Podcasts about Luddite

Organisation of English workers in the 19th century protesting adoption of textile machinery

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Luddite

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Best podcasts about Luddite

Latest podcast episodes about Luddite

Tech Won't Save Us
Science Fiction As Tech Criticism w/ Brian Merchant and Claire Evans

Tech Won't Save Us

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 45:37


Paris Marx is joined by Brian Merchant and Claire Evans to discuss their new science fiction anthology, how it uses the genre to critically interrogate the technologies being rolled out around us, and how it pushes back on the desire of tech billionaires to use science fiction to get the public to buy into their corporate futures.Brian Merchant is a tech journalist and author of The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone. Claire L. Evans is the author of Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet and singer of the Grammy-nominated pop group YACHT. They are the cofounders of Terraform at VICE's Motherboard and the co-editors of Terraform: Watch/Worlds/Burn.  Follow Brian on Twitter at @bcmerchant and follow Claire at @TheUniverse.Tech Won't Save Us offers a critical perspective on tech, its worldview, and wider society with the goal of inspiring people to demand better tech and a better world. Follow the podcast (@techwontsaveus) and host Paris Marx (@parismarx) on Twitter, support the show on Patreon, and sign up for the weekly newsletter.The podcast is produced by Eric Wickham and part of the Harbinger Media Network.Also mentioned in this episode:Brian and Claire wrote about their science fiction anthology and what you can expect from it.Some of the stories mentioned in our conversation are “Busy” by Omar El Akkad, “One Day, I Will Die on Mars” by Paul Ford, and “Devolution” by Ellen Ullman.Brian also wrote about the metaverse and the science fiction that inspired it for Vice.Langdon Winner wrote about the concept of epistemological Luddism in his book Autonomous Technology. Zachary Loeb expanded on it in a great essay called “Luddism for These Ludicrous Times.”Cory Doctorow wrote about science fiction being a Luddite literature.Support the show

Greeny
Hour 1: Luddite

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 41:58


ESPN NFL Analysts Domonique Foxworth & Robert Griffin III stick around after Get Up to recap the MNF doubleheader. Hembo is extra annoying now that the Eagles are 2-0, while the Bills are a machine. Which 0-2 makes the playoffs in the AFC? Hembo got a baby gift from Alan Hahn. Plus, Greeny has something in common with Tom Brady. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hindsightless
387: Neanderthal Luddite Gutter Jester

Hindsightless

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 17:06


In this episode I demonstrate just how guerrilla guerrilla-podcasting can get. Spencer drops us a line about messages, Kevin and I talk speed, while Jason and Rob talk best practices when it comes to being a good player.  If you're in the U.S., feel free to leave me a message @ 661-494-6656

MamaNest |Productivity, Parenting, Minimalism, Mindfulness, Family Wellness ,Finances, Sustainable Lifestyle
35 | Want to make peace with TECHNOLOGY? a 6-STEP system PLUS a comprehensive Solution waiting for you !

MamaNest |Productivity, Parenting, Minimalism, Mindfulness, Family Wellness ,Finances, Sustainable Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 23:08 Transcription Available


Do you identify as a Luddite or a Technophile? Have you ever struggled to keep up with technological advancements? Or perhaps you never consider making peace with technology! You are even aware that your lack of technological knowledge restricts and limits you daily... Let's figure out what we can do to make peace with technology, as well as the best way to learn about it!

Bill Watches Movies
The Omega Man (1971)

Bill Watches Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 158:40


In which we celebrate our third anniversary, along with Colonel Moses, Foxy Cleopatra, Vampire Jim Jones, and his cult of robed, albino, Luddite followers. Bonus points for a lime green velvet jacket and ruffled shirt combo that would make Mozart squeal and write a symphony about its magnificence. Read This Episode's Notes! Visit the Bill Makes Podcasts Website! Leave Feedback To Be Played On The Show at 1(727)755-1338! Join the Gentle Listener Newsletter! Take A Short Listener Survey Links, Links and More Links!

Discovered Wordsmiths
Episode 119B – Emily Wolf – Current Events in Writing

Discovered Wordsmiths

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 37:56


Overview Emily included a legal abortion in her story that she wrote several years ago. Little did she know that when she released that book, legal abortions would be in jeopardy and controversy would surround her story. We discuss how world event affect writing and how to handle it as a writer. https://www.amazon.com/My-Thirty-First-Year-Other-Calamities-ebook/dp/B09TSWPFXL?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1660216244&sr=8-1&linkCode=li2&tag=horrorlasagna-20&linkId=0f4079adf59edad07a019f34dc446c7c&language=en_US&ref_=as_li_ss_il YouTube https://youtu.be/uiwSm7yFSBo Transcript Okay, so let's move on. Talk author stuff, put on your author hat. All when you first thought about this book and started writing to now, you're getting ready to publish and working on another book. What are some things that you've learned that you're doing different with this next book or you've done different with your writing? Emily: Wow. The whole thing with your first book is a learning curve. Every single step of the way from the writing of the book to editing the book, to waiting your way through all of the people who are offering you, paid services, editors, proof, readers, all you know deciding whose input you trust and having them read and speak honestly to you about your book. Certainly I've learned how the sausage is made with the book publishing industry. So I think, gosh, given all those lessons, I'm a big believer that things unfold the way they're supposed to. So would it have been nice for someone, a traditional publisher to pick up my book two days after Beth my agent put it out on submission and. Telling me, they've got it in hand and they're gonna take care of it, I guess that would be partially great. But then I wouldn't know so much of what I know now, and I've seen all of the things to consider and how long a book needs to be or short a book needs to be economical. And of course getting feedback from people and talking to people about books, you'd get a better idea for what resonates with readers. I describe it like childbirth and pregnancy. My, my second novel is coming along so much, quickly, more quickly and easily than the first one. And I think that's partially because anything you learn while doing. So I learned how to write a book while writing a book and the. I think I've learned to trust myself more. And I know my go-to people who I will ask for their feedback when the first good draft is ready and I won't sweat oh, should I hire this person? Or should I send it to that person? And and I've now developed this wonderful relationship with my agent, so I can give her my second book and really trust her feedback on it. Yeah, it's just, I've just learned how to trust the process, know that I can figure it out that it's a industry and one that I think is in a lot of flu. But yeah and I think I've, I think the main lesson I've taken away is that. I would advise anyone who's thinking of writing a book to write what they are really called to write. Cause we can all think of, okay, what would be the most palatable and the most like universally saleable type plot and characters. And for me, I don't think that would bring me much satisfaction. And I imagine it's the same for most authors. So I think that's my best lesson is I stuck with this story, even though I ran up against a bit of a roadblock with the abortion and I'm really glad I did. Stephen: Nice. Okay. And when you're writing what software or services do you use that you find really helpful or maybe that's different than a lot of authors. Emily: I think I'm probably different in that I'm a Luddite. I tell people to consider me like 117 years old when it comes to technology. So I use good old Microsoft work and I know people who use pages and who use all kinds of functions and can like clip out chapters or portions and put 'em on a clipboard. I just write the thing in word and save it a lot and send it,

Spot On Insurance
Ep. 280: James Benham: How AI is Radically Changing the Future of Insurance

Spot On Insurance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 45:13


Apple Podcasts Rate and Review for Spot On Insurance James Benham is an entrepreneur, technologist, pilot, speaker, CEO, and podcast host. He is the Co-Founder of TerraClaim, a company that offers the latest cross-industry data analytics and benchmarking solutions. He also co-founded SmartCompliance, a tracking software that streamlines everyday processes by insurance professionals and is the host of The Insuretech Geek podcast, a show dedicated to the latest insurance technology news and innovations.  James joins us to describe business management best practices, especially regarding short and long-term goals. He shares what it was like growing up in Louisiana with Luddite parents, where his passion for programming started, and how it ultimately led to pursuing an insurance career. He discusses the future of claims management and how AI can streamline the various processes involved. James also describes the emotional rollercoaster of selling a business and shares his best advice on how to handle it. "You have to have a system that's prepared to handle a lot of unstructured data and structured data, and give you easy access to it." - James Benham Today on Spot On Insurance: What it was like growing up in Louisiana and being raised by Luddite parents How James found his passion for programming Pursuing a career in the insurance industry Why James always wanted to play the guitar Identifying when it's the right time to sell a business Why you become wiser after a recession What James learned from his first start-up The type of challenges James' team helps their clients solve The future of claims management Improving existing claims technology and data analytics What "Building Mad Scientists" is all about Why no one actually has ‘spare time' James' advice for effective business management Key Takeaways: Every claims adjuster out there applies discretion to everything they do. You have to focus on the problems your company needs to address, not the next shiny object. It tests your mettle when you're starting a business, especially when you're barely breaking even. Resources Mentioned: Entrepreneurs' Organization MCAI Speaker Series - James Benham "Building Mad Scientists: Disrupt your Company with Technological Innovation" Connect with James Benham: James Benham Official Website JBKnowledge TerraClaim SmartCompliance The Insuretech Geek Podcast James Benham on Twitter James Benham on LinkedIn James Benham on Facebook This episode was brought to you by….. Insurance Licensing Services of America (ILSA), America's Premier Insurance Compliance and Licensing experts. To learn more about ILSA and their services, visit ILSAinc.com. Connect, Learn, Share Thank you for joining us on this week's episode of Spot On Insurance. For more resources and episodes, visit SpotOnInsurance.com. Subscribe so you never miss an episode. Love what you're learning, Spot Light your review on Apple Podcasts Rate and Review For SpotOn and share your favorite episodes with friends and colleagues!

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
Luddite

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 2:06 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 26, 2022 is: Luddite • LUH-dyte • noun Luddite refers to someone who is opposed to change, and especially to technological change. // Call me a Luddite, but I enjoy the sense of privacy that comes with not owning a smartphone. See the entry > Examples: “A high school English teacher who has been working for more than a quarter century, Beasley is no Luddite. She taught online courses before the pandemic and has used a learning-management system for years, unlike some of her colleagues, who still prefer a traditional pen-and-paper grade book.” — Alyson Klein, Education Week, 8 Mar. 2022 Did you know? Long before your Luddite friend was waxing poetic about how blissful it is to not have a smartphone, Luddites were protesting the textile machinery that was slowly replacing them. It was toward the end of 1811, in the vicinity of Nottingham, England, when handicraftsmen formed organized bands and began to riot for the destruction of the new machinery. Their name is of uncertain origin, but it may be connected to a (probably mythical) person named Ned Ludd. According to an unsubstantiated account in George Pellew's Life of Lord Sidmouth (1847), Ned Ludd was a Leicestershire villager of the late 1700s who, in a fit of rage, rushed into a stocking weaver's house and destroyed his equipment; subsequently, his name was proverbially connected with machinery destruction. With the onset of the information age, Luddite gained a broader sense describing anyone who shuns new technology.

