous » qui fait des burgers à moins de 3 euros.sourceLa vidéo a fait 5 M de vues et a littéralement fait exploser la notoriété du lieu.Dans la foulée Victor s'est associé avec Nora Barault (une graphiste) pour créer le Guide ultime de Paris. C'est un bouquin mais c'est aussi et surtout une vrai media en ligne.Sur Instagram le compte @leguideultime comptabilise 538k abonnés.On y trouve une stratégie de contenu 100% dédié aux vidéos Reels. De vidéos avec voix off qui racontent en moins d'une minute les meilleurs bons plans de Paris.Ces vidéos elles font entre 200k et 3M de vues; c'est énorme !source—Ils ont aussi un compte Mapstr qui marche fort.sourceMapstr est à la fois une application, un réseau social et un service de cartographie qui permet d'enregistrer ses lieux favoris afin de les partager avec les autres.Sur Mapstr ils ont presque 5k personnes qui les suivent.——Le Guideultime c'est un media mais c'est aussi un business.Ils proposent un service d'abonnement qui s'appelle le Dealuntime.Le principe, je paie 79 euros / an et j'ai accès à pleins de ristournes dans des restaurants partenaires. EN gros c'est le principe de Groupon mais en plus cool.Hervé CuisineQuand on parle influenceurs cuisine en social média, quoi qu'on en dise on peut parler d'Hervé Cuisine.Hervé Cuisine c'est 1,4 millions d'abonnés sur YouTube.SourceEt plus de 800 vidéo autour de la cuisine.Ce qui m'intéresse c'est qu'il fait énormément de live sur sa chaîne.Son prénom est Hervé Palmieri. Il a commencé sur YouTube en 2007.Et aujourd'hui, il cumule 191 millions de vues. C'est énorme.Sur Instagram c'est un des plus lourd en France.Source713 000 abonnés3000 publications. Ce qui est intéressant c'est qui s'adapte plutôt bien au format.Grosses grosses stratégie de Reels.On retrouve des choses simples petites vidéos de recettes C'est ultra efficace on est sur une moyenne de vue en général autour des 200000, 300000 pour celles qui fonctionne moyennement mais on n'en a régulièrement qui vont chercher les 800.000 ou le million de vues.On a aussi notamment des posts en partenariat avec des marques.On retrouve un partenariat avec la marque de limonade Lorina : Un post + Un ReelsLe matériel de cuisine Mathon.Ou même carrément un partenariat avec Coca-Cola.Autant vous le dire c'est du lourd.Il est aussi présent sur tic tocIl est aussi présent sur TikTok avec 41 000 abonnés et plus de 160 000 J'aimesSourceC'est un peu plus modeste et on retrouve la une stratégie de recyclage de contenu avec tout ce qu'il sort enrichissent sur Instagram.Diego AlaryComment parler de créateurs Food sans parler de Diego Alary.C'est tout simplement la pépite qui est le crack de TikTok.SourceIl est assez jeune puisqu'il est né en 97 et il est chef cuisinier mais carrément vidéaste et il est français.Il s'est fait connaître en participant à la 11e saison de top chef en 2020.Il travaille pendant l'été 2020 dans le restaurant de Jean Humbert et Pharrell Williams à Saint-Tropez c'est là que tout s'accélère suite à la 11e saison de top chef.Sur TikTok c'est tout simplement 2,9 millions d'abonnés et 69 millions de j'aime.Le mec est une machine.Il a de nombreuses vidéos qui dépasse les deux ou 3 millions de vues avec des pointes parfois c'est huit.C'est souvent des recettes ou des tours demain des choses assez simple efficace souvent très court.Sur Instagram c'est 524 000 abonnés avec un petit peu plus de Lifestyle pas que de la cuisine.SourceBien sûr là aussi il y a un petit recyclage de contenu entre les réels et TikTok.Si je vous parle de lui aujourd'hui qui a une énorme star des réseaux et de la Food en France c'est parce qu'il vient de signer un énorme partenariat avec Volvic.Et là je trouve qu'on est vraiment dans l'influence marketing 2.0 !Ce n'est pas un simple partenariat avec Volvic c'est un partage de certaines valeurs.Le jeune chef a créé un parfum inédit avec un zeste cassis romarin pour parfumer une Volvic, le nom Volvic zeste.Il explique qu'il a été inspiré par le sud de la France et ses souvenirs d'enfance des confitures de sa mère et du goût subtil du romarin.Mais c'est pas tout le design est assez particulier très pop et surtout c'est une bouteille fabriquer 100 % en plastique recyclé. Et là on voit qu'il y a vraiment une collaboration totale entre un créateur de contenu est une marque.C'est pas seulement un poste ou un contenu partagé sur les réseaux du chef, c'est carrément un produit fabriqué en collaboration et ça ça cartonne pour créer du lien avec les audiences.. . .Le Super Daily est le podcast quotidien sur les réseaux sociaux. Il est fabriqué avec une pluie d'amour par les équipes de Supernatifs.Nous sommes une agence social media basée à Lyon : https://supernatifs.com/. Ensemble, nous aidons les entreprises à créer des relations durables et rentables avec leurs audiences. Ensemble, nous inventons, produisons et diffusons des contenus qui engagent vos collaborateurs, vos prospects et vos consommateurs.

Halbwissen Hoch 2
HH2-Shorts-VST-Dämonen / Coupon-Monster

Halbwissen Hoch 2

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 14:09


Stephan hat die Qual der Wahl bei Audioplugins. Statt Entscheidungshilfe bekommt Stephan eine von Pietschs berüchtigten Anekdoten von früher...sehr viel früher. Viel Zeit also für Stephan, um endlich mal die Brieftasche auszumisten - ein großer Fehler! Oder ist das was er da findet etwa für die GfK interessant?! Halbwissen² SHORTS - Kurzgeschichten in Unterhosen. Lob, Kritik, eigene Themenvorschläge und Tassenbestellungen an: halbwissenhoch2@gmail.com

Bending Brains
#53 - Priya Shah

Bending Brains

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 79:01


Priya Shah is triggering social consciousness to challenge barriers and empower communities from the inside out.  As a Chicago creative and entrepreneur, she has built a network of artists and collaborators dedicated to igniting social awareness and change through art and imagination. Shah began volunteering in developing countries at a young age, which inspired her to fill the gap between business and the social sector. She went on to earn degrees in both Accounting & Finance from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, using her studies as an opportunity to deepen her understanding of diverse cultures and perspectives through international travel. After graduating she went on to work at Big Four Accounting firm, Ernst & Young, and finally Groupon, leading strategic planning in Operations. Shah's passion for art and travel has fueled her purpose to help better communities in Chicago and around the world. Through her experience, Shah has developed a unique perspective on humanity and believes it is her responsibility to engage communities in need. Her purpose took shape when she founded The Simple Good, a non-profit with the mission to connect the meaning of good from around the world, empowering youth to become positive activists through art and discussion.  By uniting communities under a universal truth, Shah hopes to bridge understanding across all walks of life in order to bring down obstacles separating us in working towards improving the lives of our children and in turn, our future. Outside of her work with The Simple Good, she aims to build the next generation of positive leaders as a Strategist for Obama Foundation Scholars in Chicago and continues to lead necessary global dialogue as a Legacy Fellow at the Ariane de Rothschild Foundation. Shah was nominated for Forbes 30 Under 30 and is also a speaker with the Peace is Loud Bureau who promotes female changemakers promoting peace around the world. You may spot her in a print ad or two as she spends her free time as a model, promoting inclusive and diverse representation, empowering others with each new opportunity. She is the co-author of the latest children's book focused on representative literature called, ‘Sheroes of COVID-19' and also the producer on the upcoming documentary, ‘Building Hope', documenting the journey of spreading art and resilience from Chicago to East Africa.

