Podcasts about ar vr

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  • 678PODCASTS
  • 1,044EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about ar vr

Latest podcast episodes about ar vr

BlogAid Podcast
Tips Tuesday – Walmart Metaverse, Web3 Jobs, Content Creators Summit, TikTok SEO

BlogAid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:41


Tips this week include: • A critically important file at our hosting has been borked • The changes I'm making for host recommendations and host and plugin support • DIY SEO Workshops start this Thursday • New name for BB Hub Meetings • A peek into Web3 content creators and businesses to follow • Upcoming summit for content creators • What I found in the WP 5.9 release candidates • Google is confirmed as crawling TikTok videos • Yoast adds a new keyword rank tracking tool integration • What having a fast site has to do with the health of the planet • Adworld conference to feature a new Web3 track • Why you may qualify for a Web3 job right now • Apple's plans for an AR/VR headset • Walmart is getting into crypto and the metaverse

iMore show
Pill Punch?

iMore show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 61:49


This week on the iMore Show, we ring in 2022 with news, rumors, and a healthy dose of speculation. Links: Kuo: iPhone 14 gaining a 48-megapixel camera, 2023 iPhone going periscope | iMore Second analyst backs up claims that iPhone 15 will get a periscope camera for improved zoom capabilities | iMore Kuo: AirPods Pro 2 will gain lossless audio support, new charging case | iMore Apple reportedly set to ship its AR/VR headset with three screens, not two | iMore Report: 2022 iPhone SE set to gain 5G, spec bump but no new design | iMore Leaker: 'Too many compromises' for foldable iPhone, but work is ongoing | iMore Leaker backs up claims iPhone 14 Pro will ditch the notch for a hole-punch camera | iMore iMore's Best of CES 2022 | iMore Latest iPhone 14 Pro pill-shaped camera mockup looks as hot as expected | iMore iPhone 14 Pro's pill-shaped camera hole might have a circular one for company | iMore We might wait until 2024 for iPhone's notches and holes to go for good | iMore An OLED iPad could arrive in 2024 powered by Samsung | iMore Apple's AR/VR headset could be delayed to 2023 due to heat issues | iMore iPhone SE 3 renders, based on claimed leaked CAD images, show iPhone XR design | iMore Sponsors: Capital One: Machine learning at Capital One. Capital One. What's in your wallet? Hosts: Joe Keller Karen Freeman

Apple Bitz XL w/ Brian Tong
iPhone 14/14 Pro: New Design? Apple AR/VR Headset pushed to 2023? (Apple Bitz XL, Ep. 201)

Apple Bitz XL w/ Brian Tong

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 41:36


Free $75 credit to boost your post at Indeed.com/applebitz.  Terms and conditions apply. Offer valid through 3/31/22 So what's it going to be for the Apple iPhone 14 Pro? To Be or Notch to Be? That is the question. But is a Pill and a Punch Hole the answer? Plus, new info about the iPhone SE 3rd Generation, Apple Watch Series 8, and the highly anticipated Apple AR/VR Headset could be pushed to 2023. You can help support this show and my independent work at www.patreon.com/briantong THANK YOU! Call into the show by recording a Voice Memo and send to applebitzshow@gmail.com

3:59
AR, VR and smart glasses could have a big year (The Daily Charge, 1/10/2022)

3:59

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 14:12


CES hinted at the long nascent smart glass and AR market to gain ground in 2022 Story: https://cnet.co/3HP7aQR Text us: https://cnet.co/dailycharge Leave a voicemail: 862-250-8573 Follow us: twitter.com/thedailycharge Homepage: cnet.com/daily-charge Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 815. AirPods Pro 2 details emerge. Big week for AR/VR headset rumors. The notch-less iPhone 14 Pro. Here comes the M2. An Apple Display that is "half the price". Apple close to landing Brad Pitt F1 flick. In car Wi-Fi question. Cleaning up your passwords. Spam in your Calendar?. Thing of the Moment: TP-Link AV1300 Gigabit Passthrough Powerline ac Wi-Fi Kit. Special thanks to our sponsor: Zocdoc Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

MacMagazine no Ar
MacMagazine no Ar #457: rumores do “iPhone 14”, headset de AR/VR, “AirPods Pro 2”, US$3 trilhões e mais!

MacMagazine no Ar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 74:41


E hoje, após uma semana de hiato, é dia de MacMagazine no Ar! 😃 Esta é a 457ª…

Clockwise
432: By “Read” I Mean “Listen”

Clockwise

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:03


How we turn our digital photographs into physical media, our experiences with external monitors, our thoughts on an audiobook service from Apple, and the AR/VR headset features that would appeal to us.

Relay FM Master Feed
Clockwise 432: By “Read” I Mean “Listen”

Relay FM Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:03


How we turn our digital photographs into physical media, our experiences with external monitors, our thoughts on an audiobook service from Apple, and the AR/VR headset features that would appeal to us.

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)
MBW 799: Rubber Suits With Ping Pong Balls - Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 124:21


Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2 Apple first U.S company to reach $3 trillion market cap iPhone 13 sales strong during the holiday season: Apple's services business worth $1.5 trillion Mark Gurman: Apple 2022 preview Apple's upcoming AR/VR headset to feature three displays AirPods Pro 2 to feature lossless support and sound-emitting charging case Is Bluetooth holding back Apple's AirPods? The end of the line is finally coming for BlackBerry Devices Apple to launch an audiobooks service later this year? As Omicron spreads across American, much of the country still isn't using exposure notification apps Apple in exclusive negotiations for Brad Pitt Formula One racing movie Picks of the Week: Andy's Pick: The Writing of the Gods: The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone Alex's Picks: Linsoul KZ ZS10 Pro & Liminal Acquisition Rene's Pick: Return YouTube Dislikes Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wealthfront.com/macbreak ZipRecruiter.com/macbreak imperfectfoods.com promo code MACBREAK

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)
MBW 799: Rubber Suits With Ping Pong Balls - Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 123:46


Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2 Apple first U.S company to reach $3 trillion market cap iPhone 13 sales strong during the holiday season: Apple's services business worth $1.5 trillion Mark Gurman: Apple 2022 preview Apple's upcoming AR/VR headset to feature three displays AirPods Pro 2 to feature lossless support and sound-emitting charging case Is Bluetooth holding back Apple's AirPods? The end of the line is finally coming for BlackBerry Devices Apple to launch an audiobooks service later this year? As Omicron spreads across American, much of the country still isn't using exposure notification apps Apple in exclusive negotiations for Brad Pitt Formula One racing movie Picks of the Week: Andy's Pick: The Writing of the Gods: The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone Alex's Picks: Linsoul KZ ZS10 Pro & Liminal Acquisition Rene's Pick: Return YouTube Dislikes Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wealthfront.com/macbreak ZipRecruiter.com/macbreak imperfectfoods.com promo code MACBREAK

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
MacBreak Weekly 799: Rubber Suits With Ping Pong Balls

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 124:21


Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2 Apple first U.S company to reach $3 trillion market cap iPhone 13 sales strong during the holiday season: Apple's services business worth $1.5 trillion Mark Gurman: Apple 2022 preview Apple's upcoming AR/VR headset to feature three displays AirPods Pro 2 to feature lossless support and sound-emitting charging case Is Bluetooth holding back Apple's AirPods? The end of the line is finally coming for BlackBerry Devices Apple to launch an audiobooks service later this year? As Omicron spreads across American, much of the country still isn't using exposure notification apps Apple in exclusive negotiations for Brad Pitt Formula One racing movie Picks of the Week: Andy's Pick: The Writing of the Gods: The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone Alex's Picks: Linsoul KZ ZS10 Pro & Liminal Acquisition Rene's Pick: Return YouTube Dislikes Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wealthfront.com/macbreak ZipRecruiter.com/macbreak imperfectfoods.com promo code MACBREAK

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
MacBreak Weekly 799: Rubber Suits With Ping Pong Balls

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 123:46


Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2 Apple first U.S company to reach $3 trillion market cap iPhone 13 sales strong during the holiday season: Apple's services business worth $1.5 trillion Mark Gurman: Apple 2022 preview Apple's upcoming AR/VR headset to feature three displays AirPods Pro 2 to feature lossless support and sound-emitting charging case Is Bluetooth holding back Apple's AirPods? The end of the line is finally coming for BlackBerry Devices Apple to launch an audiobooks service later this year? As Omicron spreads across American, much of the country still isn't using exposure notification apps Apple in exclusive negotiations for Brad Pitt Formula One racing movie Picks of the Week: Andy's Pick: The Writing of the Gods: The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone Alex's Picks: Linsoul KZ ZS10 Pro & Liminal Acquisition Rene's Pick: Return YouTube Dislikes Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wealthfront.com/macbreak ZipRecruiter.com/macbreak imperfectfoods.com promo code MACBREAK

Radio Leo (Audio)
MacBreak Weekly 799: Rubber Suits With Ping Pong Balls

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 123:46


Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2 Apple first U.S company to reach $3 trillion market cap iPhone 13 sales strong during the holiday season: Apple's services business worth $1.5 trillion Mark Gurman: Apple 2022 preview Apple's upcoming AR/VR headset to feature three displays AirPods Pro 2 to feature lossless support and sound-emitting charging case Is Bluetooth holding back Apple's AirPods? The end of the line is finally coming for BlackBerry Devices Apple to launch an audiobooks service later this year? As Omicron spreads across American, much of the country still isn't using exposure notification apps Apple in exclusive negotiations for Brad Pitt Formula One racing movie Picks of the Week: Andy's Pick: The Writing of the Gods: The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone Alex's Picks: Linsoul KZ ZS10 Pro & Liminal Acquisition Rene's Pick: Return YouTube Dislikes Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wealthfront.com/macbreak ZipRecruiter.com/macbreak imperfectfoods.com promo code MACBREAK

Radio Leo (Video HD)
MacBreak Weekly 799: Rubber Suits With Ping Pong Balls

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 124:21


Apple $3T Market Cap, AirPods Pro 2 Apple first U.S company to reach $3 trillion market cap iPhone 13 sales strong during the holiday season: Apple's services business worth $1.5 trillion Mark Gurman: Apple 2022 preview Apple's upcoming AR/VR headset to feature three displays AirPods Pro 2 to feature lossless support and sound-emitting charging case Is Bluetooth holding back Apple's AirPods? The end of the line is finally coming for BlackBerry Devices Apple to launch an audiobooks service later this year? As Omicron spreads across American, much of the country still isn't using exposure notification apps Apple in exclusive negotiations for Brad Pitt Formula One racing movie Picks of the Week: Andy's Pick: The Writing of the Gods: The Race to Decode the Rosetta Stone Alex's Picks: Linsoul KZ ZS10 Pro & Liminal Acquisition Rene's Pick: Return YouTube Dislikes Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: wealthfront.com/macbreak ZipRecruiter.com/macbreak imperfectfoods.com promo code MACBREAK

Visual Storytelling Today
How Brands Can Create A Meaningful Metaverse Strategy?

Visual Storytelling Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 45:59


In this episode of the Visual Storytelling Today podcast, I chat with Dirk Lueth, Co-founder, at Uplandme, Inc. Upland is one of the world's fastest growing blockchain games. We talked about his journey leading to AR/VR, his definition for the metaverse, examples of brands using the metaverse, success criteria, his top 3 tips - and much more. Watch the video recording of this episode:  https://www.visualstorytell.com/blog/how-brands-can-create-a-meaningful-metaverse-strategy   This podcast is brought to you by the Visual Storytelling Institute (VSI) from Miami, FL. Learn more at VisualStorytell.com To learn more about visual storytelling, Order Shlomi Ron's  book:  Total Acuity: Tales with Marketing Morals to Help You Create Richer Visual Brand Stories

Revision Path
Charlene Atlas

Revision Path

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:49


The introduction of the metaverse to the general public was one of the biggest topics in tech last year. As we all learn more about the metaverse and what it means for the future of the Internet, I thought it would be a fantastic idea this year to talk with some of the folks out there who are involved with the metaverse in some capacity.Meet Charlene Atlas, an interaction designer for undoubtedly one of the biggest companies to stake their claim in the metaverse -- Meta. We started off our conversation talking about her resolutions for this year, and she spoke about her work on the Reality Labs team. From there, we discussed the metaverse and some of Meta's plans, and Charlene shared how she became interested in technology, gaming, and eventually got into the AR/VR space.Charlene is just one of many people who are helping to create the future of the Internet, so I hope you get inspired by her work and discover a way to chart your own course!LinksCharlene Atlas' WebsiteCharlene Atlas on LinkedInCharlene Atlas on InstagramCharlene Atlas on TwitterMeta | Reality LabsFor extended show notes, including a full transcript of this interview, visit revisionpath.com.==========We're doing a mailbag episode on January 31, so send us your questions about design, tech, or the podcast, and we'll answer them on the show! You can email the show at mail@revisionpath.com, or send us a message through our contact page.==========Sponsored by Brevity & WitBrevity & Wit is a strategy and design firm committed to designing a more inclusive and equitable world.We accomplish this through graphic design, presentations and workshops around I-D-E-A: inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility.If you're curious to learn how to combine a passion for I-D-E-A with design, check us out at brevityandwit.com.Brevity & Wit — creative excellence without the grind.==========Follow and SubscribeLike this episode? Then subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you find your favorite shows.Follow us there, and leave us a 5-star rating and a review! Thanks so much to all of you who have already rated and reviewed us!You can also follow Revision Path on Instagram and Twitter.==========CreditsRevision Path is brought to you by Lunch, a multidisciplinary creative studio in Atlanta, GA.It is produced by Maurice Cherry and engineered and edited by RJ Basilio. Our intro voiceover is by Music Man Dre, with intro and outro music by Yellow Speaker.Thank you for listening!

What's Next|科技早知道
S5 年度回顾系列 EP2|Web 3.0 与元宇宙:是互联网世界的下一个入口,还是尽头?

What's Next|科技早知道

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 59:19


互联网和 VC 在 2022 年还能不能继续 Web 3.0 及元宇宙的叙事胜利?就在上周,马斯克和 Jack Dorsey 在推特公开表示, Web 3.0 就是加密货币投资人造出的热词,随后引来 A16Z 站出来为 Web 3.0 摇旗呐喊。从腾讯布局 NFT ,字节收购 Pico ,脸书改名 Meta ,到英伟达翻身成为二级市场的工业元宇宙第一股,Decentraland 卖出 243 万美元的天价虚拟土地,在可以厘清这些概念之前,资本和机构都选择了加速入场。这两个席卷了今年所有主流媒体头版头条的概念,在 2022 年还会延续它们对真实世界的影响力吗? 在 S5 年度回顾系列的第二期中,主播 Howie 携手微博联合创始人 Indigo ,天风证券海外互联网首席 Karin , 从一级和二级市场的不同视角,共同探讨 Web 3.0 与元宇宙是否将带来翻天覆地的改变?互联网和 VC 如何争夺这个领域的话语权?明年又有哪些机会留给这个领域的观察者? #声动小邮筒# 对 Diane 和 Carter 的讨论好奇但尚未订阅的小伙伴,欢迎点击这里的报名链接 (http://shengfm2021.mikecrm.com/69KVszt),订阅我们的「声动小邮筒」

The Healthcare QualityCast
Leading Immersive Health with Dov Z. Hirsch

The Healthcare QualityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 73:20


Meet our guest on this episode, Dov Hirsch, General Manager of the Immersive Health Group, a subsidiary of the Glimpse Group, which works with Augmented and Virtual Reality technology building software for a variety of industries including healthcare. In this episode, Dov describes the role of AR/VR as well as the entertainment industry generally, in future advancements of the healthcare industry, particularly following the impact of the pandemic on workflows. Top Takeaways [03:00] Get uncomfortable, explore things that you haven't explored, and be open to ideas that you haven't been open to. [17:17] There is a huge difference between what people talk about in healthcare and what they do. Even with growth in value-based care, it is grossly under-practiced, and most healthcare delivery in the US remains fee for service. [21:21] The role of AR/VR in healthcare: The two main areas where augmented reality will have an impact are Clinical training and Behavioral health. [30:56] Lessons from experience in failure: The failure of so many health systems is leaning too heavily on past knowledge and actions that gave success, to predict what will be successful in the future. [38:53] Tools for building intimate teams: Leaders need to demonstrate an ability to change and adaptability to different situations to still achieve their goals. While closely managing the most important things, the leaders must also keep in mind that the goal is not to be indispensable; the goal is to be able to walk away and know that the entity can thrive. [43:30] Best 'Aha' moment: There are lots of opportunities for healthcare to deliver impact using entertainment as a tool, and this has been greatly underestimated. [48:20] Current exciting changes in healthcare: Care delivery has to be more affordable, more convenient, and more effective. Quality professionals need to start thinking about applying quality measures to retail and consumer health. [53:37] Dov gets a lot of inspiration from his family and the fun in his work. [56:53] Best career advice: "Accept Help; Don't be afraid to ask for help" [01:00:30] Successful Habit: Take care of your health [01:02:45] A professional society recommendation: Game Developers Conference (GDC) [01:03:38] Book recommendation: ‘The Challenger Sale' by Matthew Dixon, ‘Moonwalking with Einstein' by Joshua Foer, ‘The Tipping Point' by Malcolm Gladwell [01:06:05] Dov's message to himself would be to embrace who he is, and to have fun. [01:09:30] How to contact Dov Key Quotes: "Taking on a challenge is a lot like riding a horse, if you're comfortable while you're doing it, you're probably doing it wrong" "You cannot underestimate the value of your clinical or caregiving workforce" "The opportunities for learning are going to be greatest where and when mistakes occur" "We don't transform, if we're lucky and we work hard, we adapt" "Everyone needs to seek out help and accept it" Connect: Find | Dov Hirsch LinkedIn – Dov Hirsch Website – www.immersivehealthgroup.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/healthcarequalitycast/message

The CultCast
MORE details on Apple's AR goggles and MORE picks for our Gear of the Year! (CultCast #523)

The CultCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 70:34


This week: we've got our bet look yet at Apple's upcoming mixed reality AR headset, but do Apple fans care!? Plus: we reveal even more picks from our list of Gear of the Year! This episode supported by Easily create a beautiful website all by yourself, at Squarespace.com/cultcast. Use offer code CultCast at checkout to get 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain. Cult of Mac's watch store is full of beautiful straps that cost way less than Apple's. See the full curated collection at Store.Cultofmac.com CultCloth will keep your iPhone 13, Apple Watch, iPad, glasses and lenses sparkling clean, and for a limited time use code CULTCAST at checkout to score a free CarryCloth with any order at CultCloth.co. Join us in the CultClub! discord.gg/BrKdnSK Apple's first AR/VR headset might look like ski goggles Concept artist Ian Zelbo took the rumors about an upcoming Apple augmented reality and virtual reality headset and turned them into a possible design for a product that could be unveiled in 2022. TSA will accept Apple Wallet's digital IDs from February 2022 When Apple unveiled digital IDs for the Wallet app at its Worldwide Developers Conference in June, the plan was to launch it sometime this year, with the TSA being its first supporter. Unfortunately, like a number of new additions to iOS 15, Apple later delayed the rollout. Crime-busting mom tracks down Christmas decoration thief with AirTags A Texas woman put Apple AirTags on her outdoor Christmas inflatables in case they were stolen. And when they were, she was able to use the item trackers to easily find them.

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台
2021年110期:我想不明白为什么还有人买燃油车,不买蔚来ET5?

