Podcast appearances and mentions of John McCarthy

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Best podcasts about John McCarthy

Latest podcast episodes about John McCarthy

Someone's Thunder
John McCarthy

Someone's Thunder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 53:53


John McCarthy joins Stephanie and Angela to talk about teamwork and support (including lawyers!) and having an international fanbase.  John is a painter, chef, restauranteur, and an advisor to the New York Japanese Restaurant Association. You can learn more John and his website and his insta for art or food.Original Music by: Yah Supreme (Yahya Jeffries-El)

Sammy And The Punk
WEIGHING IN #320 with AJ MCKEE | BELLATOR X RIZIN

Sammy And The Punk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 58:27


WEIGHING IN #320 with AJ MCKEE | BELLATOR X RIZIN by John McCarthy & Josh Thomson's MMA Show

Machine Learning Street Talk
#88 Dr. WALID SABA - Why machines will never rule the world [UNPLUGGED]

Machine Learning Street Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 81:59


Support us! https://www.patreon.com/mlst Dr. Walid Saba recently reviewed the book Machines Will Never Rule The World, which argues that strong AI is impossible. He acknowledges the complexity of modeling mental processes and language, as well as interactive dialogues, and questions the authors' use of "never." Despite his skepticism, he is impressed with recent developments in large language models, though he questions the extent of their success. We then discussed the successes of cognitive science. Walid believes that something has been achieved which many cognitive scientists would never accept, namely the ability to learn from data empirically. Keith agrees that this is a huge step, but notes that there is still much work to be done to get to the "other 5%" of accuracy. They both agree that the current models are too brittle and require much more data and parameters to get to the desired level of accuracy. Walid then expresses admiration for deep learning systems' ability to learn non-trivial aspects of language from ingesting text only. He argues that this is an "existential proof" of language competency and that it would be impossible for a group of luminaries such as Montague, Marvin Minsky, John McCarthy, and a thousand other bright engineers to replicate the same level of competency as we have now with LLMs. He then discusses the problem of semantics and pragmatics, as well as symbol grounding, and expresses skepticism about grounded meaning and embodiment. He believes that artificial intelligence should be used to solve real-world problems which require human intelligence but not believe that robots should be built to understand love or other subjective feelings. We discussed the unique properties of natural human language. Walid believes that the core unique property is the ability to do abductive reasoning, which is the process of reasoning to the best explanation or understanding. Keith adds that there are two types of abduction - one for generating hypotheses and one for justifying them. In both cases, abductive reasoning involves choosing from a set of plausible possibilities. Finally, we discussed the book "Machines Will Never Rule The World" and its argument that the current mathematics and technology is not enough to model complex systems. Walid agrees with the book's argument but is still optimistic that a new mathematics can be discovered. Keith suggests the possibility of an AGI discovering the mathematics to create itself. They also discussed how the book could serve as a reminder to temper the hype surrounding AI and to focus on exploration, creativity, and daring ideas. Walid ended by stressing the importance of science, noting that engineers should play within the Venn diagrams drawn by scientists, rather than trying to hack their way through it. Transcript: https://share.descript.com/view/BFQb5iaegJC Discord: https://discord.gg/aNPkGUQtc5 YT: https://youtu.be/IMnWAuoucjo TOC: [00:00:00] Intro [00:06:52] Walid's change of heart on DL/LLMs and on the skeptics like Gary Marcus [00:22:52] Symbol Grounding [00:32:26] On Montague [00:40:41] On Abduction [00:50:54] Language of thought [00:56:08] Why machines will never rule the world book review [01:20:06] Engineers should play in the scientists Venn Diagram! Panel; Dr. Tim Scarfe Dr. Keith Duggar Mark Mcguill

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 104: A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence with Johan Stahre

