Podcast appearances and mentions of Adam Grant

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  • 1,132PODCASTS
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  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
Adam Grant

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Latest podcast episodes about Adam Grant

The Offstage Mic
Episode 8: Nobody Puts Baby in a Corner

The Offstage Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 32:34


How to handle company turnover during this period of Great Reshuffle? What are the indicators of toxic workplace culture? How do you show up as your authentic self back in the office when there is such a narrow view of what “professionalism” looks like? What to do when a man interrupts you speaking? These questions are all addressed in this final episode of season one. It's raw, it's vulnerable, and all of that feels like a good note to close out this pilot project season. Thanks to everyone who's listened. We'd love to hear from you if you enjoyed it or learned something. And wishing you all the best of luck as you prep for your own seasons starting this fall, from wherever you're listening. Resources mentioned: Adam Grant's https://www.ted.com/podcasts/worklife/the-4-deadly-sins-of-work-culture-transcript (Four Deadly Sins of Toxic Culture) Harvard Professor Amy Cuddy's https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_may_shape_who_you_are?language=en (TED Talk on Power Poses) Sponsors who made this possible: https://www.descript.com/?lmref=X0WQBg (Descript) https://glnk.io/nn4/aubrey (Lume Cube)

The Writing Coach Podcast with Rebecca L. Weber

How you think about time—such as if you have enough, not enough, or plenty of it—impacts what you create in your writing life. Many writers credit time as necessary for their skills, clients, or assignment quality to improve.  An overemphasis on time passing to become a better freelancer isn't useful or accurate, and can be a disempowering framework. Time passing isn't the important factor in if I learn or complete something; often time passes and we don't learn or complete our writing. Ironically, the refrain of “I need more time to pitch” (or finish the current assignment or freewrite or work on a book or whatever it is) often creates a sense of frustration, scarcity, urgency, or fear. In turn, the writers spends less or no extra time.  Because if you don't have enough time, why bother? If the requirement for effective pitching was more time, I'd be all for it. But it's simply not the missing ingredient. Time happens either way: if you write the pitch or not, time goes by. If you could only write a pitch effectively or efficiently, you'd almost certainly opt for a good slow pitch over a quick one that doesn't get assigned.  Time isn't the missing element. Skill, clarify, confidence, practice, and prioritization are all more accurate assessments about what to focus on.

Zen Parenting Radio
Humans Are Fascinating- Podcast# 670

Zen Parenting Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 38:35


Cathy and Todd discuss Adam Grant's research around why humans are fascinating, especially when it comes to parenting and partnership. They also discuss why optimism is essential and the beer-drinking games people play.

Interne Revision – souverän, kollegial und wirksam
Folge 228: Nichts ist schlimmer als ein zu guter Revisionsbericht

Interne Revision – souverän, kollegial und wirksam

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 7:28


Nach Ansicht einer Seminarteilnehmerin aus dem Compliance ist es ein Risiko, wenn die Prüfungstiefe der Internen Revision nicht ausreicht und das Prüfungsergebnis deshalb zu gut ausfällt. Wieso wird ein zu oberflächlicher Bericht mittel- und langfristig dem Unternehmen schaden? Weil es sich dann nicht optimal auf mögliche Probleme vorbereiten kann und wird. Schließlich hat die Revision ja schriftlich bestätigt, dass alles in Ordnung ist. Oder in den Worten von Adam Grant aus seinem Buch "Originals" (S. 214): "Negative thoughts can direct our attention to potential problems, and the absence of those thoughts predicts a failure to take preventive and corrective actions." Er bezeichnet dies als "defensive pessimism". Das Schöne daran ist, dass dieser defensive Pessimismus die Sinnhaftigkeit Ihrer Arbeit in der Internen Revision unterstreicht. Ich hoffe, dass alle Internen Revisoren und Revisorinnen mit diesem Podcast noch stärker vom Sinn ihrer Tätigkeit überzeugt werden und dementsprechend in Zukunft immer tief genug in ihre Prüfungsthemen einsteigen, um ein möglichst zutreffendes Bild von der vorgefundenen Ist-Situation abgeben zu können. Ich wünsche Ihnen viel Spaß beim Zuhören und erfolgreiche Prüfungsprozesse!

