Podcast appearances and mentions of missouri columbia

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Best podcasts about missouri columbia

Latest podcast episodes about missouri columbia

Path 11 Podcast
416 How and why Serendipity and Synchronicity Happen with Bernard Beitman

Path 11 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 52:02


Bernard Beitman, M.D., is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. A graduate of Yale Medical School, he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for Psychology Today on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book Learning Psychotherapy. The founder of The Coincidence Project, encourages people to tell each other their synchronicity and serendipity stories. His book, Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Serendipity and Synchronicity Happen (September 13, 2022) comprehensively describes their wide range of uses and explanations. The book serves both as a personal guide to using synchronicities and serendipities as well an introduction to the new discipline of Coincidence Studies. https://coincider.com/ Connecting with Coincidence podcast YouTube Channel Connecting with Coincidence 2.0 audio podcasts Psychology Today Blog Website Connecting with Coincidence Facebook / Radio Show archives Twitter Psychiatry practice ------------------------------- Watch Path 11 TV wherever you want, on the iPhone, AppleTV, Android, Amazon Fire, and Roku Apps.

The Human Experience Podcast
Episode #189 – Dr. Bernard Beitman – The Science of Synchronicity and Meaningful Coincidence

The Human Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 74:27


Bernard Beitman, M.D., is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. He is a former chair of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia , where he became a world leader in the study of chest pain and panic disorder. He writes a blog for Psychology Today on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book Learning Psychotherapy. He has written several books; his latest book, Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen, serves as a personal guide to using synchronicities and serendipities to inspire psychological, interpersonal, and spiritual growth. Dr. Bernard Beitman is Founding Director of The Coincidence Project, which encourages people to share their stories of meaningful coincidences, serendipity and synchronicity.

Vet Candy Podcast
21 Questions with Dr. Debbye Bell Turner

Vet Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 45:30


Normal veterinarian attire includes many things. For example, a white coat, blue scrubs, stethoscope, cap, and pair of gloves. But a crown? Never. Not unless your name is Dr. Debbye Turner Bell, of course! That is because in addition to being a veterinarian, Debbye was also the winner of Miss America in 1990. Originally born in Hawaii, this communications megastar attended Arkansas State University where she received her B.S. degree in agriculture. Later, the University of Missouri-Columbia became home as she pursued her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. Who would have guessed that a veterinarian could also win the Miss America crown? Yet for this wonder woman, that's exactly what happened!   Vet Candy is bubbling with excitement to introduce our listeners to the incredibly talented Dr. Debbye Turner Bell.  Check her out on 21 Questions with Dr. Jill only on Vet Candy Radio!   ▷ LET'S BECOME FRIENDS!! 

Moments with Marianne
Meaningful Coincidences with Bernard Beitman MD

Moments with Marianne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 49:21


Can meaningful coincidences inspire interpersonal and spiritual growth? Tune in for a discussion with Bernard Beitman, MD, on his new #book Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why #Synchronicity and #Serendipity Happen. #MomentsWithMarianne with host Marianne Pestana airs every Tuesday at 3PM PST / 6PM EST and every Friday at 10AM PST/ 1PM EST in the Southern California area on #KMET1490AM & 98.1 FM, ABC Talk News Radio affiliate! Not in the area? Click here to listen! https://tunein.com/radio/KMET-1490-s33999/Bernard Beitman, M.D., is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. A graduate of Yale Medical School, he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for Psychology Today on coincidence, is the coauthor of the award-winning book Learning Psychotherapy and the founder of The Coincidence Project. https://coincider.comFor more show information visit: www.MariannePestana.com#bookclub #readinglist #books #bookish #healing #MariannePestana #author #authorinterview #nonfiction #kmet1490am #enlightenment #consciousness #consciousliving #selfhelp #meaningfulcoincidences

No BS Spiritual Book Club
Face to Face with Bernard Beitman MD

No BS Spiritual Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 72:10


Face to Face with Bernard Beitman MDLive on OMTimes Radio Thursday, December 22, 2022 at 10:30 PST / 1:30 PM ESTWatch the Livestream on the No BS Spiritual Book Club on Facebook, OMTimes Radio & TV Facebook, or OMTimesTV YoutubeWhen the former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school reveals the story behind one of the 10 Best Spiritual books that influenced him the most on his life journey by say that a few years after his first experience with LSD in LA in the 60's, he received a Xerox copy of Tarot cards images based on the Book of Thoth by Aleister Crowley, cut them up to create his own deck, and then studied the connections between the card numbers, astrological signs, and Hebrew letters, you know that this is not your average psychiatrist you'll be talking to. And the impression is further confirmed by the juicy mix of the rest his chosen titles and authors, which include Lewis Carroll, Tom Wolfe, Arthur C. Clarke, and Thomas Pinchon…All I can say is don't miss this week's live streaming episode of the No BS Spiritual Book Club's 10 Best Spiritual Books interview series with BERNARD BEITMAN, MD who is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. The founder of The Coincidence Project, Bernard Beitman writes a regular blog for Psychology Today on coincidence, and is the author and co-author of several publications including his latest book, Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen.Join the No BS Spiritual Book Club mailing list https://forms.aweber.com/form/93/758545393.htmConnect with Sandie Sedgbeer at https://www.sedgbeer.com#BernardBeitman #SandieSedgbeer #NoBSSpiritualBookClubSubscribe to our Newsletter https://omtimes.com/subscribe-omtimes-magazine/Connect with OMTimes on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Omtimes.Magazine/ and OMTimes Radio https://www.facebook.com/ConsciousRadiowebtv.OMTimes/Twitter: https://twitter.com/OmTimes/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/omtimes/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/2798417/Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/omtimes/

No BS Spiritual Book Club Meets... The 10 Best Spiritual Books
Bernard Beitman, MD's 10 Best Spiritual Books

No BS Spiritual Book Club Meets... The 10 Best Spiritual Books

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 72:13


No BS Spiritual Book Club Meets… psychiatrist, author & founder of the Coincidence Project, Bernard Beitman, MD. When the former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school reveals the story behind one of the 10 Best Spiritual books that influenced him the most on his life journey by say that a few years after his first experience with LSD in LA in the 60's, he received a Xerox copy of Tarot cards images based on the Book of Thoth by Aleister Crowley, cut them up to create his own deck, and then studied the connections between the card numbers, astrological signs, and Hebrew letters, you know that this is not your average psychiatrist you'll be talking to. And the impression is further confirmed by the juicy mix of the rest his chosen titles and authors, which include Lewis Carroll, Tom Wolfe, Arthur C. Clarke, and Thomas Pinchon… All I can say is don't miss this week's live streaming episode of the No BS Spiritual Book Club's 10 Best Spiritual Books interview series with Bernard Beitman, MD who is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. The founder of The Coincidence Project, Bernard Beitman writes a regular blog for Psychology Today on coincidence, and is the author and co-author of several publications including his latest book, Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sandie-sedgbeer/support

Our Missouri
Episode 75: Sports Journalism in the 21st Century (Title IX in Missouri, Part 7)

Our Missouri

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 58:28


To conclude the Title IX in Missouri series, host Sean Rost talks with four journalists, Kathryn Lucchesi, Maddy Glab, Lauren Michelson, and Dani Wexelman, about the evolution of sports journalism in the 21st Century. About the Guests: Kathryn “Kat” Lucchesi is an assistant professor of journalism at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Prior to joining the Journalism School, she held several positions in media and digital marketing, including Multimedia Director for the University of Missouri football team; Director of Social Media for Oregon State University Athletics; and multimedia reporter, anchor, and producer at KOMU-TV in Columbia, Missouri. Maddy Glab is a multimedia journalist for Pegula Sports & Entertainment. In that role, she primarily serves as a team reporter for the NFL's Buffalo Bills. Prior to that role, she held several positions in media and digital marketing, including On-Air Talent/Multimedia Producer for the University of Tennessee; Video Producer/Reporter for Stanford University Athletics; and a sports reporter and anchor at KOMU-TV in Columbia, Missouri. Lauren Michelson is a sports anchor for KLKN-TV in Lincoln, Nebraska. Prior to that role, she worked as a sports reporter and anchor at KOMU-TV in Columbia, Missouri. Dani Wexelman is a freelance on-air reporter and producer. In that role, she has worked with MLB Network, Major League Rugby, National Lacrosse League, and Sirius XM Radio. She also co-hosts two podcasts, “Datt's What She Said with Dani” and “Amateur Hour.” She has held several positions in media and digital marketing, including On-Air Talent, Storyteller, and Producer for MLB.com; Editor/Producer for NHL.com; Digital & Social Media Paid Intern for the Harrisburg Senators, and an anchor, reporter, producer for KOMU-TV in Columbia, Missouri.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 77 – Unstoppable Transformational Changer with Shilpa Alimchandani