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 44:01


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is "A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence." Our guest is Johan Stahre (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jstahre/), Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University in Sweden. In this conversation, we talk about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved, the contemporary notion of operator 4.0, Scandinavian worker independence, shop floor innovation at Volvo, factories of the future, modern production systems, robots, and cobots in manufacturing. If you like this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you like this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean with Professor Torbjørn Netland from ETH Zürich (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/84). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Human-centered automation is the only kind of automation that we should be thinking about, and this is becoming more and more clear. Operators are fiercely independent, and so should they be. This is the only way they can spot problems on the shop floor, by combining human skills with automation in new ways augmenting workers. It seems the workforce does not so much need engagement as they need enablement. Fix that, and a lot can happen. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence. Our guest is Johan Stahre, Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University in Sweden. In this conversation, we talk about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved, the contemporary notion of operator 4.0, Scandinavian worker independence, shop floor innovation at Volvo, factories of the future, modern production systems, robots, and cobots in manufacturing. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Johan, Welcome. How are you? JOHAN: I'm fine, thank you, Trond. It's really nice to see you. TROND: Yeah, likewise. JOHAN: Fellow Nordic person. TROND: Fellow Nordic person. And I apologize for this very American greeting, you know, how are you? As you know, I'm from the Nordic region. I actually mean it, [laughs] you know, it was a question. So I do wonder. [laughs] JOHAN: I'm actually fine. It's just ending the vacation, so I'm a little bit sad about that because everyone...but it's a very nice time now because the rest of the world seems to be on vacation, so you can get a lot of work done. TROND: I concur; that is a wonderful time. Johan, I wanted to just briefly talk about your exciting background. You are an engineer, a mechanical engineer from Sweden. And you had your initial degree from Linköping University. Then you went on to do your Ph.D. a while back in manufacturing automation, and this was at Chalmers, the University in Sweden. And that's where you have done your career in manufacturing research. You are, I think, the first Scandinavian researcher certainly stationed currently in Sweden that we've had on the podcast. So I'm kind of curious, what is manufacturing like in Scandinavia? And what is it that fascinated you about this topic so that you have moved so deeply into it? JOHAN: Manufacturing in Sweden is the core; it's the backbone of our country in a sense. We have statistically too many large manufacturing companies in Sweden as compared to, I mean, we're only 10 million people, but we have like 10, 12 pretty large companies in the manufacturing area in automotive but also in electronics like Ericsson, you have Volvo, we have SKF. We have a lot of big companies. Sweden has an industrial structure that we have several small companies and a couple of large companies, not so many in the middle section there. This happened, actually, in the 1800s somewhere. There was a big growth of big companies, and there was a lot of effort from the government to support this, and that has been continued. So the Swedish government has supported the growth of industry in Sweden, and therefore we have a very strong industry and also quite good digital growth and maturity. TROND: So the Scandinavian background to me when I was there, I remember that one of the things that at least Scandinavian researchers think is distinct about Scandinavia is worker independence. And it's something that I kind of wanted to just tease out a little bit in the beginning of this podcast. Am I wrong in this, or is there something distinct about the relationship between, I guess, workers and managers in Scandinavia, particularly? One speaks about the Scandinavian model. Can you outline a little bit what that means in manufacturing if it still exists? It's an open question. JOHAN: From my perspective, Sweden usually ranks very high in innovation, also when it comes to international rankings. And I think some of that has to do with the openness and the freedom of thinking in a sense and not so hierarchical, more consensus-oriented, ability to test and check and experiment at work without getting repercussions from top management. And it is much easier. In fact, if you are at one department in a manufacturing company or in university as such and you want to collaborate with another colleague across the aisle, if you have a two hierarchical system, you need to go three levels up in order to be able to do that. But here, I think it's easier to just walk across the aisle to have this collaboration and establish a cooperative environment. I think that that's part of the reason. Also, we're not so many; I mean, I think historically, we needed to do a lot of things ourselves in Sweden. We were a country up north with not so many people, and we have harsh environments, and I think it's the same as Norway. I mean, you need to be self-sustainable in that sense, and that creates, I think, environmental collaboration. TROND: We'll go more deeply into your research on manufacturing and to what extent a question I asked here matters to that. But do you have a sense just at the outset here that this type of worker and operators sort of independence, relative independence, perhaps compared to other regions, is it changing at all? Or is this kind of a feature that is a staple of Scandinavian culture and will be hard to change both for good and for bad? JOHAN: I think that as everything...digitalization has sort of erased a lot of the cultural differences across the world in that sense. Because when I was a student, there was not this expressed digital environment, of course. The information environment was less complex. But I think now all the young people, as well as my mother, does her banking...she's 90, but she does her banking on her iPad; I mean, it's very well-spread. And I think that we are all moving towards a similar culture, and the technology is spreading so quick. So you cannot really have cultural differences in that sense. But I think that's still the way that we're using this. And I think that the collaborative sense I think that that is still there. The reason why Sweden is comparatively innovative still is that we still maintain our culture and use the technology to augment that capability. TROND: So, Johan, we'll talk about a bunch of your experiences because you obviously are based in Sweden. And because of Sweden's industrial situation, you have some examples, you know, Volvo, a world-famous company obviously, and also famous for its management practices, and its factory practices, we'll get into that. But you've also worked, and you're advising entities such as the World Economic Forum, and you are active on the European stage with the European Institute of Technology. Your activity clearly goes way, way beyond these borders. But why don't we maybe start with some of these Scandinavian experiences and research projects that you've done maybe with Volvo? What is it with Volvo that captured people's attention early on? And what sort of experience and research have you done with Volvo? JOHAN: I think that Volvo is very innovative, and Volvo today is two types of companies; one is the car company that has now gone fully electric. It was introduced at the stock market, most recently owned by a Chinese company, and before that, it was owned by Ford, and before that, it was also public. But you also have the other part, which is the Volvo Group, which is looking at trucks, and boats, and things like that. And they both share a high level of innovation, ambition, innovation, and power, I think, using the experiences already from the '60s, where you had a lot of freedom as an employee. And also very good collaboration with the union in investments and in all the changes in the company I think that has been very beneficial. And it's made them...what is now Volvo Cars was very, very early, for example, with digital twins. They were experimenting with digital twins already in the 1990s. And we work together with Volvo but also with SKF, which is a roller-bearing company here to look at how we can support frontline workers and augment their capabilities because they're very skilled and they're very experienced. But sometimes you need to have sensor input, and you need to have structures, and rules, and procedures, and instructions. So we worked quite early with them already, maybe in 2009, 2010, to see how can we transform their work situation, provide them with work instructions through wearable devices. It was very popular at that time. MIT was experimenting with cyborgs. And the people that were...I think it was Thad Starner; he was trying to put on a lot of computer equipment. Then he went through the security at the airport and had some problems there. But that's not the case for the operators. But it was a little bit too early, I think. We tried to experiment with some of the maintenance people at Volvo cars. And they were very interested in the technology, but the use for it was a little bit obscure. And this was at the time when you had the mobile connectivity was 9,600 kilobits through a mobile phone or in the modem, so Wi-Fi more or less did not exist. And the equipment: the batteries weighed two kilos, and the computer weighed one kilo. And then you had a headset that looked like you came from deployment in a war zone. So it was a little bit...it looked a little bit too spacy for them to be actually applicable. And then some 10 years later, we actually did a similar experiment with SKF, the roller bearing company where we deployed the first iPod touch, I think they were called. That was right before the iPhone. I think it was an experiment by Steve Jobs to see how can we create what then became the iPhone screen. And we put that on the arms of the operators and tried to see how can we give them an overview of the process situation. So they were constantly aware, and they were quite happy about this. And then, we wanted to finish the experiment. The operators actually said, "Well, we don't want to give the equipment back." And then we said, "Well, we need to have it back. Of course, you can use the software." So they brought their own phones, and they downloaded the software. And they're still using it, actually, not on their own phones anymore. But they use this kind of software that we developed at that time together with them. So that was quite interesting. TROND: That's fascinating. Extrapolating from some of these early experiences up until now, I wanted to just ask you this from a research perspective, but also, I guess, from a management perspective. So you work on production systems. What is really the goal here, or what has the objective been early on? You talked about these early MIT experiments. And I know control systems is a very old area of research. And from what I understand, in the early days, the use cases weren't just factories; they were also on spacecraft and things. But to your point, especially earlier, we were working with very, very different technology interfaces. But now, obviously, we are starting to roll out 5G, which gives a whole other type of richness. But does it really matter how rich the technology interface is? Or does it matter more what the objective is with these various types of augmentations that have been attempted really throughout the decades? Can you just give us a little sense of what researchers and yourself what you were trying to augment and how that depends or doesn't depend on the quality of technology? JOHAN: First, we need to realize that the manufacturing industry has always been a very, very early adopter. The first computers were used for war simulations and for making propellers for submarines to see how you can program the milling machines. This was in the 1950s. And the industrial robots in the '60s in the '70s were also very early applications of digitalization. Before anything else had computers, the manufacturing industry was using it, and that's still the case. That might surprise some people. When they walk out into a shop floor, they see no computers around because all the computers are built into the machines already. What is still missing is the link, perhaps to the people. So they are still using the screens. And they are the ones...people are the key components of handling complex and unforeseeable situations. So you need to provide them, I think...to be really productive, you need to provide the frontline staff with the equipment for them to avoid and to foresee and to handle unforeseen situations because that's what differs between the man and machine or a human and the machine. People are much more apt to solve a complex situation that was not programmed before. That's the augmentation part here; how can we augment the human capabilities? And people talk about augmented reality; I mean, I don't think it's the reality that needs to be augmented; it's the human to be handling the reality that needs to be augmented. TROND: Johan, this is so fascinating because, first of all, it's quite easy to dismiss manufacturing a little bit these days because, to the untrained eye, all the excitement is in the consumer space because that's where the new devices get released, and that's, obviously, where all the attention is these days unless you obviously are in manufacturing. But can you bring us back to those early days of computing when a lot of the use cases for computing were first explored with manufacturing? So you talked about MIT, and back at MIT and at Stanford, all the way back to the '60s, they were exploring this new and fascinating field of even artificial intelligence, but before that, just regular control systems, electronic interfaces. What fork in the road would you say happened there? Because clearly, the fascination has been with digitalizing everything and software kind of one for 30 years, but in manufacturing, it's more complicated. You say people, so it's people, and then it's kind of these production systems that you research. That's not the same as the use case of an individual with their phone, and they're sort of talking to people. There are many, many more variables in play here. What is the real difference? JOHAN: Last year actually the European Commission put forth industry 5.0, which should be the follower after industry 4.0. And they based that on three main challenges. One is sustainability, one is resilience, and the various kinds of resilience towards the shock of the war but also by climate, et cetera. And the third one is actually human-centeredness to see how can we really fully deploy human capabilities in a society and also in industry, of course. I think what you're referring to is the two guys at Stanford in the '60s; one was John McCarthy. He was the inventor of the artificial intelligence concept. His aim then was to replace human work. That was the ambition with the artificial intelligence because human work is not as productive as computing work, but it still has some drawbacks. But in the same place not so far away, in another department at Stanford, was a guy called Douglas Engelbart. And he was actually the father of...he called it intelligence augmentation. So it was AI and IA at that time. But his ambition was to augment human work to see how can you have this. And he was the one that invented hypertext and the mouse. And he put up the first hypermedia set in Silicon Valley. So this was a guy that inspired companies like Apple, and Xerox PARC, those kinds of institutions that had a huge bearing. There was a book by a research colleague at Oxford. He was comparing that over time, from the early industrial days and then forward, technology that replaces people always has more complications when introduced and scaled than technology that augments people. If you look at the acceptance and the adoption of the iPhone, that took months, or weeks, or whatever, seconds for some people, for me, for example. If you look at what happened in the industrial revolutions in the 1800s and the 1700s, you had a lot of upheaval, and already in the 1960s...I'm starting to sound like a university professor. But in '96, in the U.S., there was a Senate hearing about is automation taking the jobs from people or not? And the conclusion was that it is not, it is actually creating companies that then employ more people because of the productivity gains and the innovation gains. And you allow people to use the automation as augmentation, not only cognitive augmentation. We think a lot about augmentation as something that you do with your eyes and your brain. But robots are also augmenting people. It lifts heavy objects like cars or big containers, whatever. That's the kind of augmentation that maybe you don't consider when you look at it from an artificial or an augmented reality perspective. TROND: Well, so many things to pick up here. But the variety of meanings of augmentation are kind of astounding, aren't they? And you've written about this operator 4.0 several times. There's obviously cognitive augmentation, and then there's physical augmentation. Are there other types of augmentation that you can speak of? JOHAN: I really can't think of any. TROND: But those are the main ones. So it's either kind of your mentality or sort of your knowledge. So the work instruction parts go to the skills-based, I guess, augmentation, which perhaps is an additional one. Or I'm just thinking if manufacturing wants to make progress in these things, it would perhaps make sense to really verify what workers at any moment actually themselves express that they need. And I guess that's what I was fishing for a little bit here in this history of all of this, whether the technology developers at all moments really have a clear idea of what it is that the workers are saying themselves they're missing or that they obviously are missing. Because automation and augmentation, I mean, do you find them diametrically opposed, or are they merely complementary when it works well? JOHAN: I mean, automation traditionally has been the way to scale, and, I mean, in the beginning, you want to see what the machine is doing, right? And then you really don't want to see it. You just want it to work. So it's really helping you to scale up your work. And in that sense, automation, like collaborative robots, for example, which people are talking about robots, are something that is replacing jobs, but if you look at it, it is a very small portion of statistics. In Singapore, which is the highest user of robots installed, there were 950 maybe robots per 10,000 employees. And the average in the Americas is 100 robots per 10,000 employees, and that's not really a lot. And so there is plenty of space for robots to be the tools for people. So if you don't treat them as something that will replace you but something that will actually augment you, I think it would be much easier. What could happen, though, and I think that is maybe part of your question, is that, well, these tools are becoming so complex that you cannot use them unless you increase your skill. How do you do that? Because no company would like to end up in a situation where the tools that you have bought and invested a lot of money in are too complex for your employees to use. That's a lost investment. It's like you're building a big factory out in a very remote place, and you don't have enough electric power to run it. You don't want to end up in that situation. Like you expressed, I think that maybe what's missing and what's trending right now is that the upskilling of the workforce is becoming extremely important. TROND: And how do you do that, Johan? Because there's obviously...there's now an increased attention on upskilling. But that doesn't mean that everyone has the solution for it. And employers are always asking for other people to pay for it, for example, governments, or the initiative of the worker, perhaps. It seems like Europe has taken this challenge head-on. Germany, at least, is recognized as a leader in workforce training. The U.S. is a latecomer to the game from that perspective. But it typically shows up in a big way. So something is going to happen here in the U.S. when it comes to workforce training. What is the approach? I mean, there seems to be two approaches to me; one is to simplify the technology, so you need less training. And the other would be obviously an enormous reskilling effort that either is organized, perhaps ideally in the workplace itself, so it's not removed from the tasks. Or some enormous schooling effort that is highly efficient and perhaps online. What do you think are the winning approaches to re-skilling that entire manufacturing workforce continuously? Because it's not like you have to rescale them once, you have to rescale them every time. JOHAN: Well, I can only guess. I think that you need to do all of these, all of the above. One complicating factor is the demographics of, especially Japan; of course, we know that from a long time that, they have an aging population. But Europe is now becoming the new Japan in that sense. We have a very big problem in terms of aging populations, especially countries like Italy and perhaps Germany but also in northern countries. And we don't have perhaps...there's a lot of discussion on immigration right now. But actually, the workforce would need a lot of immigration to be able to respond to the needs of our industry in the forthcoming situation. I think that China is maybe 4 or 5 years behind Europe, and the U.S. is maybe 10-12 years behind Europe as well. So that will happen...the only non-affected regions right now are India and Africa. And that means that the European, and Chinese, and U.S. industries will have to compete with a rather young population in Africa and India. And so that will become over time, but it is a long time, so that means that it's not always on the political agenda. Things that take a long time are usually not the things that you speak about when you have election times that we have in Sweden right now. It's mostly what's on the table. So I think that how to do that is really complex. We had some collaboration within the World Economic Forum. It is a fantastic organization because it spans the whole globe. So that means that the information comes from different parts of the world, and you can see different aspects of this. And a country that has done a lot about this is Singapore, very good experiments, very nice projects, initiatives regarding upskilling. And Europe is now launching an innovation program where they want to go deeper into deep tech to try to...the commissioner for research and education in June launched a big initiative around innovation and how that can be supported by deep technology. So we'll see what comes out of that. It'll be very, very interesting to see. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com, and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: Speaking about the World Economic Forum for a minute, Johan, you have been part of this group project called the Augmented Workforce Initiative. You told me when we spoke earlier that, in your opinion, this initiative couldn't have existed even just five years ago. Can you explain what you mean by that? Because augmentation, the way that you've been speaking about it now, is a perspective that was nascent, even in the early days of computing and manufacturing control systems. Yet, it seems to have disappeared a little bit, at least from the top end of the political and research agenda. Yet here we are and you said this initiative couldn't have existed five years ago. Can you explain what you meant by that? JOHAN: That is a very, very nice initiative by the World Economic Forum, and it's run by the forum and Cambridge University, who has a very, very good group on this and some very nice people. And I'm honored to be part of that group together with my colleague from Mexico, David Romero. You may know him as well. And I think that what they're looking at is the increased understanding. And that was actually one of the sessions at this World Economic Forum, you know, the Davos days that were run this year. And it was actually part of those days as a theme about how to engage, and how to support, and to augment the workforce, which has never happened before on that level. So it's really, really high on the agenda. The Forum has been running previous projects also on the future of work and how the demographic situation is affecting or how the skill situation is affecting the companies. They have come up with suggestions that more or less half the workforce needs to be upskilled within the next couple of years. And that's a huge undertaking. TROND: The novelty here is that the world's elite managers, I guess, who are represented at the World Economic Forum are increasingly aware of the complexity of workforce issues generally, and then specifically of upskilling, and maybe even upskilling in this very specific meaning of augmenting a worker which, I guess to my mind, is a little bit different from just generally speaking about robotic automation and hammering these efficiency points. But obviously, it's a much more challenging debate because it's one thing to find a budget for an automation effort and introduce a lot of computers or introduce a lot of whatever technology, usually hardware, but what we're talking about here is a lot more challenging because you need to tailor it to these workers. And there are many workers, obviously, so it's a complicated phenomenon. How is that going? What would you say are some of the findings of the Augmented Workforce Initiative? JOHAN: I think that companies like Tulip, companies like Black & Decker, and others have a lot of good use cases actually already, which may or may not before have been labeled augmentation. It might have been labeled as operator support, or decision-making support, or things like that, or upskilling. But I think that the findings are that there is a lot out there, but it's not emphasized as something that is really important for the company's survival in that sense. TROND: It wasn't so glorified before. A lot of the decision support systems were viewed as lower-level systems that were just kind of more like HR systems or just tinkering with necessary stuff that people had to know kind of a thing. And so you're saying it's been elevated now, yeah, as having a much more essential impact on the quality of work. JOHAN: It has a leveraging impact for the whole company, I would say, but that's also part of this industry 4.0 approach. And you have the hierarchical integration of companies where the CEO should be aware of what's going on on the shop floor and vice versa, as well as the horizontal integration where you have the companies up and down the supply chain and value chain knowing what's going on early. And that is really something that maybe stopped at mid-management level before, but now it needs to be distributed out to the places where the complexity is higher, and that's the frontline workers. Maybe...now I'm guessing, but I think that also the understanding that the investments done by this company in complex manufacturing equipment could be at risk if you don't have the right skills to use them is now penetrating, I think, a lot of the companies. In Europe, in 2019 or something like that, there were almost 30 million people employed in the manufacturing industry. And if you look at the number of...if you say that half of these need to be upskilled somehow over a period of three years...and I actually made a mock calculation that the re-skilling need for in-person months in Europe if we were to fulfill this is 50 million person-months, 50 million person-months, just the time for the people to participate in these trainings. So that's a huge undertaking. And I think that that scares companies as well as governments because just imagine taking 50 million person-months out of productivity or the production equation. But the alternative might be worse. If you lose your capability to use your equipment, that might even be worse. TROND: Wow, these are daunting things. I guess that brings me to the last section here and some thoughts from you on the future outlook. When it comes to technology and these tools for human augmentation, what are the timelines for, well, either making the improvements or, as you said, not losing competitiveness because of this skills crisis? What are we looking at here? Is there some imminent challenge and opportunity? Or is this going to play out over 25 years? JOHAN: I think that in 25 years, the demographic situations will have changed again, so I assume that they will look different. But right now, we have a problem with an aging population. And we have a lot of people going into retirement. A lot of knowledge will disappear unless we can store it somehow. A lot of people will not go into industry. I mean, when I talk to colleagues, they say, "Well, we need to make the manufacturing industry more sexy. It should be cleaner, or it should be nicer because young people don't go to industry." But if I go to the healthcare section, they will say the same thing, "Oh, we need to make it much better because people are not applying for these educations." TROND: [laughs] Where are people applying, the tech companies? JOHAN: No, that's the problem. They don't exist. They were never born. TROND: [laughs] Right. JOHAN: So the demographic bomb is that they are actually not there. So you cannot rely on employing young people because they are not existing in Europe and soon not in the U.S. to the extent that they were before. So therefore, you need to focus on the older people. So you need to re-upskill not only the middle-aged people but the people in their 50s and even in their 60s. That adds to the complexity. In the next 5 to 10 years, there will be a lot of discussions on how to fill the missing places in industry to remain competitive. I also think that you can see the augmentation here as a fantastic tool together with the upskilling because upskilling the new skills together with the augmented tools like collaborative robots, like cognitive support, like whatever you can put in an iPhone, or whatever phone, or tool, or watch, or whatever, you can add the capability to make decisions. And that's the augmentation you will see. And you will see a lot of digital twins try to foresee problems. You will see a lot of transversal technologies going from different high-tech industry into manufacturing industry to support especially the frontline people and to enable their innovation capabilities. TROND: Johan, you said earlier that the complexity is higher at the level of frontline workers. Did you mean that, basically, the complexity of frontline work of itself at an individual level is also underestimated? Or were you simply saying that because there are so many frontline workers and the various situations of various types of frontline workers is so different that it's obviously an underappreciated management challenge? Or were you truly saying that frontline work in and of itself is either complicated or becoming more complex? JOHAN: If a task was not automated, it is inherently complex. So you couldn't automate it, right? TROND: Right. JOHAN: Because if you can teach a robot or whatever to do tasks, then it's not difficult, and you can foresee the results. There was a lady called Lisanne Bainbridge. She put out The Paradox of Automation that the more you automate, the more dependent you become on the few people that are still there to handle the situations that are so complex that you could not foresee them. So everything that is programmed is programmed by a programmer, and the programmer tries to foresee every foreseeable situation, and to that extent, the robots and the automation works. But if these situations go out of hand, if they're too complex, and something happens, then there is no robot that can fix that. Unfortunately, AI is not there yet. TROND: Well, you said, "Unfortunately, AI is not there yet," but I would also conjecture that, fortunately, AI is not there yet because you're pointing to something missing, I think. And a lot of the AI debate is starting to come back now. And it was there in the '60s because people realized that for lots of different reasons, to have a human oversight over robotic processes is actually a good thing. And you talked to me earlier about the experiments with imagining a trip to Mars and having to execute robotic actions on Mars in a control system environment where you actually had to foresee the action and plan; it was always a supervised type of situation. So the supervisory control concept has been there from the beginning of computing. If you were to think of a future where AI actually does get more advanced, and a lot of people feel like that's imminent, maybe you and I don't, but in any case, let's imagine that it does become more advanced and becomes sort of a challenge, how do we maintain human control over those kinds of decisions? I mean, there are researchers that have imagined, you know, famously in Superintelligence, Bostrom imagines this paperclip factory that goes amok and starts to optimize for producing paperclips, and everyone is suddenly producing, you know, and the machine then just reallocates resources to this enormously ridiculous task of producing only paper clips. It's a very memorable example. But a lot of people feel that AI could soon or at some point reach that level. How do we, as a failsafe, avoid that that becomes an issue? Or do you see it as such a far-fetched topic in manufacturing that it would be decades, if not centuries, away? JOHAN: I think that AI has been seasonal if you allow the expression. There's talk about these AI winters every now and then, and they tend to come every 10 or 15 years, and that matches two Ph.D. lifetimes, Ph.D. development. I mean, people tend to forget the problems, and then they tend to use these Gartner curves. If you look at the Gartner curve, you have the expectation part. I'm not being arrogant towards the AI research. I think that AI is fantastic, but it should be seen, from my perspective, as what it is, as an advanced form of automation that can be used as an augmentation tool. I think it was Kasparov that started to collaborate with a chess computer maker or developer, and they won every tournament because the combination of the human and the chess computer was astounding. And now I think there are even competitions with chess computers plus chess experts comes with them. There was, I think, in the 1800s, there was a traveling exhibitionist where they had the Mechanical Turk, I think it was called. It was a chess player that was competing then against the people in the audience. And actually, inside this box, there was a small human that was making all the chess moves. And they were beating all the chess champions. So there was a man inside this. I think that there is still a man inside a lot of the automation. TROND: A man and a woman. I wanted to just lastly end on a more positive note because you told me earlier that you are more optimistic now than ten years ago on behalf of your industry that you've researched for so many years. Why is that? JOHAN: I think that the technology, I mean, I'm a techno-optimist. And I think that we have also the full scale, the full attention from the ICT industry on various industrial processes right now. It was a lot of service-oriented. And I think that that is playing out now in the platform wars, the different services, but these different services are actually making a lot of good in the manufacturing and the tougher industries. And so, there is a bigger focus now on creating CO2-less steel. And there's an exploration of different industries that are going across; you look at the electrification of vehicles which is cutting across several sectors in the industry, automotive industry, electronics industry. And I think that the problems in industry are becoming so complex. So the ICT attention is on industry now more than perhaps on consumers, as it were, and I think that that's promising. I see companies like Ericsson promoting 5G. I see companies doing the Amazon Web Services and such companies looking at services that are useful for industry. And that's also augmenting the people's capability in that sense, so that's why I'm so positive. I see all the sensors coming. I see all the computing power coming into the hands of the frontline operators. And I see also the use for the upskilling and the skilling technologies that are emerging. How do you do that? What they do in Matrix when the leading lady downloads the instructions for the helicopter or motorcycle or whatever it is. But how do you do that in real life? How do you prepare for something that's coming in the next few minutes? That is something that people are now looking at using technologies, augmenting technologies, digital twins, and things like that in a completely different way than they were five years ago. TROND: Wow. So these are exciting moments for learning in manufacturing with perhaps wide-ranging consequences if we succeed. Johan, I thank you so much for these reflections. You've spent a career investigating production systems, and manufacturing, and workers. And these are very rich debates. And it seems like they're not over, Johan. So, hopefully, we'll have you back when something happens. And we'll have you comment on some developments. Thank you very much. JOHAN: Thank you, Trond. Thank you for a very interesting discussion. You always learn a lot by being asked a lot of questions, so thank you so much for this learning experience. Thank you. TROND: You're very gracious. Thank you, Johan. You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was a Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence. Our guest was Johan Stahre, Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University of Sweden. In this conversation, we talked about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved. My takeaway is that human-centered automation is the only kind of automation that we should be thinking about, and this is becoming more and more clear. Operators are fiercely independent, and so should they be. This is the only way they can spot problems on the shop floor, by combining human skills with automation in new ways augmenting workers. It seems the workforce does not so much need engagement as they need enablement. Fix that, and a lot can happen. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean with Professor Torbjørn Netland from ETH Zürich. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes and if so, do let us know by messaging us. We would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects people, machines, devices, and systems in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially about where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Johan Stahre.

