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1939–1945 global conflict between the Axis and the Allies

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Best podcasts about wwii

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Latest podcast episodes about wwii

Evil Men
E29: William Colepaugh: America's Dumbest Spy

Evil Men

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 76:42


William Colepaugh was a lonely Connecticut kid who grew up idolizing all things German. He even had a framed picture of Hitler in his bedroom, which didn't exactly solve his social problems. When America entered WWII, Colepaugh did the unthinkable: he defected to Germany and volunteered to spy for the Nazis. Luckily, he was a bumbling fool who spent more time drinking in Manhattan nightclubs than undermining the Manhattan Project. This week, Chris, James and Michael make fun of the Nazis and totally disrespect the Third Reich. Plus: the intro revisits the Milli Vanilli controversy, sheds light on Nancy and Ronald Reagan's special talents AND bigs up Ricky Gervais' hit sitcom “Afterlife.” Enjoy! Support Evil Men on Patreon for exclusive monthly bonus episodes, including SPECIAL EXCLUSIVE MATERIAL. Follow Evil Men on Twitter and Instagram. And rate and review us wherever possible! Brought to you By: The Sonar Network

Veterans Chronicles
Gen. Charles McGee, Tuskegee Airmen, World War II, Korea, Vietnam

Veterans Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 52:11


On January 16, 2022, retired U.S. Air Force Brigadier General Charles McGee died at the age of 102. His story is one of profound courage, excellence in service, and inspiring personal character.McGee joined the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. At the time, however, McGee and the other black pilots were deemed unworthy to be in units with their white counterparts.In this edition of "Veterans Chonicles," McGee details the outstanding service record of Tuskegee pilots in World War II, the discrimination they faced upon returning home, the desegregation of the U.S. Armed Forces in 1947 and his service in Korea and Vietnam.McGee piloted more than 400 total combat missions and served more than 30 years in uniform. Perhaps even more impressive is his complete lack of bitterness in response to the ugly discrimination he faced.This interview between McGee and the AVC's Greg Corombos was conducted in February 2019, when then-Col. McGee was 99 years old. Shortly after turning 100 on Dec. 7, 2019, Col. McGee was promoted to Brigadier General by President Trump.

Catholic Answers Live
#10459 Open Forum - Joe Heschmeyer

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022


Questions Covered: 02:28 – Why didn't the pope and the Catholics take more of a hard stance against Germany in WWII? 08:00 – Where is the Trinity in the Bible? 14:20 – One of my friends has a hard time with confession. He wants to know if he's still forgiven if he doesn't feel sorry for his sins, but he wants to feel sorry. 21:20 – How do we distinguish between sinners and righteous people, like the Bible talks about in the story of Sodom? Isn't there a lot of gray area? 29:40 – Why isn't there an official Church teaching on the existence of aliens, or at least a clarification on whether they might be angels or demons? 41:58 – Why would God create the dinosaurs if he knew they would be killed? 48:20 – Whenever I talk to my friend about Catholic teaching, he says “I'll pray about it and God will tell me if it's right.” Is there anything fallacious about this thinking? …

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

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Politics Theory Other
Eric Zemmour and the mainstreaming of the French far-right w/ Sebastian Budgen

Politics Theory Other

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:46


Sebastian Budgen joins PTO to talk about the rise of Eric Zemmour - the new star of the French far right and a candidate in April's presidential election. We discussed Zemmour's career in journalism, and why he is able to attract support from both Le Pen voters and more mainstream conservatives. We also talked about the strategic logic behind Zemmour's efforts to rehabilitate the reputation of the collaborationist Vichy government of WWII.

The Spaniard Show
Books 1451 - One Small Step Can Change Your Life

The Spaniard Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:04


*NOTE: This is the first time we'll be covering an entire book in one single episode. My hope is to grow this show, and this is an experiment to see if one episode per book helps with growth. Please offer feedback at @charliespaniard.  This week's book is about continuous improvement. It's about breaking down goals into small, often tiny, manageable steps. Initially a concept brought about during WWII, kaizen has transformed Japanese business and can be used in your daily life to tackle the obstacles to change that stand in your way.  ... Click here to learn more about the World's Toughest Book Club. To help support The Spaniard Show, utilize the links below: Get this book here: One Small Step Can Change Your Life Purchase all your books here: Spaniard Show Reading List For speaking information, click here: Spaniard Website

Go To Market Grit
Former President of NetApp, Tom Mendoza: Sustaining Urgency & Injecting Tension

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 80:51


Tom Mendoza, former President of Sales at NetApp, knows that there is a way to do business while bringing out the good in it. Tom has embedded this throughout his career and continues to make it a philosophical and practical focus. While Tom's incredible journey may speak for itself, we take a deeper look at his core leadership values, how it has inspired his generosity and resilience, and the impact it continues to have on others.In this episode, Tom discusses his humble beginnings in Long Island during the post-WWII era and the namesake for the Mendoza Business School and scholarship program. He expounds on important quotes that he still lives by, and why trust is critical when building a successful company. Tom also shares insight on his massive success at NetApp and how he grew the company from zero to a billion.In this episode, we cover:  Tom's childhood, beginning with his parent's journey to Long Island, NY after World War II, and his first job as an usher at a movie theater. (03:06) “Bring out the good in business”: Tom shares the touching story behind his Notre Dame scholarship program and the Mendoza Business School. (07:11) How the phrase, “catch someone doing something right” came about - and a deep dive into Tom's core leadership mantra. (14:53) A look back on the day Tom played a round of golf with Tiger Woods with Warren Buffett as his caddy. (27:01) NetApp–from zero to a billion: How Tom leveraged his passion for building companies to accelerate NetApp's outstanding revenue growth - and the effect of the dotcom bubble on NetApp and its impact on company culture. (32:38) Why Tom almost retired from NetApp before accepting the role as President - and how NetApp encourages employees to give back to the world. (47:46) Tom's perspective on customer trust and support, and why companies without a sustained sense of urgency fail. (56:43) How Tom combats complacency through injecting tension. (01:08:47) Links: Connect with Tom LinkedIn NetApp Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
1/13/22 Daniel Ellsberg: Humans Are Not to Be Entrusted With Nuclear Weapons