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 62:58


Shilpa Alimchandani immigrated from India to the United States when only a few months old. As with many immigrants we have interviewed here on Unstoppable Mindset, Shilpa grew up experiencing two worlds. As she describes it, she grew up in a South Asian home experiencing that culture, and later she experienced the wider world around her as she went to school and went out on her own. Her perspectives on her life and what she has learned are fascinating to hear about.   As you will experience, in addition to living, if you will, between two cultures, the color of her skin also caused her to experience challenges. Her “brown skin” did not fit within the normal world of dark-skinned people and her skin was certainly not white. As she tells us, some of the treatment she experienced showed her just how unfair people can be. However, as you will hear, she rose above much of that and has thrived in the world.   Shilpa will tell you about her life journey that lead her to form her company, MUK-tee which means “liberation” in Sanskrit. You will hear about her life as a leadership coach and as a DEI consultant helping many to move toward true transformational change.   About the Guest:   Shilpa Alimchandani is the Founder and Principal of Mookti Consulting. Mookti Consulting partners with clients to break free from oppressive systems and facilitate transformational change. In Sanskrit, mookti मुक्ति (MUK-tee) means liberation. Shilpa has more than 20 years of experience in diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), leadership development, and intercultural learning. She is a DEI consultant, leadership coach, and facilitator who works with clients to develop holistic solutions that lead to transformational change. In her independent consulting practice, Shilpa has conducted DEI assessments, co-created DEI strategies with clients, facilitated high-impact workshops, and advised clients on issues of racial equity and justice. In her role as the Director of Learning & Innovation for Cook Ross, she built the learning and development function from the ground up and led the organization's curriculum and product development initiatives. With her deep knowledge of various learning modalities, intercultural leadership development, and human-centered design, Shilpa is able to craft interventions that are targeted, impactful, and appropriate for diverse, global audiences. Before her work at Cook Ross, Shilpa designed and implemented global leadership programs for the State Department, led the development of a global learning strategy for the Peace Corps, and taught in the School of International Service at American University. She has facilitated trainings in nearly 20 countries around the world, and has received numerous awards, including twice receiving the Peace Corps' Distinguished Service Award. She is the author of the book Communicating Development Across Cultures: Monologues & Dialogues in Development Project Implementation (Lambert Academic Publishing, 2010), and has been an invited speaker at numerous conferences, including The Forum on Workplace Inclusion and the Society for Intercultural Education, Training, and Research (SIETAR). She has also been a guest lecturer at numerous academic institutions, including Georgetown University and the United States Institute of Peace.   Social Media Links: Website: mookticonsulting.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shilpaalimchandani/     About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Hi there you are listening to unstoppable mindset glad you're with us wherever you happen to be. Today we get to interview or chat with Shilpa Alimchandani and I got it right didn't I Shilpa   Michael Hingson  01:37 and Shilpa has formed her own company. She's worked with other companies. She's very much involved in the whole concept of diversity, equity and inclusion and we'll talk about that and and chat about that a little bit. But first Shilpa Welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Shilpa Alimchandani  01:56 Thank you, Michael. I'm really happy to be here.   Michael Hingson  01:58 Shilpa lives in Silver Spring, Maryland. I've been there before it gets colder in the winter a little bit colder than it does here in Victorville in Southern California. But we're up on what's called the high desert. So we get down close to zero. A lot of winters. And so we know the cold weather. We don't get the snow though. But we cope. Well. Thank you for joining us. Why don't you start if you would by telling us just a little bit about you growing up or anything like that things that you think we ought to know about you?   Shilpa Alimchandani  02:32 Okay, well, Thanks, Michael. Yeah, I live in Silver Spring, Maryland now. But this is not where I grew up. I grew up in the Midwest, in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri. I was actually born in India, but just a few months old, when I came here, to the US, so grew up in, you know, pretty suburban neighborhood in South Asian families, so kind of navigated between two worlds my world at home, and you know, which was very much a South Asian eating Indian food and speaking Hindi. And, you know, spending time with my family and our small community, in St. Louis, and then going to school and being part of a broader world that was really different than mine at home. And I'm the firstborn in my family. So as a first born of immigrant parents, you just kind of discovering everything for myself for the first time and not having much of a guidebook to help me along, but just sort of figuring it out as I went. And it was a mostly white neighborhood that I grew up in St. Louis, which was very segregated at the time, black and white. Not a lot of people who are anything in between, though, so kind of made my way in school. And I actually went to the University of Missouri Columbia for college. And it wasn't until I finished college that I moved out to the East Coast. And I've stayed here in the DC metro area since working in lots of different capacities in in nonprofit and higher education and government and the private sector, and now as an independent consultant for the fast past few years.   Michael Hingson  04:22 So where do you fall in the black and white scale?   Shilpa Alimchandani  04:25 I'm neither right so as someone as South Asian did not kind of fit into the dominant white majority culture that I was a part of growing up and did not fit into black American culture either because that's not my heritage. So it was a really interesting space to, to navigate to learn in, in a in a culture where race and skin color plays a big role in your identity development and the opposite. unities that you have, you know, it was something that I had to just sort of figure out where do I fit? You know, and what's what's my role in what appears to be kind of an unfair system that we're a part of. And then as I discovered how unfair things were, might the question became, well, how do I change that? What's my role? Being me and my brown skin? You know, to? to question the systems that are unfair? And to change things to be more equitable for everybody?   Michael Hingson  05:32 Do you think it's unfair all over the world? Do you think it's more or less unfair here? Or what?   Shilpa Alimchandani  05:39 Yeah, that's a great question. I mean, every place is unique. And so I don't think like, you know, necessarily, what we experienced in the United States is the same as it is, and other countries in this hemisphere or anywhere else in the world. And I think there are some global themes around power and identity that really can cut across cultures and countries, you know, human beings are used to kind of creating hierarchies, you know, and, you know, some people having more authority, more power than others, sometimes that's based on things like skin color, sometimes, you know, that's based on gender, sometimes that's based on caste, or that's based on tribe or some other ethnic identity, there are lots of different identities that are used to kind of implement that hierarchical system. But there are some things that are in common across all of them, right about how people in power retain their power, how people without power, learn to kind of accept their circumstances. And, you know, and kind of not necessarily pushback, because when they do, there are consequences to that. And so that it's like a reinforcing system that we get used to, and we sort of take for granted. Well, that's just like, how the how the world is, that's how life is. And it takes a lot of courage to question that and say, Well, no, well, it doesn't have to be that way. And we can make things more fair for everybody.   Michael Hingson  07:20 Do you think though, that here, we we see more of that than elsewhere in the world, or you think it just seems that way, because we're here,   Shilpa Alimchandani  07:30 and probably seems that way, because we're here, I mean, you, you know, you, you know, you're more in touch with what's happening, usually in your own environment. And I think, for the United States, with as much promise as it has, as a country with, you know, ideals around equality and fairness and justice, there's just a really difficult history that we haven't fully grappled with, that continues to impact people every day. And so it is a history of, you know, genocide of native peoples, it's a history of enslavement of African peoples. It's a history of patriarchy, where, you know, women haven't had the same access and rights, it's a history of ableism. You know, a topic, of course, that you know, very well in this podcast deals with in a really nuanced way, where people who don't fit into the norms of, you know, able bodied neurotypical folks, you know, are marginalized. And, and, you know, LGBTQ plus, folks are also marginalized. And that's not unique to the United States. But it is part of something that's part of our culture, that we need to acknowledge in order to change, kind of pretending like it's all in the past, and we don't really need to worry about that anymore, doesn't help us to make things better moving forward.   Michael Hingson  09:01 If there's a difference in the United States, it is that our country was founded on and we keep touting the fact that all of us are free, and all of us are equal, but in reality, it hasn't worked that way thus far.   Shilpa Alimchandani  09:20 Right? That's exactly right. And I think that it's often people from marginalized groups, who really believed most passionately, in that promise in those ideals and therefore want to push to make that a reality.   Michael Hingson  09:39 Yeah, and, and understandably so because we're the ones who tend not to have truly experienced it.   Shilpa Alimchandani  09:49 Right, exactly. And so, you know, it's fascinating to me to Michael on this topic of, you know, recognizing the you know, the inequities and the oppression that exists And what we want to do to change it is that you would think that if you understand or experience oppression or marginalization because of one aspect of your identity, that you would then also have empathy across lots of different experiences of marginalization, right. So for example, as a woman, I've experienced marginalization because of my gender. And so you would hope then that I would be empathetic to, you know, LGBTQ folks, or I wouldn't be also empathetic to people with disabilities. And I could translate my experience of marginalization and say, oh, I want to advocate for others who've experienced marginalization. But that is has not necessarily been the case, right? A lot of times, we kind of only focus on our own experience, the one that's familiar to us and have a harder time seeing how there are connections across lots of different identities. And there's power in us actually making those connections instead of, you know, operating in our silos.   Michael Hingson  11:11 Why is that? Why have we why have we not been able to take that leap? When we are part of one group, which clearly is marginalized, as opposed to other groups? Who are also marginalized, but we think essentially, we're really the the only one in town from the standpoint of not translating that.   Shilpa Alimchandani  11:35 Yeah, you know, I think it's, we are as human beings, much more aware of when we're kind of the outsider, and things are harder for us. And we've experienced adversity that we need to overcome. But when we're in that insider role, right, in the group that has more power, the dominant group, it's really easy to not pay attention to that to kind of forget it, to take it for granted. Right. So I can say that, you know, as, as a cisgender person, as a heterosexual person, I have at times in my life kind of taken for granted that I belong to those groups, because the world is sort of set up for me, I can date who want to want marry who I want, I don't have to worry about people looking at me, you know, strangely, when I'm with my partner, I don't have to think about having photographs of my family, you know, on display, these are not things I have to worry about, just because I'm part of those dominant identity groups, right. And when it comes to my experiences of marginalization as a South Asian person as a Hindu person living in the United States, I'm very, like, hyper aware of those, right, because that's where I have felt left out. That's where I have felt like I haven't been treated fairly. And so I think, because all about sort of like a complex mix of lots of identities, we tend to pay more attention to the ones where we experienced marginalization, and less attention to the ones where we are part of the dominant group.   Michael Hingson  13:13 But we don't translate that to other groups.   Shilpa Alimchandani  13:16 Yeah. Because, again, we can we have the capacity to do it. But uh, sure, more effort, right.   Michael Hingson  13:22 Sure. And, and it's all about, though, what, what we know, and what we feel. And we, we don't tend to take that leap. We're very capable of doing it. But for some reason, we don't recognize or don't want to recognize that we're part of maybe a bigger group of marginalized or unconsidered people. And I think that's probably really it, that we look at ourselves as well. We are, we are who we are, and we make our own way. But we, we don't have those other people's problems. And so we tend to ignore them.   Shilpa Alimchandani  14:07 Yeah, sometimes it makes us feel better about ourselves like, oh, well, you know, at least we don't have to deal with that. And I think when it when it comes to like race and ethnicity in the US context, there's been a conscious effort to divide people of color from different identity groups. We do have different lived experiences, I don't have the experience of someone being black of someone being Latinx of someone being indigenous, at the same time, there are some things in common across not being white, right? And what the the the exclusion and some of the disadvantages that come with that. But it's to the advantage of the group that's in power right? For other marginalized groups to be continuing to sort of fight with one another and not see what they haven't Common, because then that allows the majority group to maintain their power. Right? So you can keep fighting amongst yourselves, right and arguing about who was more oppressed than whom. But it, it, what it does is just allows the people who are in power to keep it. So it really is incumbent upon us to bridge some of those divides like you were talking about, like, why can't we extend and see how someone else has experienced marginalization in order to change things because it's that collective action is necessary.   Michael Hingson  15:33 Yeah. And that's really it, it's collective action. Because somehow, we need to recognize that the group in power isn't really jeopardized by other people, sharing power, or not being so marginalized, but rather is strengthens all of us. Mm hmm. That's what people tend to not perceive that they're, the whole concept of their power in numbers, there is power in numbers, really is just as applicable across the board. But we don't want to recognize that because we're too focused on the power, as opposed to the rest of it. Yeah. And that, that becomes pretty unfortunate. And, of course, dealing with all those other groups, and then you have people with disabilities, which is a very large minority, second only to women from a standpoint of what we call minorities, although they're more women than men, but then within disabilities, you have different kinds of disabilities that different people have, right. And that, that causes, I think, a lot of times another issue, because it is more difficult to get all of those groups sometimes to combine together to recognize the power and numbers of everyone working together. And everyone overcoming the prejudices is about for about their disabilities or toward other people and their disabilities.   Shilpa Alimchandani  17:06 Yeah, absolutely. And to even consider, you know, the, the intersections of our identities, right, so there are people with disabilities, many different types of disabilities, like you said, and then there are people with disabilities who are white, or people with disabilities, who are people of color, there are people with disabilities who are, you know, identify as cisgender women or cisgender men, or non binary or trans, right. And so when you kind of look at those combination of identities, it gets even more complex. And it also challenges us, right, it humbles us, I would say, to acknowledge that, wow, I may really be in touch with what it's what the experience of being a person with disability in this country, and but I don't have the experience, for example, of a person of color in this country, or a person of color with a disability in this country, and that those are different experiences. And to appreciate those differences, right? We don't need to erase those differences in order to understand each other,   Michael Hingson  18:13 while the experiences are different, what isn't different, oftentimes, is the fact that we do experience prejudice and discrimination. And we talk so much about diversity, that I think you've pointed out, we don't talk about the similarities. And we're, we talk well, we're talking about becoming more diverse, and that's great. But that becomes overwhelming at some point. And so how do we bring it back down to we're all part of the same thing? Really?   Shilpa Alimchandani  18:47 Well, I think, um, there's, there's a, there's kind of a journey that that we go on in understanding difference and understanding identity, you know, at first we may not be at, you know, totally aware of some of the differences around us, and then we might move to a place of feeling polarized around it, you know, that like us them dynamic, yep, there are differences, but we're better than you, you know, and that kind of a thing, and then we get to a place. And what I'm describing here, broadly, is the intercultural development continuum, a framework that's used a lot in the DEI space, you can come to a place of minimization, which is really focusing on commonalities, right. We are human, we have common lived experiences, we can focus on common values, and let's minimize the differences right? But that's not the end of the journey, because minimizing the differences is at times denying the reality of of people's different lived experiences. And it doesn't help us to really change things to make them more fair where they're not. So then we move to kind of accepting the differences not with value judgment, but just acknowledging them. And then ultimately adapting across those differences, I would take it a step further that not only are we bridging or adapting across the differences, but that we need to learn to be allies, right? So especially if we're in a position of being part of a dominant group, like as I am as an able bodied person, you know, what does it look like for me to be an ally, for people with disabilities, and that's a responsibility that I have, right. So if we minimize differences, and we just kind of stay in that place of let's just focus on what we have in common, we don't then have the opportunity to accept, adapt and ultimately become allies. And that's really the journey that we're on,   Michael Hingson  20:44 what I don't generally hear is not so much about what we have in common, or recognizing that we all can be allies, which I absolutely agree with and understand. But we don't get to the point of recognizing the vast number of similarities that we have. And we don't get to the point of recognizing that a lot of the so called differences are not anything other than what we create ourselves,   Shilpa Alimchandani  21:16 we do create differences. And we need to understand those differences in terms of systems, right, like entire systems in our society, and the way that our, you know, workplaces are set up and within the way, you know, physical spaces, as well as policies are developed. And those systems are not necessarily designed as fairly as they could be. And so that's when I think paying attention to differences is really important, and not just focusing on similarities, because the same system is impacting people differently, depending on what identity group they belong to. And we've got to be able to surface that in order to change it.   Michael Hingson  22:02 But we do need to recognize that a lot of that comes because of the system, as opposed to whether there are real differences, or there are differences that we create. Yeah, well, I mean,   Shilpa Alimchandani  22:13 humans create systems, right. And so we can agree design systems to, but what happens is a little bit like a fish in water kind of scenario, that we don't really recognize the water that we're swimming in, you know, we it really takes us having to leave the environment and look back at it to be able to say like, oh, that's what's going on. Right? Most of the time, we don't pay attention to those systems, we just operate within them without thinking about it.   Michael Hingson  22:43 And that's my point. And that's, that's exactly it. And so we sometimes somehow have to take a step back or a step up, maybe as you would describe it to get out of the water and look at the water, and see what we can do to make changes that would make it better. And that's the leap that I don't generally see us making as a race yet.   Shilpa Alimchandani  23:12 Yeah, they're, you know, they're definitely great examples of that, you know, in, in our history, and in other parts of the world as well, like when made, you know, when countries that had been colonized for a number of years, you know, finally get their freedom when, you know, there's real truth and reconciliation efforts after a war or a period of conflict. It is it is possible, it's something that has happened. And, and I think, you know, we're kind of in a moment in our culture, where people are asking a lot of these kinds of questions. What, what's not working in the status quo and the way things are, and what needs to shift this, the pandemic, has really brought those issues front and center, the movement for racial justice has has done the same. And I think it's it's actually an exciting opportunity and exciting moment to be like, oh, people are actually talking about systems now.   Michael Hingson  24:14 Yeah, it's, it's interesting. Henry Mayer wrote a book called all on fire, which is a biography of William Lloyd Garrison. Have you ever read that? I have not. Okay. So William Lloyd Garrison, you may or may not know was a very famous abolitionist in I think, the 1840s there was a reporter and he got very much involved in the abolishing slavery. And as I said, Henry Mayer was a biographer of his and wrote this book called all on fire and in the book, there is a section where, where Garrison wanted to bring into the fold, some women the Grimm case sisters, who were very much involved in women's suffrage. And he Garrison said to his people, please contact them, let's bring them in. And their response was, but they're not involved in this their field dealing with women's suffrage, and they're not interested in this. And Garrison said something very interesting, which was, it's all the same thing. He took the leap. And he said, It's all the same thing, whether it's suffrage, whether it's slavery, abolition, or whatever, Abolishment. It's all the same thing. And that's the leap, that we generally don't take any of us on any side.   Shilpa Alimchandani  25:39 Yeah, I don't know who to credit for this quote that I've heard many times. But the idea that none of us is free until all of us are free.   Michael Hingson  25:48 Yeah. Right. And interesting and interesting, quote, and true.   Shilpa Alimchandani  25:52 And that's really, you know, I had shared with you, Michael, that my, my practice is called mukti. And Mukti means liberation or freedom in Sanskrit. And that was really kind of what was behind, you know, like, I was thinking about, like, why do I do this work? What, what motivates me? What is this ultimately about? And to your point of, you know, these experiences, whether it be suffrage, or abolishing slavery, or whatever, having some really important things in common is that we want to be free, we, as humans want to be free. And there are a lot of things that get in our way. And so that kind of became the heart of my practice is like, what does it look like to work for that freedom?   Michael Hingson  26:38 Well, let's go back to you personally, and so on. So you grew up? I think you have, and that's a good thing. And so how did you get involved in all of this division, this business of Dei? And and what you do today? What What got you started down that path? And what did you do that got you to the point of starting this company?   Shilpa Alimchandani  27:02 Yeah, so you know, certainly growing up in the 80s, and 90s. In St. Louis, there really wasn't a dei field as such, it wasn't like one of those careers that you know, about and, and prepare for, like, you know, like being an engineer or a doctor or a teacher or something like that. So it was a kind of a winding indirect path to get to this place. I knew pretty early on that I cared about justice that I cared about people understanding each other and bridging differences. But I didn't know that could be my job. So at first I thought maybe I'll become a lawyer. And then you know, I could use like legal skills to fight for justice and things like that. I even took the LSAT and never applied to law school, I was like, I don't really want to be a lawyer. So I explored a bit I worked in nonprofit, and in higher ed, and began to learn that well, there really is kind of a in the late 90s, early 2000s, like a an a growing field, in educating people about diversity. And that was kind of new to me, I was excited about that. I wanted to learn more about it. And early on, it was kind of more focused on representation, right? We need to bring people together from different backgrounds, in workplaces, and schools, etc. And then that sort of evolved into, well, it's not just enough to bring people from different backgrounds together, you need to have an environment where people feel included, where they feel valued, right. So it kind of evolved from not just diversity to diversity and inclusion. And I think kind of the more recent iteration of the field is the E in diversity, equity and inclusion. And the equity piece being really looking at that systemic part, we were just talking about, how are our systems working for us? Where are their inequities built into those systems? How can those be corrected? So that we actually have a place where people from different backgrounds can feel included and valued and feel treated fairly, and paid fairly? For the work that they do? Right, so that's when all of those come together? Of course, there's additions to that as well. Some organizations add accessibility as an aide to that, you know, some include justice. So there's, this becomes a bit of an alphabet soup, but all with the this idea of differences, valuing differences and treating people fairly at the heart of, of this work.   