Jessup Think
Season 3 Finale

Jessup Think

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 52:23


Mark and Rex are joined by their award winning student associate producer, Matthew Todd, to recap the highlights of season 3. TRANSCRIPT 0:01 Everyone welcome to Jessup think I'm your host Mark Moore 0:04 and your co-host Rex Gurney and resident minion, Matthew, Todd, 0:07 and Rex and Matthew, we are excited today. This is Season Three finales. And this is our final one before we go into summer reruns. And we're just going to look back at the show, and we're going to introduce you maybe more to the minion in the room. Mr. Matthew, just show you the reach 0:25 of Jessup Think. Actually, I connected with one of my former seminary friends is living outside of DC and they've been there forever. And I mentioned that you have podcasts and so he listened to all season three backwards, he said, 0:39 Oh, there we go. Well, we hope you enjoy the season three finale. 0:43 Yeah. Well, if you're listening then and I can, I can spread it to my new place, too. 0:48 So where's your new place? So here 0:50 what we have, we have to have a break for them to and then we'll start the episode. You know what I'm saying? Like that was the intro. So we can tailor if you're listening after the enjoy season three finale, you can you can go into the music and then 1:08 oh, yeah, okay. 1:10 I forgot we're pros here. 1:11 Yeah, we just 1:13 so Pro that we gave him extra content to work with 1:15 just more content. So now we'll start the podcast portion of the show. 1:29 Rex and Matt, so glad to have you. That might be the first time I've ever called you, man in my life. 1:35 I feel like one of those things that you wipe your feet on when you come into someone's house. 1:39 That's true. Do you prefer Matthew? I do. 1:42 However, I think you know, being Matt is sort of biblical, because you're supposed to be humble and let everybody walk. 1:51 In a sense, doormats, right, they wash your feet, and when one manner of speaking if you kind of wipe your shoes on it, you know, and that's that's what Jesus would do. 1:59 And you know, that is why Matthew Todd our associate, slash minion, hear the podcast was one of the most distinguished Jessup graduates when one of our highest award he was you can just see there's just Biblical stuff dripping all over him. Right, 2:16 right. Yeah, that's right. He's an award winning graduate of Jessup for this last year. And the reason he's on the show for the last year, he's been our kind of associate producer, helping helping the show helping us with social media. Amen. 2:31 Amen. And finally, being the spur that we needed to actually get T shirts and we made the two years after he made the T shirts happen, 2:39 you can probably hear it, but I'm wearing it right now. Let me just give you a little sound a little sneak preview. 2:43 We heard that T shirt in the wind. Well, yeah, so you graduated. And where? Where are you going? What's life after Jessup? 2:53 So I got my degree in biology, and I am going to start pharmacy school in the fall and the University of Florida at their Orlando campus. So very excited about that. I'll be leaving in less than two months. 3:07 There you go. See, look at look what can happen with a Jessup grand now here on the West Coast, get a biology degree 3:15 and then go directly to what second string Promised Land Texas is first string but but Florida is pretty close. 3:24 Now I had to go I had to rank the promised lands, you know? 3:27 Yeah. Great. University of Florida pharmacy school. 3:32 That sounds good. Yeah. 30 minutes from Disney World, basically. Hey, there you go. Yeah, dealing drugs, 3:37 you're gonna have to be an official drug dealer. 3:41 But for my street cred for the for the podcast. I have to mention, I also graduated with a Bible minor. Very much like every single other exact transfer of Jessup, who graduates but so 3:53 I mean, you did win the award a graduation, you won our highest male Graduate Award, I 3:59 believe, right. Yeah. That's called the founder award, the founder or which means I'm, I guess that means I'm like William Jessup, but I've never met him. So hopefully, that's like a good thing. 4:09 You do get your name on a plaque somewhere. I think 4:13 it has John Jackson's thumbprint on it. Okay. I think I can maybe save that and sell it or something. Yeah, get 4:18 a piece of tape. You know, St. Peter's asking for that. I've heard at the pearly gates. 4:22 So I know he's like, Well, 4:25 like here, I'm a Founders Award. Because you embody the spirit of Bill Jessen. 4:30 Oh, wow. Yeah. I never even knew him. Did you guys ever meet the founder? No, no, I didn't assume 4:36 more. Yeah, it was son, his grandson, actually. Yeah. Yeah. So when you were hired here, Mark was was Bryce still president? Yeah. 4:45 It was it was his last year 2010 Wow. 4:49 I remember when I was first hired. I was walking across the old campus with Bryce Jessup and he said he was really I don't know if I should be saying this on the podcast, but he cuz I was really glad I was at Jessup because he wanted me to try to set some people theologically straight on campus. 5:06 Oh, there we go. He's talking about but coming in as the Enforcer, I 5:11 guess. 5:12 Yeah. And we'll assume that you did that, you know, I don't know. I believe it set him right. Or maybe they're gone now. And they've never been heard from again. Exactly. That is kind of enforcement. That's how it works. And I Bryce gave them kind of a wink. And then Rex is like, Alright, I'm gonna figure out what that means. Well, we 5:29 actually have some brutal faculty meetings back in the day, as far as professors yelling at each other about whether we were an Arminian or a Calvinist school. Oh, I remember of theology professor almost jumping up on a table and just screaming and everybody, because there was a little bit of Calvinists talk that he was very uncomfortable with. Oh, that was years ago, though. Yeah, the good thing is we don't do that. And I've 5:52 repented of that. 5:55 An earlier version. The bad thing is that, you know, maybe we don't take theology seriously enough to jump on tables and screaming at each other anymore. I've lost something. 6:05 Yeah, we've lost a little bit of the passion. Yeah, a little bit of the passion 6:08 and even read those stories, because supposedly, that's a pretty common thing with theology like meetings, they can get really heated about their, what they're talking about, there was someone talking about how the serpent would have moved before it slid on its belly, and somebody got mad, and at the accusation that supposedly it could bounce like a pogo stick, and they were getting really, really angry, and irate. And it's like, recorded somebody, like, typed down all the things they said, quote, 6:34 I got transcripts. 6:35 I did not know that. I didn't know the full knowledge that I had never happened. Yeah, definitely. Good. We 6:41 have. So as a snake could pogo stick before? Before the temptation? Yeah, 6:48 because the curse was that he now had this. 6:50 Yeah, maybe that's maybe that's what made him so intriguing to Adam and Eve that he just didn't. Yeah, you're like, Wait, what is this snake doing? Amazing. See theology? Well, I'm one of the purposes of the podcast is to help make theology a little bit, you know, more accessible, more accessible part of the conversation. So you're learning stuff. And just, you know, we did have a pretty amazing season, you know, looking back on the guests we were able to, to get, and it was our first season having an associate producer, student producer. So thank you, Maddie Todd, for all of your work. But even starting out at the gates, cause our seasons go from September to the end of June. And then July and August are always reruns. So we'll pull some of our best shows from season three. And we'll play him as reruns this summer sort of greatest? Yeah, exactly. And we were able to, we kind of started off season three with Caitlin shez, who's author of the liturgy of politics. And I think on that one I was, you were out of town. So I was able to actually, it was excellent. I think it's gonna be one of our one of our reruns, because she just had an amazing way of talking about that. For one, everything in our lives is political. So when you try to say like, No, I'm not trying, I'm not political. Almost every decision we make has, has some type of political ramification or, you know, and so it's like, hey, instead of distancing ourselves saying, okay, life is political. What does that mean? What does that mean to be a faithful Christian in in politics? And not not just in she kind of strays away from like, partisan politics, but just in politics? What does it mean to be a Christian and to be faithful in that, so really helpful. Went from Caitlin chest to Priscilla Pope Leveson, who we had her husband, Jack Lovcen on in her book, models of Revelation, our models, how we say that models revelation, because that's the Avery Dulles that she based it on models of evangelism. And I thought that was it was really helpful book because I had not thought of the different ways of evangelism in that way. And the categorization was good, and it also made me I am pretty skeptical of kind of the cold calling evangelism. Oh, yes. 9:31 I remember in seminary, we actually, we actually had to go to the beach and annoy people. I remember doing that. I think, yeah, I did it. I did it. And I did it. I did it. Yeah. We used to walk around basically, you know, with a question if I mean, you know, you know, the question, this is a nice goal, right? Yes. Like if, if you were to be run over by a bus Do you know? Like, that's the best question we can come up with 10:00 You have the best starter, 10:01 and I did in like summer camp, we would ask what what do you think happens when you die? And I remember specifically, someone just was like, my ashes are gonna be spread across the world. And that's the end of it and they just like walked away. I was like, well, at least he saw of it. Yeah. 10:15 He's confident. 10:18 However, we can demystify evangelism, because that's just one. 10:22 I think that's important. Yeah, she had a chapter on that. And, and it was kind of like, yeah, the, you know, I think because of my fear of kind of the cold calling, it also plays itself out in me maybe not bringing up Yeah, yeah, God enough when I could, you know, obviously, you know, with our professions, Rex, it kind of comes up. I mean, I guess you can be like, I teach history. Rama was like, Hey, I teach and they're like, Oh, what do you teach theology? You know, and they're like, Oh, okay. 10:53 Well, you know, depending on whether I want to have a conversation or not, with a seat meet on a plane, I can actually when the dreaded question comes up, what do you do? I can say two different things and be truthful, saying both things. I can say I'm a college professor, and that has implications but I can also say, I'm an ordained Southern Baptist pastor. Oh, yeah, that's usually that if you want to start a conversation stopper right there almost every time 11:18 you're like, I'm gonna put my headphones back in. 11:20 Oh, you got like the select for you that that's like a conversation starter that they like, suddenly just get into it, you know? 11:26 Yeah. Yeah. But it was, for me. Yeah. The chapter was was helpful. Like, hey, there's there is a place right. And there are I mean, here's the reason why. Why not only a Christian do many Mormons do it. I mean, I agree. You're, you're out there. So I thought that was yeah, I'd never really thought of evangelism. And it was always kind of nervous about this over evangelism, I guess. Yeah. And the way she broke it down and the models I thought, were really helpful to bring them back in. Then we had Terry Wildman on the show with the First Nations version translation of the New Testament that was so cool, which I've been doing my kind of devotion, sorry, devotion, flex, they're out of it. And it's just 12:13 they've been doing the same amazing, in fact, this morning, and I hadn't thought about that, that connection, but it's providential. Apparently, I actually finished the last chapter of John. And so the copy that I have of the First Nations version that he's that he's responsible for, is just the Gospels and acts and Ephesians. And so I just finished it up today. It's been really helpful for me, in fact, I actually have the Lord's Prayer in the First Nations version on my wall in my office here. That's great love how I love how he have this translated. 12:52 Yeah, it is because it talks about the corn and in the Buffalo maybe. Yeah, brings in like it brings in Yeah, marry 13:03 the good row cultural. Yeah. 13:04 Good road. wanna 13:05 walk the good. 13:07 Fun fact about Terry Wildman? He has a he has a connection with Sacramento. He was actually just in Sacramento a couple of weeks ago, staying at one of the board members at our churches. Oh, wow. She's She's worked for university for 30 Some years and he was doing a retreat. And he said he's going to be back in the Sacramento region doing maybe we can get him on the show again. Yeah, we could have him live on the live on the show. That would be that'd be great. We went from Terry Wildman. I mean, this is we went Kailyn shez Priscilla Pope Levison tear Wildman with the First Nations version to Dr. Lauren haarsma from Calvin College, Calvin University, in his book, which was very theological winded sin begin. It's interesting that you brought up the snake. Yeah, and the pogo stick the snake and the pogo stick. But it was really helpful to, you know, because in this conversation of theology and, or faith and science, you know, especially in terms of a doctrine of creation, is it's hard to understand and theologically, right, like some of the things that we're seeing in the fossil record and in, you know, in actual scientific data, like, I think he was helpful to say, we can't be afraid of that. And it's not that that shapes our, you know, or molds, our theology, but our theology should understand that and it's kind of like they can dialogue together 14:48 right now, one thing I really appreciate about this book and I actually went out and bought it after the after the pot because I really wanted to not just skim it, but you know, take a deep dive into it is I Think you probably remember me saying because actually, Matthew was in my Christian perspective classes last semester. So I might have said, I'm a broken record, I say the same thing over and over again, but haven't got same stick, same stick every time. Try to modify it if it doesn't work. But anyway, my ears. I probably said something like, there's some class. But, you know, with the science and faith thing, there's very few kind of bullet proof positions that you can have if you want to take both the biblical witness and the scientific consensus seriously, right. Yeah. And so you know, with them with age of the earth and that kind of thing. You do have certain questions that have to be answered about the first chapter of Genesis. But the second and third, is something that theistic evolutionists have to deal with too, because how do you actually get the fall into this? And how does that make sense from an older standpoint? Right. Right. There's no easy solutions to those things. Yeah. 15:58 Yeah. And that's what he's really kind of tackling that. Yeah. In the book tackling Okay, where does the fall right in right? Did it have to? Like, did Adam and Eve have to be the very first actually humans or hominids? Or were they in alignment, he gave a couple of different options that I think fit with the biblical text and also fit with current scientific research, which I thought was really helpful. Because it's, it's, it's unfortunate, and especially in terms of theology, where we could take a position as a church that then forces people when they go to a biology class, especially at just a state school or anywhere else, right. That means 16:46 we're gonna see at the University of Florida, yeah. 16:47 And we received Florida this no Christ in anywhere in that time, 16:50 right? Not at all. That we put them in a position to where they have to be either reject what they're hearing in class or reject the Bible. And it's like, and I think Dr. Aardsma did a good job of being like, hey, there's we don't have to reject these two. Can Yeah, yes. And we can learn what's the what is the theological principle that's being taught in Scripture? And, and how does that then help us approach things we see in the scientific data? Also noting that not just our scientific data isn't concrete, right. And there's still mystery and question and theory involved? Yeah. 17:34 And the landscape changes so rapidly. I mean, like things that we believe now we probably didn't believe 100 years ago, right. And we're not gonna maybe believe 100 years from now. Right? Should the Lord always growing upon what we 17:45 have to say that for the Lord, millennials, 17:49 for in terms of science and mean, as well, I love that actually, in that Christian perspective, class, there were so many questions. You had discussion questions about the intersection of faith and science, because I was like, This is my thing. And most people are like, Oh, I don't really know anything about science. Like I know all. 18:06 I know, we just defer to our resident expert, Matthew Todd. 18:08 Yeah. So Matthew, in your biology class, 18:12 you think about this. And so I got up my pulpit was like, Well, guys, I'm just kidding. Yeah. 18:17 Well, in that yeah, so that one might, that one might make a comeback on the on the summer reruns. We got four episodes that we do summer reruns, and we have 18:26 so many wonderful podcasts to choose from. 18:28 I know we really do. Think we are. We are getting close to 100 episodes. Wow. It's season four. We'll get we'll reach 100 episodes. So any plans for when that happens? I know we're sound effects. Fireworks. Yeah. 18:45 Well let the Patreon people decide. And if you haven't heard of Patreon, just you'll hear about at some point. Okay, 18:54 ah, oh, yeah, you will hear about Patreon at some point. 18:57 I mean, yeah, maybe they'll do something wild. Who knows? Yeah, it will be well, I'm expecting some jumping on tables and shouting, just like we kind of previewed at the beginning of the episode. 19:07 Okay. Yeah, shouting each other with your Patreon. Yeah, it's happening. Moved from that we did kind of a pretty good stretch of of having outside guests on. We had Hillary McBride on after that, and a psychologist and talking about the wisdom of your body, listen to your body. And I think it's so important, so important to to understand the embodied nature of human beings and that our actual physical bodies while it's not the totality of who we are, it is a part of who we are. 19:49 And it's really necessary to reclaim that phrase. Yeah, popular music, because right is listening to their bodies in ways that perhaps are not helpful. 19:57 Right. And that's very true and hips dome All right, so yeah, 20:01 it's like we have this fun, we have an interesting designation between, like, you know, we consider to be like the flesh that you can listen to, but it's also the body that we were given, you know, God came, or Jesus came to earth and a body. Yeah. And so for a reason, right? We're not meant to just hate it and just wish that we were just little souls like, in our movie soul that just float around. 20:21 Right, yeah, we are embodied. And, and we have to listen to what our body is saying in terms of health. And in terms of mental health, all that. I mean, like body doesn't just mean Yeah, I think sometimes in the church we talked about body has just like flesh, flesh versus spirit, right? Yeah. Flesh is bad. And we kind of, even if we don't explicitly say that, I think people catch that in church, right? And so they they end up, I was just listening to the songs sung from back in the 90s. That was kind of like an under underground song. But one of the lines said, I grew up. I was told when I was young, not to trust in my body. Oh, 21:07 that's from Bruce Cockburn. Yeah. And I actually love that song. Sort of last night, an amazing song. It is, hey, yeah, I knew Rex and 21:20 interesting thing about Bruce Kapur and you know, so he had moved to San Francisco. And started for the first time in a long time, he's always self identified as a Christian, but kind of doesn't want to have anything to do with the institutional church. Yeah. But um, started going to church with his wife in San Francisco. And they had some issues with getting musicians for their praise band. And yeah, nobody knew who he was. You know? Because if you don't know, you don't know. And the guy's kind of older now. So yeah, he's like, Well, you know, I'll play guitar with you. Yeah. And they didn't realize that a guy that's playing guitar in their praise band is like this famous singer songwriter. Right. So, you know, 21:59 that's amazing. Yeah, that's just, that's really cool. Well, I knew I could tell from the song that it was. And even that mine, that he had had some type of relationship with a church trying, you know, grew up learning not to trust my body. And then the next line is I've carried that burden all my life. And I thought, wow, that's really interesting. And we have to be careful about that in the church. Now, like what you were saying, Rex, like, there are, like listening to your body doesn't mean and I think Hillary did a good job of this doesn't mean you listen to whatever it says, right? You know, I mean, especially when we're talking about kind of what we would I'm doing air quotes here. Like, fleshly, you know, desires. But that's not necessarily like, body related. I mean, I think we have to make that distinction of our actual physical body versus what Paul would be talking about as flesh. 22:51 Right? Exactly. Yeah. Cuz your body is made of flesh. And so it's confusing in our English language. 22:57 Right? Right. Yeah, it is. And it's, and it is confusing, because the Greek that Paul's using literally just means flesh. So and we have to kind of, you know, we go back and forth. Okay, do we, you know, the NIV I think calls it sinful nature. But then we're like, Hey, that's not what the Greek word so then it's like, well, flesh, but flesh doesn't really help us. Because it's not literally the pink stuff, you know, underneath your skin that Paul's talking about. So I thought that was that was really helpful. And I think particularly, her book was helpful. I feel like there is a big focus on the body in culture. And some good some bad, right? But I think it's, it's a focus of, hey, we have to, we have to learn how to live in our bodies in your bodies. And I think it's also helpful. As you get older, I'm getting older and you have to listen to your body right body can't do the same things you could do when you were 20. So what 23:54 is the gray your beard sustained? Yeah, 23:56 exactly. The beard. You know, the gray. What's that? Like, guys? I don't even now it's just more wisdom. 24:04 Just more of any, 24:05 I'm one step closer to playing Santa Claus. That is my life goal, My life goal. We move from there and did a little bit of the advent calendar. I think we're always you know, one of the things Rex and I love to do is bring in kind of church calendar and liturgical practices. I'm really, really drawn to that. We were also able to have one of our we actually over the course of this season, we had two of our psychology profs on and on, but we started with Melanie Trowbridge. And we just talked about kind of mental health in the church and how the church doesn't always approach mental health in a gentle way, in an empathetic way. And just really important, especially I mean, more and more news reports coming out me know of a Just the amount of kind of a mental health crisis among college students among younger but also among adults, I mean, adults are not immune in any way. And what's it like 25:13 over half of folks are going to have at some point in life, a verifiable mental, right health episode of some sort, right? Nice is ubiquitous. 25:24 And it seems like maybe on the church side, it goes back to the body thing, sometimes we, we deny the physical or neurological part of that. And if we focus only on the spiritual, I think, obviously, I'm a pastor as well, focusing on the spiritual is important. But we also have to focus on the physical and the neurological, I was just reading an article that said, you know, it was talking about the, the hidden cause you're not cause but like, a hidden problem with mental health, especially among high school students. And it was sleep. 26:02 Oh, totally. It was totally my wife's a nurse practitioner. And that's her mom's mantra right now. It's just like, you know, it's how many hours of sleep do you get? Especially when she's dealing with high school students? Because, you know, apparently, until you're 21, you still like go to pediatrics. But anyway, yeah. Um, it's like, you know, so how many hours you know, right, when you get right, it's just an issue. Yeah, it's an issue. 26:26 It's crazy how like, so whenever someone especially like Trowbridge, I've been in summer classes, she's amazing. And that one of the biggest things you can do to kind of help your general health is just sleep, diet and exercise, and how people will buckle those and sleep honestly, it seems like it's almost like, you don't get the choice as much, because you're just forced to work late, you're forced to wake up early to go do other things. And so that one, it seems hard. And diet sometimes can be like, you know, money restrictive, and things like that. But it's, it's funny, because relatively speaking, those are somewhat simple. So the thing is just, you know, closing your eyes and going, right, right and exercises, it can be something like going on a walk and but it can be so difficult sometimes. Yeah, to get all three of 27:08 those. Yeah, it's interesting. I think that's a good picture of life, often the best thing for you is the simple thing. And the simple thing is often the hardest thing to do exactly. I think it's, it's we would rather like no, I'm gonna go to the gym for four hours. And it's like, why don't you just take a 15 minute walk? Just start there. Start there. And you know, take your phone out of your bedroom, turn your computer off and be able to go sleep I mean, 27:38 park in the last space in the parking lot, right yourself have to actually walk a few extra steps. Yeah, here's the things Yeah. 27:45 And diet. Yeah, I don't know. Just saying like something like diet can be financially restrictive. But also when you look at it there are from pretty affordable fruits and vegetables. 27:57 Vegetables live in a food desert, though, and there's all sorts of issues with that. Yeah, nope, an error. Yes, 28:02 very true. 28:04 Very true. In the same way what you were talking about, there's like a difference between going all the way paleo or something like that only go into like extremes Yeah, and just cutting out some sugar like maybe you eat like seven candy bars a day eat like five or four or one or none? That's a good that's a really good good there's smaller things you can do you know, each seven candy bar confession time. The truth is out there not really bars, but Reese's are, are my weakness. 28:34 And when they're only little cups, thing, for those no problem, they're fine. We also had sociologists malicious song on the show from West marsh and Professor Westmark talking about the role of technology and the role of devices. And, and part of that was, you know, the devices that keep us from sleep that can actually keep us from health, you know, now, and I thought it was yeah, really helpful book I keep going back to it when I find myself staring at a screen too long or being caught in this kind of triple screen prison of TV, your phone and, and, and not and what I liked about her approach was it wasn't a hey, you need to throw all these things. Go it's kind of that extreme mood that I had she had it is a like, have habit play a proper role in your life. But also be aware of maybe how you're using it to distract yourself, how you're using it, where it actually is impeding you from maybe being healthy and things like that, you know, so I thought it's we're only going to have to talk about that more and more as as all of our lives are more automated. Now that's not to say that there weren't problems in the 1800s. Right? I mean, I think that's the kopien. Future. Yeah. Like that's the that's my always beef with kind of a technology thing is that yeah, if you just go Luddite doesn't solve all your problems. And, and technology can be used really helpful. I mean, I listened to a ton of audiobooks every year. 30:20 Yeah, it's podcast. There's a Jessup thing. I love listening to it. It's yeah, 30:24 see, you could listen to this podcast. couldn't do that. 30:27 While you take exercise and become healthier. Yeah, actually, yeah. Which will help you sleep better actually, 30:33 literally listen to while you're exercising, wasn't to read for you go to bed. We are the solution. We are the solution, 30:43 we'll have a line of pajamas in a while. 30:47 Oh, hey, all right, we've got a few more few more to go through, we're gonna have another one of our own professors on he's in our leadership and division part of my school, Derek Zond, with his book, looking at how to be Christian and not be a jerk, which is sad that we would have to have a book on that, but it is so true. And it was a helpful, like, Hey, you can be faithful to Scripture, you can be faithful Christian. And, and in fact, I would maybe even go as far to say, if you are a faithful Christian, you shouldn't be a jerk like that would exclude being a jerk. Right? Like, like if you were taking on the characteristics of Christ. And gentleness, humbleness, love, joy, peace, all of those. You wouldn't, but yet we struggle with that. 31:43 Yeah, I find it encouraging because sometimes, I don't know why. Maybe it's just something about some people have hung around who aren't Christians, you get this feeling sometimes that inherently by being Christian, maybe you're being a jerk. There's something about Christianity. And that's not the case. Nothing about like sharing, just saying that you're a Christian is like, in any way rude to people. There's nothing about our faith that is like jerky. It's just the way that you can kind of act and you can be vindictive in certain ways. It's a more behavior. So something like inherently about Christ, that then means that well, if I'm going to serve you this, I gotta be a little bit of a jerk to people. Like, that's not required. 32:16 I think some people will think that though. Okay, everything's in as a guy, 32:23 which is why it's good to have like that book as a reminder, I thought, 32:26 yeah. Yeah. So good. So helpful. After that we were able to have I'm gonna call them a good friend, since you've been on the show a couple times. But Kelly Capek theologian from Georgia, and his book was also on body, right? You're only human how your limits reflect God's design and why that's good news. And I've probably used more from that book in my classes right away than maybe some of all of the books from from this season, I thought it was just, again, really helpful for helping us understand what it means to be human. I've told the maybe partly because it's a little awkward. And so sometimes it's good in class to throw an awkward story in there to wake people up, right, because they're like, Wait, what is happening? But the whole, like, I think I leave out what Kelly Capek, how he starts it, but the whole stare at your belly button. And what does that teach you? Right? Like, like, what does that teach you about you? That means you you were connected to someone else at some point? Like you did not create yourself? You did not, you know, the thought, Wow, that's so. So, so good. And so simple is right there on your own body be like, Wow, I was connected. Meaning we're connected as humans, and he goes into kind of body and the role of the body and listening to the body as well, which, which I really appreciate. I really appreciate it. A lot of what Colin Kaepernick has written and good that we can call him a friend of the show. 34:06 Yeah, I was kind of like all sad that he ended up ditching the former name, which was the theology of navel gazing. For that, yeah, 34:14 he Well, I think, editors sometimes the title committee got rid of that. They were like, No, we're not doing a theology of navel gazing. Yeah, but that will be my upcoming book. Oh, great. Yeah, I'm excited. Yeah, might as well take that multiple you can get Yeah, exactly. Now that we now that we have it, then we had our scholar who did our, the annual theology spring lecture, Dr. Thomas Reynolds. Up from Canada, he actually wasn't able to then come on campus. But he was able to do that remotely and then obviously join us remotely looking at disability theology of disability and and the church and how the church and when at gained from that one from working in a church. I've thought so much about that, and how, how it's not just we are being accommodating to those with disabilities, but rather how we are including them as as a vital and just normal part of our community is not like, oh, we'll put up or we'll make no, you are a part of our community. And, and that's so important that involves architecture that involves setting things up, but also just involves like, hey, like we are a family together and and we want to embrace that. And I feel like that conversation is, is rising more and more of hey, the church and disability what does that look like? And and how can the church be better at at reaching out? Then we were we had Dr. Aaron Ambrose on to kind of highlight and we did this kind of a two parter. We had Matt on later, Matthew Gatchell to look at, we did we started with toxic masculinity. And, and in some ways, that wasn't necessarily the, what we went into maybe the podcasts that I bought, but that kind of was what emerged because it is looking at, hey, how is the church? And how is culture highlighted masculinity? And how has that? How's that influenced the church and how we talk about what it means to be a man, what it means to be a woman? And what are some things we need to change and when were in the church has been rocking, you know, over this last year, we just had more and more stories and more and more continue to come out of where a an incorrect view of, of masculinity has gotten church leaders in trouble and we look at the Maurice Hill and all of that, and a lot of it is built on this. This incorrect idea of what it means to be a man and and so we were able to follow that one up. I thought Dr. Ambrose did an amazing job. 37:20 One more thing that Dr. Ambrose, we actually went to that conversation, as Mark just mentioned, wants to talk a little bit about something else. But as soon as she spent a couple of minutes with two men here suddenly the whole conversation ended up with toxic man basket. Yeah, 37:35 yeah. Do satisfy other who were probably. Well, I do What are you gonna say? You gotta say, we're probably. I'm just saying we're not. 37:48 You guys are men. We are man. 37:51 We have the beer session. Yeah, we have beards. I don't even feel like that's true. Sorry. Sorry, guys. Sorry, man. No, we had Dr. Brad Harper from Multnomah University, which I thought was one Yeah, one of our more powerful podcasts of the season, looking at his book space at the table. Conversation between an evangelical theologian and his gay son in sight, it was just so helpful way to frame this conversation. I mean, the conversation on human sexuality within the church can be so heated, and so divisive. That I thought it was helpful to say, hey, let's let's talk about the other elements of this story, not just well, how does God define human sexuality? And Brad holds a traditional view of human sexuality, and a traditional view of marriage. He also wrestled with, okay with those views, how do I love my son? How am I in my son's life? And I thought the book just sort of did a good job of balancing that, that there's more, there's more questions involved. And and you can answer the question of maybe what does the Bible say about human sexuality? But you also have to answer the question, what does the Bible say about loving others, as you love yourself, loving your neighbor reaching out? Right? Like, it's not one or the other? It has to be both. And I think Ben Harper did a great job of really helping us helping us there. Then we had a local local pastor Kevin Adams, talking about baptism. And, and again, like, in some ways, this book on baptism was similar to the book on evangelism when I went into it being like, okay, yeah, baptism, part, it's part within these get in the book, and I think as Kevin described it, I was like, Oh, wow, like, I just saw the greater importance not that it wasn't. I mean, it's an important sacrament in our church and it's, but just seeing kind of kind of just a greater focus and what role it can play in someone's spiritual Life I think is really a great book and a really important realization. And that one was able to that one came right on the heels of me having a couple of like interesting baptism stories in my own life that I had to do. And baptizing neighbor and she ended up passing away two weeks after baptizer baptized her with a red solo cup on her couch because she couldn't get underwater. She was stage four, cancer and was passing away. But she'd never been baptized and wanted to be baptized. And then on Easter Sunday, so this would have happened after the episode. On Easter Sunday, actually Easter Saturday. Guy from who was kind of connected to our church, he's struggled with addiction and been in and out. He called me up and wanted to meet at the church. So I was like, alright, you know, and Friday are good Friday service. We filled the baptismal because we were gonna do baptisms on Sunday, even though no one had signed up. But after our good Friday service, we were just like, You know what, take them off. That's yeah, let's fill this, I think, you know, our Lead Pastor Richard was like, I feel like God's name was filler. And so it filled it. And then I met him, and I met this guy and our sanctuary on Saturday. And he was just talking about wanting to change, you know, wanting and wanting to be baptized. And, but he was, he was a little bit skeptical and nervous about coming on Sunday in front of, you know, big Easter crowd. And I was like, hey, it's full right now. And so him and I just him and I in our sanctuary, in our ice cold. We didn't turn the heater on yet. So it was ice cold baptismal. Just did a baptism right there. Yeah, it was just Yeah, it was just really cool. Really cool experience. And I think, probably having read Kevin's book leading up to that made me think about that differently than I would have in the past, 42:04 when I was pastoring. I just grew up in a church where, you know, baptism was obviously important, but we wanted to stray so far away from any sort of sacramental theology surrounding that in our sort of free church tradition Baptist Church, that it was literally just something you tack on to the end of the service, and there was just, you know, not much going on there. Right. And I really felt when I was pastoring, that this is such an important thing without embracing necessarily full full on sacramental ism. It's still just really, really important. And so we would always have the whole service basically. It'll be based on what was happening in baptism, the whole thing? 42:49 Yeah, that's, that's so good. I mean, it's helpful and I think particularly helpful for evangelical communities. Who kind of post reformation and most that have been Yeah, so nervous of anything that strikes of sacramental ism, that it's a this is an important part of of the journey. And the symbolism is so important to symbolism. So important. We were then able to have in this book has still been coming back to my mind. Sociologist George Yancey from Baylor 43:23 and interesting thing about Georgia MC, it's not often that Jessup thinks actually gets a leg up on Christianity today, but we scooped them. Oh, we am on our podcast talking about his book about a couple of months before Christine today actually reviewed it 43:37 every go take that. JT and CT. Yeah, maybe maybe they listened to the episode. And we're like, we need to get that book could be almost. But it was, I feel like it's been a helpful addition to this conversation on race in the church. And, and I think Georgia does a good job of, and I'm a sucker for the Middle Way, right? Or the third way. This this idea of, hey, conversations to the extremes of race on both sides have not been helpful and have not produced reconciliation. So why how do we all come to the table? We all have a voice. And we can know what is good. And we can also say like, Hey, that maybe takes it too far, one way or the other. And I just, it was a helpful, I think a book that and that I think the church could really use because I think sometimes particularly in the evangelical church, a lot of times in the white Evangelical Church, anything that talks about race is being you know, labeled as something that it's not and it's been rejected. And it's like why we have to have a conversation and we have to be in this conversation. And I think Nancy's book is a is a good way to move beyond. That's kind of his title beyond racial division. And to in that moving beyond, right, it's not a moving beyond that, that denies racism or denies that this is happening. What is the book that that understands that it's happening, but it's like how do we move to conversation? How do we move to reconciliation part of moving to it is recognizing that it is happening, right? And, and kind of the repent and lament elements. We were able rounding this off. As we finish up our season finale, we had Cameron Wilson, our English professor on the show, talking about the importance of literature, check that one out, then we were able to have as Guinness right show as well, during the great quest, which that was, I was amazing. I've been reading knives for a lot, large part of my life. And so it was amazing to have a conversation with him. Particularly to hear his life he had such an amazing life story. That that I think was helpful, especially as he frames this book on the meaning of life. What does that look like? And I think we're all there in our lives. Sometimes we go back to it several times, especially when you get to midlife. Or a second stage of life. You're like what is the meaning? You know, I thought I knew it when I was 20. 46:24 I obviously have it down. I'm never gonna change my mind. Clearly. You pretty much know everything. I'm gonna know. Right? Yeah, I just finished. So yeah. 46:31 Yeah, right. Nothing else learn till you hit 40. Then it all changes. Now we had Cynthia shape rally it on the show for a final time as a William Jessup University professor, but possibly not the final, but not the final never, never the never final time we'll be able to, we'll be able to get a hold of her at Baylor. But we're really proud of her and happy for her. She goes to Baylor goes to the big leagues of biblical research. Yeah. And we can we'll be able to tell people we knew her one day. Yeah, we had her in the studio. And 47:07 her best work, of course, was done when she was at Jessup. And so yes, it's gonna be anti climactic. 47:13 Exactly. Just kidding. 47:16 And, and then we had Maddie Gotcha. I've kind of references to Amanda Gatchell on to kind of do a follow up of the toxic masculinity be like, Okay, what is biblical masculinity? You know, and especially, and I think what I have wrestled with and wrestle on the show is like, what are elements in Scripture that are gender specific? And what are not because I think there's so much that is not gender specific, just all of us as Christians need to. And actually, I think if we focus there, that helps us become better men and women. Rather than just trying to be a better man versus a woman. What about being being more Christ like, and as a man, that makes me a better man? 48:04 I think that was one of our longest podcasts too, because we just couldn't stop talking. I mean, right three of the say that all thought this is such an important topic and right in what to do, right and better with that. 48:14 Yeah, it's it's important. And now we're at our season three finale. Three seasons. Moving up. Closing in on 100 episodes. Looking forward to season four as well. Any plans so you're moving to Florida over the summer? Any? Any summer plans while people are? 48:36 Lots of weddings? I got two more. I think that's pretty common for once you graduate. Yeah. 48:41 Once you get everybody's like we're graduated wedding here. Yeah. Yeah. colleges 48:45 that are similar to ours. Yeah. 48:47 Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Christian school. You finish it up. And then yeah, so I had to throw a Christian bachelor party too. And that's that was pretty nice story that you can tell because it was we had a devotional, you know, and I was like, there we go. Is Christian There 49:00 you go. That is maybe some coffee involved. Was there some coffee? It was no, I don't like is 49:05 that before after you guys hit the bars? Well, yeah. It was make us feel bad. 49:12 coffee bars. 49:15 The candy bars, right. Like I said, it's definitely day to day until we let loose 49:21 from that very, very nimbly there. 49:24 I brought it up. So I had to expect to be able to dodge Yeah, that's 49:27 true. My Buffy Rex. 49:30 Actually, interestingly enough, we my wife and I are probably going well, planning on spending a week in Orlando. Not to see me you know, not necessarily just to visit our esteemed minion but to go to a conference there and hopefully spent some time with a cousin that lives in Hilton Head and Oh, for years and I've never been there so beautiful to Charleston Savannah, and Some places like that, that as a history person, yeah, you know, wanted to see and never have seen. So we're planning on doing a little bit of 50:07 the South side that might see a little bit of the south of California. So doing some beach camping and a conference in San Diego, which there are worse places. 50:20 So yeah. So dogs the mouse like he is, 50:23 yeah. Is that Yeah, yeah, I will continue to dodge the mouse until the mouse cost less. Then probably getting back to Indiana season family. So yeah. And then also both you and Rex and I are teaching summer classes. So we'll be Well, we hope you enjoyed season three. I hope you enjoyed this kind of little recap, if you hadn't kind of seen those episodes, maybe go back and check them out. We will be pulling for those to do some a rerun. So we hope you enjoy kind of these reruns of highlighting some of these really important episodes and really important issues. And we're looking forward to season four and kind of continuing the conversation and continuing to make you think more deeply about theology and your life. 51:13 Congratulations on making it to the end of the podcast. Be sure to follow us on Instagram @jessupthink where we'll be posting updates and some behind the scenes content. We would love to hear your thoughts on the episode and engage with any questions you might have to leave us a comment or email us at think@jessup.edu. Our aim is to provide a framework for further reflection and deeper exploration of these important topics. And you want to support the show. Leave us a review on iTunes. We can reach more people. Until then, I'm Matthew Todd outro reader extraordinaire, and this has been Jessup Think. 51:45 If you're interested in learning more about Jessup, please visit us at jessup.edu. William Jessup is the premier fully accredited four year Christian University in the Sacramento area offering over 60 academic programs in undergraduate and graduate studies. Designed to see each student whipped and transformed into leader they're called to be as go don't forget to hit subscribe and share so you never miss an episode. Thanks for joining us for Jessup Think.