Productividad y hábitos de éxito
Tendencia Productividad: Inteligencia Artificial

Productividad y hábitos de éxito

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 9:31


25-11-2022Tendencia Productividad: Inteligencia ArtificialEntrevista que hice a Siri en 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gByPN6XZyMLocutores sin trabajo. Precio entre 10 y 100€ el minuto de grabación.500€ grabar 1 hora- Cómo crear vídeos con Inteligencia Artificial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-olsDGzucQ- Descript.com Crear tu propia voz con IA (en inglés)Google TrendsMachina learningEl modelo de lenguaje OPT comparte lo bueno y lo malo de la red neuronal pionera GPT-3 de OpenAI.La inteligencia artificial es, en las ciencias de la computación, la disciplina que intenta replicar y desarrollar la inteligencia y sus procesos implícitos a través de computadoras. No existe un acuerdo sobre la definición completa de inteligencia artificial, pero se han seguido cuatro enfoques: dos centrados en los humanos (sistemas que piensan como humanos, y sistemas que actúan como humanos) y dos centrados en torno a la racionalidad (sistemas que piensan racionalmente y sistemas que actúan racionalmente). Comenzó poco después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y el nombre lo acuñó en 1956 el informático John McCarthy, en la Conferencia de Dartmouth.Podcast Relatos sintéticos creado con IA: https://open.spotify.com/show/4hZ1lACSmwCUbsPF6on61jRecuerda suscribirte al podcast para no perderte el resto de noticias, novedades, trucos y herramientas para mejorar tu productividad. Si te ha gustado comparte el episodio, dale a me gusta, deja 5 estrellas o comenta el episodio. Me ayudarás a seguir creando episodios completamente gratis y no tener que cobrar por ellos.Grupo Telegram: https://borjagiron.com/telegramTambién puedes acceder completamente gratis a todos mis cursos de marketing digital de desde https://triunfacontublog.com Y si quieres puedes unirte a mi newsletter privada y gratuita de https://borjagiron.comSoy Borja Girón, has escuchado el podcast Productividad Máxima, nos escuchamos en el próximo episodio.

¿Esto qué es?
Tendencia 2023: Algo que no sabías - Inteligencia Artificial

¿Esto qué es?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 11:01


Tendencia 2023: Algo que no sabías - Inteligencia ArtificialEntrevista que hice a Siri sin IA en 2018: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gByPN6XZyM122: La verdad sobre el poder psicotrónico y otras pseudocienciasGoogle TrendsLa inteligencia artificial es, en las ciencias de la computación, la disciplina que intenta replicar y desarrollar la inteligencia y sus procesos implícitos a través de computadoras. No existe un acuerdo sobre la definición completa de inteligencia artificial, pero se han seguido cuatro enfoques: dos centrados en los humanos (sistemas que piensan como humanos, y sistemas que actúan como humanos) y dos centrados en torno a la racionalidad (sistemas que piensan racionalmente y sistemas que actúan racionalmente). Comenzó poco después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y el nombre lo acuñó en 1956 el informático John McCarthy, en la Conferencia de Dartmouth.Podcast recomendado: Algo que no sabías. Tomás BalmacedaSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1ajFdyW5xU3rfupxzVD6pAApple podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/ar/podcast/algo-que-no-sab%C3%ADas/id1636164193ivoox: https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-algo-no-sabias_sq_f11614268_1.html- Cómo crear vídeos con Inteligencia Artificial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-olsDGzucQ- Descript.com Crear tu propia voz con IA (en inglés)Podcast Relatos sintéticos creado con IA: https://open.spotify.com/show/4hZ1lACSmwCUbsPF6on61jRecuerda suscribirte al podcast para no perderte el resto de noticias, novedades, trucos y tendencias del mundo. Si te ha gustado comparte el episodio, dale a me gusta, deja 5 estrellas o comenta el episodio. Me ayudarás a seguir creando episodios completamente gratis y no tener que cobrar por ellos.Grupo Telegram: https://borjagiron.com/telegramTambién puedes acceder completamente gratis a mi newsletter desde https://borjagiron.comSoy Borja Girón, has escuchado el podcast Los últimos días, nos escuchamos en el próximo episodio.

Shoulder 2 Shoulder: LAFC Podcast
E142 - John McCarthy

Shoulder 2 Shoulder: LAFC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 58:23


The Mac Daddy himself graces S2S with an appearance this week. We talk to the LAFC GK and MLS Finals MVP about his historic performance and career. From championship tours to penalty tactics to ruining a certain Italian icons suit, we dive into the story behind the legend. LAFC have a CCL draw and a slew of cup runs to prepare for at the top of the show and a surprise special guest joins to talk all the cups. Check it out!

Over The Ball with Kevin Flynn
MLS Cup Mania! The Game, the Crowd, the Scoring, the PKs at the end, and the Media Coverage.

Over The Ball with Kevin Flynn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 32:06


MLS Cup Mania has carried through the last week! Kevin and Chris discuss and dissect an MLS Cup that seems to be made for TV. Arguably the best MLS game of all time due to the game, the crowd, the scoring, the media coverage, and the PKs at the end. The boys dig into the details, celebrate the moment, and discuss the power of hecklers in this episode of OTB.

On Air With Ryan Seacrest
HIGHLIGHT- LAFC Goalkeeper John McCarthy

On Air With Ryan Seacrest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 4:51


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast
Episode 225 - LAFC Wins 2022 MLS Cup!

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 98:12


LAFC has won MLS Cup! LAFC has won MLS Cup!!! After a match now considered the best final in MLS history, and the most intense emotional roller coaster in a 5-year history of intense emotional rollercoasters, LAFC has won MLS Cup!The matchup was #1 in the West, LAFC, against #1 in the East, the Philadelphia Union, for the first time in an MLS Final since 2003, and it lived up to every bit of the hype and billing. The two best teams produced an all-time great match, filled with improbable moments, incredible performances, and a storybook ending that Hollywood couldn't begin to script. Say it with us one more time: LAFC has won MLS Cup!LAFC drew first blood, as Kellyn Acosta bent a free kick off of midfielder Jack McGlynn's head and past Andre Blake for an early 1-0 lead. Philadelphia equalized just before the hour mark off a great feed from Jose Martinez to Daniel Gazdag, and the drama had just begun. LAFC looked to have won it off a bit of set magic in the 83rd minute. Carlos Vela found Jesus David Murillo with a beautiful corner kick, and LAFC looked to be on their way to glory! But just 2 minutes later, Jack Elliott found a header of his own off a set piece to level the match at 2 and send us into Extra Time.  Seven minutes into the first 15-minute period, Carlos Vela came off for Gareth Bale. Yes, Bale, the Welsh superstar who had played just 176 Black and Gold minutes since September, would be asked to replace the Captain. The first 15 minutes came and went without much fanfare, but, as Samuel L. Jackson said in Jurassic Park, "Hold on to your butts."After a horrific injury to Maxime Crepeau on a play that likely saved a sure Union goal and resulted in a straight red for Crepeau, the former Union product John McCarthy entered the match in the 117th minute of the MLS Cup Final. Because of the injury, we would see 9 full minutes of stoppage time. Four minutes in, McCarthy would make one fantastic save on Julian Carranza, but the ensuing rebound would be put home by Elliott for his second goal of the match, and one that surely looked to be a Cup winner.LAFC, Chiqui Palacios, and Gareth Bale had other ideas, however. After a 1-2 between Ilie and Chiqui, Palacios raced to the goal line, flicked a beautiful cross into the box towards a streaking Bale, who got perfect position on the 6'6" Elliott and headed it home for a 127th-minute equalizer!!! LAFC had found a way to get it to PK's! On paper, it looked to be David vs. Goliath, as McCarthy, the MLS journeyman, would take on the reigning MLS Keeper of the Year in Andre Blake. But the match is never played on paper; this is Latitude 36 Bermudagrass, and this is the Cathedral of the Black and Gold, Banc of California Stadium. After a miss by Glesnes, McCarthy stoned both Jose Martinez AND Kai Wagner, and with Ilie Sanchez's successful attempt, LAFC would win the shootout, 3-0, and take home our first MLS Cup. One more time, with feeling: LAFC has won MLS Cup!

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: CELEBRATION MONDAY

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 54:42


SUPER CROSSTALK with Travis and Sliwa - We have a Special Surprise here at 710 ESPN as it is a CELEBRATION MONDAY as the LAFC Black and Gold are the 2022 MLS CHAMPIONS! John McCarthy and the MLS CUP are here LIVE in studio. We talk to him about the game dramatic finish, his great saves and what is next? WHEEL OF QUESTIONS - If no asteroid hit the earth to wipeout the Dinosaurs, how would we be able to live with them? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

On Air With Ryan Seacrest
HIGHLIGHT: Engineer Tubbs pretends to be John McCarthy from LAFC

On Air With Ryan Seacrest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 6:16


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lunchtime With Roggin And Rodney
11/7 H1: MLS Cup MVP, John McCarthy, joins us; A Dodger youth movement? Russ thriving off of Laker bench

Lunchtime With Roggin And Rodney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 47:59


We speak with MLS Cup MVP, John McCarthy after LAFC won the championship on Saturday. Could the Dodgers be having a youth movement on the roster? Russell Westbrook is thriving off of the bench for the Lakers - and they're still losing.

Over The Ball with Kevin Flynn
Special MLS Cup Recap Edition of OTB - Featuring Mike Woitalla from Soccer America

Over The Ball with Kevin Flynn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 20:45


A complete excitement-filled recap of the 2022 MLS Cup featuring LAFC and Philadelphia Union. Soccer America's Mike Woitalla joins Kevin to discuss the incredible atmosphere and the one-of-a-kind stadium environment at Banc of California Stadium on Saturday for the MLS Cup featuring the glamorous and stylish LAFC taking on the more physical Philadelphia. The game absolutely lived up to the hype with an epic, back-and-forth 3-3 match -- tied at regulation, the game goes into extra time and ends with an incredible penalty kick shootout. An unforgettable true Hollywood ending for two of the MLS' best teams. #MLSCup2022

ExtraTime
Post MLS Cup Madness! What just happened???