Michael Hingson  29:50 And that's really what it's about. And as you point out, it's really about equity. I've noticed and I'm still very serious We maintain the whole concept of diversity is much less of a really good goal to seek. Traditionally, diversity leaves out disabilities. In fact, I interviewed someone a few weeks ago. And this person talked about different kinds of diverse groups, and listed a number of things and never once mentioned disabilities, and I asked him about that. I said, I'm not picking on you, but you didn't include disabilities. And he talked about social attitudes. And he said, well, it, it includes social attitudes in some way. And my point was, No, it doesn't really, because social attitudes are a different animal and don't have anything to do with dealing with disabilities to disabilities is a different kind of thing. Yeah. So it's, it's interesting how different people approach it. Now, this particular individual was a person who is involved with another, another minority group, but still, we have to face that. Yeah. And it makes for a very interesting situation, and it makes for a challenge in life.   Shilpa Alimchandani  31:16 Yeah, I mean, it's one of those places where, you know, I have privilege as someone who doesn't experience disabilities in my life on a daily basis. And I That means for me, like to be an ally, like, what we were talking about earlier, is that I need to educate myself, right? I need to look for those opportunities, where I feel like well, yeah, sure. This is easy and accessible for me, but it wouldn't be for our friends and colleagues and people who don't have the same abilities that I do. And what can we do to change that? Okay, that that's what ally ship looks like. And I know, it can be overwhelming, right? People say, oh, there's so many, you listed so many things under this umbrella of diversity? Like how can how can we possibly, you know, pay attention to all of it. And I actually don't think it's, it's too hard for us. I think, as human beings, we have this amazing capacity for empathy, we have this capacity to our minds are malleable, we can continue to learn and grow throughout our lives, we have to have the will to do it. Right. And, and put the effort in to do it. But it is possible.   Michael Hingson  32:27 It's interesting to look at and one of the things that I think I see, and this is from my perspective, as a as a blind person, or let's say a person with a disability, it's it's interesting how I think sis Thai society teaches that all the rest of us are better than persons with disabilities to a great degree am. And I think it's very systemic. And I think, to a very large degree, it does go across all sorts of different lines. But we teach people that I teach our children that disabilities make those people less in ways that it doesn't necessarily apply to other groups. Although the concept and the overall process is the same, it still comes down to, we're in power, we're better than they, but it does go across a lot of different lines. And when we teach people that disabilities are less, that's a problem that somehow we, as part of all this need to overcome.   Shilpa Alimchandani  33:37 Yeah. And you know, it's ultimately, Michael, to your point, it's dehumanizing. We're dehumanizing entire groups of people. And sometimes it's like, quote, unquote, well intentioned, but it's really more of a pity than it is an understanding of respect and empathy for someone else's experience. And nobody needs that. Right. Nobody wants to be felt sorry for, you know,   Michael Hingson  34:06 yeah. And I think that that probably is more true. When you're dealing with a person with a disability, then a lot of other groups, you won't feel sorry for them, you may distrust them, or whatever. But for disabilities, we feel sorry. And that promotes fear. Gosh, we sure wouldn't want to be like them.   Shilpa Alimchandani  34:29 Right? Because that's the worst thing that could happen, right? So it creates more of that division of, I'm not like you and I don't want to be like you, you know, right.   Michael Hingson  34:40 Right. On the other hand, disabilities is an equal opportunity, kind of a thing. Anyone can join us at any given time unexpectedly, or maybe expectedly. But to use a bad word expectedly I don't know that's not a word. But anyway, Yes. So we have to learn to speak. But still, it is something that anyone can experience. And we don't try to equalize. So it is a it is a challenge. But But again, let's look at you what what was your career like getting into this? So it wasn't a job that really existed as such. And then you kind of discovered that maybe it really was. And so you decided not to be a lawyer, and we won't talk about the the legitimacy or efficacy of not being a lawyer, although, oh, many lawyer jokes out there. But But what did you then do? Yeah,   Shilpa Alimchandani  35:45 so, you know, my early work was at a nonprofit that no longer exists, but it was the national multicultural Institute. And they were kind of doing diversity training for organizations, and like the World Bank, and educational institutions, and some nonprofits and, and then, so I discovered, like, Oh, this is becoming a growing thing that businesses organizations want education, around issues of diversity, and how they can work better together across difference. So that was really fascinating to me, I also got involved in cross cultural communication. So when I was teaching at American University, it was in the School of International Service, which has had as a requirement for any international studies major, to take a course on cross cultural communication, to recognize that, you know, depending on what culture or part of the world we're from, we really kind of think differently, communicate differently. And it doesn't mean that that thinking or that communication is good or bad, but it's different. And we really need to appreciate, you know, how some cultures are much more direct, and some are much less so right, very indirect, how some cultures were engaged in conflict, really, you know, emotionally and others are much more emotionally restrained, you know, and some are much more individualistic, and others being more collectivist. So I started really studying these issues, and realizing that there really was an opportunity to educate people about some of these cultural differences and identity differentials, and ultimately power differences that exist in our societies. So I worked internationally, I worked at the Peace Corps, and I've traveled with the Peace Corps to different countries, to train staff who worked for the US Peace Corps. I worked for the State Department, and I did leadership drug development work there to prepare Foreign Service officers before they go abroad and during their service on how to lead effectively in those global environments. And then, I decided to leave government after a while and, and pursue private sector. And there's a lot like in the private sector. Well, there are a lot of organizations that invest heavily in diversity, equity and inclusion, big training programs, a real focus on how to make their policies and procedures more equitable. So that was really interesting, you know, to get into that consulting space, first working for a firm called cook Roth, and then three years ago, I went out on my own and, and started my own practice. And I love the work it's it's challenging, you know, there's some people who are in it for the right reasons, and others, maybe not as much. So I'm learning a lot in this field, now 20 to 20 plus years into it, but but also feeling quite fulfilled in   Michael Hingson  38:46 the work that I do. So what does cook Ross do? Or what did they do?   Shilpa Alimchandani  38:50 They're a diversity, equity and inclusion consulting firm, that they work a lot with the fortune 500, even fortune 100 corporate sector. In my independent consulting practice, I'm doing less kind of corporate work and more work in the NGO sector, with smaller businesses, nonprofit organizations, and the like.   Michael Hingson  39:13 What made you decide to go out on your own?   Shilpa Alimchandani  39:16 Oh, I had thought about starting my own business many times, and really erred on the side of stability and a stable paycheck for so many years. Until finally, I had some supports in place, right, talking about systems. I had some supports in place to make it possible for me to go out on my own. I had a partner who had a steady job with health insurance for for us and for our two children. My parents moved closer to where we live. So I had some family support in the area. And then, you know, decided just to take the leap and have confidence in myself and what I could offer as a consultant as a facility cater to clients. And the vast majority of my work is through word of mouth, I really don't even do much marketing. And I'm very fortunate to be in that role, but it also just showed me like, oh, you might have maybe you could have done this sooner. But it took me a while to feel like I had the the support and the confidence to do that.   Michael Hingson  40:21 But even though you're on your own, do you still have a relationship? or do any work with cook Ross? Or do you still teach   Shilpa Alimchandani  40:29 other consulting firms, small consulting firm, so I subcontract for them. And if this I, in addition to my consulting, press practice, I, I became a certified coach, I went through a coaching program, and became an international coaching Federation, certified coach. So I work one on one with people, largely women of color leaders who are, you know, in periods of transition or growth in their lives and in their careers to help guide them through that process, and help them really tap into all of the strength that they have, and the wisdom that they have within themselves. So I have a lot of variety in the work that I do, which I really enjoy.   Michael Hingson  41:15 So you, you, you keep connections open? And that's always a good thing. Of course, indeed. So what kind of changes have you seen in the whole field of diversity, equity inclusion and such over the years?   Shilpa Alimchandani  41:32 You know, there have been a lot of changes, I think I mentioned early on, there was a lot of focus on representation, I think a big and then, you know, looking at the culture, and how can we be more inclusive, but even in that conversation about inclusive, Michael, there was a bit of teaching people to be like us, right, like, so there was still sort of a dominant majority white male, you know, able bodied, you know, cisgender, heterosexual, you know, culture. And we invite people who belong to other groups, marginalized identities to join us, but to kind of be like us, right, and then I saw shift will know, the point is not to make everybody act like the majority group, the point is to actually create a place where people with different experiences, different identities, can all thrive in the same environment. That means changing the environment, right? That means actually looking at some of those systems, looking at the culture, and saying, you know, if it's a culture of like, everybody goes out for happy hour after work, or they have important conversations on the golf course, or whatever, that that is really fundamentally excluding a lot of people from those informal ways that people hold power in the organization. So how do we create cultures and systems that are more fair for everyone, I think, now, especially post the murder of George Floyd in 2020. And a real reckoning with the history of racism in the United States, there's much more attention being paid to some of those systemic issues in with particular guard regard to race, but also other identity groups. And that's a big shift. There were a number of years when I worked in this space, where people were still, like, uncomfortable naming race, they would talk about diversity broadly, talk about all the different things that make us the rainbow people that we are, but not deal with some of the harder, stickier Messier subjects. And I think there's more of a willingness to do that now.   Michael Hingson  43:42 And they won't deal with the words. Yeah, go ahead.   Shilpa Alimchandani  43:45 Yeah, there's, there's more. So there's like a caveat to that. There's also a lot of people who say they want to do that more difficult and challenging work. But when confronted with it, actually retreat and say, Oh, no, I'm not comfortable to this. This is a bit too challenging, too threatening. It's making me really uncomfortable. And so there are organizations, there are leaders who have said one thing, right and publicly made announcements about how they're anti racist, or they're, you know, all about equity or whatever. But then that hasn't necessarily followed through in the action. So that's, that's something that's we're dealing with now, in the field. In some places, there's a openness, a recognition for some of those difficult topics and other places. It's really just on the surface. As soon as you go a little bit beneath the surface, you realize that the commitment is really not there.   Michael Hingson  44:44 Now you have me curious, so you've got you've got the company or the group that does go out on the golf course and make decisions or that goes out for lunch and has martinis and make decisions and There are reasons for it. The reasons being that you're going away from the company, you're going away from the environment. And you can think and you can have all sorts of rationales or reasons for doing it. But nevertheless, it happens. How do we change that? How do we address that issue? Do we, when we have people who were excluded, because they don't go out on the golf course? Do we create an environment for them to be able to go on the golf course? Or do we do something different? Or are we there yet?   Shilpa Alimchandani  45:31 Um, I think we're there. I think that first of all, you we need to recognize that some of those informal practices are in fact unfair. And then if you're wanting to let go of them and say, Well, what we liked about that was that it was somewhat informal, right? But are those the only informal spaces you can create? Right? Not necessarily. There are other ways that people can connect informally in an organizational context that aren't around, you know, alcohol or, or aren't around a particular sport, or aren't around a particular, you know, activity that necessarily excludes or that are always after hours. So this is something that women have really struggled with, is that, you know, if those important conversation side conversations are happening, not during work hours, and they're still to this day, women have more responsibilities at home with family than men do, then that's an automatic disadvantage. Like you you're not even in the room, you're not even there to be part of those exchanges. That doesn't just apply to women. But that's just that's an example. So how do we then think about leadership differently, how we develop people, what our decision making processes are, how we hold each other accountable for those decisions, it kind of comes down to your organizational values, and how you live those values in the way in which you lead and the way in which you engage in your work and your interactions with your colleagues. It's easy to say on paper much harder to practice those values. Why is that? Oh, well, you know, everybody likes to have on their website or on the wall in the conference room. Oh, we believe in integrity, we believe in inclusion, right? We believe in collaboration or whatever the values may be. But what does that actually mean? What does that look like? How do you make on how do I Shilpa behave in accordance with those values? Right? Question.   Michael Hingson  47:45 It gets back to Talk is cheap. Absolutely. Talk is really cheap. Talk is really cheap. It's easy   Shilpa Alimchandani  47:53 to make these pronouncements and to say the right thing. It's much harder to practice them. And so when I engage with clients, it's really looking at those organizations and those individuals that are interested in making some change. They're like, Okay, we know this is not going to happen overnight, it's not going to happen, because you did one workshop with us. And then we all went home, it's going to be it's going to happen over time. By articulating the behaviors. We want to practice building the skills to practice those behaviors, building the accountability for us to actually implement those behaviors and those changes in our policies, then we can actually create some long term change. That's not easy. It's not sexy, it's hard to work. And that's how you create a more diverse, equitable and inclusive organization.   Michael Hingson  48:47 And it is very uncomfortable, and it's what really causes a lot of the hatred. So why is it that people hate race differences so much, because they're different than us. They're not as good as we are. And although in reality, they can demonstrate that the hair is equal is we are whoever we are. The fact is that they're calling us on it. We don't like that we don't like change. And the reality is we need to learn to change.   Shilpa Alimchandani  49:16 Yeah, this whole idea, you know, we all think of ourselves as good people, right? So when someone points out some way in which I have exclude been exclusionary or discriminatory in my behavior, my first instinct is to defend myself, but I'm a good person, I would never try and hurt another or discriminate or exclude. But in fact, as a human being that operates in these systems that we are a part of, I haven't times excluded, I have at times been unfair in the way I've treated people and just and been discriminatory. And so it's important for me to be able to acknowledge that that I can be a good person, but part of being human is that I do have some of these checks. Challenges, then only can I change it and work to change some of the systems if we're going to live in denial like, Nope, we're good people, and therefore we can't hear any of this criticism. It's not possible for me to be unfair, unjust or discriminatory. And then how are we ever going to change?   Michael Hingson  50:16 Right? Which is, which is of course, the whole point, isn't it?   Shilpa Alimchandani  50:19 Yeah. But it's hard. It's a tough, but I really, I always come back to humility in this work, you. If you are to engage in a sincere way to build a more equitable and inclusive world for everyone across identity groups, you will be humbled time, and   Michael Hingson  50:37 it's hard because we haven't learned to do it. And also, many of us just really, ultimately don't have the desire to learn to do it. And that's what we have to change. What are some of the major mistakes that you've seen organizations make? I think you've referred to some of this already. But it's worth exploring a little more.   Shilpa Alimchandani  50:57 You know, one thing that we haven't talked about yet, but I often hear from clients who seek out my services, is that, oh, we really need to focus on recruitment, right, we just need to get more diverse leadership team, we need to do a better job of reaching out to, you know, XYZ group that's underrepresented in our organization. And they put a lot of effort into recruitment. And then what happens, you bring in people from all these different backgrounds that you said, weren't represented, and now they're there, but there hasn't been much emphasis on inclusion or equity. And you've created a revolving door. Because very soon, people from those marginalized identity groups discover this isn't a place where they really feel like they're valued, or it's not a place that set up to really support them to be successful. And they leave. And then those same organizations are like, well, we put all this money and time and effort into diversifying, what did we do wrong? So to that, my I, what I say time and time again, is we have to start with equity and inclusion. And then the diversity will come if you don't start with diversity and with recruitment, and then just with wishful thinking, hope that it all works out. Once everybody's together in that organization, quite often it doesn't.   Michael Hingson  52:18 It ultimately comes down to changing the mindset, which is really what doesn't happen. And diversity doesn't change the mindset. And I think that's something that conceptually inclusion can really help to do is to change the mindset if you're really going to look at what inclusion means. And that's why I've always loved to talk about and I have a speech called moving from diversity to inclusion, because people clearly have already changed diversity to the point where it doesn't necessarily represent everyone. But ultimately, all those people, I think, still try to do it. You can't say you're inclusive, unless you are, you can talk about being partially inclusive. But that doesn't mean a thing. Either you're inclusive where you're not, then that means changing a mindset.   Shilpa Alimchandani  53:01 It does mean changing a mindset. And that mindset allows you to change some of your practices, like it can be as simple as like, how do you design an agenda for a meeting? And how do you facilitate that meeting? And how do you actually include all of the voices of the people who are part of that group? A lot of just a thing about how many times people and organizations how much time people spend in meetings, and a lot of them are not particularly inclusive, like half the people are checked out. There are a few people who dominate the conversation. Right? And it seems it's such a waste. It is such a waste, because there are ideas that are not getting shared, there are conversations that are not being had, there are conflicts that are not getting resolved. Right? Because we're just used to doing things in the same way. If we can change that mindset, like you said, and, and also some of the practices, even small things like that will make a difference, right? People will start speaking up in a different way. Right? Well, dialogue shifts,   Michael Hingson  54:07 and that's what we really need to work toward is that dialogue, shift that mindset change, and that makes a big difference in in all that we're doing. Tell me a little bit more about your company about mu T and what it does and how people can learn about it.   Shilpa Alimchandani  54:24 Great. So yeah, Mookti the M O OK T I. Consulting is my organization. As I mentioned earlier, Mookti means liberation. And I have two parts to my practice. One is organizational training and consulting. So I provide and facilitate workshops and and Leadership Development Series for organizations on all kinds of dei related topics. From you know, interrupting bias to Um feedback on microaggressions to you know, a leading with an equity lens and using the system's lens to solve problems in your organization. And, and I really enjoy that work that organizational training and consulting work. The other part of my practice is coaching. And that is one on one with individuals, primarily, I focus on women of color leaders, because coaching remains a white dominant profession in the US. And there's a real opportunity for people of color to enter this field and a lot of clientele who are looking for coaches who understand not just their leadership journey, but also how their identities impact them every day. So being a woman and a woman of color in a leadership role in an organization is different than being a man or being a white man in particular. And so those of one on one coaching conversations that I have with my clients really can unlock their potential, can free them up to make decisions that are more aligned with their values and make choices in their career that are more fulfilling for them. So in all aspects of my work, I'm about you know, freeing people, from the systems of oppression that limit us, some of that work is organizational. And some of it is individual,   Michael Hingson  56:21 if people want to reach out and contact you and explore working with you, and so on. How do they do that?   Shilpa Alimchandani  56:29 Sure. So my website is the best way to learn more about me and my work and also to contact me. And the website is simply mookticonsulting.com   Michael Hingson  56:40 Have you written any books? Or are there other places where people can get resources that you've been involved in creating? Yes, I   Shilpa Alimchandani  56:49 mean, I did write a book number of years ago, communicating development across cultures, which is more focused on cross cultural communication in the international development field. So not as much on organizational dei work as I'm doing now. I'm quite active on LinkedIn and and do post my own articles on LinkedIn. So that's a good place to find me as well.   Michael Hingson  57:16 How can people find you? Can you? I assume, by your name, can you spell   Shilpa Alimchandani  57:20 Shilpa Alimchandani in LinkedIn, I'm the only one so you'll find me pretty easily there.   Michael Hingson  57:26 Why don't you spell that? If you would, please? Sure.   Shilpa Alimchandani  57:29 So Shilpa  S H I L, P as in Peter A. and Shilpa Alimchandani is A L I M as in Mary C H, A N as in Nancy, D as in David A. N as in Nancy. I. So it's a long one, but a phonetic name. In fact, on my website, I have a little button where you can click pronounce. And it tells you how to pronounce all, you know, with an audio clip of how you say the word book, The and also how you say my name Shilpa Alimchandani   Michael Hingson  58:02 Well, I hope people will reach out. Because I think you're you're talking about a lot of very valuable things. And I think we really need to look at inclusion and really create a new mindset. As I said, I have a speech called moving from diversity to inclusion. In fact, it's the second episode on our podcast. So if you haven't washed, I hope you'll go see it. There's my plug. And then my fourth episode is a speech that Dr. Jacobus tenBroek gave Dr. Tim brick was the founder of the National Federation of the Blind. And one of the foremost constitutional law scholars in the speech he gave at the 1956 convention, the National Federation of the Blind has called within the grace of God, and especially the last two paragraphs of that speech, I love but it's a great speech that I think, whether you're talking about blindness or any other kind of group, it applies. And he was definitely a visionary in the field, and was a was a great thinker about it. So that again, that's episode four, I hope that you and other people, if you haven't listened to it will go out and listen to   Shilpa Alimchandani  59:11 know Michael, I did listen to that, upon your recommendation that episode four and that speech was really moving and inspiring, and what I would say more than anything else, I felt that it was empowering. It was so empowering, and thank you for recommending that.   Michael Hingson  59:27 And he thought that he was being gentle with people in talking about discriminations and so on. In later years, he delivered another speech in 1967. Called are we up to the challenge? And he thought that he was much more forceful in that he started the speech by saying, and again, it's about blind people, but it could it goes across the board. He said mind people have the right to live in the world, which is interesting, but I still think is 1956 speeches was says best and I think there are others who agree with that.   Shilpa Alimchandani  1:00:02 Well, it's been such a pleasure speaking with you, Michael, thank you so much for inviting me on to the podcast.   Michael Hingson  1:00:07 Well, I am glad that you came and I hope that you will come back again and definitely anytime you have more insights or whatever or there's any way that we can be a resource for you, and I'm sure others will feel the same way. Please let us know. But Shilpa  I really appreciate you coming on and all of you I appreciate you listening today. So, we hope that you will give us a five star rating and that you will reach out. Let me know what you think of what we had to discuss. I love your thoughts. All of the information will be in our show notes, including how to spell Shilpa his name and we hope that you will let us know your thoughts. So once more Shilpa Thank you for listening, at least you declare you listen to thank you for being here. Thanks. Thank you all and we'll see you next time on unstoppable mindset.   Michael Hingson  1:01:00   You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast
Meaning and Coincidence with Bernard Beitman