EXALT Podcast
Syed Mustafa Ali and Dan McQuillan - Does Luddism hold lessons for resisting harmful tech paradigms?

EXALT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 77:11


This month we were joined by two exciting guests, Syed Mustafa Ali from The Open University in the UK and Dan McQuillan from Goldsmiths, University of London. They are both interested in AI, technology, and applying a critical lens to the development of digital infrastructures and applications. They met at the Histories of AI Seminar at Cambridge University and found common ground through what could be described as Luddite orientation. It was this connection over Luddism that brought them together to have a cup of coffee and share ideas and a bit of subversive thought about the history and trajectory of AI. This conversation teases out what Luddism is in a historical sense and how it continues to play out today. We talk about the physical extractivisms associated with the architecture and infrastructure of digital space and the mental and power relations of algorithmization. We explore the form of resistance and intervention to digital extractivisms and the rollout of layers of digital infrastructures that extend and expand the colonial project. Dan's book Resisting AI: An Anti-fascist Approach to Artificial Intelligence will be release officially on July 15, 2022, preorder your copy today! Find and follow Dan (@danmcquillan) and Mustafa (@DrSyedMustafaA1) on Twitter --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/exalt-initiative/message

WORD UP with Dani Katz
Neo-Luddite 2.0 with Michael Wann

WORD UP with Dani Katz

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 51:24


In this episode, I had the pleasure of dropping in with gonzo synchromystic researcher/storyteller, Michael Wann.Over the course of our two-hour conversation, we discuss:Michael's synchronistic Baltimore stint (and the numerical signs he claims he doesn't track – ha!)his Masonic inviteJohn Von Neumann and his peculiar place in oh so many transhumanist narratives, as well as his archetypal resemblance to Francis Baconthe likelihood of a mass awakening, and how that will actually look/unfold; the Herkimer mysteryexiting the Matrixthe neo-Luddite 2.0 paththe end of electricity, computers and globalismtelepathyGen X's responsibility to save the species from AIthe electricity sham; real-deal American historythe Susquehanna Riverand an illion other thingsFind the second half of our conversation at danikatz.locals.com or patreon.com/danikatzFind Michael at susquehannaalchemy.com and me at danikatz.comThanks for liking, sharing and subscribing!Keywords: synchromysticism, synchronicity, transhumanism, alchemy, spirituality, mysticism, transformation, awakeningDani KatzConnect with dani and other members of Dani Katz communityPatreondani katz is creating high-vibe, mind-expanding, paradigm-shattering awesomeness | Patreon Become a patron of dani katz today: Get access to exclusive content and experiences on the world's largest membership platform for artists and creators.Dani KatzDani Katz is a writer based in Los Angeles who has contributed to dozens of publications, including Los Angeles Times, Vice, Teen Vogue, Swindle, LA Yoga, Whole Life Times/Magazine and Santa Fe Reporter, as well as Nerve, The Numinous and Reality Sandwich.

Crazy Wisdom
What is the Tirrel Corporation?

Crazy Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 69:53


Christian Langalis is the co-founder and C.E.O. of Tirell Corporation What is Orbis Tertiary? What is the Orbis Ledger? Are there any cyberpunk references for Urbit business? What is the distinction of cyber-punk? Dystopia. What is cypher-punk? Who are Timothy May and Satoshi Nakamoto What is the overreach of instrumentalization? What is the atomization of the social? How did computers atomize humans even further? In what ways has studying culture informed your world view? What is the ultimate holy grail for Tirrell? What is an interregnum? What is the role of Urbit in the Web 3.0 ecosystem? How do you maintain legacy systems on an entirely new system that is censorless? What is a Spot ETF and why is it important? What is Bitcoin's fifth pillar? (15 minutes) What is a cantalon insider? What is the New World Order that George H. W. Bush setup and how does it work now? What is the Minsky Movement? What is the Austrian tendency when it comes to economics? Who are Larry White and George Selgen? What is synthetic commodity money? What is the New Wyoming Bank Charter?  What are Full-Reserve Cryptocurrency Banks? What is the difference between a bank and a bitcoin wallet? What are interbank clearing systems? What is the difference between a deferred system and a credit card settlement? What is unchained capital multisig? What is an FBO? What are extant regulations? What is the Nick Land quote (“in the mouth of madness”) (25 minutes)? How did science fiction inform your life? Who is Phil Monk? Urbit strives to have a system that is human scale, that will never require the long-term intervention of a specialized third party. Why do people call Curtis Yarvin an authoritarian? What is peer discovery? What is the contained podcast and who is Barret (36 minutes)?  What are your favorite exclaves? How do I use Tirrell? Download the thing (find the thing). What is landscape (groups) programming language? What is the future of NFTs when it comes to fan groups? NFT's can be digital cellophane wrappers for an album. How many people are in the Tirell corporation? What should someone know about the Urbit foundation? What is Hoon School? Do you have any insight into the people aspect of doing business? How is Tirell corporation set up? What church do you belong to (55 minutes)? What is the correct view of Urbit?  What is the Jungen? What is Cottage Core? What is the relationship between Solipsism and being a Luddite?  Who is Junger? What is the naming scheme? ~tirrel ~pindet-timmut ~tirrel corporation tirrel.io

On the Media
Work Work Work Work Work

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 50:12 Very Popular


Checking in on the so-called Great Resignation. On this week's On The Media, hear why the trend is a logical response to the cult of work. Plus, when technology makes our jobs harder, maybe being a 'luddite' isn't such a bad thing.  1. Sarah Jaffe [@sarahljaffe], journalist and author of Work Won't Love You Back: How Devotion to Our Jobs Keeps Us Exploited, Exhausted, and Alone, on how love and meaning became intertwined with our jobs. Listen. 2. Anne Helen-Peterson [@annehelen], writer and journalist, and Charlie Warzel [@cwarzel], contributing writer at The Atlantic, on how technology is—or, dramatically is not — making life easier at work. Listen. 3. Gavin Mueller [@gavinmuellerphd], assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, on what modern lessons can be learned from the Luddite workers of 19th century England. Listen. Music from this week's show: Sign and Sigil by John ZornBROKE by Modest MouseMiddlesex Times by Michael AndrewsBlues by La Dolce vita Dei NobiliLiquid Spear Waltz by Michael AndrewsStolen Moments by Ahmed Jamal Trio

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Political Economy with James Pethokoukis: Virginia Postrel: Dynamism or Stasis?

