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Spoken By Elswyth - Erotic Mistress Hypnosis Sessions
4.51 How do you take your punishment?

Spoken By Elswyth - Erotic Mistress Hypnosis Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 10:32


Corner Time is your punishment trigger, and the perfect counterpart to POUR. But if you need more punishment, perhaps if your New Year had a false start, then add in A Mild Rebuke. And continue with Left with Warm Thighs for a taste of physical punishment with erotic, hypnotic suggestion. Transcript Hello there, I hope […] The post 4.51 How do you take your punishment? appeared first on Spoken By Elswyth.

Cultivate Women's Podcast
RELAUNCHING the Podcast

Cultivate Women's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 13:20


TRANSCRIPT:Hello. Welcome back to the Cultivate Women's Podcast. We are so excited to be back. We took a little bit of time off. There was just things going on in life that was inevitable and we had to take a step away and really focus on other things. But we are relaunching our podcast. And just as a reminder, I am Jordan VanCamp. I am a pastor's wife at Passion Creek. We have been a church for, wow, like almost seven years now or something like that. And so it's been. I've got three daughters. They're all in school now, which is really fun. And I am so excited that I have a new co-host with me. I have Sarah Beth with me, and I know, just, I wanna, how about you to introduce yourself, tell us about you. Awesome. Thank you so much, Jordan, for inviting me here. I'm excited to be here. I'm a leader, educator, and passion for, and have a huge passion for servant leadership. I've had the privilege of creating and. For several companies and businesses where I was always trying to create a positive and inclusive work environment and space for people. In addition to my professional pursuits, my faith in Jesus is super important to me. I'm married to my husband of Devin of 16 years together for 18. We have two daughters, Morgan and Alex. This, and they are definitely on their own now. And so I'm super excited to be here. I am a proud alumnus of Grace Christian University at a Grand Rapids, Michigan, where I graduated Summa CU Loud in their seminary program with a focus in leadership and women's ministry. I'm just really humbled by the opportunity to use my skills and experience to encourage and inspire others in their faith journey. I'm really looking forward to discussing topics related to faith and cultivating meaningful relationships on the Cultivate Podcast. So thank you so much for having me and inviting me to join you. Yeah, absolutely. I'm so excited. So today's episode, we're just gonna go over just what are, what's our vision for the podcast? What do we, where do we see it going? What topics do we see covering? And then in the next episodes, we'll obviously dive into specific topics. And so there are just like we did before, we talked a lot about leadership, about family, about marriage and so we want to do all of those same things and then expand. We really have a heart for discipleship at Passion Creek. And as I've run the women's ministry over the years, that has been my biggest like heart. My biggest goal was for us to be able to pour into women of all ages, like older women, pouring into younger women, pouring into older women, because we really can. Just because we're younger doesn't mean an older woman can't learn from us. And then vice versa, obviously. Yep. And I love that. One of those things is we find that in scripture, we find it in Titus to  chapter two verses three through five. Sir bet. Do you wanna read that like verse specifically? Absolutely. So Titus two, three through five reads, older women likewise are to be relevant ENT in behavior, not slanderous or slaves to much wine. They are to teach what is good, and so train the young women to love their husbands and children to be self-controlled, pure, working at home kind and submissive to their husbands that the word of God may not be. I don't know what that word is. Reveled. Reviled. Rev. Reviled. I'm gonna have to reread that. No Naval . I'll have reread that. Reviled, right? Reviled. I think that's what it is. Okay. I'm gonna reread that. We'll just have him pause that way. Absolutely the verse in Titus two, three through five reads, older women likewise are to be reverent in behavior, not slanders or slaves. Too much wine. They are to teach what is good. And so to train the young women to love their husbands and children to be self-controlled, pure, working at home kind and submissive to their own husbands, that the word of God may not be reviled. Yeah, I love that. I love that it speaks so much. Both older women and younger women, we both have a place and a role in the church. And I think that it's really important and I think that just a podcast that is going to touch on those things. It's going to give encouragement and tips and suggestions and and then just have like women who there is an age gap between SarahBeth and I. Yeah. I'm not a huge one. Sure. But enough that, like you raised a daughter who is. older now, and her, she's in her twenties and absolutely, it's like I still have young kids, so there's a lot of stuff that like of life that you have been through that I have not yet gone through. And so I feel like there's so much that we can talk through and discuss that's gonna be beneficial just for our individual lives, but also for all of you guys who are listening in. Who may have be in that same season of life that I am or may be the same season of life that Sarah Beth is in. Absolutely. I also think it's important that the goal of this podcast is to find ways to help teach both you and I and our listeners to cultivate great relationships with others and really inspiring everyone to be part of our community and enjoying what that looks like together, creating that togetherness, the groups together. Enjoy life together. And I think along with enjoying life together and cultivating those relationships, we learn great lessons that can also inspire us to live in alignment with what Titus Two three through five is talking about. Absolutely. I think that on this podcast we also wanna talk about Just like the importance of self-control and purity how these virtues can help us as women cultivate those strong, healthy relationships, like you were saying. I think that those are big things that society doesn't hold much value in. Self-control. I agree. Purity, like it's very much a , women today, this is my body. I'm gonna do whatever I want with it. , there's, and that we're old fashioned. Yes. That we're just like, oh my gosh. You said the word purity. That means something from the 1920s. Yeah. Why are we talking about something like purity? That's weird. And there's also a, a. Some somewhat of a stigma, I think about talking freely and openly about things that the Bible talks about. Yeah. Because people don't understand how it could be relevant today. And so I think through this podcast, we're gonna try to be a positive role model for everyone that's listening. And for each other, living in alignment with the way that we should go and what the Bible teaches us. So I think it's important that we share. We long for everyone to have that openness to hear what self-control means. And it may not mean what you think society is saying it means. Yeah. Cause there can be misconstrued statements and, popular people or famous people that we listen to that talk about those things and they give it a bad reputation. But our goal is to really share with you the goodness that those things bring. Yeah. And how it actually provides more peace in your life. And it removes. Guilt that we have had by not living in alignment, alignment with that, if that makes sense. Absolutely. And I think it's important too that.  there. It's one thing to reach scripture and to figure that out and dissect it and really dig through okay, what is the Bible saying here? What is God saying here? What is Paul teaching about? Like that's all very important. But it also is like, how do I play that to my own life? , and so as a listener, I think it's really like crucial to hear like how do I, like how does Jordan struggle with self-control? Like what are ways that I have failed and. The Lord has worked through that and taught me, like Amen. So giving these like personal examples and being on some level vulnerable, trans transparent. Yeah. Not like you we're spilling everything here. There's things that you keep to yourself, but Yes. Yes. But having even just as a general, this is a situation I was in and here's how like I handled it wrong and here's how, like the Lord taught me through that, and maybe this is what I should have done because I think it's so easy to.  to a podcast and have like someone sharing their story and you're sitting back going oh my gosh, I've done that too. You're like, oh, wow. Like I had a friend who did that meet to me yesterday, and I didn't even think that maybe that was her thought process and I got mad and maybe I, Yeah, you just, you get different perspectives and you hear different sides of the story. And when it's all based in scripture, yes. It, when we bring it back to this, these are our faults, these are the ways we messed up. . I was in a situation and I was so proud the Holy Spirit provided, and I handled it correctly. Yeah. A win. Yeah. But when we drive it all back to scripture, I think that's what's most important, yes. It's those holding those with two hands, like yes. Personal experience, things that we've been through, things that we have done, but also , how that aligns with the Bible or how it didn't align with the Bible. Yeah. And how we should change that. And I also think that there's often times where you might listen to a podcast and you might hear somebody talking about something that aligns with our faith, that aligns with what we're working on right now, or what we're reading in the Bible. . But we don't actually, maybe we have new believers on here that are just trying to understand. Stand, how to, pray or how to live in a godly way, how to be a godly woman. And I think our leader, our, everyone who's listening to this, could probably benefit from learning what we are doing, how you do it. , giving them actual practical steps in their journey, that they can follow and align with. I think that it's easy to, like you said, read your Bible and then try to dig into what that looks like. But one of the challenges can be, okay, but what do I do after I read the Bible and after I try to research what that verse might mean to somebody else on Google? , because that's common, if you're a new believer, you might say, you might Google, Hey, give me a Bible verse. How I can overcome my worthlessness if I don't feel worthy, like what do I do? But here, I think on the Cultivate podcast, our goal is to give you true actual meaningful steps that you can take as a follower of Christ. And, we're gonna share with you what Jordan and I have done individually and together. Yeah. And just the way that we have worked to love on our family, our friends, our marriages, and make certain priorities that are important. , just as you were talking it, just I don't even think we have this on our notes, but I was just thinking I know that your heart, like you love to learn, you love knowledge, you love reading and all of that. And so there are, and we've done this in the past in previous episodes of the Cultivate Women's Podcast, but we've brought up like books that we have read that were helpful resources and so that's something that we will definitely be doing also in the future. There, we did a whole series. If you guys, if you're a. Seasoned listener, if you've been around since the beginning. , we did a whole series on the book Rhythms of Renewal by Oh yes. Rebecca Lyons. Yes. And it was fantastic. Yes. And so we just did four episodes and they were a little bit longer cuz those are big sections of the book. Yes. What, but what did you know, what did that look like? What did, what are those rhythms of. And all of those things look like. And so I know that's probably something that we'll also do in the future is Yes. Found a book that Zerbe loved and she's Hey, you need to read this. Yes. And then we're gonna share about it because this was, this will be so helpful for women in every stage of life. Or that are going through this specific thing or whatever it is. Yes. Or vice versa. I read a book and I'm like, Hey, you've gotta read this. Yes. Cuz I know that's a heart for both of us. So you can definitely look forward to. I wouldn't say book reviews, but Yeah. But just communicating together and teaching you guys what we learned from different books. . And maybe even teaching you how you can become a reader. Yeah. Sometimes you might hear that people are reading a book and you're like, oh my gosh, that's so lame. Why are we reading a book? Yeah. But there actually is, So much knowledge and truth that you can get from books and different ways to think about things. And they actually can help me in diving into the Bible and learning more things about what scripture has to say. So I love to read. I think it'll be awesome to do a few book reviews and have you guys go along with us, maybe even read along with us. Yeah, absolutely. And learn what we're learning about and ways that are different. When you read through an author's. , so many different things come to light and you can learn in such a different perspective. . Yeah, absolutely. So those are just the, some of the things. Was there any other ones that, that you were thinking, Sarah Beth, of just like topics, ideas that we wanted to touch on? I think that one of the things that I wanted to make sure we touched on was that our goal is to really help encourage women to live a godly life and. Younger women and older women both have that ability to do that. You don't have to be a specific age. I believe that with, in all women, we all can be leaders in our own way, right? Yeah. And we can be encouragers in our own way. And so just the, to drive home that this podcast is all about encouragement, inspiration and really sharing with you. How you can be, part of our journey and how we can impact your life in a positive way. So that's my biggest hope here for what the podcast is gonna represent. Yeah, I love that. And I, that's definitely both of our hearts and our desires. And we just want to be an encouragement. We want to encourage you to cultivate relationships in your own life, cultivate your relationship with the Lord. Cultivate a love for learning, for reading.  Memorizing scripture for a relationship with Jesus. Yeah. We wanna drive that home. , our life would be nothing without him. And so I think that bringing in the importance of actually what that relationship can look like as a woman. Yeah. It's so easy to go to church and hear all these different things, as women we just think so differently and we have so many different things going on. A hundred million ideas at one moment, right? ? Yes. So I think this is a great safe, spla safe space for women to come and for us to just encourage them in that. Yeah, absolutely. That is all we have for today. We are so excited. We hope that you would tune in for the episodes in the future. We are going to be diving to all the things that we just talked about today, and we cannot wait. All right. Thank you, Jordan, for allowing me the opportunity to participate in the relaunch of the Cultivate podcast. I just really hope that the conversation is meaningful and helpful to all of our listeners.

The 80s Movie Podcast
The War of the Roses

The 80s Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 17:54


On this actual final episode of 2022, we take a look back at our favorite Christmas movie of the decade, Danny DeVito's 1989 film The War of the Roses. ----more---- TRANSCRIPT   Hello, and welcome to The 80s Movies Podcast. I am your host, Edward Havens. Thank you for listening today.   Before we get started, yes, I said our previous episode, on Michael Jackson's Thriller, was going to be our last episode of 2022. When I wrote that, and when I said that, I meant it. But then, after publishing that episode, I got to thinking about Christmas, and some of my favorite Christmas movies, and it reminded me I have considering doing an episode about my favorite Christmas movie from the 1980s, and decided to make myself an unintentional liar by coming back one more time.   So, for the final time in 2022, this time for real, I present this new episode of The 80s Movie Podcast. This time, we'll be talking about Danny DeVito's best film as a director, The War of the Roses.   The genesis of War of the Roses was a novel by American author and playwright Warren Adler. After graduating from NYU with a degree in English literature, in a class that included Mario Puzo, the author of The Godfather, and William Styron, who won the 1968 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for his novel The Confessions of Nat Turner, Adler paved an interesting road before becoming a novelist. He worked as a journalist at the New York Daily News, before becoming the editor of the Queens Post, an independent weekly newspaper devoted to all things happening in that New York City borough.    He would buy four radio stations and a television station in New York City, before opening his own advertising and public relations firm in Washington D.C.   Adler would create ads for politicians, businesses and communities all across the nation. In fact, it was Warren Adler who would create the name of the DC complex whose name is now synonymous with high crimes: Watergate. In 1974, he would sell the firm, and the stations, after the publication of his first novel, Undertow.   The War of the Roses would be Adler's seventh novel to be published in as many years, and the first of four to be published in 1981 alone. The novel follows Jonathan and Barbara Rose, who, initially, seem to be the perfect couple. He has a thriving career as a lawyer, she is an up-an-coming entrepreneur with an exceptional pâté recipe. Their extravagant home holds a collection of antiquities purchased over the years, and they enjoy their life with their children Evie and Josh. One day, Jonathan suffers what seems to be a heart attack, to which Barbara responds by asking for a divorce. Very quickly, their mutual love turns to a destructive hatred, especially after Jonathan, trying to save his marriage despite his wife's de facto declaration of lost love for her husband, decides to invoke an old state law that allows a husband to remain in his house while in the process of divorce.   The novel became an immediate sensation, but Hollywood had already come knocking on Mr. Adler's door seven months before the book's publication.   Richard D. Zanuck, the son of legendary Fox studio head Daryl Zanuck, and his producing partner David Brown, would purchase the movie rights to the book in September 1980 through their production deal at Fox. The producers, whose credits included The Sting and Jaws, would hire Adler to write the screenplay adaptation of his novel, but they seemingly would let the film rights lapse after two years.    James L. Brooks, the television writer and producer who created The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Taxi, was transitioning to movies, and purchased the movie rights to the book, which he would produce for Polly Platt, the former wife of filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich who had made a name for herself as an art director, costume designer, screenwriter and producer, including as the production designer and on-set sounding board for Brooks on Terms of Endearment.   At the time, Brooks was working at Paramount Pictures, but in 1986, he would end his association with that studio when Fox would offer Brooks the opportunity to create his own production company at the studio, Gracie Films. When the transfer of Brooks' properties from Paramount to Fox was being worked on, it was discovered that Brooks didn't actually own the movie rights to War of the Roses after all.    In fact, Arnon Milchan, an Israeli businessman who had been making a splash in the film industry financing movies like Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy, Ridley Scott's Legend and Terry Gilliam's Brazil, had actually purchased the movie rights to the novel before the Zanuck/Brown option seemingly lapsed, which would require Brooks to enter into a new round of negotiations to secure the rights once and for all. Milchan would sell them to Gracie Films for $300k and a producer credit on the final film.   Once the rights were finally and properly secured, Brooks would hire Michael Neeson, a writer Brooks had worked with on The Mary Tyler Moore, Rhoda and Taxi, to write the screenplay. But instead of spending time getting ready to make her directorial debut, Platt instead took a job as the production designer on George Miller's adaptation of John Updike's The Witches of Eastwick. In fact, Miller was so keen on getting Platt involved in his production that he would consider shooting a good portion of the movie in Platt's hometown of Hingham, Massachusetts, although they would eventually spend most of the location shoot in nearby Colhasset, which had more of the historical buildings Miller wanted for the film.   Platt would finish her work on Witches before Brooks would begin shooting his Terms of Endearment follow-up, Broadcast News, on which Polly would serve as an executive producer, but her leaving Brooks for several months to work on someone else's film would begin a fracture between the two that would lead to Platt leaving Gracie Films in a few years.   But not before she helped with the creation of The Tracy Ullman Show, one of the earliest shows on the then-brand new Fox television network, which included a short animated segment each week about a quirky family in a town called Springfield.    The Simpsons.   While Platt was in New England working on Witches, James L. Brooks would visit an old friend, Danny DeVito, who was shooting his feature directing debut, Throw Momma From the Train. DeVito had known about The War of the Roses for years, and really wanted to make it as a director, but knowing how important the project was to Platt, he would defer his interest in the film.    In a July 2020 episode of Karina Longworth's excellent podcast You Must Remember This, Danny DeVito tells Longworth that he only became involved in the film when Brooks told him the project was not going to move forward with Polly Platt.    And sidebar, if you aren't familiar with Polly Platt or her importance to cinema and pop culture, I highly encourage you to listen to Ms. Longworth's entire season about Ms. Platt. Polly Platt was an amazing, complicated woman who deserves a better legacy. Just trust me on this. Please.   Okay, so now were at the end of 1986. Polly Platt was out as the director of The War of the Roses, even if she didn't know she was out at the time.   So what could DeVito bring to the project that Platt could not?   DeVito had just finished his first feature film as a director. And while Momma wasn't a big hit when it was released in December 1987, it was successful enough at the box office, and the film would garner an unlikely Oscar nomination for Anne Ramsay, the actress who played the film's diminutive title character. But more importantly, DeVito could bring in Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner, his co-stars on Romancing the Stone and The Jewel of the Nile, to play the now Oliver and Barbara Rose. The three actors had had spent years looking for another project unrelated to that other series they could make together. Douglas would sign on to the project before his amazing fall and winter 1987 run, first as the star of the mega-hit Fatal Attraction, and then as the star of Wall Street, which would garner him an Academy Award for Best Actor.   Turner had been taking some time off from acting after finishing Peggy Sue Got Married in July 1985, and was pregnant with her daughter Rachel when DeVito approached her about The War of the Roses. Turner was already working on a comedy called Switching Channels, which had to finish shooting by early July 1987, as Turner's pregnancy would be rather visible if shooting lasted any longer. She had also committed to being a featured actor in Body Heat director Lawrence Kasdan's The Accidental Tourist, which would also re-team Turner with William Hurt.    But she would agree to star in The War of the Roses if they could give her some time being a new mom before shooting began.   DeVito and Leeson would continue to work on the script. As there was no character in the novel that would work for the compact actor/director, the two would create a framing device for the story. DeVito would play Gavin D'Amato, a divorce lawyer who was friends with Oliver Rose, who tells the story of Oliver and Barbara Rose to a potential client, played by Dan Castellaneta, the voice of Homer Simpson, as a way of trying to get his client to reconsider splitting with his wife. The character of Gavin D'Amato would take the place of Murray Goldstein in the novel, an overweight former rabbi who would only meet Oliver Rose during the course of the story.   Sean Astin, who had made a splash a few years earlier as the lead in The Goonies, would be cast as the Rose's teenage son Josh, while newcomer Heather Fairfield would get her first major movie role playing the Roses' daughter Evie, who would be renamed Carolyn for the movie.   The other major change DeVito and Leeson would make to the story would be to change the Roses' sitter from a teenager to a fortysomething woman, as they would be able to get German actress Marianne Sägebrecht, who had just found international stardom as the star of Percy Adlon's surprise global hit Baghdad Cafe, to come aboard.   Although the $26m film took place on the East Coast, the scenes not shot on the sound stages at Fox Studios in Los Angeles were filmed in Coupeville, WA, a small town on Whidbey Island, about forty miles north of Seattle, which had never been used as a filming location before.   Filming would begin on Stage 6 on the Fox lot, which was set up as the main living area for the Roses' house, on March 21st, 1989. The production would shoot as much of the film on the soundstages until April 7th, which was the first day they would be allowed to shoot in Coupeville. The evening of April 6th, though, would be spent on the backlot of Universal Studios, which was the only available space in Los Angeles at the time to accommodate shooting a massive, snowy Christmas Eve scene standing in for Cambridge, MA.   Two days after arriving in Coupeville, DeVito would discover a note on his rental car parked at the hotel where the production had its base, stating that thieves had stolen the dailies from the first day of location shooting, and demanded a ransom to have the footage returned. But DeVito was quickly able to find the dailies had not been stolen, and just laughed the note off as a prank.   After several weeks in Washington State, the production would return to Los Angeles to finish the remainder of the set shooting on the Fox Lot, as well as a few additional shots of homes in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Hancock Park, standing in suburban Washington D.C. Shooting would finish on July 25th, which would give DeVito and his team less than four and a half months to get the film ready for its planned December 8th release date.   Because the editing team lead by Lynne Klingman had been putting together an assembly cut for DeVito during production, the director was able to screen his first cut of the film for Fox executives in mid-August. That cut would run three hours and four minutes. But that's what an assembly cut is for. You get to see all the stuff you shot put together, and see what you need to whittle down, what you need to move around, and what you need to get rid of completely.   Over the course of the next few months, DeVito and the editors would get the movie down to a tight one hour and fifty six minutes. And unlike many movies then and now, there were very few scenes that needed to be reshot or added in. One shot that would be added after the audiences at several test screenings was horrified at the suggestion that Barbara's pâté may have been made with the family dog. DeVito would later state that he always meant to have a shot of the dog later in the movie, but it was definitely a late addition after the first few test screenings.   The War of the Roses would hold its world premiere at Century Plaza Cinemas in Century City, about a mile from the Fox lot, on December 4th, 1989. It would be a star-studded affair that included DeVito, Turner, and Douglas, who brought his father Kirk along with him, along with Courtney Cox, Olivia Newton-John, Kelly Preston, Mimi Rogers, Christian Slater and Samantha Morton, Oliver Stone, and Jennifer Tilly, followed by a New York City premiere two days later at the Gotham Theatre. The film would open in 1259 theatres on Friday, December 8th, and would be the highest grossing film in the nation, taking in $9.5m, knocking the previous week's #1 film, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, out of the top spot. It would fall to second place in its second week, as Christmas Vacation retook first place, and it would fall to third place during the long Christmas weekend. However, in its fourth week of release, the long New Years weekend, The War of the Roses would retake the top spot for the second and final time. At the end of the year, after 25 days of release, the film had grossed $43.85m, or the equivalent of $105m in 2022 dollars. The film would continue to stay strong for several more weeks, staying in the top ten until mid-February, before ending its run in theatres in the spring with $86.89m.   The reviews were pretty good, with particular praise heaped upon Douglas and Turner's performances as well as DeVito's direction. But, sadly, there would be little awards love for the film.   The Golden Globes would nominate the film for Best Comedy, and both Turner and Douglas for lead comedy performances, and the British Academy would nominate Michael Leeson for his screenplay, but would be completely shut out at the Academy Awards.   I love the movie. It was one of the first movies I bought on Laserdisc back in the early 1990s, and when I call it a box set, I mean it was actually two discs and a four page booklet about the movie not in an album-like slipcover but an actual box. The movie was on the first disc, with roughly an hour on each side, which included a separate audio track for DeVito's commentary and a personal introduction to the film by DeVito, while the second disc featured deleted scenes, theatrical trailers, a copy of the shooting script, production stills, and a gallery of the theatrical posters. For a guy who had spent years building an enviable VHS videotape collection, this was next level stuff most people wouldn't get to experience for nearly another decade.   More than thirty years after Warren Adler published The War of the Roses, he would release a sequel to his novel, entitled The Children of the Roses. Josh and Evie are now adults. Josh is married with two children himself, a boy and a girl, Michael and Emily. Much like his parents' marriage, Josh's marriage to Victoria seems to be picture perfect on the outside, but after their son gets caught up in a caper at his elite private school involving stolen Milky Way bars, Josh finds himself in his own War of the Roses.   Evie, who still copes with her depression by eating, comforts her niece and nephew with loads of food, since to Evie still, food is love, while Michael and Emily decide for themselves that their parents will stay together no matter what.   While the book was not a best seller like the first book, it would still sell quite well, as did almost every one of the other 43 books Adler would write and publish until his passing in 2019 at the age of 91.   Thank you for joining us for this year's Christmas episode of The 80s Movie Podcast. We'll talk again in early 2023, when Episode 98, about Neil Diamond's sole attempt at movie acting, The Jazz Singer, is released.   Remember to visit this episode's page on our website, The80sMoviePodcast.com, for extra materials about The War of the Roses.   The 80s Movies Podcast has been researched, written, narrated and edited by Edward Havens for Idiosyncratic Entertainment.   Thank you again.   Good night.