百车全说丨当相声听的汽车电台

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 43:36


※ 投稿邮箱:418150505@qq.com※ 本文章发布于订阅号:百车全说,订阅号阅读更加方便,欢迎关注今天这期节目跟大家聊聊最近刚刚上市的蔚来ET5,这款车可能关注的人并不是特别多,但是蔚来李斌最近的一番言论,上了好几天的热搜。他说,我真的想不明白,为什么现在还有人去买油车,除了能闻到汽油味,还有什么好?这番话让网友们炸了锅,大家觉得这就是现代版的“何不食肉糜”。燃油车比电动车好在哪里,随便找个不懂车的家庭主妇都能说出来。可是李斌为何要这样表达呢?蔚来ET5又有哪些优缺点?对比Model3和极氪001,30万级的电动轿车到底该怎么选?如何解读ET5的销售策略?今天这期节目,咱们就聊聊这些话题。首先,咱们聊聊蔚来汽车创始人李斌的惊人言论。大家仔细想想,在蔚来,小鹏这样的新造车势力崛起之前,别说车企的创始人了,就算是车企高管都是高高在上的存在。几十年来,我们从没见过李书福、王传福、尹同跃或者魏建军到处跑活动,然后频繁接受采访甚至参加综艺。吉利、比亚迪、奇瑞和长城有些非重点车型,创始人甚至都不会出席活动。本质上,新造车势力的玩法就跟传统车企不一样,新造车势力的思考逻辑是找到精准用户,然后经营私域流量。而传统车企是针对广域流量,树立好自己的品牌形象。所以,像蔚来、理想和小鹏这三个品牌诞生之初,就在不遗余力做两件事,一是企业内部打造网红产品,二是企业外部打造网红CEO。那到底怎么才能红呢?新造车势力毕竟是充当颠覆者的形象,那言论就必须要博人眼球。无论是产品还是个人,如果想要红,就得学会两个字“整活”,整活的本质就是两点:一是想不到,二是做不到。你要是脚本文案比较厉害,那你就玩包袱,脱口秀就是这么玩的,前面铺垫一段,然后带着情绪,突然一个转折,大家都没想到最后一句会是这样,逗得各位哈哈大笑。其实,人会被逗笑,本质是紧张情绪的释放。比如,我用一个玩具蛇去吓唬我媳妇,她肯定一回头就吓得花容失色,她没想到我手里拿着的是假蛇,我告诉她这是个假的,她情绪瞬间释放,然后会笑着拿出搓衣板,让我好好反省一下。而做不到的核心就是玩别人不敢玩的,或者玩别人不会玩的。比如之前的大胃王系列,一个瘦瘦小小的姑娘,花16分钟吃完10桶火鸡面,单就这一条视频就一炮而红,之后就是各种一口气吃100个包子,200个饺子之类的视频,曾经大火了好一阵子,后来被和谐了。还有天天做没用东西的手工梗,看他样子呆呆傻傻的,实际上人家是个手艺人,他每条视频背后都是冲突、共鸣和打破常规的精妙设计。所以不敢玩和不会玩,就形成了网红整活的日常,大家想想,你每天抱着手机刷视频,到底在找什么呢?不就是找各种人,给你整点新鲜的活看看嘛。所以,蔚来创始人李斌的言论你可以理解成他整了一次活儿给大家看,不过这次整活我只能给80分,没有2018年10月那次整活玩的好。那次李斌说“保时捷的工厂,肯定比不上江淮的工厂”,当时这句话也是掀起了广大网友讨论的热情,一群连汽车生产四大工艺都搞不懂的网民,疯狂Diss烧了几百亿造车的李斌,说他讲的不对,江淮怎么能跟保时捷比?那次李斌的整活,完美符合冲突、打破常规和引发共鸣这三个引爆内容的关键点。而往往大佬们发表言论时,故意留出的这种小bug,就是拿来被网民们抓住猛锤的。因为大佬们知道,讲事实摆道理你专业度不够,谈理论列数据你信息量不够。所以,你只能发泄情绪,全国网民都在隔靴搔痒地骂李斌说得不对,只会带来一个结果,大家知道了蔚来汽车这个品牌,且他的老板说了自己的工厂比保时捷工厂还要好。这次李斌说的“不理解怎么还有人买燃油车?”这句话,如果放在蔚来自己的APP里,肯定是被刷爆转评赞的。但是放在网络上,一定是被喷到怀疑人生。因为人与人之间,收入不同、受教育程度不同,用车环境不同,甚至性格和三观都不一样,现阶段对于油车和电车的理解,本来就无法达成共识。李斌的话之所以被质疑,最大的问题在于语气之坚定,态度之坦然。实际上,他真的不理解为什么有人买燃油车吗?当然能理解,他比谁都能理解。但是,作为烧了几百亿的企业掌门人,作为与燃油车特别是BBA死磕的品牌创始人,他必须这么说。你可以理解,这里面有点PUA精神控制的感觉。不信的人能举出几十个反驳他的观点,从保值率、续航、驾驶乐趣,到安全性、做工、品牌价值等等。但是,相信他的人肯定会想,他说得没错,家门口就有换电站,现在全国有700多座换电站,今后每年保持新增600座换电站的规模。按这个逻辑推导下去,换电比加油还方便,那他是真不理解还买油车干嘛。所以,大佬言论里的小bug,你可以挑刺,但是不能完全推翻。信他话的人只会点头,不会敲键盘。不信他话的人,情绪一下就被点燃了,肯定要上网骂两句。所以,这波免费流量被蔚来轻松收割。大家也别忘了,2018年10月发表保时捷工厂不如江淮的言论,没2个月蔚来ES6上市了。现在发表怎么还有人买燃油车的言论,正好是蔚来ET5上市。哎,怎么会这么巧呢?咱再回到蔚来ET5这款车聊聊。首先,对于纠结蔚来ET5、特斯拉Model 3和极氪001的朋友,我的观点就一句话:找这三款车上你没玩过,但是特别想玩的地方。蔚来的换电和社群服务,特斯拉Model 3的操控和品牌认同,极氪001的配置丰富程度。其实你花点时间思考一下,就全明白了。你是要极氪001上的YAMAHA音响,感应式自动门,空气悬架?还是蔚来ET5的换电服务,AR/VR眼镜和可按月开通的自动驾驶技术?还有特斯拉树立的高端电动车,高性能电动车形象是不是深入你心?其实选车中一些的烦恼,还是来自于钱包。大家想要的太多,但是预算太少。其实ET5是蔚来的第二款轿车,距离第一款轿车ET7的发布已经快1年时间了。ET7的定价是44.8-52.6万,这次ET5的定价是32.8-38.6万。从车型大小,车辆性能与配置的定位,大家一看就明白了,这就相当于是特斯拉Model S和Model 3之间的关系。那么ET5的定价是否合理呢?ET5定了32.8万的起售价,肯定很多人觉得有点飘了,比Model 3的26.674万起售价贵了6万。有人说了,这是补贴前的售价,而且换电车型不受30万以上没有补贴的限制。的确是这样,但是按照明年新能源车补贴幅度下滑30%来看,ET5就算补贴1万多,总价还是在31-37万,不会对消费决策有什么本质影响。在我身边遇到的很多纠结蔚来和特斯拉的客户,他们对这两个品牌都有满意和不满意的地方。但最终让很多人放弃特斯拉的,可能是简陋的内饰,或者是无法接受的单踏板操作模式。而让客户放弃蔚来车型的理由,我遇到最多的就是对于他的销售方式,感觉套路太多,客户觉得自己一直在被一套精密的计算方式带着走。比如,32.8万只是ET5的起售价,但是如果你真的下单,你会发现橙色卡钳3500元、Moon主题外观套件4500元、NOMI人工智能4900元、适享套装9500元、Nappa高级内饰22500元、超纤绒顶棚6500元。所以有消费者跟我说,他低头看配置单的时候,以为抬起头来眼前是台保时捷。而特斯拉就没有这么多选装,买起来不用那么纠结。除此之外,就是服务的费用。这也是让很多刚从燃油车转换到电动车的时候,非常不理解的地方。买车就买车,为什么还要买服务?况且蔚来的付费服务,还分成服务无忧和能量无忧两个套餐。一看花费,又是1万多没了。而客户又听说蔚来最大的特色就是服务,不花这钱,就感觉买了台不完整的车。所以,基本8成以上客户都买了服务。所以ET5,你把选装和服务算上,大家看看总价是多少钱?换句话说,买ET5的预算远超Model 3这一点希望大家提前知道。可能有人会说,那不是还有一个Baas方案吗?25.8万只是买车,电池租用,按月付费,75千瓦时的电池月费980元,100千瓦时的电池月费1480元。如果没买服务无忧,那就在此基础上再加80元。以32.8万的起售价来算,25.8万等于直减7万。这样看起来是舒服多了,跟特斯拉Model 3的入门款26.674万比,也便宜了不少。可是,每个月还有980元的电池月费要还。有很多人觉得,一是买电车就为了省用车成本,现在反而每个月还要花1000多在电池和服务上,感觉还没有燃油车划算呢;二是一共就省了7万块钱,一年租电池费用1万2,租到第六年等于买了块电池,到时候继续付电池月费就会十分不划算。其实,这账算得太明白了,你反而会难受。Baas方案本质上就是给蔚来汽车增加一个特色而已,只有具备换电前提的车企才能在销售的时候车电分离,而目前市面上就他一家这么做。说到底,Baas方案就是让换电车型的门槛更低, 把换电成本分摊到了后期的使用成本里,入门门槛越低,他的用户就越多,他的换电站才有人去使用,使用的人越多,成本就越低,最后行成一个正循环。所以,买蔚来车型的人,不走Baas方案我是很难理解的,这其实是厂家补贴政策,你也可以理解成是给你的贴息优惠,结果你给放弃了。然后车价固定不变,你还追着销售问能不能再给点优惠。我是可以理解蔚来的Baas销售策略,但是我不能理解NAD自动驾驶功能“按月开通、按月付费”,服务费680元/月,这是什么骚操作?我实在是看不懂。按此我相信对于月薪5、6千的人恐怕是更难理解,这680元买的到底是个啥?就是为了体验一下他的19项辅助驾驶功能吗?有人说月薪5、6千能开的起ET5吗?哎,你别小看人家。30万的BBA车型,贷款首付也就10几万,保险可以买少点,平时可以少开点,保养只做最基本的,人家照样可以开的起。可是买了蔚来,无忧服务,电池月费,NAD自动驾驶功能月服务费,是不是让在座各位倍感压力?有压力就说明你不是蔚来的客户群,目前蔚来客户质量真的相当高,我参加过几次车主活动,遇到了好几位熟人,都是财务自由或者接近自由的老板。当然,创业的车主肯定也有,企业上班的车主也有。但总体来说,要跟着蔚来这群车主一起玩,你的经济实力和社会背景一定要相当奥利给。不然,就算你在蔚来的社群里,大概率也只是一个隐形人,凑数而已。所以,有些人说蔚来卖的不仅是车,实际上是高质量的社群。我这里给大家加一句,你不是高质量人类,进入了高质量社群也没有意义。这次ET5还玩了个全景数字座舱的概念,号称是搭载了AR/VR技术。结果一看发布会的介绍,我大跌眼镜,原来是跟第三方公司开发了一款AR眼镜,可投射出视距6米,等效201英寸的超大屏幕。还有与第三方合作开发的 VR Glasses光学镜片,可实现双目4k显示。估计很多人都看懵了,啥意思?你让我开车的时候带上这幅AR/VR眼镜?用它来侦测一下隔壁车友的战斗力?确定战斗力比我低,就直接加塞到它前面去?开个玩笑,当然不是这样。蔚来高管说这只是在停车之后,给副驾用来娱乐的,核心理念就是突破车内屏幕的极限。我觉得他说的话没有错,回头我就下单买个小米VR眼镜,才几百块钱,让我的车也增添一个新功能,大家赶紧去评论区夸我是个大聪明。最后我们再聊一聊这台车的数据,长宽高和轴距,ET5都大Model 3一点点,4790mm的长度,2888mm的轴距,前后双电机,最大输出总功率360kW,峰值扭矩700N·m,百公里加速4.3秒。选装高性能刹车,百公里到零制动距离33.9米。了解过新能源车的人,看到这些数据都已经麻木了。30万级的电动车是最内卷的,空间、配置、性能、品牌调性一个都不能少,最后还要便宜,还要套路少,对外宣传还一句话都不能说错,不然就会被车主反水。正所谓爱之深责之切,之前极氪001刚上市好评如潮,现如今提车客户陆续增多,车机吐槽一片连着一片。所以ET5未来会怎样,还不得而知,但目前来看反响并不是那么强烈,这不一定是好事,也不会是什么坏事。至少有李斌“想不通为什么还有人买燃油车”这个热门事件,带动了ET5的曝光,该买的自然还是会买的。最后,跟第一次接触新造车势力卖车模式的朋友介绍一下订车的方式。ET5公布售价后,现阶段在网上支付2000元属于“小定”,或者说是“预定金”,主要是为了锁定首批车主的权益,比如赠送价值8000元的设计套装、老车主还可以获得30000积分或50000积分,还有什么10年不限里程免费质保、终身免费换电、免费救援、免费专属充电桩等等。如果你不交小定,这里面很多权益,后期就不会给你。小定,就好比去饭店吃饭在门口拿的小票,用来排队等号。小定期间,配置是可以更改,甚至预定金也可以退回的。然后等厂家正式生产出来这款车,他就会宣布大定的日期。比如蔚来ET7,去年1月就公布价格开始小定,11月正式下线,12月公布明年1月20日开启大定,也就是官方说的“锁单”。锁单的概念,就是让你补足定金,你原来小定2000元,现在再补18000元,等于大定2万,你交的越早提车时间越早。有些人比较犹豫,一直没摸到车,想等ET7到店试驾后再决定,那也行。反正2000元小定揣在厂家兜里,从心态上讲,他主动你被动。只要你补足大定的尾款,锁单成功后就不能更改配置了,更别想退单了。我也曾遇到大定第二天就后悔的,来找我帮忙协调。我说现在这些新造车势力,都是直营模式,你去店里吵闹都没用,不像以前在4s店,闹的凶一点,总经理出面签个字,就把订单给你退了。目前,我还没有看到有蔚来和特斯拉,有客户闹退单,私下给解决的案例。所以,大定的时候各位一定要谨慎。今天聊了这么多关于蔚来ET5我的理解,总结来讲,大家以为他与特斯拉Model 3是对手,实际上,他俩是队友。因为电动车的豪华品牌不可能一家独大,特斯拉和蔚来都希望对方更好,他俩也一直在共同开发欧洲的电动车市场。所以,国内特斯拉和蔚来的对立面,毫无疑问是奔驰、宝马和奥迪。每卖出去一台ET5或者Model 3,百分百BBA这三家就要少一台车的销量,这绝对是零和博弈,必须拼到你死我活。可以添加微信46415254加入我们的社群音频图文更新在订阅号: 百车全说每期抽三条留言,每人赠168元的“芥末绿”燃油添加剂一瓶点击订阅,每周三,周六更新会有提醒新听友可以搜索:百车全说2014,百车全说2015,百车全说2016,往期300多个小时的节目可供收听

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 812. Apple's latest OS updates arrive. 27-inch iMac update in "Spring". Apple TV+ gets first Russian-language show. Mega-MP upgrade coming to iPhone 14?. Archive, the "other" backup. Use case for AR/VR headset. Thing of the Moment: Merlin Bird ID. TOTM Bonus: Notchmeister. Special thanks to our sponsors: LinkedIn Jobs Coinbase BetterHelp Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1315: NIO launches mid-size ET5 | 20 Dec 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 21:59


Show #1315 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 20th December. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. A new Producer ADESOJI AJAO A new Executive Producer THOMAS COOK A new Executive Producer MATTI JOUHKIMO NIO LAUNCHES MID-SIZE CAR ET5 - Chinese smart electric vehicle maker NIO has launched a new mid-size car featuring a “digital cockpit” that is squarely aimed at Tesla's popular Model 3. - The ET5 meanwhile is NIO's fifth production model since it was established in 2014. - The model due to launch next year is fitted with a 75 kilowatt-hour (kWh) battery that can go as far as 550km on a single charge. - The long range version powered by a 100kWh battery has a driving range of 700km, while the ultralong range model carrying a 150kWh battery can go 1,000km. NIO has not unveiled the prices of the higher range versions. Original Source : https://www.scmp.com/business/china-business/article/3160292/nio-launches-mid-size-car-eye-teslas-market-leading-model-3 Chinese electric car start-up Nio reveals a new sedan AR VR glasses - Chinese electric car company Nio revealed Saturday a new sedan and custom augmented reality (AR) glasses that reduce the need for in-car screens. - Nio said it partnered with Chinese augmented reality start-up Nreal for the AR glasses that go with its new sedan, the ET5. - The electric car is set to begin deliveries in September 2022, with pre-subsidy prices starting at 328,000 yuan ($51,250) for models that come with a battery. - Next year, the electric car company plans to bring its products and services to Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and Denmark Original Source : https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/18/chinese-electric-car-start-up-nio-reveals-a-new-sedan-ar-vr-glasses.html NIO unveils new mid-size ET5 electric sedan; up to 1,000km with 150 kWh pack - Inheriting NIO's high-performance DNA, the 360 kW ET5 accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h in 4.3 seconds with its dual-motor architecture (150 kW induction asynchronous motor in the front and 210 kW permanent magnet motor at the rear to offer a peak torque 700 N·m). - ET5 comes with the latest NIO Autonomous Driving (NAD). With NIO Aquila Super Sensing and NIO Adam Super Computing, ET5 will gradually achieve a safe and reassuring autonomous driving experience for scenarios such as highways, urban areas, parking and battery swapping. - In 2022, NIO will continue to expand its charging and swapping network. By the end of 2022, NIO will have in total more than 1,300 Power Swap stations, 6,000 Power Chargers and 10,000 destination chargers across China Original Source : https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/12/20211219-nio.html 2023 AUDI E-TRON GETTING FRESH LOOKS AND A BIGGER BATTERY FOR IMPROVED RANGE - Audi's flagship electric SUV, the e-tron, is up for a facelift in the latter half of 2022 alongside its e-tron Sportback sibling, bringing subtle visual tweaks but important updates on the technical front - The redesigned front bumper will feature a new Singleframe grille with a honeycomb pattern, and different intakes. The camouflage on front/rear fenders, and side sills, could hint at a new style for the plastic cladding. Headlights and taillights are expected to integrate the latest tech from Audi's parts bin, while retaining an identical outer shape. Finally, the lower part of the rear bumper will also be tweaked. - The most important changes in the facelifted e-tron will occur under the skin. According to a report from a few months ago, the updated SUV could offer a 373-mile (600 km) range thanks to the adoption of new generation batteries, more efficient electric motors, and an improved energy recuperation system. If this number is confirmed, it will signal a huge improvement over the up to 274 miles (441 km) WLTP range of the current model which is considered to be one of its main weaknesses over the competition. Original Source : https://www.carscoops.com/2021/12/2023-audi-e-tron-facelift-spied-testing-in-cold-weather/ EV TAX CREDITS: MANCHIN A NO ON BUILD BACK BETTER BILL, PUTTING $12,500 INCENTIVE IN DOUBT - President' Biden's Build Back Better bill is on life support following comments from West Virginia's Democratic Senator Joe Manchin. During an interview on Sunday, the senator said he plans to vote no on the spending plan, which includes a $12,500 refundable tax credit for electric vehicle purchases. - The base amount remains $4,000, as it is today, with another $3,500 available if the EV's battery pack includes at least 40 kilowatt-hours of capacity. - EVs and consumers will be able to qualify for another $4,500 in the tax credit if an automaker makes the EV in the US with a union workforce. Another $500 comes into play for automakers using a US-made battery, for a maximum of $12,500 available. - Biden needs every single Democrat to vote yes on the bill, which would allow Vice President Kamala Harris to break a tie in the senate. There is no Republican support for the bill. The president remains keen to incentivize EV purchases as part of a $555 billion investment into actions to combat climate change, also part of the bill. Original Source : https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/ev-tax-credit-manchin-build-back-better/ CHINA EV TEARDOWN: A $4,500 'ALTERNATIVE TO WALKING' - At 28,800 yuan ($4,500), the Hongguang Mini EV has become a big seller in certain Chinese cities and villages. In Japan, a Nagoya University professor disassembled the electric vehicle to discover what kind of alchemy the manufacturer used to set such a low price. - Rather than wizardry, professor Masayoshi Yamamoto discovered a neat trick that SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile pulled off -- the use of cheap, not-so-durable parts put together in a way that makes them easy to replace. - The Mini EV has no regenerative braking system, which has greatly reduced its cost. - The electric vehicle also forgoes a liquid cooling system for the motor and other parts in favor of an air-cooled system. Since the power semiconductor inside the inverter and other electronic components are affected by heat, the inverter's expected life span has been set at eight years, or 120,000 km. - Buyers can think of the Hongguang Mini EV as a cheap electric vehicle prone to breaking down but easy to fix. SAIC-GM-Wuling calls it "an alternative to walking." Original Source : https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Automobiles/China-EV-teardown-A-4-500-alternative-to-walking EGYPT TO BUILD $20K ELECTRIC VEHICLE IN COLLABORATION WITH CHINESE FIRM - Egypt has ordered a state-owned company to work with a Chinese firm to build affordable electric vehicles priced at 315,000 Egyptian pounds ($20,000). - Egyptian authorities have approached three potential companies to partner with the state-owned automobile company El Nasr Automotive Manufacturing on the project. - Vehicle production is planned to start in 2023, with annual output set to rise to 20,000 in the next three years Original Source : https://www.arabnews.com/node/1989666/business-economy TESLA TO EXPAND SUPERCHARGER STATIONS BY 31% IN 2022 - Tesla continues to increase the number of charging stations around the world, as its car fleet grows by hundreds of thousands annually and this trend will only continue to increase. By the end of 2022, the company plans to expand the Supercharger Network by 31% - The company currently has 3,382 Supercharger stations worldwide with over 30,000 stalls, and are planning to build 1,047 more—adding no less than 10,000 new stalls. - According to the current data, Canada has the most technologically advanced Supercharger Network in the world with the largest number of new generation, V3 stalls. Currently, 37.4% of the Tesla Supercharger Network are V3 chargers and their benefits are most enjoyed by residents of Canada. 48.1% of all Superchargers in Canada are V3 chargers. Next comes China with 42.9%, followed by South Korea with 42.1%. Original Source : https://www.tesmanian.com/blogs/tesmanian-blog/tesla-to-expand-charging-stations-by-31-by-the-end-of-2022-anatomy-of-a-supercharger-network THIS APP LETS YOU RUN ANDROID AUTO ON A TESLA OVER THE BROWSER Original Source : https://www.xda-developers.com/teslaa-android-auto-on-tesla-cars/ ENEL X EXPANDS IN CANADA'S EV HOME CHARGING MARKET Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2021/12/19/enel-x-expands-in-canadas-ev-home-charging-market/ COLD TEMPERATURES AFFECT AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE'S DRIVING RANGE Original Source : https://www.consumerreports.org/hybrids-evs/how-much-do-cold-temperatures-affect-an-evs-driving-range-a5751769461/ TESLA VEHICLES LOSE FAR LESS RANGE IN COLD WEATHER THAN OTHER EVS Original Source : https://www.tesmanian.com/blogs/tesmanian-blog/tesla-vehicles-lose-less-range-in-cold-weather-than-others-testing-shows EV CHARGING STATIONS AREN'T ALWAYS IN BEST LOCATIONS FOR NIGHT USERS   Original Source : https://eu.freep.com/story/money/cars/mark-phelan/2021/12/11/ev-charger-stations-locations/8859737002/ DOBBIES GARDEN CENTRES CHARGE PARKS WITH GRIDSERVE  Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2021/12/16/dobbies-garden-centres-charge-parks-with-gridserve QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM Returns in 2022.  Email me a suggestion for a possible question and I might pick yours!  hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM

Inside Facebook Mobile
36: Developer Experience with Chandrika

Inside Facebook Mobile

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 43:28


Keeping engineers effective is not a small task when you work at Meta's scale. Many of the tools you take for granted simply break or become unbearably slow. Chandrika's team looks after developer experience at Meta and takes a holistic approach that spans the editing experience (IDEs, editors), builds, continuous integration and even custom calendar tooling. Her team ensures that as new platforms, for instance AR/VR, and languages like Swift and Kotlin emerge, our infrastructure is ready. Got feedback? Send it to us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/insidefbmobile), Instagram (https://instagram.com/insidefbmobile) and don't forget to follow our host @passy (https://twitter.com/passy). Fancy working with us? Check out https://facebookcareers.com. Links: The Diff Podcast: https://thediffpodcast.com/docs/episode-10/ Meta Connect Keynote: https://fb.watch/9YydoWHMEE/ Jest: https://jestjs.io/   Timestamps: Intro 0:06 News: The Diff is back 1:25 Chandrika before Meta 1:50 Meta vs other Megacorps 9:57 DevEx at Meta 12:05 Different Dev Infra Teams 23:18 Unexpected Challenges 26:45 Kotlin & Swift 30:34 Measuring Developer Experience 35:53 App Health & Perf 37:46 Cross-App Dev 40:12 Outro 42:17

商界早知道|一早速览商业事
12月17日【商界早知道】中央明确不救助地方隐性债务;全球债务规模创新高

商界早知道|一早速览商业事

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 6:25


今日聚焦【是否拿国债置换地方债务?财政部回应】对于是否拿中央债务置换地方债务的问题,近日,财政部副部长许宏才表示:这个问题要审慎研究,不是一个简单的事。我知道有些国家做过这样的事情,效果并不好,我们目前没有这样的安排,就是要把地方政府债务风险坚决防范好、化解掉。此外,2022年提前批专项债额度1.46万亿,将在明年一季度发行使用;对于隐性债务,坚持中央不救助原则,做到“谁家的孩子谁抱”。【百亿私募大佬信中利汪潮涌失联】12月16日午间,新三板公司信中利公告,公司实际控制人汪超涌失联,相关情况尚待确认。据最新消息,汪超涌已于2021年11月30日因涉嫌职务侵占被朝阳经侦带走。汪超涌是私募市场知名大佬级人物,于1999年创办信中利,是中国最早VC/PE机构之一,于2015年10月挂牌新三板。然而,从2016年开始在资本市场运作失败,丧失公司控制权,最终官司缠身、泥潭深陷。【俞敏洪罗振宇聊大厂35岁现象:特别扭曲】近日,俞敏洪和罗振宇聊大厂的35岁现象。罗振宇认为人的大脑40岁才达到巅峰状态,还没成为最好的自己就被市场“从电池仓里抠出来扔掉”。俞敏洪认为这种现象与现代社会的飞速发展和年轻人对现代产业更快速的理解有关。 企业动态 【童话大王将停刊,郑渊洁要拿全部精力维权】12月16日,郑渊洁宣布《童话大王》将于2022年1月停刊,原因是他笔下高知名度的文学角色,皮皮鲁、舒克、贝塔、舒克贝塔等,遭某些商家恶意抢注商标。目前,共有672个侵权商标。郑渊洁称要拿出全部精力去维权。”1985年《童话大王》创刊,在长达36年的时间里,郑渊洁是这本杂志的唯一撰稿人,他曾是中国作家版税收入最高的作家。【还完债就上场!罗永浩将进军AR和VR】12月16日凌晨,@罗永浩 在微博与网友互动时,透露自己重返科技行业后将会从事VR、AR、MR。此前锤子论坛下线时,罗永浩曾在微博回复网友称:明年春天就重返科技行业了,而且是还完债的当天就会回去。【银保监会通报华夏银行侵权情况】中国银保监近日发布通报指出,华夏银行存在互联网贷款利率宣传不规范等违法违规问题。其中,华夏银行开展互联网贷款业务时,对实际利率展示不全面、片面宣传低利率,侵害消费者知情权。客户实际承担的年化综合资金成本最高是宣传利率的2.5倍,且产品上线以来无客户享受最低宣传利率。【涉嫌信披违规,中公教育被证监会立案】中公教育公告,公司于12月15日收到证监会《立案告知书》,因涉嫌未按规定披露关联交易信息披露违法违规,中国证监会决定对公司立案。【黑人牙膏改名好来,此前被质疑种族歧视】近日,好来集团发布“品牌焕新计划”,其旗下黑人牙膏将启用公司创始中文名字“好来”,更好地诠释“美好因笑容而来”的品牌理念。此前,黑人牙膏屡次被质疑“种族歧视”。该品牌由宁波商人严柏林、严中立创建于上海,1985年被高露洁收购50%股份,现股东是高露洁和好来(台企外资)。【重庆市政府与理想汽车签署战略合作框架协议】12月15日,重庆市长唐良智会见理想汽车董事长兼CEO李想一行,重庆市与理想汽车签署了战略合作框架协议。唐良智说,重庆将全力为理想汽车提供服务保障,积极支持理想汽车在渝发展壮大。(证券时报)【明月镜片上市,为中国镜片首家IPO】12月16日,明月镜片股份有限公司在创业板挂牌上市,成为注册制背景下中国镜片首家IPO企业。截止收盘,明月镜片报67.09元,涨幅149.31%,总市值90.13亿元。【小米私募股权基金完成备案登记】中国证券投资基金业协会网站信息显示,小米私募股权基金管理有限公司已于12月13日正式完成备案登记。公示信息显示,公司成立于2021年5月7日,目前在管基金数量为0。 产业纵深【短视频不得随意剪辑影视剧,电影解说等或将消失】12月15日,中国网络视听协会发布《网络短视频内容审核标准细则》(2021)。发布的一百多条标准规定中,第93条:短视频不得未经授权自行剪切、改编影视剧及各类节目片段最引人关注。这可能意味着一度风靡全网的“几分钟看完一部电影”,以后不能做了。【商务部:海运不畅、芯片供应短缺等问题短期内难以根本缓解】12月16日,商务部新闻发言人束珏婷表示,今年以来,面对新冠疫情冲击,中国外贸依然展现了强劲韧性,实现较快增长。但当前外贸发展仍然面临诸多不确定不稳定不均衡因素,全球疫情起伏反复、国际形势错综复杂,海运不畅、芯片供应短缺等问题短期内难以根本缓解,企业综合成本居高不下,外贸运行面临较大压力。(第一财经)【IMF:2020年全球债务规模创新高】国际货币基金组织(IMF)15日发布的数据显示,受新冠疫情和全球经济衰退影响,2020年全球债务规模达到创纪录的226万亿美元。这是自第二次世界大战结束以来全球债务增加最多的一年,全球债务与GDP之比上升28个百分点至256%。其中,发达经济体公共债务上升尤为明显。 国际视野【世卫组织称新冠肺炎大流行有望明年结束】当地时间15日,世卫组织卫生紧急项目技术主管玛丽亚·范·科霍夫在新闻发布会上表示,目前已有77个国家和地区报告了“奥密克戎”毒株的感染病例,而其他一些国家可能也有病例,但“只是尚未检测到而已”。不过她同时也表示,在现有防疫手段能广泛应用的前提下,如果能继续控制新冠病毒的传播并减少死亡率,新冠肺炎大流行“非常有希望”在2022年结束。【马斯克称要成美国纳税第一人,金额超所有美国人】近日,马斯克和美国州参议员伊丽莎白·沃伦在关于富豪交税问题发生争论。当地时间12月15日,马斯克称“只需睁开眼睛2秒钟,就能知道我今年的纳税金额将超过历史上任何一个美国人“。据外媒报道,今年马斯克需纳税至少76亿美元。

Vhite Rabbit Podcast
Episode 042 with Alon Grinshpoon - Echo3D, AR & VR in the Cloud, Metaverse and Entrepreneurship

Vhite Rabbit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 40:31


Alon Grinshpoon is a founder and the CEO of Echo3D, a 3D-ready cloud platform to manage and deliver 3D, AR and VR content. We chat about XR on the web and how it applies to even the seemingly most unrelated industries, cloud streaming of XR content and finally some tips for entrepreneurs in the WebXR space. We also touch on NFTs and the Metaverse. Links https://www.echo3d.co/ - Echo3D website https://www.coindesk.com/policy/2021/11/19/why-barbados-metaverse-embassy-matters/ - "Why Barbados' Metaverse Embassy Matters" https://twitter.com/_echo3D_ - Echo3D on twitter https://www.linkedin.com/company/echo3D/ - Echo3D on LinkedIn https://twitter.com/AlonGrinshpoon - Alon on twitter

Thoughts of a Random Citizen
44. This Isn't Capitalism Anymore - AR, VR, Web 3 & Perspective w/ Zac Juergensen (Part 2)

Thoughts of a Random Citizen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 44:54


This is part two of my interview with Zac Juergensen where we talk about things like Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, useful applications for them and the potentials of them in connection with our society moving forward. We tie that conversation into Web 3.0 and the pros and cons of centralized and decentralized versions of the Web 3. We talk a bit more about the market, investing and a broader perspective of a world view. If you haven't already, you'll want to check out part one before listening to this episode!! Thoughts of a Random Citizen is a podcast oriented around open ideas, entrepreneurship, politics, investing, philosophy, travel and an odd take on history. From studying accounting in university to a real-estate venture after graduating, Hugh (the host) finally decided to travel the world. While still traveling and currently living in Barcelona, his focus now is to share with you all, a wider perspective on all things... life. Check out Home | Thoughts of a Random Citizen (toarcunited.com) for more about how to get involved with the podcast, leads on investment opportunities, travel tips, topical news, or entrepreneurial aspirations.How to Find Zach:Patron DIY WealthInstagram 

Inside Outside
Ep. 277 - Melissa Vincent, ED of Pipeline Entrepreneurial Fellowship on Helping Midwest Startups Grow & Thrive