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 59:13


Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD, is a Visiting Professor at the University of Virginia and former Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He has edited two issues of Psychiatric Annals that focus on coincidences, and … Continue reading "Meaning and Coincidence with Bernard Beitman"

Supernatural Girlz
Synchronicity - Doorway to the Paranormal (Part II) with Dr. Bernard Beitman

Supernatural Girlz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 91:00


Dr. Bernard Beitman takes us on a journey tthrough the inner workings of serendipity, coincidence and synchronicity.  Do you want more grace in your life?  Tune in to hear this fascinating explanation that will enhance your life. Bernard Beitman, M.D., is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. A graduate of Yale Medical School, he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for Psychology Today on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book Learning Psychotherapy. The founder of The Coincidence Project, he lives in Charlottesville, Virginia https://coincider.com/

Education Evolution
136. Developing Employment Empowerment from Secondary School and Beyond with Dr. Leigh Anne Taylor Knight

Education Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 36:55


Our youth are amazing people, who are learning and growing every day. Part of that learning includes figuring out what they enjoy doing and what they're good at. As educators, we get to help them see how their skills and interests can potentially turn into a career.   But not enough of us are doing that, and it can be challenging to find a connection when teenagers and young adults adopt new interests and skills regularly.   This week on the podcast, I'm talking with Dr. Leigh Anne Taylor Knight, executive director and chief operating officer of the DeBruce Foundation. Among other things, the foundation is committed to helping individuals unlock their potential and find career pathways.   The DeBruce Foundation has a free tool that can help individuals of any age identify their abilities and interests and match them with a set of agilities that will allow them to explore careers, identify what education is needed, and so much more.   On this episode, we talk about the foundation's recent research, why employment empowerment needs to be on every educator's radar, and why this is the missing piece in career development and growth. About Dr. Leigh Anne Taylor Knight: Dr. Leigh Anne Taylor Knight is a resourceful, innovative leader who currently serves The DeBruce Foundation in Kansas City as Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer. The Foundation's mission is to expand pathways to economic growth and opportunity. It seeks to help people discover what they want to do, and what they're good at doing, to open more career possibilities.   Having served as a K-12 educator, Leigh Anne established a career dedicated to improving how individuals understand themselves and view opportunities to advance in the world of work. She is driven to lead the leveraging of resources across sectors for innovative learning, rigorous research, and community collaboration in order to improve economic development and the quality of life. A teacher at heart, Leigh Anne has also served as a K-12 assistant superintendent, advised learning institutions across the nation, and led a bi-state consortium providing powerful tools for data-driven educational research to inform practice and policy.   After graduating from University of Missouri-Columbia with a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Design and Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Secondary Education, Leigh Anne earned her Education Specialist's degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and her doctorate from the University of Kansas in Education Policy and Leadership. Connect with her on LinkedIn and Twitter.   Jump in the Conversation: [2:20] - There's a disconnect between graduating from high school and then starting careers [2:49] - How to find a career pathway [5:46] - The missing piece in career development and growth [6:45] - Learning about talking about experience that starts with a club [9:17] - Research that supports the theory of change [10:07] - What is employment empowerment  [12:40] - Individuals with employment empowerment are higher on some career literacy measures [14:30] - There's strength in your network network strength  [15:05] - Career literacy and network strength helps to accelerate employment empowerment [16:20] - There are systemic issues that caused people to have barriers in accelerating their employment empowerment and working on them is a long game [17:23] - Our schools could get really dialed in about what alumni, parents, and the business community could provide [20:53] - 4 of 10 people rate themselves low in both career literacy and network strength [21:49] - Career literacy isn't the only thing that we should be working on [22:20] - Rethink some of the structures you have in your organization  [24:58] - Where to get started: Your three bold steps [28:35] - Turbo Time [30:33] - Improving the quality of life for others [31:37] - Leigh Anne's Magic Wand [33:19] - Maureen's Takeaways   Links & Resources DeBruce Foundation Agilities by the DeBruce Foundation Agile Work Profiler Career Explorer Tools Follow the DeBruce Foundation on Facebook and Instagram Connect with the DeBruce Foundation on LinkedIn and Twitter Read the DeBruce Foundation's research on employment empowerment Draw Your Future with Agilities Episode 2: Inviting Imagination and Our Agilities into Teen Goal Setting with Patti Dobrowolski Undistracted: Capture Your Purpose, Rediscover Your Joy by Bob Goff Email Maureen Maureen's TEDx: Changing My Mind to Change Our Schools The Education Evolution Facebook: Follow Education Evolution Twitter: Follow Education Evolution LinkedIn: Follow Education Evolution EdActive Collective Maureen's book: Creating Micro-Schools for Colorful Mismatched Kids Micro-school feature on Good Morning America The Micro-School Coalition Facebook: The Micro-School Coalition LEADPrep

Best Of Neurosummit
Dr. Bernard Beitman: Meaningful Coincidences – Part 2

Best Of Neurosummit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 34:58


Today Lisa continues the conversation with Dr. Bernard Beitman,  who is often called the “King of Coincidences.” He and Lisa deeply discuss coincidences and the meaning that we attribute to them. Dr Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. His latest book is “Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen.”  Through a complete catalog of coincidence patterns with numerous illustrative examples, Dr. Beitman clarifies the relationship between synchronicity and serendipity and dissects the “anatomy of a coincidence.” He defines coincidence types through their two fundamental constituents -- mental events and physical events. He analyzes the many uses of meaningful coincidences as well as their potential challenges, emphasizing that synchronicity and serendipity, though most often positive, also have their shadow sides. Detailing how to record your experiences, he explains how you will see patterns guiding your life decisions and learn to expect that coincidences are more likely to occur during life stressors, high emotion, and strong need, which helps you be ready to use them when they occur. Dr Beitman is a graduate of Yale Medical School and he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for “Psychology Today” on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book “Learning Psychotherapy.” He is the founder of The Coincidence Project. Info: coincider.com. 