Everyday Happiness - Finding Harmony and Bliss
556-Podcast Takeover With C Lee Cawley Day 4

Everyday Happiness - Finding Harmony and Bliss

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 2:18


Hey there, I'm C.Lee Cawley and yesterday I shared what advice I would give my younger self and after pondering this question, I realized, I have MORE to add.  Tune in today to hear what I've really hung onto over the years and why it matters for our happiness.      Transcript   Hello, everyone. You are listening to Everyday Happiness with Katie Jefcoat. But today I am C.Lee Cawley, taking over her podcast.   Katie asked me yesterday what advice you'd give your younger self, and after pondering it a little bit more, I have more to add.   One of the other bits of advice I would give my younger self and I actually think I did a really good job on this, is to think long and hard about the people you are dating and choosing to spend your life with. And this is not just romantic partners, but also friends.   I have been so blessed that I have had literally lifelong friends that I still keep in touch with today. So I know that younger people are very consumed with higher education and establishing themselves in careers, but careers change.   I've had seven careers in my lifetime, and I might have a couple more up my sleeves, who knows? But what hasn't changed are my relationships.   So my advice to my younger self is to nurture those relationships. And if they are friendships that don't serve you well, then give yourself permission to let go of them. Really surround yourself with the people that lift you up.   I've been very, very lucky that I chose very well. I'm still on my first husband, I like to say, and we've known each other for over 33 years, and we've been married over 30, and I feel so lucky for having the chance to date a lot of frogs before I met my prince. As well as establishing my friendships, I have friends that I'm sending 40 year gifts to for our Ruby anniversary, because we've been close for 40 years.   And I'm not saying not to make new friends, but I'm saying be sure to focus on the relationships as much as you might focus on your education or career.   So that was my second bit of advice for my younger self, and I've got one more question to share with you, and I will see you tomorrow. I hope you tune in. See you then.   About C.Lee:    As an award-winning Certified Professional Organizer – of which there are fewer than 400 worldwide - C.Lee is an “agent of change” for her thousands of clients, students, and followers - transforming their lives and homes with her adroit advice and insightful instruction.   Her current mission is to clear desks and minds around the world with her signature course “The Paper Cleanse”. In it, she teaches people how to declutter their paper piles and curate frustrating files for a lifetime of paper organization.   C.Lee lives in Arlington, Virginia with her husband of over 30 years and considers herself "indoorsy".  She delights in having friends over for decadent drinks and deep discussions.  And it appears that she adores alliteration!    You can connect with C.Lee On Instagram = https://www.instagram.com/c.leecawley_simplifyyou/   On Facebook = https://www.facebook.com/DMVOrganizing   And at her website which offers tips, tools and a resourceful blog = https://www.cleecawley.com/    *   *   *    Get Everyday Happiness delivered to your inbox by subscribing at: https://www.katiejefcoat.com/happiness   And, let's connect on social at @everydayhappinesswithkatie  and join the community on the hashtags #IntentionalMargins and #everydayhappinesswithkatie on Instagram   Links:  https://onamission.bio/everydayhappiness/

Everyday Happiness - Finding Harmony and Bliss
554-Podcast Takeover With C Lee Cawley Day 2

Everyday Happiness - Finding Harmony and Bliss

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 2:01


Hey there, I'm C.Lee Cawley and today I share how I use Intentional Margins® in my everyday life and especially how I start my day for success.     Transcript   Hello, people. You are listening to Everyday Happiness with Katie Jefcoat. But today I am taking over. I'm C.Lee Cawley, and I'm thrilled to be here.   Katie asked me, how do you use Intentional Margins® in your everyday life? And I think that I call Intentional Margins® having routine and rewards, but it's the exact same concept.   So when Katie spoke of this, I was like, “Oh, yeah, I do that all the time.” One of the ways I do that is every day I get up, I get on my treadmill or I go to Zumba class. I try to start my day with movement, and that sets my day up in a really positive way. I've already accomplished something before my day is even started.   The second thing I do is every day I make my husband and myself a healthy breakfast. And we sit and eat breakfast while doing the Wordle. And it's such a nice time of connection. Sometimes it takes us no time at all. Sometimes it takes us quite a lot of time, but it's something that we're doing together.   And talking about our day gives me a point of reference. So just starting my day in those two ways by incorporating movement into my day as a routine and connecting with my husband, we've been married for over 30 years.  And by having a healthy breakfast that I prepare him lovingly, that he eats happily and doing this kind of brain exercise on Wordle. And sometimes we even go on and do the Heardle and then he'll do the Worldle.   But it starts our day off in a positive way, and that sets me up for a lot of success. So making the time, just as Katie says, really does make a difference.   So I suggest you decide how you're going to use Intentional Margins® in your life, and know that I'm still going to be here tomorrow to chat to you more. I'm loving this podcast takeover and I'll see you then.   About C.Lee:    As an award-winning Certified Professional Organizer – of which there are fewer than 400 worldwide - C.Lee is an “agent of change” for her thousands of clients, students, and followers - transforming their lives and homes with her adroit advice and insightful instruction.   Her current mission is to clear desks and minds around the world with her signature course “The Paper Cleanse”. In it, she teaches people how to declutter their paper piles and curate frustrating files for a lifetime of paper organization.   C.Lee lives in Arlington, Virginia with her husband of over 30 years and considers herself "indoorsy".  She delights in having friends over for decadent drinks and deep discussions.  And it appears that she adores alliteration!    You can connect with C.Lee On Instagram = https://www.instagram.com/c.leecawley_simplifyyou/   On Facebook = https://www.facebook.com/DMVOrganizing   And at her website which offers tips, tools and a resourceful blog = https://www.cleecawley.com/    *   *   *    Get Everyday Happiness delivered to your inbox by subscribing at: https://www.katiejefcoat.com/happiness   And, let's connect on social at @everydayhappinesswithkatie  and join the community on the hashtags #IntentionalMargins and #everydayhappinesswithkatie on Instagram   Links:  https://onamission.bio/everydayhappiness/

The Clean Energy Show
When Electric Cars Aren't Reliable; The Benefits of Processed Foods

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 53:49


Brian talks about Wired.com's story on the benefits of processed foods. James is depressed because his beloved Nissan LEAF needs a new PTC cabin heater with a hefty price tag. The city of Houston has a boil water advisory because of a blip in their power grid. The Tesla Semi seems to be for real. Musk says it completed a 500 mile journey pulling an 81,000 pound load. The upcoming Sizewell C nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of public funding. Why the Saudis have electric buses.  There's a new record size for off-shore wind turbines and it's 16 megawatts. Ebike subsidies expand across the United States. GM dealerships are repairing Teslas. Will they also fix James's LEAF? Buy us a cup of coffee with PayPal Donate! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow   Transcript Hello, and welcome to episode 141 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. I finally come clean this week about a secret I've been keeping for two months. And, no, I'm not pregnant. And, yes, I would make an excellent mother. The city of Houston is under a boil water advisory. Because of power outages. Everything is bigger in Texas, including grid problems. The Tesla semi completed a 500 miles journey with a load weighing 81 £0, or roughly half the weight of Elon Musk's eagle. The upcoming Sewell Sea nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of funding. Ultrawealthy prime Minister Rishi Sunak has stepped in with a cash infusion. Oh, wait, I'm being told it's taxpayer money. He's not an idiot. All that and hopefully borrow this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Brian I'm sweating like a hog and I'll tell you why. Yes, I'm not a sick. I was shoveling the driveway because it blew in. And before the show, I frantically tracked down a plug in electric snow blower. My partner was coming home for lunch and I said, can you swing by the Walmart because there's one left. It was like $100 less than if I made this decision a few days ago. I would have had all the Cyber Monday Friday deals, but I missed out on that. But I found one with specs that was really good. Now, I've got a battery operated snow shovel. Not cutting it. What's going to happen now is we're going to get trace amounts of snow for the next five years, but I say, fine, it's worth spending the money for that to happen, because it's worth it. We've been snowed in and my partner had to park on the street and the driveway was daunting. So I quickly assembled it at lunchtime. While you were having your happy nap. Yeah. And I went out there with a short extension cord and did what I could. And now I'm sweating like a crazy. I'm soaked in sweat because my heart was going maximum, which doesn't take much these days, but when you're doing anything clearing snow, it gets the heart rate going, unfortunately. So, like a plug in kind rather than battery operated, I guess, is a lot cheaper. It is cheaper. I did splurge, though, and get pretty much the most powerful one you can get. It's about 14 amps. You can get a 15 amp one, but then you have problems with your extension cords overheating and blowing breakers and things. It's kind of the maximum that it will handle on an ongoing basis. But I went out there with, I would say, a 15 inch drift and went right through it like it does a foot of snow. But it will go under the drift and it will still keep going under the drift and you just go over it a second time. So, yeah, I'm happy with it. Those are a pain in the ass. I've had them before because the extension cord but I knew that I wanted power, and this was a bigger unit, and it was a couple of couldn't really afford it, but I said, man, because we got to clean the sidewalks this year by city by law. By city by law. Yeah. Well, just a quick update. Last week I was complaining about GoComics.com, this website I go to every day to read daily comic strip. It was down for a full five days and finally came back online. They offered no explanation of exactly what happened. It was supposedly a cyber security issue, which I had read on another website. But anyway, our long nightmare is over. It's back. And coincidentally, this week on Saturday, it was Charles Schultz's, what would have been his 100th birthday, the creator of the Peanuts comic strip, the legend of newspaper comic strips. It was his 100th birthday, so a lot of the comic strips had special tributes to him on Saturday. So that was a lot of fun to read. All the cartoonists got together and decided to do that. And then the last thing, comic strips do you remember the soap opera comic strips when you were a kid? There were only a couple of comic strips that were not funny. Yeah. Give me an example of one, can you? Well, there's two main ones. Mary worth. Okay. And Rex Morgan, MD. And these trips have both been around for, like, 100 years by this point. Anyway, I started reading them a couple of months ago because I was looking for new, exciting things to follow, and I'd always avoided them like the plague when I was a kid because it's like, this is ridiculous. There's no joke here. What's the point of this anyway? I've been reading for a couple of months now, and I'm starting to get into it. It's kind of fun. A bit speechless here. You're reading soap opera comic strips after resisting them your whole life. My whole life. I mean, I thought, is it a gossipy? Pleasure, man, what's going on here? Yes. I don't know. I just like comic strips, and there's not enough good ones, so I just been looking to expand my horizons. What happened to the creators? Did their kids take over? I mean, if these are 100 years old yeah, often that is the case. I don't think that's the case with Mary. We are Rex Morgan, but yeah, often it's passed on to a son or a daughter or a nephew or a niece or something. I don't know. They've all been around now, a lot of them, for 100 years. I don't know. It's a weird thing. All right, Brian, I've got an announcement to make. I've been hiding something from you for two months. Wow. You and the listeners. Wow. And it is regarding my leaf. Oh, yeah. My leaf has major problems. It happened just before we recorded a show about two months ago, and I was so distraught, I couldn't bring it up, and I couldn't bring it up for two months. I was just so unhappy about it. That's terrible. I don't know how the hell I made it through that episode. But if you could find a very glum James about two months ago trying to struggle through an episode, I guess it's all muscle memory. That's how we've done so many of these shows already. Yeah. And also, it doesn't have to be that good. No, I mean, well, we try. We do try for our listeners, don't we? Every week a good show. Come on. Okay. Now, I know that we have a lot of long time listeners, but we also have a lot of new listeners. And I wanted to just talk about electric cars with you for a little while, about the reliability. And I don't want to just jump into it without talking about what model I have, because it's going to probably be different than what you are considering. Although a friend of ours texted me the other night and was asking me about the Leaf, wanting to buy one. And I said, well, here's what happened, and you can make up your own mind. What had happened is my 2013 Nissan Leaf. Now, remember, this is the first mass produced allelectric car by a car company. They started making them at the end of 2010, and they made them for a couple of years in Japan, and then they opened up a Tennessee factory, and one in the UK as well. Mine comes from Tennessee, and it comes from the United States and was imported into Canada. So there's a few little things like daytime running lights that had to be added, and a bigger washer tank for some reason. It's just one of those weird things just to get up to Canadian standards. So it was imported already. And Quebec, the problems with Quebec, they had just terminated at that time, but they had incentives for used vehicles that lowered the used market for Leafs. And that's how I got one as cheap as I did. It was about $10,000 in change, and that was a pretty good price at the time. But it was a base model, so it was the base model S. It had no cruise control. And just when I started making those models, they put a heat pump in them in the upper trim levels. They had three trim levels. I had the low one, so I didn't even have a fast charger on mine, or a reverse camera. Or there was some things I gave up to get a really cheap one, because everyone was designing the other ones. Had I gotten one that was one of the other trim levels, I would have had a heat pump and a PTC heater. PTC heater is basically like a toaster. Now, these suckers and electric cars heat up fast. They connect rate to the high voltage battery, and it's a heater that gets red hot and air blows through it. So you have instant heat in your car, which is wonderful. And when I preheat my car in the winter time even -40 I'll get into it and it feels like a toaster oven. It just feels hot and dry and completely warm and habitable in there. It's wonderful feeling. If you leave it long enough, it'll melt all the snow that's on the car. Right. And that's what I do. So in the leaf it will preprogram itself. You just give it a departure time and based on the weather and how long it took to get to temperature and previous days, it will add more time. I think up to 2 hours. I'm not sure about that. So I probably abused it and I lost my PTC heater. So I have no heater in the car for two months now. A month ago you were talking about getting your heater replaced under warranty, which I did. Went up to Saskatoon and yeah, they replaced that under warranty and it was the same thing. Your car and I and mine are the same in that sense. That they just have a PTC heater. Later models may have had both or at least a heat pump and yours for more efficiency. Heat pump is like reverse air conditioner if you're new to the show. And it works a lot more because a great deal of power goes into these. I think 5000 watts goes into mine. That's more than the car driving. So your range goes down. So since my heater broke, my winter range is excellent, by the way. It only goes down based on denser or cold air. Do you have a little bonfire going in there or something? No, I eat some beans sometimes before. It's not a great experience. And what I've done, we have an SUV that I thought initially I thought I would just place the SUV for the winter and it's going to be expensive and it'll heat up and it will be, you know, but then even without the damn heater, Brian, I just love that bloody car. Like, I just love it. I just love driving it. I hate getting into the Prius, which is a combustion engine in the wintertime, it's cold anyway, unless your destination is a long ways away or you've warmed it up. That thing takes a while to warm up too. And it's not like an electric car and it just doesn't feel the same as an electric car. And I finally got the wheel bearings fixed, so it was nice and quiet. And I've decided that one of the great things about electric cars is after I had my wheel bearing fixed, because they were very loud, is when you get up to speed in the city, it's almost like you can feel the wind in your hair. Like you could just feel and hear the wind and nothing else. And it's just such an exhilarating feeling to just hear that. And there's something I don't know, just beyond anything a gas car can do. When I looked at yours, was covered under warranty. I found somebody who spent $1200 in Canada, basically, to do it. And the part was about six or $700, $700 for the part. And then they did some labor. Now, in the Leaf, I looked at doing it myself, but it's very complicated. Basically, the whole inside of the car has to be taken apart. And it's a $4,000 job in most cases. Oh, no. I spent ten on the car. I just spent 2100 that I didn't have, fixing the front wheel hubs, which cost way more than they should have because I got screwed by a local shop because there's no Nissan dealer here to fix it. I also need some front suspension work. Now, the car is one month short of ten years old. This is something important because we're talking about electric cars not needing maintenance. And that is true for the most part. And people say, well, it's electric car. Something weird can go wrong in it. Well, I guess this is it. Aside from the battery, which are covered under eight year warranties. Always. Always. You know, there's the charger, I suppose, could go in the car, that there's a built in charger that can wear out over time. I would have to worry about that. I could have some bad battery cells, so you might have to replace some modules at some point. But the cars would have been great. But some people put in diesel heaters. Like, there's a guy in Swift Current who bought a brand new F 150 pickup truck, and he put in a diesel heater so that he wouldn't lose any range. Like, you have a diesel heater in an electric truck? That's right. It's basically this unit that you have to exhaust, and it just kind of burns away. It is crazy. And it's got electronic controls. This is what people are doing. And I don't know, did you ever know somebody who had a really old Volkswagen Beetle? Because I think, like, some of those had a propane heater because the Volkswagen Beetles were air cooled. So you don't get that circulating fluid that you normally use for your heater in your car. So old Beetles had a propane heater, which often apparently also did not work. So, yeah, I knew a guy who had to drive around in the winter and a Beetle scraping the inside of the window because there was no heat. Well, here's what I've done. Okay, first of all, the part, it wouldn't be so bad if I was a Tesla out of warranty. Twelve hundred dollars to go from an unusable car to a usable car. Great. I actually put in a space heater, like the one you have with a cottage into my car on a timer. Like it's a plug into the lighter? No, it plugs into an extension cord. Okay, so you just run an extension cord in there because when I was a kid, my parents had in their car a block heater. A lot of people listening don't know what a block heater is. That is a heater that heats the oil in a car in a very cold climate so that it will turn over, that it's viscous enough to turn over. And we have them in all of our cars here. But yes, my parents also had an interior warmer as well. And you plugged it in with the block heater. Yes, that's what my parents did. Yeah. And so same thing like, you can have your car warm in the morning. I seem to remember it running overnight. Do you remember my parents did that too? Just left both the heater and the interior one plugged in overnight. Yeah, different times. Because it would have been like a thousand watts, probably. Yes, it would have been extremely wasteful. And for what? I don't remember the snow being melted on the windows. That's not something that I remember. Yeah, no, I know somebody who used to do that, lived in an apartment building where the plugins in the parking lot were free. Like you didn't have to pay for the electricity. So I know somebody who did that kept it plugged in all night and all the snow melted on the car just because he didn't have to pay for the electricity. It is warming up to the interior and at least getting it usable. The problem is you have to run some air on the window to defog it at the lowest setting. And if it's cold out, that feels really bad because we're talking what temperatures have we had here? Minus ten celsius -20, and it's going to get colder. It's going to be high -20 in a few days. I was hoping for a naturally warm winter and a lottery ticket win. A couple of things that I was hoping for. And if I got it fixed, I would have to ship the car all the way up to a city called Prince Albert, which is the closest Nissan dealer that is certified to do electrical work. So basically when people do these fixes, they take out the front car seats and all the dash and they have to unplug the high voltage system underneath the car. And there's also this fuse that is hard to get at, that always blows. I confirmed it because I have sort of the computer connection to my phone app and it has the right error codes on there so that the heater is seen on the phone. Now, I knew this was something that I worried about because I've seen it with other people. I've seen it online a few times, but now that I'm really looking, I haven't seen it that much at all. Like, there's a few references to it and there's people saying, well, it was bad welding and there should be a class action suit but there really isn't that many people. I think a lot of people actually had them done under warranty because I'm only a couple of years off the warranty actually. Well that's not true. I don't know if this would have qualified for that, but a lot of the high voltage stuff did and the battery and stuff like that. So I'm very depressed Brian, because and I haven't even told my partner yet. My kids know, my partner does not. She just thinks I spilled something in the car and I've got a heater going in there. I'm just so ashamed of myself because I'm an electric car advocate. I've been telling everybody they don't break down and I put my family at risk of this and now we don't have a car that's working. So I drive my kid to school, it's a ten minute drive. She doesn't complain. Well, I don't know if this makes you feel any better and you've certainly told me this as well, like you crunched the numbers when you bought that car and it's basically probably already paid for itself. If you think of all the fuel that you've saved, that was on all numbers, that was before gas went up. Before gas went up. So first of all, the car has been free so far? Basically, yes. Another way I could look at it is that these things are selling for 6000 more than I paid for it. Yeah, prices are up since when you bought it, so there's that incentive to fix it and not feel so bad about it or sell it to somebody in the summer. No, well, I would never do that. Never. That would be awful. Well, now that the evidence is out there by the way, you can't here's a tip for your kids out there. If you buy an electric car in the summer that's used check the heater just because you want to make sure it works. Now, if I had one of those models that wasn't the base model I would have had in my case a heat pump and a PTC heater. Yeah. So the heat pump, I don't know what they work efficiently at in a leaf. It might only be -15, or something like that. And it gets much colder where we are. But I would have had some heat and I could've preheated it for a couple of hours and it would have got somewhat comfortable in there, you know, and that would have been fine. Maybe not on every day, but most of our winter days aren't necessarily brutal. Hopefully it would work out, I don't know. Warm days are only five months away. Shut up, shut up, shut up. It can't be that long. There's heated seats and front and back in the Prius or in the Prius and the leaf that helps. There's a heated steering wheel. That's great. Now I've ordered off of Amazon for $30 a dinky little electric cigarette lighter, heated defroster. So I will see how that works. Is going to come in a couple of days. I'll tell you next week if it does anything. I had one many years ago when I was a teenager because my rear defrost didn't work my $300 car. So I bought one at the hardware store, and I think it sort of did something. So it's a little portable heater, like just 100 watts or something. Just a cheap yes, about 100 watts. But hopefully it will be better than just blowing cold air as far as the feeling of it. But we'll see how I survive. Actual really cold temperatures that are coming up this week, I may not you know how teenage girls dress for school? My daughter doesn't dress very warm to get her into school and even with the car, not have producing heat and try to convince her to put things on so she doesn't get hypothermia. But on the bright side, Brian, I'm feeling better. Yeah, well, like we were talking about last week, we sometimes don't dress for the climate anymore because we're just used to going from one warm environment to another warm environment. I don't have a lot of stuff this week because Twitter has gone haywire, and I get a lot of my information from climate people and various activists on Twitter. They've all left for mastodon and other places. Like, they're all completely gone, and I hope they come back. But there's talk of Tesla shareholders getting upset with Musk doing what he's doing because that seems to be affecting the Tesla stock. Just the fact that he had to sell a bunch to buy that social media platform is a little crazy. Anyway, I'm on the Chevy Voltage group. I thought it was interesting. Every now and again I see an interesting story that really talks about the economics of electric cars. We talked about how mine for $10,000 covered the gas and my SUV. That would have been five years of gas. And that's just incredible. And plus, you're saving the environment a little bit too. Obviously, it's a lot more pleasurable too, but so somebody's paying $520 for a Chevy bolt. This is one of the cheapest EVs. You can buy the monthly payment for five years with no money down or anything like that. And he's saying that he saved 175 gallons of gas, and at $4 a gallon, minus $60 a month increase in electricity, he's saving $580 a month. Both has over two months. Over two months. It's like getting a car for very little money, and it will basically pay for itself in eight to ten years. So in his case, he's buying a brand new car and getting it free after eight to ten years. The more you drive, the better deal it is. Yeah, that's for sure. And as they come down in price, this is going to be more and more things especially if you're dealing with fleets that do a lot of driving. And free is one thing, but you're still saving you're still saving over a gas car. So that's something. The New York Times had an interesting piece about how the Saudis are trying to keep gas alive. And one of the ways that they're doing it is they're buying a whole bunch of EVs and Ebuses for Saudi Arabia so that they can get this burn less gas. They want to sell the gas to other people. They don't want to waste any of it using it themselves. That's a really good point, doing that. That just struck my craw, like it's stuck in there. Well, there's going to be sort of EV have countries and EV have not countries and yeah, that's keep selling them your oil, I guess. So the Texas grid, what's going on there? Yeah, we talked about that occasionally. Texas in the US. Has its own electricity grid that tends to be cut off from the rest of the country. And they've had problems lately and I just thought this was an interesting problem there's currently, and it should be ending today, but a boil watery advisory in the city of Houston, which is a massive city for the whole city. For the whole city. And so school has been canceled. Yeah, that's first nation reserve up north kind of territory, or small town at least. And it's because they had power outages at their water filtration system when the power goes out and they were supposed to have power backup and for some reason it didn't work. But the water pressure drops within the filtration plant and once the water pressure drops down past a certain amount, they basically have to put out a boil water advisory so it's entirely possible the water is still safe to drink. It's a precautionary thing. It's a precautionary thing. And they need to let it go for a couple of days, test the water again. And they will probably lift the boil water advisory today. But I just thought it was interesting because it's just one of those things where we don't think about necessarily in terms of the grid, why it's important to have a reliable grid. And this is just one of those instances where a bad grid with frequent power outages can lead to things like a boil water advisory for a massive city like Houston. These are things that I worry about with armageddon scenarios. If there's some sort of war or something, we really need to have our water because we don't have a well in our backyard. And I'm not currently collecting rainwater. You're talking about doing that at the new cottage. But I guess we could melt some snow during the winter. Oh, yeah, not the yellow. I'll just blow it into a big pile of my new snow blower and melt it. Melt it with what, though, right? I have to collect firewood on the prairies. That's no fun. Burned gopher carcasses or something like that, I thought. I would also mention these two Chinese companies announced that the production of the largest offshore wind turbine to date has been announced. Because this is something we talked about before, so I thought I'd bring it up again. You love a big turbine. I do love my turbines to be setting records, Brian. And we knew that this would be broken because there was rumors of it. The previous record is 14 MW. This is something that can power a house for two days with one rotation of the blade. One little rotation can power your home and your family for two days, and now they've gone up to 16. There's two companies in China that have developed 16 MW. It's interesting to watch when professionals have discussions online about what the theoretical limit is. But a lot of times in the clean energy space, people think that nothing can go any further, and it does. There's always some sort of development or some sort of technique. Some of it is just a placement where you place it. They have better modeling now than they used to 20 years ago. The groups on November 24 showed off the turbine factory in Fujian Province. And the turbine has a 252 meters rotor diameter with 50,000 meters sweep area. That is a large sweep area. If you want to compare sweep areas, it's a large 146 meters. The hub of it, the middle, the turning point, 146 meters. One and a half football fields off the ground. And I saw another wind turbine blade on the highway the other day, which is always an amazing sight to see. Those checks right here. Blades? Yeah, it was heading towards Moose Jaw. That's interesting. I wonder where from, because that's kind of where it was going. Not sure. That is actually the biggest restriction on this wind turbine size, is that you physically can't turn corners on any sort of roads with those wind turbines. It was right here you saw when I saw one of Colorado was amazing. It was just blocks long, and it's just, you know, the largest man made item I think I've ever seen up close. It was like looking at a massive rocket or something. Okay, so I've got a great story here from Hannah Ritchie, who is the head of research at Our World in Data. And she is still on Twitter, and I would recommend following her. She's a great follow on Twitter, amazing information. So she's the head of research at Our World in Data. Fabulous website that just collects all kinds of data and presents it in website form. A lot of people have been going there through the COVID pandemic because it's a great place to go for sort of COVID statistics and stuff like that. So she wrote this amazing article at Wired magazine, and it's about processed foods. Every once in a while, people stop me on the street. And they say, hey, are you the guy from the Clean energy show? Why are you promoting processed foods all the time? Go on. The idea of processed food, it just has a really bad rap. We all know, I think, that we should eat raw vegetables from the garden or whatever, and processed foods can be bad. It turns out that there's sort of two categories. There's processed foods and then there's ultraprocessed foods. There's literally two categories to describe them based on how much processing. It's just a massive oversimplification. And this fantastic article summarizes everything, and it's things that we basically kind of talked about on the show before, but I just thought the article was great because it really explains it really nicely. One example of a good instance of processed food would be iodised salt. So iodine is a thing that we all need in our bodies. And iodine deficiencies used to be a really common problem around the world, and increased risk of stillbirth and miscarriages reductions in IQ from lack of iodine. That's why I'm so smart. All the processed foods I've been eating, all that. Yeah. So reduce cognitive development. But many years ago, we started adding iodine to salt. So most salt is iodized, and this kind of fixes that problem. But it's really the ultra processed foods that tend to be the problems, like, you know, snack foods like Twinkies and stuff like that. So where would we get iodised salt in nature to keep us healthy before? I'm not sure where that even comes from. Yeah, presumably our meat paleolithic cells were eating the right roots and vegetables or whatever. I'm not sure it's the ultra processed foods that we really should be railing against. Technically, something like Beyond Meat is ultra processed, but it's not that simple. It's just an oversimplification to say it's bad because it's processed well. So when I think of processed foods, Brian, I think of losing the nutritional value because of the way it's processed. I think of added salts, and I think of added sugars. That's a very common thing, too. And spaghetti sauce. And practically everything has sugar that doesn't need it. No. And as you said on the show many times before, it's not intended to be health food. Like Beyond Meat is not intended to be health food. It's intended to be a substitute for meat. So ground beef. So what you really need to compare it against is ground beef. So when you do that, meat substitutes tend to be lower in calories, lower in saturated fat, and higher fat fiber. Yes. Really? Because I thought some of the criticism of these Beyond Meat and what's the other one called? What's the other one called? Yes. Impossible Burger. Impossible Burger. That they were worse than regular meat. Or maybe that's the beef industry saying that it could all be tweaked. I mean, it can be whatever you want it to be. We're still early stages here, right? I mean, we're still developing stages. If people are saying, oh, this tastes like crap, well, then they can add in more fat. They can add in more sugar or whatever. So meat substitutes lower in calories and saturated fat and higher in fiber, which is good to their detriment. Some are lower in protein and often contain lower quality protein, meaning they contain less of the essential amino acids that we need. I didn't know there were different levels of protein. That's something new for me. Yeah. When it comes to sodium, it's sort of a mixed bag substitute. Burgers tend to be comparable to meat. When it comes to sodium, the substitute sausages have less salt than their pork equivalents. A lot of these substitute products are now fortified with B Twelve, iron and calcium, which is something you're not necessarily going to get from the meat. The Impossible burger has more B Twelve and iron than beef does. Really many plant based milks are fortified as well. So on balance, they're probably a bit better for your health than the meat equivalent. And I see this as just the beginning because we talk about the concept of food software that you can program the food that you're going to be making with precision. Fermentation in the future will be inventing new foods that have protein in them and different tastes and different flavors that don't necessarily come from an animal or plant. Or we can just tweak the things that are mimicking what we already eat, but to our taste, to what we like. And chefs, I think a chef 20 years from now could be a bit of a computer programmer and just experimenting with different things, and it could be an interesting world. Well, I've always been fascinated by that. I think I saw, like, a documentary one time about somebody who was a chef at a fast food restaurant, and it's just the idea of that I find interesting. Like somebody has to do, even if it's just regular meat, and somebody has to design that stuff to be then replicated literally billions of times. It's a fascinating sort of thing. It is. And you go to the McDonald's campus and you see they've got all these chefs making a lot of money there. And every time they come up with a new product, I always think of them and I think, you stupid buggers, you really screwed up. You know, I'm very disappointed in this rap that you made. This rap so that teenagers can put it together when they're hungover and use basic ingredients, and it's just crap. All these chefs are making these things that are disappointing and everything that you eat. I was talking to my family about Tim Hortons. What a compromise of a restaurant that is. Yes, everything is bad. Even the donut. It's a donut shop, and they can't even make a decent donut. I don't want to be the old man here, but when I was a kid donuts were pretty damn good. They're a lot better than they are. There no. And even Tim Hortons. It was about 20 years ago, they switched, and they forced all of their franchises to buy basically frozen dough or frozen donuts. Well, they make them in a factory. I've seen the news stories on them. They make them in a centralized factory, and they have baked them. They just finished the baking process and specialized ovens here, which make them somewhat fresh. But they're not a good product, which is not. No, but up until that point, they were made in the restaurants, and they were slightly better. So there's a couple more issues raised from this article. First, the idea that food processing could alleviate malnutrition for billions of people. So meat substitutes are mostly targeted at wealthy consumers. But the implications of a backlash to process food are just as harmful for people with less money. More food processing, not less, could improve health and nutrition in developing countries. So there's a lot of countries that can't afford to eat a lot of meat, and in some ways, that's good. In other ways, it's bad. There are certain things that you lack in your diet, perhaps if you're not eating meat. And some of those things could be added, like iodine to salt could be added into the thing. And plus, there's an appetite for people that they may want to eat more meat in countries where they can't afford it, and this gives them an option that is like that that's similar to meat. If you're new to the podcast, I should tell you that we talk about food on the show because it affects the climate. The new technologies and food are lower. Carbon, like, Impossible Burger is 25 times less carbon per gram than the hamburger. No, the final point from the article is the carbon footprint. I mean, it's absolutely insane how much lower the carbon footprint is from the substitute food than regular meat. The environmental toll can be ten to 100 times lower than beef or lamb, beef being the most carbon intensive. I came across another one the other day. People often complain about almond milk. Milk substitute made of almond because it uses a lot of water, you need tons of water. It's growing in places that doesn't have water. It doesn't have a lot of water. And this is true of the milk substitutes. Almond is the one that uses the most water, but it's like a 10th or 100th of the water needed if you get the milk from a cow. Like, the water needed for the beef industry is insane. So I would have assumed the opposite. Wow. It's not even close. You're saying it's not even close? Well, because I've driven by those almond farms, and you see all the irrigation, and you see the outside the border, it's a desert. So to join them in the desert and you think, wow, this is not a good idea. No, but you see the chart for the carbon footprints, and beef is the most carbon intensive of all of the meats. And one last thing here and again, it's from our World in Data. There was a really nice graph of meat consumption per person around the world. And so, quick quiz. What country do you think eats the most meat per person? My initial response would be the United Kingdom or the United States. It is the United States. Yeah, that's kind of almost a stereotype. It's a stereotype that appears to be true. Argentina eats a lot of meat. Australia eats a lot of meat. So in the US. It's 124 year per person, which is a lot. Canada is now at 82. Lot less in Canada. That was surprising to me. Now, why would that be? We have a lot of agriculture here. We have a lot of land. Why would we I don't know, except I know that anytime I've been to the States and you go to a restaurant and you order a meal in a restaurant, it always seems to be a very large portion of meat. Yeah. Yeah. But there's a wonderful graph there on our World in Data, meats applied per person. This is 2017, so the data is a bit out of date, perhaps. Well, the article is on wired.com and it's called The World Needs Processed Food. I'll put a link to it in our show notes, and you can check it out there. So the Tesla semi, according to a tweet by the CEO of Tesla, did its 500 miles trip with a full load. Now, Tesla a few years ago announced that it was making a semi allelectric semitruck. The CEO of Nicola, who is now, like, in prison, I remember reading his tweets. He was really upset that this was against the law of physics. There's no way you could carry an 18,000 pound load, which is kind of like the load that you want to carry. The Tesla semi carry this 18,000 pound load 81,000 pardon me, 81,000 for 500 miles, which is, Bill Gates said, not possible. I don't know why these people say these things, Brian. Why do they doubt us? Why do they put themselves on the record saying it's not possible? Now, lots of people said that at the time that the Tesla announcement was suspicious because people didn't think it was possible. But it's been so long since they made that announcement that battery density, the energy density, the more you can get more energy in the same weight of battery and volume than you could back then, it tends to improve by something like 18% a year. But we're kind of there now, and it sounds well, we'll know in a couple of days, right? Because on December 1 of having an event. Yeah, but apparently they've done it, and they've decided that he's invited Bill Gates to come have a ride. And, you know, I was thinking that would be a fun thing to own. And I know a lot of Tesla fanatics are actually got orders in for the semi just to have other driveway, some YouTube channels, which will be fun. Yeah, definitely fun if they buy one and drive it around because they're fast without a load. They're just really fast and quiet and tall and just such a weird thing for somebody to own. And probably not that much more expensive than some of the highly spec pickup trucks that are out there for $120,000, be a couple of hundred thousand dollars, it sounds like. But yeah, we'll learn more on December 1. And looking to learn more about the charging speeds and the infrastructure and stuff. Yeah, we'll learn how they plan to do it. But it sounds like this is for real now. If it is for real, this is a big deal because there's lots of people making electric semis, but they're making them for shorter scenarios, okay? They don't have the battery technology or the efficiency that Tesla has with their motors, their inverters, and the way that they have their batteries. And plus they've just done pretty serious design with the aerodynamics and everything and maximize everything they can get and wait. So we'll see. But this is a game changer. A lot of people are saying the cost per mile is going to be significantly lower enough that it will pull triggers on a lot of people will pull triggers on it right away once they see the difference in the cost per mile. So it's very interesting. Just as your Nissan Leaf basically paid for itself with the gasoline savings, these will pay for themselves with the diesel savings. I'd love to have one to pull. You could pull an RV right? There's people talking about that. And I'm sure somebody will make an RV based off the platform. That will probably take a while, but they'll turn one of these units into just a kickass RV, which will it'll have a massive battery, which you can power off the grid and do all kinds of amazing things. Plaster the RV part with the solar panels and charge it up as well. It just seems like a great way to RV because towing is such a pain in the butt. And a Tesla semi or pickup truck, I guess, would do a great job too. Yeah, so from Power Magazine, the UK government steps up as a 50% owner of the 3.2 gigawatt sizewell C nuclear reactors. So they've been building this nuclear reactor for a while, planning it, and guess what? It turned out to be more expensive than they expected. So they really needed the government to step in. And the government has stepped in with a 679,000,000 pound investment that's $815,000,000. So yeah, they're going to own half of it from that. But as we've discussed many times, government really has to own these because they are not profitable for any private industry there, especially by the time these get built. And I hate to go on about nuclear. We tend to bash nuclear every episode or so, but especially by the time this is finished, it will be years from now. Years, as we all know, the cost of solar and batteries, my cars will be cold and dust like so it's already a bad monetary investment now, but that's just going to get worse as time goes on. And we have a story coming up in the lightning round that says that the cost of uranium is really going up. So that's making the economics of all this very it's getting worse, I'm afraid. But yeah, private ownership and investment pardon me, in nuclear, it's not happening because governments have to do it. Then when governments do it, that makes you and I the investor. We're suffering. We're going to waste money because they don't listen to our podcast. If they only listen to our podcast, everyone would be the world would be a better place. And there was a story from Japan, too, on Bloomberg. They're looking to extend the life of their 60 year old nuclear plants, which they were planning to phase out at age 60. And keeping nuclear running that we already have is probably a good idea, but 60 seems a bit pushy. It's kind of pushing it, but they're studying it now to see if it's going to be worthwhile. Okay, well, I have no problem, as long as it's safe of extending nuclear, if that's what it takes. So Electric says that there are more electric bike subsidies coming to the United States. I guess it was in the Inflation Reduction Act, but then it got taken out like there was going to be a killer ebike subsidy that everyone would have got in the states, but that's not there anymore. So individual cities and states have since picked up the slack. They say. Vermont launched the first state incentive program in the US. Denver, Colorado, also launched the very popular ebike rebate program that repeatedly sold out and they had to renew it. New York is now considering its own ebike rebate, and now we can add Oregon to the list. It could become the latest date. They're talking about $200 off an ebike that costs, well, at least $950. But Brian, that would be free. I mean, my math isn't so good, but if all you have to spend is 950 and you get up to 1200 off, I assume if you spent 950, they'd give you 950. Yes, I know, but still, that's a free. That's free. That's what I'm saying. It goes to zero. Free bike. That's crazy. I mean, who wouldn't buy one? I mean, even if you didn't want one, it would be sitting around the house and then the bikes are going to be sold. I don't know. They have to do something about that. They can't do 100% of the purchase, but maybe it's prorated. Maybe somebody in Colorado can tell me the details. But also they would go right up to $700 if it's an electric cargo bike. I think I forgot a friend in Vancouver has an electric cargo bike. Yeah, basically, it's a cargo bike not because you're a courier, but because you're living your life off the thing. So you're getting all your groceries and your snow blowers from Walmart. And by the way, it's going to snow in Vancouver. If you're in Vancouver look good for the snow. It doesn't usually snow there. Electric cargo bikes are going to be huge. Okay, so Ireland and France are going to connect their electricity grids. How is that possible, Brian? Physically, it's with a giant extension cord. Really? Does it go underwater? It goes underwater. So it is a massive cable that is 575 km long. And so this is the first time that France has been connected to a grid in the UK. And it's for sharing power back and forth between Ireland and France. They're just beginning it now, so it will be operational by 2026. It'll be 700. MW can go through the cable, which is enough to power 450,000 households. So, yeah, I'm just always interested in these kind of stories. We need to make our grids smarter and more interconnected to share the power. Ireland and France seems like an odd combination. How did these two hook up? What's going on there? What would their accent be like? No, I'm not sure, but I'm just glad to hear it. Well, it's time for the Tweet of the Week. Well, the Tweet of the week comes from Said Razuk this week, and he says building new solar is three to ten times cheaper than operating existing gas fired power. So you have a gas fired power in a lot of places in the world. It is cheaper, like the United States, southern United States, three to ten times cheaper to build new solar than just to operate the gas. Yes. We're not talking gas this building solar, we're talking building a whole new thing is three to ten times cheaper just than existing gas. So if gas funds were invested in renewables like they're not right at the moment, europe would get rid of gas by 2028. And this is via PV magazine that he quotes data from. Well, it is time for the lighting round. Short one for you this week, Brian. General Motors dealerships have repaired thousands of Tesla electric cars, says GM, and it's annual Investor Day presentation. I have not heard this before, but apparently people are taking their Teslas to GM dealership. Maybe I could take my Leaf to the GM because they fixed. Screw you, Nissan. I'll just take it to the GM dealership. Yeah, that might work. I mean, if you could take a Tesla, why couldn't you take a Nissan? Yeah, no, that's the first time I've heard of this. First booked on Barons. A slide in the presentation simply reads eleven 180 repairs and Teslas, but they did not elaborate. So GM Volvo say that EVs won't cost more than gas vehicles by 2025. Both automakers see the Inflation Reduction Act as a key for achieving price parity by middecade, despite recent supply chain challenges. So that's good news. If true, the UK government will bolster a proposed OK, that's something we already talked about, so I'm going to skip that. It's time for what is it time for? A CES, a clean energy show. Fast fact. The International Atomic Energy Agency said 437 nuclear power reactors were operational throughout the world at the end of 2021. And that has a total net capacity of 389 gigawatts. So it's less than a gigawatt per reactor on average. The agency said 56 additional units were under construction. Some of those are in China, most of those are not other places. And as I said before, uranium prices are on the rise, thus making nuclear even less competitive. And Russia is partially the thing for that. They're raising the prices of gas and oil and also uranium. So we screwed everything up. The Department of Energy is to test rapidly deployable portable wind turbines for military use. I remember once we had on the show a story about the military with rapid deployment of solar panels that would sort of be like a transformer and unfold on a portable truck that would give energy into the field. Well, this is good for disaster relief and military use. So disaster relief and military use. A team of three labs will use remote communities to study the efficacy of turbines designed to fit into 20 foot shipping containers, perhaps towed by a Tesla. Semi clean energy jobs now outnumber jobs in fossil fuels, according to a new IEA report. Now, I'm going to continue to keep my eye open for reports like this and studies, because it seems like we are at the point now where the transition is happening, where the clean energy jobs are way overtaking fossil fuel jobs. So, by the way, France's first offshore wind farm, which is about half a gigawatt, is now fully online. So France has never had an offshore wind farm before. And speaking of offshore wind, our final story this week, before we go, is Denmark is helping India identify 15 offshore wind zones. And apparently India has some sweet wind zones, Brian, and they need electricity. We talked about huge solar developments in India, while offshore wind is next up on the list, and that will be a huge boon for them. Nice. That is our time for this week. It's more than our time. We'd like to hear from you. Please, for God's sake, contact us. Cleanenergy Show@gmail.com. That is our email address. Cleanenergyhow@gmail.com. Anything that's on your mind. Some criticism, some doubts, some things you like, some things that you're doing. Some questions about EV purchases. Let us know. We are on social media at the handle at Clean Energy Pod. And we have a YouTube channel which we have special features on. You can see me looking a bit more sweaty than usual this week. You can leave us a voicemail at speakfight. Comcleenergyow. And now, Brian, you can actually donate to the clean energy show. Buy us a coffee or PTC heater using the PayPal link on our website or in the show notes. If you're new to the show, remember to subscribe. Subscribe on your podcast app. Because our new shows, they come every week. Because we're machines. We're clean Energy machines, and we're here every week. We'll see you next time, Brian. you.