Skip the Queue
Attraction partnerships and rivalries, with Dominic Jones

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 47:55


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://maryrose.org/https://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/https://twitter.com/DominicJonesUKhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/dominicejones/ https://www.nmrn.org.uk/https://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/news/item/1152-buoyant-bounce-back-bodes-well-for-portsmouth-historic-dockyard Dominic Jones was recruited to the Mary Rose in 2019 ago as Chief Operating Officer, and became CEO in 2021.  He brings an excellent background in commercial visitor attractions (Disney, Merlin) and creative visitor experience development.During his time at the Mary Rose, he has already driven an excellent commercial and operational performance and worked closely with previous Chief Executive to create the new Portsmouth Historic Dockyard joint venture with the National Museum of the Royal Navy, which launched successfully in August 2020.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. In today's episode, I speak with Dominic Jones, CEO of the Mary Rose Museum and Director of Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Dominic shares the amazing impact of the joint venture between the Mary Rose Museum and the National Museum of the Royal Navy and his advice for any attractions looking to start and improve their partnership arrangements. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Dominic. Welcome to Skip the Queue. Thanks for coming on.Dominic Jones: Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it, I think.Kelly Molson: You are looking forward to it. You don't need to think about it. Can we just point out, I know, listeners, you can't see this, but if you're watching this on YouTube, can we just see, you've got a lovely little, "I love Skip the Queue" graphic in the background there. Look at that.Dominic Jones: Yeah, I think it's important to get across that I do love Skip the Queue and it's important to get that across before the icebreaker questions, I think, just in case you had a couple and you were thinking, "Oh, I'm going to be a bit tough." And then, so I did that and I tweeted this morning how excited I am about your forthcoming website attraction questionnaire, so that's a double. That's a double positive, right?Kelly Molson: Thank you. Thank you. Don't worry, listeners. I've got a special little recording so you understand what we're talking about that will be coming out in the next week or so, so you'll find out more about that soon.Dominic Jones: And I bought you a rubber for your rubber collection. Can you see that? Mary Rose rubber?Kelly Molson: Wow. Look at that.Dominic Jones: You may or may not get that depending on how the icebreakers go, so that's my third attempt.Kelly Molson: Gosh, I've never been bribed for a good icebreaker question.Dominic Jones: It's not bribery. It's a nice gift. It's a nice gift.Kelly Molson: Right, well, let's get cracking on the icebreaker questions, shall we? I think I've been quite kind to you. Tell us something that you are really great at cooking.Dominic Jones: I really like cooking. I actually find cooking really relaxing, so on a Friday or Saturday, I often cook at home, so it depends, really. I quite like making my own recipes, so just using what we've got in the house. So for example, scallops with chorizo, or if you're doing a steak, might do it with some sort of watercress and various cheese, or just sort of experimenting. I really like sort of seeing what we've got, putting it together and making it work. I think it's important, when you're cooking, to drink some wine as well.Kelly Molson: Oh, I agree.Dominic Jones: So cooking with wine is something I enjoy doing.Kelly Molson: We can be friends, Dominic.Dominic Jones: There we go.Kelly Molson: Absolutely, we can be friends. Also, really great choices of food there. I would definitely eat both of those. You'd be really good on Ready Steady Cook, then. That would've been your show.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Do you know what? I used to... So I once applied for a game show, which I didn't get on, I was very disappointed, but Ready Steady Cook was one I think I could have done. Because it's not hard, is it? Most things go with things, and it's also about having the confidence to carry it off and knowing... The only time it went wrong was I wanted to cook for my girlfriend, who's now my wife, a lemon pasta dish and it tasted awful and it had lemon rind in it and stuff, so... But apart from that, it's always worked out.Kelly Molson: Well, I mean, you must have done all right. She married you.Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: She married you in the end.Dominic Jones: True.Kelly Molson: All right. Well, our next one, I've gone topical for this. If you were the captain of a pirate ship...Dominic Jones: Yeah?Kelly Molson: What would be the name of your ship?Dominic Jones: That's a good one. Oh. I do like pirates. I think, because I'm Welsh and because I'd want to be a pirate who... A bit like sort of the Warrior in the Dockyard, which isn't a pirate ship, by the way, but when it came in, people normally surrendered, I want to be a scary pirate that people would think, "Oh, don't..." Maybe, like, Smoking Dragon or something like that. And then we'd light smoke as we came in so people are like, "Oh, here's the Smoking Dragon."Kelly Molson: Yeah, I like that. And there'd be a big dragon's head on the front with flame and smoke coming out of it.Dominic Jones: And people... Because a lot of pirates were Welsh. I don't know whether you know this, but a lot of pirates were Welsh.Kelly Molson: I didn't know that.Dominic Jones: Yeah, it's massive.Kelly Molson: Wow.Dominic Jones: Massive.Kelly Molson: Okay. All right. This is great. That's an excellent answer.Dominic Jones: I have to say, these are slightly biased questions because I was listening to a few of your podcasts recently and, like, you had someone from the zoo, "Oh, what's your favourite animal?" Or you had someone from IAAPA, "What's your favourite ride?" And I'm getting a "name a pirate ship"? Know what I mean?Kelly Molson: All right, what's your favourite boat?Dominic Jones: No, only joking. I'm not going to answer that. I'm not going to answer that.Kelly Molson: All right, but what is your favourite smell? That's my last question.Dominic Jones: Genuinely, we're looking at smell now for the museum, because smell is so important, it's something that can make a difference. When I was at Madame Tussauds Amsterdam, we used smell, as well, as part of the experience, because it just creates that emotive moment. I do like cookie dough and cookies and the smell of that sort of baking which you get pumped in in Disney parks. I quite like the smell of red wine.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Yep.Dominic Jones: Yeah, so I think it's food or drink smells I like, but yeah. Good question.Kelly Molson: Good answer. We are at Unpopular Opinion Point. What have you got to share with us?Dominic Jones: This is a hard one because I've decided to go work on this and I did have some really cool ones about lager and N-Dubz and stuff, but I decided to go with work because one of the things that through my whole career, anyone who knows me will know is I get really frustrated when people blame the weather, so I think you shouldn't blame the weather for anything because what happens is when someone blames the weather, when the weather's... So I've worked in theme parks and in museums and aquariums, indoor and outdoor attractions, and you probably know that when it's bad weather, it's great for indoor attractions, when it's good weather, it's good for the theme parks, right?Dominic Jones: So you get people that, when it's good weather in theme parks or bad weather in museums, they say, "Oh, our marketing and our everything we're doing is brilliant because the visitors are coming." And as soon as it's the bad weather or the good weather, depending on what you are, then it's all about the weather. So, "Our visitors are down because the weather was good." If you're in an indoor attraction and it really, really irritates me, and it's one of those things, they're mutually exclusive, you can only blame the weather if you give the weather credit when it's good, and it's one of those things, if things are good, I always think you should look outside the window and think, "Right, what's the reason for that?" And then if things are bad, you should look inside your organisation. It's one of my pet hates, but probably doesn't work for the podcast, so I should probably go with the lager or N-Dubz one, but anyway, there we go. But it is important, right? I think it's a good one.Kelly Molson: It is important. No, I think, yeah, that is important. It's really interesting. I've never really thought about that before. We need to give the weather more credit.Dominic Jones: Well, you need to give the weather credit if you're going to use it to blame. For me, it's a constant. It's something... And these days, weather forecasts are 10, 14 days out, so you should be able to plan.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Okay. Good. All right.Dominic Jones: I'll get off my high horse now. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Listeners, let us know how you feel, so let us know if you want to know about that N-Dubz one as well. I'm intrigued. Right, Dominic, I want you to tell us about your background because we met up recently, didn't we, at the M+H exhibition? And you were very humble about coming on the podcast and you said, "Oh, I'm not going to have anything... You've had really interesting people on and I'm not that interesting." You are really interesting and you've had such an incredible background. Tell us a little bit about it and how you got to where you are now.Dominic Jones: Well, I'm not sure about that. I do like listening to your podcast and you have some amazing guests and 9 times out of 10, I normally think, after listening to them, "Right, I'm going to either do something that they've suggested." Or I follow them on LinkedIn or Twitter and think, "Right, let's learn from them." Because I think you should always learn from other people, but so my career is a lot of luck, a lot of opportunity and a lot of chats.Dominic Jones: When I was growing up, I wanted to be a leisure centre manager. You know? Like you probably won't remember The Brittas Empire, but that was my dream. That was my dream, much to my mum's disappointment. And so that was all I ever wanted, so I went to college and did a leisure studies course, a HND, and there was a placement in PGL Adventure, which is like an adventure park, and I was a Multi Activity Instructor. Absolutely loved it.Dominic Jones: But then I sort of realised, actually, there's a whole world out there and decided I wanted to work in theme parks, so I applied to work at Disney and didn't get it the first time. I was very cocky, I was the wrong sort of person for Disney, but I went back three times and eventually got it and I did a placement in Disney and it was the best thing I ever did and it changed my life. It's one of the few jobs that I've left and thought, "My life will never be the same again." So good. So I did that and I got my master's degree. I didn't get the doctorate because I went on spring break, but hey, I was young...Kelly Molson: Well, spring break, though.Dominic Jones: Exactly. I was young. And then sort of went to Thorpe Park and was a Ride Operator. I remember my friends and some of their family were saying, "That's a real waste of..." Because I went to, in between Disney, went to university in Swansea, and they said, "It's a real waste of university, operating a teacup for £3.50 an hour." Or whatever it was at the time. But I loved it and for me, it was... I thought, "If you want to become a manager or you want to become, eventually, a General Manager or a Director of a theme park, it's really important to know how these things work."Dominic Jones: So I loved it, and just in case you ever get to operate the teacups, it's not too complicated, there's a red and green button, the red is to stop and the green is to start. I mean, it was five hours of training, but I finally mastered it and you can't actually make it go faster, so when you're there on the microphone and say, "Do you want to go faster?" You can't, it goes faster anyway, but I loved it and then very quickly rose through the ranks, so I became a Ride Supervisor, Team Leader, Area Team Leader, Coordinator, went to Chessington, worked there just at the time when Tussauds had bought Thorpe Park, so it was a real great time for career opportunities.Dominic Jones: Then I went to Madame Tussauds, was the Customer Service Manager there and helped create the first contact centre, if you like, call centre, where we sold tickets for things like Rock Circus, which is no longer in existence, but Rock Circus, the London Eye, Madam Tussauds, the Planetarium and that became the Merlin Contact Centre in the future, and then I started applying for loads of jobs, more General Manager jobs, and didn't get them and realised that I needed to get some marketing and sales experience.Dominic Jones: So I left and went to work for Virgin and then I was there for nearly 10 years and absolutely loved it and instead of getting the sales and marketing, well, I got the sales experience, I ended up becoming Vice President of Europe, the Middle East and Africa for the logistics side of the business, and then also, so we opened up Kenya, had some amazing life experiences, we saw the whole world and then was Regional Vice President Sales in Hong Kong for Asia Pacific, so great time.Dominic Jones: And then my wife became pregnant, obviously, I was involved in that, and it made me realise that I probably couldn't do a job where I was traveling 24/7. I mean, for a while, I did literally consider, which makes me sound like a bad person, "I could call in from Skype and things like that." And my wife was like, "Come on." So we went back to Wales and it was really hard to find a job that would allow me to be at home and be around so I actually thought, "Well, originally, when I went to Virgin, I wanted to have marketing experience."Dominic Jones: So I actually went to Thorpe Park and the marketing team and looked after the partnerships and promotions, did some really cool things, the Ministry of Sound nightclub deal was there, did some stuff with Lionsgate. A really good time doing the "buy one, get one free" things, the partnerships and events, got some good bands together on the stage that hadn't been on stage with the Wideboys and the [inaudible 00:11:55] boys if you know your dance music, it was massive.Dominic Jones: Anyway, so I did that for a bit and then got an opportunity to go back to Wales, which is where my wife's family is from. I'm from North Wales, she's from South Wales, so I got a chance to run Oakwood Theme Park, which I absolutely loved and probably would've been there forever if an opportunity hadn't come up with Merlin and Merlin, it was to look after the rest of Europe and the rest of Europe was basically anything in their midway, so Madam Tussauds, Dungeons, Lego Discovery Centre, Sea Life, that wasn't in the UK or Germany, so it was like Istanbul, Helsinki, Paris Blankenberge in Belgium, Spain. I mean, it was brilliant and I did that for a few years.Dominic Jones: Then I went and ran Thorpe Park for a few years, which absolutely loved because that was where I started as a teacup operator and I remember, there was a guy there, good friend of mine, he said, "I remember, when you were on the teacups, you said, 'One day, I'm going to come back and run the place.'" And I did, so amazing. And then, in that time, I had three kids and really was commuting from Christchurch, so decided to change careers again and come into the heritage world and came as the COO of the Mary Rose, which I did for two years, and then, during the pandemic, became the CEO, so quick sort of... Yeah. But lots of luck and right place, right time, all those sort of things, but that's good, right? That's most people's career.Kelly Molson: Whoa. That is amazing. I mean, you've been to so many different places. I love that you went full-circle at Thorpe Park as well. What an incredible story, to have gone in there as an operator and then end up running the place. That is amazing.Dominic Jones: Yeah, I loved that. And actually, all the jobs I've had have really become part of our story. I was talking to someone yesterday about the Mary Rose and they were talking about what they were going to do next but how the Mary Rose had been a massive part of their story and I said, "That's the beautiful thing about work and careers and life. Whatever you do, it becomes part of your story and you're part of their story." So whether it's Thorpe Park, whether it's when I opened up, for Virgin Atlantic, the Nairobi route for logistics and the Hamlin, it was amazing and I've been to Kenya probably more times than I've been to Birmingham, you know? So that's part of my story, and when I leave the Mary Rose, I hope isn't any time soon, this will always be... It'll be my favourite Tudor warship. I mean, it's probably the only Tudor warship, but also my favourite one, so yeah.Kelly Molson: That was the answer to my question, as well. "What's your favourite ship?"Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow. I'm blown away by your career. I just think you've had such a phenomenal journey to get to where you are now. There's something that I want to talk to you about today and that's about your joint venture that you have with the Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy. I just want to read out a tweet that I saw because this is what sparked this conversation, so this is a tweet that went out on the Mary Rose Twitter account.Kelly Molson: It says, "We are very pleased to share that Portsmouth Historic Dockyard saw a 150% rise in visitor numbers in 2021, reported by ALVA today. The significant rise in visitors demonstrates the effectiveness of the joint venture between Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy in our first year."Kelly Molson: I am very intrigued by this because this has been kind of a constant throughout most of the podcast conversations that we have is about how collaborative the sector is, but this is really specific about two attractions collaborating together to bring more visitors in. I would love you to tell us about this.Dominic Jones: Well, yeah, the end result's fantastic. 