ExtraTime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 51:02


Best MLS Cup ever???? Andrew Wiebe sits down with David Gass, Matt Doyle, and Charlie Davies just hours after the final whistle of LAFC's WILD win over Philly. We try to make sense of the maddness; Big-game Gareth delivering again, John McCarthy's PK heroics, and why we think Philly will be back sooner rather than later.  0:54 - What. Just. Happened. We try to to make sense of a WILD MLS Cup 9:28 - Best moments of MLS Cup 19:32 - Breaking down that insane Gareth Bale goal 21:08 - How the game played out 25:27 - This game was filled with standout performances 30:38 - Carlos Vela's journey with LAFC 34:24 - Heartbreak for the Union, but we think they'll be back

Inside LAFC
Max + Vince Podcast #158 - LIVE MLS Cup Preview & Predictions with Dave Denholm & John McCarthy

Inside LAFC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 56:34


This is it! We're 24 hours away from the first MLS Cup final in Los Angeles. The Max + Vince podcast was LIVE from open training for LAFC and the Philadelphia Union with the Radio Voice of LAFC Dave Denholm filling in for Max. Vince and Dave preview MLS Cup with the help of LAFC goalkeeper John McCarthy, LA Daily News writer Josh Gross, 110 Football's Connor Kalopsis, and Max drops in for a bit as well. We've got previews and predictions before the biggest match of the year!

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3713: Bash snippet - short-circuit evaluation in Bash Boolean expressions

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022


Preamble This is a case where I came upon a thing in Bash I had never considered before and was pleased and surprised that there was a way of doing what I wanted to do! If this is completely obvious to you, apologies, but it wasn't to me! Overview Many programming languages have the concept of short-circuit evaluation in Boolean expressions. What this means is that in an expression such as: A AND B if A is false then the whole expression must be false, and B doesn't have to be evaluated. That is because both arguments to AND have to be true for the overall result to be true. If A is true on the other hand, then B has to be evaluated to determine if the overall result is true. Similarly with: A OR B if A is true then the whole expression must be true and B can be skipped without evaluation. This is because only one argument to OR needs to be true to return a true result. If A is false on the other hand, then B has to be evaluated to determine if the overall result is false. Both of these expressions are evaluated from left to right. This is not a given in all languages. Some use special operators such as 'and_then' and 'or_else' which explicitly perform short-circuiting and left-to-right evaluation. Definition In simple terms, short-circuiting is where the evaluation of an expression is stopped as soon as its outcome is determined. The Wikipedia article Short-circuit evaluation defines it as: Short-circuit evaluation, minimal evaluation, or McCarthy evaluation (after John McCarthy) is the semantics of some Boolean operators in some programming languages in which the second argument is executed or evaluated only if the first argument does not suffice to determine the value of the expression: when the first argument of the AND function evaluates to false, the overall value must be false; and when the first argument of the OR function evaluates to true, the overall value must be true. This article contains a table entitled Boolean operators in various languages which shows details of how various programming and scripting languages cater for this feature. Use case I was writing a Bash script in which I wanted to ask questions about various steps - should they be done or not? Alternatively, I wanted to be able to set an option to run without interaction and assume the answer is 'yes' to all questions. I'd encountered short-circuit evaluation before in Pascal and Perl so I wondered if I could use it in Bash. The expression I was trying to write was: if [[ $YES -eq 1 ]] || yes_no 'Create directory? %s ' 'N'; then # Create directory fi Variable YES is being set through an option '-Y'; it's normally set to zero but is set to 1 if the option is used. yes_no is a function I wrote, and talked about in HPR episode 2096: “Useful Bash functions - part 2”. The requirement was that if YES was set to 1 I didn't want the function to be called at all. I was a little surprised, and very happy, to find that this is what happens. Here is the full example from the script that started me thinking about this issue - and therefore caused me to make this show: # # We need a show directory. If it doesn't exist then we'll create it because # other scripts will use it. # if [[ ! -d $SHOWDIR ]]; then echo "${red}There is no directory for show $show${reset}" # # If the -Y option was not chosen ask with 'yes_no'. It -Y was chosen # we're to go ahead regardless. This relies on the fact that Bash # "short-circuits" logical expressions like this. # if [[ $YES -eq 1 ]] || yes_no 'Create directory? %s ' 'N'; then mkdir "$SHOWDIR" _silent "${green}Directory created for show $show${reset}" else _silent "${yellow}Not changed${reset}" fi fi Notes: I have a Bash function that defines colours which is included into this script. That's why you see 'echo "${red}...${reset}"' in the above. I also have a function to turn off colour by setting the relevant variables to empty strings. The 'yes_no' function takes a prompt string with an (optional) '%s' placeholder for the expected inputs and default. This is followed by the default: 'N'. The function '_silent' writes the message given as its argument, depending on the setting of a 'SILENT' variable set earlier. Should it be used? Case 1 Bash uses short-circuiting in other contexts. This was discussed in the Bash Tips series, episode 10 with the example: [ -e /some/file ] || exit 1 Here the test is performed using '-e' to determine if '/some/file' exists. The result is either true or false. If the test returns true then the overall result of the or is true and the evaluation is short-circuited so that the 'exit 1' is not invoked. If the test is false then the second expression has to be evaluated to determine the overall result, so the 'exit 1' is invoked and the script exits. Incidentally, the '[ -e file ]' construct is actually an instance of the test command so could be written: test -e /some/file || exit 1 You might be familiar with command pipelines which use this technique, such as: sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade If the 'apt update' is successful the 'apt upgrade' is run. If it fails then the second command is not run. Case 2 We have seen the example that prompted me to make this show: if [[ $YES -eq 1 ]] || yes_no 'Create directory? %s ' 'N'; then # Create directory fi This could have been written as: if [[ $YES -eq 1 ]]; then # Create directory elif yes_no 'Create directory? %s ' 'N'; then # Create directory fi I prefer the first way, but it could be argued in a development environment that co-workers might find it confusing. Conclusion So, my conclusion is that short-circuiting is a desirable feature that I will continue to use. Links Wikipedia: Wikipedia article on short-circuit evaluation Table entitled Boolean operators in various languages Wikipedia article on conditional constructs in programming Wikipedia article on Truth values in logic, mathematics and programming HPR shows: Useful Bash functions - part 2 More ancillary Bash tips - 10

Jackman Radio
Episode 134 | John McCarthy

Jackman Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 45:26


Mike is joined by NH State Rep Candidate John McCarthy. John is running to represent District 18, which includes Jaffrey, Rindge and Dublin. They discuss the issues facing New Hampshire and his platform. Follow Jackman Radio on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JackmanRadio Support Jackman Radio https://www.patreon.com/JackmanRadio Venmo: SenatorJackman86

Cuda Confidential
Barracuda Bonus (10.14.22) 4-3 SOW at IA

Cuda Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 8:03


Nick Nollenberger recaps the Barracuda's opening season victory at Iowa, John McCarthy's first of his AHL coaching career.

Cuda Confidential
Cuda Confidential (Vol. 3, Ep. 1 – Season Preview)

Cuda Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 60:00


Nick Nollenberger previews the upcoming season by chatting with team beat writer Lizz Child, head coach John McCarthy and players.

The Earth Station One Podcast
The Earth Station One Podcast - Spotlight on the Munsters

The Earth Station One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 110:26


The Countdown to Halloween has begun! Mike, Mike, John McCarthy, and Ricky & Bambi celebrate one of the first families of frightful fun, from the original 1964 series debut to the new prequel movie directed by Rob Zombie. Also, friend of the station Darin Bush receives some tricks and treats from the Geek Seat! All this, along with Angela's A Geek Girl's Take, Ashley's Box Office Buzz, and Shout Outs! We want to hear from you! Feedback is always welcome. Please write to us at feedback@earthstationone.com and subscribe and rate the show on Apple Podcast, Stitcher Radio, Google Play, Spotify, Pandora, Amazon Music, wherever fine podcasts are found, and now we can be found on our own YouTube Channel. Table of Contents 0:00:00 Show Open / Interview & GeekSeat w/ Author Darin Bush 0:35:14 Ashley's Box Office Buzz 0:38:07 Spolight on The Munsters 1:36:13 A Geek Girls Take 1:38:29 Show Close Links Earth Station One on Apple Podcasts Earth Station One on Stitcher Radio Earth Station One on Spotify Past Episodes of The Earth Station One Podcast The ESO Network Patreon The New ESO Network TeePublic Store ESO Network Patreon Angela's A Geek Girl's Take Ashley's Box Office Buzz Michelle's Iconic Rock Talk Show The Earth Station One Website NSC Live TV Tifosi Optical The New Earth Station One YouTube Channel Monsterama Jr. Conjuration Tables of Content Toylanta Radio Cult Possum Kingdom Ramblers Inktober - Jas Ingram Inktober - Jen Broomall Promos Tifosi Optics The Best Saturdays Of Our Life Thundertalk The ESO Network Patreon If you would like to leave feedback or a comment on the show please feel free to email us at feedback@earthstationone.com Special Guests: Bambie Lynn, Darin Bush, John McCarthy, and Ricky Zhero.

ESO Network – The ESO Network
The Earth Station One Podcast – Spotlight On The Munsters

ESO Network – The ESO Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 110:26


The Countdown to Halloween has begun! Mike, Mike, John McCarthy, and Ricky & Bambi celebrate one of the first families of frightful fun, from the original 1964 series debut to the new prequel movie directed by Rob Zombie. Also, friend of the station Darin Bush receives some tricks and treats from the Geek Seat! All … The Earth Station One Podcast – Spotlight On The Munsters Read More » The post The Earth Station One Podcast – Spotlight On The Munsters appeared first on The ESO Network.

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks
Rookie Tournament Reaction Season

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 31:42


The San Jose Sharks started their rookie tournament with wins over the Anaheim Ducks and the Colorado Avalanche. William Eklund shows his worth in the clutch against the Ducks and continues to prove why he is so special, plus other players made their mark this weekend including Thomas Bordeleau and Artemi Kniazev. Also, a look at how Straus Mann and Mason Beaupit performed in net (11:00) and how Tristen Robins and Brandon Coe bounced back on Saturday night (14:30). Finally, a discussion on the penalties and what John McCarthy needs to clean up during training camp (21:00). Check out the podcast on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
“AI for Tourism” is this year's Theme for the John McCarthy AI Summer School

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 5:41


RDI hub, Microsoft Ireland, Munster Technological University, The SFI ADAPT Centre for AI-Driven Digital Content Technology, Tangent (Trinity's Ideas Workspace) AI Ireland, along with new partners IT@Cork Skillnet and Kerry Tourism Industry Federation will jointly host a hybrid AI Summer School on 1st and 2nd of September 2022. This year's summer school will deep dive into the area of AI for Tourism with both core and applied research tracks. With a stellar lineup of 18 speakers from seven different countries over two half days, this will be an unmissable event, including keynotes, plenary lectures, and roundtable discussions along with networking and research colloquia. The school is aimed at professors, post-docs, PhD students, researchers and graduate students in the fields of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Natural Language Processing and computer scientists who have an interest in statistics and Machine Learning. Why attend? Over two days you will explore cutting-edge research in AI for Tourism that is reshaping our future. Join Keynotes and roundtables with speakers from seven different countries including IT EHL Switzerland, University Of Algarve, Portugal, Sorbonne Universitiés, France, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Connecticut, University of Granada, Spain, Scotland and Ireland! Meet some of the greatest Professors, Post-Doc's, PhD Students and Researchers doing both Core and Applied research in the area of AI for Tourism right now. The RDI hub building is dedicated to John McCarthy as a tribute to the Stanford University computer scientist. McCarthy was one of the founders of the discipline of artificial intelligence and his father was born in Cromane, near Killorglin in Co Kerry. In the late 1950s McCarthy invented LISP which became the programming language of choice for AI applications. AI is going to have a truly transformative effect on our lives in the coming years, Already it is a discipline which has risen to prominence in terms of the personalisation of content we interact with on a daily basis online but there is so much more AI can help us achieve in the tourism space and we are looking forward to discussing its diversity with our speaker panel. Our aim is that the John McCarthy AI Summer School will become a calendar moment for the development of AI and the sharing of knowledge. RDI Hub CEO, Liam Cronin had this to say about the event: “The application of Artificial Intelligence will be a key driver of future Tourism growth in Ireland. Tourism is a huge economic sector for Kerry and we look forward to the further development and coordination of Digitalisation in the tourism sector in conjunction with possible associated new business/employment opportunities. The John McCarthy AI Summer School is a gathering of the brightest minds in AI, with this year's event taking a deep dive into the area of AI for Tourism with both core research and real-life applications as to how it is reshaping our future.” Professor Vinny Wade, Director of the SFI ADAPT Centre and Chair of Artificial Intelligence at Trinity College Dublin's School of Computer Science and Statistics, said: “Artificial Intelligence is making a significant impact on the tourism sector and the underlying technologies form part of ADAPT's key research focus. AI is helping to reinvent the tourism sector, from fintech and human behaviour analytics to augmented and mixed reality enabled scenic destinations, our researchers are looking to harness the opportunities offered by technological advances to help meet the needs of tourists and citizens. The AI Summer School is a great platform for broad engagement and we are delighted to be a founding member of this initiative.” Dr Haithem Afli, lecturer in AI at Munster Technological University, had this to say “The purpose of the John McCarthy artificial intelligence (AI) Award is to promote research in AI research done by students and foster scientific exchange between students and scienti...

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast
Episode 206 - McCarthy Stands Tall Though America Bests LAFC on PK's

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 58:49


Set at the beautiful Sofi Stadium, LAFC and Club America put on a spectacular exhibition in front of almost 72,000. Scoreless after regulation, and despite the standout performance from John McCarthy, America takes the win on penalties. The 3252 was electric, providing all the fireworks our boys needed, as Captain Eddie Segura led the way. 