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Living the Quantum Dream with Cynthia Sue Larson

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 58:48


Meaningful Coincidences with Bernard Beitman Cynthia Sue Larson talks with Dr. Bernard Beitman about meaningful coincidences, adventures in the psychosphere, and memorable experiences with dogs.  "Coincidences are not commands, they are suggestions," Beitman says, as we are able to identify underlying patterns in life that we can recognize as synchronicity, serendipity, or simulpathity--where we might experience the feelings of a loved one who is not with us at the  time.  The psychosphere provides a kind of mental atmosphere where a person's need defines and clarifies an intention, so that the mind can arrive at the needed information in extraordinary and wonderful ways. Dr. Bernard Beitman, M.D., is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. A graduate of Yale Medical School, he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for Psychology Today on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book, Learning Psychotherapy. The founder of The Coincidence Project, he lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.  www.coincider.com Learn more about Cynthia Sue here: http://www.realityshifters.com

Best Of Neurosummit
Dr. Bernard Beitman: Meaningful Coincidences – Part 1

Best Of Neurosummit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 30:14


Have you had the experience of thinking about someone, then they call you? Is it a coincidence? Or just random luck? Our guest today, Dr. Bernard Beitman, is often called the “King of Coincidences.” He and Lisa deeply discuss coincidences and the meaning that we attribute to them. First, we must believe that coincidences are useful and purposeful. Dr Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. A graduate of Yale Medical School, he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for “Psychology Today” on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book “Learning Psychotherapy.” The founder of The Coincidence Project, he lives in Charlottesville, VA. His latest book is “Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen.”  Info: coincider.com

Where Ya From? Podcast
38. "Courageous Faith" with Debbye Turner Bell

Where Ya From? Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 60:41


When Debbye Turner Bell won the Miss America pageant, she began the toughest time of her life. Join Rasool Berry on the Where Ya From podcast as he talks with Debbye Turner Bell about how isolation, burnout, and loss challenged her faith at a time when people expected her to be at her best. Learn how this experience taught her to be unflinchingly honest with God and to keep communicating with Him no matter what. Guest Bio: Dr. Debbye Turner Bell is a veterinarian, journalist, corporate trainer, minister, motivational speaker, wife, and mother. Her enduring passion is motivational speaking. Since being crowned Miss America in 1990, Turner Bell has spoken to millions of students at countless schools, youth organizations and college campuses. Dr. Turner Bell divides her time doing leadership development, motivational and Christian speaking, and television broadcasting.  In addition to her speaking and media work, Dr. Turner Bell is the founder and CEO of Debbye Turner Bell Consulting, through which she provides leadership development training in communications, influence, and diversity to corporate and business leaders, managers, and executives. Dr. Turner Belle graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a doctor of veterinary medicine degree. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture from Arkansas State University. Turner Bell lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan with her husband and daughter. Notes & Quotes: When you don't know if you're capable of making the step, but you know God is faithful. So you do it anyway with every fiber of your being, screaming, “I don't want to do this. I'm afraid of this. This is going to hurt me again," but you do it anyway. That is a place of intimacy and relationship with the Lord that defies human understanding. It's that place, though You may slay me, God, I'm still going to trust You because You are holy and you are worthy.  That might be counseling. That might be medication. It might be a better diet. It might be exercise. It might be more sleep. It might be fasting and praying, but we have to admit, “I can't do this by myself.”  What got me through that period was being just raw and unflinchingly honest with God. I prayed and I raged and I cried and I begged, but I never stopped communicating with Him. We might not be able to run in that season, but walk. And if you can't walk, crawl. And if you can't crawl, get on the floor and roll. But just keep moving. Don't stop because really stopping is going backwards. Links Mentioned: Read Debbye's book Courageous Faith Check out Debbye's website Visit our website to sign up for emails: whereyafrom.org Leave us a review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/where-ya-from-podcast/id1581145346 Check out our Voices Collection from Our Daily Bread Ministries Follow Where Ya From? podcast on Instagram: @whereyafrompodcast Verses Mentioned: Psalm 13  Hebrews 12:1 Philippians 4:12–13 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien
Pathways for Nov. 6, 2022: Meaningful Coincidences – Bernard Beitman

Pathways Radio by Paul O'Brien

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 30:00


https://youtu.be/rBCzvqy3O4E Dr. Bernard Beitman is the author of the new book, Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen. Bernard is founding director of The Coincidence Project which encourages people to tell each other their synchronicity and serendipity stories. He is the former chair of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia and has a private practice in Charlottesville, Virginia. His manual Learning Psychotherapy received two national awards for its unique interactive training program for psychiatric residents. He writes a blog for Psychology Today called Connecting with Coincidence. Bernard is internationally known for research in panic disorder and chest pain and has edited several books about how to integrate pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. More information about the guest can be found at https://coincider.com

Career Adventure Audio Experience w/ Nate Clayberg
Connor Lotz :Boeing Procurement Agent, Proposal Project Manager, Lifelong Learner (E.033)

Career Adventure Audio Experience w/ Nate Clayberg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 31:09


Connor Lotz participated in the CAPS (Center for Advanced Professional Studies) program while attending high school in Kansas, which sparked an interest in banking. He received a sizable scholarship and attended the University of Missouri-Columbia after sending a personal letter to the school. Before graduating, he was offered a position at Boeing as a procurement agent, purchasing aircraft parts. He has now been promoted to the position of proposal project manager. He is enrolled at Indiana University Kelly School of Business to begin a hybrid MBA program with a dual masters in strategic management. Key takeaway/life skill— It doesn't hurt to ask. Connor's letter to the University of Missouri-Columbia admissions office saved him tens of thousands of dollars. 0:52 High school experience and CAPS 8:00 Deciding a college 15:00 Recruiter elevator speech 17:08 Boeing STAR method interview 19:25 Positions at Boeing 25:22 MBA program 28:35 Advice to college students Connor Lotz https://www.linkedin.com/in/connorlotz https://bvcaps.yourcapsnetwork.org/ https://www.boeing.com/ --- Continue to enjoy this journey, share, and subscribe to 'The That's a Job? Podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. The That's a Job podcast is presented by Career Adventure Academy - Discover the work you are wired to do. Do you know a high school student looking to figure out their next step after graduation? CHECK OUT THE NEW COLLEGE & CAREER DISCOVERY COURSE; get lifetime access at www.nateclayberg.com Let the Adventure Begin! Nate Clayberg is a COLLEGE & CAREER NAVIGATOR that has guided hundreds of students to envision their future to purposeful life beyond education. Connect with Nate Clayberg on Social Media: · Instagram · LinkedIn · Facebook · Twitter This podcast is a need10 Media production www.nateclayberg.com

The Therapy Show with Lisa Mustard
Black Kids Matter: Play-Based Strategies to Support Black Youth Experiencing Racial Trauma with Dr. April Duncan

The Therapy Show with Lisa Mustard

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 93:23


Welcome back to the show, friends! I'm excited to release this episode and hope you find it helpful. Dr. April Duncan shares Black Kids Matter: Play-Based Strategies to Support Black Youth Experiencing Racial Trauma. This episode also qualifies for one continuing education contact hour. Head to the site to learn more. This episode is brought to you by Hopscotch. Learn more about Hopscotch here plus they are hiring clinicians.  In this Podcourse, Lisa interviews April Duncan, DSW, LCSW, RPT-S and she presents Black Kids Matter: Play-Based Strategies to Support Black Youth Experiencing Racial Trauma Learning Objectives:  Identify 6 signs of racial trauma in Black youth Discuss 6 play therapy interventions to use in teleplay sessions with Black youth experiencing racial trauma Explore 7 ways to support Black caregivers About Dr. Duncan: Dr. April Duncan (DSW, LCSW, RPT-S) obtained her Bachelor's in Arts & Science from the University of Missouri-Columbia (2006), Masters of Social Work from Saint Louis University (2012), and Doctorate of Social Work from the University of Southern California. She has over ten years of clinical experience in supporting children in schools, the juvenile justice system, the child welfare system, and non-profit settings. As a racial trauma expert, she champions the rights of Black children to “reclaim their childhood” by using play therapy to help them learn healthy coping skills to manage race-based stress. Dr. April also works closely with community members, educators, parents, and professionals to learn better ways to connect with Black children and provide a safe place to process negative race-based experiences.  Learn more: www.bmhconnect.com About Lisa: Lisa Mustard, MPH, EdS, LMFT has worked for a college counseling center, addiction recovery center and most recently has been working with a military branch for the past 12 years. In September 2022 she opened up a virtual coaching practice. She is the host of The Therapy Show With Lisa Mustard. She is also the Founder and Owner of Mustard Consulting, LLC. Lisa consults with and coaches other therapists who want to pivot their skill sets to make an impact outside the therapy room. If you desire less time in the therapy chair and more time doing the things you love, book a free call with Lisa. Mustard Consulting, LLC has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 7061. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Mustard Consulting, LLC is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. This course has been approved for 1 continuing education contact hour by the SC Professional Counselors, Therapists and Psycho-Educational Specialists Licensing Board. Provider #4597 Completion Requirements: To obtain your certificate of completion, you must listen entirely to the audio, pass the Podcourse completion quiz and complete a satisfaction survey. Refund policy: No refunds are provided for self study courses. Disclosure Statement for Dr. April Duncan; Financial: Dr. April Duncan receives a speaking honorarium from Hopscotch. Remember, if you are enjoying this podcourse and would like to receive continuing education credit, head to the site, click on the Buy Now button and you can purchase the quiz and evaluation. Once you have completed the quiz and evaluation, you will receive a certificate of completion.You can also grab your first podcoure for FREE so head to my site and sign up for your free contact hour.  Thank you for listening! If you are enjoying the show, please consider leaving me a 5 star rating and review.  

Develop This: Economic and Community Development
DT #417 Co-host candidate #1 Lindsay Miller - Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing

Develop This: Economic and Community Development

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 26:34


In this episode, Dennis is joined by co-host candidate #1 Lindsay Miller from Colorado. Lindsay and Dennis discuss naturally occurring affordable housing. What is naturally occurring affordable housing?  typical characteristics of NOAH Preserving NOAH  About Lindsay: Lindsay Miller is an economic and community development professional and interdisciplinary researcher, writer, and teacher. She works as a consultant in urban and rural Colorado, helping local leaders create community-based economic development strategies to foster widespread and equitable prosperity while mitigating the negative consequences of unfettered growth. Lindsay is a Senior Fellow at the National Civic League, an organization whose mission is to advance civic engagement to create equitable, thriving communities. She has also worked in real estate development for Urban Ventures LLC, a private real estate development company that focuses on affordable housing, adaptive reuse, and health-informed design. Before Urban Ventures, Lindsay taught writing courses and served as a research assistant at the University of Colorado, Denver. Lindsay holds a Master of Public Administration and a Master of Social Sciences from the University of Colorado Denver and a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and International Studies from the University of Missouri-Columbia.  

The Leading Voices in Food
E184: Carolina Farm Stewardship Association - Connecting Farmers and Communities