DesignTeam
Bom Dia UX 83 - Cultura de ux tem que ser o foco? Com Vitor Guerra

DesignTeam

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 66:21


Nos últimos anos, muitas organizações conseguiram enormes ganhos através da inovação e uma das razões appontadas é o esforço em tornar o focono cliente parte de sua cultura. Empresas como Vimeo, Airbnb, Etsy flickr, Fab, tumblr, Instagram, Pinterest, Square e Kickstarter são alguns exemplos de empresas com co-fundadores designers onde o nível de cultura de UX já nasce no estágio máximo do “Infused”. O conceito de user-centricity, ou customer-centricity (negócios centrados no cliente) não é novo e já faz parte de eventos e conversas de executivos há muitos anos. Tornar a organização centrada no usuário trabalha em fortalecer a cultura, pois quando falamos dessa centralização, diferentes áreas passam a ter contato com a percepção e dores dos consumidores, reforçando o propósito da empresa. E entregando melhores experiências que fidelizam. Mas, como se desenvolve a Cultura Centrada no Usuário? Cultura se refere a um conjunto de formas, práticas comuns, regras ou normas que caracterizam pessoas/ sociedade. No conceito empresarial, é facilmente reconhecida e disseminada por meio de interações, feedbacks e outros critérios de evolução da organização. O primeiro é Foco nas pessoas. Isso não quer dizer que você precisa sair contratando todos os designers disponíveis no mercado. O design como, modelo mental, deve permear todas as areas da empresa. Será? Você sabe o que é cultura organizacional? Como você descreveria a cultura organizacional da sua empresa? Faz sentido ela ser orientada ao usuário? Fontes: Cultura Organizacional https://www.pontotel.com.br/cultura-organizacional/ Construindo uma Organização Realmente Centrada no Usuário https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/construindo-uma-organiza%C3%A7%C3%A3o-realmente-centrada-usu%C3%A1rio-luis-arnal/ Como se configura a Cultura Centrada no Usuário? https://portalcustomer.com.br/como-se-configura-a-cultura-centrada-no-usuario/ Desenvolvendo uma cultura centrada no design https://brasil.uxdesign.cc/cultura-centrada-no-design-16fdcfe9f47e A UX Maturity Model for Introducing User Experience into the Corporate Culture https://www.macadamian.com/learn/introducing-ux-into-corporate-culture/ The Real Business Value Of Design https://medium.com/design-leadership-notebook/the-real-business-value-of-design-3fd5a4c5b077 Livros indicados: Nos bastidores da Disney: Os segredos do sucesso da mais poderosa empresa de diversões do mundo https://amzn.to/3KaYQwq Powerful: Como construir uma cultura corporativa de liberdade e responsabilidade https://amzn.to/3uRYKmX Design Centrado no Usuário https://amzn.to/35ErfMz Reimagining Design: Unlocking Strategic Innovation https://amzn.to/3J2jNs1 Hbr's 10 Must Reads on Building a Great Culture (with Bonus Article How to Build a Culture of Originality by Adam Grant) https://amzn.to/3uVIZeK

The Economist Asks
The Economist Asks: Can we learn to disagree better?

The Economist Asks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 33:44


In a polarised world opportunities to disagree are plentiful – and frequently destructive. Host Anne McElvoy asks Adam Grant, an organisational psychologist and author of “Think Again”, why he thinks the key to arguing well is to be open-minded. They discuss whether social media erode reasoned argument, and the new breed of powerful political communicators. Plus, how does the psychology of resilience help those who are “languishing”?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
The Economist Asks: Can we learn to disagree better?

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 33:44


In a polarised world opportunities to disagree are plentiful – and frequently destructive. Host Anne McElvoy asks Adam Grant, an organisational psychologist and author of “Think Again”, why he thinks the key to arguing well is to be open-minded. They discuss whether social media erode reasoned argument, and the new breed of powerful political communicators. Plus, how does the psychology of resilience help those who are “languishing”?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Steve Barkley Ponders Out Loud
Can a Focus on Best Practice be a Problem?