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 95:30


Scott is joined by the heroic whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg to talk about a recent press release he helped put out calling for the abolition of land-based nuclear missiles in the United States. Before getting to that, Scott and Ellsberg discuss how his Pentagon Papers leak contributed to the end of the Vietnam War. Ellsberg then draws on his experience as a nuclear war planner to explain the crazy and perilous thinking behind post-WWII nuclear deterrence plans. They also discuss his most recent leak of classified documents that show how close the U.S. came to starting a nuclear war over Taiwan in the late 1950s.  Discussed on the show: “Organizations Call for Elimination of ‘Launch on Warning' Land-Based Nuclear Missiles in the United States” (Common Deams) Uncommon Cause - Volume II by General George Lee Butler “Risk of Nuclear War Over Taiwan in 1958 Said to Be Greater Than Publicly Known” (New York Times) “The Drone Papers” (The Intercept) The Spoils of War by Andrew Cockburn Daniel Ellsberg is a former Marine Corps company commander and nuclear expert for the Rand Corporation. He is the leaker behind the Pentagon Papers, which revealed the truth behind the Vietnam War. He is the author of Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers and The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
1/13/22 Daniel Ellsberg: Humans Are Not to Be Entrusted With Nuclear Weapons

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 95:30


Scott is joined by the heroic whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg to talk about a recent press release he helped put out calling for the abolition of land-based nuclear missiles in the United States. Before getting to that, Scott and Ellsberg discuss how his Pentagon Papers leak contributed to the end of the Vietnam War. Ellsberg then draws on his experience as a nuclear war planner to explain the crazy and perilous thinking behind post-WWII nuclear deterrence plans. They also discuss his most recent leak of classified documents that show how close the U.S. came to starting a nuclear war over Taiwan in the late 1950s.  Discussed on the show: “Organizations Call for Elimination of ‘Launch on Warning' Land-Based Nuclear Missiles in the United States” (Common Deams) Uncommon Cause - Volume II by General George Lee Butler “Risk of Nuclear War Over Taiwan in 1958 Said to Be Greater Than Publicly Known” (New York Times) “The Drone Papers” (The Intercept) The Spoils of War by Andrew Cockburn Daniel Ellsberg is a former Marine Corps company commander and nuclear expert for the Rand Corporation. He is the leaker behind the Pentagon Papers, which revealed the truth behind the Vietnam War. He is the author of Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers and The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio.

Juke In The Back » Podcast Feed
Episode #611 – R&B Influences: The Ink Spots

Juke In The Back » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 59:00


Air Week: January 17-23, 2022 R&B Influences: The Ink Spots The Ink Spots, along with the Mills Brothers, Delta Rhythm Boys and Golden Gate Quartet built the musical bridge from the vaudevillian barber shop quartets of the early 20th Century to the post WWII vocal groups. These quartets modernized the singing style and even came […]

Il podcast di Alessandro Barbero: Lezioni e Conferenze di Storia
#8 La Seconda Guerra Mondiale – Come scoppiano le guerre – Barbero Riserva (Festival della Mente, 2014)

Il podcast di Alessandro Barbero: Lezioni e Conferenze di Storia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 69:22


Il 23 agosto 1939 Hitler e Stalin firmarono un patto di non aggressione, e il 1 settembre Hitler invase la Polonia sperando che le potenze democratiche, Francia e Inghilterra, non sarebbero intervenute. Si sbagliava: quel giorno scoppiò una guerra che si concluse dopo sei anni di morte e distruzione su una scala che il mondo non aveva mai conosciuto prima.Festival della Mente: https://festivaldellamente.itCommunity: https://barberopodcast.it/communityTwitter: https://twitter.com/barberopodcastFacebook: https://facebook.com/barberopodcastInstagram: https://instagram.com/barberopodcastGeorge Street Shuffle by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3800-george-street-shuffleLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The WW2 Podcast
158 - With the Old Breed: EB Sledge

The WW2 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 78:23


In September 1944 a young Marine name Eugene Sledge landed on the Pacific Island of Peleliu. As a mortarman, stretcher-bearer and rifleman Sledge would fight his way across Peleliu then the Japanese island of Okinawa, arguably two of the fiercest and filthiest battles of the Pacific campaign. After the war, Eugene Sledge became a professor at Montevallo University and turned his diary notes from the war into a memoir of his experiences titled With the Old Breed. The book relates the dehumanising brutality displayed by both sides and the animal hatred that each soldier had for his enemy. Sledge writes of the conditions on the islands that meant the Marines often could not wash, stay dry, dig latrines, or even find time to eat. Suffering from constant fear, fatigue, and filth, the struggle of simply living in a combat zone was utterly debilitating for the Marines. With the Old Breed has proved to be highly influential and has been used as source material for the Ken Burns PBS documentary The War (2007), as well as the HBO miniseries The Pacific (2010), where Eugene Sledge was played by Joseph Mazzello. Joining me today is Henry Sledge, Eugene's son. You can also find Henry presenting the podcast What's the Scuttlebutt. Patreon: patreon.com/ww2podcast

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey
#82 - Amanda Leve: MMA, Jiu Jitsu & Taking Down A Girl Double Her Size; Society Is Soft; The Spread of Propaganda; JFK, WWII & Time Travel