150% increase in visitors. It really feels joined up. My son's school is coming in today so I was in the visitor centre and I was waiting to see what time he was coming in because he obviously wouldn't tell me the time he's actually in, so I was looking around the visitor centre and I couldn't be prouder, when you see the mixture of Victory and Warrior and Mary Rose, and how far we've come since we started, but if you go back in history, the Mary Rose used to be part of Portsmouth Historic Dockyard and there was one ticket and there was a separate company called Portsmouth Historic Dockyard that ran it, and lots of trusts, at that time, there were lots of trusts that fed into it, and then, for whatever reason, some of these trusts went independent.Dominic Jones: And so when I joined the Mary Rose, we were separate. We had a separate ticket, visitor centre, if you like, so imagine, I guess, like a... You know when you're on holiday and there's people trying to get you to go on boat rides or they're trying to get you to come into their restaurant? And literally, we were competing, so when a visitor was outside, there'd be the Mary Rose saying, "Hey, come and see Henry VIII's warship, the biggest Tudor collection in the world." I mean, it's amazing. And then the people next door, "Hey, come and see the Victory and the Warrior." And it just was really difficult for the customers, and for whatever reason, we weren't together and we had these two separate companies, so for quite a while, when I started, along with Helen, who was the CEO and Dominic and a gentleman called John in NMRN, we had meetings to see if we could get closer and to get a deal, and then I think Matthew joined, as well, from NMRN, and eventually we kind of got to an agreement.Dominic Jones: It was about, "What can we do together? What, collaboratively, can we do?" We came up with three things. We can sell tickets together, we could run a visitor centre together, so that's #1, the visitor side. We could market the destination together, and we could do strategic operations like events. So we then looked away and came across a deal, and for us, it was important that the two parties, so Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy had a 50/50 parity of decision so it wasn't a one-sided joint venture and it was really... There's lots of talent in both organisations, so I've always admired what the National Museum of the Royal Navy have done over the years and how they've told history and how they bring it to life, and obviously, I love the Mary Rose.Dominic Jones: And so when we put us together, it was just a real opportunity, that synergy. You know when people say "one and one and you get three", but it was exactly like that and it worked really well, so we share marketing, so marketing costs, we share, we share marketing resource, so Mary Rose marketing people work along with NMRN marketing people. We do some things independently so our trusts are independent, our conservation, our research and all that sort of stuff, that's just Mary Rose and NMRN is just that, although we are working on some projects together, but in terms of the visitor, we have one visitor centre, we have one ticket you can buy, lots of options, we could talk about that, some amazing pricing we did which allowed us to do that.Dominic Jones: Because when you're competing against each other, you almost are encouraged to discount more, so we had, at times, the National Museum of the Royal Navy who were saying Portsmouth Historic Dockyard then might have a deal on Groupon, we might have a deal on Wowcher and you'd just be discounting, discounting, discounting, and you wouldn't be really getting across the real value for the customer, so yeah, it was really hard, and I remember, we would really fight for every single visitor because, for us, 84% of our money comes from tickets, so I remember, we'd get Henry VIII down the front, out the front, we'd have him talking to the visitors, saying, "Oh", you know, and with people talking in French and he'd go up in French and say, "Well, I was the king of France. Why are you going to Victory? Come to Mary Rose." But he wouldn't be taking them away from Victory, because that would be bad, but he would be saying, "Go to both." And we'd always be positive about NMRN, but we'd also want people to come to Mary Rose because that was how we were going to survive.Kelly Molson: Just going back to those times, then, was it more like a rivalry than anything?Dominic Jones: Yeah, it was really hard.Kelly Molson: So it was really difficult?Dominic Jones: It was really hard. I mean, we all respected each other, but it was really hard. It was like one of those ferry terminals or restaurants on holiday. I mean, I remember, we would flyer, like circus marketing, bumping into the brand, resort domination, we called it. We would be literally, when it was sunny because you can't blame the weather, when it was sunny, we'd be on the beach with Mary Rose leaflets saying, "Hey, get out the cool, we're air-conditioned, come to the Mary Rose." We were literally in all the restaurants, we had colour-in sheets, "Come to...", it was all about getting everyone to come and actually, we quickly realized that the NMRN was spending so much money on getting people to Portsmouth that we needed to make sure when they're in Portsmouth, they came to the Mary Rose and we did.Dominic Jones: I mean, I look back on it now, we had adverts that had, because we'd been very lucky with Tripadvisor, five stars, I mean I would've dreamed of that at Thorpe Park, but five stars constantly so we'd have posters that say, "You've just missed the best thing to do in Portsmouth." And then another one. "Turn around." You know, like when you go to Camden Town and there's a McDonald's, a Burger King and then outside the Burger King, there's a sign. "Why are you going to Burger King? Go to McDonald's." It was like that, so it wasn't great.Kelly Molson: It's quite intense, as well, isn't it, for the visitor?Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: That's a lot of pressure.Dominic Jones: Well, it is and I would do it and I would literally go down and leave, because you've got to leave from the front, and I would put my Mary Rose coat, which I've still got here, and I'd be down the scenic and we'd be... And I remember coaches would turn up and one of the ladies who was fantastic with us, Sandra, she's now one of our Visitor Experience Managers, but she'd jump on the couch and say, "Have you booked your tickets? Where are you going? Can I tell you about the Mary Rose?" And she'd bring whole coaches in. It was hard and it was really... I went to sleep every night easy, because it was so tiring and it wasn't sustainable and we did need to get a deal, and actually, the National Museum of the Royal Navy and the Mary Rose always treated each other with respect, but it was like the Battle of Victory Gate and that's not the way to behave and that's not the long-term way to run a business.Dominic Jones: So what was really great was we've got a deal, we got the ability to sell tickets together and we got the ability to work together and there's some really super talented people in the National Museum of the Royal Navy and in Mary Rose and we did some great things, so when we reopened after COVID, we did this really cool video where we had Henry VIII and we had some of their characters from Warrior and some of their actors all visiting each other's attractions in the lift, wearing face masks, getting hand sanitiser, and it just feels joined up.Dominic Jones: I mean, I've done lots of partnerships in my career. At Merlin, we had a Sea Life in Helsinki, which was a joint venture with a theme park called Linnanmaki. If you ever get to interview this lady who ran Linnanmaki, or she might the CEO there, she was amazing, but we had this joint venture. See, it's really hard in a joint venture because, especially if it's a 50/50 parity decision one, you've got to get agreement and that means that you work really hard on doing the right thing, so what's quite nice is if we were on our own, we probably would've done marketing campaigns and other things which were okay, but because we end up working together and we've got to make sure we get that joint agreement, the results is always way better. It's brilliant. And the customers benefit, because it's one entrance, it's one ticket, there's a lot more value in it, so yeah, it's been really successful.Kelly Molson: I hadn't realised quite how intertwined the organisations were in terms of decision-making and marketing, like you say, and sharing all of those resources. You talked a little bit about the visitor centre. Did you have to change the infrastructure and stuff? Did you have to build new buildings and all of that and agree on that?Dominic Jones: Well, no, they had a big visitor centre because, I mean, they've got a lot more footprint, more attractions, they've got the Warrior, they've got M.33, they've got a Submarine Museum over in Victory and we've got the Mary Rose, which is amazing. And so we had a building called Porter's Lodge, which was here and then there's the gate, and then they had their visitor center and their visitor center was perfect, so we moved in there, but we agreed to make it look and feel like it was Mary Rose and National Museum of the Royal Navy, so we spent a bit of money on the look and feel of it, so that was good and same with the brand and the marketing and making it feel like it was something new, but yeah, so there was a bit of that.Dominic Jones: I mean, in terms of infrastructure, we went with their ticketing system because it made more sense because it would be a bigger cost for them to change. We went with some of the Mary Rose's media buying because, at the time, we were buying media cheaper and better. And actually, now, we're in the process of going to tenders together, so the digital agency, we've done together, the PR agency, we've done together and it's great because it's a bigger portfolio and you get different views, and I always think the best way to run any business, so, for example, the Mary Rose or Thorpe Park or wherever it is, to talk to your customers, to talk to your staff and then, obviously, to talk to the manage experts. And we get that in spades, because we've also got our staff and our customers and our volunteers, but we've got NMRN staff and customers and volunteers and together, we are getting some really cool ideas and things we can do, so it's working well. As you can see, 150% increase in the first year.Kelly Molson: I mean, I've read it with my own eyes.Dominic Jones: And I hope you saw, NMRN, they did a little nice fist bump reply, and it just is in the spirit of it. We are working together and I think that's so important.Kelly Molson: It is massively important. You mentioned something about pricing earlier, and we've spoken about this before, but you said that you did something interesting that you'd implemented that allowed you to grow the yield and the revenue as well. Was this something that you did jointly too?Dominic Jones: Yeah, it was. So we had to come up with a new pricing structure because we were doing something new, so they had, what was it called? Full Navy Ticket, which was for all of their attractions and we had an annual ticket, so when we merged, we had to come up with a new pricing structure and it's a good opportunity to change, and 84% of our business, our revenue comes from tickets, theirs is about, I think, 80% or so, I can't remember, so it's still important to them as well. So we had to get the pricing right and it allowed us to really think about what's the best value for the customer and what's the best thing to do that stops us having to discount heavily?Dominic Jones: So we created a... It's like a decoy pricing model, like supermarkets have been doing it for years, so if you buy one attraction, it's a really bad ticket. I mean, still, a few people buy them, it's a really bad ticket, so it was... I mean, it used to be £18. We put the price up to £24. It used to be, if you bought one ticket, you could visit that attraction all year. You can only visit it once. So we made it a really unattractive ticket, so that's your lower decoy, so the idea of that is you only buy that if all you really want to do is go to the Mary Rose or all you want to go is go to the Victory and if you've just come to see one of those things, that's the sort of money you would pay, it's very competitively priced with other things on the South Coast, so that's what we did.Dominic Jones: And then we created a Three-Attraction Ticket or Three-Ship Ticket, which was slightly more money, so that went up to £39, which was the biggest sort of sting, about a £15 increase, big, big jump. And that was an annual ticket. That was, you could pick your three attractions and visit them all year. And then we did, "But for £5 more, you could have an Ultimate Explorer and have everything including the..." And that sort of, so you've got the lower decoy, which is the single attraction, then you've got the medium decoy, which is three ships, but then you go, "Well, for £5 more, you could do everything."Dominic Jones: And 80% of people do the Ultimate Explorer and they do everything, and it's so good value. I mean, it's less than the price of a football game and football game, 50% of the time, you're disappointed, and you don't get long, do you? It is incredible value and you get to go to all the attractions, you get out on the water, it's brilliant. So we've got that. And then we were going to put in an upper decoy, now, an upper decoy is a premium, really expensive ticket, so for example, we might, "We have, at Mary Rose, you can go into the ship for £300 and have a private experience." And we were going to put that in, but actually, because the decoy system worked so well, we didn't need that so we've just kept it as Single Attraction Ticket, Three-Attraction Ticket and Ultimate Explorer and it's working really, really well.Dominic Jones: So yeah, that's our pricing. And because of that, we don't have to discount because we put all the value and loaded the value in, actually, we don't have to discount. And then, when we do discount, we want to reach the right people, so, for example, we do, between the months of November and February, we do a Loyal and Local campaign where we go out to Portsmouth and Southampton regions and we say, "Bring a bill in and you can get a considerable discount." All year round, we do a discount for people who've got a Portsmouth leisure card, so anyone who's on Universal Credit, so they get 50% off.Dominic Jones: And we do some other really cool community engagement stuff between us with schools and stuff like that, and then if we do do a discount, so discounts are still important, so there's some amazing partners out there, GetYourGuide, Picnic, lots of the providers that really support businesses, Virgin, Ticketdays, all that sort of stuff. But we do it at the right level, so we've got like a playground, so whereas before, we might have been competing against each other, thinking, "Oh, we need to discount by 40% or 50% and then give them extra commission so they push it." We now do it at a really fair level, so there is a bit of a discount, but it's not much.Dominic Jones: And then for the consumer, we want the cheapest, best-value ticket to always be on our website. And we used a couple companies, so we used a company called, they were called Brand Incrementum, they're now called Magic Little Giants, we use them, we use some insight into what previous businesses have done before, but we copied the American Six Flags website model. If you ever want a quick lesson in pricing, just go to Six Flags. Their website is that... I mean, you're into websites, right?Kelly Molson: I am.Dominic Jones: It's the best website for pricing. I love it and I check it nearly every month. It makes me laugh, how focused they are on decoy pricing and how in-your-face they are, but how you don't know it as a consumer unless you know. It's amazing. It drives my family mad. I love it. Anyway. Yeah.Kelly Molson: This decoy pricing, I've never heard that phrase, I've never heard that used in pricing before. This is all new to me.Dominic Jones: It's like supermarkets when you get... And I remember, we've got a local supermarket near us and the guy did, "buy one bottle of wine, get one wine free". And then he had, "or buy one wine for £7 or buy two for £7". We were always going to buy two for £7 or two for £8. It's all that sort of trying to encourage behaviour, but he didn't quite get it because recently, I went in, it was like, "buy one, pay for one" and I was like, "Isn't that... That's the same as normal, yeah?" "Yeah." But he's a nice guy so I bought one. Well, that's my problem.Dominic Jones: But no, it's the same way supermarkets have been doing, where they try with the club card to get you to purchase things, or they're trying to do that, and all we're trying to do is encourage everyone to go for that Ultimate Explorer, which is the best value. It's almost like you can imagine it on the website, it's got a sign saying, "Pick me." So even to the extent we still don't, this day, discount our Single Attraction Ticket on our website. We don't give any discount for it and then we give a £5 discount on the three attractions and £5 on Ultimate Explorer. But yeah, loving the pricing.Kelly Molson: Love this. This is such great insight. Thank you for sharing. This partnership is really intriguing to me because I think it seems like the perfect setup, right? Because you're literally neighbors in the same area, you could make this work really well. What advice would you give to other attractions that are thinking about partnering with other attractions? Like what would be your top tips for people to make this work well?Dominic Jones: I mean, it's really hard. You've got to think about, because often people see it as competitors, but you've got to think in terms of getting the customers or the guests or the consumers, whatever you call them, giving them the best value, and during lockdown, when we were being interviewed and stuff, we'd always say, "Come visit the Mary Rose or come visit..." Once we did the joint venture, "Come visit the Historic Dockyard. But also, if you can't come visit, go visit your local museum, go visit anyone." It's important to share that, and I think there are always