The Stone Builders Rejected - We Are The Chief Cornerstone.
"He doesn't usually go to his bu**. He tends to go towards this face-down, a**-up position" - 'Big' John McCarthy agrees that Derrick Lewis vs. Sergei Pavlovic was an early stoppage.

The Stone Builders Rejected - We Are The Chief Cornerstone.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 3:58


‘Big' John McCarthy believes the Derrick Lewis vs. Sergei Pavlovic fight at UFC 277 on July 30 was marred by an early stoppage. Pavlovic blitzed Lewis with strikes early and knocked him down, prompting referee Dan Miragliotta to step in and wave off the fight. This made Pavlovic the winner via first-round TKO. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tsbrenterprises/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tsbrenterprises/support

Light on Life Podcast
Why Believing and Abiding Is the Key to the Happy Life [Encore Podcast]

Light on Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022


Podcast: Light on Life Season Nine Episode Thirty. Missionary pioneer J. Hudson Taylor of China was working and worrying so frantically that his health was about to break. Just when his friends feared he was near a breakdown, Taylor received a letter from fellow missionary John McCarthy that told of a discovery McCarthy had made from John 15—the joy of abiding in Christ. […] The post Why Believing and Abiding Is the Key to the Happy Life [Encore Podcast] appeared first on emeryhorvath.com. Related posts: Why Believing and Abiding Is the Key to the Happy Life [Encore Podcast] Why Believing and Abiding Is the Key to the Happy Life Why the Jesus Way Means Total Trust All the Time

Bloody Elbow Presents
UFC 37.5: As Real As It Gets 'Belfort vs Liddell | 6th Round RETRO

Bloody Elbow Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 52:30


Welcome to the 6th Round Retro Post-Fight Show. This is the show that digs into the archives and gives you a comprehensive review of classic MMA events, that span as far back as UFC 1. Join Eddie Mercado & Victor Rodriguez as they delve into the world of the ‘UFC 37.5 As Real As It Gets' event this week, straight out of the archives of yesteryear. So let's take a trip back to Saturday, June 22, 2002 and check out the first UFC event to feature Joe Rogan as a color commentator; after having done several behind-the-scenes interviews starting back at UFC 12. The guys will explore the UFC 37.5 event complete with results, analysis, and of course a few laughs. The oddly numbered event was a last-minute deal which was held in order to promote the ‘UFC on FOX' Sports Net's ‘The Best Damn Sports Show Period', where the “best fight” of the night was to air during the BDSSP's ‘All Star Summer' celebration in June 2002. The fight aired was ‘Steve Berger vs Robbie Lawler', which holds the distinction of being the first ever MMA fight to be aired on US cable TV. The ‘UFC 37.5' event, aka: ‘As Real As it Gets: Vitor Belfort vs. Chuck Liddell' went down from the Bellagio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, NV. It featured a mere six fights on the card and was then held aside for it's PPV broadcast until later on August 16th. They called it UFC 37.5 because UFC 38 was previously announced & marketed for England, where the UFC was making their debut in three weeks. Your commentators were Mike ‘Goldy' Goldberg, Jeff Osborne, & the debuting Joe Rogan. Plus, we had Bruce Buffer on the mic, with ‘Big' John McCarthy, Kipp Kollar, & Cecil Peoples refereeing the event. The big names of the show were Chuck Liddell & Vitor Belfort in the headliner, with Benji Radach vs Nick Serra in the co-main. We also had a young Robbie Lawler giving a stellar performance on the card. The event had what may be the smallest audience for a UFC numbered event, at 3,700 people. If you would like to watch the event, it can be found on UFC Fight Pass in the UFC Archives in one viewing; you can also search for the event via YouTube or you can search under the names of the fighters of each bout, one video per bout is likely out there across the interwebs, so some hunting would need to be done to look up the card in its entirety off of platforms other than Fight Pass. Join us to rediscover all the action and discuss as we go along! Let's check it out! ________________________________ (SPOILERS) The fight card was set up as follows: At 5:39 — LHW: Chuck Liddell (11-1) def. Vitor Belfort (10-3), DEC (Unanimous, 30-27, 30-27, 29-28) At 18:32 — WW: Benji Radach (6-0) def. Nick Serra (4-1), DEC (Unanimous, 29-28, 30-27, 30-27) At 25:31 — WW: Pete Spratt (11-5) def. Zach Light (2-1), SUB - Armbar at 2:25 of Rd 1 At 30:42 — WW: Robbie Lawler (6-0) def. Steve Berger (15-8), TKO (Punches) at 0:27 of Rd 2 At 38:45 — MW: Tony Fryklund (7-1) def. Rodrigo Ruas (3-1), TKO (Punches) at 3:34 of Rd 2 At 46:19 — LW: Yves Edwards (20-7) def. Joao Marcos Pierini (4-1), TKO (Injury) at 1:19 of Rd 1 If you enjoy our variety of shows, please “heart" us here on SC, or "like" & share over or on your BE Presents Podcast platform of choice: YouTube, Apple Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Spotify, TuneIn, OverCast, Player FM, & Amazon Music For previous episodes of the show, check out our playlists on any of our BE Presents channels.

FOSS and Crafts
47: What is Lisp?

FOSS and Crafts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022


This episode is all about the Lisp family of programming languages! Ever looked at Lisp and wondered why so many programmers gush about such a weird looking programming language style? What's with all those parentheses? Surely there must be something you get out of them for so many programming nerds to gush about the language! We do a light dive into Lisp's history, talk about what makes Lisp so powerful, and nerd out about the many, many kinds of Lisps out there!Announcement: Christine is gonna give an intro-to-Scheme tutorial at our next Hack & Craft! Saturday July 2nd, 2022 at 20:00-22:00 ET! Come and learn some Scheme with us!Links:Various histories of Lisp:History of Lisp by John McCarthyThe Evolution of Lisp by Guy L. Steele and Richard P. GabrielHistory of LISP by Paul McJonesWilliam Byrd's The Most Beautiful Program Ever Written demonstrates just how easy it is to write lisp in lisp, showing off the kernel of evaluation living at every modern programming language!M-expressions (the original math-notation-vision for users to operate on) vs S-expressions (the structure Lisp evaluators actually operate at, in direct representational mirror of the typically, but not necessarily, parenthesized representation of the same).Lisp-1 vs Lisp-2... well, rather than give a simple link and analysis, have a thorough one.Lisp machinesMIT's CADR was the second iteration of the lisp machine, and the most influential on everything to come. Then everything split when two separate companies implemented it...Lisp Machines, Incorporated (LMI), founded by famous hacker Richard Greenblatt, who aimed to keep the MIT AI Lab hacker culture alive by only hiring programmers part-time.Symbolics was the other rival company. Took venture capital money, was a commercial success for quite a while.These systems were very interesting, there's more to them than just the rivalry. But regarding that, the book Hackers (despite its issues) captures quite a bit about the AI lab before this and then its split, including a ton of Lisp history.Some interesting things happening over at lisp-machine.orgThe GNU manifestio mentions Lisp quite a bit, including that the plan was for the system to be mostly C and Lisp.Worse is Better, including the original (but the first of those two links provides a lot of context)The AI winter. Bundle up, lispers!Symbolics' Mac IvoryRISC-V tagged architecture, plus this lowRISC tagged memory tutorial. (We haven't read these yet, but they're on the reading queue!)SchemeThere's a lot of these... we recommend Guile if you're interested in using Emacs (along with Geiser), and Racket if you're looking for a more gentle introduction (DrRacket, which ships with Racket, is a friendly introduction)The R5RS and R7RS-small specs are very short and easy to read especiallySee this section of the Guile manual for a bit of... historyCommon Lisp... which, yeah there are multiple implementations, but these days really means SBCL with Sly or SLIMEClojure introduced functional datastructures to the masses (okay, maybe not the masses). Neat stuff, though not a great license choice (even if technically FOSS) in our opinion and Rich Hickey kinda blew up his community so maybe use something else these days.Hy, always hy-lariousFennel, cutest lil' Lua Lisp you've ever seenWebassembly's text syntax isn't technically a Lisp, but let's be honest... is it technically not a Lisp either?!Typed Racket and HackettEmacs... Lisp?... well let's just give you the tutorial! The dreams of the 60s-80s are alive in Emacs.Actually, we just did an episode about Emacs, didn't we?Digital Humanities Workshops episodeWe guess if you wanted to use Racket and VS Code, you could use Magic Racket?! We dunno, we've never used VS Code! (Are we out of touch?!)What about for Guile?! Someone put some energy into Guile Studio!Hack & Craft!

Dad Bod WOD Podcast
How to Level Up Your Fathering This Father's Day (Encore Presentation)

Dad Bod WOD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 35:23


 #113 - It's the Father's Day episode, and today I'm joined by FOUR amazing dads who drop SO MUCH knowledge, insight, and amazing advice. This is a slightly different format than my typical episodes, but I KNOW you're going to love it. I had so much fun recording this one and listening to these soundbites in real time. So, whether you're driving or taking your kids out for a long walk, get ready to be INSPIRED by some amazing dads!Follow these amazing dudes here:Michael Baiocco (instagram)John McCarthy (instagram)Post Modern Patriot PodcastPost Modern Patriot BlogMichael Ashford (instagram)Fit Dad Fitness PodcastFit Dad Fitness BlogJon Vroman (instagram)Front Row Dads PodcastIf you're interested in getting support along your health and fitness journey, you can fill out this questionnaire here and I'll be in touch!Click Here to Fill Out the QuestionnaireOr Just shoot me an email at Kevin@DadBodWOD.net or a DM on Instagram!Links:FREE Dad Bod WOD Community Facebook GroupTen Thousand Apparel CodeL TORRESIce Age Meals Code: KevinTorresIAMBare Performance Nutrition Code: TORRES

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks
San Jose Barracuda Head Coach, John McCarthy Interview

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 32:13


San Jose Barracuda Head Coach, John McCarthy joins to discuss his new role and what development means to him (5:00). We discuss how his experience as an AHL player will help with his coaching (9:00), the responsibility of the new crop of players including Ozzy Wiesblatt, Tristen Robins, Daniil Gushchin, and Brandon Coe, and how their previous time with the Barracuda prepared them for this stage (15:00). We finish with pregame rituals (19:00), new Cuda digs, and JD officially puts in his application to be an assistant coach (23:00). Check out the podcast on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Athletic Greens Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/NHLNETWORK. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sticky Situation
Best Gift Ever w/Carrie Cushman & John McCarthy

Sticky Situation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 27:49


Did you know that Sticky is an ordained minister and officiated her sister and brother-in-law's wedding? She felt such a tremendous responsibility for their union that somehow she channeled a full 16-week premarital program she now publicly offers and calls UNITED. Learn about the wedding gift the newlyweds said was the "best present they didn't know they needed." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sticky-situation/message

The Weekly Scraps Podcast
Will I Ever Fight Merab? | My Response to John McCarthy

The Weekly Scraps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 3:13


Everyone knows how close Merab and I are, and the elephant in the room that always accompanies us is the potential fight we could have for the title one day. In this video, I finally put that question to rest. I also address John McCarthy's comments about Nick Diaz lighting up Kamaru Usman... Enjoy! Buy Merch here on the Official Website: https://www.AljamainSterling.com Don't forget to like, comment, and subscribed! Instagram Handle - @TheWeeklyScraps @FUNKMASTERMMA https://sleepybeargummies.com - (Promo Code: FUNKMASTER) 20% OFF! WEEKLY SCRAPS INTRO THEME SONG BY: https://soundcloud.com/blass89

Daniel Ramos' Podcast
Episode 352: 29 de Mayo del 2022 - Devoción matutina para Adultos - ¨Nuestro maravilloso Dios¨

Daniel Ramos' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 4:30


================================================== ==SUSCRIBETEhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNpffyr-7_zP1x1lS89ByaQ?sub_confirmation=1================================================== == DEVOCIÓN MATUTINA PARA ADULTOS 2022“NUESTRO MARAVILLOSO DIOS”Narrado por: Roberto NavarroDesde: Chiapas, MéxicoUna cortesía de DR'Ministries y Canaan Seventh-Day Adventist Church 29 DE MAYO EL «SECRETO» DE JAMES HUDSON TAYLOR«Sean vuestras costumbres sin avaricia, contentos con lo que tenéis ahora, pues él dijo: "No te desampararé ni te dejaré"». Hebreos 13:5CUANDO JAMES HUDSON TAYLOR, fundador de la Misión al Interior de China, murió en 1905 dejó establecidos unas doscientas misiones, con más de ochocientos misioneros y millas de conversos. ¿Cómo pudo lograr tanto a pesar de todos los desafíos que tuvo que enfrentar?En 1867, Taylor perdió a su hija, Grace, por una enfermedad del cerebro. En 1870, su esposa María Dyer murió pocos días después de dar a luz un hijo varón, que también murió. En varias ocasiones, su vida y la de otros misioneros corrieron peligro durante las revueltas políticas que azotaban a la China en ese tiempo. Y como si todo eso fuera poco, con frecuencia fue objeto de calumnias, ¡algunas de ellas provenientes de otros misioneros! En un momento, fue tanta la presión, que incluso llegó a considerar «la horrible tentación de quitarse la vida».Entonces sucedió un hecho que cambió para siempre su vida. Taylor se encontró en una estación misionera en Chin-kiang, durante el otoño de 1869, cuando leyó una carta de otro misionero, John McCarthy. En su mensaje, McCarthy le reveló un «secreto»: «Dejar que mi amante Salvador cumpla en mí su voluntad. [...]. Permanecer en él, sin luchas ni afanes, puestos los ojos en Jesús, y confiando solo en él para que nos otorgue poder». *Luego Taylor escribiría del gozo que invadió su corazón: «Mientras leí la carta, me di cuenta de todo. “Si somos infieles, él permanece fiel” (2 Tim. 2: 13). Entonces fijé mis ojos en Jesús, y cuando por fe lo vi [...], recordé lo que él dijo: “No te desampararé ni te dejaré”. En vano luchó para permanecer en él, pero no luchó más. ¿No ha prometido él que estará conmigo, que nunca me desamparará ni me dejará?». **Los desafíos y dificultades no desaparecieron, pero James Hudson Taylor había encontrado una fuente de gozo que nadie le pudo arrebatar: la promesa de Uno que había dicho: «No te desampararé ni te dejaré».Y tú, ¿estás «luchando para permanecer en Cristo? No luches más. ¿Lucha el hombre enamorado para ganar el amor de la mujer que ya lo ama? Por supuesto que no. Asimismo, no luches por tener a tu lado a quien te ha prometido estar contigo «todos los días, hasta el fin del mundo». Solo mantente en comunión con el cada día, conecta tu alabanza, y recibe de su gracia. Y cuando los problemas se presenten, recuerda que Jesús nunca te dejará ni te desamparará.¿Cómo podría él dejarte después de todo cuanto sufrió para salvarte? Padre celestial, hoy quiero recordar que nunca me dejarás, y que nada en este mundo me podrá separar de tu amor. ¡Absolutamente nada!*Robert J. Morgan, Nelson Annual Preacher's Sourccbook, Thomas Nelson, 2005, p. 92. **John Woodbridge, editor. Embajadores de Cristo, Moody Press, 1994, pág. 161.

