Podcasts about leadville

Statutory city in Colorado, United States

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Any Given Runway
Episode 580: Mercedes Siegle-Gaither - Ultramarathoner

Any Given Runway

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 26:06


American Ultramarathoner Mercedes Siegle-Gaither chats about her love of the outdoors, potatoes, Leadville & more!

Zero Quit Podcast
Chasing Peak Performance | Kris Rugloski

Zero Quit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 36:50


Kris Rugloski is an obstacle course racer, Hyrox competitor, and ultramarathoner based in Colorado. She won the 2022 HYROX world championships and most recently won the 2022 World's Toughest Mudder in November to become the first woman ever to reach 100 miles in this event format. In our conversation, we dove into how she got into endurance sports, how she trains, and more. TIMECODES: (1:32) - Getting into Ultramarathons (2:58) - Athletic Background (5:12) - Running First 50 Mile Race (7:35) - Balancing Spartan, HYROX, Ultras, Etc. (8:26) - Fitness is Fitness (9:41) - Leadville & Stage Races (13:13) - First Woman to Run 100 Miles in Tough Mudder (21:10) - Format & Obstacles for 24-Hr Tough Mudder (23:01) - Training for Obstacles (24:20) - Kris' Training Split (28:30) - Handling Sponsorships & Passion (30:34) - Early Bird Mindset (33:30) - Upcoming Races / Plans For More: Support the Podcast Follow Brock's Instagram Follow Brock's YouTube: Follow Kris' Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/zero-quit-podcast/support

The Go Crazy Podcast
EP 27: The Psychological Benefits of Doing Hard Things, Human Connection, and Learning How To Talk To Yourself with Dr Justin Ross

The Go Crazy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 56:28


On this episode of The Go Crazy Podcast we sit down to talk to  Dr Justin Ross. He is a clinical psychologist specializing in athlete mental health and performance psychology. As an athlete himself he has completed several marathons (including Boston), 70.3 Ironman's, and the Leadville 100 MTB. In this conversation we talked about mental health, the impact the mind can have on performance, and actions you can take to improve your mental health. Follow Justin @drjustinrossFollow Bart @bear_lee_runningFollow Danny @dannygoescrazyFollow The Go Crazy Brand @thegocrazybrandFollow The Go Crazy Podcast @thegocrazypodcastShop The Go Crazy Brand at thegocrazybrand.com

Like a Bigfoot
#320: Brian Passenti -- Multiple Adventures at Leadville 100 and Moab 240

Like a Bigfoot

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 77:03


This week we are sitting down with ultra runner and coach Brian Passenti to talk about all things Leadville and Moab 240!!! Brian is an incredible athlete who has really embraced the LOOOOOOONG distances over the past decade or so. In this episode we hear about his experiences running MULTIPLE Leadville 100s and Moab 240s along with how he wound up in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, his mountain lion encounter on Mt. Sopris, and how he balances being an athlete/coach with his regular job and family life. Hope you all enjoy the episode!!! I'm taking away a lot of inspiration from Brian and can't wait to see him at future races!! MORE FROM BRIAN: https://www.instagram.com/passentiontherun/?hl=en Coaching: https://www.altitudeendurancecoaching.com

Leadville: The 100 Mile Mountain Bike Race Podcast, p/b Floyd's of Leadville
S6E02: John Gaston is faster than you (and bikes aren't even his thing)

Leadville: The 100 Mile Mountain Bike Race Podcast, p/b Floyd's of Leadville

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 66:39


We love a good Leadville story, and John Gaston is a great storyteller. And it doesn't hurt that the only guy who could beat him in the 2022 LT100MTB was some guy named Keegan.  The crazy thing is, racing bikes is not really what he's into. They're more of his side hustle -- his off-season way to stay sharp and in shape.  But that doesn't mean he doesn't sweat the details, and it for sure doesn't mean he doesn't know his way around the course.  Enjoy John's story, and join us in relishing that an essentially unsponsored rider can get out there and absolutely crush the competition.

Becoming Ultra
Scotty Kummer of Ten Junk Miles on race directing and finally being able to run Leadville.

Becoming Ultra

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 71:36


Scotty Kummer Started Ten Junk Miles around the sane time we got rolling with Becoming Ultra.  We bounce around a bunch of topics on the show today from the uniqueness of the 100 miler he race directs to the importance of consistency in running and podcasting.  Enjoy the show!

Inside Sports Nutrition
Mental Skills Training with Dr. Justin Ross - Ep. #59

Inside Sports Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 58:24


“You cannot change what you are not aware of. As a human being first and as an athlete second, we need a great deal of awareness about what's going on for us.” –Dr. Justin Ross Bob and Dina meet with clinical sport psychologist, Dr. Justin Ross, to dive into the importance and benefits of mental skills training for sport performance and growth for athlete mindsets. Join us to learn how incorporating this piece of your training can take you further, not just in your training and competition, but in your life. We discuss: Dr. Justin's diverse athletic background The 3 common myths about working with a sport psychologist Periodization of mindset training How we foster awareness in training if we're wanting to tune out Managing through injury and illness when our identity feels threatened His observations and experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic One tip for health practitioners for how they can support athletes with mental health Dr. Justin's approach to food and nutrient timing 3 ways to think about trust More about our guest: Dr Justin Ross is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in human performance psychology. He has spent the bulk of his career aiding in mental health initiatives and high performance pursuits for those in demanding, stressful environments. He is vetted as a provider for both the NFL and the NBA, and has had the opportunity to work with athletes ranging from the recreational to the world class across a number of disciplines. An amateur endurance athlete himself, Dr Ross has run 12 marathons with 6 Boston Marathon qualifiers, completed 2 Ironman 70.3 distance triathlons, and most recently finished the Leadville 100 MTB trail race in 2022. Find out more about Dr. Ross at: · https://linktr.ee/DrJustinRoss · Sport Psychology for Endurance Coaches online course · Unlock your Athletic Potential Course · Training Peaks Performance Psychology Training Plan – use code DrRossInsideSportsNutrition to save 20% · Instagram @drjustinross This episode is brought to you by All Around Snack Co. which features tasty snacks that are low in added sugars, contain zero dyes, colorings or additives and help control blood sugar for steady energy levels throughout the day. Use code ISNPODCAST23 to save 15% on your purchase. Learn about Bob and Dina's nutrition, coaching, and testing services at www.enrgperformance.com and www.nutritionmechanic.com.

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW
Ep. 95 Leadville Trail 100: The Race Across the Sky–What the Running and Mountain Biking Races Mean to Our Family, Including Mace and 27-Time Finisher, Eric Pence

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 175:12


In this unique podcast, Travis talks in person with a range of family members at a Thanksgiving gathering about what the Leadville Race Series means to our family.  What does Mace remember about the early days?  Why should kids attend and what do they think about being there?  How does the Leadville spirit take hold in one's psyche and pull him or her into toeing the line?  What does Travis' wife's humorous imitation of his coaching advice sound like? How does Eric Pence go about finishing the 100-mile run every year (27 so far), and how can you get coached by him (hint: www.penceultracoaching.com)? Can someone run 100 miles after donating a kidney (hint: YES!)?  Intentionally released along with the Leadville Race Series lottery results, this fun and educational podcast seeks to up your stoke and inform your preparation for Leadville and similar adventures.  To explore coaching with Travis for running, biking, Lead Challenge, or adventure racing, please see www.travismacy.com/coaching or email travis.macy@gmail.com. In This Episode:Pence Ultra Coaching Website | Instagram OFFER: 20% OFF the entire InsideTracker storeDISCOUNT CODE: TRAVISMACYTravis Macy Instagram | WebsiteMace on InstagramInjinji Discount SiteThe Feed Instagram | Website- - - - - - - - - - -If you like this podcast, please consider our book, A Mile at A Time: A Father and Son's Inspiring Alzheimer's Journey of Love, Adventure, and Hope*30% off with discount code MACESubscribe: Apple Podcast | SpotifyCheck us out: Instagram | Twitter | Website | YouTubewww.AMileAtATimeBook.com

We Are Superman
#240 - WE ARE ULTRA STAR ANNIE HUGHES EXPLORING NEW LIMITS AND AIMING FOR ANOTHER BIG YEAR

We Are Superman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 120:47


Happy New Year, everyone! Returning to the Hive is the always fun breakout star of ultrarunning, Annie Hughes.  We spoke with her in 2021 after she became, at age 23, the youngest-ever winner of the Leadville Trail 100. And she was a local resident to boot!  Annie ramped up her racing and success even more in 2022, capturing four more titles and many course records, all with the guidance of her trusty friend Olga. Included among them was a huge win at the Cocodona 250 in Arizona, which she describes as a series of course mishaps, sleep follies, and rattlesnakes, yet was a resounding victory. I'm sure you'll be entertained to hear what it takes to not only finish 250 miles, but to place highly as well. We cover a lot of areas during our high-spirited chat, including her plans for this coming year, with her keystone race being the Hardrock 100, and her insane plans for her 25th birthday in March, topping even her 24-hour run in Leadville for her 24th birthday. Annie is so much fun to talk with and as long as we did, we probably could have carried on for much longer – maybe for 250 miles!Annie HughesInstagram @annie.a.hughesBill Stahlsilly_billy@msn.comFacebook Bill StahlInstagram @stahlor

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Paige Onweller - Lifetime Grand Prix Gravel Racer