benefits of working together, you're always stronger together.Dominic Jones: When I was at Oakwood Theme Park in Wales, amazing theme park, you're in West Wales and we were thinking, "Well, how do we reach further and advertise more?" And actually, we ended up working with a farm, which was a stunning farm that had rides and animals called Folly Farm down the road and we worked, then, with Manor House Wildlife Park and Heatherton, and you actually work together and you can work together and I'd always say, "Try it on something." So try it whether it's an event or try it whether it's a destination marketing campaign. I mean, we're working with the people of Portsmouth, so with... "The people of Portsmouth", that sounds a bit grand. We're working with attractions in Portsmouth on trying to get people into Portsmouth, so we do something with Portsmouth Council where the Spinnaker Tower and D-Day Museum and Mary Rose and National Museum of the Royal Navy and now Portsmouth Historical Dockyard, together, we advertise in London because actually, advertising in London individually is really expensive, but if you do it collaboratively.Dominic Jones: There's lots of ways to do stuff collaboratively and find another angle. So we've got other people on our site that we're not partners with at the moment, so the Portsmouth Naval Base Property Trust, amazing people who run some of the small boats that we did the Gunboat Race with the D-Day veterans on the weekend. Fantastic. So yesterday, we had a really great Volunteers' Tea Party to celebrate the end of volunteer and we had the volunteers from the Property Trust, we had the volunteers from the NMRN, the volunteers from the Mary Rose, there's always some synergy and I would say, in any way, find it.Dominic Jones: Everywhere I've worked, I've tried to get partnerships with local businesses, with other theme parks, with other attractions, because, actually, it's your stronger together, and if you're going, especially, after a local market, because you've always got to love your locals, that's the most important thing. If they see that you actually are the sort of people that work with each other, it makes them almost more proud of you. You remember the Game Makers in the London Olympics in 2012 and how amazing they were and how they did that sort of course where everyone was recommending all this stuff to you, that's kind of what you want, but I would find some common ground, whatever it is.Dominic Jones: Whether it's lobbying, we found common ground at Thorpe Park with other attractions to lobby the government for things, for VAT to level... Or whether it's in Oakwood, trying to get some advertising to get people from Bristol to cross the bridge to come into Wales or whether it's, I'm trying to think, in Amsterdam, we worked, so Madame Tussauds Amsterdam and Dungeons, which I was responsible for, we worked with Heineken because they had this amazing experience and with Tours & Tickets, so we'd make sure that if anyone came to Amsterdam, they came to our attractions. It's those sort of partnerships, finding the common ground and making it work.Dominic Jones: And don't be scared of it, because you are always bigger and better together and customers have so much choice, so working together delivers amazing results. I would never want to go back to not being part of a partnership with the National Museum of the Royal Navy and I would love it if we could do more. We are keen to do more with other attractions in the South to get people to come to the South Coast, to come to Hampshire. But yeah, I would definitely do...Dominic Jones: And also, you get bigger buying power, so say, for example, Merlin are really strong, so they don't necessarily need those with other partners because they can do a campaign in the press, Sun, Days Go Out and you've got all the Merlin attractions, but if you're individual attractions, you can't, so if you do a partnership with your competitors, you can then suddenly say, "Right, well, we want to do a Days Out campaign in the press between all these independent attractions."Dominic Jones: I mean, it's brilliant. I love it and I love, also, this industry, how collaborative especially the heritage side is. You can say, "Oh, I was thinking about doing this. What do you think?" Or, "What do you think about that?" And everyone will share and everyone is almost willing you to be successful. It's crazy, right? It's one of the best industries in the world. If you were in, I don't know, the restaurant business, you wouldn't be doing that, would you? Or another... It's so good. Anyway, hopefully, that answers your question.Kelly Molson: Oh, absolutely.Dominic Jones: I get very passionate about it. I'm so sorry. I love it.Kelly Molson: I'm so glad that you do because it answered my question perfectly and I think you've given so much value to listeners today in terms of all of the things that you've done, I couldn't have asked for a better response. Thank you. It's a big year for the Mary Rose, isn't it? And I think it would be very right that we talk about that. So it's your 40th year celebration this year, isn't it?Dominic Jones: Yeah, 40 years since the raising, so 1982, October. I am obviously older than you so I remember watching it on Blue Peter as a child and it was the world's first underwater live broadcast. It was watched by over 60 million people worldwide. I mean, it was amazing of its time and so yeah, 40 years, and because of that, we've now got the world's biggest Tudor collection of everyday life, there's nowhere else in the world you can get closer to Tudor and we've got the biggest maritime salvation, so we've got a lot of plans to celebrate. Unfortunately, the pandemic got in the way. During the pandemic, I'm not going to lie, it was horrific. There were times when we were drawing a list of who we were going to give the keys to, got really, really bad and it got dark for everyone and every museum, every attraction, every business, I'm not trying to say, "Oh, poor us." Everyone had that tough time.Dominic Jones: But it meant that actually investing, we were going to do another building, we were going to do a whole museum dedicated to the raising and actually, probably one of the best things that came out of it is we didn't because we got the joint venture, which is brilliant, our trading improved, we had a fantastic summer and then we were like, "Right, we should really do something for the 40th anniversary, but we can't afford taking another lease of another building or building another building, so what can we do?" And we managed to come up with a few plans, so the first thing we're doing is we're doing a TV documentary, which is going to be brilliant, coming out in October. Honestly, I've seen, they started some of the filming and the pre [inaudible 00:37:39], it's going to be brilliant.Kelly Molson: Oh, that's so exciting.Dominic Jones: I can't give too much away because we've had to sign something, but it's going to be great. And actually, we even had, because we're responsible for the wreck site, so we had Chris and Alex who helped raise the Mary Rose, our Head of Interpretation, Head of Research, amazing people, they were out diving the other day because we're still responsible for the wreck site and it just gives you goosebumps. I saw the footage and oh, it's amazing. So we got that. We're also building a 4D experience.Dominic Jones: So when we reopened last summer, we opened with this thing called 1545, which was an immersive experience and we wanted to get across the Mary Rose didn't sink on its maiden voyage, it was Henry VIII's ship that he, when he came to the throne, he commissioned two ships, the Mary Rose was one of them, it fought in lots of battles, it had a long life and then sank defending Britain in a battle, by the way, the French who were invading was twice the size of the Spanish Armada, but because history's written by the winners, we don't hear that.Dominic Jones: But amazing, so we did this amazing, immersive experience. We got Dame Judi Dench to do the voice and you feel like you're going to get sunk. Well, the ship does sink and you go under and then you go into the museum and it's so good and we were like, "We want to do something for the end. We want to have a finale that says..." Because the thing about our museum, it's authentic. There's 19,700 artifacts. You can't get that anywhere else. I mean, it's just brilliant. Anyway, so we thought, "How are we going to end this?" And the thing we don't do justice to is the finding, the raising, the excavation, all the divers, there was 500 volunteer divers. From the 1960s, people were looking for it.Dominic Jones: I mean, Alexander McKee, who found it, was on the news and people would say... It was like an Indiana Jones movie, they were saying, "Oh, he's never going to find it." And other people were looking, the Navy were looking and there was a bit in Indiana Jones where they got the map the wrong way around and all of that. Brilliant. So they found the Mary Rose and then they got Margaret Rule who was this amazing lady who had, when she went to university, I think she didn't get a place at university at first because she was a woman and this is amazing, today's day story, and she didn't dive, she was an archeologist. And then she said, "I'm going to dive." Taught herself to dive and without her, this museum, the Mary Rose wouldn't be here, so Alexander McKee, Margaret Rule, two amazing people, both of them...Kelly Molson: What a woman.Dominic Jones: Yeah, what a woman, but both of them, both of them, without them, we wouldn't be here. So we want to tell their story, but also, we want to put the guests and the visitors to what it's like to dive, so with a mixture of real-life filming, footage from these 500 volunteer divers, outtakes from the Chronicle programs that are on the BBC, including, if we can get it to look right, even His Royal Highness, Prince Charles diving. It is stunning.Dominic Jones: So we're going to take the guests on a bit of a pre-show with the history, then they're going to get into the 4D theater and it'd be like you were boarding a red, going out to the wreck site, there'll be a dive briefing, you'll have the wind in your hair, the seats will be buzzing, but I'm hoping it's this good. I better ring the people after this [inaudible 00:40:38].Kelly Molson: You're really building it up, Dominic.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Well, it better deliver. No, they're brilliant. Figment are amazing. They're so good. So you get in there and then you dive and then you go down and you see what it's like to be under the water. The Royal Engineers were involved, the divers were involved and then you'll be there when the Mary Rose is raised, we're even going to recreate the moment where it... Oh, it'll be brilliant.Dominic Jones: So in answer to your question, we're doing a documentary and a 4D experience, and we've got anniversary lectures so if you're around in October, come and get involved. We've got a lot of people, from historians to divers to... Just talking about the relevance of the Mary Rose and the history of it, and also the diving, and we've got a new coffee table book coming out, so we've got lots and lots and lots going on.Kelly Molson: Oh, my goodness. It's all going on.Dominic Jones: And if we'd have done it the old way, if we'd have done it with a new museum and a new building, I don't think it would've been as good. I mean, I joined the Divers' Legacy group, so about 150 of the divers, on a Zoom call a few weeks ago and it's just, it takes you... These people, who, some of them are retired now or bear in mind this was 40, 50 years ago and hearing their stories and it's living history and it's so important that we tell these stories and capture them now, because in 50 years, they won't be here, and part of our responsibility, our charity objectives, if you like, is to tell the story and forever, and I think that bit of the story's missing, so if that's one thing that we do while I'm at the Mary Rose, I'll be really proud.Kelly Molson: Ah, that is wonderful. And it is [inaudible 00:42:12].Dominic Jones: You have to come, right? You're going to have to come.Kelly Molson: Well, this is the question. When do I need to come to experience everything that you've just sold to me? Because I am sold.Dominic Jones: Yeah. You probably want to come after our anniversary, because we're hoping to launch all this around that time, which is in October, which is, now, this is an interesting one because this was a good conversation with our trustees and our board. "Do you want to launch something in the off-peak period? Don't you want to launch it at Easter or the summer or..." And my view is we should launch it because it's the right thing to do and we're launching this in October because it's a legacy, we want the divers there, we want as many of them there as possible and it's going to be at the Mary Rose forever. This is the ending to the Mary Rose Museum. So it's not like we're launching something for Easter or summer, so we are going to launch it in October, so I'll let you know the details, come and get involved.Kelly Molson: All right, absolutely. I am there. If it's as good as what you've just described, then it's going to be one amazing day out.Dominic Jones: It'd be better. And then, and final thing, sorry, which we're not doing, but I wanted to do is we've still got some of the Mary Rose down in the ocean, so one day, I'd like to bring that back up. I don't think I'll be here to do that because it's probably be in 15 years' time or something because we need to raise a lot of money and do that, but we want to bring the rest of her back up or whatever's left down there back up, and that's quite exciting because our story continues. We still do research.Dominic Jones: We did this fantastic piece of research on skeletons, on human remains. It's a really cool diversity story. Out of the eight skeletons, one was Spanish, one was Venetian, two were North African, second generation, not slaves, a real diversity story in Tudor England. Amazing. Maybe the Victorians whitewashed history. Who knows? But what a great story. And we keep learning and we've got this amazing team of curatorial staff and all of our staff, from the maintenance to the visitor staff to the volunteers and every day, we learn something new, so [inaudible 00:44:03] we want to do. And then, at some point... Have you seen The Dig on Netflix?Kelly Molson: Yes. Yes.Dominic Jones: Great film.Kelly Molson: So good.Dominic Jones: Great film, but I want to write to Netflix to do The Dive. Can you imagine? This story about human endeavor with the Mary Rose? It'd be amazing, so we'd like to do that as well at some point, but we just don't have enough hours in the day, right?Kelly Molson: No. Just add it onto that long list of stuff.Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow. Thank you.Dominic Jones: So if you know anyone in Netflix, let us know, or if anyone from Netflix is listening, get in touch, we want to do that. It'd be cool.Kelly Molson: I would love it.Dominic Jones: I've already casted.Kelly Molson: If someone from Netflix was listening, that would be incredible. Who have you casted?Dominic Jones: Well, so local, because you've got to get local, so for Margaret Rule, I reckon Kate Winslet, she'd do a good job. Great actress. I mean, we've already got Dame Judi Dench, so the same sort of caliber in our 1545 experience, and then also another local who could bring the Alexander McKee, Kenneth Branagh, but to be honest with you, Netflix can do all of that, because let's be honest, I'm not going to make movies, am I? I'm running a museum. But I just think it'd be really cool. It'd be really cool.Kelly Molson: I don't think there's anything that you couldn't do, Dominic, to be honest, after this podcast, so who knows?Dominic Jones: It'd be really cool. Yeah, who knows?Kelly Molson: All right, last question for you, a book that you love that you'd recommend to our listeners?Dominic Jones: I love this question and I really struggled, so I went back and thought about a work example, because I think that's probably more useful, so in all of my career, I've come across lots of people who talk about strategy and I have my own view on what strategy is, but there are lots of books you can read about strategy and there's only one book, in my opinion, that is worth reading and it's this, Good Strategy/Bad Strategy. Hopefully, it's still in print. It is the only book to read on strategy. It's the best book I've... And without this book, I don't think I would've been able to do half the stuff that I've done, because it's all about how you formulate your decisions, how you make your decisions, what the outcome is, it's about execution, it's about everything that, for me, you need to be successful, so I recommend this book. Really good book.Kelly Molson: Good Strategy/Bad Strategy. I have not read that book, but I feel like that's going to go...Dominic Jones: You should read it.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's going to go top of my pile. All right, listeners, if you want to win a copy of this book, as ever, if you just go over to our Twitter account and you retweet this podcast announcement with the words, "I want Dominic's book." And then you will be in with a chance of winning it. Oh, my goodness. I have had such a good time listening to you today. Thank you so much for coming on and sharing. It's been so valuable. Yeah, that's blown me away today. I'm very excited about coming to visit and thank you for sharing the insight into your partnerships.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Absolute pleasure. And thanks for being kind with the icebreakers, you're going to get the rubber, that's going to your collection.Kelly Molson: Oh, yay. A rubber rubber.Dominic Jones: Because I was really upset that you've got a rubber collection without the Mary Rose. That actually hurt my feelings. It hurt my feelings.Kelly Molson: Well, I'm sorry, I've never actually visited the Mary Rose.Dominic Jones: Well, we're going to put that right.Kelly Molson: We are going to change this, aren't we? So yeah, I'm sorry. I will come and get my rubber in-person, then. Don't post it to me. I'll come and get it in-person when I come and visit.Dominic Jones: Yeah, let's do that. Thank you. Keep it up.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five-star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Comsteria Podcast
Quick guide to deals and discount websites