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 12:52


Today we're speaking with Roland McReynolds, Executive Director of the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association which is a member-based farmer-driven, non-profit organization based in Pittsboro, North Carolina, that helps farmers and consumers in both North and South Carolina grow and eat local organic food. Interview Summary   So why don't we begin with this. Can you help listeners understand what the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association does?   So our vision is a sustainable regional food system that is good for all consumers, good for farmers, good for farmworkers, and good for our ecosystems. So to achieve that vision, we work with farmers and with communities to advocate, educate, and build connections that support sustainable food systems in the Carolinas, centered on local foods and organic agriculture. We do that by working and consulting directly with farmers to help them implement organic practices in their operations and to help them expand their market opportunities. We work with food hubs and other sorts of food businesses to strengthen their operations so that they can become reliable market outlets for small farms and improve their competitiveness and ability to connect with values-driven buyers. We provide education and training both for farmers and the public. For instance, we host the largest organic farming and food system conference in the Southeast which this year is actually taking place in downtown Durham, November 6 through 8, 2022. We also run a farm incubator facility in Concord, North Carolina to help new organic farmers learn the trade and become successful in moving into organic farming as a career. We do consumer outreach, such as our Piedmont Farm Tour event here in the Piedmont Triangle area in North Carolina and K-12 agriculture education. We do a lot of advocacy educating state and federal policy makers on the needs and concerns of sustainable farmers. And, training people at the local level on how they can be effective advocates for healthy and just food systems.   Thank you for that description in this sort of remarkably broad portfolio you have. I can imagine how busy you folks are! But let me ask a question of kind of a national scope. Are there other organizations like this around the country, and is there a coalition of such groups?   Absolutely. Many states have sister organizations, like Carolina Farm Stewardship Association, serving their communities and their regions. One national umbrella group that we're a part of is the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition, which acts as a lobbying voice for our sector in Washington DC. Their members span all the way across the country. So similar types of organizations that we work with are in states everywhere, like the Northeast Organic Farmers Association in New England, Community Alliance for Family Farms in California, and everywhere in between.   So let's go back in time and speak about how the association got started. So what were its origins, why did people think there was a need for this, and who are the members?   Essentially, it was a group of organic farmers and gardeners who got together back in 1979 seeking to practice organic farming, and to gain opportunities to learn about how to grow organically. And who wanted to see a food system that was re-centered on communities and relationships and shifted away from a commodity mindset of the cheapest food grown using practices that were focused on extraction from the natural world. These were farmers and gardeners who wanted to work with the natural world and work with their neighbors to create a different vision for a food system. This is the late 1970s, and this was during the "Get Big or Get Out" mindset in agriculture. In fact, existing agricultural institutions, universities, companies, were really actively hostile to organic. It was really to create that peer-to-peer learning opportunity for farmers across North and South Carolina that CFSA originally began. Over the years, the initial project of the organization actually came to be an organic certification agency. Back before there was the green organic seal that we have in the grocery stores today, the organic label was something that was locally defined. There wasn't a national program. So these farmers got together and decided and collectively created organic standards for helping them to manage their farms in a way that was beneficial to the environment that promoted healthy living soils. And over time, as we've expanded, and as the movement has expanded, those farmers recognized the need for policy advocacy and policy change to promote more sustainable food and farming systems, and to expand our services so that we can encourage and promote new farmers to get into organic agriculture and local food.   Now that you explained the origins of the organization, I was first going to say it was the beginnings of a trend for people and farmers to become more in touch with one another through things like farmer's markets and local produce programs and farm-to-school programs, things like that. But it wasn't a new trend. It was sort of the restoration of what existed before when people were more in touch with the farmers who grew their foods, and that connection between farmers and their communities is a really interesting one. And I'd love to hear your thoughts on the role that farmers can play in addressing economic and social justice issues in their communities.   Absolutely. A really great example of how the sustainable agriculture and sustainable farming community in the Carolinas is doing just that today is our FarmsSHARE Program which was developed as a COVID response by Carolina Farm Stewardship Association back in 2020. Initially, we saw with the pandemic and the public health controls that were being put in place, saw restaurants closing and especially those farm-to-table restaurants that were buying food from small local farms in our region and across the country. So those farmers all of the sudden lost a market, and they already had crops in the ground ready to sell, and the restaurants were laying off their workers. And, you know, this predominantly is people working in the kitchens and in the service industry who tend to more likely come from oppressed backgrounds, and they didn't have money because their jobs were getting cut off. So our FarmsSHARE program initially was created to provide CSA-style boxes from those small farms to those restaurant workers who were unemployed, or underemployed, as a result of the pandemic. Thanks to some very generous funding from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation of North Carolina, CFSA was able to buy that food from those small farms. They then worked with local food hubs to have it packed, and then the food hubs delivered the food to the restaurants that they used to sell to so that the workers could have this free, fresh, healthy food. As the pandemic has evolved and revealed to a wider population, the realities of food insecurity in our communities across North and South Carolina, FarmsSHARE evolved to address people throughout society who are in need of fresh, healthy food. So the way FarmsSHARE works right now is that we provide funding to food hubs for them to purchase food directly from small farms, package that up, again, into CSA-style, (Community Supported Agriculture) boxes. And then take that to food pantries in their own communities and senior centers in their own communities so that small farms are, through this program, feeding people in need in their backyards. This is a great example of what happens when we marshal many small farms to work together to address the injustices in the food system in their own communities, and bring healthy food made in harmony with nature to the people that deserve it.   Well, it's a great example of ingenuity. It's a great example of the resilience of a local food system and how people can come together in times of crisis, and the FarmsSHARE program you talked about is really interesting. Do you think that the lessons have been learned about how these food systems can be resilient so if something like this happens again, let's hope it doesn't, but if it does, that we'll be able to respond even more quickly and effectively?   I think we have an opportunity to help people learn that lesson. I mean, there's no doubt we have seen examples of fragility of the national and international food systems as a result of COVID, and we've seen examples of local food systems being resilient. As a professor and instructor, you probably appreciate that learning doesn't just happen from experiencing it once. We have to keep pushing and keep sharing those examples. This is really where the role of policy becomes vital in terms of ensuring that our society learns these lessons. The Farm Bill is coming up, which is the massive five-year legislation that Congress brings about every few years that guides food and agriculture policy in this country. That is a crucial opportunity for advocates of resiliency in our food system to make sure that these lessons actually get ensconced in policy. That policies that direct and incense the production and distribution of food in this country are built to be resilient instead of to be commodified.   Well, so let's talk about the Farm Bill. We'll turn our attention a little bit from the local picture to the national one. So this is an enormous and enormously complex piece of legislation and, as you said, it's coming up for renewal. So what do you think the legislation can do to help support local and regional food systems, and what do you think the policy reforms might be for the 2023 Farm Bill?   It really is a crucial opportunity, and one of the places that can start is in food procurement policies within USDA programs. So when it comes to food purchasing that the government does for relief to address food insecurity, the primary metric for making those purchases, is how cheap is the food? We need to change that mindset. We need to change policy to allow for these systems to prioritize community development and supporting farmers as well as supporting communities. So, for instance, there is a proposed bill that's out there in Congress right now, the Fresh Produce Procurement Reform Act, that is an example of policy that we'd like to see incorporated into the next Farm Bill that would lower the barriers for small farms to participate in these feeding programs. And would allow the agencies that run these programs to make decisions based, not just on getting the cheapest possible food and calories for people who need it, but to actually allow them to get fresh and healthy food and do it in a way that builds community instead of extracts from communities. That's a crucial area of reform. Incenting, agroecological and conservation practices, and promoting more research on organic practices is also something that is a critical opportunity in this upcoming farm bill. There is so much that farmers do that is shaped by the policies that the farm bill puts out. The Farm Bill, as it exists right now, eliminates most of the risk for very large farms to just grow corn and soybeans, and to not worry about the environments. Changing those incentive structures, making it possible, and in fact, desirable for farmers to work in harmony with nature as a primary focus and as a primary benefit of their operations has to be a part of the kind of reform that's needed.   Bio   Roland McReynolds has served since 2007 as the Executive Director of the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association (CFSA), a member-based, farmer-driven non-profit organization based in Pittsboro, NC that helps farmers and consumers in the North and South Carolina grow and eat local organic food.  He is an attorney, receiving BA and BS degrees from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and his JD from the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Law.  Roland directs CFSA's programs and policy advocacy work at the state and federal level, and has served on the USDA's Fruit & Vegetable Industry Advisory Committee; the Policy Committee of the Organic Farmers Association; the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition's Organizational Council; and the Advisory Boards for the North Carolina A&T State University College of Agriculture and Environmental Science and the North Carolina State University Department of Crop and Soil Science; among other boards and committees.  Carolina Farm Stewardship Association is the oldest and largest organic farmers organization in the Southeast. CFSA hosts educational conferences and events on sustainable agriculture and local food systems; provides training and direct technical assistance to local organic farmers; runs a training farm for new organic growers in Concord, NC; coaches food councils on effective policy advocacy; and represents organic and local food systems stakeholders with state and federal legislators and agencies. In response to COVID, CFSA has been operating a program called FarmsSHARE, a CSA-style food box program that addresses food insecurity in the Carolinas by purchasing food from small farms at a fair price and distributing that food to people in need through a statewide network of community-based food hubs. For more information about CFSA, visit www.carolinafarmstewards.org.  

Average Joe Finances
129. House Hacking to BRRRR to Multifamily with David Dodge

Average Joe Finances

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 42:39 Transcription Available


Join Mike Cavaggioni with David Dodge on the 129th episode of the Average Joe Finances Podcast. David shares how easy it is to learn wholesale Real Estate for huge profits & how people can use other people's money to buy rental properties.In this episode, you'll learn:How you can make large amounts of money Wholesaling Houses with little to no moneyGrowing your portfolio the right wayFinding opportunities outside of the MLSHow to leverage the BRRRR method most effectivelyHow to master the art of marketing to motivated sellers and finding dealsAnd so much more!About David:David Dodge is a St. Louis Real Estate Investor with over 18 years of experience. He first started investing in Real Estate  when he was in college, at the age of 20 while attending the  University of Missouri-Columbia.David specializes in  Wholesaling Real Estate as well as using The BRRRR Method to  acquire Rental Properties with NONE of his own money!David and his team have wholesaled over 750 houses to date and his company “House  Sold Easy” averages about 5-10 wholesales a month.David  also loves to fix-and-flip properties as well as add properties to  his rental portfolio. David has over 90 rentals currently (over 20K in Cash Flow) and he has a goal to take his rental portfolio to over 200 properties in the next 24 months.Find David Dodge on:Website: https://www.wholesalinginc.com/rentalsInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/DavidAlanDodge/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DavidAlanDodgeSTLYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidDodgeShowAverage Joe Finances®All of our social media links and more: https://averagejoefinances.com/linksTools and resources I use: www.averagejoefinances.com/resourcesCRM Tool: www.averagejoefinances.com/crmPay Off Your Mortgage in 5-7 Years:www.theshredmethod.com/averagejoefinancesFind a REALTOR® in any state: www.averagejoefinances.com/realtorMake Real Estate Investing Easier with DealMachine:www.averagejoefinances.com/dealmachinePodcast Hosting: www.averagejoefinances.com/buzzsproutPodcast Editing Services: www.editpods.com*DISCLAIMER* https://averagejoefinances.com/disclaimerSee our full episode transcripts here: https://www.averagejoefinancespod.com/episodes--------------Tropical Sensation by Mike Leite soundcloud.com/mikeleite Creative Commons - Attribution 3.0 Unported - CC BY 3.0 Free Download/Stream: https://bit.ly/-tropical-sensationSupport the show

Just a Good Conversation
Just a Good Conversation: Cristina Salvador Klenz

Just a Good Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 133:02


Cristina Salvador Klenz, a photojournalist, freelance photographer, and Board Certified Behavior Analyst, graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a Bachelor of Journalism degree majoring in Photojournalism (1986). Cristina's documentary photography work on the Roma culture has been published worldwide in Aperture, Geo France, Interfacemagazine in Paris, and the textbook Photojournalism the Professional's Approach. She also received a National Endowment for the Arts/WESTAF grant for her work on the Roma culture. She was a grant finalist for the Alicia Patterson Foundation and the Nikon Documentary Grant. Her Roma images are in the collection of The Romani Archives & Documentation Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Cristina's interest in psychology inspired her to purse an additional Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from Cal State University Long Beach (2005) and a Master of Education Curriculum and Instruction/Applied Behavior Analysis from Arizona State Univeristy (2015). In 2020 she became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). She currently works as a behavior intervention assistant for Long Beach (CA) Unified School District. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matt-brown57/support

Shrink Rap Radio Psychology Interviews: Exploring brain, body, mind, spirit, intuition, leadership, research, psychotherapy a

Bernard Beitman, M.D., is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. A graduate of Yale Medical School, he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for Psychology Today on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book Learning Psychotherapy. He is also the author of Meaningful Coincidences: How and Why Synchronicity and Serendipity Happen. The founder of The Coincidence Project, he lives in Charlottesville, Virginia. Sign up for 10% off of Shrink Rap Radio CE credits at the Zur Institute

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Chuck Wolfe - FaithPrep Founder and CEO

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 15:12


Chuck Wolfe is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Faith Academics. He has more than 30 years of professional experience in the areas of law, business, and education. After graduating from college, Chuck taught 7th grade history and math in central Missouri before attending law school. He then worked as a corporate attorney for several regional law firms, was Senior Counsel for a major retailer and served as General Counsel for a national manufacturing company.Following a successful legal career, Chuck returned to the educational field, serving as the Regional Paralegal Director and Campus Director for a private university system before helping launch a statewide online high school program in Kansas. He later became Head of School for a statewide online high school in Colorado. He then served as Vice President of School Development for Stride K12 for almost nine years. In this role, he has helped develop more than a dozen public and private online school programs around the country. He formed Faith Academics in 2021 to develop the FaithPrep model and launch a network of private online Christian schools and homeschool programs.Chuck is actively involved in various local and international ministries, including a comprehensive community project outside Salima, Malawi in southeast Africa. He is a co-founder and board member of Pothawira international, a humanitarian organization that supports the Malawi project. He also serves on the Advisory Board of Care Portal, a technology-based company that supports the foster care system throughout the United States.He earned in B.S. in Secondary Education from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a J.D. from the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law. He currently lives in Tampa, Florida with his wife Debi.https://www.faithprep.com/

Flipping America
Flipping America 557, The BRRRR Method

Flipping America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 30:03


I've been doing this since 2002. I've done over 2000 single family homes, including more than 1700 fix and flip projects, hundreds of rentals and hundreds of wholesale deals. I don't want to sound like I'm bragging here, because that's not my intent. I just want you to know I have data and some personal experience to back up what I'm about to say. If I were starting all over again today, what would I do? I'm going to share it with you in just a couple of minutes. I won't keep you in suspense - if I were starting all over today, I'd dive into the BRRRR Method and acquire as many single family rental properties as I could. Today I'm going to be joined by one of the emerging champions of the BRRRR method, David Dodge. David is a St. Louis Real Estate Investor with over 18 years of experience. He first started investing in Real Estate when he was in college, at the age of 20 while attending the University of Missouri-Columbia. David specializes in Wholesaling Real Estate as well as using The BRRRR Method to acquire Rental Properties with NONE of his own money! David is the Author of 3 books: “The Ultimate Guide to Wholesale Real Estate”, “The BRRRR Method” & “The 3 Pillarsof Wholesaling Real Estate”. His podcast “Discount Property Investor” teaches people all about wholesaling real estate as well as tons of tips and tricks about marketing, land-lording, rehabbing, and utilizing The BRRRR Method.

