Podcasts about Spaniards

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People native to any part of Spain or that hold Spanish citizenship

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Best podcasts about Spaniards

Latest podcast episodes about Spaniards

Daily Rosary
Nov 25, 2021, Thanksgiving Day, Holy Rosary (Luminous Mysteries) | In Memoriam of Maria Blanca

Daily Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 30:35


Friends of the Rosary: We rejoice by celebrating Thanksgiving today. As Christians following the True Faith, we always must be grateful to the Lord Jesus, because we live for Him. The lack of gratefulness is an offense, as we don't recognize His glory and what He did in the Cross for each one of us. And a historic note. The first Thanksgiving in the U.S. was actually a Catholic celebration. Over five decades before the Mayflower, a group of Spanish colonists celebrated Mass and had a feast with native Timucuans in what would become the oldest settlement in the U.S. — St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, a group of colonists settled at Santa Fe, along with Franciscan missionaries, said Mass and a great feast with the natives followed. Moreover, hundreds of towns established by the Spaniards in the New World celebrated Thanksgiving masses. The U.S. was Catholic prior to the arrival of the Puritans. The first Thanksgiving was Catholic. Let's properly write history while giving thanks to God for His boundless gifts. Ave Maria! Jesus, I Trust In You! + Mikel A. | TheRosaryNetwork.org, New York • November 25, 2021, Today's Holy Rosary, YouTube.com/TheRosaryNetwork • In Memoriam of Maria Blanca: Testimonials • Free Online Video Course: Everything You Wanted to Know about the Rosary of Mary

Wild Connection: The Podcast
The Call of the Trail with Claire Eckard

Wild Connection: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 67:39


This week's episode is all about horses. If we had to give a relationship status on horses, it might likely be “It's complicated”. Using advanced genetic techniques and analyses, Scientists found a signature genetic event 4000 years ago that revealed  that the ancestors of all modern horses were domesticated in what is now southern Russia. Scientists had been on this trail for a while and in 2016 a project known as Pegasus was launched to get to the bottom of it. What they have now pieced together is that humans started artificially breeding this horse and it was genetically unique from all other horses 4000 years ago. It only took 3000 years for this horse, our modern horses, to replace all other lineages across Europe and Asia. Generations later they were reintroduced to the Americas by the Spaniards, bringing horses back to their ancestral homelands. These descendants are what we today call mustangs. Although bestselling author Claire Eckard wasn't writing about mustangs in her new book Gallant: The Call of the Trail: Two horses, two people, one journey, it is the first a trilogy so you never know. This first one already went to #1 on the Amazon bestsellers list and that's not too surprising because it's a wonderful story. I caught up with Claire to talk about this beautiful book that explores the sometimes special relationship we humans have with our horses.   You can get a copy here   And if you want to support an organization doing something to help wild mustangs check out the Mustangs of America Foundation http://www.mustangsofamericafoundation.org   If you are digging the show subscribe and share it so others can enjoy it too. You can follow the show on Itunes, Google Play, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Also follow the show on Twitter: @WildConnectPod You can also follow me on  Twitter: @realdrjen Instagram: @readrjen Facebook https://www.facebook.com/RealDrJen There is also a YouTube Channel where you can find a range of videos, some of them tied to podcast episodes. More are on the way so subscribe to Wild Connection TV  

National Day Calendar
November 2, 2021 - Movember | National Deviled Egg Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 3:45


Welcome to November 2, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate outrageous tax laws and a spicy history.  During the late 1800s, Peter the Great imposed a beard tax on his citizens. That's right! Men were charged an annual fee if they chose to grow out their whiskers. This meant that peasants were charged every time they entered cities. Those who paid the tax were allowed to keep their chin hair, but most men shaved to avoid the tax. As a result, extravagant mustaches became all the rage and were often paired with excessive sideburns. If you notice the men in your life sporting mustaches this month, it's because November is Movember, a time to raise awareness for men's health. Today the only money changing hands today is for charity, not taxes. While a lot of foods fall in and out of favor, it appears that deviled eggs have a long history of success. Even the Ancient Romans liked boiled eggs with spicy sauce as the opening act of their meal. And while 13th century Spaniards began smashing the yolks as a filling, the term “deviling” didn't appear until the 18th century. This is when a little heat became associated with the devil. Call it reverse psychology, or great marketing but somehow a little paprika became a walk on the dark side. Today, no potluck or gathering would be complete without deviled eggs. New twists on this classic h'ordeuvre can be made by adding wasabi or southwestern spices. On National Deviled Egg Day, celebrate your spicy side any way you please.   I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

National Day Calendar
November 2, 2021 – Movember | National Deviled Egg Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 2:30


This Crazy Tax Law Led To A Mustache Rebellion. Welcome to November 2, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate outrageous tax laws and a spicy history.  During the late 1800s, Peter the Great imposed a beard tax on his citizens.  That's right!  Men were charged an annual fee if they chose to grow out their whiskers.  This meant that peasants were charged every time they entered cities.  Those who paid the tax were allowed to keep their chin hair, but most men shaved to avoid the tax.  As a result, extravagant mustaches became all the rage and were often paired with excessive sideburns.  If you notice the men in your life sporting mustaches this month, it's because November is Movember, a time to raise awareness for men's health.  Today the only money changing hands today is for charity, not taxes. While a lot of foods fall in and out of favor, it appears that deviled eggs have a long history of success.  Even the Ancient Romans liked boiled eggs with spicy sauce as the opening act of their meal.  And while 13th century Spaniards began smashing the yolks as a filling, the term “deviling” didn't appear until the 18th century.  This is when a little heat became associated with the devil.  Call it reverse psychology, or great marketing but somehow a little paprika became a walk on the dark side.  Today, no potluck or gathering would be complete without deviled eggs. New twists on this classic h'ordeuvre can be made by adding wasabi or southwestern spices. On National Deviled Egg Day, celebrate your spicy side any way you please.   I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

Composers Datebook
The Devil's Sentry Box

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Since today is Halloween, how about a supernatural legend in music? The second of three Fábulas – fables or fantastic stories – for violin and piano by the Puerto Rican composer Dan Román is titled “La garita del diablo” or “The Devil's Sentry Box.” The old port city of San Juan is surrounded by a fortified stone wall built by the Spaniards to protect it from their enemies, dotted with stone sentry boxes at strategic locations where soldiers could gain an advantageous view of any attack arriving by sea. Mystery and myth surrounding one of these lonely sentry boxes built high above the sea began after several soldiers disappeared during their watch, leaving no trace behind. Despite a number of rational explanations, popular imagination blamed the disappearances on evil and supernatural forces. In his chamber work, says Román, “The piano and the violin form aural impressions of the echoes and distant reverberations that take shape in the old passages leading to the sentry box and of the darkness and impersonality of the ocean during the night, until the observer gets to the sentry box and hears the breaking of the sea waves against the rocks and city wall.” Music Played in Today's Program Dan Roman: "La garita del diabolo" fr "Fabulas" (Katalin Viszmeg, vn; Pi-Hsun Shih, p.) Innova 904

英语每日一听 | 每天少于5分钟
第1379期:Hiden Clues Behind Mysterious Ancient Civilization

英语每日一听 | 每天少于5分钟

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 2:43


Stonghenge巨石阵For years, the closest theories that anyone had as to how the stones of Stonehenge were transported ranged from Merlin using magic to aliens. Uses for Stonehenge ranged from ritual magic to a life-size calendar. But researchers and archaeologists have recently discovered additional stones and monuments in the ground around Stonehenge which means that the still-standing stones were merely a focal point amongst many more stones. This also gives a stronger hint that the stones were used as a calendar to track the Sun for the purposes of keeping track of seasons for farming.多年来,关于巨石阵的运输之谜,人们的普遍猜测从梅林施法到外星人杰作,应有尽有。对于建造目的,从祭祀场所到史前日历。日前,研究人员和考古学家在巨石阵周围出土石块和纪念碑,说明眼前这些石头仅仅是众多石块的重要组成部分。这极有可能证明巨石阵就是日历,观察太阳方向,记录农耕季节。Egypt埃及For a significant amount of time, researchers were giving men too little credit in the construction of the pyramid. For a time, scientists claim that the pyramids were built with technology that was too advanced for the time period which made the conspiracy theorists go nuts with thoughts of aliens giving the Pharaohs space tools to build these massive structures. But in reality, ancient Egypt has proven to have the advanced technology and the pyramids aren't built perfectly. In fact, the tools used to build the pyramids, like rope and counter-balancing, are time period appropriate especially since it meant the pyramids were built over a period of 20 years.很久以来,对于金字塔建造者的丰功伟绩,研究人员很少提及。科学家还曾认为,因建造技术较当时来讲太过先进,令阴谋论者想出外星人理论,称外星人赋予法老“太空技术”建造庞然大物。但事实上,古埃及人已证实他们拥有高超技术,然而金字塔建造本身并不完美。事实上,由于金字塔修建时间超过20年,所以像绳子,平衡理论符合当时建造水平。Mayans玛雅人After the Spaniards invaded the Mayan civilization, the mystery was that the people of this ancient civilization completely disappeared. People thought that aliens give the mayans their technology or that the Mayans were aliens themselves and "went home" after the Spanish colonization of the Americas, thus explaining why the Mayans left without a trace. But researchers have found that it's simply not true. The Mayans actually spread out and formed smaller colonies of their own and grew Mayan population from there. There are areas of South America where the mayan language is still spoken and you can find descendants of these ancient people. Also the Mayan calendar was one of the biggest mysteries which doubled as an indicator to some that the ending of the calendar also meant the end of the world. These same surviving Mayans were the same people debunking doomsday prophecies and insisted that the calendar meant a new age, not the end of the world.玛雅文明遭西班牙人入侵后,玛雅文明神秘消失。有人说外星人赋予玛雅人技术,还有说他们本身就是外星人,西班牙在美洲建立殖民地后,玛雅人选择“回家”,这的确对神秘失踪做出了解释。但研究人员却不以为然。玛雅人实际向外扩散,组建小型群落,不断繁衍后代。许多南美洲地区仍然使用玛雅语言,后代依然生息繁衍。玛雅日历也极为神秘,它还同时预示世界末日,玛雅日历的最后一天即为世界末日。但玛雅后代亲自戳穿祖先预言,称日历预示新纪元,而非世界末日。Terracotta Army兵马俑After Chinese farmers discovered the massive Terracotta Army that made archaeological history, scientists and researchers had no idea how the thousands of clay soldiers were designed to protect the tomb of Emperor Qin Shihuang, making it one of the biggest mysteries of ancient China. Initially, historians thought the soldiers were constructed in an assembly-line fashion, but each warrior had its own specific feature. Historians then took photos of each warrior's ears which are as unique as our fingerprints and discovered that each warrior was based on a real-life person.随着兵马俑大量出图,科学家和研究人员却对秦陵墓中的数千只陶土感到不解,它也随即成为中国古代史中的未解之谜。起初,历史学家以为陶人千篇一律,但每只陶土却各具特色。历史学家随即对士兵耳朵进行拍照,形态各异,如同指纹,且每名士兵都以真实人物为原型。

Reel Fun Times
House of the Dead

Reel Fun Times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 62:25


Join us as we journey into Week Three of our Spooktastic Halloween Adventure, with a movie so shitty, even the director couldn't help but make fun of it. This week we suffer through 2003's video game inspired abomination, "House of the Dead."   The overall gist of the situation: 20-somethings head to the mysterious island based rave of the year only to be forced into survival mode when they realize Isla de la Muerte isn't just a catchy name.   If awful movies based on awesome arcade games from your youth are your thing, than boy, do we have the episode for you. There's an early evening rave brought to you by SEGA, Prodigy "lite," Spaniards from Spain, being immortal to live forever, a bevy of really bad boobs, a classic case of the bubbles shouldn't be coming from down there, the hazardous turn table technique, Palpatine and Clint Howard's third appearance on the podcast!  We learn in Haiti, you never turn a person into a zombie, The Doctor really hates the show "24," Snowy gets controversial, probably piss off Wyclef, take the stance that it's a bad idea to fist fight a hoard of zombies and we take a time out for Vodka Bombs. There's church houses, accidental boob grazes, a black and white tale from the high seas, restaurant lingo, talk of the grapefruit technique and if we could turn back time, we would change a rating entirely! All this and so much more on this week's Reel Fun Times!

Criminalia
Was Sir Francis Drake Just In It For Revenge?

Criminalia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:21


Sir Francis Drake was a politician, a naval officer, a sea captain, an English explorer, and the second person to circumnavigate the globe. He was also a pirate -- disguised as a privateer. Drake considered King Phillip II, the King of Spain, a life-long enemy, and he especially targeted their possessions and colonies. There was a rumor among Spaniards, and especially sailors who fought in the Spanish Armada, that Francis Drake had supernatural powers, and nicknamed him El Draque, or The Dragon.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Harvard Classics
The Wealth of Nations (Book IV, Ch. VII), by Adam Smith

Harvard Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 22:42


All colonies are founded to gain territory or treasure. Spain expected spice and gold from Columbus's expedition, but got no spice and little gold. Adam Smith tells the true motive of the colonizing Greeks, Romans, English, and Spaniards. (Volume 10, Harvard Classics)

The Europeans
What the hell just happened in Poland?