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022


In the early 19th century, English textile workers calling themselves “Luddites” destroyed machinery in an effort to save their jobs from automation. And two centuries later, those who resist technological change are still called Luddites. In the 2020 book The Fabric of Civilization, Virginia Postrel tells the history of textiles, including the Luddite movement. And in her 1998 […]

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis
Virginia Postrel: Dynamism or Stasis?

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 34:08


In the early 19th century, English textile workers calling themselves "Luddites" destroyed machinery in an effort to save their jobs from automation. And two centuries later, those who resist technological change are still called Luddites. In the 2020 book The Fabric of Civilization, Virginia Postrel tells the history of textiles, including the Luddite movement. And in her 1998 book, The Future and Its Enemies, she describes the "stasist" view behind Luddism, as well as its natural antipode, dynamism. To discuss how this framework can help us understand the current moment, I've brought Virginia on the podcast. Virginia is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist and visiting fellow at the Smith Institute for Political Economy and Philosophy at Chapman University. She is the author of https://www.amazon.com/Future-Its-Enemies-Creativity-Enterprise/dp/0684827603/ (The Future and Its Enemies), https://www.amazon.com/Substance-Style-Aesthetic-Remaking-Consciousness/dp/0060933852/ (The Substance of Style), and https://www.amazon.com/Power-Glamour-Longing-Visual-Persuasion/dp/1416561110 (The Power of Glamour). Her latest is https://www.amazon.com/Fabric-Civilization-Textiles-Made-World-ebook/dp/B08KQ441QQ/ (The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World).

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis
Virginia Postrel: Dynamism or Stasis?

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022


In the early 19th century, English textile workers calling themselves “Luddites” destroyed machinery in an effort to save their jobs from automation. And two centuries later, those who resist technological change are still called Luddites. In the 2020 book The Fabric of Civilization, Virginia Postrel tells the history of textiles, including the Luddite movement. And in her 1998 book, The Future and Its Enemies, she describes the “stasist” view behind Luddism, as well as its natural antipode, dynamism. To discuss how this framework can help us understand the current moment, I’ve brought Virginia on the podcast. Virginia is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist and visiting fellow at the Smith Institute for Political Economy and Philosophy at Chapman University. She is the author of The Future and Its Enemies, The Substance of Style, and The Power of Glamour. Her latest is The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World.

TheTechSavvyLawyer.Page Podcast
Conversations with a Self-Professed Computer Luddite – My Conversation with Columnist, Humorist, and Retired Attorney Marcel Strigberger.

TheTechSavvyLawyer.Page Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 28:31


My next guest is Marcel Strigberger.  Marcel is a former Canadian attorney who has been writing humorous articles for many years, now full-time, in legal publications including the ABA Journal, The Lawyer's Daily, Canadian Lawyer, and California Lawyer, among other publications.  Marcel and many of his writings can be found on this blog https://marcelshumour.com/.  Marcel is also the author of several books including “Birth, Death and Other Trivialities: A Humourous Philosophical Look at the Human Condition”, "Poutine on the Orient Express: An Irreverent Look at Travel", "Boomers, Zoomers and Other Oomers: A Boomer-biased Irreverent Perspective on Aging", available in paper and eBook version where books are sold. Click here for more info. Join Marcel and I as we discuss the following three questions: 1. What are three things about technology that disturb less tech-savvy attorneys, 2. What are three things less tech-savvy lawyers would find helpful, and 3. What are the three most amusing things you see attorneys still not doing right with their technology? Editors note:  I left in a few minutes where originally I was going to edit it out due to an error I had made; but, Marcel had an interesting anecdote that I thought the listener would enjoy! WHERE YOU CAN FIND MARCEL! Website: https://marcelshumour.com/ Phone: (647) 880-6979 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/poutineontheorientexpress/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcelstrigberger/

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News
EP290 - Shoptalk 2022 Recap