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 32:05


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Melissa Vincent, Executive Director of Pipeline Entrepreneurial Fellowship. This recording was part of our IO Live series and Melissa and I sit down and talk about the people, the resources, and the companies making the Midwest a great place for startups to grow and prosper. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation, is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Melissa Vincent, Executive Director of Pipeline Entrepreneurial FellowshipBrian Ardinger: Welcome to Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest with us today. This is part of our IO Live series, which is our virtual conversation series to talk innovation and entrepreneurship. Part of our Inside Outside platform, where we have our podcast and newsletter and ongoing events like this. So I'm super excited to host Melissa today. Melissa is a good friend. She's the Executive Director of Pipeline. So welcome to the show, Melissa. Melissa Vincent: Brian, thank you so much. I love it when I get to chat with you. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited about this conversation. Before we get too far. I always like to thank our sponsors. Today our sponsor is the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. They are a private nonpartisan foundation based in the Kansas City, Missouri. They seek to build inclusive prosperity through entrepreneur focused economic development. They've been a huge help to a lot of things going on, including Pipeline. I believe they're a sponsor for. If people are interested in finding out more about Kauffman, go to kauffman.org or check them out @KauffmanFDN on Facebook and Twitter.And so huge shout out to our sponsors for making things like this happen. And having conversations that make Midwest Entrepreneurs even better. I was gonna say, you're new to Pipeline, but you were new from the standpoint of you started working at Pipeline right before the pandemic. It seems like that's a short time ago, but it seems now we're what, almost two years into this thing. So it's exactly, exactly the pandemic years. But I wanted to have you on, because I think Pipeline has been one of those proven things in the ecosystem that has helped entrepreneurs across the Midwest here. And I wanted to get you on to talk about, you know, what have you seen? What's different and, and more importantly, what's going to happen moving forward. So maybe let's start the conversation with, tell us a little bit about what Pipeline is. For those who may not know that and where we're at right now. Melissa Vincent: I would love to. Yes. So I have been there for, as you mentioned, it'll be two years next month. So it's kind of crazy because it feels sometimes like six months and other times it feels like 10 years because of the pandemic. So you never know. So Pipeline is a fellowship for high- growth entrepreneurs in the Midwest. We are industry agnostic. So we do everything from Bio to Ag. You name it, everything in between. And do not take equity in the organizations that we work with. And so we're different in that way as well. And we focus on serial entrepreneurs because they have the greatest economic impact on the region, when you focus on someone who's going to get right back up, if they have a failure. And if they succeed, they're going to get back up, start another company and invest in the community. Brian Ardinger: Pipeline's been around for a number of years. It was actually started even prior to me starting Nmotion and that. I think you have over 140 or a 150 entrepreneurs that have gone through the program. Had had an economic benefit. 2,700 employees I think are, are based in Kansas and Missouri and Nebraska because of the founders that have been part of Pipeline. Your founders have raised over $600 million in capital since joining Pipeline. And it's a flywheel approach. So, you know what started 10 or 15 years ago. Now we're seeing some of the fruits of that payoff. So tell us a little bit about how you got involved in Pipeline. Melissa Vincent: Pipeline was started 14 years ago. It was started by Joni Cobb and a number of key people kind of in the Midwest. She was the CEO. And the idea was that there was such, as you mentioned, like 14 years ago, we were in such a different place.There weren't all the entrepreneur support organizations that we have now. And so, you know, when she started the organization, it was around this idea that if you came and you brought resources from the coast to the Midwest. And you focus specifically on serial entrepreneurs to have a massive impact on the region because of what we talked about earlier, they're going to reinvest, they're going to get back up, start another company. And that was really true. So over the last 14 years, our members are not just creating jobs. They're creating really high paying jobs. So average salary for an employee of one of our members is $52,000. So they're creating great jobs. They're creating a lot of them. And they're raising capital and they are staying here in the Midwest.And so really over 14 years, that whole concept that we were seeing, if it could be proved or not, if you bring in these resources, what impact would that have if you focused on serial entrepreneurs is proven. So it's like, okay, successful, we've done that. That's really amazing. But then it becomes the question of 14 years later, how things changed. Like to your point, we've had, with the pandemic and we've had social injustice that's been ongoing that really came to a head last year.So we have all these different things that happened over the past few years. And so I think for us as an organization, we've really looked at well, how do we respond to that? And I think there's a lot of other entrepreneurial support organizations that are doing the same. How do we step in. How do we be a part of that progress and change that really needs to happen? That's where Pipeline is headed. But we couldn't have gotten there without the legacy that was started 14 years ago, by bringing in all these resources and creating some amazing fellowship programs. Brian Ardinger: It's been a very important piece of the puzzle. When I started Nmotion, I think it was 10 years ago, ish. It was the first accelerator in Nebraska at the time that's a equity based accelerator. But we quickly wanted to tie ourselves with Pipeline and get our founders an opportunity to move through the Pipeline. And you find those early stage founders. You get them a little bit of capital. You surround them with mentors and investment capital.We help build that. And then you also then connect them into a wider network. I think that was one of the most important things about like an Nmotion is, you know, we started in Lincoln, Nebraska. But we realized quickly that you can't build a startup ecosystem by yourself. In just the four walls of your own county or city.And so how do we create opportunities for those founders to make network connections that can help them grow their business wherever they end up. And, you know, we've had some great founders that went through Pipeline. Brett Byman who started with Nobl. And now he's with another company, BasicBlock.You mentioned that serial net nature of entrepreneurs. Vishal Singh with Quantified Ag. Liz Whitaker with Pawlytics and that. And now with Brooke Mullen who's with Sapahn and she came through the GBeta Program with Gener8tor that we're now working with. So those are just some of the things, but maybe let's talk about some of the success stories of some of the Pipeline Entrepreneurs that have had success based on having access to your program.Melissa Vincent: Yeah. You know, one of the things that, you know, we're really looking for when we're investing is we're looking at high growth. So they're already at a decent place. And then we're really trying to help them get to that next phase of growth to hopefully, like we said, either exit or re invest in their community.And so some of those are ones that everyone kind of in the Midwest, you know, your Toby Rush with EyeVerify. So everyone kind of always thinks of Pipeline. They're like, oh, that was, you know, Toby went through that. But the thing that I love is that we have so many other organizations. So a couple that people know of that may not have realized that their founders went through Pipeline is ShotTracker Davion Roth.So that's a company that is still ongoing. Doing massive things. In the news. Part of Pipeline program back in the early days. Another one, let's go to Nebraska here. We have Blake Lawrence with Opendorse. Oh my goodness. Since the NIL law changes, like, I mean, he already was killing it. But now it's like, those are just like set him in a whole other trajectory because he can capitalize on college sports now and college athletes.So there've been these really successful founders. And I think that there's a lot of different pieces that in the ecosystem, like what you're doing and what Pipeline's doing. It takes more than just one organization to be able to provide the support. You really need layers to that. So you need some groups that are a little bit earlier stage. And then you have Pipeline which fits in this very unique role of serial entrepreneurs who are high growth, who are looking to exit and give back.It's a very unique spot that we fill. And so really trying to figure out how do we support each other. And I think that's kind of in the Midwest, what everyone's looking at right now. So it's like, we have organizations like yours that have been around for 10 years. Pipeline is fourteen. Like these established organizations that are now looking and saying, okay, we've done this. How do we work better together? Because if we work well together, we can do even more. So I think that's kind of the shift that's starting to happen. And I don't know if it's the pandemic that was part of like, kind of being the catalyst to that. Realizing that we all needed each other. And we needed, our entrepreneurs need more support than one organization could give solo. But when you combine forces, we can do so much more.Brian Ardinger: So let's talk about the program itself. So obviously there are specific things about the program. You go through things over the course of your year, and that. I think most people think of Pipeline and think of the value that's created from the network that's been established and the access to that network. But talk a little bit about the program itself. Melissa Vincent: When you're a Fellow In the program. You go through four modules a year. And those are really intense three day workshops, basically. And they are focused on helping you really scale your company. So the first module that they go through is understanding who your target customer is. Which these are all going to sound very like early stage.They're not. I mean, they're digging in super deep to analyze this information. So finding your target customer. The second one is all about your business model. And making sure that you have the right business model now that you know who your target customer should be. And the third is telling your story through your financials.Which, in all honesty is probably the one that everyone fears the most. Because one understanding your financials is one thing. Telling your story through your financials. Nobody wants to do that. And then when they get through that module, they are just able to easily tell the story through their financials.And then the fourth we just wrapped in St. Louis. Was about telling your story and what's your why? So taking all of the things that you learn throughout the year. Putting that into basically a pitch for an investor or a potential client. And being able to tell the entire story of your company in one single pitch. Brian Ardinger: One of the interesting things, because I've been a mentor in Pipeline for a long time, and I've seen the evolution of how these companies kinda go through that. And you mentioned things like just that customer discovery piece, for example, your business model. I think a lot of times we forget that that's not necessarily something that all entrepreneurs understand or know or use.And oftentimes just having that forced function of let's re evaluate, let's make sure that we are in the right business. And we have the right metrics. The right things that are going on can do such a powerful thing to an entrepreneur because it kind of levels the system, especially when you're surrounded with other entrepreneurs and other business models and that. It gets them thinking and doing things differently.Melissa Vincent: And we certainly saw that in the pandemic where I think as entrepreneurs we're hit across the board, just like everyone else, but realizing when you're the one who is out there as an entrepreneur, It comes to you. It's so, it is lonely at the top. It's especially lonely when you're a serial entrepreneur, because we do think a little bit differently.It's that whole like, ah, knock me down. I'll get right back up and start something else. And if I succeed, I'm gonna put myself through this all over again. But I think that in the pandemic, what we really saw was the value of that network and that connection. And really being able to lean on other people who were struggling.But because this isn't a program where you go through, and yes, you've gone through that program, but that's it, you become a member. And you're part of this pipeline family. They were really able to lean in and support each other in a very unique way. And obviously Pipeline provided resources, and we did a lot of stuff around mental health and wellness.However, that support of that network was so powerful. And you could really see it during the pandemic. Cause there was a safe space to be able to talk about things that you were struggling with, that had they not had that network maybe wouldn't have come up or they wouldn't have felt comfortable talking about. Brian Ardinger: Well, I think everybody was in that boat. Reevaluating what they're doing for who they were doing it for, et cetera, et cetera. We've got a number of people in the audience. If anybody has a question from the audience, feel free to type it in the chat, or there's a great feature in this Run the World called Grab the Mic.So you can also click the little microphone button and come on stage with us and ask your question directly. Happy to do that. So, yes, we're excited to make this a little bit more interactive. So we talked a little bit about ecosystems. So talk about the different ecosystems that you support. You know, you're in Kansas, you're in Missouri, you're in Nebraska. And obviously the cities are involved. Talk a little bit about the differences in the ecosystems and where you draw your entrepreneurs from. Melissa Vincent: You nailed it. Thank you for you have exactly right. So we are Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri. And I think everyone always asks the question, like, are you guys planning to expand further? Yes, we may at some point. However, right now there is so much like attention. Resources that we know we need to provide just on that three state region, that it's super important that we stay there. But those are the areas that we look at. We are actually, we just finished. We've just closed our apps for recruiting. Had in all honesty, the best turnout we've had in years. I mean, it's interesting because at some point you don't know, during the pandemic are people really starting companies. You know, for some, it might be a really difficult time to start a company, but that's such a great, you know, response from that. And we're super excited about that. We see a lot of pockets. So we have Wichita pockets. We have Lincoln Omaha pockets. We have St. Louis pockets. And then obviously Kansas city on both sides. And so we see a lot of people coming from there. I think as far as how the different regions, and the only I can really compare it to, because I feel like I've become entrenched over the last two years here in our three state region.But when I look at like Oklahoma or some areas that aren't part of that really strong network of ESOs or Entrepreneur Support Organizations. You know, Oklahoma is further behind than let's say Kansas or Nebraska, and certainly St. Louis. I think part of that is because they have not brought in outside organizations to come in and help them establish some of the entrepreneurial groups that you need. You need more than just one group within a region. And again, when you've been doing it, as long as you know, we have here and in Nebraska and certainly in Missouri, I think that that's where you're able to, you've been doing it for a while. You realize where you play well, and then you find other people to compliment. And I think when you look at other regions who aren't there yet, they're just trying to figure out who do we even want to bring in? They're not to a place yet where they could even say, oh, here's the part that we do really well. Let's find other organizations to supplement that. So I think that the Midwest, when we're talking about Nebraska and Missouri and Kansas is unique and really amazing, and its ability to work together regionally to create really strong entrepreneur. Brian Ardinger: Are you seeing fundamental differences or different expertise in the different ecosystems? Like how does St. Louis compared to a Lincoln or? Melissa Vincent: So St. Louis has a lot of bio. Obviously there's Bio STL. So we see a lot of bio coming out of St. Louis. And then Nebraska, we see a lot more animal health resources. And obviously healthcare resources as well. And then Kansas City, this conglomeration of bio and, and also Nebraska would be sports tech. I would put that in there too, even the shot trackers here in Kansas. So you have this interesting mixture and I think along the whole corridor, you have a lot of animal health cause we're in that kind of quarter for animal health. And then we have some amazing entrepreneurs who are rural because that's an area that we really have tried to focus on. And so we have rural entrepreneurs who are doing really unique things, you know, in ag and everything else. Brian Ardinger: So talk a little bit about the mentors themselves. What type of mentors did you bring in? And how do they work. Melissa Vincent: We love to bring in a mixture of regional mentors, like yourself, and then national mentors. And we feel like that mix is super important. Because one regionally, you want people who actually understand the ecosystem, understand the issues of raising capital that are still here. And, you know, that we need to address and change if we want to really be able to grow the ecosystem. And then we want people from the coast. So we know that a lot of times what we're seeing is that on the coast, we have PE and VC that are looking to invest here in the Midwest. And so we're able to kind of capitalize on that. And because Pipeline takes our entrepreneurs through such a strong vetting process to even get into Pipeline, it's not the easiest thing to get into, but there is a pretty long process to get in. And then you have a year's long fellowship. And then they know they're going to get that extra support. We get a lot of interest from the coast about what our entrepreneurs are doing, because you're adding those layers of continued support and resource, which should hopefully help their success rates continue to go up. So that's kind of where we are. Brian Ardinger: And the type of people that you bring in, like a Chris Shipley has been on the podcast before. And spoken at our events before. People like that who have been in the industry for a long time and can navigate east, west and in between is really helpful. Melissa Vincent: And even international. I will tell you, I love Chris Shipley. She is so able to help you take and tell your company's pitch. And we just saw this because she leads our fourth module. And you can tell your entire company story in your five minutes. You're in. And she'll be like, so what I think you're saying is, and she'll like completely boil down your company to like a minute.And it's like, oh yeah, that. And it's like, oh my gosh, please tell me I wrote that down. One of my other favorites that I think, it just reminds you of how unique Pipeline is in the mentors that we bring in. So Laura Kilcrease, she leads our module three on financials. If you look her up, she's literally credited with starting the tech scene in Austin.And she's just this ridiculous, amazing leader and ecosystem builder. And now she's in Alberta running the entire Alberta, the province of Alberta, she's running their entire new innovation arm. And so she's just, it doesn't even seem real when you talk to her. I mean, she's just, she can give you stories of companies that you know, she's been on the board for, that had sold for, you know, ridiculous amounts. And she's been through so many different things. So it's that level of just resources and expertise. And just people who really care about entrepreneurs, who understand the entrepreneurial lifestyle. What's it's about. How hard it is. And really care about giving back and supporting our entrepreneurs.Brian Ardinger: I want to shift to COVID. And again, you started right before a lot of this stuff happened. Talk a little bit about how COVID and the remote nature has changed Pipeline and, and change your entrepreneurs. Melissa Vincent: You know, so I would say there were both good and, you know, difficult pieces. So Pipeline for anyone who doesn't know is very, very much an in-person organization. The modules are in person. They're three days. The professional development was always in person. There are all of these pieces that it's like a hundred percent an in-person organization.And then you have a new leader that starts, and then you have a pandemic that doesn't allow anyone to be in person. And so it was really interesting because the downside was. Our Fellows had one module, the very first one, and then everything else was virtual. And for me just research thought was okay, how does that impact, you know, who becomes a member who doesn't, or their engagement with each other. And we started with 13 Fellows, we've finished with thirteen fellows, despite the pandemic.We were very intentional as soon as the pandemic hit to go virtual with resources. So rather than having, you know, a handful of professional development. We went weekly. Everything from, okay, how do I communicate? What is this pandemic? How do I communicate to my customers, my team? I mean like things that now it feels like, oh, that was 10 years ago, but it was just last year.And so we were trying to really figure out and then PPP loans and all of that. So just started doing virtual resources. So in that way, I think it was positive because it allowed us to really beef up, any type of professional development. I mean, it was just weekly. We're coming at you and we're helping you feel connected.And then after that, I would say the downside was not being able to have those in-person connections, but we just finished our last module for this year, which we had the first two, which virtual. The last two modules were in-person. And again, we've finished with thirteen, started with 13, finished with 13.So I think really for us, it allowed us to do a whole lot more because we could do it virtually. The transition for an organization that is so heavy on live in-person events is probably some of the members who have been around for a while. And we're like, whoa. When are we going to get in the person? I heard that a lot. Brian Ardinger: Absolutely. But Hey Bob, I saw you Grab the Mic and I didn't have a chance to click the button. So if you want to grab the mic. There you go. Welcome Bob. Bob: Yeah, there's some other people from the Midwest I'm in Cleveland, Ohio, I'm at Case Western Reserve University. I run something called Launch Net. We used to be a Blackstone Launchpad, which is around the country and now we're at Launch Net, There's five of us, in different universities in the area. Besides that I'm an Entrepreneur in Residence at the economic development called Jumpstart. And also doing some business incubator. Question I had, St. Louis. Is I, I was working with a guy from Kent State. And Melissa, I don't know if you know this guy or not in St. Louis, Brian Stoyfield. Does that ring a bell? Okay. I was just curious. He's a troublemaker, which in a good sort of way. He was trying to put rockets into suborbital space for experiments. And because there's so much aerospace in St. Louis, he ended up moving down there and hung out a lot with, begins with a C the big area where everybody collaborates, connects. No people in the middle, we just have to work harder. But I think it's turned a lot. Got quite a few friends out in SF and they're leaving. Some of them, just the cost of structure. And it used to be that a VC said if I can't have lunch with you, without flying somewhere, I don't want to invest. That has changed dramatically. Austin's picked up, as you know, and Miami has picked up. We picked up a little bit here. Actually rental costs for homes have escalated tremendously. And inventory has dropped. Because people were working from here, but a number of people are staying. Which is good to see.So, but yeah, I just wanted to, you know, say hello. I'm also involved with Techstars a little bit. I just had one in Techstars, Chicago. And then Techstars, Minneapolis. And so we're gaining that. And then I used to work with GSV Global Silicon Valley. GSV.com. If you want to take a look. They just did a $220 million spec and then something called GSVbootcamp.com.We do it now twice a year. And it could be helpful for some of the people in your cohort. It's not just ed tech, it's a broader spectrum. And they kind of did it to help during COVID. And now it kind of stuck. That they said, hey, this is good. You know, while we concentrate on ed tech for our SPAC, GSV invests in other entities, plus this is a good way that people can't, you know, do something in person physical can do this.I've also done a number of, three times now, startupschool.org, which is run by YC. Which has been really helpful. But yeah, the in-person the, the two that went to Techstars. One in Chicago, that was right in the midst of COVID. So there was no in person. The other one went to Minneapolis or Farm to Fork and he was in person. And they've got a delivery robot and it's really, really, really cool. And EcoLab. The company has helped a lot. Melissa Vincent: I've been taking notes as you've been talking Bob:  CarbonOrdinance.com. It's a grad again, getting into aerospace. So a guy who worked on the Mars rover, and some other folks, one who dropped out. That basically you can deliver food in these little carts. And you can observe or be kind of like not the driver, but kind of the driver in virtual reality.So those people who don't own a car. Who maybe don't have the ability to drive a car can be drivers of this. And we already have 300 people signed up. Yeah, to drive these vehicles in virtual reality. And we're getting some restaurant pickup again. Ecolab has been a great partner in Minneapolis. It's not the best place to have a little cart delivery because when the snow flies.Brian Ardinger: Yeah, next time. Spring and Summer time. Bob: Exactly. So, but they're, they're working hard. And the other one that was in Chicago was called undone.com. Yeah. During COVID I did a hell of a lot of stuff online. I'll give you one more. If your MPD is one of the it's called pitch-force.com. They went from being in person only in San Francisco and they were charging $75 to pitch.And I don't like to pay to pitch, but they would then turn around and buy pizza, beer and pop. They went to online. Free. And I've attended almost every week for over a year. And they've got 10 companies and five VCs. These VCs generally were San Francisco based. And now they're all over the place, including Austin, including New York.And there, now that it's virtual, they now have other entities pitching from Argentina, from Australia, from Israel. And it's a good way to learn how to pitch and see how things are going for people and also things, how they're going poorly for people. So it's a good way of see a real entrepreneur. It's your real business.And so friends of mine and I, we would literally watch it and text each other, our votes. And after a while, you get pretty aligned with what the VCs would do. And the downside is you get good. And all of a sudden you see these very, you both understand, you see these very smart people going, okay, you're in love with your technology, but what's it going to do for the customer? How much are you asking for? And then you're going, this is going to burn down. And sure enough, they get a two.Other ones you go, holy crap, did they hit it. I work with a lot of students and you know, they're just learning how to do this. And I sent them there. And they see, you know, the real people putting it all on the line to do it. Max who runs it, he runs a staffing agency and he also helps startups who don't have the finances to maybe pay someone right now, get somebody to work for equity only. And that's how he makes money that you have to pay him like five grand and then a certain percentage after let's say six months, once you put them on a salary and you know, maybe they're going for that Series A or something like that, but they can't get there because they don't have that chief marketing officer. Well, he knows off people who are bad exits and they can do that. Melissa Vincent: That's awesome. I love hearing from other regions on, well, not regions, but just other states that are kind of right next to us. What's going on there and how it's similar or different. And one of the things you brought up about the VC groups out of San Francisco being like the pandemic really did shift.And I think, you know, when you're talking about who you would put capital, that has been, I think one of the best biggest shifts. The ability for us to bring capital in from the coasts. Because to your point, exactly. That was not something. If you could not do lunch or coffee, there was not capital happening here and you'd have to move.And so it's really allowed us to have a lot of people moved back to the Midwest, their roots. And then allow people who would have had to leave previously, get to stay here in the Midwest. Which is just an enormous benefit, that was a by-product of the pandemic. Bob: Absolutely. One of the entities who didn't make it into the top five does a Reg A. He pitched at going public and he didn't make it to the top five and he did a great job. And I reached out to him and his name is Darren Marble. And he has a show that he he's working with Entrepreneur magazine. It's called Goingpublic.com. And so my friend is the board director for Gen Global. Jeff Hoffman.We just went through Global Entrepreneurship Week. And I introduced Jeff to Darren. And now Jeff is one of the advisors and one of the producers on Going Public. But that wouldn't have happened if again, to go to Pitch Force, I would have had to been on San Francisco that week. And I'm going to like do that maybe twice a year.Brian Ardinger: Well, Bob, thanks for coming on stage. Anybody else have any questions? Feel free to put them into the chat. And we have a couple more minutes to keep going. You've changed parts of that program. You're actually creating a new program focused on the diversity inclusion side of things. So maybe talk a little bit about that part of Pipeline and some of the new things that are happening.Melissa Vincent: Yeah, so super excited to be able to, as I mentioned, this is a great kind of success story of what Pipeline was traditionally for the first 14 years. And without that, you know, legacy of success, you can't really add or expand. But because of that legacy of success, and because we were able to successfully say, you bring in resources from the coast to the Midwest, and you focus on these entrepreneurs who are really going to scale.And one of the things that we realized in going through the recruitment process during the pandemic was that, in order to get into Pipeline traditionally, you have to working on your company full time. And so during the application process, what we saw were a lot of really great ideas for high growth companies that the person just wasn't able to yet work on their company. Full-time. And when you looked more closely, we realized that there were a lot of those people were from underserved communities. And for us, that is rural, female, and minority entrepreneurs. And so the only thing that's holding them back is they haven't had an even playing field to get to a place where they are actually ready to be able to get into Pipeline.And so we wanted to do something to address that. And so we created a new program. It's called Pipeline Pathfinder. That is kind of like a starter program to be able to get into the Pipeline traditional fellowship. But our hope is that when you go through the program and it starts next year, we just finished recruiting for it.That it will be something that you're either able to run your company full time at the end of it. Or you get to a place where you're ready for Pipeline traditional and a really scale to the next level. So that is our hope. Next year, will be our first year to pilot it. And then after that, we hope to expand and continue to grow.For More InformationBrian Ardinger: It's exciting to see changes that are happening across the ecosystem. You know, we mentioned one of the benefits of being an entrepreneur in the Midwest is this comradery. And this ability to get access to people that you wouldn't normally have access to necessarily in the big tech hub. Where again, if you find the right person typically are one or two degrees separated from getting to the people that you need. And appreciate everything that you've done to move it forward, and then also take it in new directions. So if people want to find out more about yourself or about Pipeline, what's the best way to do that. Melissa Vincent: So go to pipelineentrepreneurs.com or reach out to me on LinkedIn. Or you can always email me at melissa@pipelineentrepreneurs.com. Could we have any longer of an email? Probably not, but. Brian Ardinger: Melissa, thank you again for coming on Inside Outside Innovation. Thanks for doing this live and thanks for all the audience folks that came and participated. We look forward to having future events and that. If you want to find out more about Inside Outside, go to InsideOutside.IO. Subscribe to our newsletter and watch the podcast every week. So appreciate you coming on Melissa. Look forward to having further conversations and thanks very much. Melissa Vincent: Thanks so much for having me. I appreciate it. Thanks everybody.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

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Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 75:55


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iPhoneItalia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 53:11


In questa puntata affronteremo due temi di assoluta attualità.Il primo, che assorbirà gran parte della puntata riguarda la recente batosta che il garante della concorrenza e del mercato ha inflitto ad Amazon. Parliamo di oltre un miliardo di euro di multa per aver abusato della posizione dominante sul mercato degli acquisti online.Nel mirino, l'aver legato il marchio prime per i venditori d terze parti con l'obbligo di utilizzare la Logistica Amazon. Cerchiamo di capire i motivi dietro questo dispositivo e le ragioni, da ambo le parti.Nella seconda parte del podcast torniamo su un tema che sarà di grande rilievo nel prossimo anno: il nuovo visore AR/VR di Apple. Come farà Apple a coniugare Realtà Aumentata e Realtà Virtuale? A chi sarà rivolto questo prodotto?I temi in questa puntata del podcast:- Amazon, le ragioni della multa- Amazon: multa legittima o eccessiva?- Commercio online, come sta cambiando il mondo dello shopping- Apple: moria imminente, sembra, il lancio del nuovo visore AR/VR- Come riuscirà Apple ad implementare AR e VR in un solo device?Conduttori:Giovanni Longo: www.twitter.com/giolongooClaudio Sardaro: www.twitter.com/ClauoITALuca Ansevini: www.twitter.com/Anse1987Feedback?Potete segnalarci temi da approfondire, dire la vostra o darci qualunque tipo di feedback su Twitter col consueto hashtag #iPhoneItaliaPodcast.Potete, inoltre, darci una valutazione su Apple Podcast e seguirci su Spreaker per aiutare più persone a scoprire il nostro podcast.I vostri consigli ed i vostri commenti sono preziosi per noi, sul serio.

Disruptance
75. AR, VR and Social Signaling in the Metaverse

Disruptance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 25:33


What is everyone going to do in the Metaverse and how does it generate profit? On this episode, Eric Forney and Michael Bounds talk about all of the things that are already available in The Metaverse or will be available in the future. They discuss how to make an NFT and how important the story behind the NFT is for generating its value. Eric discusses how any art's worth is derived from its social signal, whether it's physical art or digital art, and how the strength of the signal correlates with the price it will bring. They also talk about how the most innovative talent that will change the next decade of technology is probably working somewhere in a garage or basement, and we don't even know who they are yet. Don't forget, you can always watch the episodes on The Disruptance YouTube Channel https://youtu.be/Zga096hSnCE

The Business of Esports
Weekly News #171: 100T $60M Round, Apple AR / VR Headset, Gaming SPACs Back, Lamborghini Gaming Chair, Steam Deck Exclusives, Valve BCI, ValkyRae YouTube Contract

The Business of Esports

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 104:50


In the latest weekly news and podcast after-show (sponsored by http://yougov.com/gaming-esports (YouGov)), we discuss 100 Thieves securing $60 million in a Series C funding round, UTA raising $200 million for a SPAC, Games & Esports Experience Acquisition Corp. announcing the pricing of its upsized IPO, Lamborghini developing a gaming chair, Valve confirming the lack of exclusive games for the Steam Deck, Gabe Newell sharing information about the future of Valve and brain-computer interfaces, rumored Apple AR / VR headset focused on gaming and content, ValkyRae providing details on her YouTube Gaming contract, and so much more!

You, Me, and Your Top Three
Hitting the Reset Button (wsg Luis Cabrera)

You, Me, and Your Top Three

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 61:53


Hitting the Reset Button | Luis Cabrera, CEO of Budget Travel, joins host Gregg Garrett to discuss his storied career in digital across many industries. Luis highlights how he applies digital skills across senior roles, companies, and continents. Of course, Luis speaks about his Top 3, including Scott Galloway, a storied NYU professor, who helps him take a no-nonsense tone as he considers new opportunities, to Rich Lesser, the former CEO of BCG, who acts as his moral compass, to his wife who drives clarity in his life. And you have to hear what he has to say about having a cool head and hot feet. About Luis Cabrera Luis is an investor, operator, and consultant. He is currently CEO of Budget Travel and previously CEO of Lonely Planet, which he sold to Red Ventures in late 2020. His experience includes being a Partner at BCGDV, the Digital Ventures division at Boston Consulting Group, a co-founder of an enterprise mobility startup, and a Managing Director at WPP and other digital marketing companies. Luis was born and raised in Mexico City and has lived as south as Argentina and Australia; and has also lived in Miami, LA, San Francisco, NYC, Washington DC, and Nashville.  Show Highlights During this episode: The emergence of digital transformation programs [1:10] The importance of understanding digital/connected in two ways [4:45] Welcoming, Luis Cabrera [7:30] Developing an enterprise mobility [11:15] Turning around Lonely Planet [13:11] The launch of Budget Travel [17:30] The “Top Three” His wife, who grounds him and drives clarity in his life [20:00) Scott Galloway, who helps Luis take a no-nonsense approach as he considers new opportunities [26:15] Rich Lesser, who is his virtual moral compass [35:55] Refreshening up a legacy organization [39:30] Where travel is going in the next 12 months. [42:33] How autonomous vehicle will impact the travel industry [48:40] The impact of AR/VR on travel [49:16] You have to hear this… Growing Budget Travel & some other exciting hobbies [53:36] Mental Framework: You need to have a cool head and hot feet [57:39] Stay in touch with Luis on LinkedIn! Additional Information Contact Luis Cabrera: Luis's LinkedIn Contact Budget Travel: Budget Travel Website Contact Gregg Garrett: Gregg's LinkedIn Gregg's Twitter Gregg's Bio Contact CGS Advisors: Website LinkedIn Twitter

To The Macks
S.T.A Seed Talk | Jed Corenthal CMO w/ Phenix Real-Time Solutions

To The Macks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 54:43


Jed Corenthal CMO for Phenix Real-Time Solutions joins the show. We breakdown what/who are PhenixRST How they plan on being a world leader in this space The future of sports betting! AR/VR impacting the future of OTT And much more, come join the conversation After the interview, we discuss the college football coaching carousel and funding rounds.