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 50:27


This week we sit down with Michigan based, professional gravel racer, Paige Onweller. Paige, a former runner, had her ups and downs throughout the 2022 season, but ended it with a bang with a victory at Big Sugar Gravel in October. She is looking forward to doubling down on her efforts for the 2023 season. Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the broadcast. We welcome page on Weller. Uh, gravel racer from grand rapids, Michigan. Paige participated in the inaugural lifetime grand Prix in 2022. And has been selected for the grand Prix. Again in 2023, she finished the season with a big victory at big sugar gravel in Bentonville, Arkansas this year, and is really excited to be able to dedicate more time to the sport. Pages and other one of those amazing female athletes who discovered the sport after a career, as a runner. Only a few years ago, she was riding a trainer and figuring out how to ride a bike outdoors. Pedro we'll get into how she got into the sport of cycling, what our journey's been over the last couple of years. And what our experience has been joining the lifetime grand Prix and racing throughout the year with all the best female athletes in the gravel cycling world. With that said let's jump right into my conversation with Paige. Paige, welcome to the show. [00:01:26] Paige Onweller: Thanks, Craig. Glad I'm here [00:01:28] Craig Dalton: Good to see you. Yeah, it sounded like you had a busy day in the er, so I'm pleased you're making time for us this evening, [00:01:34] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. I was a little, a little late to this meeting, so thank you for being flexible. The ER is a little busy these days. [00:01:40] Craig Dalton: Yeah, no, of course. My pleasure. Hey, I always love to start off Paige by getting to know you a little bit about your background, like where did you grow up? [00:01:48] Paige Onweller: So I grew up in kind of a smaller town called Lapeer. Uh, it's in Michigan, kind of in the thumb area. Uh, maybe like an hour north of Ann Arbor, uh, if people know that as a reference point. Um, yeah. And then I went to undergrad at Fair State University up in Big Rapids, also in Michigan, and then, uh, grad school in Grand Rapids. And I've been settled in Grand Rapids for the last, about 10. [00:02:11] Craig Dalton: Got it. And were you a, were you a sporty young lady? [00:02:14] Paige Onweller: Uh, kind of, my parents kind of made us get into sports. Like I think they wanted to keep us out of trouble and keep us busy. And so, um, yeah, I did like, uh, swimming and diving and softball, volleyball track, cross country. Um, I was a big runner. Uh, I actually got a scholarship to, to run at Ferris and that's, you know, cross country and track. So I did running. Many years of my life and was a very dedicated runner, even after college on some post collegiate elite teams. Um, that's kind of where most of my athletic background was. [00:02:46] Craig Dalton: what was that journey like as a, as a runner would, did you sort of materialize in high school that you had a good endurance endurance engine or. Wear of a sprinter at that point. [00:02:55] Paige Onweller: I was more middle distance. To be honest. I never really, I kind of wasn't all around her. Like I, I definitely wasn't a sprinter, but I kind of excelled at. 400 meters and anything up to two mile, uh, at least in high school. Uh, but more focused on like the mile and 800. And then in college was similar. I was more middle distance, uh, 1500 meter, um, was kind of my specialty in, in track. And then in cross country it's just a six K for uh, ncaa. Um, so that was kind of my specialty overall. Um, but I got injured a lot and. , I think, you know, I could have done much better, like in the 10 K or 5k, I think would've suited me more. Um, but I think I was just always injured that we kind of kept doing the middle distance, shorter volume, you know, or, or less volume. Uh, but then after college is kind of when I started to hit my stride a bit in the endurance events, um, like I did at Ultra-Marathon in Grand Canyon. and that was like 55 miles, um, like rim to rim, to rim it's called. Um, and started doing like more half marathons and those longer distance events. And that's when I, like, I was beating all of my college times and just really excelling. So I think after college, once I was healthy and not getting injured as much, I was able to kind of, you know, consistency really helps with endurance . So if you're not getting injured and you can keep running, then you're gonna do. [00:04:15] Craig Dalton: That's quite a huge journey from where you started out as a runner to doing ultra-marathons, as you progressively grabbed hold of longer distance events. Was that, did it feel sort of more comfortable and more what you were built for? [00:04:30] Paige Onweller: I don't know. I, I mean, I was still running similar mileage throughout the week, but a lot of it was like power hiking up hills and like getting used to like the vertical gain because in running, like. Ultra-marathons are very, um, there's a lot more climbing and descending, and you have to get your quads ready for like that descending load, um, and the, the EENT changes that occur. And so I feel like. It was similar but yet very different. The volume was similar, but the intensity was much lower. Um, and I think that probably helped. Um, but honestly, like I just love being outside and being outdoors and I just like working out . And so, um, yeah, I mean, I think the little longer stuff was. Was fun to me and obviously more challenging just in a different way though, like, you know, a half marathon and 10 miles, like what I loved. And those are like, you know, hour, hour and 20 minute all out efforts, um, relative to like an endurance ultra marathon, which is like the whole day. So just kind of a different type of pain, I guess, , but I enjoyed the process for both and, and how you train for. [00:05:38] Craig Dalton: Yeah. They're so distinctly different as running disciplines. I've done a little bit of ultra marathoning myself and I I hear you like it's this descending that really adds up. But for me, the interesting thing was it was a complete mentality shift, right? Because you'll, you're running in the woods, you come up to a big hill and the 10 K in, you wants to run hard over everything. But every ultra-marathon and coach or colleague or friend is gonna tell. Just shift into another gear and walk up this hill. Yeah, to power hike up the [00:06:08] Paige Onweller: yeah, no, for sure. And it's, it's funny you say that, like the, the mental change is, you know, more than anything, and I've been a coach for many years and when I was coaching ultra marathoners, like one of the primary focus, you know, in, in the season was focusing and developing why they wanted to do that race. And cuz there was studies and research to show. Having an emotional bond to those longer events gets you through it versus like, you know, an hour and a half. So that's like a whole different way to train and it's like more mental training than the shorter distances. And I always thought that was fun. And you know, my medical background kind of makes me a little bit more intrigued into that as well. [00:06:45] Craig Dalton: Yeah, a hundred percent. Like you just have to believe and you have to always put a foot forward. And I think, I'm sure we'll get into this later, just how the, the parallels with gravel racing, particularly the long stuff, you just, you gotta keep going and know that your body's capable of much more than you probably think it is capable of. [00:07:02] Paige Onweller: Yeah, for sure. [00:07:03] Craig Dalton: So did you discover cycling at any point in that journey so far? [00:07:08] Paige Onweller: Um, I mean, you know, I would hop on a spin bike when I was injured, right? But it was always dreadful. I'm like, oh, I'd rather be running and I'm here in spin class. This is lame. Um, but you know, it was like, I didn't know any of the numbers meant, and it was always kind of a punishment for me. So, I had no idea what, you know, it was always like, What I had to do to stay in shape for running. Every time I was injured, I'd go on the bike. Um, and it was usually a stationary bike or a spin bike, but it wasn't until the pandemic, uh, so about two years ago is when I started biking outside. Um, and that was terrifying, like the clipping in for the first time. And I was like, what am I doing? You know, I'm like, this is horrendous. I'm gonna a crash. Um, let's see my, see my colleagues at the medical clinic. Um, but yeah, I think. For me, that's kind of when I first started, but it was still because I wanted to get better at running. So what I was doing is I was running like 40 to 50 miles a week, and then I would be trying to hit like, five to six hours on the bike a week as well. Um, and then I started biking more and realizing like, well, this is actually a lot of fun. And I started, you know, getting Strava kms and I was like, oh, well I'm beating these cyclists like maybe I'm, you know, pretty good at it. And I just think I started to enjoy it. But it wasn't a competitive, um, component for me. It was like just simply to get in more of. Aerobic training and cardiovascular training did benefit my running. And I did the ultra-marathon that fall. Um, and that was, so that would've been 2020 and did the ultra-marathon. So I kind of stopped biking for a little while to help with the legs. And then that, that winter I was like, okay, I'm gonna get whiffed and I'm gonna have an indoor setup because I liked biking this summer and I can do that throughout the winter. So I signed up for Zift and then, you know, a couple of local friends were like, you should do this with Community League. And I was like, oh, that sounds fun. do the community races. So I do started doing those first. When I signed up, it was like all out from the gate, um, swift, I think I dropped hard, like finished near the back and I was like, well, this is hard Um, and I was like, what am I doing? And eventually I just kept showing up and learning, you know, the tactics within thew world and then started winning the community events and that, that's kind of how I got recruited to my first pro team, um, was for eSports on Zift because of you. Essentially my raw power. Um, yeah. And that's when I first started to realize like, I'm just a competitive person and so you put me in a situation where I have the potential to win. I'm like, oh yeah, I wanna do that again, . So, uh, that's when I was like, oh, maybe I should race bikes, you know, like that, that could be fun. Um, so that's when that transition. Transition started, um, and I actually did sign up for a triathlon. I did, um, St. George, uh, 70.3 as my first, uh, triathlon. And then that was the last one I ever did, , cuz I realized biking is way better, [00:10:00] Craig Dalton: I don't wanna glance over something that I think every athlete goes through. You were also building a, another career in the background post-college. So do you wanna talk about what you've been doing professionally that has been effectively financing some of your racing endeavors in the running world, at least to date? [00:10:17] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. Well, I end up finding a lot of my cycling stuff too. Um, which, you know, I don't, we, it's a whole nother topic right there, but I don't think people understand that as much, you know, when you race pro, like they assume you have all the support. Uh, but we can get into that later. But yeah, so I work as a physician assistant. Uh, I've been a PA now eight years, and I've. Worked and practice all in acute care. Uh, so either urgent care or emergency medicine. Um, and I work for an emergency medicine group right now. Um, and I've had various roles, uh, very career driven, you know, I'm just an eager, motivated person, and so I've had. department lead roles where I'm help managing and more of an administrative role in the department. Um, so yeah, I've been a PA eight years and just a very busy person. Um, and it's, it's a great job, but medicine has changed a lot. If you talk to any medical provider, particularly some, someone that works in the ER or the urgent care, um, they will say medicine has definitely changed over the last few, few years, and part of that is covid, but we live in a very, Demanding world. And that floats over to medicine as well where patients are, uh, coming in and it's, it's not like they're always asking for medical advice, which is what we're trained to give, um, and use evidence-based medicine. It's more like demands and that can sometimes be a little exhausting. Um, cuz you know, we're there to help people and use science and, um, you know, there's a lot of stuff on the internet that patients come in and. you know, talk to us about. Um, but it's a, it's a hard job. Uh, it's very rewarding. But, you know, I've had to tell patients they have, you know, a new mask that's likely cancer. Um, you know, just today I had to tell a woman she's mis discouraging and telling her what I saw on her exam and. , you know, just helping patients process and essentially my job is if someone comes in, they have a problem and I'm supposed to fix it and make sure they're not dying. So, uh, it's rewarding, but it's also very mentally exhausting and it is, it's a hard job. [00:12:17] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I wanted to make sure to highlight that. Cause I know like many athletes as you, as you said before, like there's this aura that your name is inve and you must be having a full ride with your sponsors and all you do is train. But I think you'll probably attest that, you know, probably 90% of the pro Peloton has other jobs behind them allowing them to do these things. [00:12:40] Paige Onweller: Yeah. And you know, it's best. And I also, um, you know, I own a coaching business and I coach, um, and that has allowed me to have work that's more mobile and, you know, a little bit more relaxing work, I should say. Not as mentally demanding or physically demanding too. Cuz right now, like, I don't know if people understand, like this last year, like I still had to work my weekend requirement, which is every other weekend. or every third weekend depending on which job I was at. And so, you know, basically I would like stack my hours in the ER and urgent care work, crazy amount of hours, like 56, 50, 60 hours, you know, in a week or a little over a week. And then I'd fly to a race, race bikes for a week, come back, work in the er, urgent care. So it was like this constant yo-yo of two lives. And I knew it wasn't sustainable for too long, but I knew I could do it for one year. Like anything's tolerable. Like if you have an end. Um, and I also knew, like I had so much potential in cycling, I just hadn't had the opportunity to get the support that I needed. Um, and you have to earn that. Like, there, I never expected to have, you know, to only be able to race bikes. Like I was thinking it'd be a five year process for me to get financial support. Um, but yeah, I mean, it's, it's. very hard. And I do think, you know, for example, social media is a good example. We're posting all the positives and, and that's a good thing. We want to do that. Um, but at the end of the day, the reality is like, it's not always as glamorous as people may, you know, assume that it is. [00:14:06] Craig Dalton: Yeah, so you were just touching on your journey. You got identified as, uh, a strong athlete via the zw kind of experience. Fast forward. When did you start racing outside on a bike, you know, kind of formally. And then let's jump into how the heck you got selected for the 2022 Lifetime Grand Prix. [00:14:30] Paige Onweller: yeah, yeah. So, , I think like, and I'm sorry, I'm gonna mute my, I'm not sure if you're getting notified. Um, I apologize. I just wanna make sure that you're not getting, are you hearing the dinging on your [00:14:43] Craig Dalton: No, no, [00:14:44] Paige Onweller: Oh, you are? Okay, cool. Yeah, won't worry about that then. Um, yeah, so I first started racing bikes, um, . So I basically did, started Swift the winter of 2020 to 2021 and then I was racing the premier leg ands with, after doing all the validation testing and making sure that like, you know, I was legit and not weight doping and, and power doping and all that stuff. Um, and then so my first like main, you know, race was, um, , you know, I did some time trials, so I got an coach coaches' exception to race U s a Pro Road Nationals in 2021. So that was one of my first like main races. I did a local, uh, time trial, Willow tt, uh, before that, but really like that was one of my first outdoor races, which is, Somewhat terrifying to show up at like Pro Road Nationals and like barely riding your bike outside. Um, I didn't know how to do a U-turn. Like I just really was afraid to ride the disc. Um, had no idea what I was doing to be, to be honest. Um, and it was kind of a disappointing, I think I was 11th there, which honestly is not that bad. Um, my, my power was really good, but again, like I lost so much time in the U-turns and I really wasn't maintaining an arrow position because I think. Guarded. And you know, if you barely know how to ride a bike and then you put an 80 mill up front, a disc on the back and then tell someone to get a really aggressive TT position, you're probably not gonna hold that . So, um, I kind of, you know, I was a little jaded after that experience because I had a coach at the time that kind of. Kind of dropped me, uh, I think because I had a disappointing, um, uh, race according to them and the team that I was previously on. And that honestly like little fire under my ass, uh, pardon of my language. Um, and so I was kind of told like, well, you don't need a coach. Like you just need to learn how to ride your bike. And in my mind I'm like, well, that's why I need a coach. And so I went and hired my own coach, paid my own money. Um, and then I signed up for the biggest mass dark gravel race that I could find. And I said, gravel doesn't have all these rules, like with road. I was working a lot of weekends and I live in the Midwest. There's not access to road races to do all the category upgrades, and it just didn't make sense for me. And Gravel seemed like a good way to like try to prove myself, um, and have the opportunity to race against the guys and really show like I was strong. So sign Up for Gravel Worlds. That was August of last year. That was my very. Mass start, bike race. Um, my very first ever bike race was the March bef, uh, so the march that, uh, March in 2021, but they did Covid wave, so I really don't count that as a mass start race. Um, so I would say, yeah, August, 2021 Gravel Worlds was my first mass start race, and I kind of told myself like, okay. Don't die because I like had barely rid it in a pack before. I didn't know what I was doing. And that race also starts in a dark, so it's like dark. There's like gravel flying everywhere. You're in a pack. I'm like, I'm gonna die. Like what am I doing? Um, But I didn't die. Uh, I definitely did. Okay. I was fifth. Um, but I remember thinking like, a, I had fun. B I did decently well relative to like, my experience. And I was like dangling off the Peloton, right? Like I wasn't in the middle. I didn't know how to draft. And so there's just all these things where I was like, okay, I think there's something here. Um, and again, more importantly, like I had fun. The community was great. That event is very inclusive, and so it was just a really good. First experience. Um, and so then I signed up and I did Barry Rebe that fall, and I ended up getting second there. Um, and yeah, I kind of thought to myself, you know, maybe I have a, have a future in this. I did iceman, you know, I barely rid a mountain bike. Borrowed a mountain bike from a local guy. His name's Peter. He had messaged me. He is like, you should do this. And I'm like, what? Single track? No way. Um, so yeah, last year was kind of like my first experience without all that. And then when I heard about the lifetime Grand pr. I kind, I applied thinking like, there's no way I'll get in, but [00:18:31] Craig Dalton: And was your, was your application sort. , Hey, I was this, this runner. I had this career in running and I've transitioned. I've shown these sort of glimmers of potential already kind of thing. [00:18:43] Paige Onweller: Yeah, and I, I had just highlighted and said like, I need more opportunity to show how strong I am and I need help with that. Like, I didn't even know about race centuries. You have to register and get into the lotteries. Like, before I even knew, I didn't even know what S B T was like, I was that new. People don't understand, like I have no idea even what these races are like. And so I didn't know there was a lottery. I had never even heard of the race before now. And so yeah, I kind of entered and my application was mostly. Hey, like, I think I'm strong, but I haven't had the opportunity. I've had bad experiences. Um, I've been put down and I'm a female and, and I feel like I have an opportunity to prove myself. So I kind of, I think I framed it in that way. Um, honestly, it was like a year ago. I'm not exactly sure what I put, um, but I do remember saying like, I'm not an influencer. I barely, I think I had like, I don't know, 800, you know, Instagram followers. So I told them. I'm not here to influence. Um, I don't know if social media's important to you, but I think I'm strong. And if you look at my story, I was fifth at gravel worlds against all these people. And uh, I was second at Barry Rebe and I was top 10 at Iceman. I think there's something there, like, please give me a chance. Um, and I didn't have any expectations. Of course you want to get in, but I was out on a training ride with a friend. I remember checking my email and I, I remember getting in and being like, oh no, I gotta buy a mountain bike. No. Like I was, you know, what did I get myself into? Um, so that was like very, very scary, if I'm being honest. Uh, and I was also working, um, and so I was worried about fitting everything in. Um, I was on a gravel. for this last year. So I did not have any mountain bike support. I had to source my own bike, pay for my own bike, uh, you know, all of that stuff. So yeah, I was like very excited I got in, but I was also scared and recognizing like I had to fund the mountain bike portion of my season. Um, but I also knew like worst case scenario, I would just really get experience in learning and I just am so new that I needed that experience. So of course I was gonna give it a whirl, [00:20:47] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Amazing. And obviously the Lifetime Grand Prix is a variety of different races, as you noted, both mountain bike and gravel cycling. How did you feel sort of at Sea Otter kicking off the year? There's a bunch of single track there. You have to get pretty aggressive to sort of do well in a race like that to get out and get, get out in front and be able to stay out in front [00:21:09] Paige Onweller: Yeah. And Sea Otter was horrible if I'm being totally transparent. Uh, so to put things into perspective, uh, my very first time riding a mountain bike was that fall, like that October, 2021. And then I live in Michigan, so I have no mountains here to train. We have the winters and so sea otter's in April and our trails like, really aren't that rideable. Um, and so I went to see ot. with like very minimal experience. Um, and I remember going there on a pre ride, um, and I literally crashed, I think it was like four, three or four times on the one pre ride and I broke my fork. Um, thankfully the guys at Fox replaced it for me. It was incredible. Um, but the reality is like, I remember crying on the sideline of the trail thinking. what am I doing? Like, I, I can't do this. Like, I can't even pre ride and stay upright. There's no way I can race in, in this course. immediately, I had to change perspective and say like, I can't view this as a race. I'm a very competitive person. If I view this as a race, like I will be competitive. So in my mind, I said, Seattle's gonna be my wash race. I'm just gonna do this as a skills day. Like literally view it as a skills day. Stay upright. Don't ruin your whole season. And then drop the race and you'll be fine. And so, um, yeah, I'm not gonna lie, I hated it. It was not a fun race for me because like, I just, you know, the descending, like the climbs, gimme a climb any, any day I will climb my heart out. I love climbing. My power to weight ratio is great. So climbs I excel at. But the reality is like you climb, you pass a bunch of people and those same people are passing you, not pedaling, doesn't make you feel the greatest. And [00:22:47] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I feel like many people who are listening may not be mountain bikers or have mountain bike racing experience, and it is definitely different being out there on the single track. And it's amazing, you know, if you're just not comfortable with the single, with the flow of the single track, or going fast through single track on the descents, make you nervous. [00:23:06] Paige Onweller: Right, [00:23:06] Craig Dalton: is like, you know, minutes and tens of minutes of time that can be lost versus someone who's just has the experience to be comfortable and, and let the bike flow. [00:23:15] Paige Onweller: For sure, for sure. And I don't think people realize like the type of mountain biking definitely changes. Like I was used to like tacky dirt in the Midwest, um, on our trails in the woods in sc Otter, it's like rock with like kitty litter and like you can't corner the same way you would in the Midwest. And so. , I think like pros that have been writing many years and have all these experiences across different terrains, like really have that knowledge. Um, and for me, like that was the first time I'm like, why am I going down? Like I know I'm cornering the right body position. Like I studied this. Um, and then I'm just like, oh, well it's totally different terrain. It's, you know, then someone said, oh, you're writing on kitty litter. I'd never heard that term before. Um, and I was like, yeah, that, that makes a lot of sense. [00:23:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I always, I thought that was interesting when the Lifetime Grand Prix came up and, and I understood the type of racing they were gonna have the athletes do, because it really does require that you've got a full bag of tricks. So it's interesting, you know, and I, I'm interested as we fast forward through this conversation at the end of 22, like, you know, how your skillsets have evolved and your comfort level, and as we go into 23, what that means for. Potential in these races. But so you start off at Sea Otter, have some ups and downs there, and then I forget what's next in the calendar. But why don't you quickly walk us through some of the other racing through the [00:24:31] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. So Seattle Oter. Um, and then unfortunately after Seattle Oter, uh, I was really gunning for Unbound. Unbound suits me very well, that course profile and like my power strengths and how I ride. Um, so Unbound was like the big priority of the race. Um, and I had like set a goal to podium at Unbound, um, top three. And so I was like, okay, like this is gonna be a good year, unbounds of my race. This is right up my skillset. And I was out on a training ride back in April and ended up crashing. Um, a cross wind kind of took me out in a really loose section. It was not ideal. Ended up having to have, uh, surgery to remove, uh, like a surgical debridement of my left knee cuz of all the gravel debris. Um, and that really set me back. I had like a month of like minimal to no riding and that my leg was immobilized and non-weightbearing. And so, Yeah, going into Unbound, I had been off the bike for like, literally a whole month and I started riding like, uh, three weeks, three or four weeks before Unbound. And so I was really trying to say like, I just need to not do Unbound. Um, but I also knew, like I have very little experience with Mass Start races and I know Unbound is very chaotic in the beginning, and so I kind of told myself, do the. Go all out, like you would act like you're in shape, behave like you're in shape, race, like you're in shape, knowing that I probably will blow up and that's fine, but I, I wanted that experience and then I would just, you know, maybe a miracle would happen and I'd pull it together. But, um, I mostly did it because I knew I needed the experience with a ma start. So, uh, showed up with very, very, very little fitness. Um, and then also a little bit like scared because after you have a crash with a surgery like. You know, you're very, you're a little bit more timid and I'm already timid at that point, So that was a challenge in itself just to show up and race. So, ended up getting through and I, I did fairly well. I started off a little bit more conservatively, then I started checking it off people, but then I totally bonked. Um, and it was like so painful, a painful death. And then I ended up crashing, like. at mile one 30 and hurt the knee. That, and so anyways, I, I ended up DN Fing at Unbound and I had never DN FD a race before. Um, so that was Unbound and then, then I was like, okay, crusher's next and starting to get fitness back. Um, then I got covid like two weeks before, um, crusher and I have asthma. I did not do well with Covid. I got very sick. that derailed, trailing or training yet again. So I showed up to Crusher, was like, do I do this? Do I not do this? You know, I was like, do it for the experience. Uh, ended up, you know, not doing very well there. I think I was like 15 through 18th or something like that. And so at that point my season just was not going very well and I was racing pretty poorly. I was like, do I even finish out the Grand Prix series? Like. , this is costing money for me. Like a time, like I'm taking all this time off of work to go to these events and travel. Um, and I was just struggling mentally, like just really wasn't happy with where I was at. Um, and so I actually kind of did something different and I went and did a ran nearing event and ran nearing is basically, um, , I don't know if you're familiar with it or not, but it's not a race. It's like ultra endurance cycling where you show up and the camaraderie is the main goal of the event, not competition. And a close friend of mine in training partner was doing a 750 miler. So basically we you ride from New York up to Montreal, then back to New York again. And so. . I was like, this seems kind of wild, but I just needed something different to remove, like the disappointment of having a poor season. And so I ended up doing that for him, just thinking it'd be a good mental reset, get me in shape, you know, for the rest of the year. But it was like 10 days before Leadville. So uh, I had like a 33 hour week, uh, leading into to Leadville. Not an ideal taper. Uh, you know, I joke and I call that the anti taper. Um, but it really was the mental reset that I needed. And I think too many times people set a calendar at the beginning of the year, especially pro riders because there's a lot on the line for us. The sponsors need to know, you know, there's, we plan our whole year around this and I think there needs to be some flexibility because you don't know what's gonna happen in eight months, six months, or whatever case may be. And for me, I knew my mental, where I was at mentally. Is going to impact where I finished in a race more than what people I think recognize. And so for me that mental reset at that event was really, really important. I showed up to Leadville with the anti taper as I talk about, and ended up doing really well. I was seventh there. And then, um, s B T was a bit of a struggle, I think just because of all the subsequent fatigue, uh, in the earlier weeks, and then ended up getting fourth, that lead boat. Um, and that's when I started to feel like my normal self again. I said, okay. Performance is getting back to where I think it should be. And, uh, I was starting to feel like I was racing again. Leadville was hard just because of the descending, and I'm not used to that. Um, and I've never raced a altitude either, so that was like a whole nother animal in itself. Um, yeah, so that was kind of through the summer and then, Schwa again, was after that, and Schwa again was a Med Fest. I've barely, I've barely ridden in any mud. You know, I've, there's a lot of racing, uh, that I haven't done, um, in a variety of conditions, but I felt like I always joke and say, schwa again was my very first CY Lacrosse race. And that's what it felt like to me. I was like, if I were to ever do cycl cost, this is what I would imagine it'd be like, except on skinnier tires. Um, ended up crashing at Schwam again, no surprise there because it was so muddy and I don't have that experience. Um, but I, I fought my way back, you know, fell off the group and then time trialed my way back and motor mooted through, you know, the chorus as much as I can and got seventh there. Um, so still a respectable finish [00:30:16] Craig Dalton: Yeah, very much so. Even on the ones that you said were, you know, like, oh, I, you know, didn't do that well or went in with a light mentality like you were consistently performing, you know, you weren't maybe knocking on the door of the podium on any of these yet. [00:30:28] Paige Onweller: Right. [00:30:29] Craig Dalton: but you, you were up there. [00:30:30] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. And I was kind of like, that's why I always joke, you know, before big sugar, you know, I did that, uh, news article with Vela News that I was kind of the dark horse because I was kind of like there under the radar. And you know, the unfortunate part with this sport and with any support is that like you really don't get the attention unless you're winning. Right. Um, and you know, there's some exceptions to that and there's, there's nothing wrong with that. Um, but I do think there's a lot of really strong athletes that are like consistent. , you know, performing quite well. Um, but they might not get the spotlight as as much. Um, and so for me, like, you know, I was. Okay. You know, I just, you know, this is something I'm always struggling with too, is just to be happy with what you have that day. Um, because I'm always, I'm always wanting more. Right. Um, and some of that is knowing what I'm capable of. And part of that is like wanting to prove, like, Who I am and what I, what my worth is in this sport. Mostly because I had, I had some rejection last year. My very first, you know, year in the sport, I was rejected by, you know, someone that I respected and I looked up to, and that was my coach. And then, you know, so I think like that kind of always had stayed with me a bit. Um, you know, and I admit that, you know, And I don't know if I should admit that, but I think there is some truth to that. And, and as an athlete, you need to assess like where the drive is coming from and you need to make sure it's from a healthy place. Um, so I did a lot of that this year in making sure that like, I wanna win because it's for me. Um, and not having anything to prove either. And I say that like I had had to prove myself, had to prove myself. I think I'm at a place now. I know what I'm capable of and other people know that too. Um, but in gravel it's such an unpredictable sport that you can be there, you can have the legs for the, for the win, but it doesn't mean that you're going to win. Um, [00:32:22] Craig Dalton: I think, yeah, I think as you go back to races every year the weather conditions can change. You can have a mechanical, you can have nutritional issues. There's so many things that can go wrong in these long events that it's, it's really, it's hard to keep going and cuz you always know, it's like something went wrong. I'm sure even in like a great day, winning big sugar, something still went long wrong along the way that you had to cure and keep. [00:32:46] Paige Onweller: for sure. Yeah. I think the biggest thing is, uh, you just have to be really good at losing . And, uh, I always, you know, in setting goals, I kind of tell myself I wanna be in the position to podium or the position to win. Knowing like if I tell myself, well, I wanna win, most people aren't gonna win. And even the best athletes, like, you're, you're not gonna win. Um, but if you set the goal that you wanna be in a position to win, then it's a little bit different because, . Yeah. Like I said, you have to be good at losing, and if you're not, , you're not gonna be sustainable in the sport long term. Like, I'm not here to race for one or two more years, like I'm here to race for another 10 years. And so you need to have the right mindset and be okay with those losses and, uh, be happy with what you brought to the table on those days. And, and that's not easy for someone that's competitive and. At my level, like I'm not a magical, you know, unicorn. Like we're all this way, we're all competitive, we all wanna win. And so I think the athletes that maybe have a more sustainable future in the sport, um, have a little bit better mindset or healthier mindset with, with or losing. [00:33:50] Craig Dalton: When you looked at that big sugar course in Bentonville, Arkansas, was that something you were naturally drawn to, that it was a course you could do well at? [00:33:59] Paige Onweller: Yeah, I mean, I think the rolling hills are good. Um, I had heard that course was a little scary with the off-camera descending. Um, and I actually re-wrote all of the course, uh, on the days leading up to it. Um, and I remember. You know, as I'm going through the course, um, thinking the course actually wasn't suited for me, uh, because of the descending. Uh, so looking at it on paper, I liked the climbs. I thought, you know, the course could do well with my strengths. Um, but then when I was out there pre-writing and I pre-rolled with like my, uh, friend John, and he just like bombs down, you know, the, the descents. And I'm like trailing a minute back and I'm like, oh my goodness. Like if this is how it is in a race, like there's no way I'm gonna win. So I remember kind of having some moments of panic during the pre ride. Um, so my goal and mindset completely changed in how I approached the race. Um, so I was like, well, if I know my descending is the weakness, then I wanna be at the front of all the descending so I can pick my line and people can go around me. Um, cuz it's easy to be a timid to sender and say, well, I don't wanna block anyone. I'll just, you know, enter from the back. So I don't get in any way anyone's way. But for me, I said no, like, I'm gonna push the uphills and then that way I would mitigate any losses, uh, on the time, on the descending. Um, but what I'm learning, and, and I don't know if this is relatable to other athletes, is for whatever reason, I'm a very different writer on race day and I do things on race day that I could never replicate in training. Um, or I haven't figured out how to replicate in training. And I think that's because I'm just very competitive and I do take more risk. and then you just kind of let the bike do its thing and you trust the process. And so on race day, like I really wasn't, I was descending quite well, much better than what I did on the pre rides. Um, but there's also a lot , you know, on a line too, so, [00:35:54] Craig Dalton: yeah, yeah. So, so, you know, one of the big things that weekend was that there was a forecast for heavy winds that did materialize. Did that go through your mind at any point, and did you make a calculation that that was a particularly good thing or bad thing for you? [00:36:11] Paige Onweller: Yeah, so whenever the race gets harder for a longer period of time, that will almost always benefit me, um, because I, the harder the day, the longer the day, the better. . And so, uh, when I saw the forecast and saw the wind, um, I, I liked that. I was like, yes, bring it on. Especially the headwind for the last 40 miles. I was like, uh, bring it on. Like, make it heavier winds. That's great. Um, so I, I liked that and I, I think that's important to. Have that mindset because how you think about things in a race or leading into a race will impact how you approach it. And so people that dread headwind or complain about it or maybe have a more negative mindset, um, maybe they don't do as well. I don't know. That's just my theory. Um, so I ended up making a move pretty early and it was risky, like without a doubt because I was with a pretty solid group of most of like the lead. and then I left that group to ride with one other person, one other person, one other guy came with me. And what ended up working in my favor is that we were both very strong and motivated to like keep going. And so we started picking up all these men that were falling off the league group. Um, and good strong guys like. You know, famous pro gravel guys. Um, and I just remember like the group kind of swelling and, um, that really benefited me into the, into the headwind section. So oftentimes, like if you're with a group and you leave them into a headwind, like it's a risk because you're with a smaller group, but then all the people that you just passed now catch back up to you. That's a possibility. Um, but I also knew at that point, like I was feeling pretty good. So if I had to like buckle down and just, you know, solo TT. Maybe I could have pulled that off. But the reality is like it worked out well and we started catching other men off the leads group and you know that that seemed to work well. And in gravel, like I'm sure you've maybe experienced this, like your group is really dependent on how you do and so, , sometimes you're with a group and we're all working well together and especially in wind sections, you know, having that even rotation, someone peeling off and not having this yo-yo of pace. Um, and the group I was with was doing, doing well with that and that helped. [00:38:28] Craig Dalton: yeah, yeah. Absolutely. That was huge for me that weekend as well. I just got, I happened to make a selection early on through one of the pinch points in the early port of the. And then I just happened to be with congenial, well-working simpatico people, and I was burying myself to stay with them because I knew, to your point, like if I was off by myself, it was gonna be a dramatically different day. And sort of as it turned out, I, like, I finished way ahead of where I ever would've predicted. I would've finished simply because of a, a coup couple good decisions, a decent amount of effort, but also a lot of just good luck of riding with people. [00:39:05] Paige Onweller: yeah, yeah. And like you said, like sometimes you do bury yourself and. That last hour of that race was really challenging for me, um, cuz I was at my limit. And um, I just remember thinking like, if you fall off, it's gonna suck a lot more than what it's doing. What, what is sucking right now? ? So I just remember thinking like, hang on, hang on just a little longer. Um, yeah. And I remember like Ted King kind of like made an attack, like, I don't know how many miles we were from the finish and I was just like, yep, see you later, . I was like, there's no way I'm going with any, anyone that makes any move right now. . But it's also hard cuz I didn't have any time gaps. Like I had no idea. And I remember thinking like going into the finish and I hadn't really seen a lot of media cars in the last half too. And so, . I remember thinking, I was like, is there something else in front of me? Like, do I put my hands up across the line? Like, did I really, am I really winning? Like I, I knew in my mind I was, but yeah, it's sometimes really hard cuz you're like, not thinking straight. You're working so hard. No one's told you you're in first, like, you know, an actual official or something like that. And yeah, like the lack of media and, and time gaps like sometimes. You don't really know, um, because we're not like the men where there's no other rider in front of us. There's all these men. And so it can get really confusing for the females. Um, and, and I get bummed about that sometimes. I think there's some opportunity for races to improve what that looks like. You know, a, a lead moto car for the women, right? Perfect example. Um, you know, that sort of stuff. I think there's some room for improvement there. [00:40:33] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Interesting. So when, when you crossed the finish line and someone confirms that you are indeed the first place women athlete, uh, how did you feel? I mean, you had a whole season where things weren't coming together necessarily. What was that like? [00:40:48] Paige Onweller: Yeah, I mean it felt so good. Like I, you know, I kind of like, I think I remember joking with a friend, I was like, you know, if, if I win I'll thank you for picking up my groceries or something. And you know, I think they probably chuckled like, yeah, you're not gonna win. And I just remember like, just being, I felt validating like these are things I knew I was capable of having a big win this year. Um, and you know, some of those beliefs are, things that I've learned and observed in racing, like knowing that I'm, that I'm strong and, and seeing and feeling that, but for me, like it just felt so validating to get that whim. But I also, like no one else really knew the struggles that I had during the year. I mean, some people that follow my process, but when you look at race results, you don't know, like she just had surgery a month ago, or she had covid 10 days ago. You just think they have a bad race and. , what I've learned this year is that race results do not tell the whole story. And so for me, like the wind was great and I'm sure a lot of people would be like, yeah, big breakthrough race, you know, she got lucky or good for her. But the reality is like it's so much deeper than that. And like those. , you know, feelings like are so personal and really the only people that know that are like, the people are closest to you and your family. And so I just remember being overwhelmed and like immediately wanting to call my family and talk to my sisters and my mom and dad and, and just, yeah, just felt so good. Um, and I was excited. Like I knew, like I had raced a little differently. I raced more aggressively and I came up with a plan and I stuck to it. And I wasn't afraid to like make the moves. And I think before like I was maybe more timid and more reactive to how I raced and you know, that was like eye-opening for me. So I remember thinking as I finished. I think I learned how to ride my bike today, . So, um, and what I mean by that is like just being more ballsy and when you make a move, you stick to it. Um, . So it made me really excited. Like I immediately wanted to be like, is it 2023 yet? Can I race more? You know, everyone's like tired and they want the season to be over and I'm just like getting started, you know? Um, so I remember just being, you know, validated, excited. Um, yeah, I just, I just felt really good. Um, but of course, like, you know, you get pulled away to get a drug test. I didn't have my phone, like I didn't eat after for a while and anyways. , it was a, a blur after that. Um, yeah. And then for me, it's like you win a big bike race and it's like this huge career defining moment for me to win big sugar. And then it's like immediately fly back and then go to work in the er. And you know, it's like people in the er, like they don't, they don't know what big sugar is. They don't even know that I was gone racing bikes. And so I just go back to work, see patients and blah, da da da, da, and then try to deal with all these sponsor, you know, decisions for next year. So it was like two worlds and um, yeah. , definitely an adjustment coming back home. [00:43:37] Craig Dalton: That's crazy and exciting and I'm glad I was able to witness it and I'm glad I was able to revisit it with you. Now, so you talked about your eagerness for 2023. I'm not sure exactly when this will post, but probably in January of 2023, I just saw the announcement that you've signed on board for another year of the Grand Prix. [00:43:57] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. So put my name in the hat. Uh, year two of the Lifetime Grand Prix. Um, so yeah, got accepted into that. So they upped the ante a bit with 35 athletes for the women and 35 for the men. Um, they seem to have a good lineup. And yeah, I mean that series really gave me a good opportunity and I really feel like Lifetime is trying to. make some good changes, some positive changes. Uh, it's the most competitive female, uh, pro Peloton. You know, you go to other races and you don't see the depth of women that the lifetime events are bringing. So that to me is like, if I'm racing, I wanna race against the best. Um, and I love that. So that's been awesome. They're also trying to make sure that this is a, a. Sport by doing drug testing and they're gonna be increasing that. And I very much support that. I think that's awesome. Um, and so, yeah, I just think there's so many positives that, uh, lifetime Grand Prix series is bringing in and, you know, it's not perfect. Nothing is, uh, but they're willing to listen to the athletes and get input and, you know, hopefully I can be a part of the change that's happening in American. [00:45:05] Craig Dalton: You must be happy that you did gut it out and attend all the events, so now you have at least a bit of knowledge of what those courses look like, et cetera. [00:45:14] Paige Onweller: yeah, for sure. For sure. [00:45:16] Craig Dalton: And then they have added a seventh event that they haven't announced. That's gonna be a wild card. And the fact that you can drop two events, does that meaningfully change the way you approach the season, those variables, or do you think it more is just an accommodation? That stuff happens to athletes along the way, and it's just giving a little bit more of a breathing room for, you know, getting covid, having a crash, et [00:45:39] Paige Onweller: right. Yeah. I think if you would've asked me that question last year, you know, I very much had the mindset of this is the race dropping and these are the ones I'm doing well at. But I think at this level of racing, like you better bring your A game to all seven and then like you're probably not, you're gonna get a flat or mechanical or an illness. So my mindset is to race hard, there will be races that will be more important to me personally, that I'll target. Uh, but for the most part, you know, I'll definitely, um, you know, target all of them and then, you know, just stuff just happens. Um, but you know, for example, sea Otter, like that's not gonna be an a race for me. Like, you know, I'll probably do the road event the day before. Um, that's, you know, it's just not going to be something that I'm gonna aim to win because of my lack of skillset. Now, will I do better than last, last year? Heck yeah. And I'm gonna have a skills coach that I'm working with this winter, and I'll be out in California and I pre-read the course a lot more. And there's all these things that I will prepare myself to be better than I was last year. But knowing like, you know, I only can go so far in one year, so, [00:46:43] Craig Dalton: Yeah, you talked about the rush of kind of, uh, talking to sponsors and media attention that happened after Big Sugar. I know you're not able to kind of reveal your sponsor program for 2023, but is it safe to say that it's expanded? You're gonna have more opportunities, a little bit more time and energy to focus and less stress on, uh, the rest of your life, so to speak. [00:47:07] Paige Onweller: Yeah, for sure. Like, as we talked about earlier, like I've been juggling a lot this year and it's been very difficult. Um, even though I act like I'm handling myself well, like it's been a struggle a lot of the time. So I am excited that in 2023, um, I will no longer be working as a pa. I will be racing bikes full-time and I'm extremely grateful to the, all the sponsors that I'll be bringing on board. That see my potential and wanna invest in, in what I'm potentially capable of doing. Um, cuz I am a new writer and um, you know, I think, you know, there's other people in this sport that may have the level of support that I'm going to be having, that have been doing this a very long time. And so I don't take for granted that these are sponsors that. See potential in me. Um, you can't just win one bike race and expect that, you know, you're gonna be able to race full-time and, and have that support. Um, so yeah, I'm very excited about that. Um, my last day in the ER is January 3rd, and then, yeah, I'll drive directly to California after that to escape the winter snow here in Michigan. Um, and get some big training blocking and yeah, start, uh, start learning more in 2020. [00:48:13] Craig Dalton: That's so amazing and congratulations for that all coming together. It's just gotta mean so much to just have the opportunity to kind of go after it in 23 and really see what your potential is. [00:48:25] Paige Onweller: Yeah, no, I am excited and, and I'll be doing a private tier program and I think what I love about it is that the, you get to work directly with the sponsors and, um, , you have input into products and equipment and um, you know, you feel like you have a voice and you work with people that you respect and value, and it just feels like a family. Um, it already has felt that way with me, uh, for the sponsors that I'll be working with and. I'm just excited. And the other part of that is that when you are privateering, like you have a platform for advocating for what you believe in. And, you know, I wanna race well, but I also have some goals off the bike too. And, um, I think those are important for me to start building towards in the cycling world. Um, so it's just fun to have that freedom and opportunity to, to work with brands that believe in that too. [00:49:15] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That's awesome. Well, I'll certainly be following along with you in 2023, and I think you've got a lot of new fans that wanna see. How you're gonna do out there. So best of luck. The conversation was a lot of fun. And again, I wish you all the best. [00:49:30] Paige Onweller: Thank you. Thank you. [00:49:32] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Big, thanks to Paige for joining us. We wish her all the best in the 2023 season as usual. The women's lifetime grand Prix is setting up to be one of the more exciting series to watch and follow throughout the year. If you're interested in connecting with me, I encourage you to join the ridership. That's www.theridership.com. That's a free global cycling community to connect with other gravel cyclists around the world. If you're able to support the podcast. Please visit, buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Or ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated and a great way for other gravel cyclists to discover the podcast. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt onto your wheels  