The Europeans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:36


Wondering why everyone is suddenly talking about the prospect of a 'Polexit'? This week we're talking to excellent Polandsplainer Jakub Jaraczewski about why the government in Warsaw has just got itself into a huge legal mess. We're also talking about the downfall of Austria's Wunderkind, why so many young Spaniards live with their parents, and the mysterious power of the European chestnut. Jakub is a research coordinator at Democracy Reporting International. You can follow him here on Twitter. This week's Isolation Inspiration: the Earthshot Prize on Saturday, October 16, and 'On Time And Water' by Andri Snær Magnason. You can also watch his video for TED here. This episode was produced as part of Sphera, a collective of independent European media. Find out more at sphera-hub.com. Thanks for listening! If you enjoy our podcast and would like to help us keep making it, we'd love it if you'd consider chipping in a few euros / dollars / pounds a month at patreon.com/europeanspodcast. You can also help new listeners find the show by leaving us a review. Producers: Katy Lee and Wojciech Oleksiak Senior producer: Katz Laszlo Music: Jim Barne and Mariska Martina This podcast is part of the Are We Europe family. Find more like-minded European podcasts at areweeurope.com/audio-family. Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | hello@europeanspodcast.com

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

New Books in African American Studies
Robert C. Schwaller, "African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama: A History in Documents" (U Oklahoma Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 79:59


From the 1520s through the 1580s, thousands of African slaves fled captivity in Spanish Panama and formed their own communities in the interior of the isthmus. African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama (U Oklahoma Press, 2021), a primary source reader, edited by Robert C. Schwaller, documents this marronage in the context of five decades of African resistance to slavery. The self-sufficiency of the Maroons, along with their periodic raids against Spanish settlements, sparked armed conflict as Spaniards sought to conquer the maroon communities and kill or re-enslave their populations. After decades of struggle, Maroons succeeded in negotiating a peace with Spanish authorities and establishing the first two free Black towns in the Americas. The little-known details of this dramatic history emerge in these pages, traced through official Spanish accounts, reports, and royal edicts, as well as excerpts from several English sources that recorded alliances between Maroons and English privateers in the region. The contrasting Spanish and English accounts reveal Maroons' attempts to turn European antagonism to their advantage; and, significantly, several accounts feature direct testimony from Maroons. Most importantly, this reader includes translations of the first peace agreements made between a European empire and African Maroons, and the founding documents of the free-Black communities of Santiago del Príncipe and Santa Cruz la Real—the culmination of the first successful African resistance movement in the Americas. Schwaller has translated all the documents into English and presents each with a short introduction, thorough annotations, and full historical, cultural, and geographical context, making this volume accessible to undergraduate students while remaining a unique document collection for scholars. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books Network
Robert C. Schwaller, "African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama: A History in Documents" (U Oklahoma Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 79:59


From the 1520s through the 1580s, thousands of African slaves fled captivity in Spanish Panama and formed their own communities in the interior of the isthmus. African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama (U Oklahoma Press, 2021), a primary source reader, edited by Robert C. Schwaller, documents this marronage in the context of five decades of African resistance to slavery. The self-sufficiency of the Maroons, along with their periodic raids against Spanish settlements, sparked armed conflict as Spaniards sought to conquer the maroon communities and kill or re-enslave their populations. After decades of struggle, Maroons succeeded in negotiating a peace with Spanish authorities and establishing the first two free Black towns in the Americas. The little-known details of this dramatic history emerge in these pages, traced through official Spanish accounts, reports, and royal edicts, as well as excerpts from several English sources that recorded alliances between Maroons and English privateers in the region. The contrasting Spanish and English accounts reveal Maroons' attempts to turn European antagonism to their advantage; and, significantly, several accounts feature direct testimony from Maroons. Most importantly, this reader includes translations of the first peace agreements made between a European empire and African Maroons, and the founding documents of the free-Black communities of Santiago del Príncipe and Santa Cruz la Real—the culmination of the first successful African resistance movement in the Americas. Schwaller has translated all the documents into English and presents each with a short introduction, thorough annotations, and full historical, cultural, and geographical context, making this volume accessible to undergraduate students while remaining a unique document collection for scholars. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Robert C. Schwaller, "African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama: A History in Documents" (U Oklahoma Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 79:59


From the 1520s through the 1580s, thousands of African slaves fled captivity in Spanish Panama and formed their own communities in the interior of the isthmus. African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama (U Oklahoma Press, 2021), a primary source reader, edited by Robert C. Schwaller, documents this marronage in the context of five decades of African resistance to slavery. The self-sufficiency of the Maroons, along with their periodic raids against Spanish settlements, sparked armed conflict as Spaniards sought to conquer the maroon communities and kill or re-enslave their populations. After decades of struggle, Maroons succeeded in negotiating a peace with Spanish authorities and establishing the first two free Black towns in the Americas. The little-known details of this dramatic history emerge in these pages, traced through official Spanish accounts, reports, and royal edicts, as well as excerpts from several English sources that recorded alliances between Maroons and English privateers in the region. The contrasting Spanish and English accounts reveal Maroons' attempts to turn European antagonism to their advantage; and, significantly, several accounts feature direct testimony from Maroons. Most importantly, this reader includes translations of the first peace agreements made between a European empire and African Maroons, and the founding documents of the free-Black communities of Santiago del Príncipe and Santa Cruz la Real—the culmination of the first successful African resistance movement in the Americas. Schwaller has translated all the documents into English and presents each with a short introduction, thorough annotations, and full historical, cultural, and geographical context, making this volume accessible to undergraduate students while remaining a unique document collection for scholars. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Latin American Studies
Robert C. Schwaller, "African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama: A History in Documents" (U Oklahoma Press, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 79:59


From the 1520s through the 1580s, thousands of African slaves fled captivity in Spanish Panama and formed their own communities in the interior of the isthmus. African Maroons in Sixteenth-Century Panama (U Oklahoma Press, 2021), a primary source reader, edited by Robert C. Schwaller, documents this marronage in the context of five decades of African resistance to slavery. The self-sufficiency of the Maroons, along with their periodic raids against Spanish settlements, sparked armed conflict as Spaniards sought to conquer the maroon communities and kill or re-enslave their populations. After decades of struggle, Maroons succeeded in negotiating a peace with Spanish authorities and establishing the first two free Black towns in the Americas. The little-known details of this dramatic history emerge in these pages, traced through official Spanish accounts, reports, and royal edicts, as well as excerpts from several English sources that recorded alliances between Maroons and English privateers in the region. The contrasting Spanish and English accounts reveal Maroons' attempts to turn European antagonism to their advantage; and, significantly, several accounts feature direct testimony from Maroons. Most importantly, this reader includes translations of the first peace agreements made between a European empire and African Maroons, and the founding documents of the free-Black communities of Santiago del Príncipe and Santa Cruz la Real—the culmination of the first successful African resistance movement in the Americas. Schwaller has translated all the documents into English and presents each with a short introduction, thorough annotations, and full historical, cultural, and geographical context, making this volume accessible to undergraduate students while remaining a unique document collection for scholars. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

Sooner or Later TV
Ep. 71 SYMBIOTIC SPANIARDS, PT. 2 - REC - Sooner or LATER Reviews

Sooner or Later TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:47


THAT'S RIGHT, 2 EPISODES 1 WEEK, WE OUT HERE GETTING CRAZY WITH OUR SCHEDULE. Because maybe burnout isn't a thing? Either way, it's October, and it's still Hispanic Heritage Month, so that means we out here getting scared with some Spanish subtitles babyyyeeee. So we picked a movie that is recognized as one of the scariest found footage movies ever. So hang out with James, Eric, and Joey as we experience the spookiness of REC. We love you, bye! - JG @Soonerorlatertv | Linktree --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soonerorlatertv/message

Sooner or Later TV
Ep. 70 SYMBIOTIC SPANIARDS PT 1 - Venom 2: Let There be Carnage - SOONER or Later Reviews

Sooner or Later TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 63:49


We are some nerdy nerdy bois, so that means we had to sneak in an extra episode today to review some Venom 2. So the boys are coming in hot looking at the Symbiotic misadventures of Tom Hardy's Eddie Brock and Venom. But this isn't just any review, so that means we go off on tangents, talk about lore, and even attempt to throw in some logic from the real world. Either way, come through and enjoy the first part of Symbiotic Spaniards! We love you, bye - JG --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soonerorlatertv/message

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: Glenwood Springs businesses eligible for disaster loans; The River of Lost Souls in Purgatory

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:45


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Tuesday September 28th,   Today - Glenwood Springs has had a challenging year … between the Grizzly Creek Fire, and mudslides. But businesses have largely stayed afloat thanks to federal aid. And now, they have access to federal disaster loans.   But before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today, we take you back to September 28th, 1719, when a massive expedition of Spaniards, Puebloans, and Apaches endured an early winter storm and feared for whether they had enough food. It's little wonder that this beleaguered company at its camp near present day Trinidad Colorado, referred to a nearby river as the River of Lost Souls in Purgatory.    Now, our feature story.   Glenwood Springs has had a rough year … the Grizzly Creek Fire in August 2020 forced a two-week shutdown of Interstate 70 in Glenwood Canyon, just as the tourist destination was emerging from COVID lockdown …. in August this year the hot-springed resort town again endured a two-week closure of the canyon as mudslides buried the interstate below the burn scar … Glenwood businesses have been able to stay afloat for most of 2021 thanks to COVID relief  from the federal government … and now those businesses have access to low interest federal disaster loans approved earlier this month.   Colorado Sun reporter David Gilbert looked into what he called Glenwood's “cavalcade of hardships,” and how this new round of federal assistance is helping the town's economy …   To read more of David's reporting on Glenwood Springs, go to coloradosun.com     And Before we go, here are a few stories that you should know about today:   Nonprofit river conservation group American Whitewater is exploring a plan to adjust Colorado water law so communities can protect recreational river flows without building whitewater parks. The proposed changes to Colorado's Recreational In-Channel Diversion water rights regulations faces stiff opposition from Western Slope water users. The Denver Public Schools board has expanded its conflict-of-interest policy to ban employees of independent charter schools and innovation zones from serving on the board. The district's policy already barred school district employees from serving on the seven-member school board. Last week the board unanimously approved the new rules without public discussion. The board's next election is set for Nov. 2. Fewer than 5,000 students — that's less than 1% of Colorado's K-through-12 students — have signed up for a weekly coronavirus testing program.  That is not enough kids, says Colorado Governor Jared Polis, who launched the testing plan as a way to track cases and prevent outbreaks.    Schools need to test at least one in five students to make a difference, the governor says. The testing program, which is backed by $173 million in federal funding, is testing about one-in-25 kids at 200 Colorado schools. And Colorado students are catching COVID, with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment last week tracking 156 active coronavirus outbreaks in K-12 schools. For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. And don't forget to tune in again tomorrow.   The Colorado Sun is non-partisan and completely independent. We're always dedicated to telling the in-depth stories we need today more than ever. And The Sun is supported by readers and listeners like you.   Right now, you can head to ColoradoSun.com and become a member. Starting at $5 per month for a basic membership and if you bump it up to $20 per month, you'll get access to our exclusive politics and outdoors newsletters. Thanks for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again tomorrow. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wining About Herstory
Ep119. Homicidal Horse Princess & Little Mo

Wining About Herstory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 93:00


If you hate colonization and cement trucks then this episode is for you! First, Emily covers Eréndira, princess of the Purépecha empire who was living her sweetest Disney life with her horse companion when the Spaniards barged onto the scene.  Eréndira responded by waging war! Then, Kelley tells the story of Maureen Connolly, a teen tennis champion who harnessed hate to defeat her opponents. Grab your racket and don't forget to trample creeps, because it's time to Wine About Herstory!Promo Music for Bad Women: Mystery Unsolved by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/winingaboutherstory/overview)

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio
Father Kubicki – Prayer Reflections September 24, 2021