RN Drive - ABC RN
Fmr Ambassador John McCarthy, Wayne Swan on Labor's win and is it time to legalise cannabis?

RN Drive - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 85:25


With intelligent and thought-provoking analysis, RN Drive goes behind the headlines to give you original insight into the world you live in. Keep up to date with federal politics, current affairs, arts, culture and the stories that are making Australia talk.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
China congratulates Prime Minister Albanese but is it the beginning of the end of the deep-freeze?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 15:10


Australia's newly-sworn in Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has spent his second day in the job attending the QUAD security dialogue in Tokyo - meeting with the leaders of the United States, Japan and India. Beijing's swift move to send a letter of congratulations to the new government, parting with close to two-and-a-half years of giving the cold shoulder, suggests an openness to improving relations. Guest: John McCarthy, former Australian Diplomat

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks
Reacting To San Jose Sharks Organizational Changes

Locked On Sharks - Daily Podcast On The San Jose Sharks

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 28:08


JD discusses the big news around the San Jose Sharks with Roy Sommers heading to the front office and John McCarthy being named the new head coach of the San Jose Barracuda. Then, analyzes why this was the right move at the right time for the organization. Next, looks at Ray Whitney and why he will not be named the next San Jose Sharks General Manager (10:00) and finally profiles the newest San Jose Shark, Mitchell Russell, and why the Sharks decided to sign him (18:00). Check out the podcast on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

'The Other Side of Paradise' with Lynn Kawano
18. The HPD Veteran Who's Speaking Out From Retirement

'The Other Side of Paradise' with Lynn Kawano

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 21:20


After 45 years of service, John McCarthy retired from the Honolulu Police Department last year as deputy chief. In this episode of "The Other Side of Paradise," he explains the circumstances that pushed him out, his frustrations with the department, the public corruption scandal that rocked the department and how all that affects the rank and file.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cuda Confidential
Vol. 2, Ep. 26 - John McCarthy Introductory Interview (5/19/22)

Cuda Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 25:00


Nick Nollenberger sits down with the newly appointed head coach of the San Jose Barracuda John McCarthy for an exclusive one-on-one interview.

The Stick Hungry Podcast
Episode 41 - Doug Wilson Jr. On The 2022 NHL Draft And William Eklund's Season

The Stick Hungry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 67:35


Sheng and JD react to the news of the San Jose Barracuda coaching change with Roy Sommers moving to a front-office role and John McCarthy becoming the head coach. We analyze why the move was made (5:00) and the differences between Sommers and McCarthy as the Barracuda are set to start a new era of Cuda hockey (12:00). Then we look at why the Sharks are interviewing Ray Whitney and where they are currently at in their process of hiring a new General Manager (21:00). Next, San Jose Shark's Director of Scouting, Doug Wilson Jr., joins the show to discuss the differences with Doug Wilson around (30:00), how he goes about scouting players (34:00), the one thing he looks for when drafting players (37:00) and his thoughts on the 2022 NHL Draft (39:00). Then Doug Wilson Jr. explains why he is happy about William Eklund's season despite the lack of point production (43:00), how some of the defensive prospects are progressing including Gannon Laroque (48:30), and his under-the-radar prospect (58:30), plus he reveals Max Veronneau's expectations going into the 2022 season (1:00:30). Presented by DraftKings - Use Promo Code THPN at sign up for exclusive offers SHOW NOTES: f you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/NH/NJ/NY/OR/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Teal Town USA
TTG - John McCarthy New Barracuda Head Coach

Teal Town USA

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 34:25


Ian Reid and Kevin Lacy kick off the summer of Teal Tinted Glasses on Teal Town USA to talk about John McCarthy replacing Roy Sommer as the head coach of the Barracuda. Teal Town USA - A San Jose Sharks' post-game vodcast, for the fans, by the fans! Subscribe to catch us after every Sharks game and our weekly wrap-up show, The Pucknologists! Remember to Like, Subscribe, and hit that Notification bell to be alerted every time we go live! Want audio only? Subscribe to our audio-only platforms below:

ABCA Podcast
John McCarthy, Head Coach, Homewood-Flossmoor HS

ABCA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 63:38


In this week’s ABCA Podcast we check in with Homewood Flossmoor head baseball coach & counselor, John McCarthy. Coach McCarthy was a draft out of high school and headed to Mesa Community College out of the Chicagoland area. He finished his undergraduate degree playing for Tony Robichaux and the Louisiana Ragin’ Cajun baseball program. After his playing career Coach McCarthy got his Master’s in school counseling from Lewis University and coached with the Illinois Sparks travel program. His next step in his journey took him back to the Catholic League in Chicago coaching at Brother Rice. In this episode we discuss what he learned from Tony Robichaux & John Scefz, blending travel baseball with your high school program, getting things turned around at Homewood Flossmoor and how he is using his counseling degree to help his high school players. The ABCA Podcast is presented by Netting Pros. Netting Professionals are improving programs one facility at a time, specializing in the design, fabrication and installation of custom netting for backstops, batting cages, dugouts, bp screens and ball carts. They also design and install digital graphic wall padding windscreen, turf, turf protectors, dugout benches, dugout cubbies and more.

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast
Episode 193 - Rocky Mountain Low

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 59:33


For the fourth time in 14 days, LAFC is set to play. (Don't worry, we will do this all over again in the next 14 days) Tired, injured, and traveling a mile high to Commerce City, LAFC looked the part in their 2-0 loss to the Rapids, and you'll hear all about it here on Episode 193 of Defenders of the Banc.It all fell apart in the first half-hour for LAFC, as Sebastian Ibeagha and Pancho Ginella were both whistled for fouls in the box. Colorado buried both the penalties, though not without a solid effort on both by John McCarthy, the backup-turned-starter for the Black and Gold. Truth be told, McCarthy was pretty much the only bright spot for LAFC on the day. His four saves and several other great plays kept LAFC in the match. There simply weren't many opportunities for an obviously-tired club. LAFC forced just two saves by Yarbrough, both of the garden variety, and LAFC head home for their second 2-week-4-match set. Also on this episode, find out which dwarf Filly would be from Snow White, how many different words Scarf makes up, and what the heck the Defenders were doing during the match. We'll be back very soon for 194!

MMAjunkie Radio
Ep. #3259: John McCarthy joins the show, Rose Namajunas speaks out, more

MMAjunkie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 70:44


On Episode 3,259, the guys welcome Big John McCarthy onto the show, where he shares his opinion on some recent fights, primarily Esparza vs Namajunas. The guys also discuss Rose Namajunas speaking out, Pat Barry having no regrets, and much more.

The Long Island Sound
How to Imbue Creative Steadfast Joyful Tenacity by the Somehow Sorry Band

The Long Island Sound

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 62:18


 How to Imbue Creative Steadfast Joyful Tenacity by the Somehow Sorry BandSomehow Sorry is an American rock band formed in Long Island, NY in 2006. Their lineup consists of singer and guitarist Lorraine McCarthy, guitarist and singer John McCarthy, bass guitarist and singer Paul Maugeri, and drummer James Bosko. Maugeri and Bosko's influential playing styles rounded out to be a solid rhythm section for Somehow Sorry, John McCarthy's guitar technique has created and has developed their unique sound. John and Rain's voices when combined put the signature on this project. There is no band or artist who sounds like Somehow Sorry. They are influenced by many rock, and folk-rock bands and their songs receive regular exposure. Somehow Sorry developed from an earlier group, D'Vine Ryte, D'Vine Ryte, established themselves as part of the hard rock era of the late '80s and '90s. 1994 to 1994 was signed to the Road Runner Records Label. John & Lorraine McCarthy's contributions to rock music include the Song "When" (1994) which sold over 250,000 copies in the USA under the band D'Vine Ryte. "Pear" a Demo EP In 1977, was recorded and released under Modern Voices Records with Studio Drummer Chris Pati and Studio Bassist Christopher Warren. "Fit To Be Tied" a full-length Album in 2007 recorded and released under Guru Project is the first record recorded with the rhythm section, Maugeri and Bosko. "Same Great Taste" full-length Album in 2021. Released under Rain Arts and Entertainment. Basic tracks recorded at EKO Productions, Deer Park, NY, With Engineers Steve Porcelli and Jack Walker. Produced and Engineered at Rain Arts and Entertainment. Mixed at Chrome Orange Music Media and Rain Arts and Entertainment, Mastered at Major Decibel and Chrome Orange Music Media. Features nine original songs and one re-make. Festival appearances at Woman's Rights to Rock, Lilith Fair, Woodstock Revival, and the CCAR Recovery Fest. established their reputation as a respected rock act. As well as Supporting artists for many national rock acts including, Warrant, Huey Lewis, Nino Betancourt, and Missing Persons. Connect with The Long Island Sound Podcast:Website: Https://GigDestiny.com/podcast Follow Steve Yusko, GigDestiny.com, and his adventures:  Website: https://www.GigDestiny.com  Twitter, Instagram,  YouTube, FacebookSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/21aCeQWDmD4fkucpfVf9Email: Steve@GigDestiny.com Intro/Outro song in this episode:“Fading out Fast” from Mike Nugent's album, Mike Nugent and the Blue Moon BandThe growth of The Long Island Sound Podcast has been exponential. Help us grow the show!Subscribe to the GigDestiny.com Site here for bonus contentSubscribe to our YouTube ChannelCall the Listener Line & leave your comments: (631) 800-3579 Remember to Rate & Review the show! Help us keep the conversation going with your donation - Click Right Here or go to GigDestiny.com Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast
Episode 188 - Vela at the 6 Helps LAFC to 5!

Defenders of the Banc - An LAFC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 63:38


For the first time since 2019, the U.S. Open Cup is Back at the Banc! LAFC hosts their former USL affiliate, Orange County Soccer Club, in a 3rd Round Open Cup clash, and your boys Filly and Scarf are here to break down all the fun of the 5-1 win.Open Cup matches at the Banc are always a fun time. You can hang out in Figueroa Club, get to know USL clubs, and these matches are another great excuse to just be at the Banc. You also get to know your roster a little more deeply, as players who are a little further down the depth chart get a little more burn than usual. While we aren't sure our neighbors from behind the Orange Curtain will feel that way after this match, we sure did enjoy the start of the 2022 Open Cup. John McCarthy, Danny Musovski, Sebastian Ibeagha, and Cal Jennings would all play vital roles in this match, and with Pancho Ginella, Doneil Henry, and Franco Escobar all getting starting nods, it's safe to say everyone in attendance got a good look at the depth of MLS's most talented roster. Chicho Arango continued his hot streak, netting a brace before halftime, and the Moose ran wild at the Banc with a brace of his own. Jennings, last year's leading scorer for the Las Vegas Lights, capped the scoring for the Black and Gold, but the biggest story of the match seemed to be a new role for Carlos Vela, albeit a temporary one: Vela at the 6. With Vela playing the Ilie Sanchez role, the ball moved around the pitch with accuracy and speed, and, in combination with Kellyn Acosta, LAFC's passing was crisp and clean. Also, you may have noticed 188 was released before 187... we talk about that on the pod, too! We really appreciate all the love and support, especially in the bit of a rough spot the Defenders is in with the loss of our beloved mascot, family member, and best-dressed cat on the planet. We feel you, Defenders Nation! Enjoy 188!

Inside LAFC
Max + Vince Podcast #129 - Time To Make A Run with Special Guests John McCarthy & Jordan Harvey

Inside LAFC

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 34:35


There's no time to rest around here. After a 3-1 victory over Sporting KC this past weekend, LAFC embarks on a new journey in 2022. The U.S. Open Cup returns to the Banc this Wednesday. LAFC starts its run to the oldest trophy in the country against USL champions Orange County SC. Max is joined by LAFC legend Jordan Harvey this week with Vince away. Jordan gives makes the lowdown on his role within and around the club including his recent appearances on the LAFC broadcast. Then the guys dig into the match against SKC, which featured a Goal of the Year contender from Ismael Tajouri-Shradi and some very good work from a number of LAFC players. From there, the guys talk a little bit about the Open Cup and what it means to the Black & Gold. After that, the guys are joined by LAFC goalkeeper John McCarthy. John talks about growing up as a Philly sports fan, what excited him about joining LAFC, being a part of a deep goalkeepers group, and much more.