Singletrack
Courtney Dauwalter | 2023 Bandera 100K Pre-Race Interview

Singletrack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 20:51 Very Popular


Courtney Dauwalter is a professional trail runner for Salomon based in Leadville, CO lining up for the 2023 Bandera 100K later this week.Sponsors:Rabbit - use code Singletrack30 at checkout on their website (https://www.runinrabbit.com/) to get 30% off your next orderGnarly Nutrition - use code Singletrack20 at checkout on their website (https://gognarly.com/) to get 20% off your next orderKodiak Cakes - use code Singletrack15 at checkout on their website (https://kodiakcakes.com/)  to get 15% off your next orderTimestamps:(0:39) - career to date, training and racing mentality, current outlook on the sport(9:44) - thoughts on being a public figure, career investments, legacy(16:17) - Bandera, Western States, HardrockGuest Links:Follow Courtney on InstagramSupport the show

Backpacker Radio
#182 | Ethan Greene, Director of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, on All Things Avalanche Safety

Backpacker Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 104:28 Very Popular


In today's episode of Backpacker Radio presented by The Trek, we are joined by Ethan Greene, who is the Director at the Colorado Avalanche Information Center. We of course dive deep on everything related to snow safety in the backcountry including some basic tips people need to be safe during avalanche season, the most common mistakes people make in the backcountry related to avalanche safety, what to do if you're caught in an avalanche, and much more. We wrap the show with a new backcountry meal critic (mac and cheese edition!), we go over some of the details from the first article from our 2022 AT thru-hiker survey, we do a triple crown of our top backpacking predictions for the new year, a glorious listener poop story, and more. Casio: Shop at casio.com/us/watches. Organifi: Use code “BACKPACKER” for 20% off at organifi.com/backpacker. Gossamer Gear: Use code “TAKELESSTREKMORE” for 15% off at gossamergear.com.  Enlightened Equipment: Use code “TREKPOD10” for 10% off Enlightened Equipment's Stock Revelation Quilt or Torrid Jacket at enlightenedequipment.com. [divider] Interview with Ethan Greene Colorado Avalanche Information Center AVALANCHE.ORG Time stamps & Questions 00:04:51 - QOTD: What hopes do you have for 2023? 00:10:57 - Reminder 1: Subscribe to the Trek's newsletter to stay tuned for the Badger sponsorship 00:11:47 - Reminder 2 & 3: Apply to blog for the Trek and shop our shorts! 00:12:36 - Introducing Ethan  00:13:20 - Tell us about your background in outdoor sports 00:14:01 - Have you always had a fascination with snow in particular? 00:15:47 - Can you tell us about ski joring in Leadville? 00:17:28 - Have you lived in the Rockies your entire life? 00:19:00 - How do you go from knowing you like snow to getting a doctorate in snow? 00:22:08 - Is there a rough estimate of how many people in the world have PhDs in snow? 00:23:33 - How have winters in the Rockies changed over the past 30 or 50 years? 00:24:54 - When are avalanches at the greatest risk for happening? 00:25:52 - If you're a backpacker, what are the safety basics of avalanches? 00:29:37 - What is the data about who gets trapped by avalanches? 00:31:08 - What resources do you recommend people look at? 00:33:10 - True or false: if you're covered by snow, spit to see which way is up 00:35:03 - What steps should you take if you're in an avalanche? 00:37:45 - Describe what movement through the snow is best 00:39:38 - Is a certain type of activity more likely to trigger an avalanche than others? 00:43:30 - What are some standout moments from your childhood or career? 00:45:28 - Have you ever been in an avalanche? 00:48:55 - Are there any myths about avalanches that aren't accurate? 00:49:37 - How common are avalanches that haven't been forecasted? 00:50:45 - What area is notorious for frequent avalanches? 00:53:12 - Do the icier conditions in New England change the avalanche likelihood? 00:54:12 - Does the direction of the mountain face impact the avalanche likelihood? 00:56:07 - Can you talk at all about dangerous snow features like cornices and crevasses? 00:58:37 - What conditions made 2019 such a big avalanche year? 01:01:15 - What kind of manpower goes into cleaning up avalanche debris? 01:04:04 - Should we consider avalanches when skiing and snowboarding at big resorts? 01:05:29 - If someone is interested in getting into the avalanche field, what's a good path for them? 01:08:48 - Do you feel a profound sense of boredom in the summer? 01:10:29 - What is some avalanche lingo the commoner wouldn't understand? 01:12:02 - Is there any question we didn't ask that we should have? SEGMENTS Backcountry Meal Critics: Backpacker's Pantry Trek Propaganda The 2022 AT Thru-Hiker Survey: General Information by Kate Richard Mail Bag Triple Crown of predictions for 2023 5 Star Reviews [divider] Check out our sound guy @paulyboyshallcross. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)!  Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. Support us on Patreon to get bonus content. Advertise on Backpacker Radio Follow The Trek, Chaunce, Badger, and Trail Correspondents on Instagram. Follow The Trek and Chaunce on YouTube. Follow Backpacker Radio on Tik Tok.  A super big thank you to our Chuck Norris Award winner(s) from Patreon: Andrew, Austen McDaniel, Brad & Blair (Thirteen Adventures), Brent Stenberg, Christopher Marshburn, Dayne, Greg McDaniel, Kristina Diaz, Matt Soukup, Mike Poisel, Patrick Cianciolo, Paul Packman Sealy, Sawyer Products, and Tracy “Trigger” Fawns. A big thank you to our Cinnamon Connection Champions from Patreon: Dcnerdlet, Jacob Northrup, Jeff LaFranier, Keith Dobie Jr, Liz Seger, and Peter.

The Seder-Skier Podcast
Merry Christmas from Seder-Skier.com

The Seder-Skier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 85:09


We talk a little bit about - our broadcasting of Davos - behind the curtain - are ski journalists not doing their jobs and asking tough questions? - ideas on how to 'fix' Nordic skiing....pro ski league ....where the pro teams would be and what it would look like - pet peeves shopping at the grocery store.... - how to improve Leadville's grooming/xc ski situation --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/seder-skier/support

The MR Runningpains Podcast
My Gear Picks of 2022 - Check Out the YouTube Video of This One - Episode 149

The MR Runningpains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 51:20


Here's the link to the YouTube Version of this Episode - https://youtu.be/6WWDXV2eIWo Donation links: Donate to The Vermont Adaptive for my Vermont 100 Campaign - https://www.pledgereg.com/357957?fbclid=IwAR0-dUaRLRnQvcTU9wXywYE5JlBTJHjTaqswcPMO3IDz5h9nkCXe7n3t06o Donate to The Challenged Athlete Foundation for my Leadville 100 Campaign - http://support.challengedathletes.org/site/TR/Events/General?px=1355904&pg=personal&fr_id=1940   Gear Mentioned in This Episode: Salomon Adv Skin 5 & 12             5 – $140 - https://www.salomon.com/en-us/shop/product/adv-skin-5-lc11659.html#color=66904               12 - $160 - https://www.salomon.com/en-us/shop/product/adv-skin-12-lc11657.html#color=66310     UltrAspire Bronco Vest - $130 - https://ultraspire.com/products/bronco_race_vest/   Naked Running SL Band - $48 – https://nakedsportsinnovations.com/collections/shopall/products/sl-band?variant=41015180001460   Leki Running Poles – https://leki.mwrc.net/en/category.php?product_category_id=11043   Leki Nordic Breeze Short Glove - $50 - https://www.altrarunning.com/shop/mens-shoes-trail/mens-olympus-5-al0a7r6p?variationId=880   Nitecore NU25 - $37 – https://www.nitecorestore.com/Nitecore-NU25-Headlamp-p/fl-nite-nu25.htm?gclid=Cj0KCQiA-oqdBhDfARIsAO0TrGGbMMRiqXZkyeTMPvI78S7OvruPwTWcwjrrSV4hMhbUlSWk-9b6KgMaAvdiEALw_wcB Link to newsletter article about NU25 - https://shoutout.wix.com/so/e5OH2oigD?languageTag=en   Wahoo TICKRx - $80 - https://www.pledgereg.com/357957?fbclid=IwAR0-dUaRLRnQvcTU9wXywYE5JlBTJHjTaqswcPMO3IDz5h9nkCXe7n3t06o   Goal Zero Flip 24 - $30 - https://www.goalzero.com/collections/power-banks/products/flip-24-power-bank   Goal Zero Flip Charging Dock - $20 (on sale now for $5) - https://www.goalzero.com/collections/power-banks/products/flip-charging-dock   Book – Mental Training for Ultrarunning by Addie Bracy   Versatile Road Shoe (non-plated) – Hoka Mach 5 - $140 – https://www.hoka.com/en/us/mens-race-shoes/mach-5/1127893.html   Hybrid Shoe – Altra Outroad - $140 – https://www.altrarunning.com/shop/mens-shoes-trail/mens-outroad-al0a7r6n?variationId=108   Versatile Trail Shoe – For me it has been the Altra Lone Peak, but with new edition (LP 7 - $150) out (and I haven't purchased it yet), I can't provide much feedback here. Lone Peak 7 can be found here - $150 - https://www.altrarunning.com/shop/neutral-shoes/mens-lone-peak-7-al0a7r6h?variationId=680   Best Long Ultra Shoe – Altra Olympus 5 - $180 – https://www.altrarunning.com/shop/mens-shoes-trail/mens-olympus-5-al0a7r6p?variationId=880   MR Runningpains (Aaron's) information: If you'd like to learn more about Patreon or to donate, please visit https://www.patreon.com/MRRunningpains My Socials, Channels, & Newsletter: https://www.facebook.com/MRRUNNINGPAINSEVENTS/ https://www.instagram.com/mrrunningpains/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ6J512qA34z_N0KJSU4jfw https://www.strava.com/athletes/18431982  To sign up for my Newsletter -https://www.mrrunningpains.com Email - runningpains@gmail.com Thanks to all of you for listening! Please share the Podcast and please leave a review, rate, & subscribe if you haven't done so already! THANK YOU! Aaron Saft MR Runningpains   Thanks to my Patrons: Randall Woods Cullen Hicks Leah Lanier Teresa Bowser Carolyn Morrisroe Mike Sears Julia Jordan Nicole Burnham Peter Keyo Will Weidman Philip Taylor Martin Thorne Nancy Lewis  Victor Dostrow Kendall Weaver Nate Heaslip Austin Elder Tory Grieves  

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast
Revisit Our Conversation with Pro Skier Drew Petersen, His Sub 25hr LT100 Run and So Much More!

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 89:42


Tune in here to this episode of Grits, Guts, and Determination, The Leadville Race Series Podcast, a leading authority for all things Leadville! Host Cole Chlouber, son of race founder Ken Chlouber, takes us on a story-telling journey of the 38-year rich history of this race. We learn all the tips, tricks, and stories from the Leadville community members! Joining us today is Pro Skier, Drew Peterson, and in today's episode Drew talks about his Sub 25hr Leadville 100, mental health and more! To begin, Drew starts off explaining how the Leadviille experience is everything he hoped it would be- it included the good and the bad, lived up to his expectations and lived out his childhood dream. He explored deep parts of himself, met new people and enjoyed connecting again with the mountains. The day of the race started off rocky by getting in late and sneaking up to the front. He discusses his mistakes including not drinking caffeine at first and he made potatoes at the Airbnb, but they were bad, and created stomach issues during the race. He became frustrated with himself during the race because of those mistakes and it started to bring him down, but he changed his attitude with his mental fortitude, and decided he already learned some lessons today, but he could apply them to the rest of the race. Next, Drew goes into his entire play-by-play of the race and how he thought he was going too fast starting off, so he started talking to people to see if he could hold conversations with them. He has a weak right foot and 2 miles into the race that started to hurt, but it quickly went away and that pain didn't pop up again the rest of the race. He explained his mental state that no matter how bad things get, they're always going to get better and vice versa. He continued on and ran downhill really well, which gave him a boost of confidence, but then he hit a wall. His women coaches encouraged him and told him to have fun and go climb Hope Pass, and that's exactly what he did. The climbing part of Hope Pass was his favorite part of the race in getting to reconnect with the mountains, get some confidence and positivity and even let out a wolf howl! He kept up that positivity, but the last 30 miles were the hardest where he was full of pain and struggled. His older brother paced him for the last section and getting to share that with him meant the world. Finally, Drew explains how going across the finish line let all the emotions catch up with him. He was surrounded by his crew, was excited and cried from elation at the finish line. Drew continues on by talking about his film called “Ups + Downs,” which discusses how Drew navigated the mountains and valleys of mental health through skiing. He shares that if you or anyone you know is struggling with mental health, they can call the mental health hotline or check out his website for more resources. His last piece of advice is to start out slower in the race, but to make up your mind ahead of time that you are going to finish the race. Don't leave any space to question whether or not you will finish, but to decide you will. No matter how bad things get, things will always get better.