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 189:53


Amanda Leve is a world-class martial artist. She is currently the 6th-Ranked No-Gi Grappling / Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Fighter globally (Women's 145 LB+ Division). Furthermore, Leve is also a PFL professional MMA Fighter. ***TIMESTAMPS*** 0:00 - Intro; The Sheik's are big Jiu Jitsu guys; Amanda's dad was crazy for Jiu Jitsu; The discipline MMA & Jiu Jitsu instills; Texas of course says everything goes in MMA; Participation trophy culture; Talking S–t & The Confidence Gene in fighters 25:50 - Amanda talks about her famous recent takedown of 270 pounder, Gabi Garcia; recapping the Pre-fight press conference with Gabi; Drug testing; How good is USADA these days?; How fast did Gabi realize she was bread in a toaster?; Talking weight differences and the Logan Paul Floyd Mayweather example in boxing; Biggest MMA bases around the world; UFC, Bellator, & PFL Promotions 49:00 - Society has gone soft; Why Amanda thinks kids should be allowed to fight; Safety Culture and its damage on kids; The Pandemic's effect on kids and schools; Amanda talks about Malcolm Gladwell's theory on the Chinese numerical system (Outliers); Environments mold people 1:06:52 - Amanda & Julian talk about their alcohol of choice; Rising Sommeliers and their desire to change the “class culture” around wine (“Dining With Skyler” & Skyler Bouchard Oppenheim's fight against wine snobbery) 1:14:42 - Amanda often thinks about the normal world pre-Pandemic; Why Amanda hates social media's hold on society; Amanda loves all conspiracies; Oliver Stone's new JFK Documentary; Julian tells a story about JFK's assassination that he heard from a guy who knew a guy who knew a guy so it's probably not reliable; China and the CCP's regime; The state of America's school system; Mixing the positives of opposite ideologies to fix poverty; The applicability of school curriculums 1:42:42 - Amanda and Julian talk history; WWII & The Holocaust; The Terrifying Quick rise of Hitler in Germany and why it happened; Amanda talks about visiting the Holocaust Museum; How vulnerable is society to falling for an authoritarian regime with psycho beliefs?; Amanda has never watched Inglourious Basterds and that is incredibly disappointing to hear; Hitler conspiracies and the ratlines; Why people can't exist without war 1:59:58 - The stress level of being a spy; Julian does a Departed impression; Amanda tells a story about the British tricking the Germans in WWII; BS meters and conspiracies; Amanda and Julian discuss propaganda; Julian gives a wild theory on the repetition of a specific word in the media over the past couple months; Politicians today vs. a decade ago; The desperation that has formed across society over the past 15-20 years 2:17:58 - Back to JFK for a minute (CIA & The Mafia); The Vatican Documents; The UFO Docs; Julian's friend Alessi's work producing James Fox's upcoming UFO documentary; Amanda discusses the Egyptians, the pyramids, and the aliens who built them; Julian wants to go back in time to have a chat with the Jesus guy and see what's what; Dinosaurs and Hippos; True Crime and Serial Killer obsession in modern culture 2:35:22 - Amanda talks about why fighting is like a drug; When the fear leaves Amanda's system; Amanda talks about why preparation is the most important thing for a fighter; Amanda's mindset coach; The weight cutting process 2:56:40 - How Amanda diagrammed Gabi Garcia's strategy; Julian and Amanda discuss the he similarities between Jiu Jitsu and how Lions hunt Giraffes; why Kobe Bryant studied Great White Sharks; How do people not drink water?; Dealing with hangovers; Amanda's upcoming fight schedule   ~ YouTube EPISODES & CLIPS: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0A-v_DL-h76F75xik8h03Q  ~ PRIVADO VPN FOR $4.99/Month: https://privadovpn.com/trendifier/#a_aid=Julian   Get $100 Off The Eight Sleep Pod Pro Mattress / Mattress Cover: https://eight-sleep.ioym.net/trendifier  Julian's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/julianddorey  ~ Beat provided by: https://freebeats.io  Music Produced by White Hot

The History of Literature
373 Roald Dahl

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 57:03


Born in Wales to parents of Norwegian descent, Roald Dahl (1916-1990) grew up to become one of England's most famous writers. Although Dahl was an accomplished writer of short stories for grownups, he is today known best for his well-loved children's novels, including Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Fantastic Mr. Fox, BFG, Matilda, and Danny, the Champion of the World. Dahl also had a fascinating past as a WWII fighter pilot, an intelligence agent, and the husband of the Hollywood star (and Academy Award winner) Patricia Neal. What secrets were in his past? What do we find unsavory about him today? And what kind of impact do his books still have? Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unashamed with Phil Robertson
Ep 408 | Miss Kay Surprises Jase with an Unusual Gift & a Pre-Baptism 'Bachelor Party' Story

Unashamed with Phil Robertson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 57:28


Phil and Jase recall the early years before fortune and fame and doing what it took to make ends meet. Phil remembers the Greatest Generation, from the WWII era, as being more godly. Jase is surprised when Miss Kay gives him an unusual present. Al describes a new friend's "spiritual bachelor party" before his baptism. And Jase and Al talk about a not-so-credible doctor. Pre-order your signed copy of Uncanceled by Phil Robertson: https://talkshop.live/watch/QID3D1y77yHJ Visit http://ScoreMaster.com/PHIL and see how many points you can add Visit http://BoxOfAwesome.com/PHIL and get 20% off your first monthly box Visit https://40daysforlife.com or Amazon to get “What to Say When: The Complete New Guide to Discussing Abortion” - Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Veterans Chronicles
Yoshio Nakamura, U.S. Army, WWII, 442nd Regimental Combat Team

Veterans Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 36:29


Yoshio Nakamura grew up working on his family's farm in California. Despite the Great Depression, it was a good life and Nakamura had many friends as a teenager. But his life changed drastically after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. Less than three months later, President Franklin Roosevelt ordered Americans of Japanese descent on the west coast into internment camps out of fear of their loyalty to Japan. In this episode, Nakamura describes the indignity of that designation and the determination that and he and others like him had to prove their love for America.Nakamura joined the U.S. Army and was assigned to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, which was comprised of Japanese-American service members. The 442nd endured some of the most brutal fighting in the European theatre. In this edition of "Veterans Chronicles," Nakamura describes the horrific fighting in the mountains of Italy and how the 442nd was used to break Nazi Germany's Gothic Line. Finally, Nakamura reveals the stunning explanation given to him and other members of the 442nd as to why they would not be sent to the Pacific theatre following the German surrender.

Add Passion and Stir
First Lady of Wyoming Jennie Gordon on Ending Hunger in Wyoming

Add Passion and Stir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 20:00


With just over 580,000 residents, Wyoming is a state where “when you meet someone, it really is about one or two degrees of separation before you are starting to find common friends,” says First Lady of Wyoming, Jennie Gordon. That connectedness makes the knowledge that 1 in 5 children in Wyoming suffer from food insecurity even more personal to the First Lady and the people of Wyoming. As First Lady, Gordon has made food insecurity a core initiative and launched the Wyoming Hunger Initiative in 2019. The initiative is working with existing organizations in the state to end childhood hunger and food insecurity in Wyoming: “Almost every community had a food pantry…but what they needed was awareness. I wanted to work on raising awareness and finding a Wyoming solution to the [food insecurity] challenges we face in the state,” says Gordon. In this episode of Add Passion and Stir, Gordon shares how her parents' experience with food insecurity – her mother grew up in Vienna, Austria during WWII and her father grew up during the depression in a family with 10 children – inspired her commitment to end hunger. She also discusses how programs like “Grow a Little Extra” and “Food from the Field” offer opportunities for the people of Wyoming to share their strength by planting additional crops in their home gardens or streamlining the donation process for game and meat. “In our first year [of Grow a Little Extra], we had over 10,000 lbs. of produce that was donated throughout the state.” Join us for this conversation about building pathways for neighbors to support neighbors. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Blake's Takes for God's Sakes
World War Wooooooo!