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 58:22 Very Popular


EP290 - Shoptalk 2022 Recap ShopTalk held it's first in-person show since 2019, May 27-30th in Las Vegas. The show made the move from the Venetian to the Mandalay Bay. Nearly 10,000 attendees joined more than 600 exhibitors at this years show. Making ShopTalk one of the first industry events to truly feel like it did prior to the pandemic, and living up to the billing as the retail industries reunion. Shoptalk has truly established itself as the preeminent digital commerce event in the US. In this episode Jason and Scot recap all the major keynotes, trends, and themes from the show. If you wren't able to attend, this show will catch you up. If you did attend, they episode will help you write that event recap you owe the rest of your team! Episode 290 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Thursday April 8, 2022. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:23] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 290 being recorded on Thursday April 7th 2022 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:38] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason Scott show listeners well tonight we are excited to talk about shoptalk Jason you went for the show I was not able to make it this year unfortunately but you went and you are going to report on all the happenings and I'm excited to hear how it went. Jason: [0:57] I know I feel like listeners should know that your April Fool's joke is you told me you were there and I kept waiting like at the Starbucks to meet you and you never showed. Scot: [1:06] Not true not true I was a good co-host and I let you know with plenty of time I wouldn't be able to make it. Jason: [1:12] I am teasing but I do think shoptalk overlapped April Fool's this year. Scot: [1:17] It was her a lot of shenanigans. Jason: [1:19] There there was not any there was some usual trade show Shenanigans but I'm not sure I would say there was any April Fool's related Shenanigans but it was a good show you missed a good one. Scot: [1:31] Before we dive in what was the Starbuck situation. Jason: [1:33] So the Starbuck situation I would give it a B+ so it's a for people for a long time treat your followers shoptalk started out at the Aria as a small show and then it outgrew the Aria and they moved to the Venetian which it was nice because the Venetian does have on-prem Starbucks but the Venetian is a, kind of very big and they did it there for a number of years and then they right before the pandemic they announced they were moving it to Mandalay Bay and so this was the first one in Mandalay Bay and Mandalay Bay is good because it has. To Starbucks one in the casino area and one on the way to the convention center so so ordinarily I would give that a plus but they one of the Starbucks is still closed from the pandemic it hasn't reopened and the one on the way to the convention center normally takes mobile orders which is awesome, for the convention they turned up they turned off mobile orders every day of the convention. Scot: [2:41] I don't need it. Jason: [2:43] I stayed very well caffeinated and in my new world where I drink iced coffee from Starbucks branded iced coffee from the grocery store I got to augment my stops at the Starbucks by having a couple, jugs of Starbucks iced coffee in my room as well so no one should be worried about me. Scot: [3:01] That you can say in your backpack or strapped to your head like I have one of those beer hats. Jason: [3:06] Exactly and I showed up at a couple morning meetings with like to Starbucks and it's always this great debate like should I go hide in a closet somewhere and finish one so that the people in this meeting won't know that I was double-fisting it or should I just embrace my, my problem and I embraced it. Scot: [3:22] Everyone listens to the podcast Selena it's a well-known thing no one judges you for your Starbucks. [3:35] We live all coffee we're pretty agnostic on the coffee. We'll call what were the so that's the Starbucks what about the this whole thing called retail and e-commerce. Jason: [3:50] Yeah so before we jump into all the the topics and going ons it's a I would just say like I think there, I don't know what's the official or The Unofficial theme but they called the retails reunions and I feel like it was pretty apt this is the first big show, that to me felt like it did before the pandemic they had 10,000 attendees which. If it's off from from 2019 it's only slightly like maybe they had 12,000 attendees in 2019 so, 10 felt like a big show they had a 650 exhibitors. It felt pretty normal which was awesome and one of the best things about shoptalk normally is the networking and catching up with friends and I feel like that was in full effect and, extra fulfilling this year because you know I just got to see a bunch of people that I enjoy spending time with that I hadn't gone to Sea in a couple of years. Scot: [4:52] Prickle yeah so it's kind of a I like this post covid lifestyle where it just feels like nothing happened it uh it's a it's a joy. Jason: [5:00] Yeah yeah I feel like the biggest Debbie Downer for me is everyone I was excited to see was like mostly just asking me about you. Scot: [5:07] All right sir I'm through through Outlet cool what did any. Jason: [5:15] Throw out because maybe I'll throw a contrary position at the end but I would say the overall mood at the show was also interesting to me it felt very optimistic like people were upbeat people were. Kind of like enthusiastic about the year ahead and you know I don't know it was it was a good vibe. Scot: [5:36] Yes I was tracking a lot of the social media and it was interesting a long this so you had shoptalk which is like you know it was like one one track if you will and all the positive things there but at the same time and there was like some some chaos in e-commerce land where we had the single click checkout thing called Fast kind of falling apart we had, lot of the rapid delivery companies, go puff is not one of them but you know them better not be a gorilla and like three or four of them kind of imploded kind of right during shoptalk so there is kind of envisioned you guys like yeah this 15-minute deliveries the future while right outside the conference center it was kind of falling apart. Jason: [6:17] There was some version of that there was you know Uber instacart and doordash all talking about instant delivery well a lot of the, the tenuous VC funded ones were, we're announcing their their shutdowns and for sure they're there was I mentioned 650 exhibitors I think about 620 of them were payment providers. Or buy now pay later surfaces and what like if you walked around the show you'd think that was the biggest thing ever and and yeah / your point like you know one fast runner fast as a payment provider was kind of spinning down and laying everyone off while this while the show is going on so not a lot of talk about that at the show. Scot: [7:05] Yeah weird will call I'm excited to hear your take on things let's let's jump in. Jason: [7:10] Awesome so I kind of am dividing tonight's talk into two sections the main Keynotes and kind of what my highlights were from the Keynotes and then, some of the main trends that I sort of picked up on from the show so they will start with the key notes and all the big media companies you know had a keynote So So Meta was there not with maybe the most senior met a person like that like shoptalk tends to get big names for the Keynotes and The Meta was like a track keynote from Benjy Shalimar who's like the VP of Commerce which you know big roll it meta but it wasn't like they had Sheryl Sandberg or someone, they had Alan Siegen from Google who's like the president of America's Partnerships and they he talked about Google and YouTube, and you know from those platforms, meta was like super bullish on social commerce as you would expect but they were highlighting that like hey the biggest growth area at Facebook in the short term is Commerce, and he specifically called that stuff you talked about all the time that like there's a huge amount of untapped buying intent and Facebook groups, and Facebook Marketplace and then they're very bullish on the live streaming via reels in Instagram. Scot: [8:40] This guy's a genius. Jason: [8:41] Yeah so he was he was pitching that and you know he didn't. Again people don't tend to break news at this show but you got the impression that there was going to be some some new product launches in the in the near future that we're Commerce related you definitely don't get the impression that that, Netta is exclusively focusing on VR and moving away from Commerce, and then very similarly Google was like Hey Commerce is where it's at, you know they always have fun data to share that you know they always share some Trends about like, search and you know one of the interesting things is they were saying was that while there's a lot of evidence that people are returning to stores as the pandemic abates, that it's not at the expense of digital it's in addition to digital so they were. They now have a lot of geolocation data in the Google ecosystem and so they were talking about how like fifty-four percent of shoppers. [9:40] Have been to five different shopping channels in the last two days so in-store and online and they're they're super bullish on YouTube as a Commerce platform so they're they're both talking about, lot of new shoppable video formats and shoppable video ads and YouTube is a live streaming platform for influencers. In you know increasingly they have so many add products on Google that it can be hard to figure out where to put your money and what to invest in and so they have kind of one new, new ad product they seemed to be leaning into pretty heavily which is called performance Max and the idea is you just close your eyes and give Google its money your money and Google figures out the best places to put up for you. Scot: [10:26] It sounds a little suspicious I'm going to get Sr some machine learning in there that just going to magically spend my money for. Jason: [10:33] It's got like a bunch of real time optimization and and you know the obviously like you should be cynical about those things I'm a little dubious but I would say that a lot of these. Real-time allocation and bidding systems like you know they do tend to work pretty well like they do tend to outperform humans that are trying to make make you know decisions based on. Historically wrong stuff and opinions. Scot: [11:01] Yeah the we've been experimenting with some of the stuff that spiffy and you used to do narrow match and Broad match experiment and then as you as you do some of these under the hood as we watch what they're doing at least you have some visibility it's not like a black box you know it actually seems to be doing a pretty good job and it takes a lot of manual work out of what some of the best practices that you would do so so I like to poke fun but I do think there's definitely a there there. Jason: [11:28] Yeah ya know I tend tend to agree and prove your point like you can put all the parameters you want and so you can run a test and see how it works and kind of, increment into you know a bigger chunk of your budget, but then we had like one real retailer on the main stage which was Catholic a who's a CEO of Sam's and she was pretty interesting she was talking because you don't normally think of Club as being a super digitally engaged category and you know digital being super important to club like the, the most famous club retailer in the world is Costco who I would argue is why quite famously a digital Luddite, and Kathy was talking a lot about how important omnichannel was for Sam's and how like successful scan and go has been and that like. That that specific particularly with younger Shoppers with Millennials that there's that there's a preference to scan and go over you know traditional checkout and the scan and go customers, shop more frequently and spend more so they're they're the best customers and that Sam's Club is even running ads promoting, the scan and go functionality and that was interesting to me because. [12:51] Walmart has kind of tested and moved away from scan and go a couple times I feel like they're kind of leaning back into it at the moment, but it seems like it's and it's club like they're pretty convinced it's a no-brainer that it's a net positive so so just walk out. Type technology you know sort of more proof that customers appreciate. Scot: [13:14] Nursing J W for the win. Jason: [13:16] Exactly and then the Big 3 key notes as far as I was concerned that were most interesting where all the the. I'll call them local Commerce is what they want to be called now or we might traditionally called them rapid Commerce but so it's the. CEO of instacart Fiji Simo, the president of doordash Chris Payne and then the CEO of uber dhara and I can never pronounce his last name but but so that would, he begets as far as I was concerned and those are you know three interesting companies in our industry right now and. [13:57] You know at least two of them maybe all three of them you don't necessarily first think of as Commerce. Or if you do you think of them exclusively is kind of food Commerce and they all were kind of talking about their General Commerce Place so so it instacart, it's all about becoming the platform for local Commerce right and so exactly kind of like. [14:19] GSI pivoted from being a turnkey solution to being a platform that retailers used instacart is launching all these white label Standalone services so carrot ads and. Carrot fulfillment and they're opening their own rapid Commerce distribution centers that you can stage your products in and, and you know offer 15 minute or 30 minute delivery windows, so that you know it's kind of interesting instacart was really trying to sell their their stuff as services and and white labeled services and not just for food so across all of Commerce, the same with doordash doordash seemed to be talking about hey we're we're all general merchandise, were you know doubling down on using. Fulfilling orders from stores helping stores either use us as their own last mile service and even helping. [15:28] Create inventory locations for retailers that are closer to Consumers and Chris Payne talked a lot about, these delivery promises and it was interesting he was like. You know we can all do 15-minute delivery but there definitely is not a path to doing 15-minute profitably and there's a lot of operational challenges and he was kind of arguing, that he felt like 30 minutes was The Sweet Spot that that like he thought it was totally viable the offer, in a peeling assortment of items for 30-minute deliver and meat delivery in major Metro areas and that that was going to be the focus of doordash. And then Uber, same thing like you know right now ubereats makes as much or more than then Uber rides, and if you've been watching TV you may have seen they have a national ad campaign right now which is pretty funny called Uber not eats and it's you know promoting all the non edible stuff that you can get delivered from. From from Uber and and that like they wanted their kind of phrase for themselves was we want to be the local business operating system so all the stuff. That a business needs to do kind of local Last Mile does that get you all fired. Scot: [16:49] Chris Payne was that a it does Chris Payne was a team I know him from her. He always has he was at like MSN and then eBay he's been all over the place he said he's kind of a he started I think it was a CTO for a while but I think he's now more operational. Jason: [17:09] Yeah I mean he was good and you know it was interesting to hear from all of them I do think all of these like startups that are you know. You know I think there is a significant infrastructure disadvantage when when kind of uber doordash and instacart are all weaning into your space. Scot: [17:28] Yeah it's hard to hard to compete with them on one side and Amazon on the other it's a bit of a crunch. Jason: [17:36] Yeah and it kind of my big takeaway from the these these key notes in aggregate is, the swim lanes are off by each of these companies might have been born in a slightly different category of the gig economy of you will, and they you know they each had kind of their home market and they all have decided that the growth opportunity is to expand into each other's market so I think these three companies, feel increasingly like direct competitors to each other. Um so that was kind of my Keynotes and then and I did not get to attend every single key note it was a pretty busy show and I was over programmed, but so then I did attend as many other sessions as I could and here kind of the big themes from my perspective and you tell me of any of these resonate with you. [18:26] There are a lot of sessions about buy now pay later and like it was very optimistically covered, in these sessions and Mackenzie did a session where they were sharing some consumer research that you know more than sixty percent of consumers plan to use it I thought all the, the buzz around being PL was interesting because, in my world it almost feels like like that that trend has already peaked and is starting to decline. [19:00] So you know part of a lot of retailers adopted be in PL they originally World on their website now the ruling it out in point-of-sale and a little known fact, it's more expensive for most retailers than a traditional credit card transaction and the argument was, that it would bring incremental customers and higher value customers, um and like that hasn't been universally true amongst my clients that have tested it, and the kind of the world has changed a little since these Services first rolled out now these services are all showing up on credit reports which, for a while they weren't and so that was a reason a consumer might have chosen to use this versus traditional credit card was if you know, they already had a spotty Credit Report or didn't want to risk getting a spotty credit report and there's a lot of talk about like default rates starting to really creep up on these things so I kind of wonder. [19:57] How durable they're going to be in the long-term especially if you know the economy keeps being challenging for a little while. Scot: [20:05] Yeah and one of The Shining examples was Peloton which is kind of Hit the skids pretty hard and I think they were like half of a firm's volume or some some crazy number you know of one of the. Jason: [20:19] Meaning a lot of protons where bye. Scot: [20:21] That's got a great ahead. Jason: [20:22] Installment plan yeah okay. Scot: [20:25] Yeah like something like 80% of peloton's had an affirm plan and so but also I think it was by far our firms biggest Merchant. I've read you know like a very material percentage of a firm's, what do you guys call it transaction payment volume through those bmps I don't know whatever the metric is of the transaction volume flowing through I think I think Peloton was a big one and it's there in a world of hurt so I wonder if that's creating some pressure on the industry to. Jason: [20:50] Yeah at the very least I don't think the world needs as many as we have right now so I would expect at the very least that we're going to see some consolidation in that space and it, you know it certainly has a place in the ecosystem but there was a while when I was like oh my God the Magic Bullet to every Commerce problem is buy now pay later. Scot: [21:11] Yeah there is was there any good consumer Behavior though that you believed or was it all felt like the the buy now pay later guys had just funded it that consumers love it. Jason: [21:26] Yeah well yet I mean I don't think the Mackenzie research was funded by by a particular company but you know it was this stated preference survey from customers and you know how much I love. Stated preference service from from consumers. Scot: [21:41] Yeah. Jason: [21:44] Side note 99% of all alcoholic say they can stop drinking whenever they want if you want to do a survey. Scot: [21:53] Absolutely and everyone says they'll spend more money for something environmental friendly than they never do. Jason: [21:58] And a hundred percent of people are of above average intelligence. Scot: [22:03] Yes and handsome. Jason: [22:05] Which doesn't yet turn out to work out so. Another big talking point at the show was everybody's favorite word to hate is omni-channel like there were a ton of omni-channel sessions there's a lot of interesting talk about, people returning to stores like there is mixed messages about the rate of digital adoption declining and I would say. [22:34] The rate of acceleration is declining but like digital is not diesel is not shrinking in any like absolute basis. A lot more of these omnichannel amenities and so this was like that was a lot of the Sam's Club talk was about that Dave gilboa who's the one of the cofounders of Warby Parker he was talking a lot about Omni Channel and the role of the stores in their business model and how they've kind of gone back to Virtual try on like the I don't know people know that the original plan for Warby Parker was, that you could use your phone to try glasses on and. The technology wasn't quite there when they launched the company and people didn't like it very much so they end up having to do all these, tried for five pair for free as an emergency stop Gap but now they feel like with the lidar and the latest iPhones they feel like the virtual try and experience is working better than the, the tripe are model and so they're starting to see a lot of uptick in that but people still want to come into the store to buy the glasses so kind of talking about, Omni channel for the win. Scot: [23:45] That's not harmonized. Jason: [23:48] Yeah no only 44 what's his name Steve Dennis. Scot: [23:56] Dennis yeah. Jason: [23:57] Sorry I missed her bifurcation is how I think of them but. Data is always a buzzword at this show which again I like data as much as the next person but I'm not sure like as a tactic that it's a standalone thing but a lot of people wanted to provide case studies about how they were, you know leveraging data in new ways and particularly omni-channel data so John strain who's the chief digital officer Gap was talking about, all the new initiatives that Gap is doing for first-party data and he was arguing that like you know with the two doing personalization with first-party data like they were saying. [24:41] Did that, they were able to acquire customers that were like 40 percent more likely to be new file customers as opposed to Labs customers and it had a 30 percent higher order value than, then kind of their their pre data-driven customer acquisition tactics. The Steve Miller who's the head of digital at Dick's Sporting Goods he was talking about a lot of. Sort of the data collection techniques that they were using and how they were getting way you know better outcomes out of personalization they had a kind of cool example I like. Dick's Sporting Good launched an app called I think it's called Game Changer and what it is is it's an app for your phone to keep score at a baseball game and by keep score do you know what I mean like track all the stats. People for a long time have Branagh book and like. Scot: [25:37] Book yeah. Jason: [25:38] Manuel keep score the game so they created this app they give it away for free but what it does is it now like get wet them get 27 million. Like weekly Baseball fans like in their ecosystem that they then get to Market you know they have first-party data on and get to Market to so it's kind of like when. Um Under Armour bought MyFitnessPal for example like kind of interesting places where retailers are, are like building or buying these digital utilities that aren't necessarily directly related to Commerce so I just to get closer to customers that they can then Market. Scot: [26:21] Yeah that is color all Trojan Horse strategy. Jason: [26:24] Exactly and then Julie Bornstein who's the founder of the yes, I think a past guest on the show she was kind of talking about her first party data and she was throwing out red meat to all the Consultants that are selling personalization so here's going to be the money quote that you're going to see in every brochure you get for the next year, our first party day I driven first-party data experiences drove a 75% increase in annual spend a hundred percent annual order frequency and 125 percent better retention rate. So sounds great sounds like they got some improvement that move the needle for them I'm excited for them, here's going to be the thing when you see all these personalization vendors that are now pitching that to you like. Personalization isn't like a binary thing it's not like you don't have it and then you do have it and these are the results you expect when you do have it right like everybody's doing personalization to some extent and like how much, Improvement in results you're going to get is going to be directly related to how bad your experience was before and how far you improve it. Scot: [27:33] Yeah yeah could so it could be just started with really bad bad numbers and then didn't kind of. Jason: [27:40] Exactly so I wouldn't I mean I wouldn't be like putting too much stock in these like benchmarks are case studies as like predictive in any way of what an individual user will get but like of course if you can get more customer data and use it to have more relevant experiences that's going to be you know benefit. Scot: [27:57] Now one thing I'm noticing is previous shoptalk sweat with this whole panel format this is sounding much more like individual speaker was that that kind of change of the format. Jason: [28:08] Not necessarily so they kind of have a few formats so they have like they have the key notes which is almost always, an interview that presenter an interviewer and that that was still true so then they have track key notes and attract keynote is usually in individual speaker or an individual speaker followed by an interview and then they have these panel formats and so in some cases, I'm cherry picking what I thought was interesting from one speaker and a panel of three but in a bunch of cases these were track Keynotes. Scot: [28:47] Got it. Jason: [28:49] And we'll get to the very best track keynote in a minute which you know was obviously mine. Scot: [28:56] No bias there. Jason: [28:58] Yeah, so a lot of talk about the best and most cost-effective ways to acquire customers so you know there was a ton of sessions talking about live streaming and kind of the, the kind of at this point I'll call it the kind of predictable tripe that like oh my gosh you live streaming is huge in China and may or may not be coming to the u.s. but you should be testing it like you know Google obviously had a big keynote talking primarily about live streaming a ton of practitioners were talking in particular about like their experience on Tik-Tok and successful live streaming HSN was obviously talking about their success and then there were some, shop shops is a live streaming platform that you know gave an interesting case study and then, I would say there's always a couple of vendors that like emerge I don't know if they're necessarily the best or not but like kind of win the show for share of voice and so every time someone's talking about live Commerce the vendor that they were talking about partnering with was firework which is a enabler of live streaming, Commerce and so it felt to me like they they did a good job showing up in all these conversations are you bullish on live streaming. Scot: [30:17] I am but it's because you have trained me that it's so big in China and then you know it's one of those things, a lot of the stuff in China we thought would be good kind of come across as not like chat Commerce and why bow and all that so but it's one where you know I see these influencers and I think it will catch on because we've got, the Kardashians and if they ever did a live stream or something like that it would be huge we just need we need like that spark and kind of a unique American take on it, probably from a Content perspective not underlying technology but it all has to come together. Jason: [30:52] Yeah so I don't like we may need a an updated deep dive on live streaming in China because it's actually, it's evolving super rapidly like there was this interesting phenomenon at first where all the live streaming was happening on retail platforms so it was like, kind of influencers that got made famous by Ali Baba and j.d. on their platform so think of it as people were consuming live streaming on Walmart.com not on tick tock, and then the government kind of crack down on some of these influencers who apparently weren't paying taxes, and and it kind of shifted the live streaming to the social platform so no like now Dao Yuan which is Tick-Tock in China is. The destination for live-streaming so it's just been interesting, but one wave live streaming I really like and I think coach was talking a lot about in their their track he noted the show, is sales associates as in as micro influencers and doing live streaming either from the store or after hours which. Scot: [31:55] Yeah we'll have to get caught up on them. Jason: [31:58] It's a related Trend that got a lot of Buzz this show as another way of acquiring customers as micro influencers that's another one that I'm kind of bullish on and there were some good case studies there, so Jill Ramsey is the CEO of AKA Brands was talking about like micro influencers being their most successful new customer acquisition strategy there are a bunch of apparel brands, um one that I hadn't thought of that I feel like I need to get updated on more, Alyssa Walt is the chief business officer for Burton Snowboards so you know all the snowboarding accessories, and she was talking about they were having huge success using NCAA athletes as influencers, and of course if you're not following it closely that used to be illegal for or not illegal but like it was a gainst the NCA term so you lose your college eligibility of you made any money as a, influence our sponsor and now their college athletes are all permission to. To endorse products and make money and so it's kind of open this new, new channel if you have a product that's appropriate to be. [33:13] Advocated by college athlete so that seemed interesting that they were a fast mover there, and then I mentioned coach was definitely leaning into influencers and particularly using sales associates as influencers. Scot: [33:29] Cool aunt heard the NCAA thing yielding some some fruit so that's interesting to hear. Jason: [33:35] Yeah I've seen some funny like local case studies where do I go up a car dealership hired some NCAA athletes and as you could imagine, like some of them are awful and some of them are awesome. So I just like some of the like the quality of the deliveries have been pretty funny and uneven. [33:55] So another big talking point that kind of it was not the topic of a lot of sessions but it got mentioned in a lot of sessions including mine was the emergence of retail media networks and I would say that was, something that came up at a lot in hallway conversations more so than in like content on the stage. But everybody and their brother you know now has a retail media Network and they you know they're all doubling down and one thing they're all doing is expanding, Beyond digital search so you know more different ad platforms on their websites but increasingly a lot of. Media opportunities in stores so you and I were talking about some of these offline like you know you know in-store displays and things like that, and then also a bunch of these retail media networks are offering dsps and letting you buy ads on Google or Facebook using, first-party targeting from the retailer so you know you think about the depreciation of cookies in your ability to buy your own look-alike audience on Facebook, you know you can still pay Walmart to buy look like audiences on Facebook for you and that can be pretty successful. [35:14] So we already talked about the payment Trends another big Trend that came up a lot we kind of covered it in the, the Keynotes was the rapid Commerce being a big thing and then what I wanted to put on your radar screen. When the came up an awful lot a few times in sessions and then a lot in the hallway is everyone is metaverse curious. Scot: [35:41] Yeah yeah I read one of the summary as was everyone's talking about metaverse but no one thinks they'll actually be an e-commerce down there so I don't know we're people thinking there's actually going to be some Commerce happening or they were just. What is this wise. Jason: [35:56] So I don't know that's a good question I tried to ask probing questions and like the vast majority of people you talk to don't actually understand what they even meet like there's a lot of confluent, compilation of terms right like web 3 metaverse, um blockchains cryptocurrencies and so it's it's you know you're talking to someone about the metaverse and then they're telling you why they invested in Bitcoin and you go well like those are related but they're not the same thing. Scot: [36:28] Yeah it's like 13. Jason: [36:30] Yeah but so there are a couple case studies from some gaming companies that we're doing some in-game Commerce again Mackenzie like kind of had some consumed like part of their presentation had all these like, evolving consumer Trends and they again there's a stated preference for take it with a huge grain of salt um but they ask customers how many hours a day they expected to spend in the meadow verse five years from now and the average answer was 4 hours a day, and for for Jen's he's the average our answer was nine hours a day. Scot: [37:03] You know every pretty much every waking hour or sleeping hour will be the members. Jason: [37:09] Yeah and, you know I'll tell you about my evolving opinion The Meta verse in a minute but you know a really interesting question is what it like is like are we in the meta verse right now like like a zoom call the metaverse is. But Facebook messenger chat the med over like you know the there's a lot of gray area in definitions. Scot: [37:34] Nursing. Jason: [37:36] And so if you can't like if all my time on Twitter is in the meadow verse then I might be close to that average now. Scot: [37:44] Yeah yeah I don't know I don't think that counts. Jason: [37:49] And so I will highlight like I di think we have a metaverse Commerce Deep dive in in our near future, everybody wants to learn about it and understand it like I've been doing some kind of meta verse 101 Commerce conversations with a bunch of clients, and like at the very least if you're going to be an early mover and do some piloting like there are a bunch of easy to make tragic mistakes to make early on that you should. You should be aware of and so it just you know it might be an interesting topic for us to do a deep dive on. Scot: [38:25] Yeah we'll put it on the list. Jason: [38:27] Yeah and I got corralled by everybody's favorite venture capitalist Andreessen Horowitz and they're wildly boyish on the members. Scot: [38:36] Which which one of the folks steamer. Jason: [38:40] So they now have like a whole team, dedicate like that and you probably know them better than I do but you know they're trying to have this spin of providing all these services to entrepreneurs so they have like a lot of kind of. Share real sources and so you know the pitch to me is like, you know man if you have any client projects like we can play matchmaker and help introduce you to the right you don't companies in our portfolio and stuff like that so the these were not like Investment Partners these were all operating partners. There were trying to accelerate business for their portfolio companies that were pitching me. Scot: [39:25] I knew they had crypto Focus I didn't know they had a team thinking about the meadow verse that sinners. Jason: [39:29] They do have a crypto focus and I'm saying metaverse but I'll tell you what they really have their their their in addition their trip to focus they have a web 3 Focus. Scot: [39:38] Okay they're kind of loving it all together. Jason: [39:39] Um yeah which there is an important distinction between metaverse and web 3 which would be fun to talk about it we do a deep dive. Scot: [39:47] Yeah alright good teaser. Jason: [39:49] Awesome, lot of talk I mentioned this already but there was a lot of talk about the return of stores which is funny because you know I wasn't where stores went away, but maybe the buzz of the stores went away and you know now like stores are coming pretty well against their soft pandemic numbers and digital is comping, not as well against their Mega pandemic numbers and so, there's a way in which you look at it and go oh man you know store growth is unusually high and digital growth is unusually low. [40:22] I think that's kind of a misunderstanding of the data a little bit in a lot of cases but that was, a big hallway conversation and then the conversation that I didn't hear that really surprised me I mentioned the mood was really kind of Rosie, I have to be honest all my one-on-ones with clients leading up to the show have not been Rosy like there's a, awful lot of concern amongst the folks I work with about what everybody's calling the macros and you know by that they mean, like inflation persistent supply chain problems you know consistent persistent like economic instability like housing supplies and cost-of-living going up like all these, these kind of Doom and Gloom Financial measures and then you throw you know gas prices in war in Europe, on top of all that and I'm talking to a bunch of people that are like really worried about the Financial Health and spending ability of their customer base and there was none of that at the show. Scot: [41:24] Yeah yeah you know the consumer confidence numbers taken a precipitous fall which I always use is kind of my barometer and I'm I am also worried about the macros. Jason: [41:36] Yeah I mean you know I get these wrong all the time but there was a time early in the pandemic when, when you know my narrative was like the pandemics probably going to cause a recession and it's probably going to end with a period of like crazy accelerated spending similar to The Roaring 20s and the irony is, the opposite kind of happened like the pandemic like drove a two-year period of crazy spending and it feels like it's now ending in her session. Scot: [42:07] Yeah yeah it's kind of kind of backwards from what we all thought. Jason: [42:11] Yeah I hope that's not how it all plays out but. Scot: [42:14] Shown up in the numbers like you know the numbers that you talked about the retail numbers the but so it's either not happening or its early indications and we haven't seen it yet that's just kind of the big concern. Jason: [42:25] Yeah yeah no and I will tell you like if and it's going to come up here pretty soon I think another week. Last March was a mega month for retail and so the comps this March. Are copying against are really hard number and you know a lot of people feel that like the macros like really started to show up in the consumer numbers this March and so if, like there's a chance that like the comps are going to be really ugly this March it's going to be a interesting month to watch. Scot: [43:02] All right we'll keep an eye out. Jason: [43:03] Yeah I did say the last best session best session for last, I did a track keynote talking about achieving digital profitability right and I so I was the one Doom and Gloom session I'm like hey there is a bunch of macro concern over out there like obviously there was a bunch of extra digital, um activity and now the challenge we all have to face as we got to figure out how to bring more profit to our digital business and so I did a whole, track keynote talking about, um opportunities to improve the profitability and then I had a guest Jerome Griffith who's the CEO of lands and like I did a, like a 15-minute presentation and then we did like a 20-minute fireside chat talking about the best strategies to make money in this climate. So I tried to channel my inner Scott as much as possible. Scot: [43:56] What were some of the what are some of those strategies. Jason: [44:00] Um I mean it's it's black and tackling stuff we kind of you know talked about you know typical framework of, reducing cost getting more customers you know generating more revenue from each customer and then we kind of hit on, our favorite tactics within each of those three buckets Jerome like you know by far feels that the, the easiest best place to start is on the cost controls right and he's in the apparel space historically the apparel space does a horrible job of demand forecasting. [44:36] So they make the wrong stuff and they make too much stuff in that really hurts costs and you know just just fundamental costs of goods and and having good rigor around controlling, manufacturing cost is his kind of home base but like the part of his. [44:56] Feedback that was super interesting to me is lands in was a direct-to-consumer company so they were a company that was born as a catalog that sold 100% direct-to-consumer, they got acquired by Sears so then they were exclusively available on the lands in catalog and in Sears stores, and they were acquired by Sears I greatest years was starting to get distressed and turning into a fast Eddie Discounters and so suddenly lands in which hadn't done any discounting was heavily discounted, and then they got spun off from Sears and you know tried to recover their non discount price point and, they expanded into a bunch of other channels so today you can buy lands and direct from their website which is still about 50 percent of their sales but they sell wholesale through Macy's and Kohl's, which you know our discount channels and then they they also sell 1p on Amazon and so it was interesting he talked about wholesale and marketplaces being, a very important and vibrant customer acquisition strategy for a direct-to-consumer company and so he felt like. [46:07] Like the customers that he was meeting at Kohl's were incremental to the customers he met directly and that like partnering with coals and Macy's was, way more cost-effective way to acquire customers then Facebook ads. Scot: [46:20] Nursing and then I like the marketplace take that's a that's a good one. Jason: [46:24] Yeah yeah yeah so he I mean he was kind of like you got to be where the customer is control your costs, and then you know there are things like if you are direct-to-consumer like you should launch a retail media Network and try to supplement your, your Revenue with those kinds of tools and you know I did some stuff just on basic block and tackling and on mobile experiences that we all still get wrong and improving mobile conversion and stuff like that. Scot: [46:54] The was there a standing ovation at the end of the session. Jason: [46:59] There was there was because I said I was going to shut up now and that that generated incredible standing ovation. Scot: [47:05] Did you do the whole Spiel of if you like this I've got 290 hours out there on the internet for you. Jason: [47:11] I did but it's 3:00 because even though we only have 290 shows the average one is longer than an hour. Scot: [47:17] Nice yeah yeah good yeah some guy we interviewed somebody's like I've listened to all your podcast is like I'm not really sure yet. Jason: [47:28] Yeah although I will tell you I ran into a ton of people so many nice comments I'm so grateful like the thing I feel bad about when you miss a show is, just so many random people like recognize our name on my badge and I had a Jason and Scot show badge, and like we're honest with Sinners and had great feedback and I was just found out talk to all these people and and it's nice to hear that people appreciate what we do and if you don't know the most common, comment I get about the show is that oh yeah I listened at 1.25 speed or 1.5 speed while I'm at on my exercise bike. And I want to say for the first time ever I met a guy who's a regular listener to the show that said he listened at 2X and that I found I sounded kind of sleepy and tired in real life. Scot: [48:18] This is in your holding two coffees did you have the thing where you're speaking and someone recognizes your voice and they're looking around like a weight had I've heard that voice before that happens to us it. Jason: [48:32] It's Starbucks every single time because but I mean hey I spent a lot of time standing in a Starbucks line and I spend a lot of time talking so a lot of people have the chance to hear my voice and go wait a minute you sound familiar. Scot: [48:43] Did anyone make fun of your title that's my favorite part. Jason: [48:46] So yes but like in fairness there mostly people that are friends of yours or mine that just like on team Scott. Scot: [48:55] Okay they're just just carrying on the chief digital retail analytics customer Journey officer. Nice cool did you guys did your company have a been big shindig was it a good show for you guys. Jason: [49:11] It was it was it was also fun because I had a fair amount of co-workers their it was fun to spend time with them and we had a team dinner that was awesome. The most purposes agencies wouldn't necessarily exhibit but we own a company that helps Implement a lot of retail media networks called Citrus ad and so they had a booth there so I it was fun to hang out with them a little bit their founder by the way we might have I try not to put pupusas people in our show very often but we might have to have him on because he's a two-time very successful entrepreneur he tricked us into buying his his most recent company. He also is a former professional Australian Rules Football player like legit. Scot: [49:58] Oh ah yeah that's that weird football that they have yeah it's kind of fatter and stubby or than our football. Jason: [50:06] What version of football is not weird that okay yeah. Scot: [50:08] Cool well yeah and we should talk about if pupal sis needs to acquire any car washes with you you and I can have that one offline. Jason: [50:18] Yeah yeah for sure you I get as you can imagine that's that's most of the cycles that that I spend it purposes is pitching on us leaning into the car wash space. Scot: [50:28] Cool did you get a chance to walk through the booths and the the show floor and see Annie was that well traffic to an any any kind of. Jason: [50:38] Yeah it's always it's always hard to tell I do think shoptalk one of the things shoptalk does well is two things they try to have some events in the floor. Um so so you know like the lunches and stuff you kind of have to walk through the tradeshow to get to the lunches so they try to artificially create some traffic but one thing I really appreciate about shoptalk is, they have down time in the agenda when there's no track or keynote content like they have like two hours a day and part of the reason is they have this this function cut these out meet up so I can retailer can attend shop up shoptalk for free if they agree to take like five meetings with vendors and then these vendors pay for these meetings and so they have to have a window to do those meetings in and so I appreciate that, it creates a more natural opportunity for people to walk the show and discover vendors without feeling like you're missing something. Scot: [51:36] Crinkle how many retailers did you meet with. Jason: [51:40] Yeah so I do always try to walk the show and I do try to stop and talk to some booths I got to be honest there's a weird dynamic Scott and I feel like you would appreciate this but Walking the Floor makes me feel old because, I walk the floor and, here's basically what goes on in my mind I don't recognize the name of any of the vendors and then I agreed to sign for a second and then I figure out that there are vendor I know super well that's changed their name three times. And so it's like I feel like the Wikipedia that's like remembering oh yeah you used to be this and now you're this and now you're that and then I know I go oh and I know these 3 people that work there right now. It is now the case that all the people I know that work at all these vendors are too old and Senior to be in the booth so. I know I never run into any folks I know in the booth that's always the the Next Generation. Scot: [52:33] Yeah and then I'll get excited that you're a retailer and then you're a podcaster and they're like. Jason: [52:39] Yeah and that's my my unfulfilled young Lame Game I play with all of them is. You know by and large they're like so what do you do and I go I'm mostly just talk about this stuff all the time and there and they like think I'm lying when in fact that's exactly what I said. Scot: [52:55] The new about the 3:00. Jason: [52:58] Yeah exactly. And then in a couple cases it Dawns on them wait a minute you're the Jason and Scot show and they like chase me down in the hallway and go you I listen to your podcast. Scot: [53:08] Very cool. Jason: [53:10] Then we go into those sleepy tired thing anyway but in the interest of bringing the average down I feel like I've covered all the show do you feel like you caught up on everything you missed by not being there. Scot: [53:23] I do the one thing that I've heard chatter from the folks I talk to is this continued pressure on Shopify you ever seen they announce their last quarter's earnings Q4 their stock has been on a precipitous slide that they haven't seen since their IPO and like 2016 I think, maybe 15 was that that come up at all or no. Jason: [53:50] It didn't come up a lot and I'm trying to remember like I actually don't think they had a booth at the show which is interesting. I could be wrong on that but I kind of don't think they had had a big booth, and yeah I mean you know obviously they're totally lumped into this whole category of companies that did amazing in the beginning of the pandemic and then like you know seem like they acted like they would continue to, to grow that pace and obviously couldn't and then you know the their stock got punished for it. Scot: [54:23] Yeah yeah and there's been a lot of Wall Street notes out saying you know that I think what freaked everyone out is the fact they're going to invest in infrastructure meaning warehouses and there's a lot of Wall Street folks trying to say. It's not that bad it's only a billion dollars but I remain skeptical that that's going to be enough and then, yep so we should just wondering if that was. Jason: [54:48] Yeah I mean if anything I would say there are a lot more fulfillment companies that would be competing with a Shopify fulfillment Network and a lot more you like I'll tell you where Shopify has a ton of competition at this show are like. POS systems which is actually a meaningful part of shopify's offering now and you know like kind of. Solutions as a service besides the e-commerce site the payment systems and all of these things that you know Shopify does and I will say it's kind of funny. I still think like a lot of people try to describe themselves as the Shopify of X which. Like doesn't sound as good as it did a couple years ago and you still hear people trying to say like we're the word be Parker of X and I'm like have you looked at worry Parker stuffers. Scot: [55:37] Yeah how about how about some of our friends from The Headless Commerce industry was there a lot of a lot of Buzz there with the. Jason: [55:47] Yeah, so those platforms were there in full strength Fazal and fabric had a big presence there you remember they raised some good money right before the show, we had Kelly on from a Commerce tools you know a number of episodes ago and he talked about the mock Alliance and that mock Alliance, has really gained a lot of traction like I'm seeing a lot more and more vendors emerging that are now members of the mock Alliance so it seems like. You know that that's not just a marketing thing that's kind of like a legitimate Trade Organization for all these headless providers. Scot: [56:27] Nursing was there like common badging throughout or something like that. Jason: [56:31] Well yeah there's a mock Alliance logo that was on a bunch of booths I they may have had events I wasn't able to like attend any of their. There are social events but yeah it seems like it's getting traction I don't know if this is a perfect show for that like. There was an ERA when like everybody needed a platform you need to go to a show to meet vendors and find out about platforms like I kind of think the average attendee here has a platform today and so you know maybe there's some that are thinking about switching. But I have a feeling that those booths have gone a little bit more from customer acquisition to. Customer relationship management and retention at the shows. Scot: [57:11] Yeah yeah nursing will cope well we appreciate you going out and braving the wild environs of the Las Vegas hotel circuit and this the Starbucks to report back to us. Jason: [57:25] It was my pleasure and if she's listening definitely congratulations to Christina Gibson and the whole team at shoptalk I do think they put on a good show and it's, like I think it's definitely set itself up as the preeminent kind of digital Commerce show in our industry now. [57:59] Yeah and until next time happy Commercing.