The Athlinks Podcast
56. Rose Grant - 2x Leadville MTB Champ. Pro Mountain Biker. Recently Retired :)

The Athlinks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 72:39


A Juliana and SRAM Pro Team professional mountain bike racer and champion, Rose joins the podcast to talk about her career in bike racing, and balancing sacrifice with accomplishment while raising a family. Rose on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rosekgrant/ Faster Forward Show on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/fasterforwardshow/ Troy Busot on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/troybusot/

TrainingPeaks CoachCast
Season 4 Ep 12 — Training for World-Class Skimo and a Leadville MTB 100 Podium with John Gaston

TrainingPeaks CoachCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 49:55


Though coming to the sport later than most, John Gaston is the current U.S. National Ski Mountaineering champion and has won multiple prestigious U.S. events, including the Audi Power of Four 10 times. He is arguably the country's best ski mountaineering, or skimo racer, and competes on the world stage in the winter.  During the summer, Gaston mountain bikes the trails near his home in Aspen to maintain fitness and revel in the high alpine environment. In August, he placed second overall at the Leadville 100 mountain bike race, ahead of a stacked field of the world's top professional cyclists.  Listen in as Gaston reveals his training philosophy to compete at the world-class level in two different sports, balancing a growing family with running an apparel brand and the potentially limited future of elite-level skimo in the U.S.

Bike Talk with Dave: Bicycle racing, cyclocross, gravel, mountain bike, road and tech

Rose Grant's pockets are stuffed with pal mares, a five-time U.S. Mountain Bike Marathon National Champion, two-time Leadville 100 Champion and so much more. In 2022 she was among 30 elite athletes chosen to compete in the six-race Lifetime Grand Prix. All on dirt, racing began in April at the Sea Otter Classic and concluded in October with the Big Sugar 100-mile gravel race in NW Arkansas. Other races included Unbound, Tushar Crusher, The Leadville 100 and the Chequamegon 40. On episode no. 18 of this podcast, Rose committed to join Dave after the series and share her experiences. She also talks about her recent retirement from professional cycling and a little bit of skiing! 

Follow Rose on Instagram, Facebook and online at www.rose.grant.com. Support the show by rating and reviewing, and sharing with friends! If you'd like to support the show financially, you can go to BuyMeACoffee.com or directly with Venmo: @David-Mable - I'll send you a Bike Talk sticker made by my friends at Bike Rags Apparel -So head on over to Buy Me a Coffee and look for Bike Talk with Dave. https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dmable122Q AND HATS! Put your order in for a limited edition Bike Talk with Dave hat! Bike Rags Apparel is creating a dad-hat style black cap embroidered with the Bike Talk logo! Order yours today for only $20 (local pick-up. Throw an extra five bucks on for shipping and I'll mail it to you... with a sticker!). Venmo is easy @David-Mable Thanks also to Bikeiowa.com who serves as the online host of Bike Talk with Dave. BikeIowa.com is your one stop shop all kinds of cycling events news, information and trails in Iowa and around the midwest! We use Riverside.fm to record non-face-to-face interviews. Riverside offers separate tracks for easy editing, high quality video recording, live-streaming to your favorite platform, like YouTube, Facebook and instagram, as well as editing and posting. Click this link to sign up, https://riverside.fm/?utm_campaign=campaign_1&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=rewardful&via=david-mable

Fit Strong Women Over 50
Ultra Trail Runner Brenda Bland

Fit Strong Women Over 50

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 48:36


Jill and Chris met Brenda Bland in the Becoming Elli Facebook group and knew she should be on the podcast. Brenda Bland is an endurance athlete who has been running, hiking and biking most of her life. She took up running longer (for fun) in the late 90's while helping her teenage daughter get more fit and healthy. Running her first ultra in 2003 at age 44, Brenda has run dozens of ultras all over the US, which is one of her favorite types of road tripping. Brenda considers herself an average runner and has worked hard to build and maintain her health though diet, physical and yogic exercises. During a long journey of varying degrees of joint pain, GI issues as well as Seasonal Affective Disorder, she continues to research better ways of having a longer HealthSpan than is currently thought possible. As Brenda continues to grow in her 60's, she plans to keep enjoying the great outdoors as long as possible. During this podcast we discussed: Running the Leadville 100 at the age of 50 Completing the 80-mile self-supported Tuscobia Winter Ultra sled pull at the age of 62. Fat Ass style runs solo mountain hiking in Colorado How she trains for all these events - exercise and fueling Better ways of having a longer health span What motivates her More information at www.becomingelli.com

The Bare Performance Podcast
#157 - Sally McRae | Running 507 Miles In 81 Days | Choose Strong

The Bare Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 89:31


Welcome back to the podcast for her second time, elite runner and BPN athlete: Sally McRae! After completing the Choose Strong Project, Sally sits down with Nick to bond over their love for weight training and how their approach to fitness has evolved over the years. Sally reflects on her early career when many viewed strength training as unnecessary for runners and the unique challenges, she faced in pushing back against that notion as a performance athlete. Sally passionately speaks to the perspective that life is more about how we make others feel than simply our physical appearance. This episode goes beyond just recognizing the accolades of human performance but really emphasizes the commonalities we all have as humans, whether in parenthood, insecurities, or how to be strong for life. “Let's talk about what we're doing and not what we look like.” - Sally The Choose Strong Project was an endurance-based event in which she ran 507 miles over the course of 81 days, during 5 separate races. She created this project in honor of her late mother, running 1 mile for every month of her mother's life. For this project Sally ran Bad Water 135, Angles Crest 100, Leadville 100, Wildstrubel 100k, and a double summit of Mt. Whitney. About Sally: Sally McRae is a professional ultra/mountain runner for Nike. Also known as Yellowrunner, Sally often uses her platform to encourage others in their dream journey and to inspire others to live out their lives to the fullest. She is also a mother of two, endurance coach, writer, speaker, and creates content focused on strength training, dedication, and inspiration. She most recently launched her own strength and mental training app: SALLY MCRAE STRENGTH which you can download directly from her website (sallymcrae.com) or Instagram: @yellowrunner More Resources: BPN Website - Supplements and Apparel: www.bpnsupps.com Nick's Website: www.nickbare.com Nick's Instagram: @nickbarefitness Nick's Youtube: www.youtube.com/user/barelifenutrition Follow Us On Social Media: Instagram: @thebareperformancepodcast Facebook: The Bare Performance Podcast

The MR Runningpains Podcast
Fanny Barrette Completes The Grand Slam of Ultra Running!!! - Episode 147

The MR Runningpains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 89:39


This was an incredible conversation for an amazing accomplishment. Old dominion, Western States, Vermont, & Wasatch 100-mile races completed in one summer! Fanny nailed it! I love her enthusiasm for challenging events and her call to other women to do the same! Thank you Fanny! To connect with Fanny: Instagram - @bluerunninglicorne Facebook Messenger - Fanny Barrette   My fundraising efforts: The Challenged Athlete Foundation (for Leadville 100) - http://support.challengedathletes.org/site/TR/Events/General?px=1355904&pg=personal&fr_id=1940 The Vermont Adaptive (for Vermont 100) - https://www.pledgereg.com/357957?fbclid=IwAR0-dUaRLRnQvcTU9wXywYE5JlBTJHjTaqswcPMO3IDz5h9nkCXe7n3t06o   Dec. Newsletter Link - https://shoutout.wix.com/so/cfOJJeyeF?languageTag=en   MR Runningpains (Aaron's) information:   If you'd like to learn more about Patreon or to donate, please visit https://www.patreon.com/MRRunningpains My Socials, Channels, & Newsletter: https://www.facebook.com/MRRUNNINGPAINSEVENTS/ https://www.instagram.com/mrrunningpains/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ6J512qA34z_N0KJSU4jfw https://www.strava.com/athletes/18431982  To sign up for my Newsletter -https://www.mrrunningpains.com Email - runningpains@gmail.com Thanks to all of you for listening! Please share the Podcast and please leave a review, rate, & subscribe if you haven't done so already! THANK YOU! Aaron Saft MR Runningpains Discounts: $10 Off Ultra Running Magazine Subscription - https://subscriber.ultrarunning.com/subscribe/ambassador?code=AM7A9D7 15% off KOGALLA - http://kogalla.com/?aff=runningpains - use code MR Runningpains 15% off XOSKIN - http://www.xoskin.us - use code MR Runningpains Xero Shoes -  https://xeroshoes.com/go/MRRunningpains Thanks to my Patrons: Randall Woods Cullen Hicks Leah Lanier Teresa Bowser Carolyn Morrisroe Mike Sears Julia Jordan Nicole Burnham Peter Keyo Will Weidman Philip Taylor Martin Thorne Nancy Lewis  Victor Dostrow Kendall Weaver Nate Heaslip Austin Elder Tory Grieves

The Three Links Odd Cast
Young Leaders In Odd Fellowship

The Three Links Odd Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 98:37


Despite recent growth, Odd Fellowship is still predominantly full of retirees.  While they present a wealth of knowledge and experience, they can also be resistant to change and adaptation.  That can become even more of a challenge when young leaders emerge and try to work with entrenched members.  In this episode we talk to PGM Buddy Goetsch of Colorado and DGM Erik Fearing of Massachusetts.  With Buddy having completed his term as Grand Master and Erik preparing for his, they share very useful insights into their experience as young leaders in Odd Fellowship.  That youth can be a hindrance when it clashes with established members and customs but it can also be an advantage as it encourages new thinking and possibilities.  The Shoutout goes to a brand-new Encampment, Ridgely #2 in Pocatello, Idaho.  For the Odd Podge, Mike tells the harrowing story of Odd Fellows from Poland who ventured into war-torn Ukraine to initiate twenty-one new members; Erik talks about his plan to connect with the Odd Fellows Brewery in Nashua, NH to create a special connection to Odd Fellowship; Buddy shares the restoration process of his aging lodge hall in Leadville, CO; Toby previews his somber duty to participate in the memorial service for a passed Past Grand Master; and Ainslie enlightens us about the new gaming night his lodge is holding every month.

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast
Meet 2X LT100 Run Champ, Adrian Macdonald and Find Out What Sparked His Trail Running Passion!

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 37:32


Tune in here to this episode of Grits, Guts, and Determination, The Leadville Race Series Podcast, a leading authority for all things Leadville! Host Cole Chlouber, son of race founder Ken Chlouber, takes us on a story-telling journey of the 38-year rich history of this race. We learn all the tips, tricks, and stories from the Leadville community members! Joining us today is Adrian Macdonald, who has won first place in the Leadville Trail 100 twice. On this episode, Adrian shares his experiences winning the Leadville Trail 100 race, his advice in the sport and how he found Leadville. To begin, Adrian tells how he began running during his sophomore year of high school, and fell in love with the self-improvement aspect of the sport and found it addicting. He started running longer distances and ran cross country in college at Gettysburg University in Pennsylvania. He ran his first marathon after college in the Gettysburg marathon and had a perfect first attempt. His time was 2:30 and it took him four years to beat his personal best in Houston. Adrian was living in Boston and they canceled the 2020 marathon a month out due to COVID. He still wanted to race, so he started competing in trail running and found his body did well with the elevation gains and losses. He then found Leadville and shared with his mentor, Nick Clark, that he wanted to compete in the 2021 race and he was very supportive, and volunteered to crew and pace for him. Next, Adrian shares how in his first Leadville Trail 100 race in 2021 that he was very aware of Cody Reed and Tyler Andrews- some of the other racers that were going after the record and setting the pace for the first half. He passed both of those racers and at 50 miles out, the race was very special to him after realizing that he was going to win. He was 35 minutes out on everyone else and he wanted to enjoy the last bit of the race and soak in the experience of winning. When Adrian returned to the Leadville 100 in 2022, he had a film crew and sponsors, but he says the most pressure he received was from himself. He won the 2022 Leadville Trail 100 as well, but he wasn't feeling as good during this race and spent about half of his time running and walking. The other competitors were supporting him and the crowd was cheering him by name and knew who he was. He has a film coming out on YouTube in the next few weeks called “Out and Back” by Rabbit Wolf Creative. You can also check Adrian's sponsors: Ultimate Direction for gear and On Running for shoes in the links below. Adrian continues his passion for running as a cross country coach at Mountain View High School in Loveland, CO. His goal is to create life-long runners, but he tells the kids they will have more fun if they run fast! He is also a financial officer at Colorado State University in the Department of Statistics and he gives back to the Leadville Running Community. Adrian's advice is to put yourself out there by meeting new people and going to new places. He says to enjoy the whole process of training for the Leadville 100 and that if you love what you're doing and having fun, then you will train harder for it and find people to share it with. Adrian states that the Leadville 100 was a life-changing moment for him and has opened up opportunities for him to meet new people and given him confidence. He finishes up the conversation by saying that Leadville really does change your life and feels like family. You can find Adrian racing in Australia in mid-December and potentially the UTMB next summer!

3 OK Runners
#52 Interview with Jared Muse

3 OK Runners

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 65:46


The two Jared sit down and interview Koda Crossfit owner Jared Muse about his upcoming Leadville 100 race. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/3okrunners/support

The GearJunkie Podcast
Paul Mumford: Leadville’s Resident Wildman

The GearJunkie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 52:59


Hop into Leadville Ski Country to rent gear, and you’re likely to run into one of the most interesting shopkeeps you’ll meet. Presented by Get Rad anxiety: This real, if also made up, condition perfectly explains the mind and machinations of Paul Mumford. Better known to friends and strangers alike by just his surname, Mumford runs Leadville Ski Country in Colorado’s eponymous high-altitude township. But while you’re certain to make his acquaintance when gearing up during ski season, you’d be hard-pressed to track him down any other time of year. You see, Mumford is something of a wild man — he races in just about every form of locomotion imaginable. Ski mountaineering? Check. Mountain bike racing? Check. The 6-Day Baja Rally on a motorcycle? Check. Heck, he’s even raced in the world’s largest alleycat bicycle race, Stupor Bowl — it’s all because he has “get rad anxiety.” And it drives him to extremes beyond just racing. Mumford has even spent seasons working in mining — a job he’ll tell you was among his favorites. Needless to say, sit down with Mumford for a conversation, and you’re in for a wild ride. The post Paul Mumford: Leadville’s Resident Wildman appeared first on GearJunkie.

The MR Runningpains Podcast
I'm Going for The Grand Slam of Ultra Running & Forming Good Training Habits - Episode 146

The MR Runningpains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 37:41


That escalated quickly! I'm trying to make it possible to go for the Grand Slam of Ultra Running! With my registration for Western States already complete, I decided to try to make the rest of the races in the Grand Slam a reality. In doing so, I've secured a charity spot raising funds for the Vermont Adaptive (http://www.vermontadaptive.org/about-us/). I'm in the process of trying to gain a charity spot for Leadville 100 by raising funds for The Challenged Athletes Foundation (https://www.challengedathletes.org/mission-and-history/). I've registered for the Old Dominion 100 as a possibility if things fall through for Leadville.  I'd like to thank all that donated to Vermont Adaptive to help me reach my fundraising goal, but it's not done. I'd like to continue to raise funds for them! Please consider donating to The Vermont Adaptive through my fundraising page - https://www.pledgereg.com/357957 Thanks to the following for their donations: Mike, Andrew, Brendon, Nathan Rafaela, Terra, Chris & Paula, Blanche, Nancy, Moe & Mercedes, Trish, & Tammy. Thank you!   As soon as I have the Challenged Athlete Foundation spot confirmed, I will set up the fundraising page and share that information!   Resources: Chasing 400 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GwDc84ZIAA Free Trail Podcast - Episode 101 - Trail Nutrition w/ Shannon O'Grady of Gnarly Nutrition - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/trail-nutrition-101-shannon-ogrady-phd/id1492327668?i=1000588152907 www.moboboard.com   MR Runningpains (Aaron's) information: If you'd like to learn more about Patreon or to donate, please visit https://www.patreon.com/MRRunningpains My Socials, Channels, & Newsletter: https://www.facebook.com/MRRUNNINGPAINSEVENTS/ https://www.instagram.com/mrrunningpains/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ6J512qA34z_N0KJSU4jfw https://www.strava.com/athletes/18431982  To sign up for my Newsletter -https://www.mrrunningpains.com Email - runningpains@gmail.com Thanks to all of you for listening! Please share the Podcast and please leave a review, rate, & subscribe if you haven't done so already! THANK YOU! Aaron Saft MR Runningpains Discounts: $10 Off Ultra Running Magazine Subscription - https://subscriber.ultrarunning.com/subscribe/ambassador?code=AM7A9D7 15% off KOGALLA - http://kogalla.com/?aff=runningpains - use code MR Runningpains Thanks to my Patrons: Cullen Hicks Leah Lanier Teresa Bowser Carolyn Morrisroe Mike Sears Julia Jordan Nicole Burnham Peter Keyo Will Weidman Philip Taylor Martin Thorne Nancy Lewis  Victor Dostrow Kendall Weaver Nate Heaslip Austin Elder Tory Grieves  

Marni on the Move
268. Barry Siff, Endurance Sports Executive, Entrepreneur & Athlete Talks Triathlon, Music & Doing What You Love

Marni on the Move

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 32:03


Barry Siff has been working in the endurance and adventure sports business as an entrepreneur, top executive and sought after board member for years.  He retired at age 42 and went into adventure racing full-time from 1998-2003 and co-authored a book on the sport. With his Wife Jodee, they built 5430 Sports, sold it to Ironman in 2009, got on USAT Board 2012, became Vice President in 2013 and President USA Triathlon 2014-19. In addition to working in the endurance sports and tennis industrys, Barry has been doing marathons since 1979, triathlon since 1986, lots of multi-day expedition races, Leadville 100, and so much more. We caught up this summer a few months after Barry had a serious bike crash but he was in great spirits and optimistic about his future race plans. Beyond endurance sports, We talk about Barry's  passion for music and how he is bringing it all together… CONNECT Marni On The Move Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, LinkedIn, or YouTube Marni Salup on Instagram and Spotify OFFERS HigherDOSE: Get 15% off on today at HigherDOSE with our code MOTM15. InsideTracker: Get 20% percent off today at InsideTracker.com/marnionthemove Revitin is a prebiotic toothpaste. Get 15% off and use our code Marni 15 at Revitin.com SUPPORT THE PODCAST Leave us a review on Apple. It's easy, scroll through the episode list on your podcast app, click on five stars, click on leave a review, and share what you love about the conversations you're listening to. Tell your friends to what you love on social. Screenshot or share directly from our stories the episode you're listening to, tag us and the guests, and use our new Marni on the Move Giphy! SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER Sign up for our weekly newsletter, The Download, for Marni on the Move updates, exclusive offers, invites to events, and exciting news!      

Leadville: The 100 Mile Mountain Bike Race Podcast, p/b Floyd's of Leadville
S6E01: The Course, Version 2 (Leadville 100 MTB Course Deep-Dive)

Leadville: The 100 Mile Mountain Bike Race Podcast, p/b Floyd's of Leadville

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 225:24


Throughout Season 5, we walked you through the entirety of the Leadville 100 MTB course, going into detail that only 30 combined finishes could provide. This is the collection of each of those segments, from the starting line to the Columbine Mine...and back. At nearly four hours long, this should keep you company for at least a couple good long training rides (or your next road trip). Enjoy!

The LoCo Experience
EXPERIENCE 91 | Mandy Mullen at the Intersection of Fitness & Community

The LoCo Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 135:59 Transcription Available


Mandy Mullen is the Founder and Owner of the Run Windsor Race Series. She also founded and serves as  Executive Director of Windsor Gives, a non-profit extension providing fitness opportunities and education throughout the community. Mandy is a mom on a mission to be healthy and to encourage physical and mental fitness in youth and across entire communities.  In this episode, we talk about the beginnings and evolution of Run Windsor, a costly and ultimately failed effort to develop a gym and fitness center - victim of the pandemic - and Mandy's dreams of encouraging the union of fitness and community in towns and cities everywhere.  Mandy is smart, kind, transparent, and a whole lot of fun to have conversation with.  And, for the runners and aspiring runners, Mandy shares descriptions of ultra-marathon races, including the Leadville 100 - which she recently completed.  800 runners registered, 700 started, and 300 finished - she's a beast!  (and she was still missing most of her toenails during our interview)Finally, a correction - in our conversation Mandy shares the story of running her first 50 mile race as a 24-hour sub, when her business partner's wife had a baby early and her husband wanted a travel and running partner for the event.  In the lead-up she said that she had run 900 miles in the month of January, which would have made a 50-miler no big deal - that was an unintentional exaggeration - she actually ran 400 miles that January, before running the 50-miler on January 31.  Of course she crushed it, sprinting to the finish and feeling fine.  Check out Run Windsor 

Road Dog Podcast
232: Adrian MacDonald Conquers Leadville 100

Road Dog Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 103:16


“I was feeling pretty crummy as I was going up Hope Pass the second time. Everyone kept telling me that I was crushing it and by the time I got to the top I started to believe them.” Adrian MacDonaldand Co-host Ethan Pence discuss the iconic Leadville 100 trail race, what it feels like to win it 2 times in a row, how his life has changed, favorite parts of the course, crossing the finish line, their early running experiences, and sponsorship. Support Road Dog Podcast by: 1. Joining the Patreon Community: https://www.patreon.com/roaddogpodcast 2. Subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you listen on. GO SLEEVES: https://gokinesiologysleeves.com Allwedoisrun.com Adrian MacDonald Contact Info: Website: https://www.adrian.run FB: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100081373238233 IG: https://www.instagram.com/macdonaldadrian/ Ethan Pence Contact Info: IG: https://www.instagram.com/miles_pence/ Coaching IG: https://www.instagram.com/penceultracoaching/ Luis Escobar (Host) Contact: luis@roaddogpodcast.com Luis Instagram Kevin Lyons (Producer) Contact: kevin@roaddogpodcast.com yesandvideo.com Music: Slow Burn by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Original RDP Photo: Photography by Kaori Peters kaoriphoto.com Road Dog Podcast Adventure With Luis Escobar www.roaddogpodcast.com    

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast
Meet Cycles Of Life Owner Brian Feddema, He Can Add to Your Success, LT100 MTB Family!