Blake's Takes for God's Sakes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 43:48


Blake ranks the wars, and talks about why WWII is the most theatric. Blake's Patreon: Patreon.com/blakewexler See Blake Live: https://www.blakewexler.com/live-dates

The Bulwark Podcast
Barbara Walter: Is America at Risk of a 21st Century Civil War?

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:59


There have been more than 200 civil wars since WWII — and the conditions that triggered those conflicts are now present here in America. Author Barbara Walter joins Charlie Sykes on today's podcast. Special Guest: Barbara Walter.

Prairieland Paranormal Podcast
EP 43: The Montauk Project

Prairieland Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 52:59


How does a WWII experiment to elude Nazi radar tie into experiments in mind control, time travel, interdimensional portals, and a Netflix series? Well, in short, the answer is the Montauk Project. A secret military project that purports that the U.S. military kidnapped children, took them to Camp Hero a military base north of Long Island, tortured them, and conduct illicit and chilling research on them in mind control, time travel, and psychic abilities. Did this really happen? Join us to find out.

Learn Spanish with Stories
Nazis in South America: Escaping from Justice (Los Nazis en Suramérica: Escape de la Justicia)

Learn Spanish with Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 25:26


When we talk about World War II and how it ended for the Nazis, it's almost always about their defeat and how they ended up paying (in one way or another) for their crimes. However, you may not be aware that a small but privileged group of their officers were actually offered a new avenue and a hope for a fresh life – one without justice catching them. These lucky (and powerful) figures relocated to South America, joining right-wing tyrants such as Juan Domingo Perón in Argentina as they hid their true identities and managed to live out their full lives in a certain kind of tropical anonymity. Find out more about these fortunate fascists in the latest episode of Learn Spanish with Stories.Transcript of this episode is available at: https://podcast.lingomastery.com/listen/827

Behind The Shield
Frank Wright - Episode 561

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 173:26


Frank Wright was one of the original Marine Raiders who fought on both Guam and Iwo Jima in WWII. We discuss his journey into the Marines, special forces selection, hand to hand combat, facing banzai attacks, his powerful mental health story, writing his book and so much more.

The Way the World Works: A Tuttle Twins Podcast for Families

From 1939-1945 the world saw its most destructive and deadly war between the "Allies" and the "Axis Powers."

CORVETTE TODAY
CORVETTE TODAY #91-Corvette News & Headlines, Early January 2022 And Our 2021 Year-In-Review

CORVETTE TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 38:03


It's the first Corvette News & Headlines podcast of the new year! Your CORVETTE TODAY host, Steve Garrett along with Keith Cornett from CorvetteBlogger.com, fill you in on the latest news in the world of Corvette as we begin 2022.But the guys also to a look at Corvette in 2021 too. Here are some of the stories covered in this podcast…Current News & Headlines 1. 4th quarter Corvette sales numbers 2. Update on the Corvettes damaged by the tornado at the NCM 3. Now Consumer Reports ranks the C8 amongst its best road performers 4. Chevrolet clarifies C8's first service visit 5. Top Gear UK/BBC gets up close & personal with two C8 Z06'sThe top Corvette stories in 2021, Year in Review (News & Racing) 1. BGA Plant stoppages in 2021 (supply chain issues, Covid, tornado, cancellation of final quarter allocations in 2021, etc…) 2. Announcement of the C8 Z06 and the new LT6 engine 3. Debut of the right-hand drive C8's for the world market 4. 2 new women in the world of Corvette: Sharon Brawner named President/CEO of the NCM and Laura Klauser named to new position of Sports Car Racing Brand ManagerThe top Corvette stories in 2021, Year in Review (The Lighter Side) 1. Emilia Hartford's quest to have the fastest C8 (and her competition-FuelTech) 2. C8 awards in 2021 (Japan's Car of the Year, Consumer Reports Best Road Performers, JD Power MultiMedia Study, JD Power APEAL Study, highest in JD Power Initial Quality, List of Fastest Selling Cars 3. Chevy has a crate engine that's 632 cubic inches and makes 1,004 horsepower 4. Florida couple exchanges wedding vows before taking delivery of their C8 at the NCM 5. 2 feel-good stories: 90 year old veteran takes delivery of his C8 Stingray and WWII veteran receives a C8Don't miss this first News & Headlines podcast of 2022 and hear the top Corvette stories of last year on the CORVETTE TODAY podcast Website: www.CorvetteTodayPodcast.comWatch on YouTube: www.YouTube.com/c/CorvetteTodayThePodcastSubscribe for CORVETTE TODAY emails: https://CorvetteToday.ck.pageJoin the CORVETTE TODAY Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2718423201763136

ChinaTalk
Imperial Japan + Export Controls = Pearl Harbor!?

ChinaTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 51:04


What can US-China relations learn from US-Japan relations in the leadup to WWII? To discuss, I'm joined by Stony Brook University's Michael Barnhart, author of the 1987 Japan Prepares for Total War: The Search for Economic Security, 1919–1941 and the more recent Can You Beat Churchill?: Teaching History through Simulations (https://www.amazon.com/Can-You-Beat-Churchill-Simulations/dp/1501755641), with Scholar's Stage essayist Tanner Greer (@Scholars_Stage) cohosting.We discussWhat motivated Japan to invade ChinaWhy FDR was particularly worried about a Japanese invasion of the USSRWhy Japan and the Nazis thought the West would be on their sideThe benefits of paying attention to mid level bureaucratsFor an ad-free feed, please consider supporting ChinaTalk on Patreon or Substack!Outro music: Bei Mir Bist Du Shein by The Andrew Sisters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe2UXccid40 Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio
Encore Interview | Faith and Filmmaking: An Conversation with Mel Gibson