The Clean Energy Show
Oil's Last Lavish Party: The 2022 World Cup in Qatar

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 64:34


Two hundred billion dollars of oil and gas money to through The World Cup in Qatar. Turns out Qatar is 'new money' and yet has a huge sovereign fund of $300B. Even they know the transition is coming. The governor of Tokyo suggests turtleneck sweaters for saving on energy. Will the trend take off? Donate to The Clean Energy Show via PayPal! COP27 was a big, fat compromise and we need to do better but it does seem the world is slowly coming together to oppose fossil fuels. The sexy new Prius is fast and sporty. Too bad it isn't an electric vehicle. We predict continued bad sales for Toyota. Biden pours billions into aiding the U.S. power grid to transition to renewable energy. Canada begins a program to replace oil furnaces on the East coast with heat pumps. Other topics: GoComics, Carlos Ghosn, Unilever to make precision fermented ice cream could be the blow to dairy we've been predicting, Mazda might be the only Japanese auto company to get serious about EVs and Volkswagen may be dropping the ball. A listener bought his first EV and is worried his reduced winter range won't come back. Don't worry, it will! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Transcript------------ Hello, and welcome to episode 140 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, with the World Cup underway in Qatar, we look at what might be the peak of petrol state decadence. I mean, what does $200 billion even get? Dennis a soccer tournament without beer. Hell, even my kids pee wee soccer tournaments had beer. The governor of Tokyo has solved the energy crisis. The solution? Turtleneck sweaters. Speaking as a Canadian, wait until they hear about Tukes and woolly socks. Well, the Cop 27 climate summit was a bit of a wash. You know, like standing in the middle of Miami. Domino's Pizza is moving to Chevy Bolt electric delivery vehicles. They've ordered 800 bolts from GM, and if they don't receive the cars in 30 minutes, they're free. All that and more of this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Holy brian we're back with another show, another week. We're nonstop robotic machines here. Yeah, a lot is going on. And also this week, will I fit into the surprisingly sexy new Prius? The answer will sadden you, I think. Biden gives billions to the US power grid, and Canada follows the US. And installing heat pumps in regions where oil furnaces are popular. And I still can't figure out why oil furnaces are popular. They just didn't want to run the they just became popular, I think. Rural areas where it's hard to get them on the grid, I guess. And how are you this week? I'm going to tell you right now that I'm not well. I've been sick. You sound terrible, James. No, I'm not possessed. That is, my lungs. I've had illness. I flu since last we met. Brian pretty much okay, but it's not going well. Here's what I did. I tested my family because they're all sick. They gave it to me. My daughter brought it home from high school, and I knew I was going to get sick, so I just tested they tested. My wife and my daughter tested, and they're negative. So I thought I'm like I was singing at my nose. It's not like I have something different. I don't go anywhere, as you know. Anyway, I've had a hellish number of days, so I am barely able to be here today. And by the end of the show, I will be soaked in sweat. Oh, dear. Because I'm still doing anything is like a chore. I skipped lunch yesterday because I couldn't go downstairs. Oh, no. That maybe answers my question, because the pet peeve of mine. People often say they have the flu when what they really mean is that they have a cold. So you said you have a flu. Do you really believe it's, the damage, or is it a bad cold? I was going to jokingly bring the CDC chart on this to the show, and I thought, no, I'm not going to. But now I wish I did. Yeah, well, people say that all the time. Oh, I had the flu. And no, you just had a bad cold. If you've got the flu, it typically means you cannot go to work or go downstairs for lunch. Yeah, well, there's overlaps, okay? But having fever and severe aches is very uncommon for colds. You can have a mild fever. You can have a brief fever. But to have a long fever and severe aches, which I did, even with pills, I've been thrown down pills left and right until yesterday when I decided I've had enough. But I took one for the show, so maybe it'll kick in halfway through. We'll see. Anyway, I had to do some harrowing things, like go drive my family home from the gray cop, the super bowl of Canada, because they were volunteering there, because my daughter is going on a school trip, and that was one way to fundraise. Well, it killed my wife. She was a little bit sick still, and she had to work 10 hours one day serving rich people, which is always fun. Then my daughter asks, dad, is it legal to quit high school and go get a job? And I said, look, young lady, you want to be the people getting served, not the servers, okay? You want to stay in school. You want to be those rich bastards getting horse Durham served to them by people like you raising money for school trips. You don't want to be the person who's 30 years old, has six kids, and is trying to serve. I mean, we need those people. Those people will exist school and becomes an entrepreneur and starts a million dollar web company. Well, sure. I think she's more likely to start a bakery or something. Yeah. Not a huge amount of money in that. No, but people do do that. There's a lot of people who do that. In fact, there's a number of successful local businesses which are at least popular with people who rave about their goods. Yeah, there's some great bakeries. Finally, there's great bakeries here. There never used to be. It was always ironic because we're surrounded by fields of wheat. There's just nothing but wheat around here. But 20 years ago, you could not get a decent loaf of bread in the city. It was crazy. But now there's some really great places. Okay, so breaking news. I think we're probably the first podcast to deal with this important topic. There is an important website on the internet that has been down for four days now. It's not Twitter. It's not Twitter. It's more important than twitter. It's GoComics.com. GoComics.com. Yes. This is a website I go to every single day to get my daily comic strips. You know, I was always a newspaper guy, and one of the reasons I like newspapers was reading the daily comics. Now, many years ago, I switched to reading the comics online because you can get whatever comics you want. You don't have to just settle for the ones that are in your newspaper. So I go to this website every single day, GoComics.com to read a handful of comic strips, and it's been down for four days. When was the last time you had a website you visited and it was down for four days? People don't have patience for that anymore. No, 4 hours would be pushing the limits for most people. Four days. And you can get a lot of the comic strips in other places, but there's a handful that are only on GoComics.com. It drives me crazy. I've been looking into it, and cyber security apparently is the issue. And there's not a huge amount of information on the web, which is why we're an important news source now for this story. But getting the word out there. Yeah. Anyway, it's driving me crazy. Go to homes.com. Do you want to explain what a comic strip is to people under 45? Briefly, a few panels in a newspaper, usually with a punchline. The one I'm really missing is Nancy and Nancy classics. And this was a comic strip I didn't know about really much in my youth, but Nancy by Ernie Buschmiller, which ran like in the they do reprints of this on Go comics as well as the new strip, which is quite good. So I don't know. I'm having withdrawals. Another problem I have is I don't have enough fluids to get through the show. Okay. I was about to start the show and I have this giant water bottle from Costco that I've got. Electric pump on the top with a lithium battery. And it shows now to quit. What? It's got a pump on it? No, I bought the pump on Amazon. You could basically use these things in water coolers, although they're not quite water cooler size bottles. They're a little below that, but they're still as much as a human can carry and maybe beyond. I had my son happened to be home for Thanksgiving, canadian Thanksgiving in the head. So we decided we're only going to buy it when our kid is home from college to lift it upstairs because it's crazy heavy. Like one of those giant water bottles with a pump on it. Yeah, I put the pump on it. You can buy these pumps on Amazon for like $18. And mine just went dead right when I needed it most. Before that, I was going to help a water bottle before the show. And now I'm like, I'm going to have to be careful, very careful. Any coffee fits and I'm done. The show's going to come to an abrupt end. Well, if you have to pause, let me know. I certainly can't go downstairs for water. I'm not, you know, that strong. No. Well, at least I mean, it sounds like you're in better shape than you were yesterday. What have you been watching on TV? Well, I've been sick. Yes. Well, it's time for Brian's movie corner. Brian's movie corner. You mentioned this last week. There's a documentary on Netflix called Fugitive the Curious Case of Carlos Gon. And have you watched it yet? No, I skimmed it a bit because I was trying to see if they talked about the leaf in his history. Okay. Sadly, there's no real information about electric cars, but it was a nice refresher in who Carlos Gon is. I'd kind of forgotten what a superstar he was in the automotive world. He was originally the CEO of Renault, like 20 years ago or something. Turned around, renew. And then he became the CEO of Nissan at the same time. Turned around Nissan? They were heading into bankruptcy as well, that he made both companies very profitable. And then he got arrested for allegedly embezzling funds from Nissan and then very famously, escaped the country in a giant case on a private jet. He literally snuck out of the country after he was released on bail. So. Yeah, it's a pretty good dock. It was interesting. Yeah. Unfortunately, there was really nothing about electric cars. He was one of the proponents of the original Nissan Leaf. So maybe they're lagging in electric cars because he's no longer there. I'm not sure. You know, in the documentary. Well, first of all, there was a documentary. Who killed the electric car? This is about the EV One program. The first attempted car company making EVs. Yes. General Motors EV. One like 99 2000 in that area. Then they destroyed them all. They didn't let anyone buy them. Legendary. And that was a good documentary. And then there was the revenge electric car, which came at the point where Tesla was getting launched and starting to get the S off the ground. Their first mass produced car, I believe. And there was Carlos talking to Elon at the auto show and they were kind of awkward. It was very cool encounter because it was awkward to Egomaniacs who didn't want to give anything away. Carlos had said at that time that we're doing this just to hedge our bets. If Latter Eagles take off, we'll be prepared. But he didn't really get behind them. He didn't make them compelling enough. He basically looked at the car for the first time without approving it. He just looked at it at the auto show. Oh. This is what it looks like. Okay. And it was not a great looking car. It was divisive. I don't hate it. There's a lot of you know, it's iconic in a way because it's designed with big buggy headlights to deflect the wind so that you don't hear them on the mirrors because you would in an electric car because they're so quiet. And then who else was there with Chevrolet? There was what's his name? With GM. The cigar smoking what's his name? I can't remember. Bob Lutz, the legendary Bob Lutz, who always said that EVs would fail and the Tesla would fail. But then he was the guy sort of behind the Volt, which was coming out. So there were three things. There was a trifecta, this is history now. This used to be just my daily life, but it was the Volt with a V, which was a plugin hybrid. Essentially. It was an EV with a backup engine. And then there was Tesla getting off the ground. This was all happening in 2010, and this is when this documentary was made. And the first model years were eleven. By the way, there is a Cadillac ELR, I think it's called, for sale in Vagina, which was based on the Volt platform. They only made a couple thousand of these things, so they're kind of rare. But it's a really good kind of plug in hybrid Cadillac with all the luxurious Cadillac. What's it going for? I'm not sure. It was still kind of incoming. I saw a little thing on the web. But anyway, so Carlos Gon, a controversial figure, and there's no particular conclusion in the documentary because he managed to escape Japan and go to Lebanon, where he is originally from. And he has, I guess, not been extradited or anything, so he's never gone on trial. So no one really knows what the full story is. But there was another executive at Nissan that was sentenced to, for helping to COVID up his salary. They were trying to keep his salary quiet because it was quite high. So somebody at Nissan did do time for that. And then the pilot, like the guy who was like a US special forces guy who got him out of the country, he ended up doing a couple of years of time. I hope it was worth it, buddy. Yeah, I hope it was worth it. I don't know. I mean, I assume he was well paid. Carlos has got a lot of money. When you're that rich, you're going to throw it to millions really quickly. Just take them, just get into freedom. Quite clear on why he ended up back in Japan and in jail when Carlos Gonz has managed to not go back. Well, I think the pilot, he probably had a business there. He probably had a relationship with Japan if he was able to. I mean he could be, but he was an American. But they didn't really explain that. But yeah, so they made the point a couple of times that in Japan the conviction rate is 99%. Wow. If you are arrested in Japan, there is a 99% chance that you will be convicted. So the documentary sort of implies that there's something kind of hinky with the Japanese justice system. Well, that's why you flee. You don't wait for your trial and that's why you flee. Basically the charge is the yes. Like as soon as you're arrested, it's game over. And Carlos Gon, in an interview after he got out, he barely did 150 days in solitary confinement when they first arrested him, what he says were inhumane conditions. No butler. It's inhumane. No butler. But, like, his hands were cuffed in solitary confinement for, like, 150 days. Yeah, I probably would have done the same thing. Guilty or not guilty? Yes. He felt like he wasn't going to get a fair trial and very luckily managed to escape. So he was in a case that they said was an instrument case. They pretended that they were musicians and it was a big square case, but they said it was some type of an instrument and it couldn't go through the scanner because it was sensitively tuned, like it had just been tuned or something. And you can't put it through the scanner. I can just picture them putting it through the scanner and seeing the Carlos Scone in there, all curled up. All curled up. So? Yeah. I don't know. It's only about 90 minutes. It's an interesting little dog. Well, he is guilty, Brian. I've looked at the evidence and it seemed pretty over. Pretty compelling case. I don't know what the punishment would have been for him, but why was he in solitary confinement? I don't understand that if he was, but also, why would he need to embezzle money? Like, his salary was nine, he was making €9 million a year. Why would he need to embezzle money? I don't know. Maybe a gambling dance. Maybe he was paying for the Leaf program. I don't know. Who does? I don't know. Well, let's get out of the show. Cop 27, wrapped up in Egypt, and that's been a mixed bag of stuff for them. I'm not going to talk about it too much, but what did you think about how that went? Well, it's how these things usually go is that there's lots of optimism and then it's ultimately a compromise. There's always a compromise at the end of it, because this is a UN climate summit with hundreds of countries and getting everybody to agree. I don't know, sounds like it was not the best, but also not the worst. I see this as a very crucial time because there's a lot of fossil fuel bad things going on. They're trying to claw at what they can to make as much money as they can, and they would be happy to throw the climate down and our targets with it. So Bloomberg had a story on it. They said the United Nations climate summit just barely avoided ending in a deadlock. They went into extra a day or so afterwards. And the final compromise left big doubts over the prospect for new efforts to curb emissions. I quote, despite attempts by big powers like the United States, India and the European Union, the agreement failed to raise ambitions on reducing emissions. That could mean the world misses the one five degree Celsius warming target that enshrined the 2015 Paris agreement calls to phase out all fossil fuels, not just coal. Which is all they could come up with. They couldn't touch fossil fuels and to peak global emissions by 2025, which is likely to happen anyway according to the IEA. We're shot down by many nations who export oil, and I'm proud to say we have a bad record, Canada on this, but we didn't oppose it. Even though we are a big oil exporter. I'm sure it had a different government been in power. That would have been the case, probably. So while the phase down of all fossil fuels didn't make it to the final text, momentum grew around the idea that wasn't even in the cars before the summit. As many as 80 countries now support it. So we're moving towards banning fossil fuels, basically. We're getting closer to that. There was like a damage fund as well, right? That was a big part. I agreed to put in money to a fund for the countries most affected by climate change. Yeah. And that's all I'll talk about on that. But we'll update some more stories as we go. Here what's happening with $250,000,000 in Canada, right? Yeah. So I think we mentioned this before. There's a few more details. So there is a Greener Homes grant here in Canada that I've applied for, and they have now expanded the program with another component to it, which is to switch people from heating oil to a heat pump. So there's an extra $250,000,000 now in Canada. It's a separate stream in the Greener Homes grant, and it won't technically be available until early 2023. But this is mostly for people in Atlantic Canada, where heating oil is apparently a fairly common thing, rural properties, and everybody gets heating oil delivered. It's not a thing around here at all. We don't have this here. No, even though we have lots of rural properties. We have natural gas. We have the government who did that. Right. We have a government utility. That's kind of why we have government utilities here. But if you're in a rural property, I think it's mostly propane here. You can get your propane tank filled up. But anyway, this is up to $5,000. It's only for middle and lower income Canadians. And the twist on this, too, is you can get the money upfront, usually with this program. Wow. You apply and you spend all the money and then you get a reimbursement. But just because it's meant for middle income and lower income Canadians, you can actually get the money up to $5,000 upfront to switch you. And the potential is to save, like, according to them, as much as $4,700 a year on your heating costs. So what would a heat pump cost? Have you done any looking into it for your own house? As much as like 2025 grand. But I think for a heat pump, it depends. We need, of course, these super frigid cold heat pumps. I think in Atlantic Canada it's not as cold, and hopefully it wouldn't cost as much, maybe 10,000 or $15,000. But yeah, you get the money up front. And I checked in on the this is sort of similar and in line with what's happening in America with the biden. What's that called? The IRA. The Era. The IRA. The inflation Reduction act that starts on January 1, 2023. If you want to get a rebate on your heat pump in the US. It's anything installed after January 1 so you can get after the factory bait for yourself. Not going from an oil furnace. Right? Yeah, I'm going to go through the normal program, and I think I'll get up to 5000 as well for myself. It's too bad, though, because that would be hard for somebody low middle to finance ten grand if they weren't pressing. Yeah, and I guess that's why this program is that way. In Atlantic Canada, rural properties are probably fairly inexpensive, so you can have lower income people that own houses and they're going to be in trouble. But yeah, you can get the money upfront, which is very cool. And yeah, very much in line with what's happening in the US with the Inflation Reduction Act. So I encourage everybody to check your local jurisdiction, your local state, your local province to see what rebates are available. And things are really going to get rolling in 2023. So basically, they're starting with the biggest bang for the buck is so the biggest savings would be for people with oil furnaces, so they would be most compelled to make that switch. Right. And heating oil is one of the things that's really gone up in price with the recent inflation that we've been having. I was doing some research on this this morning, and I said that heating oil heats up twice as fast as you get more bang for your BTU, basically that it really heats up fast anyway, but probably causes more pollution than natural gas. Yes, natural gas is relatively clean as far as fossil fuels go, although there's a lot of methane in there. The new priest finally was announced on Wednesday in Tokyo and in the La auto Show, and there's been lots of speculation about it, so I've been kind of curious. Ultimately, though, there are actually Prius fans out there who are saying, wow, it's great, look at this. And what do you think? I've got a picture of it up. Well, I love the styling. Like the design road that Toyota has been going down the last few years, I just do not like. And they reached a kind of an apex with that excessively angular design of the Prius. So I think they had kind of no choice but to go in the opposite direction. But it almost looks to me like they designed it to be an EV. Like, EVs are often designed for aerodynamics. That's right. That's right. Yeah, they did. They cut down the roof line for that very reason, because there was no other way to gain efficiency. So it's just a huge shame it's not a full EV, because it looks like it could be. It looks a lot like the original Hyundai Ionic, which was a very aerodynamic shape. So I love the direction they're going. This is a huge improvement in terms of the style, I think, of the Prius. But just a shame it's not fully electric. It just feels like that would have been the correct move on it. Yeah. Obviously, you refresh the models every few years and it's totally time for a full EV refresh. And that's not what this is. Now, some people make the argument that at the moment in time that we're in right now, that a plug in hybrid, which there's a version of that right? There's a plug in version of the Prius. Some people think they all plug in. They don't. They're basically just a hybrid power train, which utilizes an electric motor to be more efficient. But it's all gas during the energy. So the plug in version has gone up in range from pretty significantly. Basically, the energy density of the batteries have gone up. It's taking up the same space to go from, I think it was, 40 range, which is a lot more usable. And in Canada, we would get the full $5,000 off. So that means you've heard it here first, because no one else has said this. The plugin. Prius prime PSE e v will be cheaper than the normal prius So why would anyone buy a Prius rebate? This is the situation that was like that in California when the Prius Prime first, there was no point. I mean, even if you don't care about plugging it in, why would you buy it? Because you have to resell it. You have to have a residual value. You might as well have the one that costs more. So it makes no sense for them to sell anything but the Prius Prime in Canada, and they also went with more horsepower, which I thought was a bit weird. Yeah, they really bumped up the horsepower. Finally, after 20 years of being mocked by truckers, by bumper stickers on truckers. Yeah. So it's quite a lot faster now. But of course, that cuts into the miles per gallon a little bit, but not too bad. Yes. Overall, though, I think it could be more efficient than it is. But the zero to 60 is a lot faster. Way faster. Yeah, that's fun. But here's my big problem with it, and that is that it sits lower. And then my wife has a Prius if you're new to the show. And that's her work car that she has to have inspected constantly because it's used for work. She takes social work clients around in it. They're not going to even talk about pricing or announcing it until sometime in the first half of next year as far as the prime is concerned. So that doesn't do me I need a car now. Brian should go buy that. Buy that Caddy. Yeah, you should actually look into it. It could be fun. You'll ever may launch ice cream from cow free dairy in a year. This is an update to a previous store because we've been talking about precision fermentation. And here it is, Brian. Here's the headline. You wait for things to happen and then there it is in front of you. Yeah. And the dairy industry likely to be the very first of the animal based products to be severely disrupted. Here's a clip from the robot who reads the Bloomberg stories. The company is working on a process called precision fermentation that uses substances like yeast and fungi to produce milk proteins in a VAT. A product could be available in about a year. If successful, unilever could be the first major food company to create an ice cream made from cow free dairy, dubbed lab grown milk. In a burgeoning industry dominated by smaller startups, a consumer giant like Unilever developing a precision fermentation version of one of its major brands raises hopes that the technology can scale up and be cost effective. The idea is that it's going to be cheaper and then also cleaner. Much cleaner. Yeah. I think a version of this ice cream already exists because there was a picture of Tony Siba eating some of it in that last YouTube video that he put up. So I think this does exist, but it's probably kind of expensive and only in health food stores. Whereas Unilever would make it a mass market product. It would probably be quite expensive. Yeah. So right now, the ideas he says by 2030 that the proteins in milk is going to be replaced by fake stuff, precision fermentation, and it's going to be cheaper and dairy is going to go bankrupt. And this is the first sign of that happening. They're doing it. Maybe they'll advertise it as an expensive but greener option, I'm guessing. At first, yeah. And more expensive at first, but I think eventually, ultimately cheaper. And unlike beyond meat, there really will not be a difference. It will be identical. It'll be very identical. Yeah. Because you're mostly tasting the fat and the sugar. The milk protein is a minor part. I think most of it is water. It's 10%. That's not water.   