Zebra's Your Edge Podcast
Worried You Lack the Experience or Expertise to Get into Sales or Start Down a New Career Path? Take It from a Luddite Turned High Tech Sales Leader: “People Buy People”

Zebra's Your Edge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 30:13


In a new podcast series, Julie Johnson will introduce you to the “Women Who Wow” her every day, including Jane Dennis. Find out how Jane built a rapport as a trusted advisor in tech after selling encyclopedias for 20 years, then visit the Your Edge Blog to learn more about incredibly strong and impressive women.

Y'all Heard?
Luddites

Y'all Heard?

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 60:12


Pete talks about anti-technology movements, kind of. He mostly covers the Luddite movement of yore and what Neo-Luddism looks like today. We also talk about bad business practices, how meetings suck, and bubble tea rage. Is it weird to talk about Luddism on a podcast? What is a half-dick-pic? Should we worship nature?

Y'all Heard?
Luddites

Y'all Heard?

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 60:12


Pete talks about anti-technology movements, kind of. He mostly covers the Luddite movement of yore and what Neo-Luddism looks like today. We also talk about bad business practices, how meetings suck, and bubble tea rage. Is it weird to talk about Luddism on a podcast? What is a half-dick-pic? Should we worship nature?

Fire the Canon
Winnie-the-Pooh Finale: A Pig of No Simple Fortune

Fire the Canon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 93:36


We read the last five chapters of Winnie-the-Pooh, by A.A. Milne. Which character is a badass bitch? Which character is the most like Theo?  Which character makes Theo suddenly turn against the book entirely?  Find out if this book gets to remain a classic, or if we decide to fire it out of the canon entirely.  (Or a secret third option?!) Rachel disrespects the wishes of the dead.  Jackie becomes a Luddite. Theo considers the benefits of killing Rachel.   Topics include: plane landings, Rowlf the Dog, cell phone destruction, Borat, dragons' hoards, Faraday cages, men of letters, Poirot, Theo's love of water, eggo my leggos, hair vs. fur, voice acting, NC housing code, and dudes secretly living in your closet.

Oh No, Ross and Carrie
Ross Meets Cory Doctorow: Bringing Back Luddites Edition

Oh No, Ross and Carrie

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 129:38 Very Popular


Ross speaks with Cory Doctorow, technology activist and author of How to Destroy Surveillance Capitalism, about 5G and fiber, the real conspiracies that the anti-5G crowd is missing, and a host of effects that telecom practice and legislation has on our daily lives. Plus, learn how you can be a technology-wielding Luddite!For pics and videos, follow us on Facebook!

The BreakPoint Podcast
Joe Rogan and Spotify, Our Loss of Trust , and God Is No Luddite - BreakPoint This Week

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 71:30


The BreakPoint Podcast
God is no Luddite, and We Need Not Be Either

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 5:18


The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.17.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 56:03


America's Obsession with Illusion Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, January 14, 2022 “He who despises his own life is soon master of others” – English proverb For the vast majority of Americans, the past year has been the most challenging in their lives – certainly for young adults. However, not everyone has been suffering equally. The nation's health or illness is not uniform. Much of our suffering is dependent upon the institutionalization and negligence of previous injustices, the loss of social equanimity, economic heedlessness, and our leaders' unmitigated greed and pursuit of power. Nor is everyone adversely affected by the shifts underway in the imaginations of the political and ideological universes. The transnational class of corporate and banking elites, for example, has little motivation to respect or contribute to national boundaries and interests. They perceive themselves as global actors. For the generals and captains of neoliberal globalization, the puppet masters of financial markets, the Covid-19 pandemic only caused annoying disruptions in the quality of their lives. For the remainder, it has been cataclysmic. As we begin 2022 should we not pause and reflect carefully about what we want and don't want as individuals and a nation to secure a sustainable future? A deep and collective introspection into the shared moral principles is called for. It is no longer what we say or profess that has any truth or significance. Rather what we actualize in our daily lives and as a society is going to determine whether the future will be better future or worse. Only our actions can realistically convey the deeper values in the American psyche. Therefore we need to ask ourselves more difficult questions to discover the real moral poverty that defines us as a civilization. Where were the large demonstrations against the trillion-dollar bailout of Wall Street and foreign banks when barely a penny was spent for the average citizen? Where were the demonstrations against home foreclosures and the loss of small family farms?  Debt drenched student aid? Exploitive payday loans and exorbitant credit card fees? There was no outrage against Obama's broken promises on universal healthcare, a platform that helped bring him to the White House. The single-minded attention on the pandemic has cancelled out 2.5 million homeless American children and 46 million adults and children who go hungry daily. Where was a collective voice condemning the hundreds of billion tax dollars to increase the power of the military and intelligence complexes as American cities further collapsed into ghettos? Where were the marches against corporations off-shoring jobs? Why no vocal outrage against the invasions of Libya and Syria, or the US' ongoing support of rogue dictatorships, such as Saudi Arabia and the UAE for crimes against humanity in Yemen? Where are the protests against corporations exploiting slave labor in poor countries such as Bangladesh and Indonesia?  There were no noteworthy protests for any of these issues. And yet these are true existential threats to our very democracy. Bertrand Russell wrote, “one should care about the world they do not see.” Should we not be planning ahead for the future of our children, grandchildren and ourselves instead of being incapacitated by fear? The national popular disinterest in these and other crises foreshadows something on the horizon that does not bode well for most Americans. It is a simple principle to understand; yet so subtle it will likely go unnoticed until everyone is individually and collectively affected. It is the utter lack of balance within the nation's body politick, and across the media that spoon feeds us virtual images of a faux theatrical play, the illusory icons on our minds' monitor screens, that shape our perceptions of reality. This is how control is exerted over our thoughts, speech and actions. In fact, it is only after people exercise their thoughts independently, with the certain belief that they have actual self-control over their lives, that they can arrive at the realization that their perceptions may be largely distorted. Throughout America's history there has been a system of three federal branches to assure there is a platform for checks and balances as well as a structure to contain the tensions between them. That system now is being rapidly challenged and eroded. Now the middle of the road Democrats officially control the White House and both legislative bodies. We will see what awaits us. There is also what is commonly referred to as the “fourth estate,” the powers of the press and news media that control the framing of the political narrative and partisan issues. In the past, the media was expected to hold the government accountable by exposing its conflicts of interest that endanger the public, its misdemeanors, and systemic corruption. This too is in decay as the media has been fully captured by corporate interests and now aligns itself politically and ideologically with the new political elite determined to reshape democracy and launch a new reset that will dramatically infringe on individual rights and liberties. Finally, there is the growing influence of a fourth branch of government, the corpocracy and its private interests. We might also include the US intelligence community that increasingly operates independently from executive and legislative oversight. Together we can witness this loose cabal of seemingly independent entities, working simultaneously in consortium and in opposition to each other, propelling us towards a future tsunami of greater polarization and immense social disruption. Earlier generations were not threatened by the telecommunication and technological giants, such as Google, Facebook and Amazon. Clinton's Communications Decency Act of 1996, despite its well-meaning intentions to protect free speech, was otherwise destructively naïve. At that time it was sensible; however, that was before the advent of the social media that now dominates our lives and shapes political discourse. Silicon Valley has become a force far more powerful than the lobbyists on K Street to ensure that corporate Democrats are raised to a position of absolute power. Yet the problem would be equally threatening if it were the corporate and radicalized GOP in power. The centrist Democratic left, lulled in a passivity that “it can't happen here,” is every bit as dangerous and delusional as the Republican far-right's paranoia over conspiracies squatting behind every nook and cranny. A moderate centrist right no longer exists as it has now exited reality like a herd of lemmings to follow Trump phenomena over a phantasmagoric cliff. The more important question to contemplate is how this will impact yourself and average citizens. What happens elsewhere around the world can no longer be viewed in isolation. Globalization is perhaps the most holistic phenomena within the matrix of financial capital movements and post-modern social restructuring. China has the means to socially control most of its population, especially in urban areas. On the other hand, China would be unable to succeed in this endeavor without the direct assistance, trade and technological development of Silicon Valley and the private innovators of intelligence and surveillance applied science. China has already launched social scoring, a nefarious means to reward and penalize public activity. If a person protests the lack of personal freedom, democratic values and free speech, his or her social score decreases. And through digital networks, authorities can monitor and identify every Chinese citizen's movements. All of this technology is ready for launch in the US and other developed nations. However, rather than social scoring, it is block chain, the digital database that gathers any information it is programmed for. Block chain has already been employed for almost a decade. At this moment the federal government and individual states are blindly over-reacting to Covid's health threats, the climate and environment, and the collapse of social cohesion. These threats are eliciting government mandates, such as vaccination. A Biden federal vaccine mandate would overrule individual state laws. The fact that this is being publicly stated should quell many conspiratorial theories. It is part of a more comprehensive and long-term agenda for expanding government social control under the pretense and propaganda of keeping Americans safe under the banner of national security. New laws are under construction that would redefine hate speech. Censorship of free speech for criticizing official narratives and policies to tackle the pandemic are being enforced. Any criticism towards the failures of the Covid-19 vaccines is redefined as threats to public health. People raising such critiques may eventually find their names on domestic terrorist lists. This scenario is not beyond the imagination. Wikileaks revealed that environmental, animal protection, and human rights groups have been labeled as domestic terrorist organizations. Guilt by association laws, for example buried in Obama's National Defense Authorization Act, are in place. Expanding a law's scope is far easier than erasing it from the books. Consequently, it is not unlikely that these laws may eventually widen to include charges of subversion based solely on the emails you read, the videos you watch or the broadcasts you listen to. This would inevitably lead to the death toll for any residue of integrity in journalism. Silicon Valley's collusion with the government has canceled the voices of some of our best investigative journalists, such as Chris Hedges, Sharyl Attkinsson, Glenn Greenwald, Max Blumenthal and Craig Murray. These are only a few of many examples. The new unstated law is that original investigation must support the official narrative, otherwise it will be prohibited from accessible public view. We may recall that under the second Bush administration, the justice department created “free speech zones,” fenced off or confined areas where demonstrators were only permitted to exercise their Constitutional rights of free protest and expression. Today we are only several small amendments away before the right to assemble being banned altogether. Faced with growing condemnation by many nations, the US' hegemony on the world geopolitical arena has waned considerably. Biden's administration and its return to neocon foreign against Russia and China and neoliberal market policies will likely make every effort to regain the dominance it lost during the past four years. What has vanished in the US' former full spectrum dominance over the geopolitical landscape is now being inverted to strengthen federal hegemonic reign over the American population. Finally, we need to awaken to modern technologies' remarkable sophistication and its certain threats to the health of our societies, and even to our definition of being human. Sadly, this is an industry each of us has been complicit in advancing. Coining a term by one of the planet's most important and forgotten 20th century prophetic voices, the Trappist monk Father Thomas Merton, we are facing a great Unspeakable, a spiritual crisis contributing to the existential vacuity of modern American culture. Few are aware that in his 1964 collection of meditations, Seeds of Destruction, Merton predicted that the civil rights movement would confront a catastrophic impasse and may find itself without leadership. Four years later, Martin Luther King Jr, who Merton had a deep correspondence with, was assassinated. Merton would die suddenly later that same year under very mysterious circumstances in Thailand. Another way to describe the Unspeakable is criminal Sovereignty, with a capital S, to convey its almost numinous qualities. If alive today, Merton would look upon both the extreme right and left as mere expressions of the meaninglessness of American life manifesting as a turbulent ocean of afflictive emotions and thoughts. Instead of technology serving the needs of humanity, Americans are being increasingly conditioned to willingly bow as slaves to technology. The public, Somerset Maugham warned, “are easily disillusioned then they are angry or it was the illusion they loved.” The Unspeakable's unspoken mantra is: technology must progress regardless of how many people fall destitute, jobless, debt ridden and physically ill with only suicide as a recourse to escape. “American democracy today,” Merton observed over 55 years ago, “is just cheap pressed wood fiber, cardboard and spray paint.” Consequently, the elite sitting in the global control tower view the Great Reset's technological regime as preferable to democracy's kabuki theater. Advanced surveillance, artificial intelligence, intelligent robotics, transhumanism, a 5G internet of everything, genetic engineering, and weather modification should be our guiding avatars. The solutions, he would argue, can no longer be found in civil discourse or the rights of human beings gathering in assembly. For the ruling elite, the masses are blind sheep wandering in search of a shepherd. This is what author Ronald Wright called the “progress trap” – progress' unending efforts to feed technology's hunger to devour natural and human capital, interest free. And the mainstream press and news media, in its' malady of cognitive dissonance, serves as its unreflective cheerleader for our march towards civilizational collapse. Merton was keenly aware of technology's dangers to social stability. In a 1967 letter he took aim at the “universal myth that technology infallibly makes everything in every way better for everybody. It does not.” However, Merton was by no means a Luddite. “Technology could indeed make a better world for millions of human beings,” he wrote. Yet there remained the nightmare of technology transforming the world into a “more collectivist, cybernated mass culture.” Decades before the first desktop, Merton foresaw a complete fragmentation of the nation's moral and spiritual fabric when people will begin basing all of their political and ethical decisions on computers. Prophetically he wrote to a friend, “just wait until they start philosophizing with computers!” That was 1967. He even foresaw technology becoming a means to elevate the slaves of technology's false self, to satisfy narcissistic appetites for admiration and status. In other words, the woke social media. “The greatest need of our time,” Merton wrote in his Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander, “is to clean out the enormous mass of mental and emotional rubbish that clutters our minds and makes all political and social life a mass illness. Without this housecleaning we cannot begin to see. Unless we see we cannot think. The purification must begin with the mass media.” For this reason we urgently need to penetrate the illusions of propaganda and popular falsehoods, across the entire political spectrum as well the self-appointed pontificating Pharisees who are ushering a new socio-economic era where endless technological innovation has precedence over human lives. Despite its newness, it has also been clearly predictable. No doubt, if Orwell were penning his great novel today, the emergence of this new American era we are witnessing would not be fiction.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.14.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 58:33