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 9:39


In this popular podcast episode, we revisit an interview in which Pastor Greg Laurie sits down with Academy Award-winning director, actor, and producer Mel Gibson, discussing his faith and career.  Pastor Greg discusses Gibson's film Hacksaw Ridge, which is about WWII hero Desmond Doss. Doss was a Medal of Honor recipient whose faith in God carried him through the war. Gibson also discusses how his faith impacts his filmmaking, and he teases the announcement that he is starting work a sequel to the worldwide smash hit The Passion of the Christ. It is to be written by Randall Wallace, the screenwriter of Braveheart. This interview originally took place at SoCal Harvest 2016, at Anaheim Stadium.  --- Learn more about Greg Laurie and Harvest Ministries at harvest.org. This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie
Encore Interview | Faith and Filmmaking: An Conversation with Mel Gibson

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 9:39


In this popular podcast episode, we revisit an interview in which Pastor Greg Laurie sits down with Academy Award-winning director, actor, and producer Mel Gibson, discussing his faith and career.  Pastor Greg discusses Gibson's film Hacksaw Ridge, which is about WWII hero Desmond Doss. Doss was a Medal of Honor recipient whose faith in God carried him through the war. Gibson also discusses how his faith impacts his filmmaking, and he teases the announcement that he is starting work a sequel to the worldwide smash hit The Passion of the Christ. It is to be written by Randall Wallace, the screenwriter of Braveheart. This interview originally took place at SoCal Harvest 2016, at Anaheim Stadium.  --- Learn more about Greg Laurie and Harvest Ministries at harvest.org. This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2: Fridays with Phil

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 37:04


1pm - The Fastest 15 // Another parent writes about their struggle with quarantine rules // Rumors/hoax about Health Dept meeting next week // Horrible jobs numbers today // GUEST:  Dori visits Phil Sulman, 96 year old WWII vet, at his home in Bellevue - talks about freeing prisoners from internment camps See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Don't Know Her
SURVIVOR - Kim Hak-Sun

I Don't Know Her

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 58:08


Kim Hak-Sun was the first Korean comfort woman to break her silence about the atrocities committed by the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II. Her story is difficult but important. Content warning for sexual violence, physical violence, war, suicide and substance abuse. Take care of yourself. https://linktr.ee/idkher_podcast

The Howie Carr Radio Network
A Day that will Live in Infancy - 1.06.22 - Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 39:12


Today the media and leftist politicians are celebrating January 6th with overreaction, half truths and outright lies. Their telling of January 6th was the worse that WWII and 9/11 combined yet no one died except Ashli Babbitt.

Garage Logic
1/06 Are we living with the Taliban? Families and landlords terrorized by car thieves.

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 83:00


Are we living with the Taliban? Families and landlords terrorized by car thieves. We lose a great living American, Lawrence Brooks, the oldest American veteran of WWII. Johnny Heidt with guitar news.

The Q & A with Rabbi Breitowitz Podcast
Q&A- Shovavim, Missionaries & the Omicron Variant

The Q & A with Rabbi Breitowitz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 111:04


00:00 Where were the bodies from the graves in the cave of Rebbe Yehuda HaNassi taken?   01:36 Why is V'shamru considered an inturruption in some minhagim?   06:09 Why can a blood avenger kill someone with no penalty?   12:18 What are the levels of Tumah?   17:38 What are insights of Shovevim?    26:21 What did Levites who didn't live near the Temple do?    29:20 Can you break Shabbos to save the life of a non-frum person?     33:34 Can you invite your non-religious Jewish friend to a Shabbat meal if you know he is going to drive?   41:42 How does one be empathetic to others' problems without having the problems harm themselves?   46:36 When Chazal say “you must say…” how literally should we take this?   49:04 Why do people still hold to night D'Rabbeinu Tam?   58:54 Is bein Hashmashot an inherent safek?    1:05:07 How should we be reacting to the Omicron variant of Covid?   1:08:26 War, plague, famine were things that affected the world and made people cleave to Hashem. We don't have those same exact issues today, so how do people cleave to Hashem now?    1:12:34 What advice would you give to people when it comes to making decisions in life?   1:19:04 Why is the Torah strict on things that don't seem so bad (such as homosexuality) and then doesn't address things that seem much worse (such as rape)?    1:25:46 How should we act toward gay people and gay Jews in particular?   1:31:23 What is the significance of wanting Rabbeinu Tam tefillin when you get married?    1:34:32 What is the halachic source of working on one's middos and is it doraisa or drabanan?    1:39:50 Is it ok to bring a Christian missionary into a (non-orthodox) synagogue to speak?    1:41:56 How has the litvisha world change after WWII?    1:46:24 What is the element of Judaism that is passed down through matrilineal descent?   1:47:36 What is the bread of shame? Would taking money to learn Torah count under this?   Comments? Feedback? Would you like to sponsor an episode? A series?   We'd love to hear from you : podcasts@ohr.edu https://podcasts.ohr.edu/ Visit us @ ohr.edu !   Produced by:  

The Brave Files
From “Othered” To Owning Myself: A Journey of discovery

The Brave Files

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 53:21


Curious • Adventurous • Self-AwareMirinda Kossoff bravely tells her father's story in her new book, The Rope of Life. Growing up in the south with a Jewish father who converted to Southern Baptist and was a WWII Veteran, with mental health challenges - Life was complicated. The oldest of four, Mirinda found herself raising her siblings and taking care of her parents. Sadly, struggling with physical and emotional turmoil her father took his own life and left many unanswered questions. Through writing about her father's life, Miranda learned more than expected about her own. Join us for a journey of discovery of going from othered to owning herself. Top Takeaways:No matter how much you change, prejudice will still find you. Be strong anyway.Regardless of how you show it, you can never escape your culture or your lineage and this is not a bad thing!Those who may be different from us should never be “othered.” Remaining curious makes you a great audience for any story.Sharing your story can be helpful for others, even though it may result in some blowback from family.Get additional details, show notes, links, and a full transcript of the episode here.ORDER YOUR COPY OF F*CK FEARLESS - MAKING THE BRAVE LEAP TODAY, Click Here!Check out The Brave Files Book Collection here! Get your BRAVE on by joining our exclusive (and FREE) Facebook Collective, Brave on Purpose. Join here. Share your feedback by emailing heather@vickeryandco.comGrab your BRAVE AF and GRATEFUL AF swag now. 