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 2:00


Back in the 13th century, Our Lady appeared to three Spaniards and she asked them to start a new religious order that had as it’s purpose, the liberation of Christian slaves from the hands of the Moors who controlled much of Spain and the Mediterranean Sea. All show notes at Father Kubicki – Prayer Reflections September 24, 2021 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 451All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Lorenzo Ruiz and CompanionsLorenzo was born in Manila of a Chinese father and a Filipino mother, both Christians. Thus he learned Chinese and Tagalog from them, and Spanish from the Dominicans whom he served as altar boy and sacristan. He became a professional calligrapher, transcribing documents in beautiful penmanship. He was a full member of the Confraternity of the Holy Rosary under Dominican auspices. He married and had two sons and a daughter. Lorenzo's life took an abrupt turn when he was accused of murder. Nothing further is known except the statement of two Dominicans that “he was sought by the authorities on account of a homicide to which he was present or which was attributed to him.” At that time, three Dominican priests, Antonio Gonzalez, Guillermo Courtet, and Miguel de Aozaraza, were about to sail to Japan in spite of a violent persecution there. With them was a Japanese priest, Vicente Shiwozuka de la Cruz, and a layman named Lazaro, a leper. Lorenzo, having taken asylum with them, was allowed to accompany them. But only when they were at sea did he learn that they were going to Japan. They landed at Okinawa. Lorenzo could have gone on to Formosa, but, he reported, “I decided to stay with the Fathers, because the Spaniards would hang me there.” In Japan they were soon found out, arrested, and taken to Nagasaki. The site of wholesale bloodshed when the atomic bomb was dropped had known tragedy before. The 50,000 Catholics who once lived there were dispersed or killed by persecution. They were subjected to an unspeakable kind of torture: After huge quantities of water were forced down their throats, they were made to lie down. Long boards were placed on their stomachs and guards then stepped on the ends of the boards, forcing the water to spurt violently from mouth, nose and ears. The superior, Fr. Gonzalez, died after some days. Both Fr. Shiwozuka and Lazaro broke under torture, which included the insertion of bamboo needles under their fingernails. But both were brought back to courage by their companions. In Lorenzo's moment of crisis, he asked the interpreter, “I would like to know if, by apostatizing, they will spare my life.” The interpreter was noncommittal, but in the ensuing hours Lorenzo felt his faith grow strong. He became bold, even audacious, with his interrogators. The five were put to death by being hanged upside down in pits. Boards fitted with semi-circular holes were fitted around their waists and stones put on top to increase the pressure. They were tightly bound, to slow circulation and prevent a speedy death. They were allowed to hang for three days. By that time Lorenzo and Lazaro were dead. Still alive, the three priests were then beheaded. In 1987, Pope John Paul II canonized these six and 10 others: Asians and Europeans, men and women, who spread the faith in the Philippines, Formosa, and Japan. Lorenzo Ruiz is the first canonized Filipino martyr. The liturgical feast of Saint Lorenzo Ruiz and Companions is celebrated on September 28. Reflection We ordinary Christians of today—how would we stand up in the circumstances these martyrs faced? We sympathize with the two who temporarily denied the faith. We understand Lorenzo's terrible moment of temptation. But we see also the courage—inexplainable in human terms—which surged from their store of faith. Martyrdom, like ordinary life, is a miracle of grace. Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Hispanic Heritage Month: Casiodoro de Reina (ca. 1520-1594)

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 27:16


Rev. Ruben Dominguez, retired pastor serving in South Texas, joins Andy and Sarah to share the story of Casiodoro de Reina (ca. 1520-1594) during Hispanic Heritage Month, including what we know about his life, how the Reformation came to Spain, why it was important to Casiodoro to translate the Bible into Spanish, the difficulties Casiodoro endured in order to create this translation, and how this translation has impacted Spanish-speaking culture still today. Casiodoro de Reina (ca. 1520-1594), translator and publisher of the first complete Bible in Spanish Casiodoro de Reina, a monk, was one of the first Spaniards to embrace the principles of the Reformation of the church in the Seville area around the mid-16th century. Those principles are grounded solely on the text of the Bible. Aware of the importance of spreading the Bible among his fellow citizens, Reina set himself the goal of publishing it completely in Spanish. After years of work and challenges found outside of Spain to gather, translate and revise various existing translations of the biblical text, Reina completed his work. Afterward, he received the assignment of finding a printer, nothing easy in those years. The first printing of the complete Bible in Spanish was finished in 1569 in Basel, Switzerland. The original cover contained an illustration of a standing bear trying to eat honey from the honeycomb hidden in a tree trunk; for this reason, it conventionally received the name of The Bear Bible. Using that cover to introduce it into Spain, Reina concealed its content from the Inquisition, an institution which had previously condemned him as a "heresiarch" (teacher of heretics), and had burned him in effigy in the Auto-de-Fe executed in April 1562 in the main plaza of Seville. Reina wanted all Spain to get the benefits of the Gospel message, especially the teaching of achieving justification by faith alone before God thanks to the sacrifice and merits of Jesus Christ won on the cross. Reina died in Frankfurt, Germany while serving as pastor of a Lutheran congregation of foreign refugees. Reina's translation and publication of the biblical text have made a significant impact among Spanish-speaking people.  His legacy will surely carry on because his version, now commonly known as Reina-Valera, is the most widely read in evangelical churches and circles in the Spanish-speaking world.

Dead Air
Interesting Etymologies - Insults

Dead Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 8:28


"Hello again Word Lovers!" and today lots of insults! Please be warned, obviously, this episode and article features some slurs and insults and are presented here for scholarly purposes only. We review some pejorative terms for people of certain nationalities: Germans, the different British nationalities, the Spanish, Americans, Italians and of course, the French. (We cover the term Spaniards which is often mistaken as a pejorative term but has no pejorative connotation. General Insults: We investigate the use of "swerve" as an insult and how it transforms to "dodger" in modern use. Pejoratives for professionals Pejoratives for forms of transport Pejoratives for bad people We take a look at the etymology of some recent language such as Quisling and Shill Further reading We recommend the Viz swearing dictionary "Roger's Profanisaurus" and the "Urban Dictionary". Links can be found on our website.

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: Growing towns around Colorado Springs hope to recycle water; Cuerno Verde dies in battle

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 10:33


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Friday, September 3rd.   Today - Some towns around Colorado Springs have come up with a project to cycle their water in a nearly endless loop to solve their water shortage problems. The cost is over $100 million and involves nearby Fountain Creek.   But before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today, we take you back to September 3rd, 1779 when a combined force of Spaniards, Puebloans, Utes, and Apaches battled with a band of Comanche for control over modern day Colorado. The battle ended the following morning with the death of Cuerno Verde - the leader of the Comanche.   Now, our feature story.   Some fast-growing exurbs north and east of Colorado Springs think they've found a possible solution to the ever growing Front Range water woes. Instead of constantly drilling wells into a  shrinking regional aquifer, they've devised a $134 million project to cycle their water in an almost endless loop through a complex process that involves nearby Fountain Creek.    Colorado Sun reporter Michael Booth joined Sun colleague Kevin Simpson to talk about the new water strategy.    You can read more from Michael Booth about this complex strategy for a sustainable water supply in the Colorado Springs suburbs at ColoradoSun.com.   And Before we go, here are a few stories that you should know about today:   In Colorado's effort to get as many people as possible vaccinated against the coronavirus, the state will employ a secret weapon: the family doctor. On Thursday, Gov. Jared Polis announced a new grant program to make it easier for primary care clinics to become vaccine providers. Those clinics, where the majority of Coloradans receive their routine medical care, could be crucial in boosting COVID vaccination rates, as surveys repeatedly show the family doctor to be a trusted source of medical advice.    After more than 100 hours of public testimony over the last two months, the two independent commissions redrawing Colorado's congressional and legislative maps now will be using that feedback to inform the state's new political boundaries. The first version of a new congressional map based on the comments is expected by Sunday but could be released as soon as today.   Like dozens of mayors before him, Steve Kudron smiled and waved at his constituents during Grand Lake's annual Buffalo Days parade. But in a notable departure from the past, Kudron's vehicle sported a sign urging townsfolk to stop his recall, a question that goes to voters Oct. 5. Kudron's controversy highlights the small town's division over the future of the community -- a future that hinges, as it does in many small communities, on how to provide affordable housing for workers and young families. Sun correspondent Vicky Uhland takes a closer look at what's at stake.   Colorado taxpayers can look forward to a break on their income taxes -- and a refund check -- because the state exceeded its cap on government growth and spending under the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights. The income tax rate will drop to 4.5% in 2021, down from 4.55%, and individual taxpayers will get an average sales tax refund payment of $70, with joint filers receiving about $166.   For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. And don't forget to tune in again on Monday. Now, a quick message from our editor.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Europe Calling
Where have all the Pesetas Gone?

Europe Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021


SPAIN must urgently change its rules on how much British pensioners need to earn to live there or its economy will suffer badly, a leading ex-pat said to The Express. Speaking from the Expat Centre in Costa Blanca South, Moira Carmenate said she was “surprised” that Spain hadn't dropped its requirement for pensioners to prove an annual earning of more than £21,000 (€24,697). Spain is a second home to many criminal groups, in particular the Italian mafia. The recent arrests of two mafia bosses highlight this trend. At the beginning of August, Domenico Paviglianiti, a high-ranking member of the ‘Ndrangheta mafia group, was arrested in Madrid, where he had been hiding after being wrongly released from prison in Italy. Forgotten, lost or collected: Spaniards hang on to peseta coins and banknotes worth €1.6 billion The deadline to exchange the former currency for euros has now passed, but unlike in countries such as France or Portugal, a surprisingly large amount has not been returned.

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast
Man City v Arsenal | C.O.T.C. with @FPLPringle & @ThreeFiveWho | Planet #FPL

Planet FPL - The Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 51:08


James is joined by Manchester City fan Jonny Pringle and Arsenal fan Adam Pritchard to discuss their clubs ahead of Saturday's Gameweek 3 meeting between their clubs at The Etihad. Recorded on Wednesday there's discussion on whether Harry Kane or Cristiano Ronaldo would be more suitable for City and what it would mean to City not to sign a forward before the window shuts - and then while recording was in progress Harry Kane sent a tweet! Could Pierre Emerick Aubameyang solve City's striking issues? What has Jonny made of Jack Grealish and City so far? Could Aymeric Laporte regain a regular starting place in the side? As ever rotation issues for FPL are discussed, but should it generally remain a watching brief on The Champions until Gameweek 7? While at Arsenal it's been a dismal start with pressure already mounting on Mikel Arteta and Adam shares his thoughts on The Spaniards future, but following the trip to City there's a very attractive fixture run for The Gunners and FPL assets shouldn't neccessarily be dismissed just yet... Follow Jonny on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FPLPringle Follow Adam on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ThreeFiveWho Join our Planet FPL mini league, the winner will be invited on to a Planet FPL Podcast next summer! The code is d7mmxw or you can auto join at the link below https://fantasy.premierleague.com/leagues/auto-join/d7mmxw Coming Up on Friday on Planet FPL - Ask James, streaming live on YouTube at 3pm (UK) with an audio version to follow shortly afterwards ____________________________________________ Want to become a member of our FPL community? Join us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/planetfpl Follow James on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlanetFPLPod Follow Suj on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sujanshah Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/planetfpl Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/planetfpl Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8043oOKTB4uP8Nq15Kz6bg

15-Minute History
What If? | The Immolation of Hernán Cortés

15-Minute History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 9:06


"Cortés and his men leapt across the breach in the causeway to pursue the fleeing Aztecs, only to see them turn and attack. Drawn into the trap, Cortés and sixty-eight other Spaniards were captured and dragged off, leaving scores of others dead on the road. Ten captives were killed immediately, and…the remaining fifty-eight were taken to the towering Great Temple, which could plainly be seen from the Spaniards' camp, made to dance before the statue of the Aztec god of war, Huitzilopochtli, and then, on by one, they were sacrificed…Cortés escaped this fate only through the intervention of Cristóbal de Olea, who sprang to his defense, killed the four Aztecs who were dragging him off, and freed his leader at the cost of his own life. The very conquest of Mexico hung on this single act." — Ross Hassig, "The Immolation of Hernán Cortés    What if Cortés had died on the causeway or at any other point in his dangerous career? Join us as we continue asking "What if", speak to what might have happened if the conquistador had met his end at the hands of those he sought to conquer, and how our world might be different today. 

Center of Attention
Far End of the Bench Episode 52

Center of Attention

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 121:32


Benchwarmers! It is time for another week on the bench and we have packed this episode for that occasion! This week Niko and Jimmy kick it off with some #Olympic games recap of the Track and Field stars and we claim the pool for #USASwimming after the clinic that was put on over the last week or so. Then of course we had to talk about the basketball tournament after the Americans survived their quarterfinal game against the Spaniards. Then the normal #NBAFreeAgency and NFL training camp news before getting into our segments! This week for How It Could Have Sounded we look at the Villanova 2016 championship and Fact Or Cap takes a turn towards Formula 1. All told you are gonna love this episode! Remember that coming up this Friday we will be releasing our interview with 3rd round NFL Draft pick and Steelers center Kendrick Green, premiering on the Unhinged Sports Network from 2-4pm Eastern! This is our first active player and it's great insight into what got Kendrick all the way to this point! https://unhingedsn.airtime.pro/# You can listen to new episodes of this podcast first every Wednesday from 1-3pm Eastern on the Unhinged Sports Network, with the on demand becoming available right after the premiere is over. Also remember to follow the podcast on social media @FeOTBpod, and follow on your favorite #podcasting app as well so you never miss an episode! We are excited to announce our partnership with Swift Lifestyles Nutrition company! Find the best in nootropics and concentration help by going to https://www.swiftlifestyles.com/ and use promo code "Benchwarmer" at checkout for 15% off your order while helping support the podcast! Link can also be found in our linktree on our social medias @FeOTBpod! #podcast #sports #steelers #Olympics #FactOrCap #Conspiracy #NFL #NBA #MLB #NHL --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/far-end-of-the-bench/support

LOL ADULTHOOD
The history of cannibalism around the world - Part 1

LOL ADULTHOOD

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 45:54


As a normal person living in the 21st century, you probably would say cannibalism is totally not okay.... but as a normal person roughly 800,000 years ago, you would argue otherwise. Back then you would say, human flesh had nutrients to cure any wound, ailment, or disease. It was the miracle meat that many across the world found unexpectedly nourishing.Tune in this week to learn about the history of cannibalism around the world. Also, if you are interested in combat sports, give Gabe's podcast, The Game of Death a listen.Have an idea for our next discussion? DM us on Instagram @loladulthood and make sure to check our website at https://www.astoldbyreem.com/ for more fun updates and posts.ALSO, help us grow our podcast! We'd love to dedicate more time in creating content for you, but due to the chaos that is adulting, it is rather difficult.  If you would like to support us on our podcast journey, make sure to share, subscribe and check out the link down below. Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/LOLADULTHOOD )