Comsteria Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 1:19


If you're looking for something to do and keen to save money over the summer then today's quick guide to online deals websites is for you.   And we start with ‘itison.com' which launched in Scotland but has now expanded to other cities throughout the UK.   You can browse the listings, search, or join and tell is what you're interested in and receive personalised deals.   There's everything from afternoon tea to short breaks and hotel stays, concerts, health and beauty treatments and money off shopping vouchers.   There's also groupon.co.uk which is offering further discounts to new customers - one thing I've noticed on Groupon in particular is a move away from high end luxury experiences to more day to day shopping deals and essentials such as socks, tops and even toilet rolls, so long as you don't mind buying in bulk and storing have somewhere to store them.   As I always say if you live somewhere with space to store 90 toilet rolls I'n not sure you'd need to look for a cheap deal.   Other sites worth a look include VoucherCodes, Wowcher and HotUKDeals.   You'll always save more if you don't mind switching to a less known brand and there are further savings if you make group bookings so if you've a bunch of friends that can all do the same thing together, you'll see some of the best deals.   As always, read the small print or ask so you're clear exactly what you're buying and when it expires.

Professional Technical Interviewee with Taylor Dorsett
Episode #32 - Chris Powers - Professional Technical Interviewee with Taylor Dorsett

Professional Technical Interviewee with Taylor Dorsett

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 48:23


My guest today is Chris Powers who is currently the Director of Engineering at Chegg (Thinkful), before that he was Director of Engineering and Engineering Manager at Sprout Social and Groupon. Chris also regularly speak at technical conferences. Video: https://youtu.be/IR0QyGYYTb0 Part Two - Technical: https://youtu.be/HY0t7XYl1rE Audio only: https://professionaltechnicalintervieweewithtaylordorsett.podbean.com/e/episode-32-chris-powers-professional-technical-interviewee-with-taylor-dorsett/ Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/7zvt9QZWMUGsQ27NM8XuMd?si=272649053fbf4c03 Apple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/professional-technical-interviewee-with-taylor-dorsett/id1557937961 Guests: Chris Powers LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-powers-b415a4122/ Website: https://www.chegg.com/ If you enjoyed the show please subscribe, thumbs up, and share the show. Episodes released on the first four Thursdays of each month. Host: Taylor Owen Dorsett Email: dorsetttaylordev@gmail.com Twitter: @yodorsett LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/taylordorsett/ Github: https://github.com/TaylorOD Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TaylorDorsett Editor: Dustin Bays Email: dustin.bays@baysbrass.com

Art of the Float
254: We Ain't Inflation Proof

Art of the Float

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 62:07


Inflaaaaaation! Yup. We said it. Many of us in the float world are feeling it - inflation has been an issue for a long while now, and it's starting to make an impact for many businesses that rely on disposable income spending. From gas prices to the other G word - Groupon - you'll hear what's happening across our co-hosts' centers, including those who have been running strong schedules at capacity for a while. Someone might start driving a truck, someone is giving away services, and someone is looking for more ways to connect with local businesses. For added fun, you'll hear from a podcast crasher near the end of the episode! Be sure to take notes on nurturing your current guests, how to bring in new audiences, and being smart with your spending. Links Art of the Float Groupon Episode (https://artofthefloat.com/2019/07/groupon-bum-bum-bummm/) Search Art of the Float for Groupon articles and episodes (https://artofthefloat.com/?s=groupon) Sponsors HelmBot (https://Helmbot.com) I-Sopod Float Tank (https://i-sopod.com) Mindfull Solutions (https://mindfull.solutions) Art of the Float Store (Shop.artofthefloat.com)

Performance Marketer
Groupon Push Marketing Strategy: 17 Things a Killer Push Pipeline Must Include (Part 2)

Performance Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 17:38


Hey Performance Marketers, Last time we started talking about the Groupon business model, and in this episode, I'm going to wrap up the topic!  Today I'm focusing more on the company's push marketing strategy and the way they're generating their impressive revenue. I'm also playing with numbers, but this time really HUGE ones.You don't believe me? What if I told you that Groupon is sending 15 billion messages a month through email, SMS, and apps. Yeap, 15 billion! Or think of this - we said that Groupon has 24 million active users. That means they might have a few billion emails in their database.Pretty impressive numbers, I say!If you join me for this episode, you'll also find out 17 things that Groupon sees as the most important for their push pipeline programs.So, tune in and find out a ton of details you should be aware of when running an email campaign, which little thing can increase your revenue by as much as 800%, and even how to win free Mets tickets!Let's dive in!Key Takeaways:Intro (00:00)How does Groupon generate all its revenue? (00:58)Most important things in email marketing (03:15)Importance of personalizing your messaging (04:50)17 most important things for any of Groupon's push pipeline programs (05:54)Want to sell your business for $36m? Go follow this model! (13:50)Win free Mets tickets (15:58)Additional Resources:- Eric Beer's One Affiliate Offer Challenge- Sign up for the SurveyDetective VIP Waitlist (Coming Soon)---Connect with Eric!- Join Eric's Text Community: 917-636-1998- Eric's website: https://ericbeer.com- Follow Eric on Instagram.- Subscribe to Eric's YouTube Channel.---Follow the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher, TuneIn, or anywhere else you listen to your podcasts.If you haven't already, please rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts!

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
Hour 1: Waving At Cruise Ships

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 40:19 Very Popular


Does anyone still use Groupon? What signifies a boat becoming a yacht? Do you ever buy clothes as motivation? The crew answers these questions and more. Plus, Greg Cote is angry over the lack of promotion for this week's Greg Cote Show with Greg Cote, so we call Greg Cote. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unlearn
The Power of Leading by Example with Cecelia Myers

Unlearn

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 35:37


Cecelia Myers is the VP of Digital at CDW, where she leads their product management, design, demand generation, customer integration, and merchandising teams. She has a deep breadth of experience from a variety of high-profile startups and tech companies and uses that to create a culture of empowerment and openness at CDW. She is a builder of new experiences and business models from co-founding a startup to the Fortune 500, a design thinker, a survivor of lymphoma, and a voracious reader. She joins Barry O'Reilly today, to talk about how you need to bring yourself to your organization to create the kind of culture you want to build.  Following Interests and Opportunities where they Lead Cecelia left university with one of those “never land a job” majors – but she didn't have that problem, becoming a personal archivist at a startup that managed documents for high net-worth people. This company didn't survive the 2008 crash, but Cecelia was invited by the VC foundry that had funded the company to join them. There, she co-founded CakeStyle, leading and working in every aspect of the business. Intimate Understanding of the Problem Do you understand the problem you're trying to solve? People often think they know, Cecelia notes, but unless you're digging deep into the heart of things, it's a hard thing to understand. Intimate knowledge of what is really happening at a company is hard to replace with any kind of experience or education. There's something energizing about connecting at a visceral level to what you're doing – it can be really fun! Unlearning Old Skills Moving into a company like Groupon, which was so new and so technology-driven was a culture shock. Politics, senior leadership, red tape – it meant having to convince finance departments and leadership that ideas were worth trying. For someone used to having control of the vision, having to work with so many other heavily involved people was a challenge, but ultimately a chance to exercise that skill of digging in deep to the business and influencing others. It was a whole new scope of managing people and leading teams. You're not Scaling Yourself Cecelia would advise new leaders and product managers to focus on empowering teams to do the work. Leaders need to hire the right people, give them the vision, and support them in accomplishing it. They should ONLY be focusing on that, not scaling or promoting themselves. Cecelia notes that her education and passion for reading has been extremely valuable in learning to create those kinds of environments. Reading shows you a lot of different ways of communicating. Her most important tip? Start with the end and make the most important point at the beginning. Leading by Example Barry asks Cecelia what skills she has had to develop, working for a huge organization like CDW. When you don't know everyone that you're working with and responsible for, you have to find new ways to communicate with them. She emphasizes the importance of sharing yourself and being yourself to be more available and approachable when people need you. The key message to communicate is that we're not really different people - we just have different roles in the business. You need to convey that it's okay to bring yourself to work.  Looking forward Cecelia is looking forward to watching CDW evolve and go to market as a technology first, and how cool it would be to see a commercial featuring the products they are building. Seeing a company grow into being a market leader, and a place that attracts talent is inspiring. “It's one of those gems that people don't really know about.” Go to Barry O'Reilly for full show notes. Resources Cecelia Myers on the web | LinkedIn CDW

Making Money Personal
Vacation Planning & Budgeting - Money Tip Tuesday

Making Money Personal

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 4:10


With the weather getting warmer and summer right around the corner, your mind may begin to wander toward a nice relaxing vacation. However, as you probably know, it is very easy to overspend on vacation, so you may want to consider planning your budget ahead of time. This tip shares some things to keep in mind while planning your dream vacation. Learn more about making a vacation budget Airbnb information: https://www.airbnb.com/ Value Penguin personal finance website: https://www.valuepenguin.com/average-cost-vacation Information on hotel fees: https://www.neamb.com/travel-and-vacations/10-annoying-hotel-fees-and-how-to-avoid-them Travel Zoo website: https://www.travelzoo.com/ Visit Groupon's website for discounts on tickets: https://www.groupon.com/ Like what you heard? Go ahead and share on your social media! Visit trianglecu.org to learn more about how we can serve you and don't forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter! Transcript:  Welcome to Money Tip Tuesday from the Making Money Personal Podcast.  First, come up with a list of places you'd like to go. Travel can be really expensive, so figure out how you are going to get there. If you plan on going overseas, the only real option you have is to take a plane. Even if you aren't going overseas, but it's still far away, it might be more cost effective and time efficient to take a plane. If you're not going too far and have access to a car, driving might be the way to go. If you go this route, figure out how far you will have to drive and how much gas you will need. Other alternative transportation such as buses and trains are also available and may be cheaper than driving yourself.  When traveling, it can be easy to go over budget. According to ValuePenguin, a personal finance website, the average American family spends 44% of their vacation budget on traveling to and from the destination. When flying, it doesn't help that airlines are constantly pushing more and more expenses to your bill. Things like flight insurance, in-flight meals and beverages, and in-flight entertainment, while nice to have, increase the cost of your travel and aren't necessary. However, some credit cards offer travel rewards, so you may get some money back by using them. Some airlines also have reward programs for flying with them.   Next, decide where you are going to stay. According to ValuePenguin, lodging on average takes up 26% of travel costs domestically and 21% internationally. Hotels and motels are usually the go-to choice, with motels typically being cheaper. Hotels are typically nicer than motels but can have a lot of fees that you may not know about. Hotels often charge for mini-bar and snacks, parking, early check in or late check out, and more. Air BnBs are a newer option, where you can rent someone's house or room. This will give you a homier location, and you can choose which Air BnB is best for your price range. You can choose the location of where you want to stay, what type of housing you'd like, and what amenities you want, which may include a kitchen, and this brings us to our next topic of food.   What and where you are going to eat is important to budget out, too. Do you plan on eating all your meals out at restaurants? This will fill up your budget very quickly. Some hotels and Air BnBs have kitchens included, so you can bring your own ingredients and food to make your own meals. This is a cheaper option and will allow you to budget some money for more fun and exciting activities.   Finally, it's time to plan out what you want to do on this vacation. Are there any national parks to explore? Or maybe a theme park is more your style. Like all the other things, create a budget where you don't overspend, but are still able to do what you want and relax. You may want to check Groupon or Travelzoo to see if they have any deals for your activities. Your local library may also have coupons that you can use on your vacation.   Planning your next vacation can be stressful, but it's better to do it now so you aren't stressed while on your vacation and can be completely relaxed.   If you found this episode helpful, we'd like to hear from you about thoughts on this show or maybe you have some ideas on other topics we should cover, email us at tcupodcast@trianglecu.org. Be sure to subscribe to the Making Money Personal podcast for our full episodes and weekly Money Tips wherever you listen to podcasts and follow us on Facebook for more great content.  On behalf of the podcast team, thank you to our sponsor, Triangle Credit Union, and thank you, as always, for listening.  Have a great day everyone! 

Alles auf Aktien
Amazon so billig wie 2009 und Wasserstoff-Aktie mit KGV 3

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 16:34


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Daniel Eckert und Holger Zschäpitz über das Stühlerücken im Dax mit unerwarteten Folgen, um Aufregung um den Ratenkredit von Apple und über vielsagende Insider-Geschäfte. Außerdem geht es um Deutsche Bank, Commerzbank, Tesla, Twitter, Affirm, iShares Core Dax ETF (WKN: 593393), Xtrackers Dax (WKN: DBX1DA), BMW, SAP, Allianz, E.on, Deutscher Post, RWE, Drägerwerk, ProSiebenSat.1, Teleservice, CTS Eventim, Rheinmetall, Mr. Spex, Einhell, Schaeffler, Knaus Tabbert, Knorr-Bremse, Siltronic, 7C Solarparken, Deutsche Telekom, Suse, Aixtron, iHeartmedia, Coinbase, Occidental Petroleum, Fiserv, Groupon, Paramount, Starbucks, Rivian, Eli Lilly, Arista, AirBnB, Nvidia, Moderna, Industrie De Nora, ThyssenKrupp. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Hörtipps: Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Außerdem bei WELT: Im werktäglichen Podcast „Kick-off Politik - Das bringt der Tag“ geben wir Ihnen im Gespräch mit WELT-Experten die wichtigsten Hintergrundinformationen zu einem politischen Top-Thema des Tages. Mehr auf welt.de/kickoff und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

The Struggle Well Project
Teen Friendships, False Eyelashes & Parking Lot Relationships

The Struggle Well Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 3:04


What you are hearing right now is a clip from one of our Patreon episodes. If you want to join the Patreon community, head on over here to receive this episode and many many more! You can also get the unedited video version of each Patreon episode if you want to see all of the bloopers before your very eyes. You won't regret it, see you soon! Have you found success with false eyelashes? We explore this phenomenon on camera today… better late than never, right?! We also discuss how involved should you get in your kid's relationships, consequences of trying to save a buck on Groupon and fun ways to stay connected during periods of family separation.  WHAT WE CHAT ABOUT: Stash it or Trash it: Lanvier Reusable 3D Magnetic False Eyelashes Stash it or Trash it follow up: The Brow Trio Our makeup brush cleaning “routines” KS: Groupon Chiropractor, scary parking lot meetings, curly hair cuts GL: lessons in keeping in touch during military deployment, Mrs. Grossman's Sticker Club, Small kindness can make a huge difference  CONNECT WITH REBECCA: website | instagram | patreon CONNECT WITH KATE: instagram | website | patreon CONNECT WITH EMILY: website | instagram | facebook | patreon SHARE THE STRUGGLE! If you've been encouraged, share this episode with a friend.  The struggle is real.  We might as well do this together! Do you love Mom Struggling Well? Please leave a review here! LINKS MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Patreon | Amazon *Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.  THE HIGHLIGHT EPISODES: Just Em | Meet Rebecca | Problem Solved | Meet Kate | A Celebration | Moms Struggling Well

Performance Marketer
Groupon Push Marketing Example: How to Replicate the Groupon Business Model (Part 1)

Performance Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 39:23


Hey, Performance Marketers! I have a treat for you today. It's something you asked me to do. Actually, a few weeks back, I posted something about Groupon and their push marketing. I also said that I'd be glad to dive into the company if you wanted me to go further into the details. You said yes, and here I am! Today, we're going to look at the Groupon company. In addition to its revenues and marketing strategy, I'm going to give you a high-level view of its journey from 2001 (when it went public and IPOed for a big number - $12.7 billion!). As always, the best part (and the greatest value) of my presentation is the fact that if you understand this, you can put together a strategy for any business. Once you crack the code and figure out the numbers I'm explaining, you'll be able to hack any company (private or public) you like.And you don't have to be a genius for this. You'll be able to literally model what you know works!So, let's dive in and see what works for Groupon!  Key Takeaways:Intro (00:00)Public vs. private company (02:17)What does Groupon do? (03:16)Who does Groupon target? (07:16) Who does this work well for on the merchant side? (11:26)Let's talk about Groupon's numbers (15:49)What numbers really matter? (24:41)Modeling similar business - the value of the company (29:45)Additional Resources:- Eric Beer's One Affiliate Offer Challenge- Sign up for the SurveyDetective VIP Waitlist (Coming Soon)---Connect with Eric!- Join Eric's Text Community: 917-636-1998- Eric's website: https://ericbeer.com- Follow Eric on Instagram.- Subscribe to Eric's YouTube Channel.---Follow the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, Stitcher, TuneIn, or anywhere else you listen to your podcasts.If you haven't already, please rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts!