Inside Outside
Ep. 276 - Ben Bensaou, Professor at INSEAD and Author of Built to Innovate on Making Innovation Accessible to Everyone

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 23:12


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Dr. Ben Bensaou, Professor at INSEAD and author of the new book Built to Innovate. We talk about some interesting case studies and essential practices that companies can use to make innovation accessible to everyone in the organization. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is a podcast to help the new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript of Dr. Ben Bensaou, Professor at INSEAD and Author of Built to InnovateBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have Dr. Ben Bensaou. He is the professor and former Dean of Executive Education at INSEAD and author of the new book, Built to Innovate: Essential Practices to Wire Innovation into your Company's DNA. Welcome to the show, Ben.Ben Bensaou: Good morning, Brian. And thank you for having me. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you. And I understand you're in Japan right now, so we're different sides of the world. You've got a new book out called Built to Innovate. But I wanted to step back and talk about how did you get into the field of innovation research.Ben Bensaou: Well, actually, as a matter of fact, I got into the field of innovation starting where I am right now. I did my PhD looking at Japanese firms. And I had lived in Japan before, but my PhD at MIT Sloan was on the way that Japanese firms were actually developing production systems. And a production system was the quality management movement.So, I was in Japan at the time. And then when I went back and joined INSEAD, I continued my interest in Japanese firms, but this time I want to know what they were doing in the field of innovation. And this is how I got involved with companies in Japan and outside of Japan. Mostly its established firms who are trying to become more innovative.Brian Ardinger: One of the things that we think about is corporations, it's hard for them to innovate. Maybe now it's a little bit more thought of is, you know with all the disruption from everything from COVID to new technologies and that. Companies are a little bit more aware of the fact that they need to be innovating and that the world is changing around them. Can you talk a little bit about how your research and your experience in the field of innovation has changed and evolved over the years? Ben Bensaou: Yes. I would say that one thing that I've noticed over the years, I've been doing my teaching innovation and also helping firms is that I noticed that number one, a lot of people, a lot of organizations equate innovation with launching a new blockbuster product or coming up with a life changing new business model.Many also think that you need to have a genius leader or to be a startup by a matter of fact, to be innovative, to be able to innovate. But I found out that it's not true. I found in my research established even centuries old companies are able to innovate. How did they do this? Well, they don't only focus on industry changing effects, but also for small important changes, very often in unexpected places.And for this, what they do is that they rely on continuous and systematic innovation. Innovation of all kinds. And innovation driven by everyone in the organization. And that's what Built to Innovate is about. It's really about how do you embed continuous innovation inside an organization using a systematic approach.Brian Ardinger: I think that's so important because a lot of corporations that I've talked to want innovation to happen somewhere else. Or like they have their teams and they're executing on their business model and they're optimizing that, but they want innovation to happen somewhere else. So, they create an innovation lab or something and they throw the idea over to someone else to execute. But what I've seen, and I think what it's apparent in your book, and the examples you give is that again, to survive in this changing world, we all have to become innovators. And it doesn't mean, like you said, you have to come up with the next electric car, but you have to find problems and take those early ideas and then innovate them and execute on them so that they become value creation, parts of the business.Ben Bensaou: Absolutely. Absolutely. I find so many people expecting that the innovation is going to come from the leaders. Or, you know, like you say, they create a skunkworks, or they create specialist units that are supposed to do all the innovations for the company. And I think many organizations, and I found this very innovative companies in my research, are able to enlist and leverage the capability of everyone in the organization. For this, what they do is that that they create what I call an innovating engine. Which is a protected, fully legitimized and organized space within the company where everyone can innovate. Not just the specialist. You can innovate in everything you do. I mean, you can innovate of course, in your products and services, but you can innovate in your processes as well, or your internal functions. You can innovate in HR and legal. And you can make innovating a regular habit. Not a sporadic kind of burst of creativity when there's a crisis. And that's what I think I've seen some of these innovative companies do is to create this innovating engine. And leveraging everybody's inate capabilities. Brian Ardinger: So, what do you think are some of the common myths or mistakes that companies make when it comes to executing or putting these innovation initiatives into place.Ben Bensaou: I think it's always the same thing is that many of these organizations, like you were talking earlier about startups, don't have the problem of size. When they start, they're all innovating in a sense innovating mode. Everybody is in contact with customers. But as soon as you grow, you start to be dominated by an execution logic. And the execution, what I call the execution takes over. And the execution engine takes over. And the execution changing is very much about control. It's no surprise that many organizations, established organizations, develop hierarchies and vertical silos focused on supplier side view challenges. And innovating in a sense is less about control. Is more about delegating and is more about collaboration. Is more about teamwork. Horizontal structures that are focused on the customer. Like you said earlier, I think this is a very important word. You said innovation is about problem finding. What kind of new problems do we need to find to solve for the customers. And execution is very much about problem solving. It's a very convergent mindset.And I think this is where a lot of companies fail. Is that they don't realize that when you move into innovating and what I'm saying is that when you create an innovating engine, you allow for every employee to be able to spend time doing some innovating activity in the space of the invading engine. And at that time, they need to switch their mind. They need to switch from a supply side view to a customer side view. Brian Ardinger: That's really interesting because too many folks forego or forget about that exploration side of the business. That a lot of companies don't measure or reward for that type of activity as well. What are your thoughts when it comes to why is it so hard for employees to be innovating?Ben Bensaou: As a matter of fact, I would almost say that it's not very difficult for frontline people to be innovating. We can come back later to the importance of middle management, but I think it's said the dominance, I would almost say the tyranny of the execution mindset stops people from genuinely discovering what the customer really needs.So, for me, when people are switching from an execution mode to an innovating mode, they have to embrace a customer perspective. And there, there are three challenges that I like to think about. One is to listen to what I call the voice of the customer. What are the likes, the pain points, the wishes of the customer? And when you are in innovating mode, you have to switch away from the traditional tell mode or even worse, sometimes people are in complete sell mode and try to be in a listening mode very much with empathy for the customer. The second challenge I think, is about listening to what I call the silence of the customer. The silence of the customer is the things they don't tell you. They don't tell you. And they don't tell you about it either because they don't know or because they know, but they don't think it's your problem to solve. So maybe it could be interesting for the audience. I give you an example about how Phillips, I mean the Dutch appliance and consumer electronics company, develop the first kettle with limescale mouth filter. So, there was a colleague who was a consultant in a consulting firm, and he was part of the team was helping Phillips re-energize their market share for kettles in the UK market. The team leader at some point asked some of the team members to spend a few days and actually live in families in the UK. Observing how customers use their kettles.And after a few days, the members noticed that people were facing a problem they never told them about. I mean, when they were trying to pour the boiling water into the cup of tea. I guess, because the water had a lot of calcium, there was this little coat of limescale floating on top of the tea. And it's very interesting because the customer knew about the problem. It was obvious because they were trying to scoop the limescale with their spoon. But they never told the kettle manufacturer. As a matter of fact, they complain about it, but they complained to the water authorities, not to cattle manufacturer. Brian Ardinger: Interesting. Ben Bensaou: So, this is very interesting because it took only a few months for engineers at Phillips to develop this little filter, which you can find in any kettle these days, that blocks or stops the limescale. So, each time you pour the water, it stops the limescale from getting in your tea. This is what I call the silence of the customer. The customer wouldn't tell you about it. So, you need to find this problem in spite of the customer. Not thanks to the customer in spite of the customer.And then the third challenge is what I call the non-customers. It's very important to learn to listen to non-customers. So here I could give an example, one, for instance, kind of observed Fiskars's for instance, when they, the Finnish company that makes tableware and garden tools. So, for their cutting tools, for instance, they spend time with surgeons in operating rooms, you know. Or they look at first tree workers who cut trees in large scale. They're not like cutting small trees in the garden, but on a large scale and very often. And much more dramatic example is this company called EcoCem. It's in the cement business. They developed a new technology, a substitute for cement based on a technology called GGBS, which has much lower carbon footprint.And it is made out of a byproduct of the steel industry. So, it is very, very good for the environment. It has the same properties of traditional cement. Now, the only problem is that the dominant incumbents, were not looking at it very positively. So, when EcoCem tried to sell it to the customer, the customers we're hearing all this criticism from the dominant players, and they were not very keen on playing with it.It just happens at the cement industry is a very regulated industry. So, what EcoCem did instead of focusing on the customers, they focused their attention on their regulators. And they spent a lot of time engaging the regulators, bringing experts on the new technology to regulators. They managed to have the regulators actually accept and propose the new technology. And then the customers walked in. So, this is again, a very good example where the innovation didn't come by creating value to the customers, the construction companies. But to the regulators who are the people who can influence what the customer do. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: And that's a good segue because I think a lot of folks think about innovation as this solo, mad scientist comes up with an idea and executes on it. But you talk a lot about in the book, this importance of collaboration. It is important engaging that idea with others and that. So can talk a little bit more about that process of collaboration. Ben Bensaou: I think this is very important, I would say that innovation is a team sport. And cross-functional teams are very important. And I always am surprised when I observed teams, to realize that it's not always the ones we think who are going to have that critical insights.So, it's very important to bring people with different mindsets. And then it's very important to close the gap. Close the distance between the would be innovators and the customers. Or there would be innovators in the company and the salespeople. For instance, I think these are two spaces and this is part of what I call the innovating engine.So maybe I can give an example of the first situation. This is about Kordsa. This is a Turkish company. They manufacturer fabric that is used to reinforce tires. On a regular basis, they send cross disciplinary team to their customer's plants. And these teams, they literally camp at the plants of the customers.They stay for a few days, and I've seen actually in the early days, they used to have a tent in the plant. And they just roam around, talk to people, observe what is happening in the plant. And these are cross-functional teams. You might have somebody from engineering, somebody from R and D, somebody from marketing, from legal, somebody from procurement.And at one plant, the team saw that the workers and the customer were having trouble to safely handle roles of reinforcing fabric that were loaded onto a truck. Now, again, this is an example of a silence of the customer. The customers knew the problem, they were facing the problem, but they didn't know the supplier could solve it.So, what happened is that this team at Kordsa, they just went back home and remedy the problems by developing a small kind of methodology, some process. They trained the customers into this new process, and they were able to help them reduce the resources from 30 minutes for three people to 12 minutes for one worker.And this was literally because they were able to go as a team and they close the gap between the team and the customer. So, it's very important to not only have multidisciplinary team, but also to bring the inside the firm first to bring the innovators together with the salespeople and then to bring the innovators together with the customer. Brian Ardinger: The last topic I want to talk about, and we talked briefly about it, but so everybody in the organization should be an innovator and should have the capabilities and aptitude to make things happen like that. But oftentimes middle managers and higher end managers either block that or change that. What are the roles of mid managers and upper management when it comes to innovation?Ben Bensaou: Let me talk to this as an example, and then I'll explain the roles. This is about Bayer, the global pharmacology and life science company based in Germany. So, this is a company that has a long history of scientific achievements through R and D and brilliant scientists. Yet in 2014, they decided to create from scratch to create an innovating engine, to leverage the capabilities of the hundred thousand employees in the company.So how did they do this? First, they made the whole board responsible for innovation. Then they selected 80 senior managers across all country groups and global functions. And these ambassadors, they made them as ambassadors. They were supporting these 80 senior managers became ambassadors, supporting the board. They were innovation ambassadors. And as ambassadors they spend most of their time with middle managers.Explaining, training, advocating, sponsoring innovation. And then they did something very important for these middle managers. They created a formidable support structure. Between 2016 and 2020, they trained and certified a thousand innovation coaches, which they activated locally across the whole company.And then for frontline people, they created WeSolve. This is a digital platform where any employee in Bayer can post information about a problem they're struggling with. And invite input and ideas from anyone in the company. So just to give you a sense. I visited the site once at any given time, they have 200 challenges posted on a platform. And then up to now, 40,000 employees at Bayer have participated in this platform. But to tell you the truth, Brian, what really impressed me the most in the statistic they showed me is that out of the best ideas that are proposed for all these challenges that are posted, two third of the best ideas effectively come from a department or unit different from where the person who posted the challenge works. This is to give you an example of what is a formal structure for an innovating engine. You can see that the senior leaders are the ones who have to give permission. They have the ones who have to give to permission to everybody to be able to innovate.They are the ones who create the governance structure, the coaches, and the local coordinators. Then the middle managers have a very important role. I was really surprised in my research to find out that middle managers are actually the key to innovation in corporate settings. Without middle managers, innovation gets lost.I've found it in any organization, senior leaders, they get it. They're facing a tough environment. They understand that without innovation, they can't survive. Frontline people, I mean the facing customers and non-customers on a daily basis. They understand that they have to innovate to solve the pain point and respond to the wishes and desires.But the middle managers are the ones who are caught in between because they don't have that direct pressure for innovation. And on top of it, they are the ones who are incentivized on execution. They're responsible for execution and they don't know if they don't get trained. They don't know how to help their people innovate.So, they need also this support structure to help them any time an individual or a team wants to innovate. They need to have these coaches. So, I would say you need to have senior leaders. You need to have the ones who create what I call the reframing. Allow for the organization to challenge the status quo challenge. Challenge the basic assumptions. The middle managers are the ones who participate in what I call the integration process. The process by which you connect the ideas and the people and the resources. And the process by which you winnow, channel, select, maybe prototype some of the best ideas before they get moved to the execution engine.So, this is a very important role for the middle managers. And they are the ones who support the frontline. And the frontline are the ones who have a huge contribution to make to what I call the creation process. The process by which the organization generates new ideas. New ideas are the raw material of innovation.And I explain how they do this by listening to the voice of the customer, the silence of the customer, and try to learn from non-customers. So, as I say, in this innovating engine, everybody has an important role to play. Senior leaders, middle managers and frontline innovators. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: And I encourage anybody who's listening to this podcast, who's in an innovation to pick up a copy of Built to Innovate. It's got a ton of great case studies, as you said. And it really helps set the framework for how you can start creating more of a culture of innovation within your company. If people want to find out more about yourself or the book, what's the best way to do that? Ben Bensaou: LinkedIn. I have a profile on LinkedIn. I have also my website on the INSEAD and then for the book, they can go to their local Amazon to find the book and to order it. Or they can go to the website for the book, which is BTIthebook.com. BTI for Built to Innovate thebook.com.Brian Ardinger: Well, Dr. Bensaou, thank you very much for being on Inside Outside Innovation. Really enjoyed the conversation and look forward to continuing it as the world changes in the future. Ben Bensaou: Thank you, Brian. It's a lot of fun.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  As an Amazon Affiliate, we may earn a small commission from purchases.  

Software Developer's Journey
#180 April Speight in her own lane from design to advocacy

Software Developer's Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 52:04


April took us on a rollercoaster. We talked about how she learned Python in the open, made videos about her learning, and landed a children's book deal. April told us about transitioning to the AR/VR space and how she landed at Microsoft, first as a Program Manager, and then (finally) in advocacy, with an explosive start happening in an MIT Hackathon! From her project management studies and realization, she learned to code to find a job to her first internship.Here are the links from the show:https://www.twitter.com/vogueandcodehttps://www.vogueandcode.comhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/aprilspeighthttps://devpost.com/software/spell-boundByte Size Python https://amzn.to/3hy9AZrCreditsCover Campfire Rounds by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed CC BY-NC-ND 4.0.Your host is Timothée (Tim) Bourguignon, more about him at timbourguignon.fr.Gift the podcast a rating on one of the significant platforms https://devjourney.info/subscribeSupport the podcast, support us on Patreon: https://bit.ly/devjpatreonSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/timbourguignon)

九八新聞台
股市熱炒店 投資Online|台股強勢整理!電子股可低接?航運漲真的? 台積電掛保證!元宇宙AR/VR概念股發燒! 2021.12.06

九八新聞台

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 33:57


主持人:詩瑋 來賓:林漢偉 分析師 主題:台股強勢整理!電子股可低接?航運漲真的? 台積電掛保證!元宇宙AR/VR概念股發燒! 本集播出日期:2021.12.06 內容: 股市熱炒店 飆股在裡面! 元宇宙成為投資市場熱門話題,台積電董事長劉德音看好AR將取代手機、VR會取代個人電腦!聯發科董事長預期 2040年VR、AR裝置市場可望達5000億美元,看好元宇宙前景與商機!今天題材王子林漢偉分析師要帶你挖掘真正的VR概念股,倍數獲利不是夢! ▼更多內容▼ 股市熱炒店YT:https://pse.is/39bfcs 股市熱炒店FB:https://lihi1.cc/ceSND 股市熱炒店TG:https://pse.is/38825q TG:ps1788 LINE@:@ps1688 有任何問題歡迎提問! 摩爾投顧:www.morerich.com.tw/ (109)金管投顧新字第030號 本資料僅供參考,投資時應審慎評估, 興櫃股票登錄條件較上市(櫃)股票寬鬆,且無每日漲跌幅限制,投資人應審慎評估是否適合投資 ----- ▍九八新聞台@大台北地區 FM98.1 ▍官網:http://www.news98.com.tw ▍粉絲團:https://www.facebook.com/News98 ▍線上收聽:https://pse.is/R5W29 ▍APP下載  • APP Store:https://news98.page.link/apps  • Google Play:https://news98.page.link/play ▍YouTube頻道:https://www.youtube.com/user/News98radio ▍Podcast:https://news98radio.wixsite.com/news98podcast

The Versatilist
Episode 36: Versatilist Happy Hour #36 - Will Apple Really Kill the iPhone

The Versatilist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 42:00


In this episode, Amy, Rebecca and I talk about whether Apple's new approach to AR will actually end with the discontinuing of the iphone, or if it's more likely that AR/VR takes a back seat.

商界早知道|一早速览商业事
12月01日【商界早知道】微信放开淘宝抖音外链;字节员工收钱帮上热搜被判刑

商界早知道|一早速览商业事

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 5:55


今日聚焦【微信可打开淘宝抖音了】11月29日,微信再次更新《微信外部链接内容管理规范》。经实测,用户已经可以在微信中打开淘宝、抖音等链接。但打开淘宝链接后仍需登陆账户才能查看商品。部分用户仍无法打开链接,微信29日回应称,这两天将覆盖完全。【字节员工收钱帮上抖音热搜被判刑】中国裁判文书网显示,字节跳动两90后员工,多次收受钱款推助抖音热搜,共计受贿58万余元。2020年9月两人在公司员工陪同下主动到公安机关投案,分别获刑一年两个月及一年,处罚金人民币两万元,同时扣押在案钱款予以没收。(红星新闻) 企业动态【我爱我家回应被取消网签资格:目前一切正常】近日,公开信息显示,北京我爱我家被海淀区房屋管理局取消网上签约资格并罚款3万元。事由为“为不符合交易条件的保障性住房和禁止交易的房屋提供经纪服务”,对此,我爱我家声明,此事为公司前经纪人在公司不知情的情况下,使用公司合同承接了不符合租赁条件的房屋进行居间代理,并私收介绍费后于8月离职。目前公司业务处于正常经营状态。【劲牌酒遭举报常年污染环境,当地已介入调查】近日,湖北一位村民罗兆义爆料,劲牌有限公司在当地的酒厂“破坏自然生态”并发来实名举报资料。罗兆义称,劲牌2004年在当地建立了原二分厂,一直在污染环境,侵害群众利益。11月30日,劲牌工作人员称,村民的举报是诬告,现在当地的环保部门正在调查,公司会配合。黄山市环保局称,目前已经抽取样本,检测结果会第一时间公布。(红星资本局)【支付宝上线钱包分类功能,每个荷包独立记账】近日,“支付宝小荷包”上线,用户可以根据日常需求创立独立小荷包,如饮食、家庭支出、旅行等,各类消费账目更清晰。用户还可以对各类消费进行限额。【贾跃亭的乐视大厦被神秘方5.7亿拿下】11月30日,乐视大厦在阿里司法拍卖平台公开拍卖,北京衡盈物业管理有限公司以约5.73亿元的起拍价拿下。接盘者衡盈物业颇为神秘,从成立时间上看,或是专门为此次法拍成立的。乐融大厦是继世茂工三后,贾跃亭的另一处重资产。相比两年前的6.78亿元,此次拍卖价格降了一个多亿。【李嘉诚1亿拍得爱因斯坦手稿】近日,一份由物理学家爱因斯坦撰写的“广义相对论”手稿,在巴黎佳士得以1160万欧元成交,折合1.026亿港元(人民币8352万元),创下爱因斯坦各类手稿中的新高。据中国香港地区媒体报道,买家为李嘉诚。对此,李嘉诚基金会并未否认,仅表示不评论事件。佳士得方面亦未公开买家身份。【辣条包装上印有黄色网站二维码?坚决查!】近日,安徽宿州市有关部门监测发现:辖区内某企业生产的辣条包装上印有黄色网站二维码,在扫描二维码后,被提醒“未满18岁者严禁浏览本站”,随后便跳转到某黄色软件下载页面。企业负责人称,一个月前其企业官网被黑客入侵,无法改回,企业已对被篡改的网站进行举报。目前,企业已更改包装,该网站已被停止访问。(安徽省“扫黄打非”办)【揭秘网红店营销套路,把店铺营销成网红只需三步】把餐厅开成“网红”店,需要几个步骤?第一步,把餐厅开开;第二步,请一堆“网红”在各种平台上发上一通“种草”文;第三步,坐等客人来。带货的主播多了,难免有“翻车”的;探店的“网红”多了,真假虚实也变得难测起来。“网红”团队训练有素,能熟练运用各种拍摄修图剪辑技术,且熟知各种营销套路,消费者随着他们的带动前去“拔草”就成了一场赌博。(央视网) 产业纵深【八部门:督促网约车平台合理设定抽成比例上限】近日,八部门发布意见指出:督促网约车平台合理设定抽成比例上限并公开;依法为符合劳动关系情形的网约车驾驶员参加社会保险;科学确定驾驶员工作时长和劳动强度,保障其有足够休息时间。不得以冲单奖励等方式引诱驾驶员超时劳动。【巨头百万年薪抢聘元宇宙人才:美术类比技术类人才更吃香】 “年薪百万抢人才”“元宇宙公司人才缺口巨大”,不论是虚拟人、游戏,还是AR/VR和社交,一时间,仿佛大家都不吝于高薪请人,重金下注元宇宙。业内资深HR称,在元宇宙所,美术类人才比技术类人才更吃香,缺口更大,构建世界从视觉呈现开始,不论是虚拟身份还是虚拟世界,都需要美术类人才打开缺口,这也是各大赛道争抢美术类人才的重要原因。【电子烟国标征求意见稿发布】据全国标准信息公共服务平台,电子烟国标(20171624-Q-456)状态变更为“征求意见”,征求意见稿提出“雾化物中的烟碱浓度不应高于20mg/g,烟碱总量不应高于200mg”。烟碱释放量不应高于0.2 mg/puff。 国际视野【45岁推特CEO多西卸任, CTO接棒】当地时间11月29日,推特联合创始人杰克·多西(Jack Dorsey)在个人推特账号上公布卸任首席执行官(CEO),并将在2022年5月左右离开推特公司董事会。【时隔六年,苹果再成为中国最大智能手机商】据报道,调研公司Counterpoint Research最新数据显示,今年10月份,受iPhone 13系列手机的推动,10月份苹果在中国市场的iPhone销量环比增长46%,一举超越vivo,成为最大的智能手机厂商,这也是2015年12月以来的首次。