Daybreak Insider Podcast
January 6th, 2022- Remembering the January 6th Capitol Riot

Daybreak Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 10:45


Looking back at the Capitol riot. Russia threatens Ukraine. Oldest U.S. WWII veteran dies. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

As a filmmaker in Hong Kong, there's an inevitable balancing act they need to do with their stories and how they depict China. This story portrays an interesting element of World War II that wasn't often taught in Western history classes – the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong. Having it told from the Hong Kong perspective is also unique to us. That being said, the film was made to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong's return to the fold of China. Does that affect the tone of the story? Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our series on Hong Kong New Wave director Ann Hui with her 2017 film Our Time Will Come. The time has come to discuss Our Time Will Come. It's hard to not start our conversation with celebration of the fantastic delight we get from Eddie Peng as the revolutionary Blackie Lau. Every time he's on screen, it lights up. How does everyone else do? Honestly, lots of performances to celebrate, and when we're not celebrating Eddie Peng, it's Deannie Ip, Xun Zhou, Wallace Huo, or many of the other performers in the film. But does the story work? It works differently for each of us, and we debate why. Is it because our unfortunate lack of knowledge in the history in this part of the world during WWII? Or whether there should be a romance? Or if the story delivers enough tension in the action scenes and sequences? Or maybe the story never quite delivers? And why does the CG in the film look less than top notch? Regardless, it's an interesting film with characters we generally like that shows how simple school teachers and mothers can end up becoming spies. We have a great time in our conversation with the film. It's worth checking out, so do so then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

The Spark File with Susan Blackwell and Laura Camien
Creativity Sparks: Operation Paperclip

The Spark File with Susan Blackwell and Laura Camien

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 59:42


Sometimes a spark is so surprising, so complex and thought provoking it can stun you into silence. And so it was when Susan shared Operation Paperclip with Laura.As outlined in the book, Operation Paperclip by Annie Jacobsen, information on this secret United States intelligence program was recently de-classified and we are now all learning about the plan to bring Nazi Germany scientists to the US to harness their intellectual resources.Defenders of the decision to welcome the scientists here have argued that the combined knowledge of these rocket scientists and nuclear scientists could have ended up in the hands of the Soviets, if the US had taken no action. Others wonder what are the ethical and moral costs of allowing their unimaginable war crimes to go without punishment or accountability.This is a #dark spark. Listen in to try to make sense of it all.Join us for The Spark File Annual New Year Creativity Kickoff on January 1st and 2nd. This 2 day virtual retreat will help you refocus your goals and lay the foundation for making 2022 your most creative year yet! Let us help you go from dreaming about what you want to make to making what you've been dreaming about. Go to thesparkfile.com to register. Spots are limited, so register now!

The Charlie Kirk Show
Is There a New Nuremberg on the Horizon?

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 35:00


We are living in the middle of a Great Inversion being perpetrated by America's Medical Machine, and if you're not paying close attention, you very well may not notice. Charlie unpacks what all of that means and asks the question on so many Americans' minds over the past two years: when will someone be held accountable for the atrocious mishandling of our collective response to this virus? To that end, inspired by Dr. Robert Malone's conversation with Joe Rogan, he talks Mass Formation Psychosis before recounting the famous Nuremberg Trials of the 1940s' following German atrocities during WWII where Nazi doctors, amongst others, were held accountable for war crimes. Could that be coming for our deeply entrenched medical establishment class and their Big Pharma overlords? The answer is yet to be seen but one can surely hope.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Centuries of Sound
1940 Preview 2 – WWII Collage

Centuries of Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


At Centuries of Sound I am making mixes for every year of recorded sound. The download here is only for two sections of the mix. For the full 4-hour version please come to centuriesofsound.com to stream, or patreon.com/centuriesofsound for downloads and a host of other bonus materials for just $5 per month. This show would … Continue reading "1940 Preview 2 – WWII Collage"

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Healing From Within with Sheryl Glick

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 31:24


Sheryl Glick host of Healing From Within Interviews Stephane Allix author of When I Was Someone Else who shares the incredible true story of past life connection. Stephane a journalist, former war correspondent, and a founder of the Institute for Research on Extraordinary Experiences, as well as the author of The Test: Incredible Proof of Afterlife, and the writer and director of the French television series Extraordinary Investigates tells of his travel to the Amazon while on a spiritual retreat in Peru, he had a vivid waking vision of a soldier dying on a snowy battlefield followed by scenes from the soldier's earlier life. Listeners will learn about Stephane's disturbing sense of closeness with the soldier who turned out to be a German soldier in WWII, and find out why perhaps this all transpired. Learn more about Sheryl here: http://www.sherylglick.com/

The Genealogy Guys Podcast & Genealogy Connection
The Genealogy Guys Podcast #399

The Genealogy Guys Podcast & Genealogy Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 62:46


News You Can Use and Share The Guys welcome two new sponsors to our family: Newpapers.com and Find a Grave. Researchers studying the Clotilda, the last known slave ship to reach America, have discovered much of the ship is still intact. They anticipate that there may be surviving DNA and other artifacts. FamilySearch has published a Year in Review for 2021. Drew provides an overview of the latest updates from FamilySearch. Listener Email Tom asks questions about the reMarkable tablet and their data plans. Tom has also digitized Super-8 movies from Christmas 1960. He is also looking for a timeline to use to track his father's WWII military service. George suggests checking Cyndi's List at https://cyndislist.com/charts/timelines/. Listeners are urged to email The Guys with their suggestions. Karen is searching for information about an ancestor who settled in Augusta County, Virginia. She and a cousin are trying to determine if he came from Ireland, and they are questioning the veracity of a book that published content extracted from old county records that purport that he (and others) were Scotch-Irish. Sean Daly shares that Geneanet has passed 1 million indexed soldiers of Napoleon. He has written a blog post at https://en.geneanet.org/genealogyblog/post/2021/12/geneanets-community-has-indexed-over-a-million-of-napoleons-soldiers that includes a link to the collection. Bunny is looking for suggestions for kick-starting her Polish ancestral research. Matthew M. shares an extensive website that provides free access to digitized church registers from across Europe, including Germany, Austria, Poland, Serbia, and Slovenia. The site is Matricula Online at https://data.matricula-online.eu/en/. Matthew G. is frustrated that the tax records for New Jersey are locked at FamilySearch. Drew suggests using their free look-up service as one aid, but raises the question for FamilySearch as to whether these records can be unlocked and made available. Genealogy for Librarians and a New Book Drew is teaching a genealogy course for librarians at the University of South Florida in Tampa in this new semester. It will incorporate videos made with Vivid-Pix and some of the foremost genealogy librarians in the U.S. The students will be using the pre-publication text of his forthcoming beginning genealogy book that will be published this year. Zion Cemetery Project George has been immersed in researching people buried in the “erased” African-American cemetery in Tampa. The project seeks to learn more about the people buried there, their families, any descendants, and more. He shares his vision of some of the products of this project. Genealogy Guys Learn The Genealogy Guys Learn subscription site continues to grow each month. Drew has recorded a video, “Organizing Your Genealogical Files”, that has made its debut this month. New content is added every month. You can subscribe at https://genealogyguyslearn.com/. Thank you to all our Patreon supporting members for their support. Your Patreon support helps us improve our technology and provide even more podcast content to you! You can join us for as little as $1 a month or as much as you'd like to contribute. Visit https://www.patreon.com/genealogyguys to get started. Please also tell your friends and your society about our free podcasts, our free blog, and our Genealogy Guys Learn subscription education website. Please let us hear from you at genealogyguys@gmail.com.