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 38:03


Tune in here to this episode of Grits, Guts, and Determination, The Leadville Race Series Podcast, a leading authority for all things Leadville! Host Cole Chlouber, son of race founder Ken Chlouber, takes us on a story-telling journey of the 38-year rich history of this race. We learn all the tips, tricks, and stories from the Leadville community members! Joining us today is Brian Feddema, the owner of the local bike shop called Cycles of Life in Leadville, CO. There is no one across the nation who can prepare your bike for the Leadville 100 better than he can. He has brought life into and protected the Leadville community, and he is the guy to see for every cycle, Leadville and business owner need, and everything in between. To begin, Brian shares how he found Leadville. He is from St. Cloud, Minnesota and at the time, he was working in Utah in 2005. He skied in Leadville, and fell in love with the environment of the town and visited the bike shop. He remembered thinking that he could do it better. He talked to the coffee shop owner, Chris, for three hours and they opened the Cycles of Life bike shop together. Brian grew up in a small town and was involved with sports in high school- he didn't bike until college. During college, he worked at a bike shop called Out and About Gear. He loved this shop and looked up to the owner, Bruce. After he graduated college, he moved to Montana to ski and then Utah to work, but quit to start his own bike shop. Brian did not always have aspirations of opening his own business, but after working in the bike shop in college, he decided to get his degree in Business and Administration. Brian competes in four major bike races a year including the Leadville 100, Unbound, Mesa Verde, but he prefers to ride with his friends for fun. The services at Cycles of Life bike shop include: renting and buying bikes, bike maintenance, nutrition advice, shipping and service package, etc. They will help you with anything you need. Their shop has helped countless individuals with their bike needs before the race and they want to be as much of a resource as they can to maximize visitors' stay. Brian shares that his favorite part of owning a business in Leadville is getting to help and see the excitement on customer's faces. He enjoys being the master of his own destiny in that if the shop succeeds or fails, it is due to himself. The most challenging part of owning a business is hiring employees that are skilled enough to help customers and leave people with a good impression in the summer. Another challenge is hiring employees because he can't offer employees full employment since the winter months aren't as busy. Brian recently got married to a real estate agent named Heather, who owns RE/MAX at Aspen Leaf Realty. They met when Brian was trying to buy his first home. Brian shares that Leaville has helped keep him grounded and rooted in the things that matter in life. He is connected with a good core group of friends and Leadville has allowed him to focus on simple and meaningful things. He has also learned to protect what he values, including Leadville and the way that is it. He wants to add to Leadville and help everyone enjoy the city more. To finish, Brian's last piece of advice for the race is to not underestimate the power of having a proper, operating bicycle. He says too many people focus on getting in shape and eating the proper nutrition, but don't take the time to give their bike the respect that it deserves. He advises you to come to the bike shop and they will check your bike to give you that extra confidence you need to finish the race.

Plant-Strong
Ep. 170: Hellah Sidibe - Running Across America and Into our Hearts

Plant-Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 93:24


Hellah Sidibe is the first black man to run across America (fueled by plants!) and has been running every day since May 15th, 2017. That's officially over 2000 days in a row in every weather condition imaginable! This year, he also completed the iconic Leadville 100 Trail Race in Colorado.  And, it all started with a commitment to run just 10 minutes a day.  Like many, Hellah hated running but started moving his body to lift himself out of a dark period in his own life. It was his way of taking responsibility for his own happiness. Five years and thousands of miles later, running is now his primary outlet to raise money for charities, help others find inspiration in their daily lives, and demonstrate the endless power of a plant-based diet.   On Instagram, he writes,  “Using our energy on what we're afraid of is wasteful when it can be used on what we want to accomplish. We don't need everyone to believe in us in order to chase those dreams and goals. Enjoy the process and get after it y'all!”  Episode Timestamps and Highlights 6:53 Origins of his name, Hellah, and his upbringing in Mali 10:57 How tragedy brought him to the US 17:28 His dream of becoming a professional soccer player 18:40 Did he always love running and what compelled him to even start a run streak? 29:45 When did he decide to run across the country? 33:15 Adventures of running across the country  36:00 How and why Hellah switched to a plantstrong diet 41:30 His favorite running conditions  43:29 Does he prefer running alone, or with people? 45:00 What about listening to music or podcasts? 48:24 Favorite athletes, or inspiration? 49:30 What in the world do his parents think about this non-traditional career? 53:40 Low points on his Run Across America 57:20 His experience at the Leadville 100 1:02:23 How did he fuel for a 27-hour race in the mountains of Colorado? 1:11:25 For Hellah, what constitutes a run distance to qualify as a “streak?” 1:14:55 What does he eat in a day? 1:17:30 How does he sleep?  1:18:00 How does he keep his feet healthy with all of this running?  1:22:26 What's next for Hellah?   Episode Resources Join TEAM PLANTSTRONG and run the Austin Marathon, Half Marathon or 5K with Rip! Watch the Episode on YouTube Hellah's Instagram: @hellahgood9 Hellah's YouTube: @hellahgood Additional Links and Resources for Hellah Sidibe To stock up on the best-tasting, most convenient, 100% PLANTSTRONG foods, including our broths and soups, check out all of our PLANTSTRONG products HERE. Give us a like on the PLANTSTRONG Facebook Page and check out what being PLANSTRONG is all about. We always keep it stocked full of new content and updates, tips for healthy living, delicious recipes, and you can even catch me LIVE on there! We've also got an Instagram! Check us out and share your favorite PLANTSTRONG products and why you love it! Don't forget to tag us using #goplantstrong

We Are Superman
#233 - WE ARE MERILEE MAUPIN, AN INSIDE LOOK WITH THE LEADVILLE LEGEND

We Are Superman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 93:43


With Thanksgiving around the corner, our focus is on family, so who better to bring onto the WASP than the creator of the Leadville family herself, Merilee Maupin? While Ken Chlouber and his rugged miner face and dressed in classic Western attire appears on the Leadville Race Series Web site and posters, Merilee, as co-founder with Ken, was the force behind creating the Leadville Family that gets runners and bikers returning to Leadville summer after summer. It is deeply heartfelt when she says Welcome Home to Leadville. And it's the goal of every runner who starts the race to receive the coveted hug from Merilee upon crossing the finish line, metaphorically returning home. The founding of the Leadville Trail 100 is well-chronicled. The mine was closed and once-booming Leadville crashed, suddenly having the highest unemployment in the nation. Residents fled in droves. Ken had this crazy idea to save the town by staging a 100-mile race at 10,200-foot elevation. Not only did it stick, but it thrived and then grew into a series of running and biking races from 10K on up that is now owned by Life Time Fitness. In the early days, Merilee and Ken did almost everything themselves, including handwriting all of the race documents, and marking and picking up the course, a task that took several days.I got to meet with Merilee at their office that you've probably passed many times on Leadville's main drag and didn't even realize was there. The old house's interior is decorated with dozens of Ken's hunting trophies as well as momentos of past races. I got to visit with Ken in the adjacent garage where he is restoring his gorgeous old Corvette and where his Harley resides. Even though Merilee co-founded the LT100 way back in 1983, she is still as fired up as ever about what the race and the Leadville Legacy Foundation do for the community, and its impact on every runner who challenges themself to cross the finish line. I think you will enjoy this chat with truly one of the pioneers of the sport, someone who is gracious and passionate, and is as tough as anyone in the tough town of Leadville.Merilee Maupinmerileem33@gmail.comBill Stahlsilly_billy@msn.comFacebook Bill StahlInstagram @stahlor

Ultrarunning History
121: Pam Reed – The Desert Ultrarunning Legend

Ultrarunning History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 28:00


By Davy Crockett You can read, listen, or watch Pam Reed, age 61 in 2022, from Jackson Wyoming, and Scottsdale, Arizona, is a 2022 inductee in the American Ultrarunning Hall of Fame, its 21st member. Over the years she has been a prolific, successful runner, especially in desert races in the western United States. Leonard Peterson Pam (Saari) Reed (1961-) grew up in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, in the small mining town of Palmer. She is the daughter of Roy E. Saari (1932-2018) and Karen H. Peterson (1935-2014). Her father worked at an enormous open pit iron mine in town and was always on the go. Her mother was a nurse who instilled in her daughters “the values of initiative and assertiveness,” and was active in outdoor sports such as snowmobiling and cross-country skiing. Pam has Scandinavian ancestry: Finish on her father's side, Norwegian and Swedish on her mother's side. Her grandfather Leonard D. Peterson (1895-1972) was a man of determination who worked two full-time jobs, for the railroad and the Chicago Transit System. Once he walked all the way from Merrill, Wisconsin to Chicago, about 300 miles. Please consider supporting the Hall of Fame by signing up to contribute a little each month through Patreon. Visit https://www.patreon.com/ultrarunninghistory Early Years As a youngster, Pam, with her competitive nature, would enjoy challenging the boys in races and games. She had dreams of competing in the Olympics in gymnastics, but she became better at tennis. At the age of fifteen, she started running to get into shape for tennis Pam attended Negaunee High School, about ten miles away, and was very active in sports and activities including track, tennis, gymnastics, cheerleading and choir. On the high school track team, she didn't like the long three-mile runs because they were boring, and she would lead her friends cross-country across backyards to cut down the distance. Suicide Ski Jump Negaunee is the home of the Suicide Ski Jump facility and a luge track. Winter sports were an important part of the region where Pam grew up, although she didn't especially enjoy skiing, because she didn't like the cold. She remembered, “I grew up skiing. My dad would take me skiing and I didn't like going. I was five years old and there was tons of really heavy snow, and I broke my leg.”  She didn't know it then, but she was destined for the desert. Hard work was in her blood. She said, “Physical toughness was a strong point in my family, and maybe in the Upper Peninsula as a whole. It was cultivated and bred into us over many generations, so it came easily to us. It was expected of us, and it was what we expected of ourselves.” For college, Pam attended Michigan Tech in the remote town of Houghton, Michigan, about 90 miles away, where she continued to compete in tennis and excelled. She majored in Business and later transferred to Northern Michigan University in Marquette.  She soon married her high school boyfriend, Steve Koski. They moved to Tucson, Arizona where Pam transferred to the University of Arizona to complete her college education and she eventually received a Bachelor of Science in Business. Pam became an aerobics director at a Tucson health club and started to compete in triathlons in 1989 at the age of 28. She also started running marathons. (She would eventually run more than 100 marathons, with 2:59:10 at the 2001 St. George Marathon as her personal best.) Pam had two young sons, but her marriage to Steve ended in divorce. She soon married Jim Reed, an accountant, who also competed in Ironmans. He also had two sons. Becoming an Ultrarunner Bennie Linkhart In 1991, a friend, Bennie Linkhart (1931-2017), age 60, gave Jim a copy of Ultrarunning Magazine. Bennie was a state weightlifting champion who had taken up running and was training to run Leadville 100. When Jim introduced Pam to Bennie, she thought, “Who in the heck runs 100 miles?

Singletracks Mountain Bike News
"I Was Shocked" Hannah Otto Smashed the Whole Enchilada FKT by Nearly an Hour

Singletracks Mountain Bike News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 38:39


Hannah Otto is a World Cup mountain bike racer, FKT record holder, and Leadville 100 winner who has been racing since the age of 9 years old. Last month she set the fastest known time for riding the Whole Enchilada from bottom to top, and top to bottom in a time of 5:50:38. You can watch a short film about her FKT attempt here (https://youtu.be/oErEWLGdPlI) and follow Hannah on Instagram @hannah_finchamp In this episode we ask: How did you first get into mountain bike racing? How do FKT attempts compare to races like the Leadville 100 or even a World Cup XC race? Is one more stressful than the other? Tell us about your Whole Enchilada FKT attempt. Why that route? Was this your first time riding this exact route? Had you ridden the Whole Enchilada descent before? According to Strava all the fastest times on the Whole Enchilada were posted by men. How did it feel to best all of them by nearly an hour? Which was more challenging: the climb or the descent? Was the weather a factor when you made your attempt? Did you do any training specific to this trail, and this FKT attempt? I assume all of your gear held up well. Any surprises out there? What have you learned by working with bike coaches over the years? Do you use caffeine before or during races? Why or why not? What does your rest and recovery routine look like? Which races or FKTs are you targeting for 2023? This episode of the Singletracks podcast is sponsored by Explore Brevard. Professional mountain biker Adam Craig says it's one of the top three places in the universe he's ever ridden. Where is this magical mountain biking nirvana? It's none other than Brevard, North Carolina, home to Pisgah National Forest and DuPont Recreational Forest. The area boasts over 300 miles of peerless singletrack, not to mention hundreds of miles of gravel roads, creating a near endless array of routes, terrains, and challenges to explore. Four vibrant bike shops will get you sorted, whether you need gear, service, or a top notch rental. Top it off with an array of craft breweries, cafes and gathering spots that have earned Brevard the title as one of the best small towns in America in 2021. It all adds up to a premier mountain biking destination you'll want to experience for yourself. Find out more at ExploreBrevard.com. ✏️ A written transcript of this conversation is available at singletracks.com. --Keep up with the latest in mountain biking at Singletracks.com and on Instagram @singletracks --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/singletracks/support

Singletrack
Adrian Macdonald | 2022 Leadville 100 Winner

Singletrack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 44:36


Adrian Macdonald is a professional trail and ultra runner for On Running based in Fort Collins, CO.  Adrians joins the podcast to talk about his history with Leadville, his influences in the sport, training in Fort Collins, becoming a pro runner, the benefits of working with an agent, and what's on his mind for next year. Note this conversation was recorded back in early September 2022 but is being released this week to coincide with the launch of Adrian's film "Out and Back", which details his win at the 2022 Leadville 100.Sponsors:InsideTracker - go to (https://info.insidetracker.com/single...) to get 20% off your next order.Kodiak Cakes - use code Singletrack15 at checkout on their website (https://kodiakcakes.com/)  to get 15% off your next orderGnarly Nutrition - use code Singletrack20 at checkout on their website (https://gognarly.com/) to get 20% off your next orderTimestamps:(1:27) - background in ultrarunning (2:56) - training philosophy(4:44) - motivations for focusing on Leadville(6:42) - reasons to return to Leadville after 2021 win(10:19) - whether the course record is possible for him(11:59) - spending more time training on the Leadville course(13:13) - preparation for this year's race(16:02) - influences in the sport, Nick Clark(18:58) - training in Fort Collins(24:26) - signing a pro contract with On Running(27:48) - benefits of working with an agent(33:02) - recommendations to other athletes navigating the sponsorship process(35:55) - team environment(38:54) - deciding between UTMB and Western States next year(44:07) - miscellaneous questionsLinks:Adrian's WebsiteFollow Adrian on InstagramFollow Adrian on StravaSupport the show

Sports Wednesday
What just happened? CFB week 10 reacts...Plus: who's a slouch? RIP Ray Guy, Coach's Leadville quest and wagers of the week

Sports Wednesday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 66:01


What just happened? CFB week 10 reacts...Plus: who's a slouch? RIP Ray Guy, Coach's Leadville quest and wagers of the week

Action's Antidotes
Bringing the Community Together Through Outdoor Adventures with Felipe Vieyra

Action's Antidotes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:37


In this day and age of technological breakthroughs, everyone would agree that it has its impact. One of the activities that people who go through this detox can engage in is exploring the great outdoors like hiking, mountain climbing, or trekking. But, what are the other things that these activities bring into the community? Oso Adventure Meals Co-Founder Felipe Vieyra delves into bringing people from different colors together through going outdoor activities and adventures complemented with delicious adventure meals. Their mission is to provide outdoor food and beverage with uniquely delicious dehydrated meals They are actively working to create an outdoor culture in which BIPOC feels included, safe, and engaged. As a Black and Latino-owned business, Oso Adventure Meals is dedicated to creating a more just, equitable, and sustainable America. To learn more about what they do, listen to this podcast on Actions Antidote! --- Listen to the podcast here: Bringing the Community Together Through Outdoor Adventures with Felipe Vieyra Welcome to Action's Antidotes, your antidote to the mindset that keeps you settling for less. Today, we're going to talk about the intersection of culture, adventure, and close encounters with wildlife with Oso Adventure Meals founder, Felipe Vierya.   --- Felipe, welcome to the program.   Thank you for having me, Stephen. Really excited to dive into this conversation.   Definitely. Now, these are some very interesting topics and one thing that I love to always identify out here in this podcast is ways to think outside the box and ways to think about things a little bit differently. And so, you were on a backpacking trip of sorts when you came up with the idea for Oso Adventure Meals.   That's right. That's right. It was two years ago, right outside of Leadville, Colorado, and I had gotten into backpacking so it wasn't my first time out in the backcountry but it was the first time for one of my best friends, he had never gone backpacking but he loved the outdoors. We decided to go backpacking and we did Jasper Lake Trail, I believe it's called, and so it was super fun. It was definitely a journey that set us up for an even longer journey of entrepreneurship and food and culture and all the things that you named.   Yeah, for sure, and so most people go on backpacking trips, especially, it's your first time, it sounds like it wasn't your first time but it was your friend's first time and you're just really focused on some of the basic necessities of life that we often take for granted, like you have to pump the water to get fresh water, you have to set up the tent in every spot to get your shelter and make sure that you get in before the thunderstorms happen, depending on what time of year it is. At the time, though, you were coming up with ideas for a whole new business.   It's funny, though, because it was few mishaps. First off, it was like later in the summer too so it was a little — or in the fall, I mean. It was a little like it was a bit of a gamble getting out there and we also started on the trail late, we ended up going to Leadville and stopping for a beer, had —   Oh, wow.    I forgot the brewery and we ended up stopping for beer and stayed there a little too long and so we got on the trail a little late. It was also a very steep trail. At some point, I remember grabbing my headlamp and my extra one, me putting one on and handing the other one to my friend because we were hiking in the middle of the night.    Oh, wow.    Yeah, trying to make it to the top and it was his first time so he was like a little anxious. He's like, “Oh, there's gonna be a mountain lion right around the corner. This is never ending,” and so it was definitely an adventurous experience, but I feel like that's what life is about. We finally make it to the top, we pitch our tents, and we're both exhausted and hungry.

Becoming Ultra
My First Ultra: 67 Lucja & Amanda

Becoming Ultra

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 72:21


Lucja Leonard is a Dutch-born Aussie-Brit currently residing in the USA. Wife to Dion Leonard, and Fur-mama to Gobi and Lara, check out 'Finding Gobi' the NY Times bestselling book for more details on that side of her life.  Lucja is an ultra-runner but has not always been one! After becoming overweight in her early 20's Lucja took up running to become a healthier, fitter version of herself and after running her first road marathon, Amsterdam in 2010, she discovered a love of going long and went on to run the Kalahari Augrabies Extreme Marathon; a 6 stage, 7-day self-sufficient multistage ultra-marathon through the Kalahari desert in northern South Africa where she fell in love with ultra-running.  Lucja has since gone on to run a multitude of multistage and single stage ultras with the likes of Marathon Des Sables, Leadville 100, Ultra Trail Mont Blanc, Mohican 100 and even 200+miles non-stop with Bigfoot200 and Moab 240. Most recently she tackled the TransRockies Race, a multistage ultra in Colorado with her friend, Amanda, running as a pair with 120miles and 20,000ft over 6 days as 'Team Granny Pants' where they duo came third open female team. Lucja is also a running and health coach and can be found traveling all over the USA, exploring the most amazing places while working alongside her husband Dion, and his book 'Finding Gobi' with inspirational talks at corporate events, schools, libraries and running stores. Amanda Asher is a single mother of 3 teenagers (son 17 and twin daughters 15) and 2nd grade elementary school teacher who started ultra-running in 2016 when she tackled her first 50k in Huntsville, Tx – Rocky 50. Since that time, she has taken on dozens of races across Texas, ranging anywhere from 13 milers to 100k's. Shortly after completing her first 50k, Amanda ran her first mountain race in 2016 when she took on the Pikes Peak Ascent, followed by the Leadville Trail marathon in 2017. Most recently Amanda competed in her first team relay alongside her daughters as they raced the clock during a 12-hour relay at Spider Mountain in Texas. The 3 of them along with one additional teammate – placed 1st female team. Amanda used this race in May as a training run for her most recent endeavor that took place in Colorado – the Transrockies Stage Race – Amanda, alongside her teammate Lucja Leonard, managed to take the podium 4 out of the 6 days. Placing 3rd overall for the week. When Amanda is not busy raising her 3 teenagers or working on lesson plans for her second graders, she can be found solo backpacking all over the U.S., completing various sections of the CDT, John Muir Trail, AT, and hundreds of miles of loop trails, within Texas, Arkansas, New Mexico, Utah, Arizona and Colorado.  It is always a fun time when Lucja is involved. We loved this conversation with Lucja and her adventure buddy, Amanda. These ladies tell us all about tackling the Transrockies stage race together and how they came up with their team's name, Granny Panties, it is a great story!  Amanda talks about finding balance with adventuring, raising three kids and work. When you hear her talk about it you will think it is possible for you too. Lucja shares her latest adventures and what she has coming up. These ladies are big supporters of each other and other women. I hope you enjoy this one as much as we did!