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: Colorado breweries struggle with aluminum can shortage; General Juan de Ulibarri reaches Prowers

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 9:20


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Thursday July 29th.   Today - The pandemic and stay-at-home orders led to new consumption habits. Many people began drinking more beer, seltzer, and other canned drinks - and those habits have persisted. But now, it's led to a shortage of aluminum cans and lids.   We'd also like to take a moment to thank our sponsors at SunShare. SunShare is building a new community solar garden and YOU can participate! Your community solar subscription adds solar to the energy mix, and your utility buys that energy directly from you! So join the thousands of other Coloradans who share your commitment to clean energy. Space is limited and filling quickly, so make sure to visit us at mysunshare.com   But before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today, we take you back to July 29th, 1706 when a party of 140 Spaniards, Puebloans and Apaches under General Juan de Ulibarri reached the south bank of the Arkansas River in present-day Prowers. They had trekked for 2 and a half weeks from Santa Fe. Ulibarri praised the area as the best and broadest valley. The expedition proved a success in strengthening the ties between the Spanish, Puebloans, and Apaches.   Now, our feature story.   The coronavirus pandemic and mandatory stay-at-home orders created a lot of new consumption habits and economic forces that have persisted in 2021. That's certainly the case with the canning industry, as high consumption of beverages like beer and seltzer have driven a shortage of aluminum cans and jar lids that a lot of Colorado businesses rely on to get their products to consumers. Colorado Sun reporter Jen Brown talks to reporter Shannon Najmabadi about what's behind shortages dogging Colorado breweries, home jam operations and other businesses.   To read Shannon's story, go to coloradosun.com.   And Before we go, here are a few stories that you should know about today:   Momentum to mandate health care workers get vaccinated against COVID-19 is growing across the country and in Colorado. On Wednesday, two more major health systems announced that they will require their employees to be vaccinated against coronavirus by the fall. UCHealth will require staff to be fully vaccinated by October First. And Denver Health gave its workers a November First deadline. The announcements came after Banner Health said workers at its four Colorado hospitals must get the vaccine.    A parks employee for the city of Arvada has died after the riding lawnmower he was on tipped into a lake. Joe Herrin was a parks maintenance worker who had been with the city since 2018. He was using the mower near the edge of Birdland Lake at Jack B. Tomlinson Park on July 22 when the accident occurred. He died of his injuries yesterday.    Douglas, El Paso, Mesa and Moffat counties are among those in which the CDC is recommending people resume wearing masks indoors in public places. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now urging people living in communities with high COVID-19 transmission rates to start wearing masks again when indoors. A long list of Colorado counties have high-transmission rates. The CDC said the recommendation applies whether or not people are vaccinated.    Adams County is the first in Colorado to revise its policies on oil and gas since new statewide regulations took effect in January. Commissioners in Adams County adopted new rules during a public hearing this week. The regulations increase setback distances for new drilling to two thousand feet from homes, schools, daycares and parks.    For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. And don't forget to tune in again tomorrow for a special holiday episode. Now, a quick message from our editor.   The Colorado Sun is non-partisan and completely independent. We're always dedicated to telling the in-depth stories we need today more than ever. And The Sun is supported by readers and listeners like you.   Right now, you can head to ColoradoSun.com and become a member. Starting at $5 per month for a basic membership and if you bump it up to $20 per month, you'll get access to our exclusive politics and outdoors newsletters. Thanks for starting your morning with us and don't forget to tune in again tomorrow. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kennedy Molloy Catchup - Triple M Network

Ross Noble, 72% of Spaniards prefer onion on their omelette, Nerd Alert! World News, Break Ups Gone Wrong & Kitty Flanagan. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, July 17, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 394All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Francis SolanoFrancis came from a leading family in Andalusia, Spain. Perhaps it was his popularity as a student that enabled Francis in his teens to stop two duelists. He entered the Friars Minor in 1570, and after ordination enthusiastically sacrificed himself for others. His care for the sick during an epidemic drew so much admiration that he became embarrassed and asked to be sent to the African missions. Instead he was sent to South America in 1589. While working in what is now Argentina, Bolivia, and Paraguay, Francis quickly learned the local languages and was well received by the indigenous peoples. His visits to the sick often included playing a song on his violin. Around 1601, he was called to Lima, Peru, where he tried to recall the Spanish colonists to their baptismal integrity. Francis also worked to defend the indigenous peoples from oppression. He died in Lima in 1610 and was canonized in 1726. His liturgical feast is celebrated on July 14. Reflection Francis Solano knew from experience that the lives of Christians sometimes greatly hinder the spread of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Francis lived an exemplary life himself, and urged his fellow Spaniards to make their lives worthy of their baptisms. Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Change the Story / Change the World
Episode 28: Normando Ismay - A Loving Trickster

Change the Story / Change the World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 39:49


Normando Ismay – A Loving Trickster Normando Ismay was born in the city of All the Saints of the New Rioja in northwest Argentina. As a young adult, he came to the United States, settling in Atlanta to pursue a career as a visual artist. Since then, he has worked in a variety of media including metal, painting, sculpture and installation art. He built a barn-like structure in his backyard and began the operation of the Little Beirut Art Space, a gallery/performance venue for visual art exhibits, poetry readings, storytelling, film, music and dance. At this time, he also began an integration of visual and performing art, combining Andean flutes, drums and stories of magical realism into large- and small-scale performances and performance installations. Normando creates work in Spanish, English and in a bilingual blending. Some of his works include “The Last Inca”, about Pedro de Bohorquez who passes as an Inca and controls northwest Argentina; “Contralabias”, about a North American smuggler, the invention of lipstick and the birth of Argentina.   Normando's large-scale performance installations accommodate other performing artists and combine paintings, signage, sculptures, video projections, masks, seating, lighting and a stage. Café Bizzoso, Café Cultural de Chamblee, The Condor's Next Hotel, Bannaland, The Mattress Factory Lounge and Dumpsite, to name a few.  Normando's work has been presented throughout Atlanta and the southeast, as well as in New York, Argentina and Europe. The New York Times, High Performance, the Atlanta Constitution, Art Papers, Mundo Hispanico, and other publications have written about his work. He has received grants from the City of Atlanta Bureau of Cultural Affairs, Fulton County Arts Council, Georgia Council for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1991 he received the Paul Robeson award in Cultural Democracy. Threshold Questions and Delicious Quotes What is Cafe Bezzoso? Well, https://www.normando.biz/slideshow (Cafe Bizzoso), it was a traveling performance space, an art installation specific to the site where I was creating it. Bizzoso came out of a proposal that I made to the Arts Festival of Atlanta. They had invited me to perform in this huge stage. … And it's like me and my solo storytelling act and my public is like twenty feet away from me like no intimacy possible because of that. So, I made him a proposal to build a small performance venue for storyteller's poets. and like that, and they liked the ideaWas the Crack Attack an art exhibition? And then two or three nights after that, Steve Seaberg hanging with me, and he was like uh, "We have to do something." You know, and we started making art about it. And we started filling up the lot and between my house and the crack house with art. And we kept working empty lot, and we'd turn it into a, do an art show. We called it the https://creativeloafing.com/content-179895-mondo-bizzoso (Crack Attack Show).Who was the Last Inca? Oh it's, it's, an amazing story straight out of history. And The Last Inca is the story of a Spanish soldier who ends up in Peru and he gets in trouble with the Viceroy and they banish him and to, send to a fort https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copiap%C3%B3 (Copiapo) in Chile, that they know, is about to fall to the indigenous people from there. And this young man goes there, and he builds a cannon out of wood. That was only good for like a couple of explosions. And then the Canon fell apart, but it wasn't enough to signal to the https://www.interpatagonia.com/mapuche/index_i.html (Araucanos) that the Spaniards now had a cannon and they decided to leave. (And that just the beginning)Transcript BC: [00:00:00] Hello, Normando are you there? Normando ismay, could be described as having a transcendent spirit. Hello Normando,. Let's see. I think you're there somewhere. Oops. Not there. A painter. A poet. A pirate. A conjurer of stories.... Support this podcast

The Corner Flag
133: EUROS Quarter Finals: Oscar Winning Italians

The Corner Flag

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 51:51


And then there were four! The quarters are done and dusted and Switzerland came oh so close to killing another giant. Massive effort to hold the Spaniards to 1-1 all through ET, but a disastrous penalty shootout both ways decided the tie in Spains favour. Shaqiri and Xhaka can be happy about their tournament though, and both should be commanding a pretty hefty fee in the summer transfer window. The Italians held their resolve and brushed aside Belgium's 'golden generation'. Does Roberto Martinez deserve to stay in the job before the world cup, or should the Belgians make some drastic changes leading up to next year's showpiece event? One thing's for sure, the other Roberto has figured out how to manage a game well, and how to get his players deliver award winning acting performances. Denmark powered through as well, with Joakim Maehle showing us what a perfect cross looks like (Till it was Luke Shaw's time to shine). The 10 million Euro Atalanta man is also going to have a lot of suitors!  And finally, England steamrolled through Ukraine, scoring four goals and yet again, conceding none. We saw a Luke Shaw masterclass, Slabhead got on the scoresheet as well, and Harry Kane took one long lookg at his doubters and told them to sod off.  Plus, we debut a new segment which is an evolution of a slightly older segment, called "In Other News!" We're going to have some fun with this one. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter @cornerflagpod Visit us on www.thecornerflag.in Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts from and don't forget to give us a 5 star review!

This Day in History Class
Moctezuma II died / Globe Theatre burned down - June 29

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 13:10


On this day in 1520, Aztec emperor Moctezuma died, either at the hands of Spaniards or Aztecs unhappy with his rule. / On this day in 1613, the Globe Theatre in London, famous for hosting performances of Shakespeare's plays, was destroyed in a fire. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Football Digest
Date with destiny set for England, Paul Pogba shining away from Old Trafford & Dubravka howler

Football Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 28:11


Guy Clarke is joined by Mirror sports writer Neil McLeman and Newcastle Chronicle's Newcastle United writer Sean McCormick following the end of the group stage.The panel discuss England's last 16 tie with Germany following the Germans' 2-2 draw with Hungary to secure second place in Group F.Group F winners France are also discussed after their draw with Portugal with Paul Pogba shining once again for Didier Deschamps' side as Karim Benzema scored twice.Plus, Group E's final day is analysed with Newcastle goalkeeper Martin Dubravka scoring a calamitous own goal en-route to the Spaniards winning 5-0 in Seville.