Augusto Digital HealthIT with Brian Anderson
Featuring Dr. Kyle Hoedebecke, Medical Director of Oscar Health

Augusto Digital HealthIT with Brian Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 35:35


What is the future of healthcare technology? In this episode of Augusto Digital Insights' healthcare series, Brian Anderson interviews Dr. Kyle Hoedebecke, Medical Director of Oscar Health—the first health insurance company built around a full stack technology platform and a relentless focus on serving its members. In this episode, Brian Anderson interviews Dr. Kyle Hoedebecke, Medical Director of Oscar Health—the first health insurance company built around a full stack technology platform and a relentless focus on serving its members. The company offers a unique virtual care experience from the comfort of your home, at work, or on-the-go—by video chat or phone.  Kyle is also an angel investor and a mentor with a focus on healthcare technology, like wearables, AI, AR/VR, 3D-printing, bio-pharma, and more. He didn't take a traditional physician's path, but rather started at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. From there, he was part of the lucky 1% of his class that got to go directly to medical school at the Uniformed Services University. Kyle specialized in family medicine, before traveling throughout about 120 countries. Along the way, he picked up 3 additional languages: German, Spanish, and Guarani—an indigenous language from Paraguay. While in South Korea, Kyle earned master's degrees in business administration, public administration, and telemedicine. Now, at Oscar Health, he's able to follow his passion of innovation within healthcare startups. The company calls itself half technology, half insurance. They provide free telemedicine to all Oscar members and a concierge service to help members process claims or get a specialty referral. Kyle's personal goal is to make our healthcare system better for everyone through technology and improved systems. So he has become an angel investor for health technology. He shares about a 3D printer for pharmaceuticals, calling it “a pharmacy from anywhere you want.” He believes this can be incredibly helpful for remote areas or during natural disasters. Brian and Kyle also discuss a variety of wearable technology—like smartwatches and portable stethoscopes—that can facilitate healthcare in areas with too few physicians. We're grateful for Dr. Kyle Hoedebecke's time on the Augusto Health IT podcast and wish him the best of luck in all his endeavors.

Inside Outside
Ep. 275 - Karin Hurt, Co-Author of Courageous Cultures on Valuing Innovation, Curiosity & Productivity

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 22:23


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Karin Hurt, Co-author of the new book, Courageous Cultures: How to Build Teams of Micro-Innovators, Problem Solvers, and Customer Advocates. Karin and I talk about the difficulties and opportunities with creating a culture that values innovation and curiosity, and how companies can develop productive micro innovators. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat to what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Karin Hurt, Co-Author of Courageous CulturesBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have Karin Hurt. She's co-author of the new book, Courageous Cultures: How to Build Teams of Micro-Innovators, Problem Solvers, and Customer Advocates. Welcome to the show, Karen. Karin Hurt: Thank you so much for having me. Brian Ardinger: Karen, I am excited to have you on the show. I just got a chance to read through a preview copy of the book and excited to dig into that. Tell me a little bit about how you got interested in this particular topic.Karin Hurt: Yeah. So, I run a company called Let's Grow Leaders. And we work with human centered leaders all over the world with practical tools and techniques. So we were noticing a consistent pattern. As we were going into organizations, we'd be working at the very senior levels of organizations. And we would hear things like why don't more people speak up. Why don't people share ideas? Why do I stumble upon a best practice? Why are people sharing them with one another? And then we would go into do leadership training at the supervisor level. And we would hear things like nobody really wants my ideas. Last time I spoke up, I got in trouble. You know, why bother nothing ever happens anyway. We thought, are you all working for the same company? So, you know, most leaders really do want ideas and employees have great ideas to share. So why was there this disconnect? So, we partnered with the university of North Colorado on an extensive research study to answer that question. When people were holding back ideas, what kinds of ideas were they holding back and what was preventing them from speaking up and sharing ideas to improve the customer experience, the employee experience, or productivity in a process. That's a little bit about why we got so excited about this research. Brian Ardinger: So, let's dig into it. What makes a culture courageous? Karin Hurt: You know, our favorite definition of culture comes from Seth Godin, the marketing guru, who just says culture is simply people like us do things like this. And so, when you're talking about a courageous culture, people like us speak up. They share ideas. The default is to contribute. People are coming to work every day saying, huh, how can I make this better. And managers are proactively going out and asking for those ideas and responding well when people share them. Brian Ardinger: So clearly that is not the case in a lot of organizations, at least the ones that I've worked with and have been around. It's not always courageous. What do you think makes it so difficult for people to speak their truth or overcome that particular fear? Karin Hurt: Yeah. So, Dr. Amy Edmondson of Harvard who wrote the Fearless Organization, you know, she's really a pioneer of psychological safety. And she talks about people are more likely to hold onto a negative experience than a positive experience. And that really played out in our research as well. We would ask people; we did a whole qualitative set of interviews in addition to the quantitative study. And we would say, okay, if you're holding back an idea, you know why? And they would say, well, because you know, something bad happened in the past. Was okay, how long ago was that?And you wouldn't believe it. Sometimes people say, well about 10 years ago. And then we would say, well, was it at this company? Oh, no, no, no. I was away at some place completely different. But it was enough to teach them that speaking up is scary. So that's one piece of it. And then, you know, other things that came out in our research, 49% said, I'm not regularly asked for my ideas. Something as simple as that.And when we got underneath that binding, the managers are saying, well, I told them I have an open door. And the problem with an open door is it's passive. And for some people, especially if they've had a bad experience in the past, it still takes some level of courage to walk through that open door. And another thing that people said, which the most surprising finding quite frankly for me was 56% said, they're not sharing ideas because of fear they will not get the credit. And, you know, as fascinating. As I've been sharing that statistic people like aha. Yeah, well that happened to me too. And  so, I think that really resonates with folks. And then another statistic that I thought was really interesting was 50% said nothing will ever happen. So why bother?And sometimes that nothing will ever happen. Isn't actually true. Something has happened, but the loop isn't closed. Right? So, people think their idea went into this black hole, you know, and because we're not circling back. So, whether it's an employee survey, it's a suggestion box. It's in a one-on-one meeting. Are we closing the loop and what we call responding with regard to the ideas that are coming forward? Brian Ardinger: That's a fascinating insight, because I see that a lot when we talk with corporations and what are their innovation efforts. And a lot of them say, well, we're doing these hackathons. Or challenges and asking for employee feedback.And that's great to do that, but what they fail to do is put the process in place and what to do with those ideas after they come through the funnel. And like you said, be able to either close the loop or have a process that moves those particular ideas forward. So, you don't have this environment where people throw things in and, and again, like you say, the black hole of nothingness. And they get discouraged to do it again.In the book, you talk a lot about this loop between clarity and curiosity, kind of back and forth. Can you talk a little bit about that and why that's so important? Karin Hurt: Yes. So, when you're building a courageous culture, it really does start with clarity. And that's clarity around two things. One clarity that you really do want people's ideas. And we found this to be really, really critical as we were testing the different tools and techniques. Clarity about where you need a great idea. So, you know, not just going out and saying, hey, do you have any ideas to improve the business? Or what do you think we could do to improve productivity? That feels intimidating. Yeah. That's like, well, gosh, where do I start? I have so many ideas. So instead, if you say, can you tell me one idea that you have to and then fill in where your strategic initiative is. You know, to improve our diversity, equity, inclusion efforts. One idea to take this new product to market. One idea to go into this new customer space. One idea to improve the customer experience. When you can ask for that, and that constraint actually owns up the creative process. And then it's showing up with curiosity. And proactively going out and asking people for their ideas. And we have a variety of tools to do that. You know, one is simply asking courageous questions. And a courageous question is simply a specific and vulnerable question. So, one of my favorite comes from a client of ours. I've known Don Jaeger for 10 years, and he has been consistently asking this question and he's moved from a couple of companies, and he continues to do this. And it worked so well for him. He's the COO of his contact center company. What is one policy we have that just sucks. Now he's asking his frontline agents. The people answering the phones, who are talking to the customers all day long. He knows if they have a policy that is annoying the customers, those folks, the ones that are hearing it. And it's vulnerable because he's the COO.I mean, he either has made the policy or is endorsing the policy, that's pissing off the customers. And so, he finds that when he asked that specific vulnerable question, Then he's got a conversation going, and then he says, oh, thank you. What else? And now it's created a safe space for people to share what else is on their minds? He's said this he's gotten a lot of really good insights around that. Another example of curiosity is teaching people how to vet their ideas so that they bring you better ideas. And one model that we use, and we teach in our training programs is our idea model, which is okay, when you're thinking through an idea.Tell me why is this idea interesting, meaning strategically aligned with where we're headed as an organization or the project we're working on? D is it doable? Tell me why you think we could actually pull this thing off. E is an engaging meaning who else might we need to include in this? This is where you teach your team to think about stakeholders and then A, what are a couple of key actions recommended next steps to get started?So, you know, if you were an employee and you were sitting here listening to this and saying, yeah, I have ideas, but I'm still a little nervous. If you went to your manager and said, gosh, you know, I really care about this team. I want us to be successful. I have an idea. Here's why it's interesting. Here's why it's doable. Here's who else? I think we need to include. And here are a couple of next steps. They still might not implement your idea, but you are going to show up as a critical thinker, team player, who wants to make an impact. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: One of the things that I've talked about in our practice is this idea of changing the mindset. Most ideas are quite frankly crap when they first start. You haven't figured everything out. It's new and unknown and that.So, if you come in with more of a side project mindset. It's like, this is my side project, or this is my experiment that I want to run, it changes the framework. And a lot of times it gets rid of that fear of it having to be perfect to launch. Or having to be perfect to have that conversation with your boss and that. What's your take on that? Karin Hurt: I can, I agree with you more. I love that so much. You know, I'm always like, so just do a pilot. And, you know, I was at Verizon for 20 years and I led some really large teams there. And in one of those roles, I had a particularly change resistant boss. Like he just was super corporate. He didn't want to try anything different, you know, he's like, if it didn't come from headquarters, we're not doing it.And that's not me. And I'm not happy leading in a role like that. And I had a big job. So, I was constantly saying, let's just try it in this one market. And let me prove it in. Let's just try it with a couple of our employees. Let's take a couple of our high performers and let them kick the tires on this thing.Yeah. And that made it very, he's like, okay, but don't tell anybody you're doing it. Yeah. But then he was very happy to take it to headquarters when we proved it in. And so, I think that is a way to deal with that. And I'll say that even when we're selling in training programs to folks, I'm like you don't need to say you're going to train all of your leaders, just give me one team. And let me show you the impact and how this will play out in your culture. And that's really much easier for people to say, oh yeah, well, we could try that. Brian Ardinger: So, in your book, you talk about how you're trying to create micro innovators. These small, powerful people that can take action and do things. Is this something that you see courageous cultures being built from the ground up or top down or a combination of both. Karin Hurt: Mostly you need to go from the top down. For our first book, Winning Well was really more practical for the frontline managers to do this. To really truly create a courageous culture, you need to do all the things, right.You need to be having very clear that you do want a culture of innovation. You need to be communicating that consistently five by five. You've got to have strategic priorities that people know where things are headed. Some of that can come from the top, right? With that said either you're a manager listening to this, or you're an individual contributor and saying, I would like to be a micro innovator.You don't need to go out and declare, well, we need to build a courageous culture around here. Everybody should read Karin's book. No, just figure out where is one area of the business that could improve? And come up with a little idea. It doesn't have to be game-changing. It's just a little idea that would make things better.How would you have less stress in your day, if one process was improved. How can you collaborate better and reduce the friction that you've got with this other department that's driving you crazy? You know, that's the micro-Innovation. And when you have a culture where more and more people are coming up with these little incremental ideas, they completely add up to build a more courageous culture.Brian Ardinger: How do you start measuring your progress and success? How do you know if you are on your way to building that courageous culture? What things do you look at and what things can you measure? Karin Hurt: Yeah, so I would say one of the things that you really will see is you getting more ideas when you are in meetings, what is happening? Is it you're coming in with the agenda and everybody's listening to you and taking notes and doing what you say? Or are people saying, you know what, I'm not sure that's going to work. Or what about this? Could we try it this way? Or have an idea. And I think the quality of your ideas, because at first you might get a lot of ideas, then you're like, oh my goodness, why did we even open this can of worms? But over time as you teach people, what a good idea looks like, how to vet their ideas, how to articulate their ideas, how to, to your point pilot and test their ideas, you will see that happening. And then, you know, I think the other thing is the irony about a courageous culture is it takes less daily courage to show up because this is the way we do things around here. So, it doesn't feel courageous to raise my hand because everybody is raising their hand. So, I think that is one of the things. Now, where does it play out in business outcomes? Well, you're going to see ideas that improve productivity. That improve the customer experience. So, you see those metrics improve.And from an employee engagement perspective, it will definitely improve retention because people will feel seen. And, you know, we have this one client we've been working with for two years now. And we have trained pretty much everybody. Every leader from the senior team to the VPs, to the Director in the revenue generating and the revenue enabling side of the business it's become cultural.And one of the interesting things that they've told us is, you know, before we started working with you and really introducing this courageous cultures concept, the number one reason people were leaving was leadership. That's what they said in their exit interviews. Now it's not one of the top reasons people are leaving anymore. The cost savings of better retention is tremendous. Brian Ardinger: We are living in this new world hybrid world, or COVID, everything has literally changed the way every business is working. What are some of the trends or things that you're seeing and how can courageous culture play out as we evolve the workspace in general.Karin Hurt: Yeah. So, a couple things that I'm seeing play out as I'm sure you are too, is one, is there is a deeper need for human connection. People are really craving it. There's been a lot of mental health issues. There are people who've been through a lot. We're all tired. And so, leaders need to be more attuned to that than ever.And part of what we've seen as I've been watching good leadership and bad leadership throughout this time, is good leadership is really correlated to are people willing to show up and be authentic and a little bit more transparent than they have in the past. And I've watched people, managers who've showed up, you know, with their teams and said, I know this isn't easy. It's not easy for me too. Here's why, you know, why I know this is hard for you. Here's a little bit of a, what's been happening to me. But here's what I do believe. Now clarity. I believe in you; I believe in this team. And I know that we'll figure it out. Then curiosity. So, what ideas do you have as we've transitioned to working from home? What do you need? What's one idea that you have that could make you more productive while you're working from home? And so, it's that. It's that human, being, being human. And I think if there's any silver lining out of this whole mess that we've been in, it's that people are paying more attention to leadership. And to developing their leaders and understanding that you can't do it without the deeper human connection.Brian Ardinger: Well and that's so difficult in a remote type of environment. Are there things that you're seeing that have made it easier for some companies to latch onto that? Or create that more intimate relationship even though a lot of them are remote.Karin Hurt: So, the number one thing I would say is getting really great at one-on-one meetings. And not just phoning in the one-on-one meetings, where you show up, you have the same agenda every time, you know, and you just check it off. It's saying what does this person, this human being need most at this time. And so, you know, we talk about there's five different things that you could include in your one-on-ones. Are you having a connection one-on-one where you're just really checking in on a human level? Are you having a clarity one-on-one where you're really reinforcing strategic priorities? So, people understand what's most important right now in the sea of things coming at them. Are you curios? A one-on-one where you're going to ask them for their ideas. And so, thinking about each person on your team. And then how do you mix up the way you're doing the one-on-ones so they feel fresh. That they are serving the team. And I think if every manager could get really good at one-on-ones you're halfway there. Yeah. Brian Ardinger: Well, we have a lot of startup founders who listen to this podcast as well. Do you have any advice for companies that are forming new cultures and how to get it right early and avoid some of the pitfalls that bigger companies have fallen into?Karin Hurt: Absolutely. And that's actually one of our favorites. We work with a lot of clients that are venture based, fast growing startups. And that seems to be a sweet spot because as you're growing fast, you get to that point and you're like, oh, we probably ought to be more intentional about our culture and the values and the behaviors.And so, the things that I would say there is start by really defining what does success look like. And, you know, one way we actually do that with folks is we give people two pieces of paper and say draw the picture of what we're trying to be. Draw the picture of what we look like right now. And, you know, sometimes you'll see, especially with startups, the house is on fire.Usually there's a house on fire somewhere in the room. Right. And we would like not to be that. We would like to be smooth and organized. Or you'll see, gosh, we're in a lot of silos when we were really small, we just got in a room, and we figured it all out. And now as we're growing, we've got unnecessary bureaucracy that is creeping in and we never wanted to be that way.You can start there. And then you'd say, okay, what are the values? And not just, you can do this well, or you can do this in a way that's just not going to work very well. What are the values and don't just paint them on your walls or put it on your internet and call it a day? Then get really tactical about what are the behaviors both internally about how you're going to function and externally how you're interfacing with your clients or customers. And how does that play out?And then you could even say, get, come up with some scenarios of, and we do this a lot with folks. What are these two values are in clash? Like if compassion for your employees, is in tension with a, you know, responsiveness value. How do you play that out in real life scenarios? And so, and just getting people to talk about that and then looking at every element from how are you hiring, how are you onboarding? How are you rewarding and recognizing? And are you building those values and those behaviors consistently. And the final thing I would add there because this happens most of the time, if there is a turkey who is not behaving according to your values, just because they were there with you from the very beginning, if they are destroying your culture and you keep looking the other way, everybody is watching that.And you can say we value integrity, but if they're not operating with integrity, that is a problem. And some of our clients have had to make some really hard decisions of people that they cared about who were there at the beginning, but who could not behave consistently according to the values. And they have not regretted having to make that choice.Brian Ardinger: It's about being courageous, right? Yup. Doing the hard things sometimes. Excellent. Well, Karin, thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to tell us a little bit about this. I, again, encourage people to grab the book. It's called Courageous Cultures. If people want to find out more about yourself or more about the book, what's the best way to do that? Karin Hurt: So, our website is letsgrowleaders.com and on LinkedIn. Love to connect with people on LinkedIn. Answer any of your questions. It's Karin with an I. Karin Hurt on LinkedInBrian Ardinger: Excellent. Well, Karen, thanks again for coming on to the program and looking forward to continuing the conversation as the years continue on.Karin Hurt: Excellent. Thank you so much. It's been my pleasure.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  As an Amazon Affiliate, we may ear a small commission from purchases.  