America's Obsession with Illusion Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, January 14, 2022   “He who despises his own life is soon master of others” – English proverb   For the vast majority of Americans, the past year has been the most challenging in their lives – certainly for young adults. However, not everyone has been suffering equally. The nation's health or illness is not uniform. Much of our suffering is dependent upon the institutionalization and negligence of previous injustices, the loss of social equanimity, economic heedlessness, and our leaders' unmitigated greed and pursuit of power.  Nor is everyone adversely affected by the shifts underway in the imaginations of the political and ideological universes. The transnational class of corporate and banking elites, for example, has little motivation to respect or contribute to national boundaries and interests. They perceive themselves as global actors. For the generals and captains of neoliberal globalization, the puppet masters of financial markets, the Covid-19 pandemic only caused annoying disruptions in the quality of their lives. For the remainder, it has been cataclysmic.   As we begin 2022 should we not pause and reflect carefully about what we want as and don't want as individuals and a nation for securing a sustainable future? Fundamental is a deep introspection into the common and moral principles we are living today. It is not what we say or profess, but what we actualize in our daily lives and as a collective society that matters. Only our actions can realistically convey the deeper values in the American psyche.    Therefore we need to ask ourselves more difficult questions to discover the real moral poverty that defines us as a civilization. Where were the large demonstrations against the trillion-dollar bailout of Wall Street and foreign banks when barely a penny for the average citizen was spent? Where were the demonstrations against home foreclosures and the loss of small family farms?  Debt drenched student aid? Exploitive payday loans and exorbitant credit card fees. There were no protests against Obama's broken promises on universal healthcare. The single-minded attention on the pandemic has cancelled out 2.5 million homeless American children and 46 million adults and children who go daily. Where was a collective voice condemning the hundreds of billion tax dollars to increase the power of the military and intelligence complexes as American cities further collapsed into ghettos? Where were the marches against corporations off-shoring jobs. Why no vocal outrage against Obama's invasions of Libya and Syria, or the US ongoing support of rogue dictatorships, such as Saudi Arabia and the UAE, for crimes against humanity in Yemen. Where are the protests against corporations exploiting slave labor in poor countries such as Bangladesh and Indonesia.  There were no noteworthy protests for any of these issues. And yet these are true existential threats to our very democracy. Bertrand Russell wrote, “one should care about the world they do not see.” Should we not therefore be planning ahead for the future of our children, grandchildren and ourselves instead of being incapacitated by fear.   The national popular disinterest in these and other crises forebodes something on the horizon that does not bode well for most Americans. It is a simple principle to understand; yet so subtle it will likely go unnoticed until everyone is individually and collectively affected. It is the utter lack of balance within the nation's body politick, and across the media that spoon feeds us virtual images of a faux theatrical play, the illusory icons on our minds' monitor screens, that shape our perceptions of reality. This is how control is exerted over our thoughts, speech and actions. In fact, it is only after people exercise their thoughts independently, with the certain belief that they have actual self-control over their lives, that they arrive at the realization that their perceptions may be largely distorted.   Throughout America's history there has been a system of three federal branches to assure there is a platform for checks and balances as well as a structure to contain the tensions between them. That system now is being rapidly challenged and eroded. Now the middle of the road Democrats officially control the White House and both legislative bodies. We will see what awaits us.   There is also what is commonly referred to as the “fourth estate,” the powers of the press and news media that control the framing of the political narrative and partisan issues. In the past, the media was expected to hold the government accountable by exposing its conflicts of interest that endanger the public, its misdemeanors, and systemic corruption. This too is in decay as the media has been fully captured by corporate interests and now aligns itself politically and ideologically with the new political elite determined to reshape democracy and launch a new reset that will dramatically infringe on individual rights and liberties.   Finally, there is the growing influence of a fourth branch of government, the corpocracy and its private interests. We might also include the US intelligence community that increasingly operates independently from executive and legislative oversight.   Together we can witness this loose cabal of seemingly independent entities, working simultaneously in consortium and in opposition to each other, propelling us towards a future tsunami of greater polarization and immense social disruption.   Earlier generations were not threatened by the telecommunication and technological giants, such as Google, Facebook and Amazon. Clinton's Communications Decency Act of 1996, despite its well-meaning intentions to protect free speech, was otherwise destructively naïve. At that time it was sensible; however, that was before the advent of the social media that now dominates our lives and shapes political discourse. Silicon Valley has become a force far more powerful than the lobbyists on K Street to ensure that corporate Democrats are raised to a position of absolute power. Yet the problem would be equally threatening if it were the corporate and radicalized GOP in power.   The centrist Democratic left, lulled in a passivity that “it can't happen here,” is every bit as dangerous and delusional as the Republican far-right's paranoia over conspiracies squatting behind every nook and cranny. A moderate centrist right no longer exists as it has now exited reality like a herd of lemmings to follow Trump phenomena over a phantasmagoric cliff.   The more important question to contemplate is how this will impact yourself and average citizens. What happens elsewhere around the world can no longer be viewed in isolation. Globalization is perhaps the most holistic phenomena within the matrix of financial capital movements and post-modern social restructuring. China has the means to socially control most of its population, especially in urban areas. On the other hand, China would be unable to succeed in this endeavor without the direct assistance, trade and technological development of Silicon Valley and the private innovators of intelligence and surveillance applied science. China has already launched social scoring, a nefarious means to reward and penalize public activity. If a person protests the lack of personal freedom, democratic values and free speech, his or her social score decreases. And through digital networks, authorities can monitor and identify every Chinese citizen's movements. All of this technology is ready for launch in the US and other developed nations. However, rather than social scoring, it is block chain, the digital database that gathers any information it is programmed for. Block chain has already been employed for almost a decade.    At this moment the federal government and individual states are blindly over-reacting to Covid's health threats, the climate and environment, and the collapse of social cohesion. These threats are eliciting government mandates, such as vaccination. A Biden federal vaccine mandate would overrule individual state laws. The fact that this is being publicly stated should quell many conspiratorial theories. It is part of a more comprehensive and long-term agenda for expanding government social control under the pretense and propaganda of keeping Americans safe under the banner of national security.   New laws are under construction that would redefine hate speech. Censorship of free speech for criticizing official narratives and policies to tackle the pandemic are being enforced. Any criticism towards the failures of the Covid-19 vaccines is redefined as threats to public health. People raising such critiques may eventually find their names on domestic terrorist lists. This scenario is not beyond the imagination. Wikileaks revealed that environmental, animal protection, and human rights groups have been labeled as domestic terrorist organizations. Guilt by association laws, for example buried in Obama's National Defense Authorization Act, are in place. Expanding a law's scope is far easier than erasing it from the books. Consequently, it is not unlikely that these laws may eventually widen to include charges of subversion based solely on the emails you read, the videos you watch or the broadcasts you listen to. This would inevitably lead to the death toll for any residue of integrity in journalism. Silicon Valley's collusion with the government has canceled the voices of some of our best investigative journalists, such as Chris Hedges, Sharyl Attkinsson, Glenn Greenwald, Max Blumenthal and Craig Murray. These are only a few of many examples. The new unstated law is that original investigation must support the official narrative, otherwise it will be prohibited from accessible public view.    We may recall that under the second Bush administration, the justice department created “free speech zones,” fenced off or confined areas where demonstrators were only permitted to exercise their Constitutional rights of free protest and expression. Today we are only several small amendments away before the right to assemble being banned altogether.   Faced with growing condemnation by many nations, the US' hegemony on the world geopolitical arena has waned considerably. Biden's administration and its return to neocon foreign against Russia and China and neoliberal market policies will likely make every effort to regain the dominance it lost during the past four years. What has vanished in the US' former full spectrum dominance over the geopolitical landscape is now being inverted to strengthen federal hegemonic reign over the American population.   Finally, we need to awaken to modern technologies' remarkable sophistication and its certain threats to the health of our societies, and even to our definition of being human. Sadly, this is an industry each of us has been complicit in advancing. Coining a term by one of the planet's most important and forgotten 20th century prophetic voices, the Trappist monk Father Thomas Merton, we are facing a great Unspeakable, a spiritual crisis contributing to the existential vacuity of modern American culture. Few are aware that in his 1964 collection of meditations, Seeds of Destruction, Merton predicted that the civil rights movement would confront a catastrophic impasse and may find itself without leadership. Four years later, Martin Luther King Jr, who Merton had a deep correspondence with, was assassinated. Merton would die suddenly later that same year under very mysterious circumstances in Thailand.   Another way to describe the Unspeakable is criminal Sovereignty, with a capital S, to convey its almost numinous qualities. If alive today, Merton would look upon both the extreme right and left as mere expressions of the meaninglessness of American life manifesting as a turbulent ocean of afflictive emotions and thoughts. Instead of technology serving the needs of humanity, Americans are being increasingly conditioned to willingly bow as slaves to technology. The public, Somerset Maugham warned, “are easily disillusioned then they are angry or it was the illusion they loved.” The Unspeakable's unspoken mantra is: technology must progress regardless of how many people fall destitute, jobless, debt ridden and physically ill with only suicide as a recourse to escape. “American democracy today,” Merton observed over 55 years ago, “is just cheap pressed wood fiber, cardboard and spray paint.” Consequently, the elite sitting in the global control tower view the Great Reset's technological regime as preferable to democracy's kabuki theater. Advanced surveillance, artificial intelligence, intelligent robotics, transhumanism, a 5G internet of everything, genetic engineering, and weather modification should be our guiding avatars. The solutions, he would argue, can no longer be found in civil discourse or the rights of human beings gathering in assembly. For the ruling elite, the masses are blind sheep wandering in search of a shepherd. This is what author Ronald Wright called the “progress trap” – progress' unending efforts to feed technology's hunger to devour natural and human capital, interest free. And the mainstream press and news media, in its' malady of cognitive dissonance, serves as its unreflective cheerleader for our march towards civilizational collapse.    Merton was keenly aware of technology's dangers to social stability. In a 1967 letter he took aim at the “universal myth that technology infallibly makes everything in every way better for everybody. It does not.” However, Merton was by no means a Luddite. “Technology could indeed make a better world for millions of human beings,” he wrote. Yet there remained the nightmare of technology transforming the world into a “more collectivist, cybernated mass culture.” Decades before the first desktop, Merton foresaw a complete fragmentation of the nation's moral and spiritual fabric when people will begin basing all of their political and ethical decisions on computers. Prophetically he wrote to a friend, “just wait until they start philosophizing with computers!” That was 1967. He even foresaw technology becoming a means to elevate the slaves of technology's false self, to satisfy narcissistic appetites for admiration and status. In other words, the woke social media.   “The greatest need of our time,” Merton wrote in his Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander, “is to clean out the enormous mass of mental and emotional rubbish that clutters our minds and makes all political and social life a mass illness. Without this housecleaning we cannot begin to see. Unless we see we cannot think. The purification must begin with the mass media.”   For this reason we urgently need to penetrate the illusions of propaganda and popular falsehoods, across the entire political spectrum as well the self-appointed pontificating Pharisees who are ushering a new socio-economic era where endless technological innovation has precedence over human lives. Despite its newness, it has also been clearly predictable. No doubt, if Orwell were penning his great novel today, the emergence of this new American era we are witnessing would not be fiction.

Podcast – Cory Doctorow's craphound.com
Science Fiction is a Luddite Literature

Podcast – Cory Doctorow's craphound.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 14:43


This week on my podcast, I read my latest Locus column, Science Fiction is a Luddite Literature about the technological critique the Luddites embodied, the unfair rep they got, and how it applies to today’s tech hellscape. MP3

Poured Over
Jessamine Chan on THE SCHOOL FOR GOOD MOTHERS

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 34:51


“One thing that I was interested in doing is making literal the surveillance that parents feel every day, because there is the sense that you're being watched and judged and shamed all the time.” Jessamine Chan joins us on the show to talk about her debut novel, The School for Good Mothers (think The Handmaid's Tale meets Klara and the Sun), writing a Chinese American main character that she wanted to read, making sure her satire is laced with humor, how a self-proclaimed Luddite came to write a book like this one, and more. Featured Books: The School for Good Mothers by Jessamine Chan, Plainwater by Anne Carson, Karate Chop by Dorothe Nors, Mrs. Caliban by Rachel Ingalls, Orange World and Other Stories by Karen Russell, The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith, Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado and How to Write an Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee. Poured Over is produced and hosted by Miwa Messer and engineered by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays (with occasional bonus eps Saturday).

Kill Bigger Radio with Kyle Keegan
Who Were The Original "Luddites?" - Ep 270

Kill Bigger Radio with Kyle Keegan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:50


"THIS TIME IT'S DIFFERENT!" The cry of an economically illiterate luddite. This episode includes a little bit of a history lesson about the rejection of progress. Not progress in the nutjob political sense, which should be more aptly considered regression, but progress in human efficiency brought on by technology and entrepreneurship. Text KKRS to: 713-528-8219Telegram Community: https://t.me/killbiggerTwitter: https://twitter.com/kylekeeganradioCheck out https://keeganradio.comThe American Precious Metals Exchange at https://apmex.comJoin the discussion at https://www.thefastlaneforum.com/community/threads/kaks-kill-bigger-radio-show.95326/ DISCLAIMER! I am NOT your financial advisor. Do your own research. I advocate heavily that you should make intelligent and informed decisions based on your own understanding or hire someone that does this for you.The Kyle Keegan Radio Show and The iTalk Media Network™️ is © Atlas Southwest LLC.