The Berean Manifesto
S3EP33 - Just Hanging Out

The Berean Manifesto

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 68:27


Pastor Newms: [0:00] Intro video. Pastor Bill: [0:04] Yay. Pastor Newms: [0:06] Intro video. How was the level of the intro video did it need to come down at all? Was it good? Pastor Bill: [0:14] It was good no they were just right yeah.   Pastor Newms: alright good good.   Pastor Bill: That you could hear the you could hear that well I don't know I thought maybe the music was a little low, maybe could have turned the music up a little bit but the volume of the of the talking was. Pastor Newms: [0:32] Well yeah it's the same volume as normal.   Pastor Bill What was the number of this episode?   Pastor Newms: I don't remember I've lost track it. Pastor Bill: [0:58] I'll go look at the titles. Pastor Newms: [1:02] I turn this computer on when I texted you earlier so. Um, I ain't got nothing going nothing. I haven't created the folder for today nice why did you type that okay. Pastor Bill: [1:23] Mirand on Facebook beat me to it. It's in some of the season and episode number. Hey Biggs, Biggs on Twitch we're doing a thing we're we yeah we talked during the five minute countdown now so you should be able to hear us it was my chatter we're going to chat. Pastor Newms: [1:51] I'll give you some chatter cheddar sea. Pastor Bill: [1:57] Yeah HPuffPhoenix says. Pastor Newms: [2:02] Are we staying up super late tonight and watching things or are you going to be are you going to be watching. Pastor Bill: [2:10] It's Father's Day. Pastor Newms: [2:11] Or are you going to be watching things with your wife. Pastor Bill: [2:14] I'm probably going to be spending time with my wife since it's father's day. Pastor Newms: [2:25] But it's the first episode of season 5 aha. Haha yeah we all came home and crashed like hardcore. There's a come with your deep theological questions Bring It On. [2:51] Push down with the beds been calling she has already been in the bed that was calling her name she slept on the way down here mmm mmm. Pastor Bill: [3:03] Okay so like I was saying before we started the countdown this game terragenesis game. My temperature is still too hot I'm trying to get my temperature down to terraforming the Moon, and that's creating more water or but I still need to get my temperature down more but then I've got too much water just crazy and then, the game got complicated it was supposed to be a I can just leave it running while I go do other stuff but then all of the little plants that I created on the planet all died off every time I walked away, so I gotta pause the game when I walk away now or the whole planet dies. Pastor Newms: [3:47] Hello the best 13:17 appears to be one of my cousins. Pastor Bill: [3:55] The best 1317 like Macallan 1317. [4:03] McCallum it's the it's a scotch. [4:20] I collect useless details in my brain. Pastor Newms: [4:22] Forty seconds by the way. Pastor Bill: [4:25] 40 second buffer.   Pastor Newms: No, we're not doing that.   Pastor Bill: [4:54] Um maybe it's your cousin Matt do you have a cousin Matt? Pastor Newms: [5:00] Have to cousin mats oh yeah that's my cousin Matt Okay there I push the right button. Pastor Bill: [5:12] Hello and welcome to season 3 episode 33 of The Berean Manifesto. Tonight we are hanging out, we're answering questions we are getting into deep theological discussions Maybe. Pastor Newms: [5:28] About book. Pastor Bill: [5:30] If that happens that comes up it may not, um it's Father's Day Newms is a father I'm a father we're kind of taking it easy Newms had a family reunion this week and I, set up my lovely workspace with my new desk and my new shelves that my wife got me for my Father's Day present and I redid my rug so it's not all you know hanging loose. Pastor Newms: [5:53] And you hung the free hugs where everyone can actually see him that's the T-shirt he wears. Pastor Bill: [5:58] And I hug my. Pastor Newms: [5:59] When we do ministry. Pastor Bill: [6:00] Sure yeah this is a t-shirt we've been wearing we do ministry we're going to design a new one for the next the next Pride that we actually have, um because that's two prior as in a row that they canceled, and so yeah this is a shirt I cut up my shirt and mounted it on a canvas and hung it and then I don't know if you can see this. This is our determination letter from the IRS, that makes our church a church in the eyes of the government. Pastor Newms: [6:32] Yeah it was fun the family reunions was real good, it's enjoyable soft family some we like some we don't like families family who knows, it was very interesting some of the conversations I had oh excuse me, I don't know is the Dallas Pride canceled Biggs is asking. Pastor Bill: [6:57] Dallas pride is cancelled what they're doing instead is you're just having a concert, One concert where everyone will be social distancing and wearing masks and that's all they're doing. There's no vendors there's no you know any opportunity for any of that and then hopefully next year we'll be able to have a face to face Pride event where we can go out and spread the love of God and let people know that we love them. Pastor Newms: [7:38] Unless you come to Nashville in September. Pastor Bill: [7:43] Is Nashville having their Pride in September? Well I mean you didn't send me any information so we wouldn't have a booth but. Pastor Newms: [7:53] We could still go. Pastor Bill: [7:54] You could you can send me information and we can get a booth probably still. Pastor Newms: [7:59] I'm not sure how we would work a booth because we can't you have to bring everything and that be really complicated. Pastor Bill: [8:06] Well I'm sure you have an Academy there and we can just go get a 10 by 10 foot you know there's like a hundred bucks for one of those so. Pastor Newms: [8:17] H puff Phoenix will be sending you all the pride. Pastor Bill: [8:21] HPuffPhoenix is going to send me the. Pastor Newms: [8:23] Because whether you come or not I'm going so, it's really either way you really should probably send me some cards I'm gonna need some of those either way, I'm going. Pastor Bill: [8:45] It wouldn't be a bad idea I mean that's one of the things that's in you know my heart and it's in the heart of this ministry to reach out and it started with um the Holy Spirit really bring to my attention to the suicide numbers for that demographic and it really just kind of blossomed from there my earlier in life I was I was I was I was homophobic for sure. Pastor Newms: [9:23] Uh-huh. Pastor Bill: [9:25] Didn't want to be in Ministry to that community that that demographic didn't have anything to do with it. Pastor Newms: [9:32] Several demographics actually but that one also. Pastor Bill: [9:36] And then as time got has gone by the Lord's worked on my heart and and you know and I've gone through this transformation in knowing you know that the Lord wants me to be doing Ministry in this area and so that's what we've done. We've reached out and we've made ourselves available and gone to Pride twice in Dallas and done Ministry because I mean we walk what we talked and we preach love and so we love. Pastor Newms: [10:11] Some of us better than others. Pastor Bill: [10:15] Does it hurt you as much as it does me that people post videos about Christians being anti LGBT or sermons where they preach just stupid stuff about being anti LGBT and in the like the number one comment is a no hate like Christian love, does that bug you as much as it bugs me. Pastor Newms: [10:42] Um yes. Pastor Bill: [10:42] Because I'm like that's not that's not love and I and it hurts my heart that you've been hurt by Christians who claim to love it just hurts me so much. Pastor Newms: [10:54] And that's the big thing about it it's not necessarily just the fact of these people are so stupid it's the fact that the commenters have been so hurt we have sadly we've sadly. Pastor Bill: [11:07] That's what hurts me is that they have a right to say that. Pastor Newms: [11:16] I did not see real Christians forgive like Jesus billboard but that's a good one yeah like Heather said. Pastor Bill: [11:24] Phoenix see ya. Pastor Newms: [11:26] Like HPuffPheonix said. Pastor Bill: [11:29] She's had her own experiences in this area lately and so she can relate to that comment and that's what honestly irks me is that is a, completely Justified comment and I'm like I I I want to hug you and I want to let you know that, we're not all like that some of us actually love and aren't hung up on, our own deficiencies too much to see past our theology, to actually love you and to question my theology actually accurately biblical, or have I learned things out of context and need to put them back into Biblical context. Pastor Newms: [12:16] Yeah and that's a big one a big one is so many people and they don't look at the aspect of the Berean lifestyle you know as Paul teaches you know be like the Bereans because they actually, tested what they heard and took it back to the Bible and if it didn't line up with the Bible they say okay that's not right. Pastor Bill: [12:41] Let's be honest he didn't say Bible he said scriptures. Pastor Newms: [12:44] Well yes he said. Pastor Bill: [12:46] Where I want to I don't want to drop in some confusion and anyone that might be listening to this and go wait Paul said Bible also the word bible. Pastor Newms: [12:55] That'd be really weird. Pastor Bill: [12:57] It would be really weird. Pastor Newms: [12:58] Since it didn't exist yet yeah and it's an English word so be really really weird. Pastor Bill: [13:06] It would be really really weird yeah. Pastor Newms: [13:09] No actually we're what is the root of Bible. Pastor Bill: [13:13] It's a biblio of it's a Latin word. Pastor Newms: [13:18] So it's Latin okay. Pastor Bill: [13:20] It's a Latin word that did you literally just means book pretty much but in this case we would we would say the book. [13:33] You looking it up you googling it the etymology of the word bible always agree. Pastor Newms: [13:35] Yeah it's actually it is from it is from Greek meaning the books. Pastor Bill: [13:42] Books plural gotcha. Pastor Newms: [13:45] It had the literal meaning of scroll so. Pastor Bill: [14:01] Bigle did you mean Bible b.i.b.l.e. Pastor Newms: [14:06] Yes that's the book for me I Stand Alone. [14:16] First you're going to tear the pages because they're always leather and you're going to. Pastor Bill: [14:20] Yeah you shouldn't be standing on books that's not good for books. Pastor Newms: [14:23] Now there's something that I always have an issue with I love books, anyone who knows me very well knows I love books I have boxes of books in the house right now because I still haven't built all of the bookshelves necessary to hold everything in this house so. Um so I always struggle with that when people are like, I don't write in my Bible and I'm I always go and not because there's anything it's not like the Bible special you shouldn't write in it that's not the reason it's just like why did you write the book you know I have workbook. Pastor Bill: [15:24] So are sacrificing there. Pastor Newms: [15:27] II have workbooks. Pastor Bill: [15:29] Books. Pastor Newms: [15:30] Yeah I have I have work I have work books that have sheets, of paper in them because certain workbooks I was like this isn't feel like a workbook so I'm not writing in it I've gotten over. Pastor Bill: [15:46] Did you do with the Divine Easter devotional that I made that one year did you not right in that. [15:56] Really okay. Pastor Newms: [15:56] It's on a bookshelf now there are some books I have written in over the years some I don't really have a problem with and I don't really know why, but some just don't feel like they should be written in if the pages don't feel right I won't write in it. Pastor Bill: [16:21] Mmm I definitely write in my Bible I'll write any book I don't care but mainly my Bible I write when in when I read something and I feel like, I've received Holy Spirit and inspiration you know I'll write it in the margin, and then if I come back across that, and I'm like oh I felt like this before if I feel like well that was definitely my ego that was definitely pride those I'm gonna flush whatever I'll mark it out. My spirits still confirms that that's accurate then I'll leave it and that's you know that's one of the things that I do and I mean you can look at my this is a Bible I use most often you can't really you don't really see much because that doesn't happen all the time it happens you know infrequently but it does have. Pastor Newms: [17:18] Yeah I've got notebooks just tons of notebooks. Pastor Bill: [17:22] The one Bible I won't write in, is my copy of the Geneva Bible the 1599 Geneva Bible the version that the pilgrims brought with them on the Mayflower I'll highlight in this Bible, but I don't write in this Bible and I love this translation because it isn't, influenced by the King James and it's translation this was translated before the King James was and the King James translation was written was was, what kicked off The King James translation party as it were was that King James was upset that people were using this Bible, instead of something that he had signed off on, and so that that was the final straw and why he started having his own bible translated, and so I love this translation I don't read from it all the time but I do reference it if I find a discrepancy, between the King James and my CSB and then my going back to the Greek or the Hebrew doesn't Define it well enough for me. [18:47] I'll reference my Geneva to see, you know what am I talking about what am I looking at what was King James the King of King James was the King of England. Pastor Newms: [18:59] Which would the Church of England also makes him the head of the church correct. Pastor Bill: [19:05] Right which is a completely different issue he founded the Church of England before he, started his translation work, because he was upset at the Catholic church for overriding his, his laws and his authority and, and the church was like well we have the authority of God because we're the church and he was like but I have the authority of God because I'm the king and they were like Well church Trump's King and he was like okay, I'll just declare myself the Church of England and me the head of the church and so now I'm the church. Pastor Newms: [19:50] James became king of Scotland in. Pastor Bill: [20:00] You know what maybe was Henry that made the king of the Church of England Biggs said he thought that. Pastor Newms: [20:05] Yeah I think it's Henry that did the. [20:15] James was the King of Scotland from 1567 to 1625 and the King of England England from 1603 to 1625. Pastor Bill: [20:26] Hey I think you're right I think it was Henry I think my brain lumped it into James but that's not right it is Henry but brains are like that memory is like that sometime. Pastor Newms: [20:41] The Church of England was founded in 1534 definitely before. Pastor Bill: [20:46] So definitely not James. It was more than Biggs says because he could not divorce his wife and a lot of historians paint it that way but that was literally only about this much of it that wasn't the whole story. Pastor Newms: [21:03] Henry the 8th in 1534 and of course this says because of his annulment to, so then he. Then pulled it to the Church of England. Pastor Bill: [21:29] Henry took a lot of women's heads, one of his wives he beheaded her because she gave birth to a daughter instead of a son, I'm like, give her another chance bro. Pastor Newms: [21:50] King James started the project in 1604 and the first trip the first published was of course 1611. Pastor Bill: [22:00] And the Geneva Bible was published in 1599. Pastor Newms: [22:04] And it was just the new version would help consolidate political power is what historians believe. Pastor Bill: [22:12] Now granted, the Geneva Bible was not in the language that it is in right now and neither was the King James Bible but both the King James Bible and the Geneva Bible were written in old English and if you want to know what old English looks like because it's really hard to find a copy of the Bible in Old English, go look for a copy of the Canterbury Tales in Old English and that'll give you an idea of what English was like in the time of King James. Pastor Newms: [22:48] I've seen some you know in museums and stuff copies of it and they'll have it open and it's it's to me especially being dyslexic it's unreadable. Pastor Bill: [23:00] It is it is it is unreadable it really is. [23:12] It's pretty close like the word Jesus isn't pronounced Jesus it's EOsus and it's spelled Ioesus, um in English that's English, now we call it Old English because since then we've replaced all the English with the queen's English which is what, modern King James bibles are translated into and what The Geneva Bible is translated into is the queen's English and then from there we got English which does what, British people speak right now which is a slang version of the queen's English and we have American English which is. Pastor Newms: [24:03] It's a language we'll leave it at that. Pastor Bill: [24:04] Melting Pot language it's just a bunch of languages that we pulled everything together and borrowed from to make a whole different version of English. Pastor Newms: [24:14] It's a something is what it is. Pastor Bill: [24:16] But Phoenix says Canterbury Tales gives me British literature Nightmares From culinary, I agree Canterbury Tales in the original language will get anyone nightmares when you hear it spoken especially it is, terrifying Old English is it's terrifying to here, at least for me. Pastor Newms: [24:46] It doesn't it messes with your brain because it's close but not there so it feels like an alien trying to speak your language. Pastor Bill: [24:57] Well it almost feels like Roman and German and English just like imploaded into each other. Pastor Newms: [25:07] I mean that's basically what happened. Pastor Bill: [25:12] That's what happened but it actually sounds like it, when you're when you're speaking American English in your borrowing words from you know Latin and  Spanish and German you don't actively understand that but when you hear Old English, and you know and you know you know enough of these Roman and Germanic and languages and you can actually feel you know. It's this it's crazy it's this mishmash of insanity. Pastor Newms: [25:44] It's a little weird yeah I will. Pastor Bill: [25:48] All right so we may be, not having an official night but we're still going to know do Get To Know The Pastor's so come back we'll get everybody involved not just you and me we get everybody in the check ball two. Pastor Newms: [26:06] I can't go any farther from when I baby sat Liby the cages is still in my office so this is as far as I can escape. Pastor Bill: [26:17] You did. Pastor Newms: [26:18] I can only Escape I didn't think it through and then when I got there I went. Pastor Bill: [26:27] Okay you ready what's the worst job you've ever had. Pastor Newms: [26:36] Can I answer for you. Pastor Bill: [26:43] Um I've got to but yeah go ahead. Pastor Newms: [26:45] Walmart specifically in that little Podunk town that was terrible, where the store manager was completely insane and broke all the rules. Yeah thank you HPuffPhoenix that's a good point Libby is a dog I should clarify that. Pastor Bill: [27:14] We have a cage when we were babysitting. Pastor Newms: [27:18] Thank you H Puff Phoenix. Pastor Bill: [27:22] I didn't even think about it that yeah think about it. Pastor Newms: [27:28] I don't have any people that would be in cages running around I don't want to try to explain since we have young ones here what any of those terms might be I would love I would love for you to have to explain that later though if I used any other terms. Pastor Bill: [27:49] That would be interesting, okay so Biggs asks paid or unpaid job either just any job responsibilities that you have so let me you're right but let me before I say anything further about that, my experience with this employer WalMart was my personal and shouldn't be taken as any reflection of judgment or claims, against the largest employer in the world who can sue my butt off for ages. Pastor Newms: [28:31] No and because. Pastor Bill: [28:32] It should have no reflection on the corporation. Pastor Newms: [28:34] And what's crazy about that I will say is he still talking but we can't hear him sorry we'll give him a second to come back are you back now, you did you left right about here. Pastor Bill: [28:52] Let me make sure I'm not on the Wi-Fi, I'm not. Pastor Newms: [29:00] So for me Walmart wasn't my worst job I loved it was great, and so when you tried to get a job there you were like oh this is going to be good and I'm like that's why I said for a bad store manager because I worked for a store managers that was awesome. Pastor Bill: [29:22] By the time I was coming to the end of my term at Walmart it was so bad, that I literally would walk in the front door and become so nauseated the first thing I would do before I clocked in was go throw up. And then I would go clock in, it was that it was really, really bad, and it wasn't so much the customers the customers, I mean they were just normal customers they have needs yeah they're not the brightest sometimes because they'd be like hey help me find, but yeah like you said having a store manager that did everything wrong I mean he would literally come around the store with his little cart pushing his car man and give us a notes on things that needed to be done. [30:32] And you do the things on your notes and then he follow up after lunch and spend 10 minutes swearing at you. Because you did the thing that he told you to do on your note and now he's saying that's wrong you should never do that, we don't do that here and I'm like. I literally just did what's in your the note that you gave me this morning I can literally word for word what you wrote in your notes, so that was my Walmart experience and then number two for me was once again not reflective on the whole Corporation but McDonald's. [31:18] I worked at McDonald's for 3 days I worked flipping burgers for three days, and by that I mean. [31:30] I'm standing there and they want me to flip burgers that are on a surface that I could Bend like this to get to, and I'm bending down this freezer pull out meat to put on this thing and then push this button and it goes down which is supposed to fully cook them, or at least cook them most of the way and then you're supposed to transfer the heating trays but ours didn't quite work right, so after I push the button and it went down once then I had to flip them literally flip them and press the button again, cook them again and then put them in the trays and ever so often I would have to do it a third time, because you literally they were literally still pink, um like uh not even fully thawed yet pink and hard still after two times of using the, heated press and on the third day when my shift manager came over and wanted to have the conversation about, you know you're a great employee and in 6 months I want to get you into the management training program and you could make up to nine dollars an hour. [32:49] That was the last straw that was my okay my back hurts constantly I'm burned all over my arms from this this thing, you're talking about a future where I can look forward to maxing out at nine dollars an hour I'm done. Pastor Newms: [33:06] So I've been sitting here trying to think. I've had jobs that had bad situations but no bad jobs overall jobs that turned into bad, but I'd probably have to say it was working for the prison software that was probably the worst just. Pastor Bill: [33:46] It wasn't calling Baptist Churches to try to get them to send their kids to an Acquire The Fire. Pastor Newms: [33:54] No I don't think it was because the job wasn't bad the people were just really really rude to someone who believed the same thing they did mostly, so