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW
88. Nate Whitman: 20 Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Finishes by a Sub-7 Guy with a Job and Family

THE TRAVIS MACY SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 73:07


Nate Whitman is an elite cyclist from Evergreen, Colorado who also has a career and family. In addition to excelling at gravel races like Unbound (formerly Dirty Kanza), Nate has 20 Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race finishes, including many top-10 and sub-7 hour performances. Join Travis and Nate for a compelling and educational conversation about career progression, Leadville history (including legends like Rebecca Rusch), balancing work and family with racing, training, and more.In This Episode: Nate Whitman on InstagramRoute 66 UltraRunTravis Macy Instagram | WebsiteMark Macy on InstagramInjinji Discount SiteThe Feed Instagram | Website- - - - - - - - - - -If you like this podcast, please consider our book, A Mile at A Time: A Father and Son's Inspiring Alzheimer's Journey of Love, Adventure, and Hope*30% off with discount code MACESubscribe: Apple Podcast | SpotifyCheck us out: Instagram | Twitter | Website | YouTubewww.AMileAtATimeBook.comThe show is Produced and Edited by Palm Tree Pod

King of the Ride
Episode 98: Anton Krupicka -- Ultra Endurance Icon

King of the Ride

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 55:10


Our guest today is an icon in the endurance running space, Anton Krupicka. Winner of the Leadville 100 as a fresh faced 23 year old in 2006, fifteen years later he was once again on the podium in 2021 at Leadville after a spate of injuries, but not a shortage of adventures over that time. Early in his career, Anton's blog became requisite reading material for all aspiring runners. His social media attracts millions of views. He writes prolifically and travels minimally… by that I mean, check out his stunning social media channel which features his bikepacking ventures. Anton's IG: www.instagram.com/antonkrupicka Anton's Strava: www.strava.com/pros/antonkrupicka And don't forget Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs of AG1 with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/tedking  

Ask a Cycling Coach - TrainerRoad Podcast
Do Antibiotics Make You Slower, Hannah's Leadville Tips and More - Ask a Cycling Coach 388

Ask a Cycling Coach - TrainerRoad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 102:40


Hannah Otto joins us to discuss whether antibiotics make you slower, her tips for Leadville as the current champion, and a ton of discussion on common nutrition questions we get from all of you. Enjoy the episode, rate the podcast 5-stars in your podcast app, and share it with your friends! TOPICS COVERED IN THIS EPISODE (0:30) Do antibiotics make you slower? (26:22) Should endurance athletes always be carb-loading? (37:58) How to break 9 hours at Leadville (01:03:11) Should athletes avoid high step counts? (01:14:42) Does it matter in which order you eat different foods? (1:23:14) Is mid-ride protein supplementation a good idea? RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE:  https://trainerroad.cc/3Ns5oJH  Watch our latest Cycling Science Explained video now! https://youtu.be/_RIl4s2q-rs  Subscribe to the Science of Getting Faster Podcast below!  Spotify: https://trainerroad.cc/spotifysogf  iTunes: https://trainerroad.cc/itunessogf  TRY TRAINERROAD RISK FREE FOR 30 DAYS! TrainerRoad is the #1 cycling training app. No other cycling app is more effective. Over 13,000 positive reviews, a 4.9 star App Store rating. Adaptive Training from TrainerRoad uses machine learning and science-based coaching principles to continually assess your performance and intelligently adjust your training plan. It trains you as an individual and makes you a faster cyclist. Learn more about TrainerRoad: https://trainerroad.cc/3LBb5Ur Learn more about Adaptive Training: https://trainerroad.cc/35Tqtea  ABOUT THE ASK A CYCLING COACH PODCAST Ask a Cycling Coach podcast is a cycling and triathlon training podcast. Each week  USAC/USAT Level I certified coach Chad Timmerman, pro athletes, and other special guests answer your cycling and triathlon questions. Have a question for the podcast? Ask here: https://trainerroad.cc/3HTFXNi MORE PODCASTS FROM TRAINERROAD Listen to the Successful Athletes Podcast: https://trainerroad.cc/3JmKrN5 Listen to the Science of Getting Faster Podcast: https://trainerroad.cc/3LpuIhP STAY IN TOUCH Training Blog: https://trainerroad.cc/3gCdNdN TrainerRoad Forum: https://trainerroad.cc/3uHvLnE Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/trainerroad/ Strava Club: https://www.strava.com/clubs/trainerroad Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TrainerRd Twitter: https://twitter.com/TrainerRoad

The ALL ME® Podcast
Episode 84: Strategies to Increase Your Fat Utilization – Bob Seebohar, MS, RDN, CSSD, CSCS, METS II

The ALL ME® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 66:08


The ALL ME® Podcast Strategies to Increase Your Fat Utilization – Bob Seebohar, MS, RDN, CSSD, CSCS, METS II Over 70% of the US is overweight or obese and it is estimated that 45 million Americans go on a diet each year spending $33 billion dollars on weight loss programs and products. These programs usually advise the cutting out or lowering of carbohydrates, the use of fasting techniques or recommend dietary supplements. But what if you could manipulate your diet and food intake to help you increase the amount of fat your body uses as fuel throughout the day? In this podcast, I speak with Exercise Physiologist and Sports Dietitian Bob Seebohar, on how to become more metabolically efficient at using fat as a fuel source. We also discuss macronutrient needs for strength vs endurance athletes, fat burning zones, the best ratio of carbohydrates to protein for blood sugar control, and why carbohydrates are demonized. Stay tuned until the end to learn more about Bob's certification program and the only 3 foods he could survive on forever. About Bob Seebohar Bob is a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, the former Director of Sports Nutrition for the University of Florida and served as a Sport Dietitian for the US Olympic Committee. Bob traveled to the 2008 Summer Olympic Games as a Sport Dietitian for the US Olympic Team and the personal Sport Dietitian/Exercise Physiologist for the Olympic Triathlon Team. Currently, Bob owns eNRG Performance and is the Sport Dietitian for the University of Denver Women's Gymnastics Team and the University of Denver Athletics Program. Bob has a bachelor's degree in Exercise and Sports Science, a master's degree in Health and Exercise Science and a second master's degree in Food Science and Human Nutrition. He is a Registered Dietitian, Exercise Physiologist, NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and a High Performance Endurance Coach. Being an out of the box thinker, Bob created the concepts of Nutrition Periodization™ and Metabolic Efficiency Training™ in the early 2000's. As a nutrition coach, Bob specializes in enhancing health and improving performance by improving metabolic efficiency and using nutrition periodization, which provides varying nutrition recommendations based on an athlete's sport, training cycle, health and performance goals. As an endurance coach, exercise physiologist and strength and conditioning specialist, Bob specializes in leading athletes to optimal performance through the use of science and real-life training applications that balance life, work and family. He has a true passion for food and this had led Bob to creating two food companies that support his Metabolic Efficiency Training Concept: and Bob has worked with a variety of recreational, recreationally competitive, and professional athletes from sports including triathlon, duathlon, ultra-running, ultra-cycling (road and mountain), track and field, marathon, mountain biking, road and track cycling, cross country, swimming, football, tae kwon do, motocross, gymnastics, Nascar, tennis, wrestling, weightlifting, rowing, skeleton, sailing, paralympic sailing, canoeing and kayaking, hockey, Crossfit, mountaineering, professional basketball, professional golf, and obstacle course racing. He has worked with all ages and abilities of athletes including high schoolers/juniors, recreationally active adults, collegiate and professional athletes, and Olympians. He is also one of the very few Sport Dietitians in the country who specializes in working with young athletes. Practicing what he preaches, Bob has been an athlete his entire life growing up playing competitive soccer. During his undergraduate studies, he turned to endurance sports and has competed in many endurance events including the Boston Marathon, six Ironman races, the Leadville 100 mile trail running race (twice), the Leadville 100 mile mountain bike race (twice), and in 2009, Bob became a Leadman, completing all six of the Leadville endurance events in 7 weeks. Bob enjoys challenging himself and will regularly compete in triathlon, cycling, obstacle course racing, and ultra-running. He enjoys exploring the depths of human performance through his daily training adventures. Resource Definitions and Links: eNRG Performance: All Around Snack Co: Follow Us: Twitter: @theTHF Instagram: @theTHF Facebook: Taylor Hooton Foundation #ALLMEPEDFREE Contact Us:  Email:  Phone: 214-449-1990 ALL ME Assembly Programs:

The Impossible Life
Steve Weatherford & Pierce Showe - The Importance Of Doing Hard Things

The Impossible Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 92:23


Steve Weatherford is a Super Bowl champion, Men's Health & Fitness cover model, and personal coach to a number of high performing individuals. Pierce Showe is an ultra endurance athlete with famous races like Leadville, the Florida Keys 100, and 29029 Everesting to his name. They are both men who live beyond normal and push themselves to do hard things on a regular basis.Listen as we go into the thinking behind pushing yourself beyond your limits and hear what they've learned and discovered from doing so. We give tips for getting through the most difficult moments as well as getting Steve's "4 Point Warrior Compass For Life" and so much more.FOLLOW OUR GUESTSSteve Weatherford on InstagramSteve Weatherford PodcastHear Steve on Our Podcast The First Time - Episode 19Pierce Showe on InstagramGot a show idea or something you'd like us to cover? Please get in touch!Instagram - @theimpossiblelifeYouTube - The Impossible Life PodcastFacebook - @theimpossiblelifepodcastTik Tok - @theimpossiblelifepodcastemail - impossiblelifepodcast@gmail.com

The Athlinks Podcast
51. Cat Bradley - Professional Trail Runner & Host of The Be Rad Podcast

The Athlinks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 81:24


By the age of 20, Cat Bradley had run her first 50K. By 23, she had bagged multiple ultra trail running wins including a victory at Western States 100 and top 10 finishes and podiums at some of the word's biggest races like Leadville 100 and UTMB. She even had time to score an FTK, becoming the first woman to go under 8 hours on the Grand Canyon's Rim to Rim to Rim. Simply put, Cat Bradley was born to race Ultra Marathons. A collision with a drunk driver took away the hearing in her left ear, left her with a broken pelvis and lingering nerve damage that has delayed - rather than derailed - her plans. We talk about what it has taken to get back into racing form. Why fear of failure leads one to run away from, rather than toward one's goals, and which comedian she'd most like to share a long run with. Links: https://www.catberad.com/ https://methodseven.com/trail-eyewear/ https://ultrasignup.com/results_participant.aspx?fname=Cat&lname=Bradley https://www.catberad.com/be-rad-podcast

Singletrack
Annie Hughes | Javalina Jundred Pre-Race Interview

Singletrack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 11:52 Very Popular


Annie Hughes is a professional trail runner for Hoka based in Leadville, CO lining up for the 2022 Javalina Jundred.Sponsors:InsideTracker - go to (https://info.insidetracker.com/singletrack) to get 20% off your next order.Kodiak Cakes - use code Singletrack15 at checkout on their website (https://kodiakcakes.com/)  to get 15% off your next orderGnarly Nutrition - use code Singletrack20 at checkout on their website (https://gognarly.com/) to get 20% off your next orderTimestamps:(1:09) - living and training in Leadville, CO(3:46) - insights, takeaways from an impressive season of racing to date(5:58) - energy, confidence, fitness heading into Javalina(7:52) - adapting to the demands of Javalina(9:30) - interests in golden ticket, Western States(10:38) - shoe choice for JavalinaLinks:Follow Annie on InstagramAdditional Episodes You May Enjoy:#142 - Stefanie Flippin | 2022 Javalina Jundred Pre-Race Interview#141 - Nick Coury | 2022 Javalina Jundred Pre-Race InterviewSupport the show

Like a Bigfoot
#307: Tim Barr 3 -- Up Against the Leadman

Like a Bigfoot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 72:37


What is it like to persevere when your body is broken and your mind is telling you that you won't be able to make it? What makes someone push through anyways? Where does the grit and resilience come from? Tim Barr was at mile 40 of the Leadville 100 when he had his biggest ultrarunning "gut check moment". His legs were destroyed from the 100 mile mountain bike just a week before. He had spent all summer taking on the Leadman- essentially all the big races in Leadville, CO all within one summer. I was there. I watched him stand up and soldier on...despite the pure agony. And he pushed 60 more miles to the finish. This week we are chatting with Tim about this incredible adventure! I am very inspired by him and excited to share this one!!