That's the part you replace. The others are fats and sugars, which are easily replaced, obviously. Yeah. Anyway, speaking of Japanese automakers, Mazda looks like it could be, and I'm not convinced of this, but it could be doing something significant. They could be the first of the Japanese automakers to actually set a target. That is reasonable. Mazda is raising its EV sales target to 40% by 2030 and they're investing $11 billion to accelerate this transition. Sounds like they got the memo. Yeah, well, we were making fun of them for their MX 30, which is. A very low range electric car. They are down to selling, like, only a handful of them. So they've been a real laggard. And so this is their first step up to the plate. I mean, it's not maybe what it should be, but it sounds like they're getting the idea. Right. That's something. It's probably too late. I don't want to be a naysayer, but at least they have a target. Hopefully they survive. Brian 505. I've sold more brownies at bake sales than they have in these cars. It's 100 miles of range, 160 range, which is in today's market, no good unless it's a cheap car. But it's 33,000 us. Yeah, that's a lot of money. You expect something for that. I mean, you can get a Leaf, you can get a Chevy Bolt that does way more mileage than that and probably is a more capable car. Yeah, for maybe only slightly more money. And they even said this EV has been sold out, so you can't find one. So there was a demand there. There's going to be some Mazda fans who want to go EV. But anyway, this is a story about VW maybe delaying their EV plans. Like, VW was maybe one of the great hopes of the EV transition. And now the CEO's been replaced, right? Yeah. As we reported, they're on track to deliver 500,000 EVs this year, which is a significant amount. That's way ahead of everybody else except for Tesla. Herbert Dies was their CEO that put all this in motion. He really had a radical vision for VW and really felt like it had to be a radical remaking of the company or, you know, they were going to run into problems. And so yeah, so he started a lot of ambitious programs that have gotten them to 5000 EVs a year, which is significant. But he was sort of moved out recently as CEO, and the new CEO is definitely scaling back these plans to be much less ambitious. I don't like that. No, I think Herbert Dees was on the right track. And you what, like with Mazda? So Mazda wants to sell 40% EVs by 2030, but that means there's going to be people to buy the 60% of EVs that are gas in 2030. No, it doesn't work that way. Doesn't work that way. When EVs are available, people are not going to want the gas cars. So I don't know. The new CEO of VW seems to be betting that such things are possible. And every car commercial on television is electric. Can you buy the cars? Not so much. Not so much. But for some reason, we're in this weird time where, yeah, all the car companies are vying to look like. Then there's Toyota, who says, we're electrified. That's enough. Right? Electrified. So, VW, they've got the second generation platform that they were planning to come out in 2026. They call this their trinity. EV. And now it's going to be more like 2030. Under the new CEO, 26 might have been difficult to actually achieve, but if you're moving the goal post down to 2030, even 2030 may not be moving it up to 2024. And hey, you may not make the deadline, but the commission should be moving up anyway. So that's a three year delay, basically. Or worse. Let's hope not. And that's no good. We can't deal with that. And it was already a kind of a target that wasn't even as gracious as it should be. They've got a lot. It takes a lot to turn a giant ship like VW around. I don't know. They're the best at it. The biggest car company in the world are the best at it. They are manufacturing in and out well. They do really well to get up to 5000. That's impressive. I think what they're not getting is what you said, that once the pendulum sort of swings towards EVs and that the weight starts to get on the teeter totter on the EV side, look out, it's not going anywhere else. It's going to chip way over and then you're going to be caught with your pants down. So who's going to be able to provide those cars? Hopefully? Well, Tesla, you and I are already at the point where we would never in a million years consider buying another gasoline car. But we're still kind of the outliers. But every year the percentage of people who won't consider a gas car just goes up. Yeah, and it is regular people are considering EVs. And there's people around here with pickup trucks. I'm reading about them all the time. Their neighbors are, their business associates are, their clients are. This becomes normalized very quickly now. It's really going to pick up. Yeah. So, moving on to Tokyo, the governor of Tokyo, this is Eureka Koiki, has suggested everybody wear turtlenecks to help reduce their energy bills. Okay. It's sort of a funny thing and a fun thing to make a joke about off the top of the show, but I'm in favor of this. There's an energy crisis going on. Everybody's going to be struggling to make enough power, make enough heat. Can I make a turtleneck work? I mean, not everybody can. Yeah, I don't think I own any turtlenecks, but everybody. The idea is that dress warm and you can save money on your electricity bills, which are going up in Tokyo, just like they're kind of tending to go up everywhere is in my neck. That's the coldest thing, though. I mean, really. Well, the idea is here's the quote, warming the neck has a thermal effect. I'm wearing a turtleneck myself. And wearing a scarf also keeps you warm. This will save electricity. This is what the governor of Tokyo said around the house is true. He wants people around their tiny little Tokyo apartments to wear a scarf. I mean, it sounds radical, but why not? We have a problem here. I don't know what it's like in other places, but we often have this problem in North America where like, office buildings particularly often have very poor heating or cooling that can't be controlled very well. So there's often a problem around here where people have to wear sweaters in the summer because the air conditioning is ranked too high and nobody can seem to turn it down. Or I've actually heard of people who have electric space heaters under their roof. Yeah, I've seen that it's really bad in the summer. I've seen that it's too cold because the air conditioning is too high. That's not good. Yeah, so you're overusing the air conditioning and then some poor employee has to use UTC heater to sort of gain back the energy. So I think this in many ways, used to be like a common sense thing where people just dressed warmer in the winter because it was kind of common sense. But then you go to work in an office building where the heat is all wonky, so maybe it's too hot in your office in the wintertime and then you just end up wearing a Tshirt instead in the winter. It's all messed up. I wear fleeces and sweaters inside the house now, but that's because I'm getting old, right? Yeah. I'm still turning up the temperature tin more than it should be. And then I'm also wearing those things. That's not good. I do the same thing. Yeah, it's not good at all. I can't laugh, by the way. Otherwise I'll go into a coffee and fits. I don't sound anything funny. Well, Brian, as you know, the World Cup has started. And I know you don't have world cup fever, but I do. Is that what you're suffering from? Sure. I took a title for my World Cup fever this morning. Argentina lost to Saudi Arabia and the biggest upset in World Cup history. Some people say, wow, I'm sorry, Argentina, if you're listening. In fact, this is probably way too soon for me to even bring it up, but I apologize anyway. Of course, all the coverage, it's been announced like ten years ago that they were getting this. So a Qatar, which is a small nation state with oil, was accused of using their oil money to spend on the World Cup and bribe. And there's been some people who've actually been, you know, charges and so forth. There's a new Netflix documentary. I won't make you watch it, but it's there. OK on FIFA. This is a tiny Middle Eastern autocracy with a population of barely 3 million people. How do they get the world's biggest sporting event? You know, like, this is by far the world's biggest sporting event. It happens only every four years, but the temperatures there in the summer are 50 degrees Celsius or 122 Fahrenheit. And that's when the World Cup you normally played during that time and I, as you know, was in Death Valley when it was that temperature. And I could only get out of my healthier, man then, and I could only get out of my car for ten minutes at a time. My kids could do 1213. But then you're like facing the Grim Reaper. He starts to encroach on your area, looking for you, to kill you, because you can't play soccer in that, I guess. They spent $200 billion of their petrol money on this games. They've built eight stadiums. One of them I'll talk about in a minute. That's a little bit different than the other ones. It's recyclable, we'll just put it that way. But yeah, they've got air conditioning. The temperature is only 24 degrees with like 64% humidity. These games have been checking on them. So, yeah, it's perfectly reasonable for soccer. But I read you a bit from the Atlantic here. It says Qatar might now be home to about 3 million people, but the proportion of actual Qatari citizens who lived there is a little more than 10%. So there's hardly any. The rest compromised some very rich expatriates of other nations and a huge army of poor migrants up to 6000. And some may have died, by the way. This is a whole separate issue which is not part of our show. But my God. My point is that this is the pinnacle of oil decadence. And to think that thousands of lives were not cared about and lost from other countries to make this destruction of everything and we'll never have this again. This is peak oil. I don't think we'll see crap like this ever again. This is the moment in time where it's all going to fall apart. They did not have any infrastructure, they're not a sporting nation, they didn't have a fan base, they had nothing. But they were very rich with their oil money. But Brian, their new money, they haven't had this money for very long at all. Guitar has had huge reserves of natural gas, which was discovered, I think, quite a while ago, maybe the by Shell, but they just left it there because they couldn't do anything with it. They had all this natural gas and nowhere to get it anywhere. So in the was this coup, I think the leader of the country, the King or whatever the term they use for it, left to go on vacation to England and his son took over. Which is why if I'm ever in that situation, I'm never leaving because my son would take over in a second. He was just sorry, Dan. But he did a good thing for the country in a way, because he invested in liquefied natural gas tank so that it could be transported on a ship. So when you cool it natural gas. It's like transporting oil on a tanker. But it's ridiculous how much -165 degrees celsius or something like that they are now the third richest country in the world. And they learned how to extract natural gas from the ground much more cheaply. So even after they cool it and put it on a ship, a tanker full of natural gas is four times cheaper from Qatar than if it originated in the United States through their normal channels. That's why they are so rich, is because their gas is cheap, even though they have to do that. So they started a sovereign wealth fund, though this is the shocking part that I didn't know about. Even though they blew 200 billion on these Games to make them a respectable country, which is not working out, by the way, because all we're doing is talking about how crappy they are, the LGBTQ rights and everything like that, and the fact that they can't serve beer at the games. And they yanked that privilege two days before. So they started a sovereign wealth fund like Norway did, and they have $300 billion in it because they saw the writing on the wall. They knew that our Canadian jurisdictions here who have oil in the provinces don't think that way at all. They think spend, spend oil forever. But when you had something they didn't always used to have this. So they've only had it since the 90s. So in that short time, they've got a 300 billion dollar sovereign wealth fund and they're building up infrastructure. Part of the game spending is that to make it for an investment possible. And I don't know that that's going to work, especially with their human rights problems, that a whole lot of people are going to go there, but they are planning for the end of oil by diversifying their investments around the world. So, yeah, that fund is going to do all kinds of things around the world. So there's been of course, it's supposed to be a carbon neutral World Cup. And it's a joke. It's a bloody joke. Here's a clip from Bloomberg. Organizers estimate that the World Cup will emit three six megatons of carbon dioxide. International flights in and out of Doha will account for the majority of emissions. However, organizers argue that this World Cup will be more energy efficient than others, since fans won't have to fly to different venues and can instead just take public transit. The sticking point is always the flights. Most Olympics and World Cups, it accounts to more than 85% of total emissions. So that surprised me. I guess it makes perfect sense when you hear it, but it's not the building of these eight giant stadiums and you know, all the infrastructure around it, it's the flights and during the actual Games. And it's the same with the Olympics. It's a very carbon intense thing when all these people do that. Yeah, when you got to travel so many people around the world, that's what you do, you fly. Now, the game today was in stadium nine seven four, which is built with shipping containers it's not entirely shipping containers. It's like steel girders and shipping containers. But the 400 seat stadium can be disassembled and rebuilt elsewhere. So this is the world's first tear down build a back stadium, supposedly, and apparently, if everything goes on shipping containers, it can be shipped anywhere. Yes. So this will be available for my Ikea soon. Quite the price, but yes, it was designed by a French architectural firm. Other things they're trying to do is they have built solar farms to offset the emissions from the games. They're using electric buses, an electric mass transit. So that's good. They're not burning their own product, and they are supposedly buying carbon offsets, but they're way behind on that. Brian yeah. So Domino's Pizza has announced, and this sort of falls into that category of story that we're going to have to stop reporting soon, because this is just going to be business as usual very soon and maybe is already. But Domino's Pizza in the US. Has ordered 800 Chevy bolts, and they're kind of custom painted with the Domino's logo and everything. And they've got about 100 of them so far. And these are going out to Domino's Pizza locations in the US. So they will eventually have 800 fully electric delivery vehicles for the fleet of pizza delivery vehicles. And of course, they're doing this because it just makes sense. And the bolt is not a particularly expensive car. So imagine all the money they'll save on gas. This is just the EV calculation that every business in the world is going to be making when it comes to fleet vehicles. I wish on your Domino's app, if you could select an EV to have it delivered like you can on other apps for a ride sharing, that would be nice. Do you ever eat domino's? Never. I would think he would hate Domino's. That would be an anti Brian pizza right there. No, when we have excellent pizza to choose from in our city, I don't see a reason to use donald okay, well, I agree. The pizza shows up in advance a lot of times where people have some there. Okay, so Joe Biden has promised $13 billion for the US. Power grid. So this is part of the green spending from the US. And as we talk about frequently on the show, the grid all over the world is going to need some upgrades. And so this is a decent amount of money, $13 billion to upgrade the grid. And as we go greener in the next couple of decades, it's important to get the foundation correct first before we do that. So this is a nice, like, really forward looking thing. I think that the US government is doing $13 billion available to do grid upgrades around the country. So I think that's great. It is subsidizing what they could probably do themselves, though. How do you feel about that? Yeah, well, I mean, it's a weird thing about all of this spending. Right. Because companies like Tesla don't even need subsidies, really. Their cars are profitable already and yet they're going to benefit from these subsidies. So it's always a bit weird and taxing fossil fuels. A carbon tax, it would probably have been the better way to go with all of this. But however it gets done, there are certain things politically that are difficult to do. Like a carbon tax. Yes. It wouldn't necessarily be my first choice for how to deal with it, but at least they're dealing with it. Let's dip into the mailbag. Brian. This is a message from Nick. Hello, Brian and James. I live in New England, and recently got a 2022 Ford Mac E. That is an electric vehicle, small crossover. Right. My battery life, as he calls it, was originally at 230 miles. He means range. So the range of that car when he first got it was 230 miles or 370 colder out. It is 170 miles and 274. So it's a lot. About 100, roughly of range. So I know about range decreasing in colder weather. My question is, does the range come back when the weather gets warmer? With the cost of new EVs, a range of 170 miles is not acceptable. Fan of the show since day one. Thanks. Wow. Thanks. How many episodes? 140. Congratulations, Nick. Thank you for sticking with us. So, yes, I would be bold. Enough to say that I think, James, you and I are the two leading experts in the world on EVs and cold weather. Yes. You've come to the right place, Nick, because Alaska has nothing on us. We're in the Southern Canadian prairies where it gets to -40 and it has recently not this year, but it has and -40 celsius is the same as -40 fahrenheit that's where the two scales cross over. Yeah, it does get that cold here. So I don't know everything about how the mach e battery meter works, but yeah, usually the range on any car is calculated on your recent trips. So if your recent trips have been in the cold then your car is going to be smart enough to figure, okay, well, the next trip is going to be so I assume that range will come back in the summer. Of course it will. But in a way, Brian, this is a stupid question for us, to us, for people like us. But that concerns me that the people buying EVs, really, that there are things that this would be scary to somebody nick's, obviously an EV enthusiast, but a regular person who doesn't care, who just goes out and buys their next car, might be very concerned about this if they don't know about it. That's right. You're going to look at the range thing. Now, the one thing I can recommend is I don't know if you can do this in your car, but in a Tesla you can change the battery to percentage rather than miles. Or kilometers. So when I first bought my car, it would give me the range in kilometers and started around 400 km. But then you tend to get obsessed about that range and every time you plug it in, it's like, oh, it's 5 km less than it was last time I charged it. So I just switched it to percentage. And so then you don't end up obsessing about that mileage. But then if you're going on a trip, you use the trip calculator. And the trip calculator will tell you in a Tesla that gives you a graph that says, okay, you'll get at your destination and your battery will be 20%. And that's what you monitor. And sometimes it's a little bit off in a Tesla. Now these days, about 5% error. Is that's pretty good though? Actually for this they are getting better. It used to be about a 10% error where it would tell you, oh, your battery will be 20% at your destination and then you'd get there and it would be more like 10%. Yeah, is way worse though. So we're slowing down that's one tip. Yeah, it's switching it to percentage and not worrying about it. Now when you get to the summer and it is not giving you the same range, it is always possible that your battery has cells that have deteriorated or something. So it is something you have to keep an eye on, but presumably that will come back. Yeah. And the way we do it on the Leaf is you put in the little data reader you buy on Amazon. It's a bluetooth device. For $20. It hooks up to an app for your car that's made by a third party. Mine is called Leaf Spy. Tesla is a little different because they have a different connector. I don't know how you guys do it or even if you need to, but there would be if you got into this, you can see how your battery is doing and know the state of health of it, but this means nothing. Okay, so let's say you lived in Hawaii where it's the same temperature every day. If you drove like a mad person for a day or two, it would show that you have a lesser battery, right. Because you're driving with a heavy lead foot. But if you're driving like a nun, then you're going very slow and gentle and that's going to show a higher range. It's not really showing what your battery is capable of, it's just what it's capable of based on your recent driving. And that is a weird concept to get around to people. And also I mentioned too, it is typical for batteries to lose range like battery degradation. And the typical formula seems to be you are going to lose about 5% of your battery in the first couple of years and then it kind of slows out. So I assume my battery has lost about 5% of its capacity but I don't know exactly how I would confirm that. Yeah, and it's not something you should obsess about. You should know that when you buy the evidence, buy bigger than you think you need, and then you don't worry about that. Right. That's always a good thing. But there's lots we can talk about here very quickly. Okay. Now, the first thing is that in winter, a gas car loses range. You just don't notice it. You're not thinking about that. Right. There's many factors. There is the dense winter air, so your aerodynamics are off. This affects EVs a little bit more because they're more efficient. And they're also usually more dependent on the aerodynamics of the vehicle for efficiency. So if you put winter tires on, that's going to be less efficient, for sure. That could lose you 10%. It could lose even more depending on what your tires there's the snow on the ground or ice on the ground. The fact that it's just not a smooth, rolling surface. It's like if you're pedaling a bike through snow, it's going to be harder to pedal that bike. There are different factors like that the battery becomes less strong in cold weather. When the battery is cold, it's chemically not capable of holding as much of a charge. It can't hold as much of a charge, the battery, in colder weather. And don't forget that you're using your battery to heat your cabin. That is a lot of heat. Even if it's a heat pump, even if it's just not that cold, but a little bit cold, you're still using a lot of energy. In fact, it's different in every car. Your car is a PTC heater. Mine is, too. So it's just like a toaster. It's like red hot elements heating up. That's the least efficient. And then the heat pumps. Sometimes there's both a heat pump and a PTC heater. Sometimes there's just a heat pump that uses less energy, but it's still using energy. Brian yeah. When I checked in, the Mustang Machoe does not have a heat pump heater. So it has a normal oh, really? Heater, which is not as energy efficient. So you're definitely going to lose range with that. Yeah, you're definitely going to use range. Unless you're using it to make these long trips on the highway, then that's when the only time you really need to concern yourself. Unless you have a long commute, for the most part. If you can charge every night at home, just don't think about it. Nick. Don't think about it. Enjoy your fast heating car and your efficiency and how wonderful it is. And, you know, keep us up to date, too, as you drive it through the winter, because we're not in the worst part of winter yet. Drop us a line again and how you like the car and how it made it through the winter. Yeah. And it's really only on road trips that you ever need to think About It. If you're just driving around the city like you said, you charge at home, you're always going to have enough. With Tesla, they spaced the superchargers about 150 km apart. Roughly. It varies a bit. So that's about 100 miles apart. If you're going to go nick on a road trip. You want to make sure that there is a charging station. Roughly every 100 miles and you should be fine like around here when it does get -40 I don't think it's going to get to -40 where nick is so he's probably not going to have to worry about it. But they based on about right. So mine. I've got the standard range. Tesla model. Three and it can just barely make it between chargers when it's -40. If it's only -20. -15 celsius. I mean it's not constantly -40 but we call that the worst case scenario around here. Okay. EV drivers call that you want to be prepared for the worst case scenario. We've gone years without it getting that cold. Yeah. And then the last couple of years, it's gotten a few days. That cold. So you want to be prepared for those days. And it's usually only that cold overnight. But last winter, and this was covered on the podcast, I drove up to Saskatoon and The Daytime Temperatures was -36 Celsius, which is about -32 Fahrenheit daytime Temperatures. This was at Noon, and that's what I had to drive through and just kind of barely made it in my Standard Range car. Yeah. So that's an issue. And another thing to keep in mind is if you are doing highway trips so that in winter it charges slower, the battery can't take the charge as fast because it's like regenerative braking too. You can't put your brakes back into the battery pack as well when it's cold. No, that's kind of the biggest thing for me because summer road trips, I'm only spending about 20 minutes at the charger. But the winter road trips in these cold conditions, it's more like you're spending an hour at the charger. And at that point, it gets annoying. And I'm at the point now where if this winter, I have to drive up to Saskatoon and it's -40, I'm going to take a gas car because I just don't want that. I have to wait an hour at the charging station. The worst case scenario in the worst place in the world is what we're talking about. And we tell people around here that you could lose up to 50%. It varies from car to car. I've heard somebody talking to about 17% in his ionic five when it wasn't too cold. Okay, but that's, like, the worst worst case scenario. Now, if you're driving around the city and you do 60 miles in a day, at the very worst, and you have 170 miles, who cares? You plug in at night, it's going to charge the same way as it always does. If. You're on the highway and it takes you a half hour to charge, it might take you an hour to charge. And that's a major change, too, in habits to be aware of. Yeah. And of course, electric cars, they're not as efficient on the highway as they are in the city. Higher speeds are tougher for electric cars. You drain the battery a lot faster. And I really wish that when they publicized the range for electric cars, that they did a highway figure and a city figure. I think that's the way it should be done. But they don't do that. They pick a number kind of somewhere in between the two. Yeah, but you'll get used to this, Nick. There's a lot of weird little things that people fret about when they try something new. I did it. Brian did it. It's normal. We EV owners tend to think too much, but just enjoy the car. You'll get used to it. And tell your friends about it. Time for the lightning round of fast paced look at the rest of the news. And Brian, we've overstayed her welcome, which is good because I don't have a lot of stories. This week. Rivian starts international deliveries of the R one T, rather, and the R one S in Canada. So you've seen one here, right? Yeah. It must have been an American one that drove up over the border, because I saw one on the road. But yeah, officially, deliveries of the Ribbean just started in Canada. Now, post the IRA, the inflation reduction at next era expects wind with storage will cost $14 per megawatt hour United States later this decade. This is only because this act was passed. And solar with batteries, $17 per mega, 1 hour. This is down because of this act. This is how much the IRA is going to affect everything and speed things up, if I may say. Yeah, for sure. This is a Brian story. I can't believe you didn't see this one, Brian. There's a induction oven maker who has added a battery to their stoves. Lithium battery. This is because, I guess some of these induction stoves use a lot of draw, right? Yeah. And some places aren't wired for it. And you'd have to get an extra panel if your panels full. So they've solved that problem. Interestingly with putting a battery in a stove. That makes a lot of sense. Yeah. So the big draw when you need it comes from the batteries. Well, we talked about this before in terms of heat pump, water heaters, because that's a similar problem with those, because you tend to need a few thousand watts to run those, I think up to 7000 watts to run an induction cooktop. So that's a lot of juice. It's one of the reasons I did a panel upgrade on my house. But it cost a few thousand dollars to go from 100 amp to 200 amp. So I guess the idea is you can charge up this battery and so it can draw more power. You can sort of just plug it into in a regular outlet, as it was, but with the battery have much bigger output. Right. So that solves that problem. But it's just weird, that sort of appliance with a battery in it. And I imagine it adds to the price, but it's cheaper than maybe rewiring your house, if you want to do that. So I thought I thought it was quite interesting BYD the Chinese, mostly EV maker and bus maker has sold as 3,000,000th, Bee, V or PHEV. I thought that was an interesting milestone. Some are plug in hybrids, but that's still an impressive number. Oh, it's time for a CS. Past 636 fossil fuel lobbyists were preying on government delegations at Cock.   Oily bastards. That's a lot. Scotland approves a 38 megawatt solar plant next door to a closed nuclear plant. And guess how much the objections were in the community? Zero. No objects were their objections. Will they put up a nuclear plant? Probably. Probably. Some concern solar. Not so harmful, not so scary. A village in the French Alps this is from CNN demolishes its ski lift because there's no snow left. It hasn't snowed in years. lack of snow meant that the last time it ran was about 15 years ago, and just for one weekend. And since then, it has not been. This is sad. Sad. This is why the Winter Olympics will now be held in Qatar with fake snow and perhaps potato flakes. Finally, this week, India is looking to produce its own solar modules to meet all of its demand and then some. That's right. India requires a lot of solar, and they want to make it themselves. You know, it makes sense. Perfectly capable country of ramping up something like this. I'm looking for takers for a $2.4 billion in government aid to offer stimulation to domestic manufacturing of solar equipment. They want to do all of their solar and export all as well. That's great news. That is our time for this week and a bunch more. I apologize to myself more than anything. My body wasn't ready to go long. It was ready to go short this week, and I went long. So see you next week. See you next week. Bye.