Steve Barkley Ponders Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 18:44


Adam Grant, the author of "Think Again," states that the term best practice can create an illusion that we have reached an endpoint where there is nothing left to top. It's unlikely that any educational best practice is the best for ALL students. As educators, we need to be exploring what's better. Do we want to implement an improvement or a change? Read the article, "The Problem With Beat Practices" here. Subscribe to the Steve Barkley Ponders Out Loud podcast on iTunes or visit BarkleyPD.com to find new episodes!

best practices adam grant think again steve barkley ponders out loud
Athletic Training Chat
Ep. 114: Grady Congleton-4D Sports Medicine

Athletic Training Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 52:02


Grady is an athletic trainer that currently works with middle school athletes. At the time of this recording he was writing a blog called “Youth Sports Reimagined”. Since then he has rebranded it to “4D Sports Medicine”. Everything in the conversation still applies, it is just happening under a different name. In this episode we talk about how youth sports has been going through its own arms race and the detrimental impacts it has been having on some youth sports athletes. There is no quick fix for what youth sports have become and it will take many people to help restore it back to where athletes aren't quitting at the age of 13. Hear some of the things that Grady has picked up in his education and experience working with these athletes. Check it out. LINK: https://www.athletictrainingchat.com/2022/08/ep-114-grady-congleton-4d-sports.html In this Episode: +Living vicariously through kids +Long-term athlete development model +Injury and quitting around the age of 13 +Best practices to communicate and educate +Importance of ATs and shifting youth sport culture Mentioned: Freakonomics, Adam Grant, Atomic Habits Connect Twitter: gradyatc www.athletictrainingchat.com www.cliniallypressed.com SUBSCRIBE:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc3WyCs2lmnKK6shrL5A4hw?sub_confirmation=1 #ATCchat #ATtwitter #complicatedsimple #atimpact #at4all #nata #boc #bocatc #athletictraining #athletictrainingchat #health #medicine #medical #careeverywhere #service #marketing #ATvalue --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/athletictrainingchat/support

Vato Radio
Kelly Leonard on How to Use 'Thank You, Because' to Disarm Disagreement

Vato Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 43:27


In a world of increasing polarization, Kelly Leonard is working to bridge the divide and bring people together by teaching the power of improv. In this episode you will learn: 1. The importance of play, especially as we get older. 2. The power of "Yes, And" to create agreement and understanding. 3. The importance of a shared humanity that includes people who may not think or vote like we do. "The world we live in right now, no one wants to work together. It's never been this bad, in my experience. If we could just enter rooms with curiosity instead of blame, if we could enter rooms with a 'Thank You, Because' orientation, I think we have a shot." - Kelly Leonard Kelly Leonard is the Executive Director of Learning and Applied Improvisation at Second City Works. His book, “Yes, And: Lessons from The Second City” was released to critical acclaim in 2015 by HarperCollins and was praised by Michael Lewis in Vanity Fair who called it “...an excellent guide to the lessons that have bubbled up in Second City's improv workshops.” Kelly is a popular speaker on the power of improvisation to transform people's lives. He has presented at The Aspen Ideas Festival, The Code Conference, TEDx Broadway, Chicago Ideas Festival, The Stanford Graduate School of Business and for companies such as Coca Cola, Microsoft, Twitter, Memorial Sloan Kettering and DDB Worldwide. Kelly co-created an initiative with the Center for Decision Research at the Booth School at the University of Chicago, The Second Science Project, that looks at behavioral science through the lens of improvisation. He also hosts the podcast, “Getting to Yes, And,” for Second City Works and WGN radio that features interviews with academics, authors and leaders such as Brene Brown, Adam Grant, Michael Lewis, Lindy West, Ash Carter and Amy Edmondson. For over twenty years, Kelly oversaw Second City's live theatrical divisions where he helped generate original productions with such talent as Tina Fey, Stephen Colbert, Amy Poehler, Seth Meyers, Steve Carell, Keegan-Michael Key, Amy Sedaris, Adam McKay and others. In 2019, Arts Alliance Illinois awarded Kelly and his wife Anne Libera with their Creative Voice Award. Twitter.com/KLSecondCity Paul Vato is an on camera and voice actor, improvisor, podcaster and entrepreneur. Connect with Paul Vato: PaulVato.com • VATO.tv • y.at/