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Josh Poertner - Silca

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 102:09 Very Popular


In this week's episode, Randall has Josh Poertner on to talk aerodynamics. In a wide-ranging conversation, the two touch upon Josh's time as Technical Director at Zipp, involvement in the development of computational models for rotating wheels, early collaboration with Cervelo founders Phil White and Gerard Vroomen, founding and leadership of the product brand Silca and The Marginal Gains Podcast, and ongoing consulting work with elite athletes and teams. Silca Website  Marginal Gains Podcast Episode Sponsor: Logos Components  Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Silca - Josh Poertner [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the show, I'm handing the microphone back to my co-host Randall Jacobs. Who's got Josh Portner, the CEO of Silka on the shout out a wide range in conversation about the sport and high performance. Many of you may be familiar with the storied Silka brand. It's been around for close to a hundred years. But josh took over back in 2013 with a mission of merging the highest quality materials and craftsmanship with cutting edge design and manufacturing When you visit the Silca website, you notice a tagline, the pursuit of perfection, never settling, always improving. And I think that embodies how Josh approaches the sport. . So I'm excited to pass you over to Randall to dig into this conversation. Before we jump in i want to thank this week sponsor logos components Yeah, I've been itching to get back on a set of six 50 B wheels, and I've been waiting for my logo's components, wheels to arrive. They literally just arrived last night and I'm super stoked. But yet disappointed because I have to go away for the weekend and I won't be able to actually ride them until sometime next week. I chose the Atara six 50 B model. As you know, I'm sort of big on the big tires, big fun philosophy. So I've been eager on my unicorn, which I've been riding on a 700 SEASET for a while now. To get into the six 50 bees again and see what a six 50 by 50 combined with that rock shock fork is going to yield for me on the trails here in Marin. You guys may remember. Me sitting down with Randall, talking about what makes a great gravel wheel set and everything that went into these logos component wheels. I encourage you to go back to that conversation because whether or not the logo's wheel set is for you or not. I think Randall does an excellent job of teasing out. All the various considerations. You should be having when considering buying a gravel wheelset, It is no small expense when getting into a carbon wheel set, but the team at logos has endeavored with their direct consumer model. Uh, to make it as affordable as possible and make them as durable and high performing as anything out there on the market. I written wheels designed by Randall for the last three years. So I'm super excited. To see his latest vision come to fruition. With these new wheels and I'll have them underneath me soon enough. I encourage you to check them out@logoscomponents.com. Randall's also an active member of the ridership community. So if you have questions for him, feel free to join us over there at the ridership and connect with other riders. I seen people paying that their wheels have arrived so you can get some real, real people answering your questions. About whether they're enjoying the wheelset and how they perform, et cetera. And I'll have more on this in future additions. At this point. I'm going to hand the microphone over to Randall. And i hope you enjoy this conversation with josh [00:03:30] Randall: Josh Portner, thank you for joining us on the podcast. This is a conversation I've been looking forward to for quite some time. Some deep bike nerdy is probably about to ensue, so, uh, let's dive, let's hope. Dive right into it. [00:03:43] Josh: Well, thank you for having me. Always, always up for some deep bike. Nerdy. I like that. [00:03:49] Randall: So a number of our listeners will already know who you are, but just give folks a high level summary of what you do now. [00:03:55] Josh: Oh gosh. So I own Silca, um, or I own Arrow Mind, which, uh, owns the Silca brand and trademark, um, and, and all that that entails. And then we also have a, uh, we own Marginal Gains, which is a podcast and a YouTube channel. And, um, Yeah, our goal is to, a mind works with a lot of pro riders, pro teams, world tour teams. Um, you know, we do everything, Excuse me. We do everything from, you know, performance consulting, uh, modeling, uh, you know, setting up our record attempts for people or, or helping them design our record attempts. Um, you know, we do tire pressure work with pros. We do equipment choices for teams. We think some of the most interesting stuff we do, um, is around where like, uh, teams or national federations don't trust the equipment they're getting from somebody. And they'll come to us and say, you know, the, you know, bike brand X says that this does this, and our writers don't think so. Can you tell us what's true? And. We'll find a way to make that happen. So we, we've had some pretty interesting ones of those with, uh, particularly around the Olympics with the national federations. You know, no, nobody wants to have another Under Armor speeds skating suit, uh, situation, , right? Where all the, all the athletes think something is true and therefore it becomes true and, and nobody knows. And so, um, you know, so we do a lot of that. Arrow mind does that, essentially. And so that's a lot of the performance work I was doing in my old world. I was technical director at ZIP for almost 15 years. Um, and, and then Silca is the product arm of the company. Uh, that's probably how, you know, most people know us. You know, we make pumps and tools and, and, but we also make a lot of crazy things that people look at me and go, Oh, where the hell did that come from? Well, that probably came from some project or another. We did it in the Arrow Mind side of the business, Um mm-hmm. . So that's how we've gotten into sealants and lubricants and 3D printing and, and all sorts of other craziness. Right? That's sort of how the one flows into the other. And then, you know, Marginal Gains is a podcast and, and YouTube channel where we talk about it all and, and we, we typically with a, a team or a company have like a two year. Secrecy period on a technology. And then after that we can do something with it and, and talk about it and tell the story. So, you know, it's always, it's always fun to go through those periods where like, Oh, thank God we can talk about that now, . Cause you know, we're talking about it internally all the time. And, and you're like, Oh, can we put that in the podcast? I don't know. So, so that, that's what I do now. We, I, I play with bikes basically. [00:06:34] Randall: Very, very cool. And, um, when you talk about the consulting work you do, is this kind of full stack performance consulting, is it very a focused, is it all technical sides, including say, like bearing drag or, or things like this? Is it, um, obviously positioning falls into Arrow Nutrition. Like where, where do you, ooh, where does your domain physiology start? [00:06:57] Josh: And I draw the line at physiology, you know, there's a whole, there, there are people who are, are like my equivalent in that world. And, and my God, I can never even dream to. You know, clean their shoes. So, um, no, you, you need someone to talk physiology, you know, And I'll, I'll pull my phone out and we'll call Allen Li or somebody, you know, Yeah. With a bunch of contacts. But, uh, you know, Alan's one of my favorite go-tos for things like that and be like, Oh dude, I've been over my head help . You know, [00:07:21] Randall: he, he's, um, he's actually been on the pod before, but Craig interviewed him, so I might bring him on in the future to do, you know, my, my more kind of nerdy type of interview. Alan's great. Yeah, no, [00:07:31] Josh: he's, he's a lovely guy. He's a lovely guy. And, and I just love, I mean, he, you know, like I find myself pretty quickly sometimes getting into places where people's eyes just glaze over, like, what the hell is this guy talking about? And, you know, I love that Alan can do that to me in about 30 seconds, you know, we're talking about the stuff that he does. You're like, Oh, whoa, shit, way over my head way. I, I didn't even recognize the last four words that you used in that sentence, . And, uh, so it's, it's awesome to be able to be surrounded by people with that. But no, you know, we. The stuff that they come to us for. I mean, you know, when I left sip and started soak, of course everybody and their brother, you know, came and said, Oh, design us a wheel. I'm like, well, like I can't do that for a couple years. But also I'm kind of just done with that, you know, like I've lived that life. I, you know, it, it was fun. But, you know, we, we continually updated wheels for 15 years, but it, it really is kinda like doing the same thing over and over again, you know? And, and so it just wasn't fun for me. So, you know, they'll come and say, um, you know, help us design this cockpit, or we, we do a lot of, with our, our in-house, uh, 3D titanium printing, we do a lot of custom cockpits for, uh, teams, riders, things like that. You know, where we laser scan the rider, get the position, lock that down to the wind tunnel, design the part, 3D print it, um, you know, stuff like that, that, that's really exciting. We, we'd get a lot of, you know what, um, You know, help us optimize for this time trial at the tour or the Olympics or whatever, where, you know, what tires should we run and we can, we have systems and tools and, and spreadsheets and a million other things that we can, um, Yeah. Help, help them determine. And then a lot of times we, you know, we get companies coming to us, um, really just wanting to know, like, you know, if, like, which of their sponsor products should they use and when should they go off sponsor? You know, you'll see that a lot at like, the tour where, excuse me. Um, you know, like they, they ride the sponsor correct product, you know, 98% of the time, and then they're gonna sneak it in here or there when it's really critical. So, you know, what, what are those really critical points? And then, you know, if, if they're gonna risk getting in trouble or outright get in trouble, like it needs to be worth it, right? And so they might come to us with like, okay, you know, we need. I need a time trial tire for this rider for this day. You know, what should we do? And, and we'll help him with that. But yeah, you know, if you, if you were a, a brand, uh, or a world tour team there, or approach our athlete that wanted to go to the win tunnel, you know, you might pay us to come along. Um, a lot of what I do too is kind of fun is just act as like a fly on the wall in these team to sponsor interactions. You know, I think I was probably at half a dozen wind tunnel tests last year where I really had pretty much nothing to contribute other than being the neutral third party in the room, um mm-hmm. you know, so that everybody was comfortable that everybody was. Comfortable . [00:10:26] Randall: Well, I would imagine there's a mix of the, uh, the political, if you're talking about, you know, what should be using our own sponsors gear versus slipping something else in all the way to, um, balancing the competing goals of say, like comfort and pure power output on the bike versus aerodynamics. Um, if you're talking about a time trial position. Yeah. [00:10:47] Josh: Oh yeah, for sure. And, and I think even down to, you know, and I think as much as we love to talk science and testing and, and try to be as scientific as possible, I mean, this stuff is really, it's emotionally hard. It's politically hard. It's, you know, companies will bring new equipment in, they're with their engineers. I mean, those guys and girls want that stuff to work so bad. And you know, sometimes you just see things coming out where, Oh yeah, that's clearly faster. And you're like, Well, actually, the way I would interpret that is it's probably about. The same, um, or mm-hmm. , you know, let's, let's rerun that test or, um, you know, it's always, I don't know, it, it, they, they like, people like to get themselves in these loops where, you know, Oh, we did this and it's 10 seconds faster and it's that, And I feel like back in the, you know, when I was with zip, we did this a lot during the Lance Armstrong area and he was writing our disc and, and we were coming in as consultants for the first probably five tours or whatever. And um, you know, every wind tunnel test you'd get to the end and they would have this chart that's like, we just made him 90 seconds faster. And it's like, look guys, that. There is no 90 seconds faster. I mean, you know? Mm-hmm. like, like that is not gonna happen. You know, you, you just did a whole bunch of stuff that's not sustainable that he can't hold his head like that. Mm-hmm. that helmet tails gonna come off the back, you know, I mean, cuz he, people do things like, Oh, oh, the helmet tail moved, rerun. You're like, Yep guys, when you ride in the real world, like the tail's gonna move. Like you don't, you know, people like to, they select data, um, without even realize they're selecting data. And so, you know, it is, it's just good always to have a third party in the room. Um, you know, it's kinda like funny story, you know, back to, you know, my zip days, how Firecrest came about, you know, Firecrest was literally the name of the prototype that, that kind of blew all of our minds. And the reason the prototypes had weird bird names was that we had to double blind them across engineers because you just didn't want anybody. Kind of, you know, having an effect on their product, right? I mean, we all, you know, we all fall in love with our children, right? . And, and in this world, like you, you can't love your children. Um, and you have to be willing to kill them when they're not good. And, um, you know, we would do this double blind thing where we would like assign them all a number and then we would assign bird name, these bird names a number, and then we would randomize it and then they would get all put up. And then nobody really knew whose idea was what, when you were in the tunnel. Um, that's necessary, right? Cause you're, you know, you can be your own worst enemy at that stuff. I think we've, you know, we've all been guilty of that a time or two in our lives. But, uh, you see it all the time, particularly in these performance, um, improvement coaching type things where, you know, people just wanna will something into existence even when it's not. Yeah. [00:13:38] Randall: Well, and I can see, um, you know, the marketing oftentimes has it much more, uh, presented, much more like a, you know, this is just, it's physics. It's more, it's more exact, it's more, um, it's more controlled. And, um, there are competing variables, particularly when you have, you know, a monkey in the middle. You have to, this, this, you know, this animal needs to be comfortable. This animal needs to be fueled, This animal needs to be able to control this machine through a varied environment. And that varied environment may be varying in real time if weather changes or things like this. Um, and so there's just all these competing interests. And so when you see, you know, I often laugh at like, You add up all the different arrow benefits that, you know, different companies claim for components and you should be doing. Right. Right. You know, you might be looking at, um, uh, relativistic effects potentially at some of the speeds you'd be able to achieve. Uh, Jen, just like how, how many watts can be saved. Totally. Being a little bit facetious there. [00:14:37] Josh: Yeah. No, no, it's totally true. I mean, and I still have this photo somewhere, I think I even showed it a couple years ago on social media. But as this, this really great photo that I love that ended up, um, on the wall at the Texas A and Wind tunnel, but it's me with next to Lance Armstrong, um, in the, what became the Nike Swift spin suit, um, that had been flown down there from, you know, Seattle. And it's, uh, oh God, the guy in from his book college or whatever he calls him, and then a guy from Nike, so it's the four of us. And I'm kind of standing there like doing, you know, like pointing at something on his back and it, like, a college student took it for the school newspaper and then they had him autograph it and it ended up on the wall. And so like, Oh, that's me. You know, it's kind of funny. But, but the real story there was that suit, you know, they were paying like 3000 bucks a meter for this suit. They'd been putting it on a mannequin in the tunnel. I mean, it was gonna save three minutes per 40 k. And you're just sitting like going, guys, like, I, I mean, just quick doing the math, like three minutes for Lance Armstrong, you know, like the guys already, That's not possible. And, and of course we get it. We put it on him. Um, the whole thing, you know, it, it's, it's cool, it's fancy, it was very red and it does nothing. I mean, it literally, we were, and the Nike people are there and they're like, Oh, that's not possible. It, it can't do nothing like whole. Let's run it again. Okay. Now get 'em out of it. Put 'em in the normal suit. Run that one. You're like, it, it just doesn't do anything. And, and they just kept going. Well run it again. Well do this. Let's, let's close pin it up. Let's tighten it. Let's, do, you know, I mean, I bet we, we lost two hours trying to make that stupid thing look like it would do anything. You know, And again, it's, it's just people being people and we've all done it. But [00:16:21] Randall: I hear like something of stages, of, stages of grief. Like, you have your baby and like first it's denial, and then you, then you have bargaining. Yeah. Yes. Put so much into this. Yeah, that's exactly, [00:16:32] Josh: that is exactly what it is. And, and you know, the, the crazy reality with that one was, you know, three months later at the tour, they launched it anyway, and they said it saved three minutes and he , you know mm-hmm. . And we, we. It, you know, I just had to laugh. I mean, I remember, you know him, you know, winning whatever one of the time, trials by like a minute and like going, No. So Nike's essentially saying he would've lost that time trial by two minutes had it not been, had he not been wearing that suit. Come on guys. Um, yeah. [00:17:00] Randall: Well, and I think that, that maybe that's, um, you know, headline number one from this interview is don't believe everything you read, especially if it's coming from a party, has a financial interest in it. [00:17:10] Josh: That is true. That is true. Yeah. I, I, I tell don't, don't even believe yourself. Right? I mean, truly like you, you are a bad, um, a bad predictor of things and, and you're a bad feeler of things and nobody wants to admit that. Um, but it's just true. You know, that's, I've been preaching that gospel for, for years. But, you know, I mean, 90, I, I would say 90% of the things you. That you feel when you're on your bike. Total, total crap. Um, and, and we know that cuz we, we've done blind testing with riders. I mean, like unbelievable world class rider. And if you blind them to what they're actually riding, they can't tell you almost any Yeah. Um, you know, all that perception, but still, but the stories away, the [00:17:56] Randall: stories we tell ourselves are powerful. There is a strong placebo effect. Oh, for sure. Uh, for sure. But it has to be acknowledged that that is the placebo. And if you actually had those beliefs about things that had genuine benefits, you would get both, You would get the actual [00:18:11] Josh: benefits. Yes. The, the most powerful thing in the world is a placebo that actually works. Right. , where you get, it's like a, it's a double whammy benefit. Um, and so yeah. That, that's where, you know, I mean, in a nutshell that's a lot of what, you know, I've made my career doing right, is trying to help, help sway people towards the, the, the placebos that, that actually do have a, a, a benefit for them. [00:18:34] Randall: So this has the conversation going in a slightly different direction than I was anticipating, which I'm really enjoying. So I've been, I've been diving into this lecture series from this guy Robert Sapolsky at Stanford. It's on, um, the, uh, uh, behavioral biology, and it's looking at all the different ways in which studies go wrong. And so there's like, you know, beliefs about something, uh, for a long period of time, you know, eminence, people in the field, uh, promulgate these, you know, these ideas. And then it's shown that, you know, the study was, was not, uh, taken, uh, done properly or what have you. And so I'm curious, let's dive more into things that go wrong in the study of aerodynamics and, um, maybe kind of the edge of, say, human performance where interfaces with aerodynamics [00:19:17] Josh: Hmm, ooh. Interest. So, I mean, a, a good. I would say career defining for me, example of that was, um, you know, we, from like 2009 to 2012, we were really all in on developing, uh, CFD for the, for bicycle wheels. And it, it just wasn't working right. Everybody was talking about it and showing papers, and, but I mean, it just, the reality was like the CFD just never looked like the wind tunnel. The curve shapes were different. The data was, we're, we're talking It [00:19:47] Randall: wasn't mid, mid [00:19:48] Josh: nineties, right? Oh, no, Mid, mid late two thousands. Yeah. Like mid, late, late [00:19:53] Randall: thousands. Okay. Yeah. And you're not using, you're having to develop something ground up or you're having to, uh, adapt something from Desso or, or one of these bigger [00:20:02] Josh: vendors. Yeah, So I think the question at the time was, you know, how do you, how do you really properly model the spinning wheel in, in flow that's also translating, right? And you look at. You know, all the CFD stuff with aircraft, um, you know, there's no rotational flow, you know, and then you look at, there's special models that people have built to look at, like, um, turbine jet, turbine engine combustion or whatever. But those are incredibly unique. And they're also, you know, there's RO flow rotating, but in a different access and Yeah. [00:20:36] Randall: The F1 guys perpendicular access. [00:20:38] Josh: Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And so, and then you got the F1 guys who weren't really modeling, um, they were modeling the rotation of the wheels, but they were doing it by modeling a rotational component at the surface of the tire. So you were, you weren't essentially like spinning the wheel, you were just saying, Oh, there's a induced rotation a about this surface. Um, which has been in the, the solvers forever. So [00:21:02] Randall: in interesting, this is taught because the, those wheels are traveling so quickly, especially the top of the wheel. If you're doing 200 miles an hour, the top of the tire is traveling at 400. And so you're having sign significant turbulence at that interface, right? Well, [00:21:15] Josh: and you, you have like Magnus effect, right? You're actually getting pressure differential top to bottom, um, you know, from , the direction of the wheel spinning. And so, you know, we, we could do stuff like that pretty accurately, right? You know, you could look at the, you know, a rotating baseball and, and predict the direction that's gonna curve. I mean, things like that were possible. But, you know, every single, and, you know, my God, I used to get, I still do occasionally, but I, I used to probably get 20 PhD papers a year from kids all over the world. Um, you know, Oh, what do you think of my paper on, you know, CFD of bicycle wheel? And we're like, Oh, it's beautiful pictures, but your data's crap. Um, . And it just wasn't figured out. And, and in 2009, I, I met a guy, Matt, uh, Godo, who's a triathlete, but he also worked for a company called FieldView. And they had built all of the CFD automation for, uh, Red Bull F one, um, and probably half the F1 grid, but his, his big account was Red Bull. Um, and he, I met him at Interbike and he had a paper that he was working on. He said, I think, I think I might have figured this out, but I really need to be able to like, Like, build a wind tunnel in the computer and then look at it so we can directly compare them back and forth. And, and so we, we did that. We published a paper at the a I a, which was at MIT that year, and it went over really well and people liked it. And we published another paper the next year, um, at, at the a i A conference. And that went well. And then we got this big grant, like an $80,000 grant from Intel, um, to really tackle this problem. Cause the, the head technologist at Intel at the time was a guy, uh, Bill Fry Rise, and one, one of the coolest guys I ever met. Um, you know, the kind of guy who, whose resume just has like a five year period that says like Los Alamos , like, [00:23:01] Randall: okay, you're cool. You know? Yeah. Yeah. Not, not allowed to talk about it. What do you do? Yes. Uh, yes, exactly. . But, [00:23:08] Josh: uh, but he was a cyclist and he was some senior, somebody at Intel. And, and, um, And they, they gave us this money and we, we, we really went hard at this and we ended up developing a, essentially all of the little nuance details. Uh, we did it in star ccm. We post processed it in field view. I think we processed it on like a thousand cores, which for 2010 was, you know, a lot. Right. [00:23:33] Randall: Um, and these are, these are, um, CPUs and not GPUs for that era. Right. A lot of the stuff of that era GPUs now, right? [00:23:40] Josh: Yeah. Yeah. I remember we, yeah, I mean, that was the beginning of, uh, that was the beginning of the cloud. It was pretty cool, like 2008, 2009, people were still traveling. I remember at one point in that process there was discussion that like, we might have to travel, um, to, Oh God, what is it? The, the university over there in Illinois had a huge, had like a 1200 core machine and they're like, Okay, we, we might have to go there and, and buy, you know, two days of time. And then as that was happening, cloud. Kind of the beginnings of cloud was there. And I remember we, we met a guy who had a cloud thing, and they had just been bought by Dell. And, uh, we were at a conference and he's like, Oh, no, you know, with our, our thing, What was that called? But, uh, with our thing, you, you can just do it like up in the ether. We're like, Whoa. You had never heard of that before. Yeah. Um, it was just exciting times and, and, uh, but, but we, you know, had this great team. We pulled it together. I mean, that's really where Firecrest came from, right? It was, it was largely designed using, um, Hundreds of iterations of capes predicted to be fast, uh, using this cfd. And, and ultimately we won. We, we became like, I think the first non university and non-governmental group to ever win a, uh, uh, innovation excellence award from the Supercomputing Society. So it was pretty cool. Salt Lake City's like this huge super computing conference and you know, it's like darpa, this and university of that. And it was like these four guys from this bike brand and, you know, was, uh, it was a pretty cool experience. But, but in that, so that's like a huge tangent. No, [00:25:17] Randall: no, this is, this is great. And, and just to take a, uh, stop for a second, CFD computational Fluid Dynamics software that is used to model complex multi-variate systems where there's second order effects and, you know, fluids and, and things like this. So anyone who's not, uh, who's not with us on that, like complicated software for complicated system models, in your [00:25:39] Josh: ideal world, it's like a wind tunnel on your laptop, right? In the, in the George Jetson's version of things. It, it's the wind tunnel on the laptop. And in the reality of things, it's kind of more like, eh, it's about as good as guessing most of the time. But, but, but sometimes it's really good at finding certain really specific things. So I won't, uh, I won't knock it too hard, but why the thing I wanna [00:25:59] Randall: dive in a little bit [00:26:00] Josh: here. Oh, go ahead. Yeah, yeah. Well, let me, so let me finish the, the thing that we discovered in this process that was super cool. Um, was that once we had all of these transient, we were solving for all these transients, um, and we really started looking at not just like the, you know, the, the side force or the yaw force or you think of um, you know, the whole thing with like wheels and handling, right? This all came out of this project cuz you could, you could predict the steering torque on the wheel, which, you know, none of the balances being used to test wheels at the time even had torque sensing, right? You had drag side force and lift, but none of them had the rotational components in there. And so that for us at first was like, oh shit, we've never thought about torque cuz we weren't measuring it. Right? It's sort of one of those, yeah, like you've biased your study all along, but then the big one was looking at the predicted, um, data and there were all of these, uh, harmonic effects. and we kind of looked at each other and we're like, Oh my God, every wind tunnel you've ever been in, Right? The first thing everybody discusses is, you know, what's the, what's the, the time across which you're taking the data and at what frequency? And then you're averaging that data, right? Cuz we're all after a data point. And you could look at the tunnel data and the CFD data, and when you pulled them out of their point form into their wave form, essentially you could see the harmonics kind of lined up, the frequencies match when, oh shit, we've been averaging out a really important piece of data for 30 years. You know, this harmonic thing is big. Like what's your, [00:27:39] Randall: your standard? So it's operating on a, it's operating on a frequency that is smaller than the sample rate. Or how [00:27:46] Josh: was it essentially? Essentially we were just idiots and we were just, we were just time averaging the all of that out. Right. I mean, it's, you know, if you need to Okay. Any wind tunnel you, you went to in the world and be like, Oh, well, we'll take, we here, we take data for 30 seconds at, you know, whatever, a hundred hertz, 60 hertz, 120, or whatever it is, and then we'll, we'll take an average. Oh, okay. That, that's fine. Got it. You're averaging out in there is real, um, uh, like amplitude changes, uh, largely due to vortex shedding is, as it turns out with bicycle wheels. But a lot of that high frequency handling stuff, particularly as wheels get deep, um, , sorry, I'm in, uh, I'm in our studio, which is off of our kitchen and somebody's lunchbox just, just leapt off of the top of the [00:28:34] Randall: refrigerator. Um, yeah, sometimes I'll have a niece or nephew come in screaming, so No worries. Yeah. So, but, [00:28:39] Josh: uh, but no, we, we realized there, there was a, a. About a factor of five difference in amplitude between wheels in terms of that, those oscillating effects. Right. Which typically it's just, it's generally vortex shedding. And the CFD can predict that really well, right? Where your little pressure builds up, sheds off, sets off a counter rotation that sheds off. Um, but as a, as a cyclist, you, you feel that as the wheel, you know, kind of oscillating left to right. Um, and we, and let's, let's for 20 years, you know, [00:29:12] Randall: Yeah. So you're just taking the, the lump, you know, 30 seconds averaged out data and saying, Okay, it gives you this amount of benefit and you're not seeing those. Um, I mean, really what we're talking about is, uh, you know, instability that may. Or, you know, otherwise result in, in control issues on the bike. And I want to take a moment to just like, define some terms, uh, because not, you know, many of our listeners are not overly technical. Um, but uh, I think some of these concepts are easy enough to get your head around, like, so, you know, describe at a very high level you're talking about vs. So, you know, maybe describe lader flow and flow attachments and vortices sheddings. How, how does this, how does