Ed Leaders In Literacy Podcast

Dr. Jill Dunlap Brown Jana Schmidt What's Inside: In this episode, we chat with Dr. Jill Dunlap Brown and Jana Schmidt about their work as leaders in the field of literacy. Together Dr. Jill Brown and Jana Schmidt wrote Matching Reading Data to Interventions: A Simple Tool for Elementary Educators to serve as an accessible guide for teachers so they can better determine their student's instructional needs. Dr. Jill Dunlap Brown has worked in the education field for 20 years as a teacher, literacy coach and Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education in a school district of 19,000 students. She is currently an Educational Consultant with Brown & Schmidt Consulting providing literacy training and support to teachers, leaders and school systems. Jana Schmidt has worked as an associate director in the Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis Department at the University of Missouri-Columbia and as an educational consultant. Jana served as a language arts coordinator for kindergarten through eighth grade in a school district with approximately 19,000 students. Resources mentioned in this episode: Science of Reading The Simple View of Reading Scarborough's Reading Rope National Reading ReportThis podcast episode was sponsored by Heggerty Phonemic Awareness

The Essential 11
Deirdre Fitzpatrick - A Woman Who's Dying To Ask

The Essential 11

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 62:44


Deirdre is a four-time Emmy award winner in writing, anchoring, and reporting and has a bachelor's degree in Journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia. She's traveled the world with KCRA photographer Mike Domalaog as a member of the Hearst Television Olympic Team. Together, they've covered the last nine Olympics -- 2000 Sydney, 2002 Salt Lake City, 2004 Athens, 2006 Torino, 2008 Beijing, 2010 Vancouver, 2012 London, 2014 Sochi and 2016 Rio de Janeiro. You can catch up on Deirdre and Domi's adventures in her Olympic blog, Deirdre's Diary. She's also a wife, mom of two sons, and likes to point out that being a #boymom is WAY more tiring than getting up at 2:15 a.m. or finishing Ironman. Now, hear her take on the Essential 11. More places you can find Deirdre: Twitter - @kcraFitz Instagram - @runreadsip

Experience The Buzz
97 DEIRDRE FITZPATRICK | KCRA Channel 3 Morning News Anchor

Experience The Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 92:54


DEIRDRE FITZPATRICK has been a fixture in Sacramento TV. Since the persistent and confident graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia arrived on the scene after her first job in Des Moines, Iowa. Since 1997, Fitzpatrick has been a part of the news team at KCRA Channel 3. She started as the Weekend News Anchor doing five hours of news on her own. That transitioned into her becoming the Morning News Anchor for many years with Walt Gray and currently with Teo Torres. In addition, Fitzpatrick has covered the last 12 Olympics and hosts her own podcast called "Dying to Ask." One word: IMPRESSIVE!HOST STEVE BUZZARD on Deirdre Fitzpatrick |  "Deirdre knew from a very young age what she was going to be doing in her lifetime. And through what she shares, it is fascinating and inspiring that her determination, confidence, persistence, and will got her to where she wants to be as a TV anchor." Our conversation hits TWO areas: SEGMENT 1 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.16.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 59:46


VIDEOS : WES2022 | Yuval Noah Harari and Vanessa Nakate in conversation (3:19) Why Colleges Are Becoming Cults [Full Series] | Dr. Lyell Asher (15:00 to 43:42 Gary Null Speaking Out at the NYS Assembly Hearing  (25:00)   Astragulus found to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation Fujian University of Traditional Medicine (China), September 8, 2022 Huang qi (Astragalus) is one of the fundamental herbs in traditional Chinese medicine, with earliest records of its use dating back over 2,000 years ago. Now, a study in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine has found that astragulus is also able to prevent the spread of breast cancer cells in the body. In the study, researchers from the Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in China looked at how astragulus extract can affect breast cancer cells and the process behind this biological effect. They also looked at the primary isoflavones in the extract, as well as its anti-proliferative activity on three breast cancer lines: MCF-7 (ER+), SK-BR-3 (HER2+) and MDA-MB-231 (triple-negative). They did this by exposing these breast cancer cells to the extract for 48 hours. In addition, they examined the effect of astragulus extract on phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways, a primary intracellular signaling pathway that contributes to cell proliferation, growth, migration, metabolism, and apoptosis. The results of the study showed that the treatment of astragulus exhibited anti-proliferative activity on breast cancer cells. Furthermore, the therapy promoted the death of breast cancer cells. These suggested that it's ability to inhibit breast cancer cell growth was linked to its ability to inhibit PI3K/Akt/mTOR activity. Moreover, the researchers found that the Huang qi extract contains four types of isoflavones, such as campanulin, ononin, calycosin, and formononetin, which contributed to the inhibitory effect of Huang qi extract on breast cancer cells proliferation. Vitamin D supplementation could help critically ill patients University Hospital Würzburg (Germany) September 12 2022. Findings from a review and meta-analysis reported in Critical Care suggest that providing critically ill patients with vitamin D supplements may improve some clinical outcomes, including survival. “Upon ICU admission, the majority of patients have significantly reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, which remain significantly reduced over the entire ICU length of stay,” Johannes Menger and colleagues wrote. “In these patients, significantly reduced vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) serum levels are frequent and independently associated with higher incidence and severity of sepsis.” Sixteen randomized, controlled trials that evaluated vitamin D supplementation's association with mortality were identified. Vitamin D supplementation was associated with a 22% lower risk of overall mortality in comparison with a placebo or standard care. Among studies that reported 28-day mortality, vitamin D supplementation was associated with a trend toward lower a lower risk. Receiving vitamin D by injection or intravenously had the strongest effect. Patients who received vitamin D spent an average of 3.13 days less in the ICU and 5 fewer days on a ventilator than those who received a placebo. “The results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that vitamin D supplementation may be associated with reduced overall mortality in critically ill patients,” they concluded. Natural compound could reduce breast cancer risk in some women Luteolin may inhibit growth of human breast cancer cells in postmenopausal women taking hormone replacement therapy University of Missouri-Columbia, September 9, 2022 More than 100 women die from breast cancer every day in the United States. The odds increase in postmenopausal women who have taken a combined estrogen and progestin hormone replacement therapy; these women also have an increased risk of developing progestin-accelerated breast tumors. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found that luteolin, a natural compound found in herbs such as thyme and parsley as well as vegetables such as celery and broccoli, could reduce the cancer risk for women who have taken hormone replacement therapy. “Most older women normally have benign lesions in breast tissue,” Hyder said. “These lesions typically don't form tumors until they receive the ‘trigger'– in this case, progestin–that attracts blood vessels to cells essentially feeding the lesions causing them to expand.” His newest study shows that when the supplement luteolin is administered to human breast cancer cells in the lab, benefits can be observed including the reduction of those vessels “feeding” the cancer cells causing cancer cell death. Hyder's lab has found that as human breast cancer cells develop, they tend to take on stem cell-like properties, which can make them harder to kill. Here, luteolin was used to monitor stem cell-like characteristics of breast cancer cells and his team saw a vast reduction in this phenomenon, further proving that the natural compound exerts its anti-tumor effects in a variety of ways. “We feel that luteolin can be effective when injected directly into the bloodstream, so IV supplements may still be a possibility,” Hyder said. “But, until the supplement is tested for safety and commercialized, which we hope will happen after further testing and clinical trials, women should continue consuming a healthy diet with fresh fruits and vegetables.” CBD shows health benefits in estrogen-deficient mice that model postmenopause Rutgers University, September 14, 2022 A Rutgers study points to cannabidiol (CBD), a major component of hemp and medical marijuana used to treat conditions such as chronic pain, inflammation, migraines, epilepsy, autoimmune diseases, depression, and anxiety, as a possible treatment for postmenopausal women whose ovaries no longer make estrogen. In a study published in Frontiers in Pharmacology, scientists reported that when estrogen-deficient mice were fed CBD, a non-intoxicating compound extracted from hemp, they showed marked improvement in several areas. Their bloodstreams more readily disposed of glucose, and they burned more energy. In addition, their bone density improved, they had less inflammation in gut and bone tissues and they possessed higher levels of beneficial gut bacteria. “This preclinical study is the first to suggest the therapeutic potential of CBD for alleviating symptoms of estrogen deficiency,” said Diana Roopchand, an assistant professor in the Department of Food Science of the Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS) and senior author on the study. “There is much anecdotal evidence of CBD's health benefits for menopausal and postmenopausal women, but our study is the first to investigate some of the claims in an established preclinical model of postmenopause.” Over 18 weeks, researchers fed the estrogen-deficient mice a steady diet of either tiny, CBD-laced peanut butter balls or peanut butter balls without CBD. The untreated estrogen-deficient mice developed symptoms that resembled those of postmenopausal human females, such as metabolic dysfunction, evidence of inflammation, lower bone density, and lower levels of beneficial gut bacteria. However, in mice that ingested CBD, these conditions were significantly improved. Mediterranean diet and depression among older individuals Harokopio University (Greece), September 9, 2022 According to news originating from Athens, Greece,research stated, “In Europe, depression is one of the most frequent mental disorders across all age groups, but particularly in people aged 65 years and over, and higher depressive symptoms have been reported among individuals with chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes and heart disease).” Research from Harokopio University stated, “To evaluate the role of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) in depression in a sample of older people living in the Mediterranean basin. Standard procedures were used to determine socio-demographic, lifestyle, and clinical characteristics of the participants, as well as their dietary habits, and depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Participants classified as having mild or severe depression were less educated and physically active, and more diabetic, and they reported less adherence to the MedDiet. Adherence to the MedDiet was associated with the absence of depression [(OR, 95% CI): 0.65, 0.50 – 0.85]. In addition, daily tea drinking was also related to the absence of depression [(OR, 95% CI): 0.51, 0.40 – 0.65].” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “Greater adherence to the MedDiet and daily tea drinking seem to have a beneficial effect on depressive symptoms in older adults.” High cholesterol leads to long-term liver scarring and immune cell dysfunction in lab study University of Southern California, September 15, 2022 There's a long-established link between a high-fat, high-sugar diet and fatty liver disease, which can lead to life-threatening conditions such as cirrhosis and liver cancer. Now, new research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC adds some detail and dimension to this picture. The lab study, published in Frontiers in Immunology, is the first-ever to focus on how different amounts of cholesterol as part of a diet high in fat and sugar affect fatty liver disease progression. Modeling the disease in mice, the investigators demonstrated that high cholesterol intake can make fatty liver disease worse—driving inflammation and scarring—and that, importantly, scar tissuecan persist even after switching to a diet low in cholesterol. The findings also indicated that a high-cholesterol diet can create long-lasting dysfunction in a specific population of immune cells previously shown to play a role in fatty liver disease. “We saw that you may have a high-fat and high-sugar diet, but when you add high cholesterol to that, it will accelerate the process that causes inflammation in your liver,” said corresponding author Ana Maretti-Mira, Ph.D., an assistant research professor of medicine at USC. “People focus on high cholesterol as a risk for heart disease, but we showed that your liver may also be affected, causing inflammation, scarring and, potentially, cirrhosis.” High cholesterol makes fatty liver disease worse The researchers fed mice a high-fat, high-sugar diet shown to cause a form of advanced fatty liver disease similar to human illness. The mice were split into three groups that received different amounts of cholesterol in their food for 20 weeks—midlife for the animals. The low-cholesterol group received one-quarter the cholesterol compared to medium; the high-cholesterol group received 25 times more than the low-cholesterol group. After 20 weeks, the livers of mice from all three groups showed accumulation of fat, a benign feature of fatty liver disease, but the high-cholesterol group had more advanced disease, with increased inflammation and scar tissue. For the following 10 weeks, mice from all three groups received low cholesterol as part of a diet that remained high in fat and sugar. At the end of that time, that change in diet had reversed inflammation in the original high-cholesterol mice, but had not reduced scar tissue. This finding shows that damage caused by high cholesterol can be hard to undo. The high-fat, high-sugar diet given to mice in the study has unfortunate similarities to the typical Western diet in humans. “Our daily diet has lots of carbohydrates, such as sugary drinks, bread, rice and pasta,” Maretti-Mira said. “Then there's high fat, since everybody likes deep fried foods. At the same time, we don't have the same active life we used to, so we end up eating much more than our body needs.”

Two Kids and A Career
118: Do You Suffer From Supermom Syndrome?

Two Kids and A Career

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 34:49


Over the past 16 years, Laura Ann Rogers, FNP-C, MSN, RN, BSN, has worked as a floor nurse on a cardiothoracic surgical stepdown unit, as a lead nurse and clinical nurse manager in several hemodialysis clinics, as a nurse practitioner rounding in the hospital on kidney failure patients and managing chronic kidney disease patients in the office, as a traveling community health wellness provider, and in a chiropractic office as a holistic primary care provider skilled in alternative pain management and regenerative therapies for musculoskeletal & joint pain and dysfunction.After many years of experience in conventional medicine, she followed her passion and changed her career path to integrative and functional medicine. She works at a medical spa, Elemental Esthetics, owned by Jennifer Warmann-Bloss. Her mission is to provide patient-centered, proactive, and personalized care to those who are weary and frustrated with our current medical system and are committed to achieving optimal health and wellness by removing what doesn't belong and adding what is missing in your body and in your life. She labels herself as a "medical detective" who uses specialized functional medicine lab work as her "magnifying glass" to uncover the underlying root causes to symptoms, illness, and disease. She spends an extensive amount of time analyzing test results, patient health history, and physical assessment findings to develop a personalized treatment plan to restore physiological balance within the body. She enjoys the freedom to spend as much time as she needs with her patients to develop a relaxed & genuine relationship. She integrates lifestyle medicine practices into her personalized treatment plans to improve stress management techniques and support self-care habits. Laura and Jill Devine talked in depth about functional medicine and “Supermom Syndrome” in this week's episode.Laura grew up in Washington, Missouri where she graduated from St. Francis Borgia High School with Honors in 2000. She attended University of Missouri - Columbia and graduated in 2006 with her Bachelor's in Nursing Science and a minor in psychology. She graduated with her Master's degree at Maryville University in St. Louis, Missouri in 2016 and is AANPCB board- certified Family Nurse Practitioner. She is a member of American Association of Nurse Practitioner, Institute of Functional Medicine, American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, Functional Medicine Fast Track, and is currently studying for certification in functional medicine at Functional Medicine University. She is currently training in Applied Kinesiology Muscle Testing as a tool to supplement her diagnosis processes. She looks forward to continuing her education in Lifestyle Medicine and Nutrition.You can set up a discovery call with Laura. It's complimentary and will take about 10-15 minutes. The number to reach Laura is 314-279-6069.IG: @laura_wellnessnpFB: Upstream Integrative HealthTwo Kids and A Career Website: https://www.jilldevine.com/Two Kids and A Career Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jilldevine/?hl=enTwo Kids and A Career Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JillDevineMedia/Thank you to our sponsor: Elemental EstheticsWhen you call or text the following number (314-279-6069) to schedule your appointment, mention my name and you'll get a special gift with your purchase.