now I don't think that was the job but the, just the actual but that job was bad because of the it started off being a little bit of micromanagement and I was like okay I'm new cool and then after, what was it for years it never changed and so at a certain point it was like okay I'm done, and so I moved to Tennessee um so yeah. Pastor Bill: [34:42] Zadie says but that wasn't a job is she talking about you or she's talking about what I said about your ministry assignment. Pastor Newms: [34:49] What you said because it was yeah she's saying what you said because it was a. Pastor Bill: [34:56] No it was definitely a job. [35:05] All right so Biggs on Twitch says washing big electric cabinets with powerwash spraying acid, that sounds terrifying. Pastor Newms: [35:20] How old were you at that point Biggs? Like would that even be legal at this point the kind of acid wash they used back then because I know it was like the 1500 s. Pastor Bill: [35:34] The fifteen hundreds, Biggs was 18. Pastor Newms: [35:38] Yeah 18 so that was 1392 so I mean it yeah I can see that. Pastor Bill: [35:45] Biggs is not older than the United States of America come on man. Pastor Newms: [35:54] No but some of his family members might be. Pastor Bill: [35:58] Oh You would know you were just spending time with them. Pastor Newms: [36:03] And by the way just in case you're wondering the Matt that is joining us the best, he's in the good part and actually only lives about you know a little ways away from here so it's good cuz, we're going to start a oh he's being mean now. Pastor Bill: [36:32] He is being mean he calling you old. Pastor Newms: [36:34] Cuz that means that is true I was born when he was 20 supposedly but I don't know if vampires when they have children they age in the same way. Pastor Bill: [36:43] Twenty hundred Maybe. Pastor Newms: [36:44] Maybe. So and then HPuffPhoenix said the same thing you said but for a different reason she said McDonald's because of the customers because she wrote wrote, sheep was. Can I try that one again we'll just cut that out and post that we don't do, it'll do any post but post know we're live we're not playing this game. Pastor Bill: [37:30] This is a live man. Pastor Newms: [37:31] Oh yeah I forgot, she worked the drive-thru most of the time so she mm yeah. Pastor Bill: [37:46] Now on the opposite side what about good jobs like what's the best job. Is it really. Pastor Newms: [38:04] For me it is because and here's the reason why all of my jobs have ended really really weirdly, except for Walmart actually Walmart ended because I transitioned out to focus on school, but all of them, ended because I chose to because of the situations except for one and, and that one, is just real, bad situation from beginning to end but I enjoyed the work, so I that one I don't even think I could begin to answer I love the company I am currently working for because what they do is awesome, Heather sorry HPuffPhoenix said in her message where she currently works I can't it's names are hard for me. Pastor Bill: [39:09] Yeah so when I hear when I hear HPuff or read heads pathetic say that and hear you say that I'm like looking for a raise huh. Pastor Newms: [39:19] No my eval already. Pastor Bill: [39:20] Get now is the best job I've ever had. Pastor Newms: [39:23] No my evals already come through and sadly it was really it'll cause, the healthcare has gone through a rough time with covid let's just um when your main when your main basis is elective care surgeries and then, elective care surgeries I'll get cancelled for almost a year. Pastor Bill: [39:47] Yeah. Pastor Newms: [39:48] But no the reason I like to company I currently work for is because they offer a payment program, and our medical system is so messed up we all need payment programs to actually pay for any of our services because none of us can ever afford actual Healthcare. Pastor Bill: [40:08] Yeah. Pastor Newms: [40:09] And it's at zero percent interest the patient doesn't get charged anything extra, the hospital doesn't get charged anything extra and it doesn't go on their anyone's credit score and I haven't been someone who went through bankruptcy because of medical bills, because of that but in Heather loves it because I saw Phoenix loves it because she, she can see Ellen insurance companies all day she's great at her job and it's really funny because she's really sweet, to the to the patients they'll if they get through to her that she should go well I'll head definitely take care of you everything's going to be fine let me put you on a brief hold give me just one moment and then like with like the people at the clinics it's like oh yes we'll definitely let me put you on a brief let me step by step by step but we just need to answer a couple but about that but you know super sweet and then she gets on with these insurance companies that aren't paying for medicine that these people need because they're going through kidney failure you know and it's like, yes but the temperature butter this is dated and then all of a sudden it's like well. [41:31] What you don't understand is and like you don't I don't know what she says ninety-nine percent of the time, because it's that attitude it's real sweet it's real calm it's really everything's fine everything's great and then you just hear from the other just the uptick and you're like insurance company said, and Heather Phoenix is protecting her patients so. Pastor Bill: [42:00] That's funny all right so for me I got to again, um and I'm going to tell you what the name you know the companies are but I'm in a preface this with, it wasn't about the companies for me and it wasn't about what the companies did for me, it was being in positions that challenged me and that kept my focus varied, and gave me the ability to multitask, you know I've got this project and I've got this project and I'm trying to balance the time and make sure it's all working and I've got metrics that I can plug things into and make sure it all balances and so for me, adding all of that to do where I'm not bored and I've got multi things going on so. [43:03] Um being the marketing director there I had to do I had to be cash here add to B marketing director I had to be team lead shift lead all that at the same time, so basically doing all of the running of the restaurant not actually being responsible for running the restaurant that was that was the actual, franchisees job she did a great job her and her husband they ran it great but I was there to do anything that they needed to do while they weren't there I could step in, and do that and so that was really fulfilling for me I really like that despite, how that ended where I was like you know I either need more money and less hours or I'm gonna have to start looking for a different job. [43:58] And that really poisoned the relationship I had with the franchise owner, she didn't take that in the spirit that I was intended she took that as an insult or as a leveraging technique which it really wasn't I was just being honest you know this is what's going on, and I'm going to have to look for a new job and if I find something I'll give you two weeks-notice once I find something and so everything was just weren't real downhill from there, so despite that ending you know and the other job, you know for all the same reasons that I listed was when I went back to work for Teen Mania after I left Gateway, or with separate from Gateway or however you want to say that I went back to work for Teen Mania and while that was a brief. [44:57] Time because that ship was already sinking, um it really you know did all those things multiple fires and had to juggle and you know all that stuff so, that that was that was what it was this for me. [45:28] Where do we go from here. Pastor Newms: [45:31] Well so. How was your week we haven't even done this part yet. Pastor Bill: [45:44] Oh man well I got my desks in. And then realize well I had enough space for the desks I didn't make enough space for me in my chair, so then I had to get a little creative and the way that I put in the desks. Pastor Newms: [46:07] I thought we I thought you measured that first. Pastor Bill: [46:10] I didn't measure me I measured the space and I was like well this gives me space to walk in and out. But I didn't consider the size of my chair and the size of me sitting in the chair and doing this and all of that so. Had to be arranged a little bit but I got to desks so I have a little shit going on and those are working great, and then I got these lovely shelves this week this is my Father's Day present from my wife I went on Amazon and I was like, you know sent her a list I said I like this and I like this and she was like those are only shelves and I was like yeah but they're two different kind of shelves you get to pick which one, so I opened that yesterday and put those up so I could you know put all my stuff on it and you can't see oh so fine. [47:14] Bottom shelf is knickknacks and then the next shelf is a cup few knickknacks and the, religious books that I reference from time to time one of them is the complete collections of Smith Wigglesworth, which I really like The Geneva Bible and the other one I don't really agree with everything that she teaches but it's the complete collections, Maria Woodworth Ettor, I like to reference it sometimes just to get an opposing Viewpoint you know it's not that she's unbiblical in her beliefs it's just that theological we don't always agree, and that's okay that's not a problem for me you know all that does is challenge me too. [48:09] To find you know what I actually believe and why I believe it which is good and then my third shelf, I've got I love this this is a 50th Anniversary Edition TARDIS Doctor Who Tardis that my wife got me used to be a bauble that made noise but um, Finnick made sure that it would never do that anymore and then I've got a couple of Doctor Who books from the time the time lord Victorious series that I still need to read but reading has become an issue for me lately and then I've got A Princess of Mars which is the beginning of Edgar Rice Burroughs Barsoom series, and then I've got At The Earths Core which is the beginning of Edgar Rice Burroughs. [49:03] Pelucidar series and then I've got the ever life shattering Lungbarrow, which is the Doctor Who book that came out in the 80s that redefined the canon of Doctor Who and forever shaped, Doctor Who lore and everything has built upon that since then even the new twists that they've released in Doctor Who in these recent seasons have been inspired by this novel, last I checked there were only a few copies of that left and the cheapest you could get one for was a hundred and seven dollars. Pastor Newms: [50:10] Doo doo doo doo doo doo doo ba he searches. Pastor Bill: [50:13] Cheapest you can get it in paperback right now is 200 dollars. Pastor Newms: [50:18] Nice. Pastor Bill: [50:21] So that that up there on top of my shelf and when I asked for it was one of those shoot for the moon you know quests and then my mom found one for like 20 bucks, and got it for me and I was like I didn't expect that to ever okay awesome. That will shoot for the my prayer request I had no idea. Pastor Newms: [50:55] I think you even cried a little. [51:02] I mean not to front you but I'm pretty sure you did so. Pastor Bill: [51:11] Definitely been a grams my mama she she's something else so. I'll show you the book as it looks like this. All right so that's what happened this week with me a lot of, labor and then I had to go through my filing cabinet and get rid of everything that I had you know. I have hoarder tendencies, so I went through my filing cabinet and threw away a 13 gallon trash bag worth of stuff from my filing cabinet and it's just a three drawer cabinet it's literally sitting underneath this desk right here and is only like 14 inches wide but it was stuffed to the brim with things and, is not important. Pastor Newms: [52:23] You have to you have to purge every now and then it is very important I learned that at a certain point in life and I don't like it, at all not even a little and I'm really really really really really really bad at it but my loving wife Zadie is much, better at it than I am and. Pastor Bill: [53:05] And what would they audit, I don't I don't have enough money to spend enough money to make an audit last more than a few minutes I don't even know what they would be auditing I'd be like, here you go here's all my bank statements for the year yes it's only 24 pages that is all the bank statements for the whole year, here you go. Pastor Newms: [53:32] It is true. Pastor Bill: [53:38] You just throw it all away well everything's digital now I mean you throw away receipts are all digital. Stores are like would you like a receipt and I'm like yeah I'm pretty sure my bank statements just going to tell me what you charged me so. Unless I'm buying it from some place I said I think I might need to return this at some point. Then I don't need your piece of tree you can just say that. Pastor Newms: [54:11] I like the email option and then it goes to my email and then I don't look at it ever and forget to clean that email out. Pastor Bill: [54:21] It bugs me when I go to Sam's and all I buy is like what's the word, consumables all I buy is consumables so it's not something I'm going to bring back and you get to the cash register and they're like would you like a printed receipt, or would you like it printed and emailed so either way I'm gonna have to take a receipt. Pastor Newms: [54:46] Well would you like me to tell you why. Pastor Bill: [54:50] I would like to explain yeah so many of these explain to me why they scan the receipt and a couple of your items at the door. Pastor Newms: [54:57] Oh no that that that's just for are you walking out with something, verification that's what I'm talking about I'm talking about the actual reason for certain receipting and how the receipting is done so the government actually dictates how receipts have to look and in what ways you can share them and depending on what you can buy, depends on how the receipt has to look so like places that sell, gift cards and things like that their receipts have to have specific language on them depending on the state and federal government and so because of that it's, certain states require a printed receipt so some companies just print the receipt every time because it's cheaper than trying to figure out are you a consumer from that state it's not a requirement based on where you're at it's a requirement based on where you are a current resident and so because of that it's very interesting. Pastor Bill: [56:10] Biggs is like or now. Pastor Newms: [56:13] You can thank two states for that but I'm not going to name them because they're mean. [56:22] And you can thank money launderers. Pastor Bill: [56:26] Juneteenth is a Federal holiday now. Pastor Newms: [56:30] Oh really. Pastor Bill: [56:32] Yeah it's Friday they voted on Thursday they officially voted to make Juneteenth a Federal holiday and then this year it was observed on Friday, you know celebrated Saturday, and so all federal buildings were closed on Friday all businesses that observe federal holidays were supposed to be closed on Friday, um and I thought you know I never want to be the white savior guy that's not who I am I'm an ally I'm a friend I will back you up you call the play, and I'll be there you know you say black lives matter and we need representation I'm the guy that goes you tell me what my responsibility is to back you up there I'm not the guy going around going, you know you're not representing them correctly that's not me I'm the Ally I meant you know you tell me what I'm supposed to be doing to back you up I'm there and I thought this was a good thing I thought you know finally the federal government is represent you know is Right is recognizing Juneteenth and if you don't know what Juneteenth is, it is the day that. [57:52] The slave owners in Texas officially received word, two years after the freeing of the slaves, um that, slavery was now illegal in the United States of America and had to let their slaves free and I said had to because that's actually how it went down, they were not willingly setting them free in Texas there were other states that, willingly Texas that was not a thing Texas they had to be forced so Juneteenth is this, this Landmark beginning of this march to equality some people say it's you know two years earlier when it started, saying you need to set all your slaves free is it isn't really the actual start it's the point, all of that is actually enforced is the word starts so to me Juneteenth is the beginning of that march to equality, but I've seen a lot of videos on Tic-Tok where like I said I'm an ally you tell me where to go and I've seen a lot of videos where a lot of people in the. What am I supposed to say now is it black or African-American or. Pastor Newms: [59:17] Just say community in that community. Pastor Bill: [59:20] Okay that Community are. Pastor Newms: [59:24] I'm not I'm not sure until I don't want to say it wrong let me let me be clear on why it's really depends on preference of the person you're talking. Pastor Bill: [59:30] Due respect, to who it's do we respectful they feel like it's pandering I've seen a lot of videos where they feel like this is just pandering and I get that I see their point of view, and if that's what we you know if that's the overwhelming consensus like I said I'm an ally I'll back you up, but I saw it as a recognition of the beginning of the March toward equality and so I was happy for it, so if somebody wants to email me if you're hearing that saying this somebody wants to email me and tell me how to support it and how to follow through or if I should just ignore it because like with the black history month thing for years I felt like that was pandering, I felt like. Pastor Newms: [1:00:22] Well there are some people go. Pastor Bill: [1:00:26] I felt like we need holidays all year long that celebrate Breck black history not cram everything into one month and go well this is everything that but you know it needs to be spread out over all year long all year long, we need to give recognition to the Pioneers that, made this country what it is that aren't white we should be doing that all year long it shouldn't be one month and then you know I shared a video on Tic-Tok of an interview that Morgan Freeman where he said the exact same thing and I was like that's how I felt about this for years. Pastor Newms: [1:01:07] Yeah. Pastor Bill: [1:01:09] And I'm an ally I'm not the white savior I'm not the. Pastor Newms: [1:01:12] We're not trying to do that you know. Pastor Bill: [1:01:13] I'm not going out there and trying to fix the world's ills for everybody else, and so when he said that I was like hey I can share that because I agree with that and now you know someone in this community is actually saying it so it's, the 19th is Biggs asks because the 18th the date for Juneteenth the 19th is but when federal holidays fall on a Saturday they are observed on a Friday when they fall on a Sunday they are observed on a Monday. Pastor Newms: [1:01:48] When I first heard about Juneteenth it made me sick, the fact that we did you know that and I say we I don't mean we as white people I don't mean we as you know Texas that I'm no longer. Pastor Bill: [1:02:08] Proud Texan I was ashamed. Pastor Newms: [1:02:11] I say we as Americans we as humans continued to do that always just makes me sick. Pastor Bill: [1:02:21] It makes me sick that we had slaves as Americans at all like the whole Spirit of founding America was freedom and then we literally did the opposite we won't we should have done, when the when the Spanish ship showed up full of slaves, we should have bought them and made them Freemen all in one motion,we should have bought them and sent the Spaniards away and said go get us you know, go buy more people that have already been put into slavery bring them back we'll buy them from you and will make them citizens that's what we should have done. Pastor Newms: [1:03:09] I will actually take it a step further because you're a nicer person than I am I wouldn't do it that way I would buy them all get them off the boat and then magically that boat would disappear. Pastor Bill: [1:03:21] But that doesn't help with everyone in Spain that's already in slavery. Pastor Newms: [1:03:27] I know the prop yeah and yeah there's a lot of there's a lot of gray area in in that whole situation. Pastor Bill: [1:03:38] The Spaniards were going to Africa, the African tribes were stealing people from other tribes and then selling them to the Spaniards, then the Spaniards were going back to Spain and putting them into the slave trade and then the people that were Commerce minded, we're buying up a bunch of slaves and then bringing them over to the colonies you know and selling them to the Americans. Pastor Newms: [1:04:10] It's just it's messed up how the whole situation human beings are terrible we live in a fallen world and human beings do terrible things other human beings every day and it's absolutely disgusting. Pastor Bill: [1:04:25] It is. Pastor Newms: [1:04:29] And I say that not as someone who's like (disingenuous) it's disgusting I can't believe anyone would ever do that because there was a time in my life where I did some pretty terrible things and so it's one of those things where it's like I feel, terrible for the terrible things I've done I was a bully at one point I was bullied I was you know I've been through lots of the different parts of the cycle, all terrible because we are terrible to each other for some, crazy reason that I've never fully understood. Pastor Bill: [1:05:05] And every year when we celebrate July 4th, and inevitably there's someone from that community that has issue with celebrating Freedom when as that freedom happened there were slaves. In this country that weren't set free at the same time I feel like that's valid and also not valid. Like yeah not everybody was free that's a problem and it was six, and it shouldn't have been taken time to fix it, it should have been fixed right away but I want us all out to celebrate that now we're free. Now but that's my personal feeling. Pastor Newms: [1:06:10] Well I mean we could definitely get into the wage slavery conversation but we will today because we're already. Pastor Bill: [1:06:19] Okay but that's not that's not. Pastor Newms: [1:06:20] I said we're not. Pastor Bill: [1:06:24] Whole class of people and injuring a whole other class of people a race of people rather. Pastor Newms: [1:06:32] Race I will agree with classes exactly what's going on. Pastor Bill: [1:06:36] Because exactly that's not a whole race of people and injuring a whole another race of people there are still problems. Pastor Newms: [1:06:41] Yes it is classism yes there are still problems. Pastor Bill: [1:06:46] I'm not going to argue against that there are still problems. [1:06:58] I'm an ally not a savior so alright so we're out of time for this episode for this night, so unless you have anything else you want to add or in clay in unless anyone else has anything they want to contribute on chat we'll go ahead and wrap this up, I cut my hand at some point this week just ever so slightly and I keep doing things that just like barely touch it and it makes it hurt. Yeah I don't know how I cut it. All right so now we're going to do the 30 second buffer because some of our streaming services require it before we hit the button otherwise it'll cut off what we're saying now so, I'll sing a little song, 30 second buffer 30 second buffer 30 second buffer has it been 30 seconds yet of course not that's not how time works 30 second buffer 30 second buffer 30 second buffer, that's enough singing now we love you guys have a great week you say your thing now Newms. Pastor Newms: [1:08:14] You guys be safe please love you guys. Pastor Bill: [1:08:17] And until next time.