Armstrong and Getty
A&G Replay, December 28th, Hour 3

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:56


In this hour, Slow Living, Jack the Luddite, In-N-Out Burger gets Harassed, and a Tsunami of Wokeness. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Pixel Vision
E33 Observer

Pixel Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 76:51


In this special, early Christmas Day release, Ben and Tao upload themselves into neural noir, cyber arthouse, psychological horror, Observer. As they detangle the convoluted murder mystery, Ben finds his inner Luddite, Tao imagines cyber-limbed, animal-spliced, Super Tao, and discussion veers into dangerous political territory, sordid subject matters, and extensive deliberation over dystopian futurism. Story spoilers late in the pod, but it's a short game, so either play it first or don't complain!   Content Warning: PEGI 17. This is seriously dark and very explicit. Sorry. Also, Tao's cat miaows offensively in the background.   Clarifications: Observer music is by composer Arkadiusz Reikowski The main character is called Daniel Lazarski The upcoming ‘cyber renaissance' game from Greedfall devs, Spiders, is called Steelrising (apparently at Spiders, titles either rise or fall…) The film Ben references on the theme of uploading consciousness is Transcendence, a 2014 American science fiction thriller directed by Wally Pfister and written by Jack Paglen. Anon is a 2018 British-American science fiction thriller film written and directed by Andrew Niccol starring Clive Owen Audio extracts: 'Figment' by Simon Park (from Dawn of the Dead) Multiple tracks from Observer OST by composer Arkadiusz Reikowski Love Actually (2003) feat. Hugh Grant Iron Harvest OST The Coup - Pork and Beef Saw (2004) - and its soundtrack by Charlie Clouser So You Wanna Be A Boxer(Bugsy Malone Soundtrack) by Paul Williams (1976) ANON (2018) feat. Clive Owen Soylent Green (1973) The Herbaliser - Very Mercenary The Simpsons - ‘tis a fine barn Fitter Happier by Radiohead Paranoid Android by Radiohead Elysium A Touch of Frost by Ray Russell Harrison Ford has lost his family (My Wife! My Family! Compilation) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-vjbuodBEU Alien Isolation OST by Christian Henson Toccata and Fugue in D Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach Steelrising trailer by Spiders David Fincher's Se7en (1995) Transcendence (2014) The Matrix (1999) Halo 2 Mjolnir Mix by Marty O'Donnell feat. Steve Vai HCS Raleigh 2021 Slade - Merry Christmas Everybody Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/pixelvisionpod Twitter: @pixelviz Email: pixelvisionpod@gmail.com

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1463 People Are Waking Back Up To The Need For Labor Unions

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 75:20


Air Date 12/22/2021 Today we take a look at some of the history of labor struggles in America and the current wave of strikes that is giving renewed energy to the labor union movement and the struggle for better working conditions for all. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) Check out Coffee from the Unf*cking the Republic podcast! BestOfTheLeft.com/Store BotL MERCHANDISE! BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Lessons from the Luddites - On the Media - Air Date 12-10-21 Gavin Mueller [@gavinmuellerphd], assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, on what modern lessons can be learned from the Luddite workers of 19th century England. Ch. 2: Victory at Starbucks, Struggle at Kellogg's Part 1 - Jacobin Radio - Air Date 12-13-21 Suzi talks with John Logan about the unionization victory at Starbucks in Buffalo, and the continuing Kellogg Co. strike. Ch. 3: Strike Wave Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market Part 1 - Intercepted - Air Date 11-10-21 We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave. Ch. 4: Labor Unions From Pullman to Kelloggs. Labors long, hard road. - Unf*cking The Republic (UNFTR) - Air Date 12-18-21 The episode includes a blow-by-blow analysis of a recent interview with the CEO of Kellogg's to translate Wall Street speak for “how to fuck workers and influence inflation.” Ch. 5: Victory at Starbucks, Struggle at Kellogg's Part 2 - Jacobin Radio - Air Date 12-13-21 Suzi talks with John Logan about the unionization victory at Starbucks in Buffalo, and the continuing Kellogg Co. strike. Ch. 6: Class Struggles in the US Today - Economic Update with Richard D. Wolff - Air Date 12-2-21 The "labor shortage" isn't, "Build Back Better" does not begin to approach what Europe already has. Ch. 7: Can Child Labor Solve Labor Shortage The GOP Thinks So... - Thom Hartmann Program - Air Date 12-2-21 Republican-controlled legislatures in several states have come up with a novel way to stem the effects of an ongoing labor shortage: loosen child labor laws governing the number of hours and times that teenagers are allowed to work. Ch. 8: Strike Wave Workers Flex Their Muscle in Tight Labor Market Part 2 - Intercepted - Air Date 11-10-21 We hear from Kaiser Permanente workers, and then Labor Notes' Jonah Furman joins The Intercept's Washington Editor Nausicaa Renner to discuss this year's strike wave. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 9: Lessons from the Luddites Part 2 - On the Media - Air Date 12-10-21 Gavin Mueller [@gavinmuellerphd], assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, on what modern lessons can be learned from the Luddite workers of 19th century England. Ch. 10: Labor Unions From Pullman to Kelloggs. Labors long, hard road. Part 2 - Unf*cking The Republic (UNFTR) - Air Date 12-18-21 VOICEMAILS Ch. 11: Fear that Democrats will lose the House - Alan from Connecticut Ch. 12: Thoughts on multiple tiers of humans - Nick From California FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 13: Final comments on how progressive thinking embraces equality while conservative thinking often requires division MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com

Husband and Wifetime
An Ice Wine Christmas: Have Yourself A Luddite Little Christmas

Husband and Wifetime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:29


In An Ice Wine Christmas, Camila (Roselyn Sanchez) takes over an ice wine vineyard and falls in love with Declan (Lyriq Bent).Philadelphia! Diners! The Pennsylvania Wine Trail! Christian Mingle! Infomercials! Dickens! Christmas movie montages! Jukebox musicals!Elizabeth anthropomorphizes her artificial Christmas tree!Matt's primary note is about a coat!

Nuclear Barbarians
Dr. Decouple ft. Chris Keefer

Nuclear Barbarians

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 51:55


Dr. Chris Keefer, host of the Decouple podcast, joined me to talk about how he went from being a neo-Luddite to a full-blown nukepilled doctor of medicine and one of nuclear’s most powerful advocates. We talk about fragilizing green policies, the importance of labor for nuclear energy, why mitigation is the wrong way to think about handling climate change, and more. Check out his podcast, and follow him on Twitter. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit nuclearbarians.substack.com

Catching Foxes
Luddite 90, with Matt Fradd

Catching Foxes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 57:01


What's new with Pints with Aquinas? How much can one man hate technology? Fradd will show you the way. Also, he's got a new book! Plot twist: it's on St. Thomas Aquinas. Post retwist: it's about Aquinas' prescription on how to be happy. Special Guest: Matt Fradd.

Bakes Takes
Bullish #URNM, #COIN. Bearish #DKNG, #DIS. Get ready to Sell 1/3 #GME!

Bakes Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 22:50


Bakes' Takes Podcast Show Notes Saturday,    October 23, 2021   :27 Why I do this—Bobby, Jack, please listen in.   1:03 ‘87 crash, journey, technical analysis first, fundamentals second, not right or wrong, just works for me. read WSJ, Barron's Economist, listen to podcasts, devour relevant newsletters, monitor what Google alerts bring. Point you to them, but if you don't want to do that, please know that I'll do it for you and I eat home cooking, I have no conflicts. What are your pain points? Problems you'd like solved? Topics I should cover? Thank you.   Thank you especially Charlie, Justin, Murph from this Luddite.   2:07 Supercast/Patreon levels. Weekly call with me on Discord, teach technical analysis, etc. You help me design the show. Guests I should reach out to. Text like I send to my sons. 610-331-4283.   2:26 Not investment advice. Please conduct, and share, your own due diligence.   Bakes' Take—Fan Mail! Calls! Questions!   2:41 ICLN/Ishares S&P Global Clean Energy—Sell discipline—$21.97, $22.58, $22.18. $22.24 average. $28.24 12/31/21. -21%.   4:25 Solar, wind. No uranium.   5:00 $42.90 12/31/21. $92.98. 116%   Bakes' Take—Let market tell you where to do more research. Uranium is ESG!     6:12 Murph—Big down volume a warning sign. Still respecting 200 dma 434.54 now. Feels, looks tired.   6:54 Surprised Intel/INTC #1 8%+   7:15 Earnings disaster, gap down 11%+.   7:37 Bakes' Take—NVDA, AMD, earnings reports will tell us if enough to keep bull going. I doubt it, but hold this winner for now.   7:58 DKNG/DraftKings—New lows. $48.42, $48.81, $48.75. $48.66 average. $46.52 now. Down volume 63% above normal. Earnings 14 days.   9:25 Bakes' Take--Still avoid. Happy to discuss.   9:33 Cramer's wrong, SELL Disney!   10:25 BUT…Good example for Bakes' Takes+--I will monitor your stocks/ETF's alert you of buy and sell points. What else would you like?   10:59 Coinbase/COIN--$280.61, watch for NH, volume picking up   COIN, week 2, launch pad?   12:22 GME--Close below 200 dma, Sell 1/3.   Bakes' Take-The memes are over, they're all behind me. Part II.                                                                                                         Bakes' Take—Reporters of the Week!   14:02 Business Insider—Lina Batarags https://www.businessinsider.com/china-housing-market-explainer-cost-debt-wealth-evergrande-impact-2021-9?fbclid=IwAR1XXeUaHqn29nGbVHcoKIyXIBd75QzGrTqShGNQ5o_JAhOlXRE1__0q9kU   14:34 Business Insider—Harry Robertson   14:59 Bakes' Take—I am again treating like Covid. Not panicking nor dismissing. Sounds like can be neutral, it can't be bullish. If subscribers in China, I would love to hear your perspective.   Bakes' Take—Charts/Tweets/Posts of the Week!   15:45 Jim Bianco Crypto bigger then CCP!   Bakes' Take— Newsletters of the Week   Bear Traps Report   17:15 Copper inventories at 47-year lows. Classic Squeeze. Copper could scream.   18:35 Nuclear generates a tenth of world's electricity. Sentiment shifting.   19:58 Six new factors exacerbating inflation.   21:39 Please also subscribe to my Bakes' Takes YouTube Channel, the audio is the same but the charts that I reference are on the screen. Follow us on Twitter @BakesTakes_ and other social media. Please, please use your voice memo app, tape your question(s) and email to bakes@bakestakespodcast.com or write if you prefer. I will also keep you anonymous is you'd like.   Thank you for listening, Mike Wilson is my producer.   Have a great week. Bakes   Bakes' Much-needed levity…   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEgLV4lntyg 22:05 20 FUNNIEST Frank Caliendo IMPRESSIONS

Why Did Peter Sink?
23. Narcissus

Why Did Peter Sink?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 11:13


Isolating with our devices is the new baseball and apple pie. Whenever I look around, I see someone staring into his or her phone, still as a statue, and I think of the myth of Narcissus and how he stared into the pool at his reflection, and falling in love with what he saw, he lost himself. Then I think to myself, wow, that must be exactly what I look like when I'm staring into my phone. From Ovid's Metamorphoses, chapter 3 there is something strangely relevant for today's world. Ovid was a Roman poet who lived at the same time of Jesus and during the reign of Caesar Augustus. He recorded many of the Greek and Roman myths, and when I was a attempting to be an author of fiction (which I'll save for another episode), I read Ovid's Metamorphosis quite a bit for a couple of reasons: first, they are ancient stories with deep insights, second, I enjoy reading mythology, and third, I could steal plots from these ancient tales and plug in my own characters. There are only so many plots, and once you exhaust your Netflix, Hulu, Prime, and HBO Plus shows, you will know what I mean by that. There is not an unlimited well of plot lines for writers to draw from. But for my purposes here, I only mean to talk about one of Ovid's recorded myths, and it's a pretty well known one, about Narcissus. See if you can spot the similarities between your usage of the smart phone and this silly old myth. Narcissus comes to the side of a pool of water and looks down, very drawn into what he sees there.…There as he stoopedto quench his thirst another thirst increased.While he is drinking he beholds himselfreflected in the mirrored pool—and loves;loves an imagined body which containsno substance, for he deems the mirrored shadea thing of life to love. He cannot move,for so he marvels at himself, and lieswith countenance unchanged, as if indeeda statue…All that is lovely in himself he loves,and in his witless way he wants himself:—he who approves is equally approved…The cheat that you are seeking has no place.Avert your gaze and you will lose your love,for this that holds your eyes is nothing savethe image of yourself reflected back to you.It comes and waits with you; it has no life;it will depart if you will only go.Good luck finding a more apt description of what the smart phone does to us. The phone is the image of our thoughts reflected back to us, allowing us to love what we are thinking. And we cannot move. We become stone. Like statues, like Narcissus.Somehow the ancient writers, prophets, and thinkers can reduce our modern “advanced society” to a yawning “been there, done that” kind of mockery. The thoughts and epiphanies in our heads today lack originality if you go back to the classics. What's clear to me is that the ancients were not simpletons, or fools, or gullible - they were wise from living, and suffering. Storytelling from all cultures has a wisdom that we tend to ignore in our age of instant gratification and tech efficiency.Even as we unlock more doors to physics and biology, the greatest questions have not changed and will never change. I recently read that scientists have developed a laser to see around corners. Won't that be nice. Will it make the world a “better place”? No. In fact, many of our “better place” stories about technology end up blowing up in our face, sometimes literally, since military applications are the first takers. A show called Silicon Valley produced a great joke on the software and tech industry's self-congratulation for fixing the world's problems. Every app and product claims to be “making the world a better place” but for the most part that is just a marketing ploy and self-delivered backrubs for techies to encourage themselves in their endeavors. There are many things that start out to “make the world a better place” and end up doing the opposite, the two most famous ones that I can thing of being: splitting the atom and a thing called Facebook.I do not mean to attack science, since I love it. The findings are amazing. I nodded along with these “fixers,” with a faith in scientism, believing that tech and science would undo every knot - if not today, eventually. We, as individuals and collectively, are gazing at ourselves with amazement, marveling, in self-worship of humankind and things of this world, and forgetting about God. I did for many years.I am an internet Luddite. It's true. I admit it. I see no conflict between science and religion, or science and spirituality, since science is concerned with things of this world and faith is concerned with things beyond this world. But I do see a conflict between big tech and reality. Along with the Narcissus myth that is so obvious in the phone addiction, there is another primeval event that I recall whenever I turn over my phone and see the back.The irony of the company Apple having a logo of an apple with a bite taken out printed on the back of every phone is too rich and obvious to ignore. While I appreciate the Catechism of the church's reference to figurative language regarding Genesis 1 and the Fall of Man, I also love the story of how Genesis uses the apple to describe the flaw that is written on our hearts. The Catholic church's allegorical reading of Genesis is one of the main reasons I am a returned Catholic, as I felt much like St. Augustine when he said: “I was being killed by the Old Testament passages when I took them literally.” (Confessions p109, p414) But when the story for original sin uses an apple as the central temptation of turning the first people away from God and toward worldly pleasures, and the largest corporation in the world, Apple, is turning people away from God and toward worldly pleasures…and the logo is a bitten apple…again you can't help but nod toward the ancient writers. Apparently, there is something about apples that we really, really like. I think the only name that could have been more perfect for Apple, the company, might have been Golden Calf, but I have a feeling that wouldn't sell as many phones.The funny thing to me is that the pre-Christian Greeks had a saying of “Know thyself,” which said that man must be subordinate to the Gods, and Prometheus was punished for getting out of order. The Hebrews first three commandments are about respecting and surrendering to God. The Christian addition was to love God first and then one another. The Islamic profession of faith, first thing, is that there is no God but God. Myths from nearly all cultures have humans in tales that makes them subordinate to God, because mankind is underneath God. The order of things must be God before humans, otherwise bad things will happen. I have a deep feeling that this correct. The ordering set forth by old knowledge was learned by experience.Today, however, the sprawling message, mainly broadcasting from America, is the opposite focus of the old wisdom. “Know thyself” is now a self-oriented interpretation of life, like the kind Narcissus found. We stare into the phone, at the reflection of our thoughts, looking at a watery, amorphous truth in the mirror, wrapped in a fog of a false “connectedness.” But really we are alone, separated, fooled, like the boy and his reflection, staring at himself in the mirrored shade. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.whydidpetersink.com

Bakes Takes
Good calls on #URNM, #FDX, #SOFI, #COIN, #SPCE, much more...

Bakes Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 24:56


Bakes' Takes Podcast Show Notes Saturday,    October 16, 2021   :27 Why I do this—Bobby, Jack, please listen in.   ‘87 crash, journey, technical analysis first, fundamentals second, not right or wrong, just works for me. read WSJ, Barron's Economist, listen to podcasts, devour relevant newsletters, monitor what Google alerts bring. Point you to them, but if you don't want to do that, please know that I'll do it for you and I eat home cooking, I have no conflicts. What are your pain points? Problems you'd like solved? Topics I should cover? Thank you.   Thank you especially Charlie, Justin, Murph from this Luddite.   1:45 Supercast/Patreon levels. Weekly call with me on Discord, teach technical analysis, etc. You help me design the show. Guests I should reach out to. Text like I send to my sons. 610-331-4283.   1:58 Not investment advice. Please conduct, and share, your own due diligence.   2:05 Bakes' Take—Fan Mail! Calls! Questions! Mike!   Jack—SOFI, FDX, UPS   3:02 Biden, trying to play Santa, Long Beach 24/7, etc.   4:11 $276, $266, average $271 vs. $228, -16%. The sell discipline works. 10x earnings? Don't care. Dead money. Why would you own this? $234 to $250 now resistance.   7:52 UPS Gap down on earnings, 7/27/21, never good, Dead cat bounce maybe to $200 or so, doubt it breaks above. Labor, goods, simply running out of time.   8:48 SOFI--Last week's chart…   SOFI--$18.58, watch for big volume, plug into Google Alerts, $16.41   9:17 Agree with thesis—MS? student loans, restart in January, refi opportunity   Higher rates good for them, NIM widen?   Cross selling. Makes sense   Noto—Chamath, high praise   Compete with Robinhood, crypto?   JPM, etc. sick of fintech eating lunch   10:54 Bakes' Take--$18.58 close! Big volume-yes!   11:03 $16.41 to $19.48,   11:12 33 mil shares short, 4%, not huge, but helpful   11:26 Bakes' Take—I encourage you to let markets point you to opportunity, rather than news, etc.   12:09 Square/SQ—close below 200 dma, big volume, great company, 144 P/E   12:48 SQ—low volume, stalling at resistance. Watch for 50 dma cutting down through 200 dma, then 200 dma turn down.   13:13 Bakes' Take—If you have a DDM you would bet your life on different story. Sell discipline kicked in works very well, if hit new highs so be it.   13:58 BUT…Good example for Bakes' Takes+--I will monitor your stocks/ETF's alert you of buy and sell points. What else would you like?   14:20 Coinbase/COIN--$280.61, watch for NH, volume picking up   Charlie—Virgin Galactic/SPCE   Last week's chart…   15:39 SPCE-space tourism? Not where want to be, Chamath has sold lot of stock   16:17 $23.23 down to $20.29. -14%+   Michael Sheetz, CNBC—Virgin Galactic stock plunges after company delays spaceflight tests to 2022   17:22 SPY—daily, gap down, close below 50, so far low volume rally to underside/resistance, just warning sign for now   18:15 AAPL—ok   18:41 MSFT—ok   19:08 AMZN—ok, Christmas logistics have to hurt   19:39 FB—not ok, but still respecting 200 dma   20:38 GOOGL--ok   20:42 Bakes' Take—20%+ of the SPX, ok, but just ok, again, seems tired, do companies get pass on earnings due to logistics, labor, energy, does not seem transitory   21:15 Bakes' Takes—My Themes/Groups   21:33 URNM--$71, $75, $80 now, likely consolidating base from here to $98, building next launch pad, volume increasing nicely, 96 RS, let THIS winner run!   22:13 Bakes' Take—Will alert you to the next URNM, searching hard   22:36 Bakes' Takes-Gray Swan   23:48 Bakes' Take-Lot of podcasts discussing now. Taiwan, Evergrande, HK, Tech, list keeps growing!   Bakes' Take—Podcasts of the Week!                                                                                                       23:48 Bakes' Take— Will catch up on podcasts, reporters, charts, etc. wanted to address Jack first.   Bakes' Take—Reporters of the Week!   Bakes' Take—   Bakes' Take—Charts/Tweets/Posts of the Week!   Bakes' Takes-   Bakes' Take— Newsletters of the Week   Bakes' Take—   Bakes' Ooh La La—   Bakes' Take—   23:54 Please also subscribe to my Bakes' Takes YouTube Channel, the audio is the same but the charts that I reference are on the screen. Follow us on Twitter @BakesTakes_ and other social media. Please, please use your voice memo app, tape your question(s) and email to bakes@bakestakespodcast.com or write if you prefer. I will also keep you anonymous is you'd like.   Thank you for listening, Mike Wilson is my producer.   Have a great week. Bakes   24:25 Bakes' Much-needed levity…   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neUaSTSKFZc Official Ron White - I Got Thrown Out of a Bar