Supernatural Girlz
Coincidence & Synchronicity~How They Happen~w/ Expert/Author Bernard Beitman, MD

Supernatural Girlz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 90:00


Dr. Bernard Beitman takes us on a journey tthrough the inner workings of serendipity, coincidence and synchronicity.  Do you want more grace in your life?  Tune in to hear this fascinating explanation that will enhance your life. Bernard Beitman, M.D., is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to systematize the study of coincidences. A graduate of Yale Medical School, he did his psychiatric residency at Stanford University. The former chair of psychiatry of the University of Missouri-Columbia medical school for 17 years, he writes a blog for Psychology Today on coincidence and is the coauthor of the award-winning book Learning Psychotherapy. The founder of The Coincidence Project, he lives in Charlottesville, Virginia https://coincider.com/  

The KC Morning Show
Monday, September 5. 2022 - "Hope Is Like The Sun: A Labor Day Special"

The KC Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 29:08


Happy Monday and a Happy Labor Day From YOUR KC Morning Show!On the show today, a show of Solidarity! We play back Hartzell's remarks from a few weeks ago, when he hosted the Forever The Free State Gala, presented by the Johnson County Democrats! We meet Andrew Hutchinson, Union Organizer with Laborers Local 955, representing service and maintenance workers at UMKC, MU Healthcare, and the University of Missouri-Columbia, who will be rallying THIS TUESDAY (9/6) to stop the Board of Curators from cutting their PTO pay.LINKS: https://www.liuna955.com/DON'T FORGET! NOMINATIONS ARE NOW OPEN FOR THE PITCH, "BEST OF" FOR 2022. LETS RUN IT BACK AS BEST PODCAST...AGAIN!LINKS:https://vote.thepitchkc.com/arts-and-entertainment/best-local-podcastA Good Day To Be A Kansas Citian. Always.Solidarity Forever.xoxo - @hartzell965, @holeyhearts, @kcmorningshow

That's Healthful
65. National Breastfeeding Month - Dr. Allison Stiles August 2022

That's Healthful

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 24:42


National Breastfeeding Month – August 2022Dr. Allison Stiles, Chair of the Shelby County Breastfeeding CoalitionAugust is National Breastfeeding month and on this episode, my guest and I explore the health benefits to both mom and baby as well as the barriers to breastfeeding. Dr. Allison Stiles is a physician and advocate for breastfeeding and an advocate for underserved populations. Join us for this informative conversation. More About Dr. Stiles:Dr. Allison Stiles has been practicing Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, “Med-Peds” in Midtown Memphis since 2003 when she moved back to be closer to family. She had lived in Memphis from the age of 5 through high school at Central High. She attended the University of Missouri-Columbia where she received a BS in Biochemical Engineering in 1985. She worked for Procter and Gamble as an Engineer in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, Cincinnati, Ohio, Italy, and England. In 1995 she retired after 10 years and went to Medical School at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Stiles did her Med-Peds (Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) residency at the University of Illinois- Chicago. She is double board certified in Pediatrics and Internal Medicine.Practicing in Pediatrics and her experience with her own children led to her interest in Breastfeeding and “Lactivism”. She is Chair of the Shelby County Breastfeeding Coalition and a TN AAP Chapter Breastfeeding Coordinator. She received her certification as a Lactation Consultant in 2016. She has lectured on Breastfeeding for UT Medical students, Family Practice Residents, Pediatric Residents, and Midwives. She was a lecturer for the TN Breastfeeding Symposium 3 times and has taught a class for new Parents every month for over 5 years. She is a contributing author of the article, “Breastfeeding Sisters that are Receiving Support: Community-Based Peer Support Program Created for and by Women of Color, published in the Journal of Breastfeeding Medicine on 2/21.Dr. Stiles has partnered with and supported OutMemphis, Friends for Life, and the Metamorphosis Center. She treats Transgender and Non-binary people to help them with their healthcare needs and to be their Primary Care doctor. She is one of the few Memphis providers of PrEP, to prevent HIV. She has been treating HIV for over 15 years.Dr. Stiles is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American College of Physicians (ACP). She is a member of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the AAP Section on Breastfeeding Medicine, the US Lactation Consultant Association, the International Lactation Consultant Association, the Memphis Pediatric Society, and the Memphis Medical Society. She is a member of the WPATH – the World Professional Association for Transgender Health, and the Academy of Pediatrics –Section on LGBTQ.Her Midtown practice, called “Memphis Internal Medicine and Pediatrics” is nearly 20 years old. She takes care of people of all ages, from newborns to Geriatrics. Dr. Stiles believes in science and compassionate care for all people without boundaries.Resources:www.shelbycountybreastfeeding.orgwww.memphis-medpeds.com

North American Ag Spotlight
Insight into the Next Farm Bill with Women in Agribusiness Summit Speaker Brooke Appleton of NCGA

North American Ag Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 23:51


This week Chrissy Wozniak gains some insight into the upcoming Farm Bill with Women in Agribusiness Summit Speaker Brooke Appleton Vice President of Public Policy for the National Corn Growers Association.The 11th annual Women in Agribusiness (WIA) Summit will take place this year September 26-28 in Dallas, Texas. The event is renowned for annually convening more than 800 of the country's female agribusiness decision-makers, and for building a year-round community of career-minded women. WIA initiatives have grown to include WIA Membership, WIA Career Connector, WIA Demeter Award of Excellence, Scholarships, and the WIA Today blog. The 2022 Women in Agribusiness Summit will feature nearly 40 industry expert speakers and cover topics such as supply chain disruption, the impact of the war in Ukraine, immigration challenges, price volatility in the ag market, and animal agriculture. It also will feature an update on what's to come for the 2023 Farm Bill, which will be covered by speaker Brooke Appleton of the National Corn Growers Association, who is today's guest.Brooke Appleton works in concert with the board and leadership to develop and implement the organization's policy priorities and manages all outreach to Congress, the administration, and government agencies.With close to two-decades of experience in Washington, Brooke has served in senior leadership roles at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, on Capitol Hill, and with some of the nation's leading commodity groups.Prior to heading NCGA's Washington office, Brooke served as chief of staff for the deputy secretary at USDA, managing the office's day-to-day operations and serving as the deputy secretary's lead advisor.She also served as a chief advisor on agricultural and environmental issues to Rep. Sam Graves (R-Missouri) as he chaired the House Small Business Committee. Prior to her committee work, Brooke served as an agricultural advisor in Graves' congressional office.Thanks to her upbringing on a multi-generation row crop and cattle farm in northwest Missouri, Brooke is able to couple her deep understanding of agriculture with her extensive knowledge of the policy process to effect change for America's corn growers.Brooke holds a B.A. in agribusiness management with a minor in international agriculture and political science from the University of Missouri-Columbia.Don't miss Brooke's presentation along with many other ag professionals live in Dallas at the Women In Agribusiness Summit September 26-28. Register at - https://agr.fyi/wia_register. For more information visit - https://wia.highquestevents.com/website/34360/The Women in Agribusiness (WIA) Summit annually convenes over 800 of the country's female agribusiness decision-makers. The 2022 WIA Summit, September 26-28 in Dallas, TX includes presentations from Cargill's Corporate Senior Vice President, Animal Health & Nutrition, Ruth Kimmelshue; Marco Orioli, VP of Global Grain & Processing for EMEA, CHS; and Brooke Appleton of the NCGA. Learn more at https://agr.fyi/wia_register. FIRA USA 18-20 OCT. 2022 (FRESNO-CA): The only 3-day event dedicated to the California and North America market for autonomous agriculture and agricultural robotics solutions.Learn More at https://agr.fyi/fira

Business of the Beat Podcast
Building the product of my dreams!

Business of the Beat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 40:48


This week, Ciara Imani May, CEO, and co-founder of Rebundle, the first proprietary braiding hair made from a non-toxic, biodegradable plant, discusses the steps she took to extend the zero waste lifestyle she desired for herself into the hair product of her dreams. Leaning into her own scalp sensitives to truly get to the root of what causes irritations to the hair when using synthetic fibers and solving a systemic problem that has been overlooked for decades. Ciara also shares more info on her historic $1.4M raise to grow her company and the future plans for Rebundle.    Bio: Ciara Imani May, CEO, and co-founder of Rebundle is creating space for Black women in clean beauty with the first U.S -made plant-based braiding hair brand. Ciara's combined passion for sustainability and understanding of health disparities in personal care products inspired the vision for Rebundle's first product, braid better. Before launching Rebundle, Ciara earned her bachelor's in business management from the University of Missouri-Columbia and her master's in social entrepreneurship from the University of Southern California. Ciara is committed to providing women with more comfort and less waste through eco-friendly and non-toxic hair extensions that we deserve.   Follow @_cizn and @rebundle.co or visit https://rebundle.co/.   Quote: “People are still excited and have given us grace to get it right!”    Tune in to learn more from Ciara and Kendra! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Minding My BLACK Business
131. Black Women will save the world featuring Dr. Kimber Shelton, Dr. Mahlet Endale, Dr. Michelle Lyn

Minding My BLACK Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 63:08


The weight of the world is heavy these days and Black Women are on the front lines of the work. We've been a crucial element of change throughout time and it can feel overwhelming. Take a listen as to how to best balance our desire to make the world better without sacrificing our well-being.  Dr. Kimber Shelton is a licensed psychologist and owner of KLS Counseling & Consulting Services. She provides psychotherapy, professional consultation, and diversity-related trainings. Dr. Shelton specializes in the areas of cultural competence, ethnic minority and LGBTQ issues, trauma, and relationship concerns. Additionally, she serves as an adjunct instructor in Yorkville University's Masters in Counseling Psychology program. Dr. Shelton is the co editor of the recently released Handbook on Counseling African American Women: Psychological Symptoms, Treatments, and Case Studies. She earned her PhD in Counseling Psychology from the University of Georgia and MS in Mental Health Counseling from Niagara University. Dr. Mahlet Endale, is a licensed Psychologist and board certified telemental health provider.  She serves clients in Georgia, Florida, and some countries abroad.  Over the course of her career, she has served as instructor, clinical supervisor, consultant, suicide prevention coordinator, outreach coordinator, and psychotherapist.  She opened a private practice in 2017 and primarily serves adult clients holding intersecting marginalized identities.  Prior to opening her practice,  Dr. Endale worked in university mental health for 10 years in settings ranging from private liberal arts colleges to large research one institutions.   Dr. Michelle Lyn is a licensed psychologist with experience in a variety of clinical settings, including private practice, collegiate mental health, and veterans' affairs. She earned her doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Georgia, her master's degree from the University of Missouri–Columbia, and her bachelor's degree from Xavier University of Louisiana. Special Guests Contact Information: Website:      https://www.counselingblackwomen.com/ Instagram:   https://www.instagram.com/counselingblackwomen/ Facebook:   https://www.facebook.com/counselingblackwomen/   Where to find us: Facebook:       https://www.facebook.com/drjanaetaylor/ Instagram:       https://www.instagram.com/drjanaetaylor/     Twitter:           https://twitter.com/Mindingmyblkbiz  Website:          www.mindingmyblackbusiness.com Merchandise:      https://bit.ly/2ICq1VQ 

Our Missouri
Summer Series 2022: In Their Own Words – Elizabeth Engel, Laura Jolley, Aleksandra Kinlen, and Heather Richmond (NWMC, Part 3)

Our Missouri

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 25:00


Elizabeth Engel, Laura Jolley, Aleksandra Kinlen, and Heather Richmond from The State Historical Society of Missouri join us to discuss their involvement in the creation of the exhibit, “In Their Own Words: Celebrating the National Women and Media Collection,” The exhibit is on display in the Wenneker Family Corridor Gallery at the Center for Missouri Studies from July to December 2022. About the Guests: Elizabeth Engel is a senior archivist for the State Historical Society of Missouri and manages the National Women in Media Collection. Engel is one of four curators of In Their Own Words: Celebrating the National Women and Media Collection. Engel, an Iowa native and a University of Iowa graduate, holds a master's degree in library and information science. Her undergraduate work was in English at Iowa State University. She has been with the State Historical Society since 2006 and currently heads the Columbia Research Center's accessioning program, working with donors to acquire manuscript collections. Laura Jolley is the assistant director of manuscripts for the State Historical Society of Missouri and one of four curators of In Their Own Words: Celebrating the National Women and Media Collection. Jolley holds a master's degree in library science and a bachelor of arts degree in English from the University of Missouri. She has been at SHSMO for over 14 years and currently oversees the collecting and preservation efforts of the Society. Aleksandra Kinlen is a manuscript specialist for the State Historical Society of Missouri and one of four curators of In Their Own Words: Celebrating the National Women and Media Collection. Kinlen earned a bachelor's degree in education and a master's degree in history from Missouri State University. Currently pursuing a master's degree in library and information science at the University of Missouri–Columbia, she joined SHSMO as a practicum student before becoming a manuscript specialist in April 2021. Heather Richmond is a senior archivist for the State Historical Society of Missouri and one of four curators of In Their Own Words: Celebrating the National Women and Media Collection. Richmond received a master's degree in library studies with an emphasis in archives from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2007. Her undergraduate work was in creative writing and psychology at Beloit College. Richmond has been with SHSMO for nearly 10 years and currently oversees the Society's digitization program.