Speak English Now Podcast: Learn English | Speak English without grammar.

Transcript: Hello everyone! I am Georgiana, founder of speakenglishpodcast.com. My mission is to help you speak English fluently. This week is a bit special because it is Black Friday and all my courses have a 60% discount. I've received several messages with questions about the courses. In this short episode, I'm gonna try to answer some frequently asked questions. By the way, you can get the deal at: speakenglishpodcast.com/blackfriday Hurry because the offer is only available until this Sunday at 12 p.m.   Let's start with the most frequently asked question:  What is the difference between the podcast and the courses? That's a great question! In the podcast, I discuss very diverse topics that allow you to improve your vocabulary. This is great listening practice.  In each episode of the podcast, I also give a small example of a lesson. This can be a mini-story of questions and answers or a point of view. Because of time limitations, I can barely develop these lessons, yet they allow you to test the method in an easy and fun way. Besides, it is good practice. Instead, the courses are complete programs designed to improve your spoken English dramatically.  In fact, the courses contain hours and hours of questions and answers. Imagine for a moment a podcast episode multiplied by 100.  Also, the courses allow you to work much better on grammar aspects such as the plural, singular, all kinds of verb tenses, and certain common expressions of English. All this is integrated, following one or several stories that offer a rich and entertaining context. For example, the Fluency Course (level II) contains more than 8 hours of audio, thousands of questions and answers (mini-stories), and almost 200 pages of transcription text. Of course, many points of view lessons also allow you to work very deeply on aspects of grammar.One rule I always follow is to create lessons with complex characters and funny stories with unexpected endings. That way, you'll never forget what you learn best, and it's a lot more fun. Another question: Can the courses be used on the iPhone, iPad, Android, and so on? Yes, of course. You can use them without problems. An important thing to keep in mind is that the courses are not apps. That is, you don't install them. It's much more flexible. The courses consist of MP3 audio and text (PDF). This is much simpler and prevents technical problems. Transferring the content to any device is quite easy. However, when you buy one of the courses, I send you instructions with detailed steps to know what to do. In any case, you can contact me by e-mail with any questions.  Is there a monthly payment for the courses? No, there is no such thing. When you buy the courses, they are yours for personal use and forever.  How many courses are there, and what is the difference? There are currently four courses. I will describe them briefly: 1) 30-Day Crash Course (level1): This course is for beginners with no knowledge of English. It is a course that works very well, and I am happy with the result because it helps a lot to start with English. I don't recommend it in your case because if you are a follower of this podcast, you are no longer a beginner.  2) The Fluency Course (level2):  The level of this course is a bit easier than this podcast, but there is almost no difference. This program will help you automate the most common structures when speaking. It consists of 20 units with 20 unique and fun stories. For example, two penguins who escape from the zoo to surf, a person who wants to learn to be a cook but is a disaster, someone who wants to quit smoking and visits a very strange guru, and so on. I recommend this course if you're trying to stop mentally translating when you speak English, even with relatively easy expressions. 3) The Magic Course (level3): This course is very ambitious because it goes one step beyond the Fluency Course. The aim is to practice all the verb tenses in the context of a long and well-developed story. There is a lot of vocabulary, and grammar points are very useful. When you finish this course, you will have an advanced level of English. 4) The Business Course (Job Interview Course): This is the last course created. With this course, you will master the 30 most common questions asked at a job interview, learn specific vocabulary, and when to use it. You will get examples of how to answer the questions.  And the exclusive mini-stories will help you speak English more confidently. Georgiana, what if I don't like them or don't adapt to the courses? That's all right. If, during the first 30 days, you are not convinced by the program, you can request a refund without any problem.  Are there any free samples of the courses? Yes, of course. You can get some samples at: SpeakEnglishPodcast.com/samples Very well, I think I have answered the most frequently asked questions. I hope you found this useful. Remember that you can benefit from the Black Friday promotion at: speakenglishpodcast.com/blackfriday If your goal is to improve fluency, these courses can really help you. I repeat for the last time: speakenglishpodcast.com/blackfriday Only until this Sunday at 12 p.m. All right. That's all for today. I will see you next week for another episode of the podcast. See you soon! Bye! Bye! Get the transcript on my website: SpeakEnglishPodcast.com/podcast  

The Art of Living Big | Subconscious | NLP | Manifestation | Mindset

In todays episode, Betsy shares some tips for dealing with holiday stress and defines what she thinks is going haywire at the holiday time. After you listen, you'll have a new way of thinking about everyone at the table and a new way of protecting your energy… and sanity! Transcript: Hello fellow adventurers. Hi. Welcome … 322: Dealing with holiday stress Read More »

The Clean Energy Show
Fossil Fuel Assets Worthless by 2036; Hydroponic Wheat; Electric Truck Stops