Cupertino
Un Mac en toda la cara

Cupertino

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 30:13


La VR de Apple calienta para 2022, con dos rumores sólidos desde diferentes fuentes que nos hacen pensar incluso que los veremos en el WWDC. Patrocinador: En BP quieren estar contigo en cada kilómetro que recorras con tu coche porque les gusta ser parte del viaje de tu vida. Con el programa Mi BP https://mibp.es/es/welcome podrás disfrutar de muchas ventajas. Con muy pocos puntos puedes conseguir https://mibp.es/es/welcome entradas de cine, unas pizzas para cenar o incluso cheques regalo de Amazon. Los visores de realidad mixta de Apple calientan para 2022, con dos rumores sólidos desde diferentes fuentes que nos hacen pensar incluso que los veremos en el WWDC de junio. ¿Será verdad que costarán 3.000 dólares, o podremos esperar un precio más reducido? Un ¿fallo? de la App Store añade miles de reseñas de podcast para la aplicación oficial de Podcasts de Apple, destapando sospechas de propios y extraños. Y por último, lamentamos informar que Matías ha perdido su cartera por no llevar un AirTag dentro. Kuo: Apple's AR headset to launch in 2022 with Mac-level computing power, will operate without the iPhone - 9to5Mac https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/25/kuo-apples-ar-headset-to-launch-in-2022-with-mac-level-computing-power-will-operate-without-the-iphone/ Kuo: Apple's AR/VR headset to support Wi-Fi 6 - 9to5Mac https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/31/kuo-apples-ar-vr-headset-to-support-wi-fi-6e-for-higher-bandwidth-and-low-latency/ Apple Car, VR Headset Launch Plan; Belkin Boost Charge Pro Review - Bloomberg https://www.bloomberg.com/news/newsletters/2021-11-28/apple-car-vr-headset-launch-plan-belkin-boost-charge-pro-review-kwjly0i1?cmpid=BBD112821_POWERON Gurman: Apple is still working on a 'multi-device' wireless charger - AppleTrack https://appletrack.com/gurman-apple-is-still-working-on-a-multi-device-wireless-charger/ Conozca por qué una confusión ha hecho que Apple Podcast revierta su racha de malas calificaciones - Infobae https://www.infobae.com/america/tecno/2021/11/21/conozca-por-que-una-confusion-ha-hecho-que-apple-podcast-revierta-su-racha-de-malas-calificaciones/ https://twitter.com/keleftheriou/status/1460856187595804676 Life360 compra Tile por 180 millones de euros | Viatea https://viatea.es/noticias/life360-compra-tile/ Tile says AirTags helped its business, still says Apple is 'unfair' | AppleInsider https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/11/20/tile-says-airtags-helped-its-business-still-says-apple-is-unfair Puedes ponerte en contacto con nosotros por correo en: alex@barredo.es Suscríbete al boletín de información diario en https://newsletter.mixx.io Escucha el podcast diario de información tecnológica en https://podcast.mixx.io Nuestro grupo de Telegram: https://t.me/mixxiocomunidad

九八新聞台
股市熱炒店 投資Online|族群缺電 台股高檔震盪 航運冒出頭? 元宇宙核心關鍵!伺服器將引爆下波飆漲商機! 2021.11.25

九八新聞台

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 33:25


主持人:方詩瑋 來賓:張志誠 分析師 主題:族群缺電 台股高檔震盪 航運冒出頭? 元宇宙核心關鍵!伺服器將引爆下波飆漲商機! 本集播出日期:2021.11.25 內容: 股市熱炒店 飆股在裡面! 元宇宙Metaverse席捲投資市場,臉書直接改名Meta宣布五年轉型元宇宙公司,谷歌、亞馬遜、微軟也積極布局,跟AR、VR相關個股早已漲翻天!沒賺到怎麼辦?今天張志誠分析師要帶你切入元宇宙的核心關鍵!搶先抓住下波飆漲商機! ▼更多內容▼ 股市熱炒店YT:https://pse.is/39bfcs 股市熱炒店FB:https://lihi1.cc/ceSND 股市熱炒店TG:https://pse.is/38825q TG:morehappy1688 LINE@:@morehappy1688 有任何問題歡迎提問! 摩爾投顧:www.morerich.com.tw/ (109)金管投顧新字第030號 本資料僅供參考,投資時應審慎評估, 興櫃股票登錄條件較上市(櫃)股票寬鬆,且無每日漲跌幅限制,投資人應審慎評估是否適合投資     -----  ▍九八新聞台@大台北地區 FM98.1 ▍官網:http://www.news98.com.tw ▍粉絲團:https://www.facebook.com/News98 ▍線上收聽:https://pse.is/R5W29 ▍APP下載 • APP Store:https://news98.page.link/apps • Google Play:https://news98.page.link/play ▍YouTube頻道:https://www.youtube.com/user/News98radio ▍Podcast • Apple Podcast:https://goo.gl/Y8dd5F • SoundCloud:https://soundcloud.com/news98

Inside Outside
Ep. 274 - Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for Agora on Startup Tech, Trends & Ecosystems

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:48


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for Agora. Todd and I talk about the new technologies and trends from no-code tools to embedded audio and video platforms, that affect how we see, hear, and interact with each other. We also explore how companies are tapping into startups and startup ecosystems to enable founders to build and impact the world more effectively. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation as the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO. Each week. We'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for AgoraBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have Todd Embley. He is a Senior Startup Advocate for Agora and a formerly with China Accelerator. So welcome to the show, Todd, Todd Embley: Thank you, Brian. It's good to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you because we've met a while back early in my startup days when I was running NMotion. You were in China. And we met at some global accelerator network conference. I think it was in San Diego, perhaps. So, you spent a lot of time in Asia, as I did. And recently moved back to the states, working for a interesting company called Agora. We had a chance to run into each other again in Lincoln. Todd Embley: Yeah. Thanks very much. I actually did come back from China and moved to the U.S. but now I'm back in Canada. I am Canadian and I'm living in Western Canada. Brian Ardinger: I wanted to start the conversation with the most recent company that you're with is a company called Agora. It's an interesting company for a couple different reasons. And it's a real-time engagement platform that a lot of popular companies are using to build on top of like Run the World, which is something that we've used for our IO Conferences and that. And some of our IO Live events. I think you guys provide like the SDKs and the building blocks to enable these types of startups to build off of. So, I I'd love to get your take, not on just Agora, but you've got an interesting role there as a Startup Advocate. So, what is a Startup Advocate? Todd Embley: It's a great role, for those of us who aren't necessarily adept at selling. And we fall under marketing. And the role is really, if I were to compartmentalize everything that we're about and our ethos and thesis. Is go out into startup land and be as helpful as possible. Try to integrate. You know, we sponsor. I run workshops. I meet with lots and lots of entrepreneurs all the time, and we're just out there trying to be as helpful as possible. And the great thing that the company and the founders and senior leadership have all gotten behind is just be out and be as helpful as possible. And wear the t-shirt while you're doing it. That's almost the be all and end of it. And for those that are really interested in what Agora is and what Agora does, then we can get into that. But essentially, we're not trying to put it in front of everybody and not trying to blast everybody with, with Agora specifically. The team is comprised of people who have been entrepreneurs, been in startups, been in VC, run accelerators. And who have just a lot of empathy for startups and that's kind of where it begins and ends. Brian Ardinger: We see a couple of different companies use this approach of startup advocate type of program to help build their business. Walk me through like, what are the benefits and the reasons why a corporation would want to put together some type of program around this.Todd Embley: You know, I think AWS and what they've been doing for as long as they've been doing it are kind of the benchmark. And they were, I would say the pioneers, at least the most famous pioneers of running programs like this. Our senior leadership had an opportunity in China to talk to the heads of AWS Activate in China.And they divulged some interesting statistics, which I think were the precipice of Agora wanting to build their own startup team as well. And that was that after 15 years of them having a program, they will now attribute up to 65% of AWS revenues today to the activities, you know, over the last 15 years, of their startup program.And what we're trying to do is invest in our future huge customers. Knowing that the world's next billionaire companies, trillion-dollar companies. The unicorns of the future are still just startups today. And if we want to align ourselves correctly with what it takes to build a startup and how hard it is, let's maybe try to get out of their way at the early stages while they're trying to cross the early chasms of, you know, and the difficulties of what it takes. So, from a revenue perspective or from a cost perspective, let's give our stuff for free. You know, until you, their revenue. You can't get blood from a stone. So, while they're still searching for product market fit and revenue, let's let them use our software for free until such time as they are then finding product market fit and then able to start generating revenue. And only at that time, should we then start to talk to them about actually paying for the service? Brian Ardinger: That makes sense. And obviously it seems to be working. I think I read on your website, you've got over 50 billion minutes of engagement on the platform. Probably going up as we speak. I don't know if you can speak to any specific use cases or specifically what you do when it comes to helping these companies get up and off the ground. Todd Embley: Sure. As you alluded to, there are some famous companies that have been using us, especially in the real-time audio space. There are a few NDAs in place. So, you could mention who those companies are. And by all means it's pretty widely known. I necessarily can't speak directly to who some of those more famous ones are. But the nuts and bolts of the program essentially boils down to free minutes. So, my Director, Tony Blank. He and another friend of ours, Paul Ford, used to do this at SendGrid. And that's where they were a big supporter of the Global Accelerator Network where you and I met in the beginning and then the Twilio acquisition of SendGrid. So, he was there. And they were doing a great job as well. And leading on some of the data from their experience there, or Tony's experience there, and then understanding our business and the data that we had over the years that Agora has been thriving. We positioned the amount of minutes at 1 million, we figured 1 million minutes of Agora should be enough for most companies to achieve product market fit and revenue.If you haven't achieved product market fit and revenue, after using a million minutes of Agora, you may have some underlying other issues that are getting in the way of that. But we really feel that upwards of 80%, even 90% of companies who do achieve and use up the million free minutes, should be at a position of having raised money and are revenue positive.At which time we feel comfortable to say, okay, though, now we do have to, for our business purposes, need to, to work on something and we'll hand them over to sales in a gentle way and work on getting them some discounts and start forecasting future usage and things like that. But those are the nuts and bolts.In our world of real-time video, real-time audio, just the real-time engagement aspect of it. There are certain verticals that are really taking off. I think health is obviously a big one where you have doctors and patients or therapists and their clients. We're seeing a lot in fitness, so for coaches training. Doing big group classes. Education is probably our biggest. I think that's a pretty obvious use case of doing real time lessons with teachers and things. But we're also seeing a lot of activity in the area of gaming where people want talk to each other. They want to be on video with each other while playing games together. Live performances and experiences around online virtual concerts or comedy shows or things like that as well. There's a lot of added context that you can get from engaging in real time, over video. That you couldn't get at an actual conference.You know, there are solutions coming around blending those where you might be at the concert, but you'll also have on your phone different camera angles that are available to a viewer. And you can get other contextual information that is happening plus chats with other people at the concert or something like that.And then, you know, a lot of multi-verse. A lot of VR stuff. I mean, I had a conversation with a startup out of New Zealand who was working in the overcoming therapy space, where if you had a phobia of dogs, you know, a psychologist would work with their client, and they would go to a kennel and slowly start to integrate and learn how to overcome. But now we can do that in a VR environment, but overlay a lot of very interesting artificial intelligence, facial recognition. Stuff like that to really be able to measure the things that are almost imperceptible to the human eye, to understand like the dilation of their pupils when faced with a small dog versus a big dog or different breeds or something, just giving a lot more contextual information to help a psychologist really work with their client to overcome a phobia. So, it's fascinating to work with the startups because they are thinking of use cases that we even within Agora can't think of. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: Well, and that's an interesting thing because the platform itself is really robust. You can do video calls and voice calls and interactive live streaming and real-time messaging and white boarding. And like you said, the toolkits are there. And I think this fits into one of those trends that we've been talking about, where it's never been easier for a startup founder to find the tools they need. They don't necessarily have to build everything from scratch nowadays. They can find partners and no code, low code tools and things like that to get up and going and testing the marketplace a lot easier than ever before. And get to those use case scenarios that a platform tool provider may not have thought of originally. I'm curious to get your take on some of this accessibility to tools that founders didn't have maybe, you know, 10 years ago when we started in this business. Todd Embley: Yeah, it's amazing. I think back to, I used to be with SOSV was the fund, and we were doing kind of an internal conference for all of our portfolio, all of our mentor network. Everybody that had ever been involved with us, including investors in Agora or LPs. And we had a guy named Dave McClure come and speak. And somebody had asked him is your eight-year-old daughter learning how to code. And he said, let me rephrase that. I think what you're asking me is do I think that it is important for very young people to learn how to code and essentially that's what you're looking for. And he said, you know, coding is like learning any other language, you know, in the development of the brain and how that enables young people to really grow. But it is in his opinion, he said it is just kind of a commodity. He said coding is probably going to become a commodity. And we've seen that in the low-code no-code explosion.And then he thought, you know, design would probably not be that far behind. I mean, there probably will be a day in the future where our phones will know everything they need to know about us, where you won't have to necessarily code or design the UI UX CX, of how an app works and feels. Because it can just deploy to our phone and our phone can tell the app how to develop itself as it lands on our home screen, in the way that we prefer it to be from colors to where the settings are or where our profile lives.And we can navigate that so intuitively. It has been absolutely amazing. And I think, you know, as we go, we've launched our app builder where pretty much anybody, even without any coding experience can go on and within 20 minutes create a video conferencing tool that they can use for their family reunion. You know, that is super easy. So yeah, it's been amazing. Brian Ardinger: It is kind of crazy to think what are the uses. I'd imagine obviously COVID has changed the dynamic landscape for you guys, especially. And so maybe let's talk a little bit about that. Some of the trends you're seeing with the move to more remote and more virtual environments. Todd Embley: Anybody who just watches the stock price of Zoom over the last couple of years would understand exactly where this industry has gone, but then factors like the quote unquote Zoom fatigue. And now we're seeing people that want to have more control over the layout and the design and the backgrounds and the information and the chats and emojis and music and all these other things that you can build into it. Because you know, now for instance, all our conferences went virtual, right? So we are now having to figure out how did you run a web summit or you know, like an East Meets West, that Blue Start-ups does in Hawaii or something. How do we now do this online and create a really great experience where everybody can still try to achieve those same outcomes for why they attended in the first place. It's been a pretty amazing growth that has really kind of pushed the boundaries.The work from home, I think has been the biggest thing where everybody's now at home. So, there's working with colleagues. There is collection of data. There is monitoring output and outcomes. And, you know, as a department or as a salesperson or marketing has changed. How do we do now market to people who aren't leaving their homes anymore that has now all changed.It's been such a game changer just in the future of work. I wouldn't say it necessarily changed course, but COVID has absolutely accelerated what we were already starting to think it would be. You know, it's done some damage to the world of coworking spaces, right. Or in-person accelerators or incubators. It's changed how we, even as a startup team go out and find partners and find startups to introduce them to Agora. So, it's had a tremendous impact. Brian Ardinger: You spent a lot of time ecosystem building for lack of a better term. You know, you go to different communities and see what the landscape is in the startup world. And then again, try to help founders navigate that. So, what are you seeing when you travel around to different startup communities and that. What's maybe different than it was five or six years ago? Todd Embley: There's a lot of factors. Entrepreneurship and startup land, as we know it, just even in the last 20 years, let's say since the .com boom and bust. And then, you know, Paul Graham kind of the Godfather of the accelerator starts Y Combinator in 2005. And so, the way investors started investing, and then there was, you know, a lot of information and then Crunchbase and others started coming around. And then, then we had 10 years of data from Crunchbase, somewhere around 2013. That we're now measuring how well people were investing, how well-performing that whole venture financial class was doing.And we've seen things where investors are now looking more at timing of solutions versus not just team and problem, but they had so many investments that were either too early, too late. And they started to recognize that. A lot of funds are starting to look internally and seeing, trying to reinvest inside the value that they've created to capture more of the food on the table versus being so outwardly focused. For our jobs, even in doing ecosystem development, how to startups find us versus how do we find them? If there's no meetups. If we're not able to do in-person startup weekends, then how are we able to find them, to attract them, to support them and to help them. How are investors doing their due diligence? You know, things like DocSend. Right.Having that digital data room with a lot of analytics built into it. So that founders can now not only see who's entering and who's looking at their due diligence documents at, but where in the deck are they spending time? On what slides, what is important? Where are they stopping? Where are they looking at? There's a lot of data and information that they can measure from that as well. I'm not exactly sure if that answers the question, but it is so drastically different. And now we're going back into, you know, web summit is in-person. I'm going to be going to that next week after we record this. That is going to be a different experience as well. And then there's the hybrids that are kind of doing both. It's changed a lot. Brian Ardinger: It is definitely interesting. You know, it's always been hard to find startup founders. A lot of times they're heads down doing their thing. You know, over the last five or six years pre COVID, you started to have a different environment where things like coworking spaces and events like Startup Weekend and that, started to bring some of those folks out and started to get some energy. And then COVID kind of slap that in the face to a certain extent. But now what I'm seeing at least is more collaboration across different communities. So even though I'm based in Lincoln, Nebraska, the network and our reach to different communities for the startups in our backyard, has increased and been beneficial from the standpoint of they're no longer having to be in the middle of flyover country. They can access folks that wouldn't necessarily in the past look outside of their own Sandhill Road area. So, I guess there's pros and cons to this new environment, but I was curious to get your take on that as well. Todd Embley: Constraints, breed Innovation. And COVID has drastically brought a whole new set of constraints just by not being able to meet in person as much. So, I think it's the development and the investment in developing a different skill set. You know, you take one sense away, the other senses improve. And so, we've had to become better at being able to build relationships. And we have video. And we have voice. But suddenly we're tuning in to the video and tuning into the voice. We may not have the same social cues and we may not have the same physical cues to be picking up on things. We used to train entrepreneurs on how to pitch in person. You were on a stage facing an audience. You were standing in front of an investor at a meetup. Here's how you do it. Here's how you talk. Here's how you hold yourself. Be careful of your hands. Don't shift your feet around. You know, there is all these, you know, all this kind of training, which has had to change. Which has had to develop. And now we're reaching out, we're developing partnerships and I think I've seen a lot of ecosystems lean in on having silos or verticals that they're starting to own to be seen as a place.And accelerators are now going virtual, where they're pulling from anywhere. Right. We have a focus. We're vertically focused. And so even if you're in Brazil or you're in Russia or wherever, this is the accelerator that you want to join because the world has just been absolutely flattened. And now this is the best place. This is the best accelerator, and you don't have to fly in and live here. Right? So now you've seen costs of living. People are moving out of the main centers. It's just, it's been a tremendous change. Brian Ardinger: You've spent your life helping founders. And I'd love to get your input on for our founders that are listening to this show. Some of the biggest obstacles or barriers or things that you've seen or can help them overcome. Are there particular tips or tricks that founders should be paying attention to nowadays?Todd Embley: I still think it all starts with the problem. And I still find myself having to talk about deep diving into the problem discussion. And there has been a penchant for the snapshot. And of the landscape as it is today. But I think what we're starting to understand. And what I'm seeing from a lot of questions that come from investors, is it's not as much about what. It's about why. And when you're pitching or talking about what you're doing, you have to start layering in the why.This is our go to market strategy. Great. Doesn't really matter, but why did you choose that? They're being measured on the way they think. The way they process. The way they built. What data did you take in. Which did you keep? And which did you throw away and why? And then what decision and strategy did you make off of that data?And why did you decide to strategize that? Why are you deciding to build this next? Why is this the next iteration of what you're doing, this problem that you're trying to solve? Anybody can Google and get a lot of data on a problem that exists today. But do you have a deep understanding of how we got here? You know, we have this Canadian kind of saying of the Wayne Gretzky, don't go where the puck is, go, where the puck is going to be.And as investors, we're always trying to find the entrepreneurs who are good at figuring out where the puck is going to be. But the only way that they can figure that out, isn't understanding just where the puck is, but how the puck got to where it is. Because only then do we understand the speed and the trajectory and are able to extrapolate off of that to know where it's going with some reasonable degree of accuracy. But we'll never get it right. But that I think is always be factoring in your why. Nobody is going to be blown away by your what because you're still early stage. Unless you have a hundred thousand downloads or a million MRR, you know, it's just not that impressive. Because the only thing that matters is what people use and pay for.So, knowing that. Now, we're just trying to measure size you up as a founder. So lean in on all your why of everything that you're talking about so that they can understand how you develop, how you price, how you see the world. Be unique, be different. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Solid advice. Well, Todd, I want to thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation and sharing your insights and your experiences from the many years of being in the trenches there. I want to encourage people to check out Agora and that. If people want to find out more about yourself or about the startup program at Agora, what's the best way to do that? Todd Embley: Yeah. I mean, if they want to connect with me, LinkedIn is great. Just Todd Embley. I will generally show up. That's a great way to do it. And I'd love to connect. And I love to meet with everybody. And then agora.io/startups is where the entrance to the startup program lives. But Agora.io is where most of the information about Agora lives. And we're happy to talk to anybody, especially partners. Anybody doing events. Anything out there. We'd love to be a part of it. We'd love to sponsor. And try to add value. Brian Ardinger: Well Todd, thanks again for coming on the show. It's great to see you again and look forward to continuing the conversation in the years to come. Todd Embley: Thanks, Brian. It's been great.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Inside Outside
Ep. 273 - Radhika Dutt, Author of Radical Product Thinking on Developing a Vision to Build Products