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani
Aljamain Sterling, A.J. McKee, Cub Swanson, Mike Malott, Olivier Aubin-Mercier, PFL CEO Peter Murray, and more

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 266:51


Michael Malott around (6:04) discusses if he's the next big Canadian star, his nickname, why he chose Team Alpha Male, if he ever had doubts he would make it to the UFC, his UFC debut, the charity drive for his coach's daughter, when he would like to fight again, and more. Olivier Aubin-Mercier around (28:05) discusses difficulties with training MMA due to Quebec government, transition to PFL and really liking the 'little family' vibe, planning to retire at 35, what he'll do after, no regrets with his UFC career, confidence he can win PFL lightweight tournament this year, and more. PFL CEO Peter Murray around (48:17) discusses the upcoming PFL season, their TV deal with ESPN, the re-signing of Kayla Harrison, the storylines to watch, the recent PFL gambling scandal, the PFL's plans for pay-per-view, a cross-promotional event with Bellator, the return of Claressa Shields, and more. AJ McKee around (1:09:12) discusses his new hairstyle, what took him so long to return to the Bellator cage, his contract issues with Bellator, if he could be a free agent after his next three fights, his rematch with Patricio Pitbull, his dream fight in the UFC, and more. Aljamain Sterling around (1:33:29) discusses his performance against Petr Yan at UFC 273, the scoring by the judges, why he was so emotional by weigh-ins, who won the first round in the co-main event, his response to John McCarthy's comments, if TJ Dillashaw should get the next title shot, his apology form, when he might return, and more. Cub Swanson around (2:12:26) discusses finding out he was headed to UFC Hall of Fame for his fight with Doo Ho Choi, was he surprised the fight was honored, his favorite memory from the fight, when he might return, if he'll end up fighting Uriah Faber, how he thought Sterling vs. Yan was a draw, and more. GC and Helwani around (2:42:25) break down the best bets for the upcoming Bellator and UFC events this weekend. In the latest On the Nose around (3:13:31), Ariel Helwani discusses his “elevator,” the welterweight division, Khamzat Chimaev's rise in the UFC, how finishes should earn fighters bonus, Nick Diaz's possible return, helping out Henry Cejudo, Sean O'Malley's return, and more. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/NH/NJ/NY/OR/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. New customers only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Midnight Train Podcast
Episode 150! Who Was Jack the Ripper? Part 1