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 56:43


Electric truck stops will need as much power as a small town. Heat pumps mandatory in new homes in Washington State. Indoor hydroponic wheat produces 6 crops per year on the same land. LaGuardia Airport will host a pilot project that uses a flywheel to speed up EV charging. SpaceX buys ads on Twitter. Could Tesla be next? Battery espionage in Canada by China.  Tesla proposes a North American charging standard. Should ICE trucks pay highway tolls? New study could show how batteries can have 20% more life cycles (and therefore lower prices). Half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036. The price of hydrogen at the pump in California has risen 33%. We compare gas and electric alternatives. Tony Seba has our Tweet of the Week: Percision fermentation land area to replace all the cows. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Transcript Hello, and welcome to Episode 139 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, an indoor wheat experiment is a big success. A new crop is harvested six times a year. Wish my hair did that. Heat pumps are now mandatory in new homes in Washington state. Also mandatory cheering for the Seattle Kraken electric truck stops will need more power than a small town. What about the same amount of meth? LaGuardia Airport will host a pilot project that uses a flywheel to speed up EV charging. This partnership makes perfect sense, because if there's one thing LaGuardia is known for, its speed. All that and more on this week's edition of The Clean Energy Show. Welcome, everyone, to what I think is the best podcast on the Internet everywhere. It's objectively true. Objectively true. I think so. Right now, this is a particular moment. And also on this week's show, Brian, we also have stuff about SpaceX. It's buying ads on Twitter because it's CEO bought Twitter. And we wonder if Tesla could be next, because Tesla has never advertised near her SpaceX. So maybe this could break ground for that. We'll see. The first case of battery espionage has been discovered in Canada. Hydrogen pump prices are going up 33% in California, half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036. So keep that in mind when investing today. How are you? I'm good. So just an update on my house. So I applied for the Greener Homes grant here in Canada to do energy upgrades to my house. All right. Hoping to put in an air source heat pump, get rid of my natural gas. And so the first step of that is the blower door test and kind of home energy evaluation. And that all happened today. So that was fun. They put the big blower in the door. They test the air tightness of the house. So they got this doorshaped mass that goes all over the door with a hole for the blower. And the blower only, right? Yeah. And it blows air in or out, I can't remember. And then they could also go around the house with the sort of infrared camera thing and with the blower on, kind of show you where the leaks are in the house. It's wintertime now. It's super cold out. Oh, well, then it will be sucking. It will be sucking it. And the air will be coming in through the window cracks and things like that. Yeah. So did they go around with a smoker? No smoker. Just this infrared thing. Maybe they use a smoker more in the summer. Okay, well, they didn't use a smoker on mine, and they didn't do that on mine. They didn't go around. So what did you find out? Not too much yet. They have to sort of crunch all the numbers because they do a volumetric assessment of the house where they calculate the interior volume of the house. So then they have to go and take the measurements that they got from the blower door, do some calculations, figure it out, and you get kind of like an Energy Star rating for your home. And we did this about ten years ago when we did some upgrades. It was a similar program. So they give you a number, I think it's out of 100 of what your energy efficiency is, and then as you make improvements, you hope to they do the blower door test again when you're all done, and you hope to increase the sort of Energy Star rating of your house. This is mostly for air ceiling, right? Yeah, and we could see that a little bit with the infrared camera. But we will hopefully do some more upgrades. It's the main thing we want to do is the air source heat pump, and we should get the grant for that kind of regardless of what the blower door result is. I told you last week there's a TV series shooting across the street from me, and they were actually outdoors shooting today, so I was worried the blower would they come knock on our door. Because you're a film, you know, the film community. Old man stalked and wanting money to shut down his blowers so we could continue our production, because people do that on the streets. They'll run their muscle cars and have to get paid off get paid off to shut it down because the film crew needs quiet. And I watched The Godfather yesterday, which I hadn't seen in many, many years. Let me guess. Blue Ray, 4k? Exactly. It's this restored version. It's quite cool. They did extensive restoration, but a lot of that movie is ADR. I sort of didn't remember that, but ADR being dialogue replacement, where a lot of the dialogue was replaced in post production. Like, a lot of it, like, way more than half, I think. Wow. So it was a low budget film, more or less, wasn't it? Yeah, I guess that would be the reason. Like, lots of location shooting and lots of extraneous noises. But yeah, that was sort of the surprise on that one for me. Did you just notice it more this time, or what? Yes, I haven't seen it in 2030 years. You were just a child then, really. I mean, you naive. You accepted everything as reality. Yes. I wish I was that. It's a fascinating if you're interested, on the Bluray, and there's these special features about how they had to restore it because the film, when it came out in 72, was just wildly more popular than anybody expected. And whenever that happens, they have to run more prints so that they have to make more prints of the film. So the original negative, even though it's only 50 years old, I ended up getting totally ruined. And the restoration that they had to do was to the point where they were going and taking outtakes they were taking outtakes and cutting them back into the film because certain shots were damaged. And with the approval of the director, you can do that kind of weird thing. Oh, wow. I don't know how I feel about that. You get used to a film that would stand out to you. It shouldn't be in any way that you notice it's like literally like just a shot of somebody walking down the hallway or okay, that's different. It's nothing important. You know, my childhood home has been destroyed. There was an explosion in Regina. That was your childhood home. No, it wasn't, but it was built next to my childhood home. And when I say childhood home, I mean I lived there for three months with great eight. My brother lived there, and I left home in grade eight and went and lived with him and found out he had a girlfriend who became his wife, who eventually became his ex wife. That building, which is a brick, three story apartment building with, I think, you know, twelve suites, and it was, has to be demolished now because the house next door blew out. Well, it was kind of like an apartment building that they were building right when I was living there, I think. And it's like a four suite housing, but nobody was living there. The whole thing blew up, rain off the ground, boom. And the only person who was injured was somebody who didn't live there, who lived somewhere. That window broke. But this is a story. Kids at Natural Gas caused this explosion with solar and wind have never caused an explosion. You know, I had my first clean energy show dream the other night, and it was a paraphrase in the first one. Brian, I was in the backseat of your Tesla. You got out and I was concerned. Did he hit the brake? You got in front of the car and the car ran over you. And I think I was watching Breaking Bad because I'm just now watching Breaking Bad, and there was a scene of a car running over somebody. So the same crunch for Breaking Bad was there, and I didn't think it went well for you. There's another part of the dream. For some reason, I was in this giant mansion with all kinds of celebrities around people, and I was ready to record my end of the podcast. And we couldn't find you. It was just not to be found. Like I said earlier, SpaceX, as a guest, has bought a package to advertise its Starlink Internet service on Twitter. Now, SpaceX has never advertised before. Starlink has never advertised before. Tesla famously does not advertise because its CEO has always said that the car sells itself. Until this point, it continues to do so. But I wonder, Brian, I wonder if either to prop up the company he bought, or could this be the first time that Tesla actually buys advertising on Twitter? Could that happen one of these days. Well, the explanation I heard was that he wanted to test the efficacy of advertising on Twitter. So they also bought ads on, like, Facebook and Instagram at the same time to kind of see how the Twitter kind of advertising scheme works. But it is a sort of demand lever that Tesla could employ. They still have a big backlog of orders, so demand is super strong. But if demand ever starts to slip, once they start producing more and more vehicles, they could start advertising to if the demand ever does start to slip, I guess the first thing they would probably do is lower prices because they've been raising prices because the demand has been too high. The first thing they would do is back off in those price increases and maybe go even a bit further if they had to. I imagine they're going to I mean, they've got three factories around the world which are going to hit their stride pretty soon, right? Or is it more than 03:00 a.m. I counting wrong, I guess technically four, if you count three months. Yeah. And there was an Arranium, what people think is an Iranians report that Tesla was going to sell the Chinese made cars in the United States. Some of them. I've long predicted that ever since I saw what's his name? Sandy Monroe. Sandy Monroe live his channel. Yeah, he said that from what he understood and he has expertise in Chinese manufacturing and has consulted with automakers over there that 20% less is what the Tesla can make in China. Like, they'll save 20% on the price of the car. And it turns out that the Chinese manufacturing is really good because they're bringing the Chinese manufacturing people over to the States to say, why can't we be as productive as you? Did you ever see that documentary called what was it called? I don't know. It was a factory. It was produced by Obama, and it was about Chinese companies that decided to take advantage of tax breaks in Ohio or somewhere to bring back an automotive factory or a factory that was in an automotive town in, I don't want to say Ohio, somewhere like that. And they just could not get the productivity. They couldn't understand it, but they couldn't no matter what they did, they finally threw in the towel, I think, and went home, and they visited the factory in China and man, what a different culture. What a different work culture. Everything is like calisthenics and unanimity and one team. I don't like that. I wouldn't want to work there. But as a manufacturer, it seems like quite an advantage, and it seems to be effective. Yeah. Well, the Tesla Shanghai factory is now operating at a run rate of about a million vehicles a year, so it is likely the largest car factory in the world. And they've gotten there in pretty short time. It's only been a couple of years that they've been producing cars. And it's true that demand in China is down a little bit, and they did cut the prices in Japan a little bit, or sorry, in China a little bit too, because the demand is slipping. But yeah, and they export those cars currently to Europe, but the Germany factory is going to start filling those orders. So those Chinese cars, if there's too many of them for the Chinese market, will have to go somewhere. I don't think it would be North America, because the Texas factory will start filling that in, but more cars to go to Australia or Japan or wherever. But on the other hand, Brian, you've got the Cyber truck coming and the Tesla semi. So maybe you could take one of those lines and start spitting out Model YS or something from China. Or maybe you make the X and the S, which are lower volume. It's more likely, like the next model that's coming, like they'll eventually be a lower cost model. So I assume they're planning for that in China, and they could start making more variants, too, like longer range variants as well. Sure. So, from Bloomberg, a 35 year old Hydro Quebec employee who worked on battery materials research has been charged with espionage for allegedly obtaining trade secrets for China. Well, he's in Kandiac, Quebec. He has a Chinese sounding name. So I don't know if he was originally from China or if he's an immigrant worker or what his nationality is for sure, but he was arrested following an investigation that they get in August. I'm concerned about the Chinese government. They have no shame when it comes to these things. There's some car companies in China accused of duplicating Tesla's, blatantly copying them, and a lot, even down to the software, this is the first time this happened. But it seems like they'll do anything to be competitive. And as we've mentioned before so Hydro Quebec, that's the electricity utility in Quebec, the provincially owned utility, but they've done a lot of research into batteries and battery materials, and they own a lot of patents in that. So I guess whatever they own there at Hydro Quebec was valuable enough to be espionaged. And it's a highly competitive batteries are highly competitive. But if they have, who knows what hasn't been caught? Because it seems like there's been more and more instances of this. And of course there's computer espionage and all that sort of thing. That's a concern for all countries, it seems like you have to put a lot of money into that. What do you think? This is why I asked, Brian. What do you think about things that I don't know what to think about? So, Brian Tesla has proposed a North American charging standard. Now, those of you who are new to the game, there is basically two charging ports in North America, CCS and Tesla. Tesla has its own charging network, which is the largest and most consistent, but it's got a different connector, so that's a problem. But it's amazing how great that connector is, right? Because it's small. If you compare it side by side to what everybody else is using for all the other cars, my car included, it's like half the size, but it's basically when you charge your car, you can do DC Direct, fast current fast charging at public charging stations, or you can AC charge at home. But what I didn't realize until today is they only have two pins on there that does both. So that's why it's lighter and smaller. They've figured out a way to do both now and the connector, it's more like a quarter the size of the CCS connector. So I think it'd be a fantastic idea. It's definitely the better standard of the two. So if North America were to standardize on the Tesla charging socket, I think that would be fantastic. Question is it might be a bit too late. Like Tesla could have maybe released this a couple of years ago, a couple of years ago, five years ago. A better chance at this. Yeah. So disappointing. Too little, too late, because it's probably not going to happen now. Probably not. But what Tesla said in their press release was that some of the, they've been talking already to the companies that make the charging networks, the chargers for the third party networks that normally are CCS. And it sounds like they have some plans already to incorporate the Tesla connector onto those. So, I don't know, there is some hope, but it's probably too late. And CCS will likely be two standards in North America, CCS and Tesla. Part of this is the federal government in the United States is giving a lot of money to expand the charging networks. But when you do that, you have to have more than one charging standard, more than one car company that uses it. So if just one car company, any car company that sells maybe ten cars a year adopted Tesla's in the clear, they don't have to make the GCs ones, and they could get all the government subsidies for just making their charges that they already make. Now the government could go and tweak that fine print. Okay, so here's another one for you. This is a clean technical op ed. It says Tolling the highway to green trucking. Should tolls be implemented on combustion semi trailers once EVs are on the road. Do you think that would be an effective way to do it? Well, I don't think you'll have to. It's kind of like the cost of running a combustion truck will already be more expensive, so there's already a kind of a penalty just for using one. So an extra toll probably not needed. I mean, what's needed is faster production of the electric trucks and get those on the road. That's the thing. This is assuming price parity, that the cost of ownership is going to be the same, right? Well, charging lithium ion cells at different rates boost the lifetime of battery packs for electric vehicles. So says yet another Stanford study. We have so many Stanford studies on the show. According to the study, batteries managed with this new technology could handle at least 20% more charge discharge cycles, even with frequent fast charging, which puts an extra strain on the battery. So basically they're saying don't charge each of the individual cells at the same rate all the time. And that actually gives you 20% longer life. And 20% longer life if you're talking about a fleet of cars of a million cars and a robotxis, or storage for the electrical grid that lasts twelve years instead of ten, the costs on those greatly changes with doing this basically a software tweak. So that seems quite to me, it seems like it's got a lot of potential if it works, yes. That's exciting. There's a lot that can be done with software. It isn't just the hardware components of a battery or the chemistry's, or the chemistry is where you can improve the life. Yeah, the software can have a big benefit. So Ford is officially the number two electric vehicle seller in the United States. And if you extrapolate out the twelve months of a year, based on what they had in October, ford would achieve 75,000 EV sales. Which is what's, Tesla right now? Close to a million. Close to a million. So that's not much, but that's what your number two is. A lot of people wouldn't have picked for it to be number two right now. They would have took GM or more likely Volkswagen. And that points back to our previous conversations about the connectors. Standardizing on the Tesla connector has a fighting chance just because Tesla vehicles are so ubiquitous in North America in terms of EVs. Another thing I wanted to talk about is electric truck stops will need as much power as a small town. So as Tesla rose out, it's semi next month, hopefully, I think December 1 is when they're having the release. Are you looking forward to that one? Yeah. Do you think something special could roll out of the back of that truck? I hadn't thought of that. The tesla ebike. The robotic musk. I don't know. I do. Social media platform and we'll roll out the back of the truck. Yeah. So it's adding pressure on the truck industry to go green. But the grid upgrades must start now if the new era is to last. This is from Bloomberg, and sometimes these stories make me wonder if that is all accurate. But a sweeping new study. This is another study of highway charging requirements conducted by utility company National Grid Plc. Researchers found that by 2030 electrifying, a typical highway gas station will require as much power as a professional sports stadium. And I would think sports stadiums use less now with all the Led lighting, but it's probably better. But I know our city built a new football stadium a few years ago, and I don't know if you noticed, but they're all kinds of electrical transformer boxes outside the stadium. They hid them in the park. There's a park next to the stadium and they had to try and hide all of these electrical transformer boxes. And there's a lot of them. And the power used to go out on the old stadium we had here. This is a stadium we have for the Canadian Football League, by the way. Okay, so this is just for electrified passenger vehicles. As more electric trucks hit the road, the projected power needs for a big truck stop by 2035 will equal that of a small town. And they think that lots of wiring will have to be done. Nobody really knows how this is going to play out with trucks. Like, is there going to be specialized newly built truck stops? Because truck stops are a thing. You have a shower, you park the truck for a while. It's a truck resting stop as well. So I don't know. How do you think that will play out, if you had to guess? Well, there's usually a decent amount of space at existing truck stops, so I assume there's enough room at the existing truck stops to kind of transform them and have both fuel and electric. Hopefully they have started working on that already. Now, just to tag onto that, I want to skip ahead to the story about LaGuardia Airport. Sure. Because I think it sort of makes me think of the same issue. So there's a story here from Electrac about zoo's power that's got this machine with a flywheel. And this is being installed at LaGuardia Airport to facilitate fast charging of cars, rental cars particularly. And yeah, I bring it up because the reason this machine exists is that the power available in certain locations can be limited. Right. Like if these truck stops are going to need all the power of a small town, well, you don't necessarily have the grid infrastructure where you need it. I don't think this does an enormous amount. Like, it's not going to triple or quadruple the amount of power available. But the idea behind this zoos flywheel machine is that it literally uses flywheels. And we talked about this before. Some power plants use flywheels as well. It's literally just the momentum of a spinning wheel to help kind of even the power output of your hydroelectric dam or whatever. Anyway, so I guess the idea being that you take a limited amount of power that might be available in a parking lot at an airport, and then you use this flywheel machine. And some by spinning up the flywheels, you can increase the amount of power available. It's sort of similar to having batteries on site. I would think that's going to be the more normal solution. Like at these truck stops, would be to put a big battery pack, a grid storage battery pack at a truck stop. But this is a kind of a smaller and cheaper way to add just a bit more power to what's available for your fast chargers. So with hertz ordering a couple of hundred thousand electric vehicles from Tesla and GM, I wonder how the infrastructure at airports is going to go. I mean, nobody is panicking about that, but I mean that's going to have to be built up presumably, and larger airports will have a lot of cars sitting there with batteries. You would have the chance in the low demand because most flights happen 06:00 a.m. To midnight or whatever. You could have 6 hours to when people aren't taking those cars, maybe to charge off the batteries for the next day. And that would yeah, I can see that being an important thing unless they have some off site, like just off the airport type of parking spaces for charging. Yeah, and like our parking spaces here in Canada at our airports, a lot of them are probably already electrified where we live because it's super cold in the winter and so you have plugins for block heaters. So at least there's power running to these parking lots. Whereas of course, in many places there would be no power running there at all. Half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036 in a net zero transition. So says an article in the Guardian that I read. $11 Trillion in Fossil Fuel Asset Crash could Cause a 2008 financial crisis, warrants a new study. I don't care. Yeah, that's my hot. Take it. Yeah. It's something I really wonder about and think about. Like, obviously these assets are going to become stranded and worthless at some point or at least the value start crashing at some point. But what point does that start to happen? Is it two years from now? Is it six years from now? Is it 20 years from now? It's hard to say, but I wouldn't want to be holding a lot of fossil fuel investments longer than the next couple of years, that's for sure. I think the big question is when will EVs really take off where there's not a battery constraint? And it sure seems like it's going to be within five years. It could be two years, it could be five years, but somewhere in that period I think it's really going to grab momentum. Yeah, but also too, like, as we've discussed, like last week and other weeks, there's not a lot of new money being spent on new oil exploration because they can kind of foresee, okay, there's not really going to be the demand. It's not worth it to spend this money building. So that does mean that the supply of oil will be kind of naturally constrained if the system doesn't expand. So it could be that as the oil industry shrinks, the production shrinks and if the production shrinks enough, then the price stays up. So countries that are slow to decarbonise will suffer, but early movers will profit. This is something we say on the show all the time. You have to move now. And our jurisdiction is not great where we live. We live in fossil fuel country with a mentality thereof and our country as a whole starting to make some moves. But we're basically a fossil fuel country in Canada and even the United States to some extent. But it finds that renewables that are freed up investment will more than make up for the losses of the global economy. You're freeing up a whole lack of investment that was going into fossil fuels that can go into other things and expand the economy that way. And just the renewables themselves will save money, of course. So it highlights the risk of producing far more oil and gas than required for future demand, which is estimated to leave 11 trillion to 14 trillion in stranded assets, which is a lot of stranded assets. Brian. Also, as we always say, we predict that governments are going to have to, and therefore you and I are going to have to pay for the clean up of some of these wells as well. So the most vulnerable assets are those in remote regions are technically challenging environments. Most exposed are Canadian tar sands in northern Alberta, us shale and the Russian Arctic, followed by deep offshore wells in Brazil and elsewhere. And North Sea oil is also relatively expensive to extract and it's going to be hit when demand falls. I'm worried about this because it could affect us as being an oil part of the world, it says. In contrast, current oil, gas and coal importers such as the EU, japan, India and South Korea will reap hefty economic dividends from the transition because they will be able to use the money they save on spending those places, spending gobs of money. We get our gas cheap here in North America, but they're spending gobs of money on fuel purchases and they'll be able to use that money to invest in their own economies. The lead author of the report said in the worst case scenario, people will keep investing in fossil fuels until suddenly the man they expected does not materialize and they realize that what they own is worthless. And we could see a financial crisis on the scale of 2008. Houston Detroit could have the same phase detroit did in the car industry collapsed earlier in this century. So yeah, it's got to be carefully managed. If you don't accept that all this is going to happen like people around here, yeah, it's going to be a problem. That's what I have to say about that. Yeah. And when your oil is expensive to extract like it is in the Alberta oil sands, that stuff will be the first to go because you won't be able to sell it at. A profit. So you've got another heat pump story. Heat pumps are the item of the year. I say yes, absolutely. No, it's amazing how even when this podcast started a couple of years ago, it was barely in our vernacular. It was barely in the vernacular. Yes. And now it's everywhere. So yes, electric is reporting heat pumps are now mandatory in Washington State for new homes and apartments as well from July 2023 onward. But the thing that I think is interesting about this, and it's not really mentioned in the story, we talked about the incredible heatwave that happened last summer on the west coast of North America. So Seattle area, Vancouver area, they're just an unprecedented heatwave because of climate change. And so many of those homes and places and businesses and apartments are not cooled. So this is the other benefit of this. So not only do you start heating your homes with electricity, but you also in Washington State now are adding essentially mandatory air conditioning, which, especially if it's low income apartments or something, would be a godsend for people who are hopefully won't. I mean, there was literally thousands of people died from the heat stroke on the west coast last summer. Well, that's an interesting take in a region that doesn't have air conditioning. And yet with climate change, we can see this happening a lot more often and now they'll be prepared. That's an interesting aspect of the story and I have to wonder if it was even part of the planning. No, I'm not sure. I mean, it depends on when they started talking about this. But one of the great benefits is of a heat pump heating and cooling. You get both in the same machine. So why just put in an air conditioner when you can put in an air conditioner that also runs in reverse and can heat your home as well? And for people who are new to the podcast or this type of thing, heat pumps are reverse air conditioners, essentially that transfer heat from one place to another, like inside the house to outside. And air conditioning or outside, even if there's a little bit of energy in that area, it takes it out. And the idea is to use electricity, which instead of natural gas, right, if you're heating, you want to use electricity and this is the most efficient way to do it. Yes, and in a place like Washington State, a lot of homes are already heated with electricity. Like it's not a frigid cold place like here. So there are more like 99% of homes where we live are heated by natural gas because it's so ridiculously cold. But in a milder climate, you might have electric baseboards in a lot of homes. So it is something like 50% already are heated with electricity in Washington state and this will eventually get it up to 100%. Yeah, that's very interesting. And a very interesting side effect of going green using solar and wind and so forth for your heating, that you will actually probably save lives from a government policy in future heatwaves. Who knows when those heat waves will come, but they're going to come more often, those once in a century type heat waves, or once in a thousand years or 500 years, whatever it was. I want to talk about indoor wheat because we live in a heart of wheat country. You can't swing a cat with a wheat chief. It's on symbols for everything. Where we live, we're the breadbasket of Canada. And what was the name of your first feature film? I made a film called Wheat Soup. There you go. It had to be in the title. It had to be. So this is interesting to us because you know how there's hydroponics like indoor gardening, which I'm fascinated with. They do it in containers, they do it in buildings where they're basically using fertilized water and no soil to grow tomatoes or whatever in greenhouse like conditions. And I find that very interesting, especially when they can do it up north. And by the way, I saw another article in Blueberg about the Yukon. The climate changing, and the people are up there growing potatoes and things that they never used to grow before, and wheat as well, which required a lot of cabbage. And things like that require a lot of sunlight when they have 20 hours sunlight days in June. But, you know, it costs a lot to transport fresh food up there. So it's very expensive and very not fresh. Carrots is another thing that they're growing a lot of potatoes and carrots. So that's great. It's great in one sense because there's an advantage to them. But in this case, indoor wheat. Amsterdam based startup In Farm grew wheat without using soil or chemical pesticides, which is nice, and with far less water than conventional farming, which is also nice. So the first indoor farming company to grow a stable staple crop in a milestone for an Asian industry that has attracted venture capital funding on its promise that its technology can help feed the planet if delivered at scale. Growing a staple crop indoors has the potential to become a game changer. Supplies have increasingly been challenged by climate change and logistical issues. So you could grow well, you could grow wheat in Antarctica if you wanted to, right? If you got this technology down. And Infarm says that its first trial shows that projected annual wheat yields of 117 tons a hectare, okay? Now, that compares to the average 2022 yields of 5.6. So let me give you that again. Indoors, 117 tons hectare annually. Outdoors, 5.6. And in the European Union, it's 3.1. So that's in the European Union, it's actually less than the United States, which surprises me. It's only 3.1. Now, part of that reason of the higher yields is they have six crops a year. Okay? But if you times 3.1 times six, you still don't get 117 tons. So it's just a lot more dense and efficient to do it that way. I mean, it's not easy. We're probably decades away from this being a regular thing and getting the efficiencies and the cost down maybe a couple of decades, it's hard to tell. But, you know, it depends on what the need is, too. But this is interesting. It's going to be perfect, right? You don't spread pesticides on it. You're not going to have to worry about weeds. It's just going to be pure indoor stuff and locally delivered. No. And the more things, of course, you can do locally, then the more transportation that you can eliminate. You know, so many things now that, you know, our produce at the grocery stores just shipped in from incredible distances here. But if all that stuff could be grown locally, it would just be so much more efficient and just kind of save all that energy. I mean, theoretically, you could, in the middle of a desert in Africa, start up an operation like this and make flour or make proteins for food. Basically, you would need water, but you wouldn't need as much of it. So if you could use solar to desalinate water, you could put it anywhere. You could put it in there because we transport all of our grain by ship, which goes by train from the center of the continent out to the coasts and then onto ships. I don't think that this is going to completely replace green farming, but it could augment it. Maybe 100 years from now, it could replace it, but in the near term, this is basically saying that it could just fit in, reduce the challenges of supply, and in certain situations, a lot of land will be required to produce this. Wheat cultivation takes more than 216,000,000 land, more than any other crop. So, yeah, wheat takes a lot of land, which we have a lot of land here. A lot of land. Most of our province is filled with wheat fields. It's kind of insane. So, yeah, they would require very large indoor farms exceeding the area of all the wheat in France, I think. But they said it could potentially increase its yield by another 50% in the coming years, thanks to better technology. So it could even be 200 times or 200 tons instead of three tons. So that's interesting. Yeah. Once they learn what they're doing and tweak it and software can play a part, perhaps. Yeah, it could be amazing. Okay, so starting here from Hydrogen Insight, and this is about hydrogen pump prices in California. So this was something I just had never thought about before now. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles do exist. James, take a guess. How many hydrogen fuel cell vehicles do you think there are in California, which is currently one of the main markets for them? 410. There's $10,000. Okay. Which is not bad. It's kind of more than I expected. And there's a series of hydra. They're not all the Toyota Mariah. What are these vehicles? There's a Toyota Mirai there's a Hyundai. That's really nice. I forget the name of it, but there's a big Hyundai SUV. That's a hydrogen vehicle. They've sold a few of those for sure. Okay. But yeah. So there's hydrogen fueling stations in California, not in too many other places. But I just was interested in this because, yes, recently they had to hike up the price at the pump of these hydrogen, up 33% in California. This is a fairly big price jump. So just in terms of the price per mile, I thought this was really interesting. So right now is basically what it costs you to drive a hydrogen vehicle in California, roughly in a gasoline vehicle down to California has the most expensive gasoline in North America. Yeah, well, no, it's probably more expensive here in Canada. Is it? Because I went there, it was pretty damn expensive. That was a few years ago. So $0.22 for gas per mile and for hydrogen. Plus, you spend a whole bunch more money on your hydrogen car than you do a gas car. It's a serious technology. And then if you're driving an EV and you charge it off the grid, you're down to if you have to use a fast charger like a Tesla Supercharger, then you're up to but that's compared to for driving a hydrogen car. So I just wasn't totally clear on that until now. The actual cost of driving a hydrogen vehicle is more than gas, way more than electricity. Now, theoretically, if we were to SuperBuild out the hydrogen infrastructure and kind of get that all pumping again, locality is a key to that. Like, if each city had its own hydrogen plant or whatever, you had even smaller ones at the filling stations, making the hydrogen there, that would reduce costs a lot. But for right now, it's super expensive to fill up with hydrogen. And I don't see that coming down anytime soon. And the days of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is probably numbered. If we had no other option, we would be going full steam ahead with hydrogen and trying to get that that still take a while, but we would be trying to get green hydrogen, and then we'll be trying to get that green hydrogen price down so that it would be cost effective. But since we have an alternative to that called battery electric vehicles, electricity is also expensive in California. So if you compare it to other places, it would be even a larger variation there. And as we said, so obviously the electricity for charging your electric car comes from the grid. And there are certain shortfalls at places, perhaps like truck stops that don't have enough grid infrastructure. So it's far from perfect. But any electrical outlet anywhere in the world can charge an electric vehicle. So that's just an insane advantage over these very rare hydrogen stations. Yeah, they're expensive. And transportation and processing of hydrogen is also an issue. So Amazon is getting heat. We get heat for not talking about ebikes sometimes. Well, Amazon is getting heat for selling kits to override speed limits of ebikes. Now, this is mostly happening in Europe, right? Because there's more restrictions in Europe. Europe has strict electric bike laws that limit electric bicycles to a sluggish 25 km an hour or 15.5 mph. Even an old man like me can go well, I can't go 25, actually. It takes the work to go 25. Yeah, that is kind of cool. But solutions range from an electromagnetic modifications or chipping, quote unquote, that can remove digital speed limits. So people do that with cars sometimes, to hardware hacks to trick the bike speed sensors into thinking it's going slower than it truly is. And I haven't been able to find out exactly how that works. So I'm kind of curious. Yeah, I thought maybe you had done that on your bike where it's like you change the setting and it messes up the speedometer, so it ends up sending you faster than it's what you do is you change the wheel size on your bike. Didn't work for mine. It was supposed to, but my bike manufacturer has been kind of savvy to all the tricks, so by the time I get to them, they've figured it out and have eliminated that. But yeah, if you have like a 29 inch wheel and then you tell that it's a kid's wheel of half that size, then it thinks that one rotation is actually going a shorter distance and yes, and then you won't have a proper speed. And I have that FETO electric folding bike and I looked on the Internet and apparently there is a hack that you can do by pressing a certain combination of buttons on the little kind of remote screen there where you can hack it to go faster. But I haven't tried it. And with mine it was a code. It was like an eight digit code that you could type in at a certain place. And that one also did not work. I was curious, but I think the longevity of James is more important than the thrill of maybe trying out a 50 kilometer an hour. That's probably all my bike could do if it really wanted to. It would take a while to get there too. The important thing to remember in all this is you probably don't need your bike to go any faster. No, but what does my bike do? My bike does 32 instead of 25. So that's the next level. I think that's about what mine does. And that's pretty fast. And like I've said before in the show, I get kind of uncomfortable at that speed, and yet some other bastard on an ebike passes me and I think, I wish I had more speed. I start pedaling, which you can do. Apparently you can pedal and use the Ebike part. Well, anyway, I guess Ebike hot rodding as it's called, is much less common in the United States, where E bikes are permitted to go up to 45 km an hour. That's the United States. You can have guns and fast Ebikes or whatever you want. Tanks, cruise missiles, no. And modifying your car. Take out the pollution controls, although they have been cracking down on that lately. Oh, it's time for the Tweet of the week. This is where we pick a Tweet. And this last week was for Tony Siba. It's going to be for Tony Siba again. Okay, I'm sorry. Tony Siba is kind of one of our main people that we follow on the show here. Now, this was a person who was responding to how 5 million, what Tony calls precision fermentation. This is the future of food. He believes that will be disruptive based on price. This is one of the ways that is like beyond meat, that's one aspect. And then there's cellular meat, which will actually resemble steak and the texture of steak in the future, maybe ten years from now, that will be viable financially. But dairy is the first one that's going to be disrupted because glass of milk is 90% water and 3% of that is protein from the milk. So that's really all you're dealing with is that protein because the rest is fat and sugars, which you can get from other places. It doesn't have to be from a cow. So as they make these things in like brewery like buildings and disrupt milk. He says there are 5 million dairy cows in New Zealand. And so that would require 100 precision fermentation factories to replace all the cows. Less if they're bigger, which they will be. So it's just a matter of time and probably less time than most people expect. And Tony. Steve assisted that tweet. Correct. The total land needed to replace all the cows in New Zealand, 5 million of them, which is more than Canada, by the way. I believe we only have a million cows in Canada. I haven't counted lately, but I'm told that it's around a million. The total land needed would be around 1700 acres. But you compare that with the Auckland airport, it's 3700 acres. So basically half the Auckland airport could replace all the dairy cows the land wise. And then you have all that land. You can put solar on and do other things. This is a huge disruption of the world. Yes. If you think of a cow as basically a type of food technology, well, it can be delicious. It's the least efficient food technology. In fact, I think Tony said that the cow in particular is the least efficient of all of the kind of animal food technologies. So we get a lot of things from a cow, but the resources and the land and everything needed to get that is kind of insane and is ripe for disruption. So, as Tony points out, the first disruption will happen in just a few years. And he thinks that dairy will be bankrupt by 2030. And the reason is 30% of his business is business to business. So if you buy a protein shake, you're buying protein powder. Okay? And if it's cheaper to come from this fake stuff, if you can call it that, fermentation than it is from a real dairy cow, and you're greener people are just going to go, where the cheapest? If you want to buy bulk for a protein bar or a protein shake or whatever, all these things that have chocolate bars and everything and all kinds of foods that are processed will have first that will go and then 30% of dairy's gone. Yeah. No. And he mentioned, too, in his latest video, just the switch, like Coke and Pepsi switched from cane sugar to corn sugar back in the 80s. Basically, their entire product lines switching over to corn as the source for sugar. And while there is probably some taste difference, they was definitely not enough taste difference to stop what they were doing, because they completely four years. Four years. They did it in just both yeah. In four years. Complete switch over. And this is the main ingredient in their products? Yes. That means it's time for the lightning round. A quick look at fast paced energy news and climate news from this past week. Growing EV dem demand helps Volkswagen reach half a million ID deliveries one year early. Brian, that is a good news story, isn't it? Yeah, we talked about that a few weeks ago. They're on track for 500,000 deliveries. That's Volkswagen this year of EVs, and that's a huge number. Volvo debuts its first electric trucks made with fossil free steel. That is steel made with green electricity, and it is also 90% recyclable. So that's cool. Yeah. So Volvo was trying to green their whole lineup of vehicles, and they're doing it partly by switching over to electric, but they're also doing it by going with fossil free steel in their cars, which increasingly more and more manufacturers are going to do. Cough 27 news, 41 signatories have joined the pledge to stop funding fossil fuels by the end of year. But problematically. Brian, four large signatories are not signing. Germany, Italy, the United States and your favorite country in the world, canada. No, I'm sorry. Damn, it just sad. Can't overuse that, can I? Okay, it's time for a CS festival. Toyota has sold 4.7 million Priuses to date. That's no easy feat. Tesla did 3 million. But total yeah, that's to date, over the last ten plus years, 4.7 million Priuses are on the road, but nobody buys them anymore. No. Did you see the stat of, like, at one time they were selling 500,000 Priuses a year and it's down to 86,000? Yeah. People who bought them initially wanted an environmentally friendly car or to save money. Best way to be environmentally friendly or to save money is to buy electric now. Or at least electric hybrid. But anyway, solar power already saved China, India, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines and Thailand. $34 billion American in potential fossil fuel costs went in the first half of this year. First half of 2022. We're just getting started. That's astonishing. Yeah. I mean, spend your money on solar and then you won't have to spend it on fossil fuels. The US will finance about a third of the $9 billion rooms romania needs to build two nuclear reactors. That's a lot of money. They're getting it from the United States, which seems like a bad investment. I thought I would mention this. Globally up 13%. Okay. That's everywhere in the world. Europe is up 35%. I wonder why. Vladimir, the US is up 15% and China 13%. So this heat pump thing is, whoever makes the most of the best heat pumps, put your money in them because they're going to pay back. No, and I assume that I haven't seen announcements, but I assume that there are heat pump factories being built as we speak. And I don't know, we always hear battery factory announcements and things like that. I don't hear heat pump factory announcements, but presumably it's going on. The demand is huge. Inflation Reduction Act had money for developing better heat pumps, too, so there's going to be some R and D in there. Friend of the show, Greta Thuneburg thoonberg rather. I'm kidding. She's not a friend of the show, but we're working on it slowly. Global Witness found that more than 600 people are at the talks in Egypt at Cop 27. They're linked to fossil fuels. And, Brian, that is more than the combined delegations from the ten most climate impacted countries. Barf, we're at a critical stage now where we got to say no to fossil fuels. Just say no. And we got to stop the green washer, we got to stop the BS right now. Right now. No time left. From Tennessee Valley Authority, that is one of the grids in the southern US. The three giant cooling towers at the retired paradise coal plant in Kentucky came down this morning, was a few mornings ago now as demolition efforts continued at the site. And they say we are striving for a cleaner and more efficient energy future as we are building the energy system of the future. And by God, Brian, we have a clip. Fantastic. Here's the initial charge. The towers are collapsing. They're coming down completely now. And they're gone by the doctor. Goodbye, coal plants. Three cooling towers in Kentucky, a grave risk of winter blackout speaking of nuclear, is happening in France because electricity prices have surged past $1,000 or, pardon me, €1000 per megawatt hour as more nuclear reactors, more are closing in France, as if enough hadn't closed already. What this means, Brian, is, on a cold January day, france needs around 45 gigawatts of nuclear energy, and one day last week, there was only 25 available. Yeah, and there was a lot of reactors down, or at least down partially for repairs. So the amount of electricity from nuclear in France dropped 34% year over year in October. Just less power available from nuclear, which everyone always says it's like reliable base load power. That's one of the reasons it's promoting this is not reliable here. But it's not exactly that. You know, it's the pipes, the cooling pipes that are structurally problematic and cracked, and they realize that they're all bad. So they have this, and it apparently takes a while. They've hired like, 100 contractors to go in and fix this, but it's not that easy. Finally this week, Brian japan's government wants to remotely control private air conditioners to avoid power outages. The Japan Time points out that the government committee is currently working under the concept that the government would only be able to turn down AC units if individual owners have agreed in advance to grant them that authority. This is something we've seen, or, what, the third time now on the show? Yeah. And in Ontario, they're working on this. Here in Canada where remote control california, they do it with text messages where they just tell everybody to stop using so much AC. But this works. And no one really suffers if you shave a degree or two off your air conditioning for an hour and say it's much better than a blackout where you have no air conditioning. So that's not so bad. That is our show for this week. Next week I'll be talking about the new Toyota Prius lineup that will be announced between now and then and what excitement that will be. Because I need a car badly, Brian. Mine's starting to fall apart. My FUS is getting long on the tooth. How disappointed will I be? Tune in to find out. Maybe I should sell you my car. Would you buy my Tesla? Well, the street price for that Tesla, unless there's a murder in it, is not going to be good for me. What if I gave you a really good deal? I'll take two. Why would you want to? It's not the form factor you want, I guess, but I don't care. I would take a Tesla. What would you do for a new car? Buy a why? Yeah, something like that. You think I want to start? What's interesting, what are your interest rates? How quickly do you break legs? We'll sign over. Like making a 20 year loan? Pretty much what it would have to be, I think. Anyway, everyone out there, we thank you for listening. We do appreciate you and we'd love to hear from you. So contact us with anything that's on your mind Cleanenergy show@gmail.com. We are on social media with the handle Clean Energy Pod. We're on TikTok. Check out our TikTok channel. Don't forget to check out our YouTube channel, too, because you know why not? Sometimes you might want to look at things that are shiny. And you can even leave us a voicemail where we get to hear your voice, which is always a thrill for us. Speakpipe.com cleanenergyshow. Remember, subscribe if you're new to the podcast so that you can get new episodes delivered every week. And, Brian, I look forward to next week. you.