Second Decade
55: Smuttynose Island

Second Decade

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 47:40


Nine small islands, called the Isles of Shoals, lie off the coast just over the line between New Hampshire and Maine. One of them, Smuttynose Island, has a mysterious past. Traditional stories going back to the early 19th century, amplified by poetry, folklore and modern tour-guide apocrypha, speak of a Spanish ship called the Sagunto having been wrecked on the shore of Smuttynose Island in January 1813 and fourteen (in some accounts fifteen) of its crew buried on the island by the patriarch who once ruled it. The story of the “Graves of Spanish Sailors” has made it from town records and court documents, through Victorian-era poetry, the mid-20th century tall tales of Edward Rowe Snow, all the way to Google Maps and modern tourist websites. Whether there really are Spanish sailors buried on Smuttynose Island is surprisingly difficult to determine. In this episode, Dr. Sean Munger again takes on salty New England tall tales, which have surfaced before on this show, to reach a reasonable conclusion about whether there really are 14 Spaniards buried on Smuttynose Island. In addition to former “flying Santa” and coastal historian Edward Rowe Snow, who we tangled with back in Episode 9, you'll meet the two confusingly-named proprietors of Smuttynose Island during the Second Decade, a histrionic poet who immortalized the story for the benefit of disaster tourists, a Boston abolitionist and doctor whose 1858 “X marks the spot” survey missed a crucial fact about the island's geography, and the intrepid modern-day archaeologist who set out to science her way to solving the mystery. This is a lighter-hearted episode of Second Decade with some surprising twists. Note: after this episode, Second Decade will be on hiatus until September 2021. History Classes Online at Sean's Website Sean's Patreon Make a PayPal Donation Sean's Book: "The Warmest Tide: How Climate Change is Changing History" Additional Materials About This Episode Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tech Deciphered
# 22 – The (no BS) truth about Silicon Valley – Part 1 – Start of Season 2