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:40


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with entrepreneur and product developer Radhika Dutt, Author of the new book, Radical Product Thinking. On this episode, we talk about the product diseases holding back good product development, as well as ways to develop and execute a more radical vision to build products that have impact in a changing world. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Radhika Dutt, Author of Radical Product ThinkingBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Radhika Dutt. She is the author of Radical Product Thinking: The New Mindset for Innovating Smarter. Welcome to the show. Radhika Dutt: Thanks so much for having me on Brian. Brian Ardinger: I am excited to have you on the show. I always love to have entrepreneurs and product folks on here to talk about what it takes to build in today's world. You've been in product development for a long time, and you help companies figure this out. What's the state of product development today? What's working and what's not? Radhika Dutt: I think the most important thing in terms of where we have landed today, right. Is we've learned that the way we build products is by iteration. The mantras have been, you know, fail fast, learn fast. We keep hearing that you really just have to keep iterating and pivoting until you hit this nirvana of product market fit. And here in lies the problem. Because Innovation it's like having a fast car, a fast car is great. It's good to have a fast car. But the problem is, if a fast car is just not that useful, unless you know where you're going. And the ability to iterate fast has often given us this illusion that you don't need to start with a vision, just set off on your journey, and you'll kind of discover a vision. And that is the piece that's really not working.So, if we think about the fact that Lean Startup, Agile, all of these methodologies have really become ubiquitous over the last decade, right? And yet fundamentally the number of startups who succeed or fail hasn't really changed. Right? So, we've really gotten this approach of innovating fast, but what we're really missing is a methodology that helps us set the direction and be able to navigate to it using this fast car. Meaning that our iterations have to be driven by a vision and strategy. And that's the piece that's been not working so far. Brian Ardinger: You talk about in the book, how folks in product and that, or they're building stuff, kind of run in to these product diseases that hold back good product development. Can you talk a little bit about what stops people from developing and maybe getting into this iteration rut? Radhika Dutt: These product diseases are things that we need to be able to speak openly about. Because regardless of the size of company or the industry that we're in, I keep seeing these same product diseases over and over. So, a few that I've run into or caught myself, right? One that I will admit to contributing to myself is obsessive sales disorder.This is where your salesperson comes to you and says, you know, if you just add this one custom feature, we can win this mega client. And it sounds mostly harmless as a product person. I was like, yes, let's do this. Right. And pretty soon, by the end of the year, you're sitting with a stack of contracts and your entire roadmap is driven by what you have to make good on. And that's one example. A really common one is Pivotitus. Pivotitus is where you know this idea that we have that you just pivot until you find product market fit, it leads us to just keep trying different ideas to see what works. And your team just feel demoralized, confused, even your customers, they don't know what you're about anymore. And that's Pivotitus. Brian Ardinger: I love those. And I think a lot of us in product can relate to that. And even more to that, I think it's not just product folks that are running into these particular issues. A lot has changed in the world of product development with things like no code and low code. And pretty much everyone these days has run into this ability to create something. You know, and it's democratized the product development process in general.And so, whether you are in product today and you've seen these things, the majority of folks are going to be running into these diseases, whether they know it or not. What can you talk about to the new product person, the person who maybe is new to this world and trying to understand what does it take to build something of value in this world?Radhika Dutt: Yeah, maybe first, I want to talk about what I mean by product. Because, you know, traditionally we've thought about product is a software or a hardware. A thing, basically, right. A digital or a physical thing. And that view has really become outdated is what I've realized. To me product is your mechanism to create change in the world.It's your vehicle for whatever that change is. And so, you know, whether you're a non-profit, you're working in a government agency, in a high-tech startup, or even freelance. You're creating change in the world. And as a result, you are building a product. And I think that's the first fundamental realization. Given that this is our new definition of product for every person who's entering this field, the question is then, you know, how can you create change very systematically? So, you're most likely running into these diseases and I list seven of them in the book. A few other examples are Hyper Metracina. Which is where we're all about analyzing data and optimizing for metrics, except that sometimes those wrong metrics. And things like Strategic Swelling. Which is where your, either your organization or your product just tries to do more and more and more, but it's just a very bloated product and you kind of lose your way.So, all of these diseases, like it's not just in your product itself, it's in your organization that you might be seeing it. And so, we need to think about product differently as a mechanism to create change. And then think about, are we experiencing these diseases in our organization? And then finally, if you're seeing it, then it's time for a new approach where you create change systematically and build the successful product systematically, which is what Radical Product Thinking is about as a methodology. Instead of taking this approach of let's just try what works, which is kind of evolved from the venture capital business model over the last decade. Brian Ardinger: And what I like about the book is you say all the stuff that we're doing when it comes to Agile or Lean or that, they're good tactical stuff to continue to do. But you almost have to have a layer above. That thinks about the vision and thinks about how does the vision fit into, you called it the Sustainability Matrix. Maybe can you talk a little bit more? Radhika Dutt: You know, one of the things that I've found is, we all know that we need a vision, and it's just that the way we've thought about a vision and what we've learned about, what's a good vision has been so flawed until now. For the longest time, we've heard that a good vision is a BEHAG or a big, hairy, audacious goal. For the longest time, you know, vision statements such as to be the leader in blah, blah, blah, or to be number one or number two in every market. We're touted as just visionary statements. That this is what you want in a vision. You know, stating your big aspirational goal. And the Radical Product Thinking way, what I realized is your vision should not be about you or your aspirations at all. And so, your vision has to be about the change you want to bring about.That's really the starting point of a Radical Product Thinking approach. And so, what I mean by good vision is thinking about questions like whose world are you trying to change? What is their problem? Why does that world even need changing? Because maybe it doesn't. And then you can talk about what the world would look like when you're done. And how you'll bring about this world.And so this is the Radical Product Thinking Approach, where instead of the short slogan you're writing, well, there's this fill in the blank statement that I use for writing such a vision statement. That really makes it easy to do this and answer those profound questions. And once you have a vision, then you can use this vision versus survival.The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. I'd like to talk a little bit about this Radical Vision Worksheet that you have in the book. It's really almost a Mad-Libs way to fill out and fill in the blanks to get you thinking about what your vision really is and who does it serve and how does it work? And I've heard you talk about this before. Like it almost creates, what you said is that the source code of your vision. And then that's not what you necessarily have to portray to the world as far as the marketing around it. But it gives you that guiding force when you're in a product meeting, working with your teams. To look back at that source code and say, hey, are we on track.Radhika Dutt: Exactly. And you know, this idea that your vision statement has to be what you tell the world, is really the marketing vision statement, which, you know, you can figure out the marketing aspect afterwards. But first for your own team, what you really need is the blueprint. If I think about this as a house construction analogy. If your team is actually building that house, would they need is the blueprints of the house.It's not the 3D renderings that look pretty that you start with. Right. And a good vision statement, gives them a clear blueprint of what exactly are we trying to solve? Why are we trying to solve it? And then how are we going to bring about that before? Brian Ardinger: In the book, you also talk a lot about this trap that we fall into of iteratively building products and that. And so specifically like big companies and that, fall into this trap of they've been building a car the same way forever, and they don't necessarily think about, are there different ways to do that? Can you give me some examples? I read in your book about Tesla and Volt, for example. And the two approaches that they had to developing an electric car. Can you talk about some of that? Radhika Dutt: One of the fundamental differences between a Vision Driven Product versus an Iteration Led Product is in an iteration led approach, your iterations are driving where you're going. Where as when you're Vision Driven, right, it's your vision that drives those iterations. So, the example of Tesla versus Volt. Specifically, the Model 3 versus the Chevy Volt. You know, there was this really well-known auto expert, Sandy Munro, and so he took five of these cars and he was looking at these cars under the hood to really evaluate, you know, which car is better. And he had a profound reaction to the Model 3. It was like, wow, this car is revolutionary. It's not inching up. And whereas on the Chevy Volt, he said, well, this is a good little car, and you know, it's value for your money kind of thing. But the Tesla Model 3, like he was just raving about it. But if you look under the hood, like you really get to the why. The Tesla, it has a 40% more efficient engine, and it had this hall effect that Sandy Munro says, you know, I've only ever heard about it. I never seen an engine being built using this approach. And he couldn't even figure out how they manufactured some of the elements that made this engine. Whereas he looked at the Chevy Volt, he was like, you know, I'm very familiar with all of these pieces. This looks pretty much like a gas car except in an electric format.And then if you look at why Tesla built this transformative product versus Volt was just an evolutionary thing. It all comes down to their vision. The Chevy Volt was built with this vision of beating Tesla Model 3 to market with a car that had a range of over 200 miles. On the other hand, the Model 3 was built with a more transformative vision, a radical vision, which was about the change that they wanted to bring about. Which was to make it no compromise and give an affordable car to a driver who wanted to go green.And so, the two visions lead to very different products and being vision driven means taking the transformative vision and systematically just infusing it in every aspect of your product. And that's why the end product is so different. And so, in the Radical Product Thinking, right, the idea is not just that you start with a vision, but it's a step-by-step approach. So that, that vision is very systematically translated into every aspect of your product, into your everyday activities. So, your everyday activities become connected to a vision. Brian Ardinger: I'd love to get your input on some of the new trends that you're seeing when it comes to product development. Again, a lot of the stuff that used to be new as far as Lean and Agile has, there's a lot been written about. 10 years ago, it was tough to get tactical in that particular space because it was so new. You know, now we've seen a lot of folks that have executed on that particular format. What are some of the new trends that you're seeing and how do you see the world of product development playing out? Radhika Dutt: You know, we're still getting better at doing more testing, more AB testing, optimizing, right. And fundamentally the trends that I keep seeing, they aren't that different. It's more that our tactics have improved in terms of how we're doing this. If I think about product management, maybe 10 years ago, we didn't have all these tools to be this data driven. Now, there are just so many tools to be able to know how well your product is working.Is your user going through the right journeys? What all are they clicking on? What are they doing on your products? Like we've become more data-driven and have more insight into what our users are doing. We capture every piece of data and work on analyzing it. So those are more of the trends that I keep seeing. Right. But what I haven't seen is a fundamentally big shift in how are we thinking about the data? What exactly are we trying to learn from these insights? So that's one thing. The second trend, this one I'm excited about. I'm starting to see the first kernels of product people realizing that, you know, we're building products that affect society, and we have to take responsibility for what we're building.There's a chapter in my book, where I talk about Digital Pollution. And the chapter after that is the Hippocratic Oath of Product. It's fascinating to me that these two chapters are so polarizing. There are people who love the fact that I included that in the book. Because this gives you the superpower for building successful products and it has to come with the responsibility of building products that don't create collateral damage to society. But there's also, an equally large faction of people who say, you know, that had no place in your book. You should just talk about how to build successful products. You shouldn't be talking about, you know, digital production and this Hippocratic oath of product.Brian Ardinger: Well, it is interesting because you do see a lot more discussion around what it is that we build and the effects of that. And I think 10 years ago, a lot of the product building was I need to build an app because that's the new technology out there. And we've gotten to a place where a lot of that low hanging fruit of product development has been picked. And so now it's really about, we're having to tackle harder problems. And whether it's climate change or social media injustice or, or whatever, they're hard problems out there. And I think it takes more radical thinking around what type of products we produce to try to solve this particular problem.So, I found it interesting that you included that in the book as well. Primarily to get people thinking about, it's not just about solving a particular customer pain point. It's like the larger vision that you need to be including as you develop products out there. Radhika Dutt: Exactly. And my goal was to provide a framework so that we can think about, you know, how are we affecting society with our products. And ways to identify digital pollution that we might be contributing to as only if we have that awareness that we can actually do something about it. But I want to go back to something you just said in terms of trends. What you talked about, you know, it's basically that we seem to be commoditizing the skillset. When you said we've picked all that low hanging fruit, all that I was saying about, you know, we've gotten better at doing data analytics and AB testing, et cetera. I think that is really like to articulate that trend, it's that those skill sets are becoming commoditized. And what's really going to set people apart is doing that next level, which is what you are just saying. Brian Ardinger: If there are people listening, they're maybe working in an existing company, iterating through their products and that, but they want to be more radical. They want to be more transformational with what they do. Are there tips or tricks that they can start introducing into their team or into the product development that can help start moving that needle? Radhika Dutt: I'll share two types. One is, you know, if you are working in a larger organization, it's always hard to bring change. When you bring a radical new idea, it's like you're introducing a foreign body into this organization and you'll see organizational immunity that tries to attack this foreign body.And so, the first start that you need is to be able to talk about why are you even introducing this new body, so there's more acceptance. So, start with a discussion around product diseases. Very often, like the way I've even approached this, and sort of this slightly sneaky way is, you know, you do a book club where people start to think about these product diseases and kind of like, oh, that's what we're suffering from. So that gives you this first entry point to start talking about, you know, maybe we need a new, radical way of thinking about this. That's one step. The second is with your world, where you have control, you can start to develop a radical vision and start to use that with your team. You had talked about vision versus sustainability. Maybe, you know, in the book, I call it Vision versus Survival to make it really much clearer in terms of what we're trading off. So having a vision is good, but using your vision in everyday work, that's where the real power comes in. And so the way you use your vision is if we think about our own intuition, what we're really doing is we're balancing the long time against the short term. Which means that we're thinking about vision versus survival in the short term, where vision is the longer-term picture. And so things that are both good for the vision and survival they're of course ideal.But if we always focus on just the ideal, then we're just still being short-term focused. And so sometimes you have to invest in the vision where it's good for the vision, but not good in the short term. For instance, if you're refactoring code for three months or working on technical debt, you're investing in the vision. And the other quadrant, right, is Vision Debt. Basically, if you're finding this Obsessive Sales Disorder disease, it's because you have too much vision debt. It's where you're doing things that are good for survival in the short term, but it's not good for the vision. And so the way you can infuse your vision in everyday actions is you start to talk about your decisions on this two by two matrix of Vision versus Survival. If you find yourself taking on a lot of vision debt, then you know that, okay, maybe something needs to change here. And talk about your decisions so that everyone is aligned on what are the right trade-offs for your particular company. There aren't any right answers, but those discussions are what really are most important.The tips that I have for our listeners is you start with product diseases and a discussion of why you need a new approach. Then work on a vision and then use that vision and making decisions as you trade off long-term against short term.For More InformationBrian Ardinger: I love that. And I encourage anybody who's listening to grab the copy of the book, because it does walk you through the process. It gives you some great frameworks. Some exercises and a lot of great examples as well. So, if people want to find out more about yourself or about the book, what's the best way do that? Radhika Dutt: So, the book is on Amazon. It's Radical Product Thinking: The New Mindset for Innovating Smarter. The free tool kit is also available on the website. It's radicalproduct.com. And then finally, if people want to reach out to me on LinkedIn, I'm easy to find there. And I always love to hear stories of how people are applying Radical Product Thinking in their innovation journey. Brian Ardinger: Radhika, thank you very much for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to talk about the book and all the new things that you're seeing out there. I'm excited to see where the world is going when it comes to product development and appreciate your time today. Radhika Dutt: Thanks so much for having me on this has been such a pleasure.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

The Jason Cavness Experience
Replay of Bernard Mendez CEO of Interco Industries

The Jason Cavness Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 116:39


This is a replay of my talk with Bernard Mendez on The Jason Cavness Eperience. Bernard is the CEO of Interco Industries Sponsor The Jason Cavness experience is sponsored by CavnessHR. CavnessHR focus on your business, we've got to HR! CavnessHR delivers HR to companies with 49 or fewer people across the US. Did you know that small business loses an estimated $27 billion per year because of bad HR. This comes out to an estimated $10,000 per small business employee per year. Do you know that small business owners are spending an average of 25% of the time on HR. Time that would be better spent taking care of their employees, their customers and building a their business. Here at CavneessHR we want to say small business owners time and money. Sign up at www.CavnessHR.com or you can email me at jasoncavness@CavnessHR.com to learn more. We talk about the following His company Interco Industries. Advice for new entrepreneurs. What is AI, Machine Learning, AR/VR and Blockchain. Importance of Product Market fit and Idea Validation. Bernard's Bio Bernard started his first website as an 11 year old in the age of dial-up. He studied at the Illinois Institute of Technology where he was elected as the Student Government VP of Finance. On his time off he was a member of the motorcycle racing club and founder of the school's martial arts gym. After graduation, Bernard joined the Army as a logistics officer where he deployed across the world and served as a parachute jumpmaster with the 1st and 3rd Special Forces group for 6 years before moving on to the tech world. He went back to his roots and began to re-learn the tech world where he found many new challenges. Bernard is a managing partner and CEO at Interco Industries. Interco provides clients with technology solutions through data analytics, AR/VR and custom hardware solutions that help reduce overhead, lower equipment, improve decision making and maximize efficiency. Bernard's Social Media Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/interco-industries/about/ Bernard's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bmendez6/ Company Website: https://www.intercoindustries.com/ Bernard's Gift We're launching our latest iteration of our website. We'd love to hear from you. We'd love to hear what kind of pain points you guys have going on. Let's see what kind of issues are coming in your business and see how we can help bring the latest technology that develops products that are customized to your needs and see how we can help you grow, develop and use the latest tech to really get a step ahead of that competition. Bernard's Advice I would just say read some books. I'm a big fan of nonfiction man. I used to do the whole YouTube video and like reading articles and all the online stuff and I still do a little bit. But I try to focus more on published works and trying to get that that knowledge transferred and then see how I can fit it into business or my overall life.

MacCast (Enhanced) - For Mac Geeks, by Mac Geeks

An enhanced podcast about all things Macintosh. For Mac geeks, by Mac geeks. Episode 806. Apple's AR/VR headset to support Wi-Fi 6E. AppleTV+ News. Apple cuts back iPads to push iPhones. “Application out of memory” errors. macOS Monterey “bricking” some Macs. Apple shipped a ton of MacBooks. A few follow-up items. Is this thing on?. Missing iCloud Tabs. Not so Apple Geniuses. Family Sharing Albums Special thanks to our sponsors: Nebia Overland BetterHelp Shownotes in: HTML or OPML Subscribe to the Podcast Feed or Get the MP3

iMore show
Drop the Beat(s)

iMore show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:06


This week on the iMore Show, we take a look at the new earbuds from Beats, break down the latest iPhone display controversy, and look ahead to 2022. Links: Gurman: Apple's mixed reality headset to offer 'high-quality virtual reality' gaming | iMore Kuo: Apple's 2022 AR/VR headset to pack Wi-Fi 6E for improved performance | iMore University of Michigan reveals early results of 'unprecedented' Apple Watch study | iMore Apple's colorful HomePod minis are now on sale | iMore AirPods 3 review: A fantastic set of earbuds with a problematic price point | iMore Beats Fit Pro earbuds are here, cost $200, and might just best AirPods Pro | iMore iPhone 14 could adopt 4nm chip process, claims report | iMore Next-gen Apple silicon to "easily outperform Intel's future processors" | iMore iFixit confirms third-party iPhone 13 display swaps disable Face ID | iMore Sponsors: Capital One: Machine learning at Capital One. Capital One. What's in your wallet? Hosts: Joe Keller Karen Freeman

Rocketship.fm
Antitrust: The Facebook Papers

Rocketship.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 34:20


The internal documents now known as The Facebook Papers, or Facebook Files, are a damning documentation of how the social media giant knowingly causes real world harm. Examples include measures to suppress hateful, deceptive content are lifted after the American presidential election in 2020, as the pro-Trump group “Stop the Steal,” which disputes the legitimacy of the election, experience “meteoric” growth. A dummy test account on Facebook in India is flooded with violent anti-Muslim propaganda - leading researchers to seeing more pictures of dead bodies than they have in their entire lives. A trove of internal Facebook documents reveals that the social media giant has privately and meticulously tracked real-world harms exacerbated by its platforms, ignored warnings from its employees about the risks of their design and algorithmic decisions and exposed vulnerable communities around the world to dangerous content.  The Facebook Papers were leaked by Frances Haugen, a former data scientist at Facebook, who copied thousands of pages of internal documents and webpages before she left the company. Then she shared those materials with The Wall Street Journal, which began publishing stories about them last month under the heading “The Facebook Files.” Weeks later, she began to parcel the materials out to a variety of news organizations. The files have now come to be known as “The Facebook Papers,”  A mix of presentations, research studies, discussion threads and strategy memos, the Facebook Papers provide an unprecedented view into how executives at the social media giant weigh trade-offs between public safety and their own bottom line. Some of the documents were first reported by the Wall Street Journal. Finally we'll cover Facebooks rebrand to Meta - a hopeful shift in focus to the next technological frontier of AR / VR and Web3. *** This episode is brought to you by: Vidyard: The Top Video Tool for SaaS Marketing and Sales http://vidyard.com/rocketship NetSuite: NetSuite by Oracle is a scalable solution to run all of your key back office operations. Go to netsuite.com/rocketship today. Blinkist: Rocketship.fm is now on Blinkist! Listen to 12 minute episodes with no ads! Get seven days free when you check out Blinkist. Indeed: Indeed is the job site that makes hiring as easy as 1-2-3. Get started with a free $75 sponsored job credit at indeed.com/rocketship. BetterHelp: Unlimited Professional Counseling via Online Chat, Video or Phone Anytime, Anywhere. Get 10% off when you visit betterhelp.com/rocketship. Fundrise: Fundrise makes investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks, bonds, or mutual funds. Go to fundrise.com/rocketship today. Airfocus: The home for products and the people who build them. Airfocus is an easy-to-use and flexible product management platform that combines product strategy superpowers with modularity. Visit airfocus.com/rocketship and try it for free today. WIX: When your agency partners with Wix, you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating, managing and growing your business online. Head over to Wix.com/Partners and reimagine what your agency can accomplish. *** This show is a part of the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter for more information about our shows, launches, and events. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy.  Since you're listening to Rocketship, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows surrounding entrepreneurship, business, and careers like Creative Elements and Freelance to Founder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 636: Twisty Buttons - Facebook is Meta, Pixel 6 Pro camera test, Zillow's big mistake, Tesla's Hertz deal

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 147:43


Mark Zuckerberg speaks at Facebook's annual AR/VR conference. Related: Microsoft Teams enters the metaverse race with 3D avatars and immersive meetings. Zuckerberg's Meta promises a 'future' these video games delivered years ago. Facebook teases 'Project Cambria' high-end VR / AR headset. Ant's time with the Pixel 6 Pro and the camera system. Google warns that 'high demand' for Pixel 6 Pro has heavily delayed shipping, the retail stock is scarce. Zillow, facing big losses, quits flipping houses and will lay off a quarter of its staff. Google is turning on two-step verification for a lot of personal accounts. EEOC Launches Initiative on Artificial Intelligence and Algorithmic Fairness. Email is 50 years old, and still where it's @. Waymo cars are coming to NYC to train autonomous vehicles, manual driving only for now. Spain adopts EU copyright law, paving way for Google News to return. Google News to return to Spain. Australia also wants Google to unbundle search from Android. Calling Gina: Microsoft launches Google Wave. Elon Musk Says Tesla Hasn't Signed Contract With Hertz Despite Earlier Announcement. PICKS: Stacey - Flic Twist: The Wireless Dial for your Smart Home. Jeff - Taco bell wedding. Jeff - Turns out Taco Bell weddings are a thing. Jeff - "I make the best mac n cheese". Ant - FLOSS Weekly has been on fire! Ant - Andre Mack Playlist on Bon Appetit. Jason - Chromecast with Google TV promo with Netflix. Jason - Donate to my Movember. Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: udacity.com/TWiT code TWIT75 andela.com/for-companies twit.cachefly.com