The Kingdom Perspective
The Peace of True Wisdom

The Kingdom Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 1:56


Transcript: Hello! This is Pastor Don of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective! In our current cultural climate, we are increasingly tempted to absolutize politics. We, thus, become convinced in our own rightness, and so begin operating in a very “us vs. them” framework. In contradiction to this Jesus calls us to a different posture. He calls us to humble service and love, even toward those we might think are wrong. There is no righteousness, there is no truth, without humility. Proverbs tells us: “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom”—the “beginning of [true] knowledge” (Proverbs 1:7; 9:10). True wisdom begins with humbling yourself. True wisdom never ceases to be a humble servant, a humble learner. That's why James challenges us in our prideful “wisdom”: Who among you is wise and understanding? Let him, by his good behavior, show forth his deeds in the gentleness of wisdom. But if you have bitter jealousy and selfish ambition in your heart, do not be arrogant and so lie against the truth. This wisdom is not that which comes down from above, but is earthly, natural, demonic. For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist, there is disorder and every evil thing. (James 3:13-16) Does your “wisdom”, or your “rightness”, lead you to bickering, hatred, and bitterness? Then, it is not from God—no matter how right your position might be. Rather, true wisdom is: …first pure, then peace-loving, gentle, reasonable, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial, free of hypocrisy. And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace. (James 3:17-18) And that is something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective. “Who is wise and understanding among you? By his good conduct let him show his works in the meekness of wisdom. But if you have bitter jealousy and selfish ambition in your hearts, do not boast and be false to the truth. This is not the wisdom that comes down from above, but is earthly, unspiritual, demonic. For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist, there will be disorder and every vile practice. But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial and sincere. And a harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace.” ~ James 3:13-18 (ESV)

The Clean Energy Show
Highway to Climate Hell; Autonomous Driving Delayed

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:46


As COP 27 kicks off in Egypt, The UN chief says we're not doing enough to prevent a climate catastrophe. On the bright side, France is mandating all parking lots have solar panels over them resulting in the power of 10 nuclear reactors. An analyst says Tesla may never achieve full self-driving. South Dakota produced more energy from wind than any other source. Why a switch in power in the United States Congress won't kill Biden's Inflation Reduction / Climate act. Brian's PTC cabin heater in his Tesla Model 3 had to be replaced and that meant driving in a parka for two and a half hours to the closes service center. Clip from the Energy Vs Climate podcast with guest Katherine Hamilton. Netflix has a documentary on Nissan head and current criminal Carlos Ghosn called 'Fugitive: The Curious Case of Carlos Ghosn." He was accused of stealing millions from Nissan and escaping in a storage chest on a plane. The eight billionth human being is about to be born. We disguss the Energi Media YouTube channel where Markham Hislop talked to an analyst from Guidehouse Insights about what's taking level 4 autonomy so long. Porsche has made 100,000 EVs. Tesla (TSLA) is now earning eight times more per car than Toyota, and they are starting to notice back in Japan. Pakistan's utility knows going green means consumers pay less for their electricity bill. Electrek editor Fred Lambert on Elon Musk's feedback loop of constant praise. The "hydrogen-is-not-all-that" podcast suggested by one of our listeners can be found here. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Tell your friends about us on social media! What should we do for Patreon perks coming in 2023? Let us know your ideas! Transcript  Hello and welcome to Episode 138 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, several companies are throwing to the towel and full selfdriving, but please keep your hands on the wheel and your attention on the road as you listen to this podcast. The state of South Dakota and now produces more electricity from wind than any other source. Must be the hot air coming from Mount Rushmore, am I right? No. UN Chief Antonio Gutierrez says we are on the highway to Climate Hill with our foot still on the accelerator. Again, please keep your hands on the wheel and your attention on the road as you listen to this podcast. In France, the government has ordered that all parking lots must be covered by solar panels, all because President Emmanuel Macron can't get the top back up on his convertible Renault. All that and so much more on this edition of the Clean Energy Show. And also this week, Brian, why a switch in power in the United States Congress, which is voting as we speak, as we record this won't kill Biden's inflation reduction act, but a change in government in Canada actually would be problem for us north of the border because well, I'll get to that later. And we also have a bit of an update live from Cop 27, sort of. And what's new with you? How was your trip to Saskatoon? Because last week you're heading north two and a half hours in the snowy Canadian winter to get your Tesla fixes. That's the closest Tesla service center to you. Yeah, that's right. So the heater has not been working right and didn't seem to be working quite right last winter, but kind of not enough to generate an error message. But now I had an error message, so they seemed to know what to do to fix it. So drove up Saskatoon, where the closest service center is, and yes, they replaced the whole heater. That's what they did. Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. It's under warranty. Everything's fine, isn't it? Everything's fine. When does the warranty end? Let me ask you, because it has, as we pointed out a couple of weeks ago, two and a half years, a quarter decade, getting close to the point where this is going to start killing you in the wallet. I don't recall when it ends, but I think it might say specs of warrant. It says in the app somewhere. Yes, here in the app. The Tesla app, basic vehicle, limited warranty, expires in March 2024 or 80,000, battery 2028 or 160 and the drive unit 2028 or 160,000 km as well. So, yeah, a couple more years to go on the basic warranty. Okay, I see. This could be a different discussion in the future. OK, what was it? Was it the PTC heater, the resistive heater? Yeah. Or you don't have a heat pump, so that's what it was. No heat pump. So the resistive heater. Yeah, for some reason they were sure about that. They were pretty sure by the time I got there. Because they have all the data from the car, like everything, the car is digitized and they can see all the data from my car. So as I dropped it off, they said, yeah, it's probably the whole heater needs to be replaced. And they were prepared to do that. And at the same time, too, there's been a recall for the trunk lid harness or something. I think it's to do with the cables, the wire harness to the camera in the back. So they did that at the same time. And it took about like 4 hours for them to do it. Wasn't too bad. Is that right? You had an appointment at 08:00 a.m. And they went right at it and started working on it. Yes. Call me around 1130. And they had the part, which is good again, I assume because they had all the data, they could order the parts ahead of time that they would need. That's nice. Yeah. And they gave me a loaner car, which I drove around Saskatchewan for a while. And yes, I got back before there was another blizzard. What was that? A couple of days later, our second blizzard of the year. Which is not technically a blizzard environment. Canada doesn't call it a blizzard. Do not call it a blizzard. But boy, was it a blizzard. It was crazy. Another nasty, nasty one. And I think we were the epicenter this time. Last time it was Moose Jaw. Yes, really nasty. Tons of snow. Yes. Crazy out there. How was your trip back? Was it okay? And the heater was all hot. How was it there, though? It was below zero, so I put on my parka. So you didn't have heat? There was a little bit of heat, not enough. And the heated seat was still working, but with the parka on, it was fine. Here's what I'm thinking, and that is the newer cars have a heat pump. Yeah, that's right. Newer cars have a heat pump instead of a resistive heater. So they don't have both then? I don't think so, no. You'd think that they might need one as a backup. But maybe the car generates enough heat that it holds. It's taking heat from the motor, it's taking heat from the from the batteries or something. There's a loop of different things that heat up here. But we do know there has been problems with some of the heat pumps as well in extreme cold. Is it in the heat pump itself or something related to the heat pump? Anyway, that's interesting because you didn't get a price on what that would be. Didn't show the invoice of what that repair would cost. No, they didn't. Just said zero. I'd be interested. I guess you could look it up online. What somebody else did we'll talk more about this sort of thing in future months. So anything else? You went up? You managed, your feet didn't get cold? Yes. No. It was a little bit chilly, but it wasn't too bad. Was it the most unpleasant trip you've had because you work cold? Yeah, I guess so. Yeah. I've got a really warm parka, so it felt almost normal. With that on, the heat can radiate up from the heated seat and fill the market. There you go. And then the other thing that's going on with me is they started shooting a TV show across the street from me here in the neighborhood. Really? You know, that's happened before, hasn't it? What is it about across the street? Because there used to be somebody of relevant who lived there who was connected to the film industry. Yes. They're gone. Not anymore. And it's their house that's being rented for this shoot. That's a weird coincidence, though. Yeah. And our good friend Jay is working on the shoot, so I've run into him out there on the street. Wow. I bet he doesn't know we're talking about him. No, probably not. I assume he doesn't listen to the podcast. No, he wouldn't. He's an old man. I don't think he knows what a podcast oh, he's an angry old man, Brian. Angry, angry old man who is actually six months younger than me. So he's working in winter and there's a TV show shooting across the street from you. I think Jay would prefer to be shooting in a sound stage where there's a lot more room for everybody and it's a lot more comfortable because, of course, it's a blizzard, remember? Why couldn't it be a James Cameron green screen affair? That's what you want to work on. But yeah, no, there's a lot of traffic on the street, lots of cars parked on our streets. But it's fine. Back in the day when I was a kid, I did a couple shows outside. It's horrible. Even in the fall when it's warmer than this, to spend 14 hours outside is just not good. I mean, they're shooting really inside the house, but there's so many crew people that they got to have to spill out into the cars and into the yard and everything. Is there somebody blocking traffic? No, no one closing off the traffic so far. Okay, that'd be annoying. You're coming home, you got to pee. Some little film student has a stop sign and says, no, you can't. So it's really weird. Happened to be on Sunday. I was biting my own business watching TV. We were snowed in. It was a blizzard, as you say, right. I couldn't do anything. So my son's home from college, and he took a shower. And I got to thinking, what is that cable cam on football games called? What is the brand name for that? Because I started thinking about that, and so I googled it, and it's called a Sky Cam. And then that took me to the Wikipedia page of the sky camp. And then I found out that the Sky Cam company was bought by this company, then bought by that company, and then it was bought by the person my son hates most of the world, which is Stan Crockey, the owner of the Arsenal Football Club in the Denver Broncos, and a bunch of other things. He's a bad man, according to people who support the team. And then I was gravitated towards a section that said incidents, because of course, that's sexy. I'm going to go there. There were three incidents, Brian. One in, like, 1981, when they first invented, and by the way, it was invented by the same person who invented the steadicam. Yeah. So that person, I'm assuming, is rich now. Yeah. So this is a camera that's on a giant cable that runs across the stage, two cables. So it's a couple of cables so it can fly over the players during a football game with a camera, I believe it's like a big X of cable, so it can go in three dimensions, back and forth. And just above the helms of it, you see them, you may not notice them. I don't think anybody who's paying attention notices them. Anyway, there was one incident at a small college football game back in the 80s when it was first came out. There was an incident in like, 25 years ago, and the third incident was an hour before I read it. An hour before I read it. It was a game that we didn't have. Here was the New York Jets game, and apparently the game was delayed by an hour because the Sky Cam fell from the I just thought that was weird. You're reading three incidents in history and going, this was an hour ago. The third one was an hour ago. And somebody had updated the Wikipedia. And of course they did, Brian, because Wikipedia, it's all about updating quickly. When we die, our family won't know before Wikipedia knows. Like, it will be updated instantly. Well, you know, there's no entry about me on Wikipedia, so if anyone out there well, there will be by then to write one. Me, too. I keep begging people to write one for years. I keep writing it myself, and they rejected, even though I have many awards if you're not allowed to accolades. And yeah, last night my partner had a grocery store order far away, and we went to the east end of town to pick up groceries because she ordered it in advance before the blizzard without checking the weather. It was a herring affair. And we decided to use her coupons for Carl's Jr. Which she never go to, but we thought that would be exotic someplace. We have a bit, let's go there and try this coupon out. And we got there and ordered it all went smoothly. And we got to the drive through window and there was this car load of teenagers in front of us who had been stuck there for an hour. And no one at the drivethrough told us anything. But the car in front of us was stuck right at the window for an hour. So we had the card that my partner uses and many, many years ago we went to the grocery store chain Superstore and they had clearance, these pieces of rectangular plastic that are grippy that you put under your wheel. They're like a little tread of plastic that's really pointy. Yeah. So it's something you keep in the trunk and if you get stuck in the snow, you put them under your wheels. Never used them. Cost about $0.50, like they were discounted from like twelve bucks to fifty cents. Never used them. But she had them in the car, put one under the front wheel, cut them out of there in a second. Wow. And they threw $20 at me, which I refused, of course, but they were so thankful to get out, they ever would. And of course it's embarrassing because you're blocking a fat guy from getting his burger behind you and that's no good. So, yeah, we got them out instantly, which was funny as hell. Good deed of the week. Sure. Now let's get on to some discussions with past stories because I wanted to talk about the Energy Vis Climate podcast. Okay? This is my name's. Sake ed. Woodynham calls himself I call myself Whittingham. He calls himself Woodynham. He's from Alberta. It's 90% chance for cousins. Okay, I haven't worked it out yet, but two people, there's like six Whittingham in Canada and apparently two of them fell into clean energy somehow. But whose podcast is more popular, that's what I want to know. Well, he's a big deal. He's been in the news for working for governments as a consultant. So he would have a lot of like this is not the same kind of podcast that people necessarily listen to because it's in the weeds, it's in policy. There's a lot of policy for people who work in the industry. That's a huge news. Well, I do listen to it. And they had Kathryn Hamilton on, who used to host the Clean Energy or the Energy Gang podcast. Now she's gone off to other things and I think she worked for the US government for a while. She's from the States, of course, and she's a clean energy expert and got decades of clean tech and policy in DC. And she was talking about the US midterms. And I was worried, I've said before on the show that I'm worried about what's going to happen because it's probably going to change. Power is going to change in one way or another in Washington, whether it's now or later, it always changes. How safe is the clean? The big biden thing is not going to be reversed because they're evil, they reverse things. They don't believe climate change at all. They're a hoax. So I just thought she had a really interesting answer that I'll play for you now. So I don't think that shift will have a direct impact yet on the climate goals. It will certainly prevent anything additional from happening. And the US. Congress holds the purse strings for the federal government. So just on appropriating funds to keep the government going, that will have an impact. But the pieces that are in IRA are pretty strong. I mean, they are tax credit, unless they were to completely rewrite the tax code. And I'll give you a little secret. When you give somebody something, don't ever try to take it away. So you're going to have all of these people taking advantage of credits. And in fact, manufacturers are already moving into states that are heavily Republican states and the last thing they want is those tax credits to go away. In fact, during the Trump administration, they never put on the table rolling back solar and wind tax credits. They just didn't because they knew that was a losing proposition for them. Yeah, I didn't realize that even during Trump they didn't roll back very much, did they, as far as climate goes, because business people were investing and that's the thing. Now in Canada, it's a different story. What they call it, and they refer to it as a runway. In the states, solar and wind have a ten year runway that it's guaranteed that if you invest, you can keep investing and it will still work out. You're not wasting your investment. You need to give assurances and security to people to make these investments because that's what the clean energy transition is. It's largely investing, but in Canada we don't have that. So our government is a minority parliamentarian. Government that may switch to 2025 will probably I mean, the government don't last forever around here either. And that government hardly wants to get rid of carbon taxes and doesn't seem to legitimately believe in climate change either. They're not that far off in the Republicans. But yeah, apparently the Canadian government is working on making that so that it's a guaranteed thing because investors are already threatening. They might be grandstanding, but they're threatening the one is going to the states because that's where the guarantee is, I don't know. And there's even definitely companies worried about doing business in places like Alberta because of the sort of backwards looking energy policy that they have there. If you're a giant business, giant international business, you're going to think twice setting up a business in a place that is denying climate change. And we were talking about Carlos Gon last week, the former chairman of Nissan who oversaw the implementation of the Nissan Leaf, the first mass produced electric car, which I happen to own a ten year old version of that. And there's actually a Netflix documentary that just came out a week ago as we were talking about that. Oh, fantastic. Well, I don't know that it is fantastic. I'm not reviewing it. I'm not endorsing it. It's called fugitive. The Curious Case of Carloscone. And I watched a bit of a lot of talking heads. It's interesting because it's kind of like a heist movie, right? Because he's accused of stealing millions from the car company he led, he was arrested in Japan and smuggled out of the country by two Americans in a storage chest, who, coincidentally, were also just convicted this week. As soon as I brought it up, things started happening. Brian wow. Okay. Well, I think I'll check that out. It was an interesting story just because of that one detail that he had to escape the country in a storage chest. Yeah. Oh. We have some breaking news. The 8th billionth human being is about to be born in the world. We go now to Antonio Gutiris, the head of the United Nations. The 8th billionth member of our human family is born. How will we answer when baby 8 billion is old enough to ask, what did you do for our world and for our planet when you had the chance? After President Trump announced that America would withdraw from the Paris Climate Change Accord, elon Musk immediately announced he would quit presidential business councils. We are in the fight of our lives and we are losing. Greenhouse gas emissions keep growing, global temperatures keep rising, and our planet is fast approaching tipping points that will make climate chaos irreversible. Twitter owner Elon Musk has told his followers on the platform to vote for a Republican congress. Tuesday, Musk tweeted, quote to independentminded voters, shared power curbs the worst excesses of both parties. Global warming, which a lot of people think is a hoax. The Earth will end only when God declares it's time to be over. We are on a highway to Climate Hill with our foot still on the accelerator. This is a clean energy show with Brian Thompson and James Whittingham. Okay, so a quick start here from South Dakota. Now, we often talk about North Dakota here on the show because we're just above North Dakota here. In many ways. In many ways, I love North Dakota. Home of the Fargo Film Festival. Home of the Fargo Theater. Anyway, South Dakota, which is just below North Dakota, it is now getting most of its electricity from wind they previously had. Hydroelectric was the biggest source, but now 52% is coming from wind turbines in the province there. So congratulations to South Dakota. And what I say to that initially is, why not us? Brian why not us? I wonder what led that to happen. Like, what was it? Private investment? Because we have a utility owned, government owned utility here. Was it the private sector that saw cheap electricity that drove the investment in? That what sparked that? Because South Dakota is not in the day and age of accusing everything green as being on one side of the political spectrum and therefore the enemy the other, then I'm surprised that a state like South Dakota was able to do something like that. Yeah, in South Dakota and North Dakota, both tend to be conservative leaning states. It is slightly surprising, but as we know, it's a great idea. So we have very similar wind profile here in our province and a little bit of wind power, but it really needs to be cranked up. You know, it's interesting politically when I was in Fargo with you, that I was asking, because that was just when Trump was becoming a thing and I was trying to get a Trump sign to bring over, was asking around for one. They were all lefty apologizing for their country. But it just goes to show that even in very right wing states, you have pockets of people who are, you know, not everybody is going to be one way or the other. There's always pockets, even in the most extreme leaning states. Yeah, fargo is a college town. They've got, like, I think, three universities in Fargo or Fargo morehead. And of course, people involved in the film festival, I guess, tend to be people in the arts, more left leaning, but as a whole, pretty conservative places. And my son always points out that Wyoming has Casper, which is also a small college town, because we've been through Wyoming a few times and I've been shaken by some of the images I've seen there. And there's lots of bad things to look at and signs and messages. But, yeah, Casper, which is a town we did go to, it was like a Fargo of Wyoming. It was kind of like a cool little college town with a nice Taco Bell, I may add. Nice. And, you know, I wanted to go there for the eclipse. The total eclipse of the sun that was the closest to us was Casper, Wyoming. Oh, interesting. I think we had just done a six week vacation in the mountains with our camper, and I couldn't convince my partner to do it. I regret that ever since, because it would have been a one day trip to see something remarkable. No. And I thought about driving to Calgary or Winnipeg to see Kate Beaton, author of the Duck's graphic novel, which I was plugging on the show. But these blizzards prevented these blizzards are bad. You never know this time of year whether we live in western Canada, where you're going to get bad weather, and certainly any mountain pass, even the Sierra Nevada mountains, are getting killed with a whole whack of snow. I've got a story I wanted to talk about. I guess a few companies, at least a couple in the last week or so, that have dropped plans, like, Ford has announced that it has dropped plans for a level three driver assistance, which would lead them to robotaxis. And they're going to focus on level two just for the consumer rather than as a business. So that's been a big shift. Mercedes is kind of doing the same. They say robotaxis are no longer a goal. We thought that in 2016 or 17, and that's kind of when the neural net sort of became a thing and they thought, well, everything is going to be solved quickly, but now they're backing off of that and they thought they could solve the robotaxi problem quite quickly. And so did certain CEOs who now social media magnets, but committing to both a ride hailing solution and a passenger driven assistant solution was expensive. So they thought they just concentrated on the one that make people because people are demanding it now. They're demanding basically the different versions of autopilot for different cars just to drive itself on the highway. How was your autopilot, by the way, in wintertime? How is it doing on actual highways? Yeah, generally really good. It can kind of sense generally through the snow. Okay, well, self driving taxis that operate all day, every day and all kinds of weather have been a dream for many for decades, including one of the Google people who started their autonomous program, Waymo. Yes. So now he's programming trucks to operate within the confines of industrial sites. Only one of these guys. And he says the foreseeable future, that's as much as the complexity as any driverless vehicle will be able to handle, in his opinion. He says, forget about the profits, the combined revenue of all the robotax the robotruck companies, it's not a lot right now. It's probably more like zero. So our friend of the show, Mark Hislamp, who is one province over from us or two provinces over, but from where we live, he's got a YouTube show called Energy Media, and he also has a podcast from time to time, and he has a guest on from Guidehouse Insights. He's an automotive engineer and EV analyst. His name is Dulce Meade and he's somebody that I go to for EV information and sort of market knowledge like that. And boy, he's got some cold water to throw on the robotaxi thing. I got some clips from him. This is him talking about that it's going to be a while before someone solves this to be at the point where you can really start to scale it up dramatically and get to a level of number of vehicles on the road where you can start to build a really viable business out of it. It's probably closer to eight to ten years, closer towards the end of this decade than where we are today. And again, this is Marks YouTube show energy Media. I'll have a link to it in the show notes, so we can borrow from him without guilt. And also he's talking about how AI sort of plateaued. What I was just talking about, the Neuron net development in early 2010s was something that people thought would move fast but apparently he sees a big plateau happening and slowing down. We had that big advancement in the middle part of the last decade, and that suddenly moved things forward very quickly. But then it plateaued and it's been climbing very slowly ever since it hit that plateau. And so that's why it's hard to predict when we'll get to that stage where these systems are at least consistently as good as or better than humans. Now, there's been a Department of justice investigation into Musk over full selfdriving claims. According to Reuters, prosecutors in Washington, San Francisco are examining whether Tesla misled customers. I hear when you look at sort of on stage discussions from people in this space, they're really bad mouthed Tesla. Now, you could take that with a grain of salt and say it's envy, or I don't believe in their approach, but Tesla is always proving people wrong. Anyway, this is his opinion, his contrary opinion on the Tesla approach, and he doesn't think much of it. There are some fundamental flaws in the Tesla approach relying on cameras only, and particularly because of the way they've configured the cameras, where you don't have any stereoscopic imaging, so you can do parallax imaging to get some accurate distance measurement. Tesla is relying entirely on AI inference to try to measure distance to objects, which is an inherently flawed approach. The system that they have devised is not really capable of robust automated driving, and probably never will be. Between the name and what Elon Musk has consistently said for the last six years, since October of 2016, when they launched autopilot version two. And he started his presentation with starting today, all vehicles rolling out of the Tesla factory have all the hardware they need to get to level five. Autonomy. Which was a lie then and it's a lie today. He's a pinch angry, I think, which is up to the sort of a toad that I hear of these things. But yeah, well, we'll see. But Tesla's future is highly reliant on that's one big aspect of it. It's not just selling cars. Yeah, well, I suspect that they probably wouldn't do the same thing now. So that's back in 2016, and Tesla was not in a profitable position back then, so they started selling full selfdriving, I think partly just as a way to get revenue into the company, a future promise of a future feature. Since then, they've become very profitable and very stable. So if they were starting this program now, I don't think they would be selling this feature for the future at ten, $20,000. But, yeah, I suspect back then they just wanted the cash flow. And another problem that I've seen come up is people like you who have the full self driving beta but aren't using it. So apparently that's a bit of an issue because it's kind of annoying. Right? It turns off and you think, Well, I'll just drive normally for now. Yeah, I've. Got better things to do. Sure. Even as you're retirement. But this has become an issue because they're getting less data and they need more data, which is maybe one of the reasons why they're trying to roll it out to even people with bad driving scores. Yeah, but could they possibly even crunch all the data that they're getting? Almost on the inside observer, I have a friend who owns a Tesla, but you I'm amazed at how the promises keep coming that it's later this year, end of the year, next year, and year after year it's always there. But watching the progress of Auto full self driving beta, it does seem to be a slow crawl. Something could happen where everything comes together. I don't know, everything about it to ComEd and maybe they'll solve something that puts everything together and suddenly it makes a giant leap forward. But right now and we'll see. We'll see. Because we're six months away from testing your car again on the same route, and we'll see how it does. And we had a rainy day last year, so it wasn't perfect, but yeah. Anyway, France is doing something quite unusual, even for France. Yeah. So there is new legislation that was approved this week that requires all parking lots in France with spaces for at least 80 vehicles. This is both existing and new parking lots be covered by solar panels. So this is great. You think that has an 80 vehicle parking lot? What would that be? A strip mall? A strip mall would have that. Yeah, I guess so. We have quite a few kind of small parking lots in our city. I think that wouldn't qualify. Or even a big hotel. Brian would have 80 spots, wouldn't it? I mean, if you have 80 rooms, you'd have 80 spots. Yeah, it just makes sense. Like, this is schools, maybe. Yeah, schools. This is space that it's just there. And if we put solar panels on it, it will keep the rain off the cars and produce electricity. It's a nice incentive. So you have to do this. Yeah, this is the law. So according to the government, the potential of the measure could reach up to eleven gigawatts, or the equivalent of the power of ten nuclear reactors at midday on a Sunday in the summer. So that's interesting. That's a lot of power just from parking lots. No, and we've had stories in the past about covering canals. Like in California, I might as well cover the canals. It's just all this space that we have that could have a double use. And parking lots is one of them. You know, though, I wonder what the business model is for this, what the payback is, because I don't know what France's tariff system is, or if they have any money for just putting out the panels or the feed in of the electricity to the grid, how they pay and what the payback period is. But let's say that it's reasonable. You would have customers that would be pretty happy to be parking under a structure, an outdoor structure that shaded you, perhaps shield you from precipitation. And you could sit and wait for your spousal unit to shop. And you wouldn't cook in the sun. He would be shaded and comfortable. No, we have a real problem here. We have very hot sun in the summertime, so always better to get a parking spot with shade. I thought this was interesting. So it's the bigger parking lots that are going to have to do this first. Car parks with 400 spaces or more have about three years to comply, and then the smaller parking lots get about five years to complete. So this isn't just new construction. This is existing construction. Existing parking lots. That is a big deal. My goodness. Yeah. No, and if you think of some of the like, think of I don't know if they have Walmart in France, but you think of Walmart, the Walmart, the giant parking lots that we have for places like Walmart or shopping malls. Man, that would be a lot of solar panels. Yeah. I've been thinking about what we'll use, because the grocery store that we went to last night of the blizzard actually has a bunch of stuff built on the outside of what used to be a parking lot. There's actually an office building there with yeah, they've been restaurants used to be a gigantic parking lot, but they keep adding businesses to it. And that confused me because it's hard to find now it's easy to find a store at the end of a giant parking lot that's 10 miles away. There are walmarts in China. Do they? Yeah, they do. Wow. There's no French walmart in France, so I just Google that. Of course, there's a French Disneyland, but there's no French Walmart. It's basically the same, right? Yeah. Disney. When we do go to a robot taxi future, we're going to need less parking spaces. Right. So the way I envision it is, say I've got a shopping mall close to me that's got lots of parking spaces. And I think that what they could say is, well, you know, part of this shopping mall can be designated for Robotaxis because, you know, robotaxis will go mostly at the peak of when people get on and off work and on and off school. It's just like rush hour. But for the rest of the day, they'll have to sit somewhere. They'll need somewhere to have they'll need to go somewhere where they can charge and where they can somewhere nearby, different areas of town. I don't know where that's going to be. Yeah. Plus, I imagine it will be like the movie Cars, and they'll want to hang around together at a party, have social issues and things like that. Of course it will be like that. But at the same time, I'm wondering if we'll need less. Well, I mean, that's what Tony Seba says. We'll need less parking lots. And there's a significant amount of Los Angeles that has nothing but parking lots. And that's also a heat gainer for it increases the urban island, t island of cities as parking lots. Yeah. Well, hopefully we can densify all of our cities and just start building more building and housing on all these parking lots we're not going to. Right? And that'll be an exciting future. Plus like a driven right to the door. And hopefully some sort of device will lift me up and put me on an automated cart that will drive me around. Because walking is just too much for sure in the future, I think. So Porsche has made 100,000 cars. What does it mean? 100,000 of Brian? This is the Porsche Taycan electric car. They've now produced 1000 of this car. So it's been a pretty big success for Porsche. These are in demand. They are selling more of these than the 911, which is kind of the marquee car for Porsche. What I didn't know is it's not a huge company. This is really a niche player. So they delivered just over 300,000 vehicles last year. So they're a small car company niche and of course, very expensive. Tesla deliver like, one and a half million. Yeah, and they're just getting going. This is with two new factories that just went up. This is just with one. Yeah. So they delivered just over 300,000 vehicles total, and 41,000 of them were the all electric Ticans. So they have plans to electrify more of their lineup. But like a lot of things, it's been a little bit delayed. The Macan was the next one that they were going to electrify, and so far they haven't managed to do that. They've been surprised by that, haven't they? I mean, I think they've been overwhelmed by demand, but they've also stepped up to meet that demand, which is great, too. Yeah, but it really does make sense if you're someone who's interested in a Porsche, you're interested in performance driving. And as we know, Electric makes for fantastic performance driving. And if you're wealthy, then you want to impress your wealthy green friends. Well, there's nothing more luxurious, though, than driving quiet, so I love that. I don't know. Would that impress your green friends to a Porsche can? Some of them seems a little excessive. I've impressed myself. Maybe that's really what counts in the car world. Yeah. I don't know. It's a lot of money and you could probably solve the world hunger in a small nation somewhere for the purchase of that car. But Electric says that Tesla is now earning eight times more per car than Toyota. And Toyota is basically one of the world's largest automakers, and they're starting to apparently notice. Back in Japan, according to Electric, for example, tesla reported $3.3 billion in net profit last quarter, compared to Toyota earning just roughly 3 billion. So. Yeah, Tesla. This is despite Toyota delivering eight times more cars than Tesla in the same time period, and Tesla beat them on profits. That's kind of wild. It is. So they made the same money, same profits. But wow, I mean, the demand for Tesla is high. There's this whole inflation thing going on. There's the supply problem, the chip shortages. So they have eat up their prices a little bit. Thousand here, thousand there, as a lot of people are. What do you think it is? It's like a third of profit per car or something like that. It's really high. It's higher than most people. Yeah, I don't know. But the traditional automakers make more money on things like service and part of stuff. So this milestone of Tesla beating Toyota and earnings during a quarter is especially impressive when you consider that just a decade ago, toyota owned 3% of Tesla with just a $50 million investment. Think of how they get rid of that. So now Tesla generates $50 million in free cash flow almost every day, which is why the CEO can do cookie things and do whatever they want. So it's now time for the Tweet of the Week. This is where I highlight a tweet that I like. There's a couple of good ones. Maybe I'll do two. This week from Jenny Chase, solar analyst with Bloomberg NEF New Energy Finance. It's a casual line from those hippies at Pakistan's National Electric Power Regulatory Authority. And this is basically what they said in their report. They said the existing average cost of supply electricity to consumers is high, way too high. And one way to reduce this high cost is to procure cheap electricity from indigenous resources like wind and solar. Now, if we heard that from our utility in Canada, that would be remarkable. But this is coming from Pakistan, a very conservative place, who is not known, especially in governmental terms, to talk like this. But they see the value of this. No utility talks this way, actually. But Pakistan is and because she lives in the solar space, she knows nobody else is saying that but Pakistan Solar, or pardon me, the electricity utility is saying that one way that we're going to lower prices is by buying wind and solar. So good for them. Yeah. As we've said before, the fuel costs for wind and solar are zero. And now a secondary Tweet of the week. Just because I wanted to do too, and I hate deciding, brian, it's a lot of work to decide. Why should I have to decide? Fred lambert lambert. Lambert. Lambert. Fred Lambert, editor in chief at Electric. He says his personal account he says when I talk about Elon's feedback loop being hijacked by superfans, this is what I mean. And he has a story from the Mercury News in San Jose, California. And before I go on, I just want to say that Fred owns like, five teslas has been the biggest fan of Tesla and he's a journalist, but he's been reporting on Tesla forever. He is an enthusiast. He's cheering them on in every way. But Elon Musk blocked him once a long time ago because he had something mildly critical to say and Elon couldn't just take that. So what Fred thinks is that Elon like Michael Jackson and other people, they have this feedback loop of everybody who's constantly praising them. And this is a story from the San Jose newspaper that says that this one guy who's like a dad was tweeting him like 19 times a day or something. And Elon was often responding to him because it's such praise. And the softspoken superfan dad praised him for being fit, ripped and healthy and asked, hey Elon Musk, what's your secret? It sounds like almost a joke, like a comedian might do that because it's the opposite of true. He's not fit, he's not ripped, he's not healthy. You look at him and you see a guy who doesn't he's like an It guy who never gets an hour of sleep. It looks like he hasn't had sleep in years. And certainly not the healthy lifestyle and certainly no son. And the world's richest man's response was how do I keep fit and healthy? Fasting and diabetic drug that promotes weight loss. So good for you. When you're rich, you get to have the diagnosis. Drugs that promote weight loss and fasting is not good. Sumo wrestlers fast. They don't eat until 01:00 p.m. In the afternoon. Yeah. Wow. Not to 01:00 p.m. In the afternoon. That is a CES fast fact for you. That's because they store more weight if they don't eat all day. They train their body to fast. See, in human history, back when we were in caves and such, ten years ago, if you didn't eat, your body would think it was a famine and it would store extra weight. It would just change. So like fat people like me would survive in a zombie apocalypse. So my nutritionist tells me because we would need 20% less calories because we're that more efficient. Anyway, so we get a little bit of feedback here from the Twitter says clean energy fraud. You guys are talking about the future of hydrogen. So check out this podcast and what was it? It says this guy's super anti hydrogen and has some great points. And this is from Nelson. The podcast was our friend Mark Mslop at Energy Talk Show. He has a podcast as well. Occasionally puts out a guest, Paul Martin, a chemical engineer with a 30 year history of working with hydrogen and a member of the Hydrogen Science Coalition. And I'll put a link to that in the show notes if you want to hear some smack talk on hydrogen. And coming up in the show is the lightning round zoom through the rest of the week's headlines in a fast fashion. We like to hear from you. It's really what we live on. Brian doesn't get up in the morning without the hope of somebody contacting us. Clean energy show@gmail.com. We're on TikTok and Instagram and everywhere else. Clean energy, pond. We're on mastodon. At Mastodon Energy. We're on YouTube. Clean energy show. Speak Pipe. You can leave us an online voicemail message. Speak pipe.com. Cleanenergyshow. That sound means it is time for the lightning round, where we'll end the show this way. A fast paced look of the week in clean energy and climate news. Canada is putting the break on China's $4 billion lithium acquisition free. China is here buying up all the lithium they can, and Canada has finally said no. So Chinese companies have been the biggest financers of overseas lithium projects globally in recent years, including purchases of Canadian listed assets. And that's a new development, Brian. Yeah. So this is new legislation that limits the foreign ownership of some of these critical minerals that we're going to need for the electric revolution. Call it the biden approach, saying no more China. The Charging Interface Initiative, a global industry association focused on the electrification of transportation, has launched its new megawatt charging system. MCs is going to be called. We have CCS, the non Tesla standard for charging connectors. This is going to be MCs. So memorize that term. Brian. MCs is the new megawatt charging system standard for North America. So this will be some specific kind of plug and protocol for how to charge at even higher speeds. Megawatt speeds for trucks, basically for trucks, big trucks. Not necessarily all semitransport trucks, but medium trucks as well. This is interesting. The 2023 Kia EV six base trim has been dropped. And the starting price that means has dropped to an unfortunate $50,000 US. That means brian, I can't afford it. Yes, that's too bad. I mean, we sometimes do get different trim levels here in Canada, so we'll see. But 50,000 is a lot. Another CS fast fact, the golden toad is the first species to go extinct to climate change. Put that in your toaster and smoke it. It's too warm for them. And I guess the towed has had enough. Panasonic has broken ground on their EV battery factory in Kansas. This is what we refer to early red states getting a lot of this EV manufacturing, green tech manufacturing and jobs. And they'll be making 2070 cylindrical cells. A Viking bus orders 31 Mercedes Benz E Cetera buses as long distance runners in the country known as Denmark. Hello, Denmark. The reason I bring that up is because we've mentioned this before. When will long distance city to city buses electrify? Well, the answer is, I guess it's starting. That's great. The market share of zero mission light duty vehicle registrations in Canada hit 9.4% in the third quarter of this year. And that's a new record. It's up from any previous record which shows that the EV adoption is accelerating in Canada. Yeah, we're definitely past some sort of a tipping point, which is often said to be around 5% of the market. So, yeah. Canada at 9.4% EVs. That's fantastic. How many Ford Mustang electrics do you see around? I see them almost every day now. Maybe it's the same neighborhood, I don't know, but I see them everywhere. The North End, one of 600 EV sold in Europe will be made by Chinese makers of EVs by 2025. Fitch solution says, according to the China EV Post, So that's interesting. Something we've been following since the early days of this podcast is when will Chinese EV makers start to make gains in Western markets? Yeah, and I guess you're at first, because it's always Europe first, isn't it? Because they need their EVs over there. It's physically closer and they have tougher regulations to kind of phase out combustion. A slight majority of California voters favor the recently announced ban on new sales of gasoline powered vehicles by 2035. Only 52% and 43% disapprove, but hopefully they'll come around when prices do. I don't think anyone's going to complain about the range and prices there and charging infrastructure. Another fast fact air conditioners and heating elements consume 50% of electricity in America. Did you know that? That's a lot. No, that's a lot. Analysis as seen by the BBC shows that the production and transport of LNG causes up to ten times the carbon emissions compared to pipeline gas. So build more pipeline. I'm kidding. This around here, liquid natural gas as opposed to actual gas that goes through pipes. The greater than 8% electricity from a solar club in Europe for 2021. Here's the countries that have 8% or more just from solar germany, Spain, Greece, Italy, Netherlands not bad. And there's a whole bunch of 5%. A whole whack at 5%. Good for you. Greece, by the way. I always think of Greece as a leader in clean energy, but these things, they sneak up on you. Amazon is meeting holiday demand this year with a fleet of over 1000 Livian electric vehicle delivery vans. So we are talking about those for a long time now. And I guess there's a thousand on the roads for Christmas this year. Yeah, that's not bad. But 10,000 next year and 50,000 a year after that or something. Yeah, they've definitely ordered more than that. Amazon is a big investor in Rivian and they're desperately trying to scale up their production of these vans and their pickup trucks. So hopefully things speed up nicely. And finally this week, Tony Sieve says in a post that speaking of Amazon, amazon created a vast information technology infrastructure, but the use of just five weeks of the year, the holiday shopping season, which is Christmas in November and December where we live, they overbuilt capacity for the rest of the year. And he says, well, let's call that super data center. And thus the Amazon AWS cloud was born, which you see advertised on TV. It's now a trillion dollar business because they overbuilt something. So the reason he mentions that, Brian, is why? Because this is what's going to happen to solar, wind and batteries. Because solar is intermittent. Wind is intermittent. We need to overbuild it. But because these technologies are so cheap and getting cheaper, we can easily overbuild it. So Amazon, of course, a large amount of shopping happens in November and December, the Christmas shopping season here in Canada and the US. So they had to really beef up their online system to handle all these transactions in December. And what did they end up with? Amazon Web Services, which is now a trillion dollar business, apparently. Yes, it's a lot of money just for overbuilding something, because that's what's going to happen with the energy markets, because we're going to have extra solar, extra wind around. That is our show for this week. You know what? Next year we're going to have a Patreon. If you have any ideas for the patreon, let us know what kind of perks you might be interested in. And by God, write us right now. Cleanenergytow@gmail.com or clean energy pond everywhere on social media. If you're new to the show, remember to subscribe to our show on your podcast app to get new shows, new episodes delivered every week. We'll see you next time. See you next week!  