Feed Your Brain - Future of Tech, Strategy in Business and Digital Innovation
145 - Stephan Heller: A crazy 15-year startup journey incl. IPO and Scaling at Groupon, Building Watchmaster.com, Angel Investing and building a fund of fund vehicle now

Feed Your Brain - Future of Tech, Strategy in Business and Digital Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 50:19


"There was so much pain that just went into this and so much blood, sweat, and tears, personal commitment, you know, working really for three, four years, not sleeping, not having a personal life in that sense. And suddenly this whole thing, that's to fall apart." It didn't take long for founder and entrepreneur Stephan Heller to move on and start something new after selling his previous company. In this episode, Stephan reflects on his experiences working with startups over the years and shares the lessons he's learned. We also learn about his current project, AlphaQ, which was founded with the goal of creating an innovative, unique fund of funds structure that has the vision of being listed on the stock exchange and thus democratizing access to venture capital. Learn more about AlphaQ Venture Capital: https://www.aqvc.com/ Stephan's Recommendations To read: Ray Dalio Books The Score Takes Care of Itself To watch: The Last Dance Let's Connect! Connect with Stephan Connect with Max Connect with Mike

The Coast Host
Episode 9: My 5 Favorite Rental Must-haves

The Coast Host

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 16:54


If you own a short-term rental, full-furnished long-term rental, or a vacation rental, I always have a list of maybe no-so-common items that make the guests happier and your life easier as a host/owner. Here's a few of my favs: 1. Smart Locks: Wyze Lock Bolt, Schlage Smart Deadbolt, Schlage Smart Handle Lock 2. Tool Box: Amazon under $50 3. Chargers: Various types for iphones, android & USB-C 4. Night Lights: automatic sensor included. Vont brand on amazon (plugs in to outlet), Wyze rechargeable to place anywhere on a wall (no outlet needed) 5. Black-out curtains: Groupon under $35, Amazon Eclipse Brand 2 panels $35 Other nice to haves: - Swiffer & hand-held vacuum - Hooks to hang towels & wet items: Command brand brushed nickel metal hooks ~$20 - Hair dryer - Luggage Rack - Notepads & pens Don't forget to check out my Instagram at Thecoast.host and Facebook at The Coast Host. You can also contact me via email at thecoasthost@mail.com. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Australian Seller
TAS 126 – $3.0 Million on Amazon per year selling sunglasses & building the Woodies brand with Cory Stout.

The Australian Seller

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 43:40


This week's episode is a fun one. Cory Stout's story is amazing. He's gone from selling watches on Groupon – he sold 7,000 watches in 1 day – but what should have been cause for celebration, in fact had disastrous consequences … He's now running the biggest wood-frame sunglasses brand on Amazon. He has a […] The post TAS 126 – $3.0 Million on Amazon per year selling sunglasses & building the Woodies brand with Cory Stout. appeared first on The Australian Seller .

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast
Kathleen Jennings On What Actually Works In The Beauty, Skin, & Products Industry

The Skinny Confidential Him & Her Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 61:20 Very Popular


#459: Today we are joined by Kathleen Jennings. Kathleen is a former attorney, mother of three, self prcolaimed makeup nerd and skincare fanatic. Kahtleen founded the BeautyNow app with certain assets that were acquired by Groupon, Inc. in 2016. Today she joins the show to discuss what actually works when it comes to skincare, beauty, makeup, and products industry.  To connect with Lauryn Evarts click HERE To connect with Michael Bosstick click HERE Read More on The Skinny Confidential HERE For Detailed Show Notes visit TSCPODCAST.COM This episode is brought to you by Feel Free from Botanic Tonics. If you are looking for an alcohol alternative try this euphoric kava drink and get 40% off your order or subscription by using either code SKINNY40 or code SKINNY240 at www.botanictonics.com  This episode is brought to you by Sakara This year, turn your resolutions into reality. Whether you're looking to try plant-based eating, build an empowered body, boost skin's glow, or simply feel your very best, Sakara makes it easy to create rituals that last. Sakara is a wellness company rooted in the transformative power of plant-based food. Their menu of creative, chef-crafted breakfasts, lunches, and dinners changes weekly, so you'll never get bored. And it's delivered fresh, anywhere in the U.S. And right now, Sakara is offering our listeners 20% off their first order when they go to www.sakara.com/skinny and enter code SKINNY at checkout. Produced by Dear Media   

Valley Girl Tan
You Charge Peanuts, People Expect Monkeys .

Valley Girl Tan

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 4:31


In this episode, Amber will discuss why it is important to provide value to your customers and how to value yourself. I will also give my take on Groupon and why I no longer use it. Don't forget to like and subscribe :)

Comment t'as fait ? Les rencontres d'entrepreneurs.
#58 Frank Zorn (Deskeo) - Comment t'as fait pour connaître le communisme... puis créer des startups à succès comme Groupon et Deskeo ?

Comment t'as fait ? Les rencontres d'entrepreneurs.

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 67:33


Frank Zorn, c'est l'histoire d'un homme né en Allemagne de l'Est ayant passé son bac au moment de la chute du mur de Berlin qui débute par un stage chez eBay... pour ensuite devenir DG de Groupon France et co-fondateur de Deskeo, le leader des marchés de bureaux flexibles avec services (plus de 90 collaborateurs, 75000m2 de bureaux proposés à Shell, Frichti ou encore Spotify) ! Un parcours impressionnant, sans oublier son passage chez Rocket Internet, cette fameuse société qui a pour modèle de "copier" (selon leurs détracteurs), d'adapter et perfectionner des concepts de commerce en ligne à succès pour leurs promoteurs. Dans cet épisode, Frank revient sur son parcours, nous explique comment il a fait pour passer de stagiaire chez eBay à un poste à responsabilité pour accompagner l'hypercroissance de ce site web dans les années 2000. Il revient sur l'importance de vérifier la disponibilité de son nom de marque au lancement de son entreprise, sur comment il a suivi sa femme à Paris en 2008 et appris ainsi le français ou encore sa situation à la sortie de l'INSEAD lorsqu'il arrive sur le marché du travail français en pleine crise financière de 2009 sans réellement parler la langue. Il nous partage également comment il a fait pour faire face à un défaut d'actionnaire : une situation pas si courante mais pourtant possible. Frank nous explique comment l'idée de Deskeo est venue, c'est à dire les problématiques rencontrées pour trouver des bureaux assez flexibles capables d'accompagner des croissances rapides d'équipe, passant de quelques collaborateurs à plus de 80, voire plusieurs centaines. La solution n'existe pas sur le marché ? Dans ce cas, Frank se lance et co-fonde avec Benjamin Teboul, son courtier en immobilier de l'époque, la société Deskeo. Avec un modèle challengeant celui des espaces de coworking traditionnels : à découvrir en détails dans l'épisode. Enfin, il nous explique en quoi le covid-19 a impacté son activité de location de bureaux avec notamment des équipes potentiellement en télétravail et un nouveau mode de travail en cours de développement. Un épisode riche en apprentissages ! Chapitres :  11'42 Comment t'as fait pour passer d'un stage chez eBay à VP de Groupon France ? 29'29  Comment t'as fait pour challenger le modèle économique des locations d'espaces de travail ou de bureaux ? 47'35 Comment t'as fait pour adapter ton activité à la crise du Covid-19 ? ----------------------

Comment t'as fait ? Les rencontres d'entrepreneurs.
Extrait #58 - Frank Zorn (Deskeo) et ses apprentissages lors de son passage chez Rocket Internet

Comment t'as fait ? Les rencontres d'entrepreneurs.

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 3:45


Frank Zorn ou comment son passage chez Rocket Internet à Berlin (entreprise autant plébiscitée que critiquée du fait de son modèle consistant à adapter et perfectionner des concepts de commerce en ligne à succès, souvent américains) lui a permis d'apprendre énormément pour lancer ses projets entrepreneuriaux et connaître la réussite (CityDeal devenu Groupon, Deskeo...). Attention, des idées reçues... challengées ! L'épisode complet arrive... très vite. ----------------------

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
Linum Home Textiles Children's Robes Are Flammable

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 1:13


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/fqF7bzikebc   The CPSC and Linum Home Textiles now recall Linum Home Textiles children's robes.  These robes do not meet federal flammability safety standards for children's sleepwear and create a risk of burn injuries.  About 44,600 of these robes were sold online at Amazon.com, QVC.com, Overstock.com, Groupon.com, Wayfair.com, Zulily.com, Bedbathandbeyond.com, Boscovs.com, Houzz.com, JCPenney.com, Kohls.com, Linumtowels.com and TorreyCommerce.com.  Do not permit your children to wear these robes.  Contact Linum Home Textiles by phone at 1-855-933-0300 or via email at recall@linumhometextiles.com for a prepaid mailer to return the items for a full refund.   https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2022/Linum-Home-Textiles-Recalls-Childrens-Robes-Due-to-Violation-of-Federal-Flammability-Standards-and-Burn-Hazard   #linumhonetesxtiles #robes #children #flammable #burns #recall  

Not To Be Technical
43: Mother's Day Gift Guide & Actual Hypnosis

Not To Be Technical

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 67:04


Mother's Day is here and we have an extensive, last-minute gift guide, but first... Nafis recounts getting hypnotized on stage by a comedian/hypnotist named Flip Orley and the lasting effects of it. (2:07) Follow-Ups:Our Yelp Elite competition is heating up and one of us has been nominated and recommended to Fort Lauderdale's Yelp Elite Chapter. (9:40)Marketing Team Updates:Stickers are here - reach out on Instagram if you want some! (14:30)Facebook killed its own podcast platform after less than a year.  (16:35)We are on a whole ass billboard in Fort Lauderdale.  (19:51)Trending Tech:CNN+ was killed only 23 days after launch.  (21:47)Paramount Plus subscribers have grown to nearly 40 million. (24:21)Netflix is cracking down on account sharing and will charge a fee soon. (30:22)With the rising use of smartphones among tweens, we share some data and recount our experiences. (34:00)Mother's Day Gift Guide (43:08):Air Fryers or Coffee Bean GrindersHot Tip: get a gift for mom, not for the household. Home Meal Food Kits: HelloFresh, BlueApron, GreenChef, or GobbleHouse Cleaning - Use Thumbtack.A MasterClass subscriptionRecently - turns photos into a magazine.Spa Sets, Oil Diffusers, Air Purifiers, or Eye Massagers."Save for a Rainy Day" gifts: Amazon Alexa Devices, iPads, AirTags, Apple Watches, or Kindles.Tri-Fold Lighted MirrorAn actual experience and spending time with Mom! Don't sleep on Groupon for ideas.-----------------------------------   Support The Podcast:InstagramTwitterApple PodcastsSpotify 

Cuentos Corporativos
EP #115 - T3. TAXDOWN. Revolucionar el mundo de los impurstos.- Conoce a Thomas A. Matamala.

Cuentos Corporativos

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 57:06


Este episodio es presentado por Jeeves, la plataforma financiera global todo-en-uno para manejar tus gastos empresariales, solicitar financiamiento y obtener beneficios inigualables. Solicita tus tarjetas de crédito físicas y virtuales para tu startup o empresa y haz despegar tu negocio. Usa el código CUENTOS en su website o haz clic aquí para registrarte Thomas A. Matamala es un joven, nacido en California, que de muy pequeño se muda a Chile donde estudio Ingeniería Comercial y posteriormente un Máster en Marketing, ambos en la Universidad Andrés Bello. Inicio su carrera profesional como Jefe de Importaciones y Operaciones en empresas como Groupon y Glovo. Por lo que hoy cuenta con más de nueve años de experiencia en gestión de equipos, comercio electrónico, operaciones, ventas y negociación en América Latina y España. Hoy es Founders Office (Strategy and Expansion) en TaxDown, donde lidera desde hace cuatro años la apertura de oficinas, expandiendo la Fintech europea que ha revolucionado el mundo de las declaraciones anuales para personas físicas, ahora hacia México y LATAM. TaxDown es una plataforma de Inteligencia Artificial para realizar declaraciones de impuestos. Sus servicios incluyen un asesor en línea, chat, presentación de la declaración de la mano del usuario y el seguimiento hasta que la devolución del contribuyente esté en su cuenta bancaria. Recientemente, cerraron su ronda de capital por $6 mdp en la que participaron fondos que han invertido en referentes como Rappi y NuBank. Con esta ronda de inversión, su meta es llegar a un millón de usuarios. Síguenos en: www.cuentoscorporativos.com Newsletter. Escribe una Reseña Encuesta Audiencia Nuestras redes sociales: Facebook Instagram. Linkedin. Twitter También puedes escribirnos a adolfo@cuentoscorporativos.com

Her Brilliant Health Radio
Prevent & Reverse the #1 Killer of Women At Midlife: Heart Disease