Tech Deciphered

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 47:37


In episode 22, we begin the second season of Tech Deciphered, by deep diving into what Silicon Valley is, what made us (and others) move here, its unabridged mythology and whether there is really an exodus (or not) going on. This episode is the beginning of a trilogy that is an ode to our love and hate relationship with the region. Navigation: Intro (01:34) Section 1: What (exactly) is Silicon Valley? (02:23) Section 2: What brought us (and others) to Silicon Valley? (32:15) Conclusion (46:09) Our co-hosts: Bertrand Schmitt, Tech Entrepreneur, co-founder and Chairman at App Annie, @bschmitt Nuno Goncalves Pedro, Investor, co-Founder and Managing Partner of Strive Capital, @ngpedro Our show:   Tech DECIPHERED brings you the Entrepreneur and Investor views on Big Tech, VC and Start-up news, opinion pieces and research. We decipher their meaning, and add inside knowledge and context. Being nerds, we also discuss the latest gadgets and pop culture news. Subscribe To Our Podcast Intro (01:34) Nuno: Welcome to season two of Tech Deciphered.  Today, because we like to do really long episodes, we will start our trilogy on Silicon Valley. This episode will focus on what Silicon Valley actually is. We'll go into the geography of Silicon Valley, the origins of Silicon Valley, the development of Silicon Valley. Then we will also talk about what brought us here, what brought Bertrand and myself to Silicon Valley.  In the next few episodes, we will go into the mythology and reality of Silicon Valley as well as other areas of love and hate , and we will finalize with Silicon Valley in transition. Is it a mindset? Is there an Exodus? Is there a no exodus? Bertrand: Thank you Nuno, good to be here with you today.  How are you? Nuno: I'm well, so let's start with what is Silicon Valley?  Section 1 - What (exactly) is Silicon Valley? Today we start with what is Silicon Valley? And one could say Silicon Valley is a state of mind, but it's actually a region of the world with a long history behind it. Bertrand do you want to guide us a little bit through the long history of Silicon Valley and where we're at? Bertrand: Yeah, sure. So as you say, it's a long history, but that depends by which standard?  Nuno: For someone from France and Portugal probably not very long, but yes. Bertrand: Or China Nuno: Long from a US perspective, I guess.  Bertrand: It's one of these places where you don't have much standing that is more than a hundred years old, and one could argue, it might be because of earthquakes. But not just, I would say the modern California is probably and Northern California is probably 150 years old, started with the Gold rush. And maybe before I go to the gold rush, obviously California was  in some ways discovered by the Europeans  500 years ago Nuno if we go back  to the origins of California and Northern California, and it was a spaniard, a Portuguese?    Nuno: We will not have that discussion. And obviously it's not questioned whether it was discovered, it was here, and there were native people here and then.  The Spanish conquistadores arrived. There is some argumentation whether Cabrillo  was actually Portuguese or Spanish, but he was definitely working for the Spaniards. So we'll let them do that. We'll let the Spanish people get that. Bertrand: Yes.  So California  was interspersed by a lot of missions and that connected the main roads. Actually historically the main road in Silicon Valley, El Camino Real, Nuno you want to say what it means. Nuno: Yeah, the Royal way. So it was a way that was put there to connect the different missions. And it was the Royal way because the Spaniards were here at the service of obviously the monarchy in Spain. And that's why it was called the Royal way or Camino Real. So now, you know.   Bertrand: And so, that's for me interesting part of Silicon Valley to think that you are on the Royal way most of the time when you are going from city to city.

National Day Calendar
June 7, 2021 – National VCR Day | National Chocolate Ice Cream Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 2:30


Do You Remember Watching Movies On A VCR? Welcome to June 7th, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate an old relic and a frozen favorite.  Once upon a time, dinosaurs ruled the Earth. And now there are only traces of their existence. And through the 1980s and 90s, another giant ruled the world of home entertainment—video cassettes. Instead of sitting on a couch and scrolling endlessly through Netflix, people drove to Blockbuster and roamed the aisles searching for movies to rent. And then one day, those stores were gone. As were VCRs. They were replaced by DVDs which were replaced by streaming content. But it was the VCR that kicked off the era of home entertainment. On National VCR Day, celebrate with a movie trip down memory lane and if you still own one of these dinosaurs be kind and rewind. While the most popular ice cream flavor is vanilla, it may surprise you that chocolate ice cream was invented first.  The recipe for chocolate ice cream appeared in an Italian cookbook in 1692, but like most frozen treats, it came from popular drinks that were poured over ice.  When the Spaniards conquered Mexico in 1519 they discovered the irresistible Mayan chocolate drink that would become the basis of the first frozen chocolate. Spanish explorer Alberto Garcia reportedly exclaimed, “In all my life I have never made a discovery so fine.  This is not a taste, it's an emotion.”  On National Chocolate Ice Cream Day, celebrate your favorite scoops that still hold the spirit of the nectar of the gods!  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

Dig: A History Podcast
Lost! Cabeza de Vaca Stumbles Through Southwestern North America in the "Age of Exploration"

Dig: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 58:35


Borders #1 of 4. Like many of the Spanish conquistadors who made their way to the Americas, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca joined an expedition to explore “Florida” in search of glory and, ideally, an encomienda of his own. (“Florida” is what the Spanish called all of the land around the Gulf of Mexico, including the actual Floridian peninsula.) Unlike most Spanish conquistadors, Cabeza de Vaca ended up lost in the area we now call Texas for the better part of a decade, naked, barefoot, unarmed, horseless, and at the mercy of the natives he encountered--most of whom he couldn't communicate with beyond gesturing and hoping to be understood. Cabeza de Vaca's experience of the Americas was brutal at times, as he teetered on starvation, was beaten by his enslavers, and suffered indignities for much of his eight+ years lost in Texas and northern Mexico. Still, his recollection of his “journeys” are nuanced, if inevitably colored by his background and biases. And by the end of his life, he became a champion of indigenous rights, demanding reform so loudly that the other Spaniards of South America had him arrested and sent back to Spain on trumped up charges. Though the writing and travels of Cabeza de Vaca are very much a part of the history of conquistadores, they also stand out. For the complete transcript, as well as links to our swag store and resources for teachers, visit digpodcast.org Select Bibliography There are several English translations of Cabeza de Vaca's text available. Fanny Bandelier's is usable, but Adorno and Pautz's is excellent, with thorough annotation and cross referenced footnotes utilizing Oviedo and other sources.  Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca (transl. Rolena Adorno and Patrick Charles Pautz), The Narrative of Cabeza de Vaca (University of Nebraska, 2003). Rafael Varón Gabai, Francisco Pizarro and His Brothers: The Illusion of Power in Sixteenth-century Peru, (University of Oklahoma Press, 1997).  Alex D. Krieger and Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo y Valdes, We Came Naked and Barefoot : The Journey of Cabeza de Vaca Across North America, edited by Margery H. Krieger (University of Texas Press, 2002).  Charles Gibson,  The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519-1810 (Stanford University Press, 1964).  Dennis F. Herrick, Esteban: The African Slave Who Explored America. (University of New Mexico Press, 2018). Baker H. Morrow and Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, South American Expeditions, 1540-1545, (University of New Mexico Press, 2011). Kathleen Ann Myers, Nina M. Scott, and Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo y Valdes, Fernandez de Oviedo's Chronicle of America : A New History for a New World (University of Texas Press, 2017) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The History of the Americans
The Coronado Entrada into the American Southwest 2

The History of the Americans

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 38:56


In this episode we conclude the story of the Coronado Entrada into the American Southwest. By the spring of 1540, a few hundred Spaniards, a few free and enslaved Blacks, perhaps a thousand Indios Amigos – literally, friendly and free Indians – hundreds of horses, and herds of cattle, sheep, and pigs, were making their way up the west coast of Mexico aiming for supposed riches of Arizona and New Mexico, all on the basis of a massive intelligence failure. There were no Seven Cities of Gold, but Coronado and his men would be the first Europeans to see the Grand Canyon and they would name Texas, which ain't nothing.  Selected references for this episode Stan Hoig, Came Men on Horses: The Conquistador Expeditions of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado and Don Juan de Oñate George Parker Winship, The Journey of Coronado, 1540-1542 F. S. Dellenbaugh, “The True Route of Coronado's March” Tiguex War Coronado's Expedition, Legends of America Hawikuh and the Zuni-Cibola Complex New Mexico

Davor Suker's Left Foot
Ranking the Heroes of This Season

Davor Suker's Left Foot

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 62:43


It's been a weird year, nobody is arguing with that. But in the gloom, in the darkness, some heroes have shone on the pitch for their respective clubs. Be these leaders of men, comeback stories, against the odds triumphs or all three, we asked friend of the pod Zach Lowy, co-founder of Breaking the Lines, to come back and help us pick five of the best personal storylines across Europe this season. And boy did he deliver - from Championship hitmen (to the chagrin of Jack and Dean), to versatile Spaniards playing every position under the sun, to champion defenders who went from one end of fans affections to another, to veterans who inspired unlikely title charges, this one had it all.Before that though, as ever, there was time for Things We Love, which this week included Dean talking about Romelu Lukaku's redemption arc and the very real possibility of him returning to the Premier League; Sam discussing one of the best games of the season in the U21 European Championships, and Jack talking about Aguero's unveiling, Barca-born, Betis-bred defenders returning to the Villamarin and his predictions coming true in both European finals last week.It's Ranks! Come and join the Ultras on Patreon for two extra podcasts a week, our Torcida newsletter and access to the Rank Squad Discord Community! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Spaghetti For Brains
24: END OF HISTORY SEASON TWO

Spaghetti For Brains

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 65:37


After a totally planned hiatus, Ben & Norm are back. It's the End of History — Season Two. Israel, the movie. Fighting to lose. Chimps and Spaniards of Hartlepool. The Queen's Speech, Kill the Bill, long distance asylum applications and other Tory manoeuvres straight out of the Republican playbook. Cockhands' Voter ID law and how the US is like the UK a little further down the road. Also we call out Chapo Trap House. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/spaghetti-for-brains/message

These Vatos Network
S2 E14: Cinco De Mayo

These Vatos Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 43:42


Feliz Cinco de Mayo Vatos... Fellas dive into the "American Holiday" lol with discussions behind the history and how it is celebrated here in the United States. Remember Cinco de Mayo isn't a celebration of our independence but more of a victory battle between an outnumbered Mexican army agains the French in 1862. The actual independence day for Mexico, is on September 16th which celebrates the cry of independence against the Spaniards. Enjoy...

The New Yorker: Politics and More
The Children of Morelia

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 30:09


Refugees arriving at the southern border of the United States, and especially the unaccompanied children among them, are again in the headlines. A parent’s decision to send his or her chiId on an extremely perilous journey is difficult to comprehend, but war, violence, and hunger can be decisive factors. Nearly a century ago, a group of Spaniards put five hundred of their children on a boat and sent them across the ocean to find safety in Mexico. They were escaping the extraordinary brutality of the Spanish Civil War, and few ever saw their parents again. When they arrived, the conditions in the Mexican orphanage where they were placed were bleak. The youngest of those children was Rosita Daroca Martinez, just three years old; her first memory is of throwing her shoes overboard on the ship, because she thought the fish would need them. The writer and radio producer Destry Maria Sibley, who is Martinez’s granddaughter, tells her grandmother’s story and explains how the impact of the trauma she suffered resonated during her life and down through the generations.

PH Murder Stories
Juan Luna’s Dark Past (In Collaboration with Bianca Mikaehla)

PH Murder Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 14:13


Juan Luna's colorful life may have reached all textbooks, especially for his roles as an illustrator, propagandist against the Spaniards, and one of the most renowned painters in the Philippines. However, little did you know that Juan Luna had a dark past involving the murder of his wife and mother-in-law. This episode is in collaboration with Just Another Podcast with Mik. Subscribe to Bianca Mikaehla's YouTube Channel ▸ https://bit.ly/3e8KWfK WEBSITE ▸ https://phmurderstories.com PODCAST ▸ Spotify — https://spoti.fi/3iz2YI3 ▸ Apple — https://apple.co/2GmarNN YOUTUBE ▸ PH Murder Stories — https://bit.ly/3sm11n4 SOCIALS ▸ Facebook — https://bit.ly/33xXEAm ▸ Instagram — https://bit.ly/33BL03r ▸ Tiktok — https://bit.ly/2F4a8pY ▸ Twitter — https://bit.ly/3no4jFq SUPPORT US ON PATREON ▸ https://bit.ly/3iNyiD0

Desert Oracle Radio
The Dark Watchers

Desert Oracle Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 28:00


Where there are mountains, there are mysteries. Tonight we visit with some old friends who've long haunted the Indians, the Spaniards and the Americans. They are called the Dark Watchers, and as usual their world is part of ours, tied up in our own recent history of desert mystics such as Aldous Huxley and the ancient culture of the Esselen. Hosted by Ken Layne, with new soundscapes by RedBlueBlackSilver. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=26080998 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Our Daily Bread Podcast | Our Daily Bread

In the late 17th century, William of Orange intentionally flooded much of his nation’s land. The Dutch monarch resorted to such a drastic measure in an attempt to drive out the invading Spaniards. It didn’t work, and a vast swath of prime farmland was lost to the sea. “Desperate times call for desperate measures,” they say. In Isaiah’s day, Jerusalem turned to desperate measures when the Assyrian army threatened them. Creating a water storage system to endure the siege, the people also tore down houses to shore up the city walls. Such tactics may have been prudent, but they neglected the most important step. “You built a reservoir between the two walls for the water of the Old Pool,” God said, “but you did not look to the One who made it, or have regard for the One who planned it long ago” (Isaiah 22:11). We aren’t likely to encounter a literal army outside our homes today. “The batterings always come in commonplace ways and through commonplace people,” said Oswald Chambers. Yet, such “batterings” are genuine threats. Thankfully, they also bring with them God’s invitation to turn to Him first for what we need. When life’s irritations and interruptions come, will we see them as opportunities to turn to God? Or will we seek our own desperate solutions?

The WW2 Podcast
135 - Spaniards in the British Army

The WW2 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 80:44


In previous episodes we’ve touched upon the Spanish civil war, when the war came to an end there was a large number of displaced Spanish living in France and to a less extent other Europe countries. With the second world war looming, the French began to recruit these displaced men into their armed forces. When France fell in 1940 a sizeable number found themselves in Britain, where they were recruited in to the British Army. But they weren’t just in Britain, in North Africa and the Middle East spaniards signed up to fight with the British. In this episode I’m joined by military historian and hispanist Sean Scullion to explore who these men were and their stories.