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 110:54


ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY FRIGGIN' EPISODES! Thank you all so much!! Consider becoming a Patreon POOPR! www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com  London in 1888:   Victorian London was not a happy place to be, and the facts speak for themselves. Prostitution was rife, poverty and crime were prevalent, and 19th-century housing was barely habitable. Finding work in 1888 was extremely difficult for the residents of Whitechapel, feeding into the cycle of poverty and depravity.   Soot and smoke generally filled the air, and there were still grazing sheep in Regent's Park in the mid-Victorian period — it was said that you could tell how long the sheep had been in the capital by how dirty their coats were. They went increasingly from white to black over days.   The nights were riddled with gas lamp-lit streets and dark, foggy alleyways.   The city was steeped in poverty and all manner of crime and disease.   Many children were seen as a strain on their parents' resources, and it is believed that two in every ten died before reaching five years old.   breeding ground for crime and poor behavioral habits, including murder, prostitution, and violence – and vicious circles like these were rarely broken in such poor districts   Streets were dirty, and fresh food was scarce. Pollution and sewage smells filled the air.   Urine soaked the streets. There was an experiment in Piccadilly with wood paving in the midcentury. It was abandoned after a few weeks because the sheer smell of ammonia coming from the pavement was horrible. Also, the shopkeepers nearby said that this ammonia was discoloring their shop fronts.   London in the 19th century was basically filled with cesspools.   There'd be brick chambers, maybe 6 feet deep, about 4 feet wide, and every house would have them.   It was more common to have a cesspool in the basement in central London and in more crowded areas.   Above the cesspool would be where your household privy, or toilet, would be.   These made the general smell in crowded London pretty awful.   There would have been horses everywhere. By the 1890s, there were approximately 300,000 horses and 1,000 tons of horse droppings a day in London. The Victorians employed boys ages 12 to 14 to dodge between the traffic and try to scoop up the excrement as soon as it hit the streets.   Shit everywhere.   The streets were lined with "mud,"... except it wasn't mud.    Life was much harder for women than men generally.   The lack of proper work and money led many women and girls into prostitution, a high-demand service by those wishing to escape their grim realities.   These women were commonly known as "unfortunates,"   They owned only what they wore and carried in their pockets - their dirty deeds would pay for their bed for the night.   There was an extraordinary lack of contraception for women.   Doctors performed unorthodox abortions in dirty facilities, including the back streets.   Many women would die of infection from these ill-performed surgeries or ingesting chemicals or poison.   The insides of the houses throughout the borough were no less uninviting and more reminiscent of slums.   Many of these dilapidated homes were makeshift brothels.   Prostitution was a dangerous trade, as diseases were passed from person to person very quickly, and doctors did not come cheap.   Most work came through casual or 'sweated' labor, like tailoring, boot making, and making matchboxes.   There was very little job security, and the work premises would more than likely be small, cramped, dusty rooms with little to no natural light.   Workhouses were another alternative, set up to offer food and shelter to the poorest of the community in return for hard, grueling labor in even worse conditions.   large portions of the population turned to drinking or drugs to cope with everyday life   Pubs and music halls were abundant in the East End, and booze was cheap, too, making it a viable means of escapism for many.   Crime rates spiraled and were unmanageable by London's police force in 1888. Petty crime like street theft was normality.   High levels of alcohol-related violence, gang crime, and even protection rackets were everywhere.   The high level of prostitution meant that vulnerable women were often forced to earn a living on the streets, leaving them easy targets for assault, rape, and even murder.   Police stations and the detectives at the helm lacked structure and organization, with many crimes being mislabelled, evidence going missing, or being tampered with was common.    The maze of dingy alleyways and dark courtyards, each with multiple entrances and exit points, made the district even more difficult to police. There were even some parts of Whitechapel that police officers were afraid to enter, making them crime hotspots.   With that brief look into what it was like in Whitechapel, it is no wonder that Jack the Ripper could get away with his crimes. That being said, let's look at the crimes and victims.   Mary Ann Nichols:   Mary Ann Nichols led a brief life marked with hardships. Born to a London locksmith in 1845, she married Edward in 1864 and gave birth to five children before the marriage dissolved in 1880.   In explaining the roots of the separation, Nichols' father accused Edward of having an affair with the nurse who attended one of their children's births. For his part, Edward claimed that Nichols' drinking problem drove them to part ways.   After separating, the court required Edward to give his estranged wife five shillings per month, over 600 pounds today— a requirement he successfully challenged when he found out she was working as a prostitute.   Nichols then lived in and out of workhouses until her death. She tried living with her father, but they did not get along, so she continued to work as a prostitute to support herself. Though she once worked as a servant in a well-off family home, she quit because her employers did not drink.   On the night of her death, Nichols found herself surrounded by the same problems she'd had for most of her life: lack of money and a propensity to drink. On 31st August 1888, she left the pub where she was drinking and walked back to the boarding house where she planned to sleep for the night.   Nichols lacked the funds to pay for the entrance fee, so she went back out to earn it. But, according to her roommate, who saw her the night before someone killed her, she spent whatever money she did earn on alcohol.   That night Mary was wearing a bonnet that none of the other residents of the lodging house had seen her with before. Since she intended to resort to prostitution to raise the money for her bed, she felt this would be an irresistible draw to potential clients. So, she was escorted from the premises by the deputy lodging housekeeper. She laughed to him, "I'll soon get my doss money, see what a jolly bonnet I have now."   At 2.30 on the morning of 31st August, she met a friend named Emily Holland by the shop at the junction of Osborn Street and Whitechapel Road.   Mary was very drunk, and she boasted to Emily that she had made her lodging money three times over but had spent it.   Concerned at Mary's drunken state, Emily tried to persuade her to come back to Wilmott's with her. Mary refused, and, telling Emily that she must get her lodging money somehow, she stumbled off along Whitechapel Road.   That was the last time that Mary Nichols was seen alive.   At 3.45 a.m., a woman's body was found with her skirt pulled up to her waist, lying next to a gateway in Buck's Row, Just off Whitechapel Road. This location was around a ten-minute walk from the corner where Mary met Emily Holland.   According to some newspaper reports, the woman's throat had been cut back to the spine, the wound being so savagely inflicted that it had almost severed her head from her body.   Within 45 minutes, she had been placed on a police ambulance, which was nothing more than a wooden hand cart. She had been taken to the mortuary of the nearby Whitechapel Workhouse Infirmary.   Here, Inspector Spratling of the Metropolitan Police's J Division arrived to take down a description of the, at the time, unknown victim, and he made the horrific discovery that, in addition to the dreadful wound to the throat, a deep gash ran along the woman's abdomen - The killer had disemboweled her.   The funeral of Mary Ann Nichols took place amidst great secrecy to deter morbid sightseers on Thursday, 6th September 1888.   Strangely, the ruse used to get Mary Nichols's body to the undertaker's could be said to have included an element of foreshadowing.   Mary Nichols's body was brought out of the mortuary's back gate in Chapman's Court, from where it was taken to the undertaker's premises on Hanbury Street.   Two days later, the murderer struck again and murdered Annie Chapman in Hanbury Street.   Annie Chapman:   Annie Chapman didn't always lead a hard life. She lived for some time with her husband, John, a coachman, in West London.   However, after the couple had children, her life began to unravel: Her son, John, was born disabled, and her youngest daughter, Emily, died of meningitis. She and her husband both began to drink heavily and eventually separated in 1884.   After the separation, Chapman moved to Whitechapel to live with another man. While she still received ten shillings per week from her husband, she sometimes worked as a prostitute to supplement her income.   When her husband died from alcohol abuse, that money stopped. According to her friends, Chapman "seemed to have given away all together." Then, a week before she died, Chapman got into a fistfight with another woman over an unreturned bar of soap.   At 5 p.m. on Friday, 7th September, Annie met her friend, Amelia Palmer, in Dorset Street. Annie looked extremely unwell and complained of feeling "too ill to do anything."   Amelia met her again, ten minutes later, still standing in the same place, although Annie was trying desperately to rally her spirits. "It's no use giving way, I must pull myself together and get some money or I shall have no lodgings," were the last words Amelia Palmer heard Annie Chapman speak.   At 11.30 p.m. that night, Annie turned up at Crossingham's lodging house and asked Timothy Donovan if she could sit in the kitchen.   Since he hadn't seen her for a few days, Donovan asked her where she had been? "In the infirmary," she replied weakly. He allowed her to go to the kitchen, where she remained until Saturday morning, 8th September 1888.   At 1.45 a.m., Donovan sent John Evans, the lodging house's night watchman, to collect the fourpence for her bed from her. He found her a little drunk and eating potatoes in the kitchen. When he asked her for the money, she replied wearily, "I haven't got it. I am weak and ill and have been in the infirmary."   Annie then went to Donovan's office and implored him to allow her to stay a little longer. But instead, he told her that if she couldn't pay, she couldn't stay.   Annie turned to leave, but then, turning back, she told him to save the bed for her, adding, "I shall not be long before I am in. I shall soon be back, don't let the bed."   John Evans then escorted her from the premises and watched her head off along Dorset Street, observing later that she appeared to be slightly tipsy instead of drunk.   At 5.30 that morning, Elizabeth Long saw her talking with a man outside number 29 on Hanbury Street. Since there was nothing suspicious about the couple, she continued on her way, hardly taking any actual notice.   Thirty minutes later, at 6 a.m., John Davis, an elderly resident of number 29, found her horrifically mutilated body lying between the steps and the fence in the house's backyard.   Annie had been murdered, and her body mutilated. She had a cut across her neck from left to right and a gash in her abdomen made by the same blade.   Her intestines had been pulled out and draped over her shoulders, and her uterus had been removed. The doctor conducting the post-mortem was so appalled by the damage done to her corpse that he refused to use explicit detail during the inquest. Police determined that she died of asphyxiation and that the killer mutilated her after she died.    She was later identified by her younger brother, Fountain Smith.   The severing of the throat and the mutilation of the corpse were similar to that of the injuries sustained by Mary Ann Nichols a week previously, leading investigators to believe the same assailant had murdered them.   At this point, the killings were known as 'The Whitechapel Murders."   Elizabeth Stride:   The Swedish-born domestic servant arrived in England in 1866, at which point she had already given birth to a stillborn baby and been treated for venereal diseases.   Stride married in 1869, but they soon split, and he ultimately died of tuberculosis in 1884. Stride would instead tell people that her husband and children (which they never actually had) were killed in an infamous 1878 Thames River steamship accident. She allegedly sustained an injury during that ordeal that explained her stutter.   With her husband gone and lacking a steady source of income, like so many of Jack the Ripper's victims, Stride split the remainder of her life living between work and lodging houses.    On Saturday, 29th September 1888, she had spent the afternoon cleaning two rooms at the lodging house, for which the deputy keeper paid her sixpence, and, by 6.30 p.m., she was enjoying a drink in the Queen's Head pub at the junction of Fashion Street and Commercial Street.   Returning to the lodging house, she dressed, ready for a night out, and, at 7.30 p.m., she left the lodging house.   There were several sightings of her over the next five hours, and, by midnight, she had found her way to Berner Street, off Commercial Road.   At 12.45 a.m., on 30th September, Israel Schwartz saw her being attacked by a man in a gateway off Berner Street known as Dutfield's Yard. Schwarz, however, assumed he was witnessing a domestic argument, and he crossed over the road to avoid getting dragged into the quarrel.   Schwartz likely saw the early stages of her murder.   At 1 a.m. Louis Diemschutz, the Steward of a club that sided onto Dutfield's Yard, came down Berner Street with his pony and costermongers barrow and turned into the open gates of Dutfield's Yard. Immediately as he did so, the pony shied and pulled left. Diemschutz looked into the darkness and saw a dark form on the ground. He tried to lift it with his whip but couldn't. So, he jumped down and struck a match. It was wet and windy, and the match flickered for just a few seconds, but it was sufficient time for Diemschutz to see a woman lying on the ground.   He thought that the woman might be his wife and that she was drunk, so he went into the club to get some help in lifting her.   However, he found his wife in the kitchen, and so, taking a candle, he and several other members went out into the yard, and, by the candle's light, they could see a pool of blood gathering beneath the woman.   The crowd sent for the police, and a doctor was summoned, pronouncing the woman dead. It was noted that, as in the cases of the previous victims, the killer had cut the woman's throat. However, the rest of the body had not been mutilated. This led the police to deduce that Diemschutz had interrupted the killer when he turned into Dutfield's Yard.   The body was removed to the nearest mortuary - which still stands, albeit as a ruin, in the nearby churchyard of St George-in-the-East, and there she was identified as Elizabeth Stride.   On the night of her burial, a lady went to a police station in Cardiff, and made the bizarre claim that she had spoken with the spirit of Elizabeth Stride. In the course of a séance, the victim had identified her murderer.   Nothing ever came of this…obviously.   CATHERINE EDDOWES:   Unlike the other Jack the Ripper victims, Catherine Eddowes never married and spent her short life with multiple men.   At age 21, the daughter of a tin plate worker met Thomas Conway in her hometown of Wolverhampton. The couple lived together for 20 years and had three children together. But, according to her daughter, Annie, the pair split "entirely on account of her drinking habits."   Eddowes met John Kelly soon after. She then became known as Kate Kelly and stayed with John until her death.   According to her friends and family, while Catherine was not a prostitute, she was an alcoholic. The night of her murder — the same night Elizabeth Stride was killed — a policeman found Catherine lying drunk and passed out on Aldgate Street.   She was taken to Bishopsgate Police Station, locked in a cell to sober up. But instead, she promptly fell fast asleep.   By midnight, she was awake and was deemed sober enough for release by the City jailer PC George Hutt. Before leaving, she told him that her name was Mary Ann Kelly and gave her address as 6 Fashion Street.   Hutt escorted her to the door of the police station, and he told her to close it on her way out. "Alright. Goodnight old cock" was her reply as she headed out into the early morning.   At 1.35 a.m., three men - Joseph Lawende, Joseph Hyam Levy, and Harry Harris saw her talking with a man at the Church Passage entrance into Mitre Square, located on the eastern fringe of the City of London.   Ten minutes later, at 1.45 a.m. Police Constable Alfred Watkins walked his beat into Mitre Square and discovered her horrifically mutilated body lying in the darkness of the Square's South West corner. The killer had disemboweled her. But, in addition, the killer had targeted her face, carving deep "V"s into her cheeks and eyelids. He had also removed and gone off with her uterus and left kidney. Finally, he had cut open her intestines to release fecal matter.   Dr. Frederick Brown, who performed the post-mortem examination of Eddowes' body, concluded that the killer must have some knowledge of anatomy if he could remove her organs in the dark. Mary Jane Kelly:   She is the victim about whom we know the least.   We know virtually nothing about her life before she arrives in the East End of London. What we do know is based on what she chose to reveal about her past to those she knew, and the integrity of what she did tell is challenging to ascertain. Indeed, we don't even know that her name was Mary Kelly.   According to her boyfriend, Joseph Barnett, with whom she lived until shortly before her death, she had told him that she was born in Limerick, in Ireland, that her father's name was John Kelly, and that she had six or seven brothers and one sister.   The family moved to Wales when she was a child, and when she was sixteen, she met and married a collier named Davis or Davies. Unfortunately, her husband was killed in a mine explosion three years later, and Mary moved to Cardiff to live with a female cousin who introduced her to prostitution.   Mary moved to London around 1884, where she met a French woman who ran a high-class brothel in Knightsbridge, in which establishment Mary began working. She told Barnett that, during this period in her life, she had dressed well, had been driven about in a carriage, and, for a time, had led a lady's life.   She had, she said, made several visits to France at this time, and had accompanied a gentleman to Paris, but, not liking it there, she had returned to London after just two weeks.   She began using the continental version of her name and often referred to herself as Marie Jeannette Kelly.   After that, her life suffered a downward spiral, which saw her move to the East End of London, where she lodged with a Mrs. Buki in a side thoroughfare off Ratcliff Highway. Soon after her arrival, she enlisted her landlady's assistance in returning to the West End to retrieve a box that contained dresses of a costly description from the French lady.   Mary had now started drinking heavily, which led to conflict between her and Mrs. Buki. Relations between them became so strained that Mary moved out and went to lodge at the home of Mrs. Mary McCarthy at 1 Breezer's Hill Pennington Street, St. George-in-the-East.   By 1886 she had moved into Cooley's typical lodging house in Thrawl Street, and it was while living here that, on Good Friday, 6th April 1887, she met Joseph Barnett, who worked as a porter at Billingsgate Fish Market.   The two were soon living together, and, by 1888, they were renting a tiny room at 13 Miller's Court from John McCarthy, who owned a chandler's shop just outside Miller's Court on Dorset Street.   She and Barnett appear to have lived happily together until, in mid-1888, he lost his market job, and she returned to prostitution, which caused arguments between them. During one heated exchange, a pane in the window by the door of their room had been broken.   The precariousness of their finances had resulted in Mary falling behind with her rent, and by early November, she owed her landlord twenty-nine shillings in rent arrears.   On 30th October 1888, Joseph Barnett moved out, although he and Mary remained on friendly terms, and he would drop by to see her, the last time being at around 7.30 on the evening of Thursday 8th November, albeit he didn't stay long.   Several people claimed to have seen her during the next fourteen hours.   One of them was George Hutchinson, an unemployed laborer, who met her on Commercial Street at 2 a.m. on 9th November. She asked him if he would lend her sixpence, to which he replied that he couldn't as he'd spent all his money.   Replying that she must go and find some money, she continued along Commercial Street, where a man coming from the opposite direction tapped her on the shoulder and said something to her, at which point they both started laughing.   The man put his arm around Mary, and they started walking back along Commercial Street, passing Hutchinson, who was standing under the lamp by the Queen's Head pub at the junction of Fashion Street and Commercial Street.   Although the man had his head down with his hat over his eyes, Hutchinson stooped down and looked him in the face, at which point the man gave him what Hutchinson would later describe as a stern look.   Hutchinson followed them as they crossed into Dorset Street, and he watched them turn into Miller's Court. He waited outside the court for 45 minutes, by which time they hadn't reemerged, so he left the scene.   At around 4 a.m., two of Mary's neighbors heard a faint cry of "Murder," but because such cries were frequent in the area - often the result of a drunken brawl - they both ignored it.   At 10. Forty-five on the morning of the 9th November, her landlord, John McCarthy, sent his assistant, Thomas Bowyer, round to Mary's room, telling him to try and get some rent from her.   Bowyer marched into Miller's Court and banged on her door. There was no reply. He tried to open it but found it locked. He, therefore, went round to the broken window pane, reached in, pushed aside the shabby muslin curtain that covered it, and looked into the gloomy room.   Moments later, an ashen-faced Bowyer burst into McCarthy's shop on Dorset Street. "Guvnor," he stammered, "I knocked at the door and could not make anyone answer. I looked through the window and saw a lot of blood."   "Good God, you don't mean that," was McCarthy's reply, and the two men raced into Miller's Court, where McCarthy stooped down and looked through the broken pane of glass.   McCarthy would later recall the horror of the scene that greeted him. "The sight we saw I cannot drive away from my mind. It looked more the work of a devil than of a man. I had heard a great deal about the Whitechapel murders, but I declare to God I had never expected to see such a sight as this. The whole scene is more than I can describe. I hope I may never see such a sight as this again."   Someone immediately sent for the police, and one of the first officers at the scene was Walter Dew, who, many years later, would recall the horror of what he saw through that window:- "On the bed was all that remained of the young woman. There was little left of her, not much more than a skeleton. Her face was terribly scarred and mutilated. All this was horrifying enough, but the mental picture of that sight which remains most vividly with me is the poor woman's eyes. They were wide open, and seemed to be staring straight at me with a look of terror."   Possible victims:   Martha Tabram   On Tuesday 7th August, following a Monday bank holiday, prostitute Martha Tabram was murdered at about 2:30 a.m. Her body was found at George Yard Buildings, George Yard, Whitechapel, shortly before 5:00 a.m. She had been stabbed 39 times about her neck, torso, and genitals with a short blade. With one possible exception, a right-handed individual had inflicted all her wounds.   Based on statements from a fellow prostitute and PC Thomas Barrett, who was patrolling nearby, Inspector Reid put soldiers at the Tower of London and Wellington Barracks on an identification parade, but without positive results. Police did not connect Tabram's murder with the earlier murder of Emma Smith, but they did connect her death with later murders.   Most experts do not connect Tabram's murder with the others attributed to the Ripper because she had been repeatedly stabbed, whereas later victims typically suffered slash wounds and abdominal mutilations. However, investigators cannot rule out a connection.   Rose Mylett   On Thursday 20th December 1888, a patrolling constable found the strangled body of 26-year-old prostitute Rose Mylett in Clarke's Yard, off Poplar High Street. Mylett (born Catherine Millett and known as Drunken Lizzie Davis and Fair Alice Downey) had lodged at 18 George Street, as had Emma Smith.   Four doctors who examined Mylett's body thought she had been murdered, but Robert Anderson thought she had accidentally hanged herself on the collar of her dress while in a drunken stupor. At Anderson's request, Dr. Bond examined Mylett's body, agreeing with Anderson. Commissioner Monro also suspected it was a suicide or natural death as there were no signs of a struggle. The coroner, Wynne Baxter, told the inquest jury that "there is no evidence to show that death was the result of violence." Nevertheless, the jury returned a verdict of "wilful murder against some person or persons unknown," and the case was added to the Whitechapel file.   Alice McKenzie:   Alice McKenzie was possibly a prostitute and was murdered at about 12:40 a.m. on Wednesday 17th July 1889 in Castle Alley, Whitechapel. Like most of the previous murders, her left carotid artery was severed from left to right, and there were wounds on her abdomen. However, her injuries were not as deep as in previous murders, and the killer used a shorter blade. Commissioner Monro and one of the pathologists examining the body, Bond, believed this to be a Ripper murder. However, another of the pathologists, Phillips, and Robert Anderson, disagreed, as did Inspector Abberline. Later writers are also divided and either suggest that McKenzie was a Ripper victim or that the unknown murderer tried to make it look like a Ripper killing to deflect suspicion from himself. At the inquest, Coroner Baxter acknowledged both possibilities and concluded: "There is great similarity between this and the other class of cases, which have happened in this neighbourhood, and if the same person has not committed this crime, it is clearly an imitation of the other cases."   Pinchin Street torso:   A woman's torso was found at 5:15 a.m. on Tuesday 10th September 1889 under a railway arch in Pinchin Street, Whitechapel. Extensive bruising about the victim's back, hip, and arm indicated that the killer had severely beaten her shortly before her death, which occurred approximately one day before discovering her torso. The victim's abdomen was also extensively mutilated in a manner reminiscent of the Ripper, although her genitals had not been wounded. The dismembered sections of the body are believed to have been transported to the railway arch, hidden under an old chemise. The age of the victim was estimated at 30–40 years. Despite a search of the area, no other sections of her body were ever found, and neither the victim nor the culprit were ever identified.   Chief Inspector Swanson and Commissioner Monro noted that blood within the torso indicated that death was not from hemorrhage or cutting of the throat. The pathologists, however, pointed out that the general bloodlessness of the tissues and vessels told that bleeding was the cause of death. Newspaper speculation that the body belonged to Lydia Hart, who had disappeared, was refuted after she was found recovering in hospital after "a bit of a spree." Another claim that the victim was a missing girl called Emily Barker was also refuted, as the torso was from an older and taller woman.   Swanson did not consider this a Ripper case and instead suggested a link to the Thames Torso Murders in Rainham and Chelsea and the "Whitehall Mystery". Monro agreed with Swanson's assessment. These three murders and the Pinchin Street case are suggested to be the work of a serial killer, nicknamed the "Torso killer," who could either be the same person as "Jack the Ripper" or a separate killer of uncertain connection. Links between these and three further murders—the "Battersea Mystery" of 1873 and 1874, two women were found dismembered, and the 1884 "Tottenham Court Road Mystery"—have also been postulated. Experts on the murders—colloquially known as "Ripperologists"—such as Stewart Evans, Keith Skinner, Martin Fido, and Donald Rumbelow, discount any connection between the torso and Ripper killings based on their different modi operandi.   Monro was replaced as Commissioner by Sir Edward Bradford on 21st June 1890, after a disagreement with Home Secretary Henry Matthews over police pensions.   Frances Coles:   The last murders in the Whitechapel file were committed on Friday 13th February 1891, when prostitute Frances Coles was murdered under a railway arch in Swallow Gardens, Whitechapel. Her body was found only moments after the attack at 2:15 a.m. by PC Ernest Thompson, who later stated he heard retreating footsteps in the distance. As contemporary police practices dictated, Thompson remained at the scene.   Coles was lying beneath a passageway under a railway arch between Chamber Street and Royal Mint Street. She was still alive but died before medical help could arrive. Minor wounds on the back of her head suggest that she was thrown violently to the ground before her throat was cut at least twice, from left to right and then back again. Otherwise, there were no mutilations to the body, leading some to believe Thompson had disturbed her assailant. Superintendent Arnold and Inspector Reid arrived soon afterward from the nearby Leman Street police station, and Chief Inspectors Donald Swanson and Henry Moore, who had been involved in the previous murder investigations, arrived by 5 a.m.   A man named James Sadler, who had earlier been seen with Coles, was arrested by the police and charged with her murder. A high-profile investigation by Swanson and Moore into Sadler's history and his whereabouts at the previous Whitechapel murders indicates that the police may have suspected him of being the Ripper. However, Sadler was released on 3rd March for lack of evidence.   https://www.imdb.com/list/ls079111466/?sort=user_rating,desc&st_dt=&mode=detail&page=1&title_type=movie&ref_=ttls_ref_typ