Her Brilliant Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 38:24


Do you know what the number one killer of women is in midlife? If you said heart disease, you're right!   In this episode of The Hormone Prescription Podcast, Dr. Beverly Yates joins us to share her knowledge of how to prevent and reverse heart disease.   Dr. Yates is a leading expert in natural hormone replacement therapy and has helped countless women achieve optimum health and well-being. In this conversation, she shares her insights on how the menopause transition can impact heart health and what steps we can take to protect ourselves.   You'll learn about:   -The link between hormones and heart health   -The impact of the menopause transition on heart health   -How to prevent and reverse heart disease   -And much more!   If you're concerned about your heart health or want to learn how to protect yourself from this deadly disease, this episode is a must-listen. Tune in now!   [01:03] So without further ado, I will tell you a little bit about Dr. Beverly Yates, and then we will started, she's done a lot of stuff ladies. So her bio is very substantial. So here we go. Dr. Beverly Yates, naturopathic doctors, a diabetes expert, an author who has over 28 years of experience of working with those who struggle with blood sugar issues related to type two diabetes and pre-diabetes and feel like nothing works for them.   [02:03] Dr. Yates creates breakthrough changes in the habits that cause blood sugar issues. This allows her clients to finally get off of the blood sugar roller coaster, have more energy and create the level of health that lets them live the life of their dreams. She is the creator of the Ys protocol, a simple and effective lifestyle - based program for people who have type two diabetes or pre-diabetes to lower blood sugar levels, achieve healthy A1C and fasting blood sugar levels and have more energy to live life the way they want to. She's worked with thousands of people, helping them to lower their blood sugar levels to a healthy range and get control over their health.   [03:29] Yep. The summer is at the end of July. That's right.   [03: 31] End of July that you don't want to miss. She was chosen as the lead doctor for a new three - doctor panel TV show on ABC CT. And they did not green light the series, but I know another TV show is in your future. Dr. Bev Dr. Ye has been featured in the media, including ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS NPR, black news channel Fox series, XM, MINDBODY green essence magazine, good housekeeping woman, world readers, digest, Rodale press, and more welcome doctor advocate.   [04:05] Wow. What a lovely intro. Thank you so much, Dr. Karen, for your invitation to be a part of here with your group and also to, you know, explore a topic that is just, it really just needs to be on everyone's mind, frankly. There's other, um, illnesses that people are far more aware of, and they don't know, understand that heart disease is still far away.   [04:28] Yeah. Particularly in women and you find all kinds of information about other issues, you know? And when I ask myself why that is, this is what I think. Tell me what you think that people really think, oh, my doctor's got that covered. I don't need to worry about that. I don't need to look for that on social media. Yeah. And it's also silent, and you know, I've diagnosed so many women probably like you have, you know, coronary artery blockage from a coronary calcium scan. So can you talk a little about that a little bit more?    [05:18] Yeah. That's a great intro. Let's take back the covers here and have a heart disease is one of those silent processes whereby the time it's clear and someone's symptomatic. The process has been in place for years, if not decades, right? Just like diabetes. It tends to sneak up on people. And unless they have clear testing, clear assessment, you know, some kind of a, a rational testing process, diagnostic imaging, looking at blood markers, et cetera.    [06:02] A lot of people have this misperception and I really want to make this point clear for women, men, anyone people has this misperception that if you lead a healthy lifestyle, you will avoid problems. It's not true. It's not that simple. Don't we wish. And if you have a genetic risk from your family, if you have a lifestyle or a past set of chronic stresses or traumas, they can all set you up for heart disease that could potentially be lethal.    [06:50] There's some good news to be had around this too, especially for women. But meanwhile, we all have to do what we can. And I think one of the reasons we don't have about this is that selling you the solution after the problem for really expensive heart surgery, to have your chest cracked open and have your heart re plummed and other things like that is just worth so much more money than the things that you could do well before that's ever needed. It will never ever have that huge expense.   [07:36] But when I started on this path and I learned about some options that aren't standard of care, like coronary calcium scanning, I started sending all my at-risk women for it. And I literally would have some women, they would call from the center and say, she, you know, almost had a complete blockage in all three arteries. And we would send her to the ER, and she ended out with a stent or a bypass. Right. And her life was saved, but it's not even recognized in mainstream medicine. So because it's this silent killer and women don't even know how they can protect themselves?   [08:37] Yeah. That's a great question. You know, even today in 2022, it is not necessarily the standard of care that insurance companies will pay for a coronary calcium scan. Right? And any, depending on where you live, that scan could cost you somewhere between $75 to $300. And for some people it can be lifesaving. If it determines that there's a blockage, you know, off to the cath lab, you go, or maybe it's time to have your chest cracked, but at least it was before you had that coronary failure, that myocardial infarction a heart attack that can drop you like a rock and potentially kill you.    [09:19] So when we go through menopause, obviously a lot of our hormone shift in change, right? As much of that conversation starts though before the time of actual menopause aging of all kinds, that conversation in your body really starts to shift somewhere between the ages of 38 to 42. And at that point somewhere between age 38 to age 42, about 1% to 4% shift per year. Now, if you are comfortable with money and finances, think about it.   [10: 07] So you wanna then start to manage and maintain and boost your aging conversation, so you can live long and live well when it comes to cardiovascular health and making sure that your heart has what it needs and the rest of your cardiovascular system. It's just so, so important to have a healthy lipid profile, to have the fractions be at a good ratio to each other and to not have issues with the blood vessels that feed the heart. Those are called the coronary vessels, coronary meaning heart vessels, right? [11:01] And you can call around and shop around. You know, when you call hospitals and outpatient centers, et cetera, probably less expensive in an outpatient center compared to hospital has much bigger overhead as you might expect, but it's worth making that call to find out. It would be lovely if we had almost like a door dash of equivalent for health. So we can just look it up on an app and know how much it will cost me.   [11:41] I really can't. And today it's so true. It couldn't be easier, right. To make this transparent. Why is it so hard? You know, I've had times like, uh, I remember once when one of my kids needed surgery for something and I called around, get an idea, what would the out-of-pocket cost be? The time they were much younger, you know, we're trying to pay for school, this other thing. And I could not get anything on anybody. And it was really crazy. I mean, I knew all the ICD codes, the CPT code, I had all the numbers. Right. All the big words and, and the people who ran through the phone were like, I have no idea. I   [12:22] I mean, but you're right. It's like shopping on canal street in New York. It's like, no prices on anything. How much is that bag? And they'll be they'll, they'll kind of size you up and go for you $375.   [12:40] You are a tourist anywhere in the world. They think you might be from the US, you know, the price went up. So yeah, I got that.   [12:46] Right. So just as a public PSA, we might save some women's lives today. Can you tell everyone what a calcium scan is and that their doctor's not going to order this for them. And you can maybe help me understand why that is. Um, that they can, like I've said people, sometimes I've seen Groupons for like $89, and you can go get it, and it can save your life.    [13:14] Yeah. So a coronary calcium scan is an imaging, a simple imaging where your body scans specifically your chest to capture your heart. And it's looking at your heart, it's looking at the chambers of the heart. And it's looking at the blood vessels that feed the heart, particularly the ones that sit right on the top surface here, the coronary arteries, right? Those are the blood vessels that are dedicated to the heart. They're going nowhere else. They're simple.    [13:55] This is why blood pressure is lower. Other things. This gives the heart a way to rest that lower blood pressure number. For instance, the diastolic numbers. Like if your blood pressure is one 20 over 80, that 80, the lower number is critical. That's your heart at rest. Again, it never really stops. So I was able to relax. You can't relax.    [14:43] That's what the compromise is about. And after a certain amount of blockage, that's usually when people become symptomatic, maybe they're short of breath for no particular reason. Any exertion at all is exhausting. They might find that they have chest pains. Yes or no. And for women, the presentation of chest pains is very different from it is for men. Frequently.    [15:26] Maybe she's got pain in her shoulder. It might be on the left side. It might not. It might be on the right side. It can be very confusing almost all the time. When women have heart attacks, they'll say, I didn't feel well. I felt profoundly unwell. That's usually the most presenting symptom. And so it's kind of easy to get that overlooked.    [16:12] It's still considered perspective or experimental or research controversial, whatever. It's not condoned in terms of conventional medicine. And as such insurance companies do not feel required to pay for it. It hasn't yet gotten to that status of being part of the standard of care. And so people will look at you often with a side eye, and they will not prescribe it or recommend it. You can go and get these things yourself.   [17:09] O C C L U S I O N occlusion in the absence of a blockage or occlusion. Right then you're good in terms of whether or not the heart is getting what it needs for blood flow. Now, can we talk about another aspect of this that usually isn't put together? Is that okay, please? Absolutely. There's stress echocardiograms. Now, from the point of view of a cardiologist, this is something I happen to agree with them on a stress echo, as it's called more, you know, familiarly, a stress echocardiogram, in my opinion, is a gold standard.   [18:03] If you are a woman with larger breast masks, this could be one of the most awkward tests you will have in your life, worse than a mammogram in some ways to be clear but worth it. Okay. All right, wait a minute. I'm just, I'll talk about it right now. fellas do not go through all this drama. So with the ultrasound head there, and you'll have 12 EKG leads all around you electrocardiogram that is recording the electrical activity of the heart. So what they're doing is they're going to have you initially walk light load, right?   [18:46] You'll see whether all the valves are flapping or not. And you also see one of the most critical, sensitive measures you can ever imagine for the function of your heart called L V E F left ventricular ejection fraction in plain language, how much blood that has now just been oxygenated from your lungs and has come back to the heart is actually going to go out of that sucker and around the rest of the body to deliver that oxygen. You don't wanna, it all stick in there. So when that ejection fraction gets lower, like significantly under 50, say it's 30%, 25%, 20%, 14%, et cetera. That's where congestive heart failure happens.    [19:43] So the stress echo you like as the gold standard for diagnosing coronary artery disease or looking for function of the heart, or what do you like that for   [19:54] The heart function is the heart functioning well, okay. Make sure it's getting blood in. And the blood is getting back out because it's not doing us any good. If the blood's going in, and it's not leaving, that's why people have these problems with clots. You see all these medications being promoted for lowering clots, blood thinners, et cetera. This is what's. This is why, right? Heart disease.    [20:15] Right? But I know there's some people listening, going, Dr. Bev, do I need to ask for a stress echo    [20:22] Think it's a great baseline test. I do, especially in your middle life years. I think it's a great baseline. And if you have a history of being an athlete, if you've been athletic, if you are a big a person who was huge on dancing, anything that was aerobics in nature, some of the more vigorous things I've seen for cheerleading, absolutely qualify as far as I'm concerned, their athletes do as well as the individual and team sports. Anything that involved running, lifting resistance or weight training. I think it's a good idea for you to get that test. Here's why you will have a natural increased growth called a hypertrophy of that left ventricle wall.   [21:38] Yes, absolutely. All right. So that's another test. Let's back up a little and talk about the risk factors. Mm-hmm for heart disease. Sure. And you mentioned earlier genetic dyslipidemias mm-hmm can you talk about what are the risk factors that really need to be addressed and mitigated, and then we'll weave that into lipids?   [22:01] Sure, sure. So risk factors. One of them is something that's affecting many people right now, as we work our way through this pandemic situ and that is sitting too much sitting throughout the day, sitting on an airplane or a bus or a train or whatever it is, right? Extended periods of sitting are a real risk factor. So that's one, another issue is a complete lack of exercise and any kind of exercise. It could be dancing to your favorite music. It doesn't mean you have to go to the gym and do some, some specific, right it's simply movement.    [22:45] Your blood lipids love that fiber, the healthier ones are more likely to be pronounced when you've got plenty of fiber on board. So green leafy vegetables are a great way to get fiber. You can have ground FLA seeds, a few nuts and seeds. Those have fiber in them, fruits, fresh fruits, absolutely other kinds of vegetables, not necessarily green ones. All of those food groups have fiber naturally in them, can take fiber as supplements.    [23:22] Smoking's another risk factor. Smoking basically sets your blood vessels on, on fire. If you will, it's a kind of inflammation and the sort of damage that smoking those blood vessels makes it far more likely that the unfriendly lipids will park in the blood vessels and turn into those Velcro balls. I talked about it. So their Velcro balls happen.   [23:51] Yes. And the sitting the smoking. And I know you're gonna talk about blood sugar and diabetes, right?   [24:01] Absolutely. Blood sugar, um, problems where blood sugar rises chronically high and doesn't come back down or the blood sugar roller coaster for people who go from super high to really low, super high, to really low experience, to hang, reach phenomenon, hungry and angry who have first too much blood sugar. And then not enough, it just plummets like a rock off a cliff. This is a problem, right? It's another risk factor.   [24:34] That blood sugar wants to hang onto the proteins in your blood. The proteins belong there, but too much blood sugar does not. And you have extra blood sugar. It hangs on those proteins to create big old honk and molecules called protein glycan.    [24:52] Tries to get through your tiny little capillaries. Well, it doesn't fit. it's too big. And so all of your circulation starts to be compromised. So then when you have the unfriendly fractions of that, of the lipids, they see this mess and one of them joins it's a pile it just gets bigger and bigger. It's a problem.   [25:13] Yeah. So let, so the blood, sugar's a problem. Definitely gotta get that under control. Yep. And let's segue into the lipids. So let's talk about that. How does that contribute and what testing do people have? And let's dive into that.   [25:30] Lipid fractions that we care about, here are the ones that should be on most lab tests. They are HDL, which stands for high density, lip protein; there's LDL, which is low density, lip protein. Then there's V LDL, which stands for very low density like protein. There are some other fractions as well. One of them that is super helpful to know about is called lipoprotein little a right. So lipoprotein little a it's either shown as a lowercase, a or in parentheses an after the word lipoprotein, depending on the lab, the lab, company's way of doing that call out.    [26:20] Think of it as like beach balls in your blood. It's good. It's not thick into anything. It's kind of natural. Telon it's not toxic at all. In this case, it's just good for you. It doesn't cause problems and cholesterol as a large category is the building block a substrate for all the sex hormones. We actually want cholesterol in the body. What we care about is what the body is doing to the cholesterol or interacting with it. So if you have the presence of other kinds of inflammation, which we'll talk about later, this is where lipid pro profiles and fractions matter a lot.   [27:08] Same is true for V LDL, a very low density lipoprotein in the presence of inflammation. It too can be troublesome. LDL is more likely to take people out compared to V LDL triglycerides.They, too, are another fraction of lipid, and they can definitely be problematic. And it's all about inflammation. So back to where we talked about the biggest loser in one of their trainers, Bob Harper, who you know, seemed to be amazingly fit and in shape and blah, blah, blah, and still dropped like a rock from a heart attack. Well, it turned out he hadn't unfriendly cholesterol profile, a very unfriendly one. And again, if he hadn't been in a place where people saw him drop over from a heart attack, he probably would've died because he wouldn't have gotten help fast enough.   [28:11] No, I do. And I'm trying to think of the name of that famous marathon runner who also dropped dead from a heart attack. So just because you're physically, you look physically fit doesn't mean that you are. Yeah. So when people get a regular lipid profile from their doctors, they usually get what total cholesterol, LDL VDL chide and HDL, correct.    [28:39] Right. And so I also gonna say is that sufficient, and I just want to let everybody listening in the podcast know that Dr. Bev is getting ready to give a master class to the women in my midlife mastery program. And so that's who she's talking to. when she's showing, uh, look, look at my hands and stuff.   [29:09] And the course of now 30 years of, of clinical practice and growing where they'll come in, their total cholesterol number will be higher than 200. So it's considered L of or high, right. It automatically falls into the category of at risk. However, a lot of times for these women, especially in midlife and older it's because their HGL fraction has gone up the protective good gal, good girl, kind of cholesterol.    [29:50] They've been told, oh, it's high cholesterol. It's time to put you on a statin as a reflexive response, irrespective of anything else about their lifestyle. And it's not, in my opinion, in a scientific, clinically measured way to go. It doesn't make sense. If your cholesterol profile is dominant with HDL high density protein, you have an unusual amount of protection and that's good. And if you don't have inflammation, it's even better because now it is highly unlikely. You'd be is such a low risk category for a heart attack, right? You just are. Now the other way, this could go HDL is low and V LDL or more likely LDL, usually LDL and triglycerides will elevate more so than V LDL.    [30:52] And when it comes to lip profile, we care a lot because stress at the moment for a reason that you burn it off with activity, like you literally had to lift the car off a loved one, you were literal, really running from a bear for instance is okay, it's good for us. It keeps us safe. It can save lives. The problem with stress is when it's chronic, and it runs away with us, and we are trapped, we feel overwhelmed. And those chemicals surge throughout our body, whether it's cortisol, the primary stress, chemical adrenaline, some other things, right, neurotransmitters, they all get in the mix.    [31:52] And if enough of it builds up, it creates what's called those Atheros or those fattythis fatty buildup, those fatty plaques on the walls of the blood vessels. That's where the word athero sclerosis will come from where it's this process where, because the blood vessels been damaged now, the fats are trying to patch it. And the fat's really hard to sign to patch. It that's just a bad patch.    [32:26] You know, this is super important. What you just said about chronic stress. And this is what gets back to the hormones. Ladies. I always say everything leads to hormones . So by the time we hit midlife, it's usually not only our sex hormones that have a problem, but this is one of the reasons why we have what we call pathologic menopause in, in America is because our cortisol stress hormone has been struggling for years. And usually at midlife really takes a hard hit. Well, while you're having stress, this cortisol is working on your arteries and causing these micro injuries that become a hospitable place for toxic lipoproteins to, to set up shop and start blocking your arteries. So stress is not just a mental health issue. It is a physical issue.    [33:45] I'd like to leave everyone with this. Please take action. Most of these processes are silent and invisible. And by the time you start to develop symptoms, you know, you're well on the way to some serious outcomes. So being proactive, this is one of those times when you are so richly rewarded and don't let someone Buffalo you into ignoring something that's important for your health. So if you have a family history of heart disease, you really need to be particularly vigilant because you may have a genetic predisposition to it, but please understand how you live your life, your lifestyle and the environment you're in and how many tox exposed to like you live near a factory or a source of diesel fumes, et cetera, all these things accumulate and make that difference for your health. Please be proactive. Clearly if you're here, if you're listening to Dr. Kirin and the good, wonderful work she's doing the great stuff she does with the hormone club, then you're probably really dialed in and tuned in to continue to take action because the person has to live with the problem.    [35:34] Yes. So well said, I love this quote that you shared with me from Maya Angelou. We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but really admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty. I don't think I've heard that quote from her before and it's fabulous. And I think it speaks to this situation because so many women want to transform their health. And they're looking for the one thing, the one super supplement, the one diet that's gonna fix everything. And it really is a labor of love and very intensive, right?   [35:57] Yes. Thank you so much. I know you have the guide on how to improve your hemoglobin A1C and fasting blood sugar numbers and beyond for those people who are wanting to improve their blood sugar and decrease their risk for heart attack, heart disease, cardiovascular disease, including strokes. And we will have the link in the show notes. Do you wanna tell them a little bit about that?   [36:20] Yeah, sure. So in that guide, you know, I, the information there is clear and we talk about the big topics that affect it. Some of it would be things you would expect like around nutrition. All, some might be some things you may not know that some aspects of gut health, other things interact to really make that difference.    [36:59] Great. Well, thank you so much for that wonderful resource and thank you for the work that you do and for sharing this important, very important information with us today.   [37:08] You're welcome. Thank you for letting me be a part of your mission here. Um, I really love that we are so aligned with helping people live their best lives.   [37:15] And thank you all for listening to another episode of the whole hormone prescription podcast with Dr. Kyrin. I'm very grateful that you've taken time out of your precious day to spend it with us. Hopefully you have learned some information that's going to impact your life in a positive way. And I hope that you share that information with your loved ones.   Get this for FREE: How to Improve Your A1C and Fasting (Morning) Blood Sugar Numbers (and Beyond) by Dr. Beverly Yates https://bit.ly/blueprint-diabetes-nutrition-secrets   Q & A Episode each month Submit your questions here (leave me a voicemail): https://bit.ly/AskDrKyrin    Join The Hormone Bliss Challenge  FEEL ENERGIZED, SEXY & CONFIDENT IN YOUR BODY AGAIN... IN JUST 5 DAYS. Discover How To Balance Your Hormones & Jumpstart Your Metabolism So That You Can Lose Weight & Regain Energy! CLICK HERE: https://bit.ly/hormonebalancebliss