Up is Down Podcast
Ep 121: Let's Go Camping!

Up is Down Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 92:39


Greetings to the Living. Thank you for listening to the Up Is Down podcast and double-plus-good thank you to all who support this work. This time around I offer some perspective on the historical context of "the camps" everyone talks about. And the ones no one ever talks about.Libertarians and conservatives alike go on and on about "putting us on trains and taking us to the camps" but tend to think there were just a handful of camps in WW2, concentration camps, and these camps were shut down immediately following the arrival of the Allied Forces. While that is partly true, the fact remains that thousands of labor camps and refugee camps were built by the Allied Forces themselves, including the US under Eisenhower, for every single German citizen in all of Europe for years after the end of the war. Millions of everyday Germans, women, children and elderly, with nothing to do with the Reich, were forcefully expelled from every country in Europe and sent to camps. For years. Tens of thousands died and were disappeared on the way.It's funny to me how many people cannot connect the dots of history together and arrive at the obvious conclusion that the same victors of the conflict decide who goes where and when upon redrawing the borders of the newly acquired geography and in every case mobilize that effort immediately.It's even more funny to me how many fweeedom loving Americans simply ignore the history of not just these scenarios, but also bury their heads in goods and services when it comes to the history of the entire "civilized" world fueled by endless and constant bloodshed and ethnic cleansing. How does anyone think borders get drawn anyway? Negotiations over golf following a nice tea?Obviously we Americans would never engage in genocide and the ethnic cleansing that follows.Relevant Links:German Expulsion From Europe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyWx4p4hiaYhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8SdcFFK1N0https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWFeKPpVVJ4Some Revisionist History (a very looooong documentary, 6hrs)https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=WWII+revisionist+history+greatest+story+never+told&&view=detail&mid=5C989644272E55D549235C989644272E55D54923&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=/videos/search?q=WWII+revisionist+history+greatest+story+never+told&qs=n&form=QBVR&sp=-1&pq=wwii+revisionist+history+greatest+story+never+told&sc=0-50&sk=&cvid=B4F47B79938D492B8BFD296A0B405CD7***Executive Producers Ep. 121 Up Is Down***Blair NeumanMy Aunt Patty***Associate Exec. Producers Ep 121***Seth KlannSteve FoxChris JeromeRebecca Anne Sinkula+++T H A N K Y O U A L L S O V E R Y M U C H+++((((S U P P O R T THE S H O W))))PayPal Support Link:https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=U66JAQQUSFSUYBitCoinCash BCH: qzgwfjeu5vp634h84zzurw8kdah5j3cuxg8daq6qrk. Venmo: @Dean-Reiner-1YOU (OR YOUR BANK) CAN SEND A CHECK for ANY AMOUNT TO:P.O. BOX 354345 Westfield StreetSilverton, OR 97381(you can even go so far as to schedule recurring, sustaining donations with your own bill pay services via your bank and by doing this you cut out the paypal/mastercard middlemen who charge fees and take a cut for themselves)CONSIDER SUPPORTING THIS WORK BY ACQUIRING SOME ORIGINAL ART THROUGH THE GALLERY SHOP AT deanreiner.comVALUE-FOR-VALUE: Consider the value you have for yourself as a free person with the ability to think for yourself. Next, consider the value you received from this production. Then consider the money value you'd place on that value and consider returning that value in the form of a donation to this production. You can decide for yourself what amount feels right for you. You don't need a PayPal account, just the generosity and will to support something you value and believe in. It all helps. This work is enjoyable but not easy, it takes time and costs money. Your support is needed and highly appreciated.PayPal Support Link:https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=U66JAQQUSFSUYBitCoinCash BCH: qzgwfjeu5vp634h84zzurw8kdah5j3cuxg8daq6qrk. Venmo: @Dean-Reiner-1A GREAT WAY TO SUPPORT THIS WORK IS TO PURCHASE SOME OF MY ARTWORK. BY DOING THIS YOU NOT ONLY SUPPORT ME AND THE SHOW BUT YOU ALSO HAVE SOMETHING TO SHOW FOR IT THAT IS BEAUTIFUL, ORIGINAL AND MADE BY MY OWN HANDS. I DO NOT PRODUCE OR ENDORSE CLEVER MERCH MADE BY FORCED VACCINATED SLAVES IN FACTORIES FAR AWAY. THAT IS NOT WHAT LIBERTY LOOKS LIKE.You can browse some of the art here: deanreiner.comFollow me on them Twitters: @upisdownpodcastEmail me at upisdownpodcast@gmail.comYou will never find me on Youtube, they'd shut me down instantly, and it's only a matter of time before the podcast platform and hosting services become as compromised as the mainstream media. I will never accept sponsorships that require me to try and sell you bullshit products you not only don't need, but likely cannot afford anyway. I believe that Value-For-Value is indeed the future of free speech and expression, as anything else has already proved itself to be more than compromised at all levels; you can actually just sit back and watch monetized platforms disintegrate each and every day. That cannot happen with Value-For-Value, because only YOU decide what's valuable and only YOU decide how that is determined and returned. Now that's power!Of course you can always listen (and donate) at:deanreiner.comS U B S C R I B ED O N A T ED O W N L O A DR E P O S TS H A R EC O M M E N TS U P P O R TS U P P O R TS U P P O R TR A T E / R E V I E WE M A I L upisdownpodcast@gmail.comdeanreiner.com for more art and support optionshttps://paypal.me/frankenbones?locale.x=en_UST H A N K Y O U F O R L I S T E N I N GThis podcast contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. It is being made available in an effort to advance the understanding of society, economics and social engineering. It is believed that this constitutes a ‘fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and education purposes.