The Kingdom Perspective
Our Ultimate Citizenship

The Kingdom Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 1:50


Transcript: Hello! This is Pastor Don of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective! Your ultimate hope will drive what you obsess about. Said another way, wherever you find your greatest sense of belonging will determine what you think is ultimately valuable. “Home” is always where the heart is. Paul calls this our “citizenship”, and it effects how we think of ourselves, especially in our public engagement. Although the Bible tells us that we are indeed citizens of this world, with all the rights and responsibilities thereof, our ultimate “citizenship is in heaven from which we eagerly await a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ” (Phil. 3:21). Such a hope functions like an anchor in the stormy world of politics. It doesn't keep us from the public square; it keeps us steady in the public square. While everyone else may be getting sucked up in the vortex of divisions and partisan politics, we are able to operate with both shrewdness and gentleness. It gives us the strength from which we can both obey God, love our neighbor, and testify to the truth. Thus, at the end of the day, we must be formed not by the kingdom of this world but by the kingdom of heaven. Since we are citizens of God's kingdom, we are thus called to be ambassadors in this world. The most political act you will do this week is not campaigning for an election or voting. Rather, it is gathering with God's people and calling on the King of Heaven—asking that His kingdom come and that His will be done on earth, even as it is in heaven. Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective. “The Lord reigns; let the peoples tremble! He sits enthroned upon the cherubim; let the earth quake! The Lord is great in Zion; he is exalted over all the peoples. Let them praise your great and awesome name! Holy is he! The King in his might loves justice. You have established equity; you have executed justice and righteousness in Jacob. Exalt the Lord our God; worship at his footstool! Holy is he!" ~ Psalm 99:1-5 (ESV)

The Kingdom Perspective
Misplaced Confidence

The Kingdom Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 1:57


Transcript: Hello! This is Pastor Don of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective! In our current cultural climate, we are increasingly tempted to become anxious over politics. We can be tempted to get upset that things are not going the “right way”. However, as Christians we need not be anxious. Rather, we are free to walk in faith, despite political disappointment or disagreement. Now, why? Our anxiety and anger stem from a misplaced confidence—fixing our eyes on self and would-be saviors, instead of Christ. The Scriptures are clear: The kingdom of God is not inaugurated with the next session of Congress. The Messiah doesn't arrive on Air Force One. Jesus is not coming to take sides. He is coming to take over. As Abraham Lincoln put it so well at a time of great division: “Sir, my concern is not whether God is on our side; my greatest concern is to be on God's side, for God is always right.” Remember, the early Christians were put to death for their simple confession, “Jesus is Lord!” By this, they were saying that no human leader or political regime is ultimate. Their hope and allegiance were in Christ Jesus, and the powers-that-be saw that as a threat. These Christians had their own center of gravity and so could not be manipulated by the state or society. As Christians, I urge you with renewed fervor to look to the Savior, not to Caesar. This allows us to engage the public square both courageously and peaceably. It frees us to enter the voting booth with the proper perspective: rightfully fulfilling our duty as citizens, not frantically looking for salvation. Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective. “For this reason, because I have heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love toward all the saints, I do not cease to give thanks for you, remembering you in my prayers, that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you the Spirit of wisdom and of revelation in the knowledge of him, having the eyes of your hearts enlightened, that you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power toward us who believe, according to the working of his great might that he worked in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and above every name that is named, not only in this age but also in the one to come. And he put all things under his feet and gave him as head over all things to the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills all in all.” ~ Ephesians 1:15-23 (ESV)

The Kingdom Perspective
Eternal Hope and the Lordship of Jesus

The Kingdom Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 1:56


Transcript: Hello! This is Pastor Don of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective! In our current political climate, we are increasingly tempted to become anxious not only for any given election result, but also the potential reaction to it. However, as Christians we need not be anxious nor filled with dread. Rather, we are free to walk in faith and be peacemakers. Why? Well, first, we can know one thing for sure, that the day after any election nothing will have changed in heaven…or even ultimately on earth. Jesus is Lord regardless of the outcome. And that is very good news…for everyone! Recently, a dear brother commented to me about the “devastating” situation our world is in. He wondered “what people hold onto without the hope and assurance of Christ.” How true! Thank God we have a hope that goes beyond elections. Indeed! We have a hope that goes beyond the grave! Jesus—not earthly kings, congresses, or courts—determines our fate. All earthly kingdoms shall “come to pass,” but Jesus's kingdom shall have no end. One of the most arrogant politicians of all-time, King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon, finally got it right after God humbled him: For His dominion is an everlasting dominion, And His kingdom endures from generation to generation. All the inhabitants of the earth are of no account, But He does according to His will among the army of heaven And among the inhabitants of earth; And no one can fend off His hand Or say to Him, ‘What have You done?' (Daniel 4:34-35) Nebuchadnezzar had quite literally lost his mind. His self-obsessed pride had driven him mad, until he “raised [his] eyes heavenward and [his] reason was restored” (Daniel 4:34). Nothing restores our sanity like a glimpse of the Sovereign Savior. Are you anchoring your hope in the eternal God or in earthly government? Something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective. “This is the interpretation, O king: It is a decree of the Most High, which has come upon my lord the king, that you shall be driven from among men, and your dwelling shall be with the beasts of the field. You shall be made to eat grass like an ox, and you shall be wet with the dew of heaven, and seven periods of time shall pass over you, till you know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will. And as it was commanded to leave the stump of the roots of the tree, your kingdom shall be confirmed for you from the time that you know that Heaven rules. Therefore, O king, let my counsel be acceptable to you: break off your sins by practicing righteousness, and your iniquities by showing mercy to the oppressed, that there may perhaps be a lengthening of your prosperity.” ~ Daniel 4:24-27 (ESV)

The Kingdom Perspective
Considerate of One Another's Perspective

The Kingdom Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 1:54


Transcript: Hello! This is Pastor Don of Christ Redeemer Church. Welcome to The Kingdom Perspective! When engaging in political discussion, we must always seek to be considerate of our brothers and sisters who may have differing perspectives, born of differing personal experiences. Do not stand in judgment of one another. Human politics are always messy. Our options are never perfect, and our perspective is never quite clear. In a real sense, whenever we enter the voting booth, we are always settling for some compromise. Therefore, when we fulfill our civic duty to vote, we must have the freedom of conscience to make the choice we think is best, before the eyes of God. It is before God that we will give an account, not before one another! Certainly, we have the freedom to persuade one another as to which choice would best facilitate the common good. But we do not have the freedom to judge one another's consciences—disdaining others by casting their motives and intelligence in the worst possible light. Inevitably, we are going to have differing perspectives, differing consciences, and therefore, we may come to different conclusions. Our responsibility is not to sit in judgment, but to love, understand, and serve one another under the kingly authority of Jesus. Jesus commands us to love our enemies; how much more so our brothers and sisters with differing opinions! The true and final Judge has commanded us to understand and accept one another. He does so precisely because He has already been judged for us all. And that's something to think about from The Kingdom Perspective. “So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.” ~ Philippians 2:1-8 (ESV)

The Clean Energy Show
Tarnishing the Tesla Brand; European Union Bans Combustion Vehicles

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 49:28


Twit Elon Musk may be tarnishing the Tesla Brand as we navigates his way through Twitter ownership. The European Union bans the sale of new combustion vehicles by 2035. Small modular nuclear reactors largely rely on highly enriched urnanium that only comes from Russia. So that's a problem since Russia invaded Ukraine. A large bank is getting scolded for greenwashing during last year's COP climate conference. Turns out they're really into financing fossil fuels. The IEA says carbon emissions will peak in 2025, sooner than previously thought. Why? Thanks to Russia invading Ukraine.  British PM Sunak may attend COP 27 afterall. King Charles would like to join him but the government won't let him. Cruise ships are way worse than travelling by airliner for carbon emissions per person, per mile. James gets angry at a Nissan ad starring Brie Larson telling people to buy a gas guzzler and not wait for 'furturistic' EVs. Beyond Catastrophe A New Climate Reality Is Coming Into View By David Wallace-Wells Here's a gift link to the article discussed in this week's episode (no paywall): https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2022/10/26/magazine/climate-change-warming-world.html?unlocked_article_code=00s0e3fyPujeR6ZZPUmwythO-8EhSgezVhODl8kPm8RXKmxbQukf9ee3Hcyz34OSNFIlx_wXLHnIAbMr3aG5ahMgZRr6zucMwAKyLgCGIuYs2KUa8oicAdA8QzdXJq-8Fs549_949iEdGZggYwjrJ8ZC_eCqz69i5w2sB6YaBtzpBxTBCvKtqDF_VXY0UX0wpOj3jgMywSImQs7H9N3Zgt4tHB0bvqWkQZEmhxvReOE0aeg5QH-soag4aQXaWlDLeE3eR2wi35ecfN3tClOHfo6s-_gGy8226ulDDtGrzdRXOLu6DSz6YiaavnDBPvYZsMNpYUzizeei992Es3rv1AUMLc_9dCsM57OnlSkd8R93De1uRcwl&smid=share-url Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow   Transcript Hello, and welcome to episode 137 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, it's not just natural gas that comes from Russia. So that's the specialized uranium used in small modular nuclear reactors. Whoopsy. The European Union has officially banned new combustion and cars in 2035. Now. If only they could ban the Eurovision song contest. A large multinational bank is getting scolded for greenwashing. Brian I'm old enough to remember what a multinational bank greenwashed. It meant laundering money for criminals. According to the IEA, carbon emissions will peak in 2025. They also said our podcast peaked in 2020, which I thought was kind of me. Why do they keep studying us? Anyway? All that and more on this edition of the Clean Energy Show. And welcome, everyone, to our weekly podcast on climate and clean energy. If you're new, be sure to subscribe to get all of our episodes delivered to you weekly. More on the show. Brian we have is Twitter owner Elon Musk damaging Tesla's brand? Answer is yes. Will British PM Sunak attend Cop 27? And will King Charles be jealous? Answer is also yes. Well, I'm spoiling everything. SMRs have a geopolitical problem thanks to Russia invading Ukraine, poland bosched its nuclear ambitions and is now letting foreigners run the show. And how Africa can benefit even more than the rest of the world by installing renewables. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. All kinds of stuff we're talking about this week. So much stuff to do. So one thing I wanted to catch up on, which I just sort of mentioned off the cuff last week, we somehow started talking about a transatlantic cruise. Something I've always wanted to do is take a cruise across the Atlantic rather than airplane because it would be sort of old fashioned and fun and less stressful than plane travel. I've always wanted to do it, but I've done some googling and it turns out, in terms of a carbon footprint, taking a ship across the Atlantic is worse than flying. But, yeah, I just wanted to follow up because I didn't sort of cite any sources last week because I just kind of mentioned it off the cuff. But if anyone wants to Google that, there's sort of a few articles here, but there's one from the Guardian that's way back from 2006, and it quotes Climate Care, which is a carbon offsetting company, and they calculated it at 00:40 3 passenger mile on a cruise ship and only .25 for a long haul flight. So point 43 versus point 25 for airplane travel. So, yeah, it does appear that taking a ship, one of those big cruise ships anyway, like, maybe you could still away on, like, a cargo ship that's going anyway. I mean, that'd probably be well, they put swimming pools on those ships, multiple swimming pools, ads on my social media. They've got a go kart track on the top of one of these cruise ships. Really? Wow. Jeez. I'd like that. Hopefully there's a barrier so you don't fly off into the ocean. Yeah, cruise ship. It's like you're moving basically a small city across the ocean. So I guess we shouldn't be surprised that it's worse in terms of carbon emissions. And then also possible, like, they sometimes do things like burn their waste because they've got so much waste on a ship and things like that are not good. We should have done something on a sustainable Halloween because it was Halloween last night. And what's your favorite Halloween candy? You're not known for your sweet tooth, I'll say that. Yeah. What did you steal from the kids, Brian? Come on, be honest. Well, we had some, like, Swedish Berries that were pretty good. Those are good, aren't they? They do really ring the bell in the old brain, don't they? They're nice. There are a lot of things. My least favorite is smarties. I have a box right here. Oh, I like smarties. You're the guy who likes smarties. Smarties. I looked this up yesterday, is at the bottom of the preferred candy lists all over the Internet. At the bottom. Wow. I like smarties. You like smarties. And I'm going to eat them right now out of not spite, but because I have to. And also, I will point out, you know, the candy that we call rockets, a little sugar candy, in America, those are known as smarties. What? Yeah. They don't have smarties like we have smarties. Really? Yes. Smarties here in Canada are kind of vaguely like an eminent M. It's a chocolate covered candy covered chocolate in different colors, but they're not very good, the M and Ms. I will tell you, this is a knowledge that I have deep knowledge of candy have ground up peanuts in the shell, which is why you cannot, if you have a peanut allergy, eat M and M's chocolates. These do not. And I really noticed the flavor difference. Like, they have a flavor to their shell in M and Ms. But do you see M amp M very much? No. We had a lot of help. Do you have trick or feeders? Did you do that? Yeah, just maybe a couple of dozen. Well, that's pretty good. My son was texting me all night from his great uncle's house in town where he goes to university. And his uncle, who's 83, and his twin lives in Regina, is very close to us, his sister, and he was giving out he didn't give out anything last year, so when my son was there so my son was kind of wondering what Uncle Gary gives out christmas oranges. He gives out oranges. Interesting. And my son was very upset by this, but then it got worse because then Uncle Gary made him hand out the oranges and accept the wrath from the kids. How embarrassing. Apparently, there was a meme to give out potatoes, so people were giving up potatoes this year. We did that as a joke. We had some potatoes lying around and we said we should give those out. The thing is, Brian, people are paranoid, even when we were kids about Halloween, catty rather, and those oranges are going to the landfill. Yeah, probably. Maybe one in 20 will be eaten. I bet you most of them will be thrown out, especially when they're handed to a long haired teenager. There are already reports of marijuana gummies getting into the Halloween supply in Winnipeg. I'm sure it's possible, although they're kind of expensive. That's kind of an expensive maybe you get high, you make mistakes, Brian. I don't know. The other thing I want to mention is I've got another Tesla appointment in Saskatoon on Friday. I'm starting to have troubles