this, uh, how can you understand this without a, a technical background? [00:29:59] Josh: Oh, those are awesome questions. Okay. So Lader LaMer flow is kind of what you. What the, the world wants you to think of in the wind tunnel. You see the wind tunnel picture and they've got like the, the 10 lines of smoke and they're all kind of flowing together cleanly and beautifully. That's, that's meant to, to evoke lam or flow, right. That if you were to drop a, a smoke or a particle in there, that they would all flow in lamini, you know, like sheets of paper. Um, yeah. Uh, so, so [00:30:29] Randall: it's going in a straight line. Smooth, [00:30:31] Josh: controlled, Predictable, yeah. Flow. And it, it follows the contours of the thing that it's flowing against. So, [00:30:38] Randall: so kinda like water flowing down a river sort of thing. It's not perfectly laminate, but it's all going roughly in the same direction. And there's not a lot of water [00:30:46] Josh: in a pipe disturbance, you know, would be in a pipe better example, presumably pretty laminate, right? And then you start to add stuff, you know, water in the river. Now you're, you're, you know, you've got a rock and now all of a sudden there's a disturbance and it starts to swirl. Um, and so you, you get into, you know, more complicated types of flow. I, I think the, the big ones, you know, for us to think about are, you know, most, so most drag that we deal with comes from, um, uh, pressure related things. So you either have like the, the high pressure on the front of the rider, right? The wind that you're pushing into this when you stick your hand out the car window, right? The mm-hmm. the air you feel hitting your hand, you know, that's, uh, that's a pressure drag, uh, in the positive direction. And then you have the flow, the vacuum in the back. Yeah. The flow will detach off of the object and that'll create a vacuum behind. And so that's a suction drag, um mm-hmm. . And then when you have something like vortex shedding, it's when, uh, the, the. Description I ever have for vortex sheddings. If you've ever driven an old car with, uh, like the metal antenna on the hood, you know, at some speed on the highway, that antenna starts vibrating, oscillating sideways, which is like the last thing on earth you think it would do, right? Like your brain's like, well, it should just keep bending backwards with speed. Mm-hmm. , why is it going sideways? Well, that's that you get this thing where you have a little, uh, a little curl of flow will kind of detach more on one side than the other, and that creates a side force. Mm-hmm. . But in doing so, the suction that that has now left behind will pull a similar vortex from the opposite side. Mm-hmm. . And that creates an opposite side force. And so you get these, see an oscillation, you get these oscillations and uh, you know, that's, it's huge in architecture and mm-hmm. , it, it's why you see so many of those super tall buildings or kind of have pyramid shapes or might have some sort of like, feature that spirals down them to, to kind of break that up. I, I live [00:32:46] Randall: in Boston. We actually have, um, a skyscraper here that was flexing so much, the windows were popping out. This is, you know, decades ago. And, you know, it's still, you know, they have this like funnel of air that's going through there and just the nature of the shape of it and how air gets funneled in, it was causing enough torsion to, um, you know, cause window de bonding. Um, so yeah. That's crazy. Uh, so then, you know, think applying this to the bike and particularly a wheel, um, you know, this is the biggest effect is, is presumably your front wheel where you're having this oscillation, this shift in pressure from one side to the other at a very high, high level, um, that's causing instability. It's making it so that you may lose control of the bike. It's not predictable. [00:33:34] Josh: Yeah. Correct. Correct. And, and the, the other thing we learned through CFD that it was doing, which is not obvious until you think about it, but so you think of the. So you might have, say it that the trailing edge of the front half of the rim, you're, you, you set up a little vortex shedding situation. Mm-hmm. . Um, and so you've got a little side force, but it's kind of at the, the trailing edge of the rim there. Right? So it's got a little bit of leverage on your steering, but the other thing that's happening is that alternating attachment and detachment of flow, um, changing the side force, but you're a side force at an angle. So there's a lift component, right? Which is how the drag is being reduced. And as that happens, what, what's also now changing is what we call like the center of pressure. And the center of pressure. You think of like the wheel from the side, like, like the sum, the aggregate of all the, the arrow forces on that has a center point about which it's balanced. It's kinda like a center of mass. Um, you know, so it's, it'd be center of pressure. Well, that center of pressure when you have. Shedding happening somewhere that's now moving forwards and backwards and very [00:34:40] Randall: rapidly [00:34:41] Josh: as well. Potentially, Yeah. Rather rapidly. I mean, and, and when you really look, look in on it, it, the frequency actually can be quite close to, um, the, uh, speed wobble frequency, right? Which is somewhere in that like three to four hertz range. Uh, which also happens to be really close to the frequency of human, uh, shivering, which is kind of cool's why you're more likely to, to speed wobble when you're really cold. Um, [00:35:05] Randall: and not everyone just push will have experienced speed wobble. But if, you know, if this is basically your, you, you hit a certain resonant frequency of, of the frame based on the frames geometry, uh, the head tube angle, the what are the factors that go into that, [00:35:20] Josh: Uh, it's top tube stiffness is big and so, yeah. Yeah. And it's actually this speed wobble's. Interesting. It's. It starts as a residency issue, but it's really a, it's a hop bifurcation and, um, a hop B. Okay. And so, yeah. And so what you have in a hop, uh, bifurcation is you essentially have two st two stability, um, would be the best way to think of it. And you are jumping from the one to the other. And so like, right up until that, so the [00:35:48] Randall: system wants to be in one state or the other, but not in the middle [00:35:51] Josh: and there's no middle. Right. And, and what's, what's so cool, like, like early in, um, uh, early in covid, you know, we were all talking about this, you know, what is it the are not value, the, you know, like if it's above or below one. And when you, you line that out that are not, when are not crosses one, it's a hop bifurcation that looks just like the speed wobble, bifurcation, I mean the graph. It's amazing how like, cool those things, you know, mathematically you're like, Oh yeah, that's exactly the same as this. It's just here, it's in a, you know, you get the exact same graph if you're looking at, um, Uh, wing flutter in an aircraft, uh, in the wing tunnel. Mm-hmm. , similar bifurcation problem, but yeah. So you, you, you have essentially two states and the system can get tripped from one end into the other. And in the one the bike is stable and wants to go straight, and in the other it wants to oscillate because each oscillation mm-hmm. is setting up the, the counter oscillation. Um, and so like, it, it's, you know, in resonance it's more of like a runaway you, you think of like the, how that's tradition. Yeah. It amplifi forcing. Yeah. It, it just keeps growing and growing and growing. Um, and in this one it just, it, it, it's not growing and growing, but it just trips you into this spot where like it's really bad. Um mm-hmm. and it will just shake the crap outta you at the front end. And um, and in fact motorcycles quite [00:37:07] Randall: scary. The high performance motorcycles will sometimes have a steering damper for this very reason. Um, because you'll, yeah, you'll get these speed wobbles. And so the damper is essentially making it so there's some exponentially increasing resistance. Um, I, I know you know this, I'm explaining it for our, our audience just in, you know, cause again, I wanna keep bringing it back down to earth, but, you know, having just like your, your suspension, you don't just have a a just a spring, you have some sort of damping circuit so it doesn't feel like a pogo stick. Um, which is a related effect. Um, but, uh, very cool. And are not for our listeners as well. [00:37:47] Josh: Funny. I hadn't thought about that. I haven't thought about that in like two years as we were talking like, Oh, I remember now. That was, uh, yeah. Yeah, that was, uh, But what or not was the, um, Oh shit. It was the. The contagion ratio or whatever, like how, how many people, each person would transmit to mm-hmm. And so if it's, which makes sense, right? If every person's gonna transmit it to 1.1, it grows. If you're gonna transmit it to 0.8, it, it dies. Um, [00:38:12] Randall: so the analogy here is that, that the increasing amplitude of that, you know, those pressure differentials, sending it to the, the system to one state or the other and causing that increasing oscillation, Is that a exactly correct characterization? [00:38:26] Josh: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Like you, you can take it right up to a line, um, and you don't have a problem. And then as soon as you cross the line, you're in a different state. Mm-hmm. . And, and that's where I think, you know, speed wobble for those of you who've experienced it or chase tried chasing it on a bicycle, um, you can solve it sometimes with like, the stupidest stuff. Um, you know, one of the, the common ones is to just put a little bit of like, um, like, like a heavier bar tape or a little bit of lead weight in like your, um, Uh, your plugs. Mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm. . You can oftentimes change it with a tire pressure or a different tire cuz you can add just enough damping at the contact patch. Um, that it just pushes it up high. You know, if, if, cause typically what people will find is like, Oh, it's, I'm totally fine. Then I hit, you know, 38.5 miles an hour and all hell breaks loose. Well. Mm-hmm. , you change the mass at the top of the system a little bit and maybe you've now pushed that point out to 45 miles an. but if you never go 45 miles an hour, you've affected, that's not a problem. Right? Yeah, yeah. Like, oh yeah, I [00:39:28] Randall: fixed it. I think another example that people may have experienced too is like, uh, sometimes you'll have an issue with your car that, you know, won't notice except that certain speeds and it's because of those speeds. There is some, you know, oscillation that's happening. If it's a tire and balance or something in your drive train or the like. Um, you know, I've, I once had a vehicle that was really good up to 60 and then like 60, 61, it was problematic and then it would smooth out a bit after that and it was just like this wobbling effect that would balance out beyond that, that speed. Um, alright, so then bringing things back down to earth. Um, this is delightful by the way. I, I could do this all day, . Um, and I, I hadn't quite appreciated. Um, the, the basic r and d and like basic science and tool building that you were involved in. Uh, so. That's, its its own topic. That's probably not one for, for a podcast of this particular [00:40:22] Josh: def. Yeah. I, I will say on that, I think that's the part that I think never, you know, the marketing never really tells that side of the story cuz it's just too complicated. Yeah. But if you're, if you're out there and you're, you're into this stuff, like that's the fun stuff. Like, I love launching product and, and the product itself. But like, that crazy journey to get there is usually like, that's where all the fun is happening. And, and, and typically cuz we're, you know, you're doing it wrong, like 90% of the time you're like, you know, it's just can be months or years of like, we suck, you know, this doesn't work, we're getting our sasses kicked. And then you, you know, if you persevere long enough, you will come out the other end and it's like, wow, we, we needed all that stuff. Like, we needed to get our heads handed to us over and over again, or we never would've figured this stuff out. Um, Yeah. I really, really enjoy that part of, um, of, of technology development or whatever you wanna call it. [00:41:16] Randall: Yeah. Basic, like real basic r and d right down to building the tools that you need to do the r and d you want to do, um, Right. . Yeah. Very cool. And obviously like the compute power and the, the algorithms available and, you know, the switch to GPUs and all these other things that have, um, changed since you were developing that make it such that today's models are both vastly more powerful and still yet trivial in complexity relative to the system itself. [00:41:44] Josh: Yeah, totally. [00:41:46] Randall: Yeah. Um, well let's dive into some more practical topics. So let's talk about like, alright, so a lot of our listeners we're the Gravel Ride podcast, right? So thinking about that particular experience, um, what should, what are, what is worth, um, a gravel rider thinking about. Uh, with relation to arrow. Uh, so things that can be done that will improve aerodynamics, but then not take away from the ride experience that a lot of riders are after, particularly when they're going to grab, you know, they wanna be comfortable, they wanna have a good time, they wanna have good control over a variety of different terrain and so on. So what are the arrow? Um, and, and they don't wanna look silly, so they might not be, want wanting to wear a skin suit or something like that. Not that it looks silly, but, but you know, a more, a more serious enthusiast type of rider. Uh, what are the Yeah, what are the things to think about? [00:42:36] Josh: Oh, gosh. That's, that's a good question. Um, I mean, I think it really depends on, on what. Th the particular rider, you know, is after, I mean, are you, are you racing? Do you wanna go fast? Do you wanna not get dropped? Mm-hmm. , um, you know, do you need to carry stuff? I mean, I would say one of, one of the big ones that I, I just see and, and you know, we, we make a ton of stuff in our company and one of, one of them being bags. And, you know, we're constantly accused of not making bags that are big enough. And so I've been on this mission for a couple years of like, you know, what is in there, , Like Really? Mm-hmm. what's in there. Yeah. And it is amazing to me just how much crap people are carrying. You know, you, you open some of these monster seat bags, it's like, man, just because you bought it doesn't mean you need to fill it or use it. Um, you know, it, and, and absolutely there's, there's like time and place for it. But, um, you know, I. Some of the stuff like that, like, Oh, okay. You've, you know, do you, you show up on the local gravel right here and you know, people look like they're, they're almost like bike packing, like mm-hmm. , you just don't need, you know, it, it's a 40 mile loop, you know, that starts and ends at a bike shop. Like, you, you don't need to bring a bike [00:43:49] Randall: shop with you. Well, you, you need your coffee grinder, you need your, your mini stove and you need your neuro press. Yeah, Yeah. Um, different experience. You know, let's assume that we're going after like a performance rider who's, um, like doing, doing, you know, a hundred, uh, a hundred mile events than they're, they're training for it and they wanna squeeze out more performance, um, out of their existing setup. Or they're considering, you know, what bike to get, what wheels to get, what, um, how to set it up, even considering bike fit. Yeah. Or, you know, clip on arrow bars and the, like, what are the different things that people can do and what are the compromises and so on. [00:44:24] Josh: Yeah. I mean, the, I, I think certainly for gravel. The one clear cut, no compromise. Better all around product that I can just always recommend is like a, an arrow top drop bar. I mean, it is amazing how much faster those things are than round section bars. I mean, any really, you know, like pro vibe or the zip fuca or whatever, you know, there's, I think every company makes one. It's that big, you know. Oh, it's hu I mean it like wind tunnel speeds. It's a flattop bar can be like 28 to 30 watts. I mean, it's nuts. Yeah. Cause you're, you're replacing round covered in tape with something that's like pretty thin and shaped Well, sure. Or it can be massive, but, but the, [00:45:05] Randall: I didn't, cuz the cross sectional areas is not that big compared to, you know, the rider and the, the rest of the bike and so on. Some [00:45:12] Josh: No, it's, it's, well and in gravel it has the double effect of being, you know, shaped or ized in the direction that is also gonna add compliance, right? Yeah, yeah. And, and comfort. And so you, you know, it's one of the few products I can really look at and go, okay, that thing is more arrow and more comfortable and has more service area for your right. I mean, better all around. Um, that's a pretty easy one to, to go with. And, and similarly, you know, if you've, you've got the money. I mean some of these, the, the integrated cockpit solutions that are out there are even faster, right? Cause it's just even less. Stuff in the wind. Um, so let's talk you, let's [00:45:48] Randall: talk about that. That's big, a big serviceability compromise and, and you know, fit can be a concern with that too cause it's harder to swap components and so on. How much of that is coming from, um, simply not having the cables running into the down tube? Like, can you get the vast majority of those benefits with cables coming out from, say, underneath the bar? If they're tucked in on the bar or even coming out from the bar and dropping underneath the stem into the, the headset from there? [00:46:14] Josh: Yeah. Yeah. My, my rule of thumb for cables that I always use cuz it's so memorable is, um, You know, Greg Lamond versus Fon in the 89 tour time. Mm-hmm. , So 2020 kilometer time trial. Um, the eight second gap, there was more or less equivalent to Fons ponytail, Right. As we, we loved to joke about a cyclist, but was also the equivalent of one number two pencil length worth of cable housing. So, and [00:46:46] Randall: this is, and this is true even if the cable housing is say, in front of the head tube, so it's going to be disturbed by the head tube anyways, cuz you're getting the drag off of it. Be, you see what I mean? Like, so I, I'm trying to hone my understanding of the [00:46:59] Josh: Yeah. I mean, you think, Yeah. So I, I would think, uh, good way to put that would be that, Yeah. Putting, putting a slow. Crappy thing in front of a smooth thing, you're, you're still getting the drag of the slow, crappy thing. Yep. Um, and you may actually be worsening the flow, um, on the arrow thing. So Yeah. Got it. Absolutely. Still, you still have that effect. Um, you know it, and it's hard to say, you know, in some cases, you know, it's, it's close enough or it's just in like the goldilock zone where it's a good distance away where you're like, Ooh, we can kind of make them disappear. And they become, you know, uh, a almost like the cable isn't there, but that's not typically what we see. And typically, you know, you, you throw a bike in the wind tunnel with that and then you rip the cables out and you run it again and you're, every time it's like, Oh shit. Big difference. Difference. You've, in [00:47:50] Randall: terms of watts, like a few watts here, like, so, so the handlebar is the big one, you said as much as 30 watts at wind tunnel speeds, which granted gravel riders generally are, are, we're [00:48:00] Josh: not going that miles an hour. But you, Yeah, you we're out for a long time. Yeah, but you are out there for a long time, so you don't have the speed. But yeah, you, you definitely have the, the, the potential time saving. So, yeah, I, you know, hidden cables. I agree with you. Total pain in the ass. And, you know, my God, I've spent a career working on world tour bikes and, and you know, Ironman, world champion bikes and things like that. And I, I feel everybody's pain, you know, people are always like, Why is the industry doing this to us? Like, like, Well, cuz you want it and cuz it works. I mean there's no, like, it, it's a pain in the ass, but it works. Mm-hmm. . So anywhere you can get rid of cable. get rid of cables, um, you know, skin suit. I have to say not everybody loves it, but man, it can be a huge, huge difference. Uh, I mean, you look at, you know, we were just out at lead, uh, Leadville and Steamboat, and you know, all the top. Guys at Leadville and skin suits now, cuz it, it makes that big of a difference. Um, arrow bars can be huge and, you know, I think that's, that's one I I think everybody's got their own sort of flavor that they like. But, you know, to me, like for gravel, a stubby, a stubby bar that has functional pads mm-hmm. , um, really can be worth it just because it's a different hand position and it, it's enough that it, it's effectively changing your, kind of, your whole torso position and it, it, it's just giving you a, a break all around. Right. It's different pressure points in your shammy for the time that you're using it. It's different, you know, muscles in your back. Um, I think there's a good, this is the, the extent of my physi physiological knowledge, but I, I think it's good to, to mix things up. Um, like that. I, I know a lot of people have kind of gone to these super. Narrow, stubby, I don't even know what you call 'em. Like semia bars that Yeah, [00:49:46] Randall: mini arrow bars. [00:49:48] Josh: Nowhere to put your, nowhere to rest your weight. And, and it just feels like everybody I know using those is constantly complaining about their wrists, you know? Um, and so I, I, again, not a physical, but the change [00:50:00] Randall: in the change in frontal area, um, is that just an unmitigated benefit or are there circumstances where you can reduce frontal area and, you know, have a negative result within the realm of, you know, changing a Roger's position? [00:50:16] Josh: Yeah, you know, a lot of it depends on your, your baseline and, and how good you are. Positionally, I think, you know, when, you know, we do a lot of position training with top athletes and you know, the. The best place you can be that's not an arrow bar is on the hoods with level forearms. Mm-hmm. , right? Like that's the, and and ideally with relatively narrow bars, [00:50:37] Randall: so, and perpendicular upper arms as well, presumably, [00:50:40] Josh: or give or take. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean it is, it's, you're gonna roughly get there depending on what the rest of the position looks like and, you know, obviously different body shapes and whatnot. But yeah, I mean, you think horizontal forearms are keeping that pretty much out of the wind. Mm-hmm. , Um, and, and they are also keeping it, it's just hard to hold that position, um, with, in a way that you're also still opening your chest. Because, you know, you were really trying to keep air from getting blocked up under the chest. And when you get a rider doing that, they just always kind of form, which I say always, I'm sure there's some counterexamples out there, but they, they almost always, um, kind of adjust their back and their shoulders in a way that they kind of turtle their head a little bit. You know, the head comes down and you're just kind of now pushing more air up over the body and less down into it. Um, but from there, arrow bars are almost always an improvement, right? Cuz you're narrowing the arms, um, you know, you're tightening things up even further and now you're pushing more flow around the sides, um, and less into the chest and less into the hips. And there's some physiological things. You know, people, you know, wide hips, big hands, certain shoulders, certain back shapes, right? That's why we go to the tunnel, you know, it's, it. 90% of the time, you could look at somebody and go, Oh, do this, this, and that, but man, 10% of the time it looks good and you run it and you're like, That's not good, We can just find a different solution. Um, [00:52:10] Randall: yeah. So air bars are huge. Another thing that we're starting to see is, uh, so BMC has their new cas uh, uh, line. They went with a super narrow, uh, handlebar, so narrow at the hoods, and then, you know, flare at the bottom. Uh, that seems like another thing that again, is, Well, I mean, on the one hand, yeah, you're getting narrower, but on the other hand, you're also closing up the chest and maybe, you know, you're not getting as much oxygen, like air turnover or something. Or like, are there issues where I, so [00:52:38] Josh: I, I have been beating the narrow handlebar drum for 25 years. Um, you know, I am yet to actually see or be told by a real physiologist that that whole. Oxygen lung thing that we were all told as juniors is true, is an issue. Um, yeah, I I've just, yeah, we've just never, I mean that, that I know of and I'm sure somebody out there will say, Oh, here's a paper. But, you know, I, I know whenever we've studied it, looked at it, we've looked at it with athletes, I mean, look at what's happening at the world tour. A lot of that is, you know, we've been beating that drum. I'm starting to see that for years, and people are doing it and they're winning. Um, so, you know, and I wonder [00:53:17] Randall: why aren't we seeing it with extreme flare as well, like a compound flare at least, so that you can still keep a, you know, a reasonably vertical lever position because then you could go even narrower and have, um, still have the leverage for the descending and so on. Is that a [00:53:32] Josh: tradition thing? Yeah, I, yeah, I think some of it's that. I think some of it is just, you know, how far do you really wanna push the uci? Um, [00:53:42] Randall: you know, oh, the UCI cares about the flare in your bars. [00:53:46] Josh: Oh, they will. Yeah. I mean, I mean, I think there are actually rules putting some limits on that, but yeah, at some point it's gonna look funny enough that you're gonna draw attention and they're gonna go, Wait a minute. Um, and, and you know, we've, we've [00:53:58] Randall: seen them, I've got a 28 centimeter wide bar with huge flares on there, and I've got specially made levers that come off of it so that I can actually still touch them from the job. [00:54:07] Josh: We have seen it with, I, I can't remember the name of that bar, but I think it's out of Belgium or something. But it's got like, you know, uh, 180 millimeters of reach, um, super narrow with long, and you can kind of lay your forearms. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I remember seeing that and they quickly were like, Nope, that's out. Um, so I, you know, I think we just, people are, people are cautious. I think the, the setups that are working now, um, are very largely built around that, uh, three T track bar. I can't remember what it's called, but, uh, I know. You know, it's got that kind of cool like wing, like gulling shape to it, but it's super narrow, arrow tops, um, relatively vertical, uh, drops. But, but that's a bar that the ucis allowed for years, right? And so I think that as a, you know, when, when conversations are happening behind closed doors, that's the kind of thing of like, Oh, well this looks enough like that, that if they call us out, we, we go in there and be like, Well, it looks a whole lot like this thing that you've allowed for 20 years. Um, you know, we, we have tons of those conversations. Yeah. So, so I, you know, I, I think, but I, I will say, I, I think too, that's where, um, you know, a lot of people might look at the pro tour and things that they're writing. Oh, well if this worked, they'd use it. You know? I mean, that was what people told us when we were building zip in the early days. Well, if they worked, the Pro Pros would ride it. I'm like, Yeah, but they. They don't know what they're, they don't believe in aerodynamics. You know, they, the pros, they don't riding [00:55:34] Randall: super skinny tires at super high pressures cuz they felt faster for a long time, even though, you know, at least, well, you know this better than than I do. I mean, the data has been saying for quite some time that it's more efficient. Never mind the accumulated fatigue that you get when your body's just being, you know, rattled at, you know, high frequency over the course of many hours. [00:55:56] Josh: Yeah, yeah. No, it's, you know, that I would say they're quite often the last, at least as a group to change. Right. But you, you are seeing it now. I mean the, you know, and, and, and you know, the team like Nios hiring a guy, hiring Dan Bigham to come in and, you know, you, you are seeing some changes, right? Uh, that when teams are bringing full-time people like that in, um, we are gonna start moving the needle there, but it's still a delicate dance with the. With the UCI and, and all the sport governing bodies, right? Nobody, You hear it all the time. Nobody wants a repeat of the whole fna. Uh, I don't follow swimming, but I was the technical, uh, committee director for cycling at the World Federation of Sporting Good Industries. And, uh, at the time when FNA Band banned all of the super tight, uh, swimming suits, and it was just a cluster, right? I mean, they just came out and said, Nope, you've pushed it too far. We're done. And if the whole industry was sideways with like, we've invested millions of dollars in this and the records are breaking, and people wanted and on and on and on, and they just said, Nope, you're done. And, uh, I think it took them five years to under undo all that damage. You know, I mean, you just wanna [00:57:11] Randall: something parallel with running too with, uh, carbon fiber insoles and like what is, what is allowed in terms of the amount of spring that can be delivered and so on. Um, Yeah, I, I see, I see them showing up on my local run. And, um, I might have to get a set just to keep up with the people I used to beat, to keep up with [00:57:29] Josh: It's totally true. [00:57:31] Randall: Uh, that's, I mean, that's, that's, to some degree, that's the nature of the game. And that's why in, in significant part, that's why the gear is as good as it is right now is because, you know, people are looking for, as you would say, those marginal gains. Um, yeah. Um, I wanna dive in. So, uh, I want to put, bring in a few, uh, listener questions. Uh, so we posted in the ridership that you were gonna be coming on, and so we had some folks asking questions there. Probably the biggest one that came up was, um, talking about, you know, we've, uh, Craig and I brought up the rule of 1 0 5 or 5% on the podcast before, but, you know, citing, citing it, it's not a deep understanding, uh, at all. So tell us about how that emerged in. How it applies. Um, you know, particularly in the gravel scene where you're looking at tires that are much bigger. Um, and I mentioned, uh, earlier that, you know, specialized as a video for their reval wheels where they're running a a 42 mill tire on i, I think a 35 or less external rim, and they're claiming some arrow benefit. Does that seem plausible? Is there, uh, given, given, given what you have seen in the wind tunnel and in your modeling? [00:58:41] Josh: Yeah. Um, yeah, it's totally plausible and I guess, we'll, we'll start with rule of one. Oh, so rule 1 0 5 was really, you know, I, I realized pretty early in my career that you had to come up with sort of rules of thumb for things or nobody would listen to you Mm-hmm. and, you know, spent two years traveling Europe trying to sell Arrow. Sell World Tour or pro tour at the time, uh, directors and team owners on aerodynamics and you know, I mean literally got thrown out of every single team, team over there. Uh, I mean, it was just, we just got laughed out of the room. Just imagine [00:59:20] Randall: any of those team directors could have just adopted it at that time and had this huge advantage and didn't, [00:59:26] Josh: uh, that was, I mean, I always said, you know, Uli at srm, thank God, you know, he was developing his thing. And when I walked in to pitch Reese, um, he was alrea