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation

How do you turn your brilliant startup idea into a successful business? Steven Hoffman (Captain Hoff) is the Chairman and CEO of Founders Space, a global innovation hub for entrepreneurs, corporations, and investors, with over 50 partners in 22 countries. He is also a venture investor, founder of three venture-backed and two bootstrapped startups, and author of several award-winning books, including Make Elephants Fly, Surviving a Startup, and The Five Forces. In this episode we explore the startup world – what entrepreneurs need to know when launching a startup, how to avoid deadly mistakes, build your team, and some behind scenes tips on how to accelerate your success. What We Discuss with Steven Hoffman (Captain Hoff) Inside the startup world Avoiding the common entrepreneurial pitfalls The “brilliant idea” myth Turning your startup idea into a viable solution that people want Finding the right people to execute on your idea How YouTube, Google and Groupon had to pivot to succeed How to gain traction in the marketplace When and how to attract investor money for your startup Why getting too much investor money too early is bad for business How startup accelerators and incubation hubs work Building your leadership team Leadership skills as a startup CEO Full Show Notes: https://leadersoftransformation.com/podcast/business/420-accelerating-your-startup-with-steven-hoffman 

Get Your FILL
Ignite Your Entrepreneurial Spirit with Bobby Matson

Get Your FILL

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 43:22


Do you have what it takes to walk away from the 9-5? Is there an idea in you itching to come out? In this week's Get Your FILL, Financial Independence & Long Life podcast, Bobby Matson, CEO and Founder of PayItOff, shares his entrepreneurial journey and the burning desire that kept him going through the hard times. Listen to the podcast Check out Bobby's company Watch the video About Bobby Matson (from Techdayhq.com): Bobby is a 2x startup operator obsessed with building better infrastructure for all borrowers. He led engineering teams at Carbon Five, where he built technology for Groupon, Fandango, and Stitchfix and shipped software to millions of users. After managing six-figure student debt in his own life, he's working on Payitoff to create better outcomes for every borrower. About PayItOff Payitoff is a debt infrastructure company based in NYC and LA offering a host of services that help fintechs, workplace providers and financial institutions save the average customer $240 / month on their student loans. With our tools, any financial service can easily: - Sync the richest loan data - roughly 2x more data per loan vs. alternatives - Automate any type of guidance, including forgiveness programs that already exist - Digitally enroll borrowers in federal repayment options that save them money - Embed several student loan workflows with a few lines of javascript Partners using their technology have collectively saved borrowers over $10 million to date.

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley
Big Picture: Was ist schlecht an web2, dass wir web3 brauchen? (Mit Christian Leybold)

Digitale Optimisten: Perspektiven aus dem Silicon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 39:08


Jeder redet über web3, Crypto und das Metaverse. Aber was ist so schlecht an web2, dass wir web3 brauchen? Eine Diskussion über die großen Tech Trends mit Christian Leybold, Managing Partner des Venture Capital Funds Headline.Was ist web3 überhaupt? Und was ist es nicht?Was sind Use Cases von web3, die heute schon spannend sind?Warum hat Christian in sorare investiert, einem web3 Unicorn?Was sind die Nachteile von Dezentralität in web3? Spoiler: Entscheidungsgeschwindigkeit+++Abonniere den kostenlosen Newsletter mit Trends, Ideen und Gründerporträts auf www.digitaleoptimisten.de +++ Herzlich Willkommen bei Digitale Optimisten. Ich bin Alex, und in diesem Podcast geht es um Inspiration für neue Geschäftsideen und Strategien, wie man diese Ideen umsetzen kann.Ich habe mir in den letzten Wochen viele Gedanken gemacht, wohin wir diesen Podcast weiterentwickeln wollen. Ich glaube, dass wir bisher ganz, ganz tolle Gründerinnen und Gründer hier zu Gast hatten - und einige davon haben wirklich das Zeug die großen Companies des Jahres 2030 zu bauen. Ich denke zum Beispiel an Nik Volk, der mit seinem Start-Up Kyte zuletzt 200m Dollar geraised hat. Oder Daniel Metzler von Isar Aerospace, der einfach Satelliten ins Weltall schickt und auch fast 200m Dollar Kapital aufgenommen hat. Und noch viele, viele mehr die ihre Geschichte erzählt haben.Mir ist aufgefallen, dass dieser Podcast schon lange viel mehr als Gründer-Interviews ist. Wir hatten auch Politiker wie Johannes Vogel von der FDP, der vor der Bundestagswahl über das Wahlprogramm der FDP in Bezug auf Start-Ups und Digitalisierung gesprochen hat. Und nicht zu vergessen "Hear Us Grow", wo wir als Beifahrer 3 Gründern auf Schritt und Tritt auf ihrer Reise durch die Höhen und Tiefen begleiten.Deshalb werden wir den Podcast etwas neu strukturieren - aber keine Sorge, es kommen eher mehr Formate dazu, und sowohl Hear Us Grow als auch die langen Gründerinterviews werden bleiben. Eins dieser neuen Formate hört du hier, es heißt schlicht Trends. Ziel ist es, dass ich mit einem Gesprächspartner ein dediziertes Trend-Thema im Detail besprechen, und zwar aus einer Vogelperspektive. Also web3, NFTs, Audio, Cybersecurity oder was auch immer - wir sprechen über die Themen, in denen die großen Geschäftsmodelle von morgen entstehen.Besonders wichtig ist natürlich, dass man einen ganz besonders smarten Gesprächspartner hat - und das haben wir zweifelsohne. Es ist Christian Leybold, Managing Partner des Venture Capital  Investors Headline, den einige vielleicht noch unter dem alten Namen e.Ventures kennen. Christian macht nichts anderes, als über die Trends nachzudenken, die morgen groß sein werden und die Start-ups zu identifizieren, die in diesen Trends erfolgreich sein werden. Headline ist einer der bekanntesten VCs in Deutschland, hat Offices auf der ganzen Welt und in Start-Ups wie Bumble, Farfetch, GoPuff oder Groupon investiert.Mich freut's ungemein, aber bevor ich jetzt zu lange rede, gehen wir doch rein ins Gespräch, in dem wir über das top, top, top Hype Thema unserer Tage sprechen: web3. Was sind überhaupt die Anwendungsfelder, die web3 so revolutionär machen sollen. Für mich ist das alles andere als klar - wahrscheinlich geht's dir auch so: los geht's!Ich freue mich über 5 Sterne Reviews und dein Feedback an alexander@digitaleoptimisten.de. Bevor es mit dieser Folge losgeht: Bitte erzähle zwei Freundinnen oder Kollegen von diesem Podcast, wenn Dir diese Geschichten gefallen. Es hilft ungemein, neue Hörer zu finden und den Podcast weiter wachsen zu lassen. Wenn Du magst kannst Du mir auch einen Review auf Apple Podcasts oder Spotify geben.