The WW2 Podcast
157 - General Patton

The WW2 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 52:34


George S Patton Junior starred as an Olympic athlete in the 1912 Stockholm games. In 1916 under John J. Pershing Patton joined the Mexican Expedition against the paramilitary forces of Mexican revolutionary Francisco "Pancho" Villa. When the US entered the First World War Patton joined the new Tank Corps and commanded the U.S. tank school in France. Leading tanks into combat he would be wounded near the end of the war. But Patton is best remembered for his exploits on the battlefields of WWII, and this is what what we are looking at in this episode, from Morocco, through Sicily to D-Day.  Joining me is Kevin Hymel. Kevin has worked as a historian for the US army and is currently doing work for the Arlington National Cemetery. He is also a tour guide for Stephen Ambrose Historical Tours. He is the author of Patton's Photographs: War as He Saw It and his new book is Patton's War: An American General's Combat Leadership, Volume I: November 1942 - July 1944. Patreon: patreon.com/ww2podcast

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Martini Shot: The Simple Saboteur

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 4:04


Rob discovers a WWII era psyops spy manual and realizes it is the perfect guide for disrupting the business practices of modern content companies. But —as a New Year's resolution— he vows not to use the manual's power for evil. For now.

Martini Shot
The Simple Saboteur

Martini Shot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 4:04


Rob discovers a WWII era psyops spy manual and realizes it is the perfect guide for disrupting the business practices of modern content companies. But —as a New Year's resolution— he vows not to use the manual's power for evil. For now.

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge
The Bridge: Encore Presentation - RCAF WWII Disaster

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 41:14


We're looking back at The Bridge in 2021.  Today an encore presentation of an episode that originally aired on November 8th.  The Story of an RCAF WW2 Disaster.

The Todd Herman Show
The CDC just admitted to their massive fraud - Episode 23 - Hour 2

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 47:12


THE SCRIPTURE: Thou shalt not lieThou shalt not commit murder NEWS: The newly updated CDC guidelines don't require testing at the end of isolation because PCR tests can stay positive for up to 12 weeks, CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky tells GMA Vaccines don't stop Covid hospitalizations or deaths; They never have, even at peak effectiveness. A huge US database offers proof MY TWITTER THREAD ON WHY THIS IS SUCH MASSIVE NEWS: The PCR Test scam was one of the 3 the linchpins to the greatest human rights crime since WWII. A Thread. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ArtCurious Podcast
Live on Fireside: Laura Morelli's "The Stolen Lady"

ArtCurious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 45:54


Did you miss our LIVE bonus show on Fireside, the interactive storytelling platform? Don't worry— you can catch the replay on Fireside, or enjoy the bonus audio here. In this conversation from early December, I spoke with Laura Morelli, a USA Today bestselling author and art historian who writes amazing historical novels involving the art world. We discussed her background in art history, how she writes and structures her novels, and get into some of the nitty gritty on her latest book, The Stolen Lady, a book about the Mona Lisa that takes place in both the Italian Renaissance and in france during WWII. It is not only a fascinating and engrossing read, but the conversation with Laura herself was absolutely lovely, too--and I hope you enjoy listening in.  Want to join in on the fun next time? Join Fireside now and follow me for invites to each live recording, where you can participate in the audience and ask questions live! And who knows? Maybe we'll even throw a trivia contest every now and again. The next one is coming up on January 12 at 2 PM eastern, when I'll be speaking with author Jeffrey H. Jackson to discuss his latest book, Paper Bullets, about the incredible artists Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore--two women who risked their lives to defy the Nazis. It's an awesome real-life tale of using subversive tactics to disrupt Hitler's crew--and you're not going to want to miss it. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts and FOLLOW on Spotify Twitter / Instagram / Facebook / Fireside Don't forget to show your support for our show by purchasing ArtCurious swag from TeePublic! SPONSORS: HoMedics: receive a FREE PORTABLE PHONE SANITIZER when you buy $100 or more in massage products NYU Tisch Pro/Online: Register for spring 2022 film-making and screenwriting courses online with NYU's Tisch Pro online Want to advertise/sponsor our show? We have partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started. https://www.advertisecast.com/ArtCuriousPodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The World and Everything In It
12.27.21 Remembering those we lost, and a difficult chapter in U.S. history

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 30:06


Leigh Jones kicks off our end-of-year obituary series by remembering business leaders who died in 2021; Katie Gaultney recounts a difficult chapter in U.S. history with a WWII internment camp; and listener prayers for the new year. Plus: the Monday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate.

The History Hour
The right to drive in Saudi Arabia

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 49:55


In 2011, cybersecurity expert Manal Al-Sharif helped found the Women2Drive movement. It was designed to force the Saudi Arabian government to overturn its ban on women driving cars - one of the many restrictions on women in the Kingdom. Inspired by the mood of the Arab Spring, Saudi women got behind the wheel and then posted videos of themselves all over social media. The movement attracted international attention and the ban on women drivers was eventually lifted. Saudi journalist Safa Al-Ahmad describes how the lifting of the ban was a radical change to Saudi society, but women in the country still face many severe restrictions. Plus, how in 2010 a Tanzanian man with albinism braved threats and discrimination to become the country's first albino elected politician. Also, the dramatic story of how the great Russian ballet dancer, Rudolf Nureyev, defected from the Soviet Union in 1961. Finally, the festive history of how a town in Finnish Lapland, eviscerated during WWII, rose from the ashes to become the unofficial home of Santa Claus. Presented by Max Pearson.

The Bulwark Podcast
Episode 2023: Trump's Dereliction of Duty on Covid

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 43:02


The Trump administration's malfeasance in responding to Covid demands a 9/11 commission-style investigation. Plus, Biden's 2020 victory was more Dunkirk, and less D-Day. Churchill fan Bill Kristol joins guest host JVL on today's episode. Special Guest: Bill Kristol.