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons
How to Build the BEST Marketing Team to Grow Your Business Faster

Growth Everywhere Daily Business Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 6:32


In this episode, Eric talks about the best strategy for building the perfect team for your company! Find out what are the main things you need to consider and how you can use Dr. Adam Grant and Ray Dalio's PrinciplesYou - a proven tool that aims for personal and organizational success! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:00] - How to build the BEST marketing team for your Business [00:45] - Key points you should look for as an employer! (Job Hiring Tips 2022) [02:34] - Why Linked In is the best platform for HIRING people! (CEO Tips for Recruitment) [04:15] - TOP questions you should ask during the hiring interview!  [04:27] - Our HIRING strategy in finding Rock Star Marketers! [05:30] - PrinciplesYou, This personality test will help you find the right people! Leave Some Feedback:   What should I talk about next? Who should I interview? Please let me know on Twitter or in the comments below. Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review here Subscribe to Leveling Up on iTunes Get the non-iTunes RSS Feed     Connect with Eric Siu:      Growth Everywhere Single Grain Leveling Up Eric Siu on Twitter   Eric Siu on Instagram

New Hope Church Toowoomba
Reimagine Rest | Adam Grant

New Hope Church Toowoomba

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 26:51


When was the last time you rested with God?

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Business Development Mindset Rule - You Don't Have to Be an Extrovert to Succeed

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 5:32


Adam Grant did a study on salespeople and put them on a spectrum of introversion to extroversion. For most people they land right in the middle and end up being a mix of both introvert and extrovert, and most successful salespeople were exactly the same way. Ambiverts were the most successful at making sales, not extroverts like people assumed was the case. Full-on extroverts might actually have some disadvantages when it comes to making a sale. Their desire to be around people all the time may prevent them from following up effectively or being direct with someone when they need to challenge them. Extreme introverts likely just aren't putting themselves around other people most of the time, but that doesn't mean they don't get energy from interacting with them or can't be effective salespeople. The magic in sales and business development happens at the middle of the curve, where you can connect with people in the moment and follow up thoughtfully later. Luckily for most people, that's where they fall. You don't have to be extroverted to be successful at sales. Great business developers have a wonderful mix of being around people, getting energy from the interactions, asking great questions, and giving great ideas. They can also go back to their quiet surroundings and find ways to follow up thoughtfully.     Mentioned in this Episode: faculty.wharton.upenn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Grant_PsychScience2013.pdf

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
Business Development Mindset Rule - You Don't Have to Be an Extrovert to Succeed

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 5:32


Adam Grant did a study on salespeople and put them on a spectrum of introversion to extroversion. For most people they land right in the middle and end up being a mix of both introvert and extrovert, and most successful salespeople were exactly the same way. Ambiverts were the most successful at making sales, not extroverts like people assumed was the case. Full-on extroverts might actually have some disadvantages when it comes to making a sale. Their desire to be around people all the time may prevent them from following up effectively or being direct with someone when they need to challenge them. Extreme introverts likely just aren't putting themselves around other people most of the time, but that doesn't mean they don't get energy from interacting with them or can't be effective salespeople. The magic in sales and business development happens at the middle of the curve, where you can connect with people in the moment and follow up thoughtfully later. Luckily for most people, that's where they fall. You don't have to be extroverted to be successful at sales. Great business developers have a wonderful mix of being around people, getting energy from the interactions, asking great questions, and giving great ideas. They can also go back to their quiet surroundings and find ways to follow up thoughtfully.     Mentioned in this Episode: faculty.wharton.upenn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Grant_PsychScience2013.pdf

On the Brink with Andi Simon
323: Maura Carlin and Christie Derrico—Isn't It Time For Us To Solve The "Balance Dilemma" For Working Women?

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 49:24


Hear how to be bolder and braver at balancing your life Suppose you are a working woman with children. I bet you have experienced the "Balance Dilemma." How can you find the right balance between home life, family, a business or professional career, and even your own self-care? You, your partner or spouse, your friends and your family will enjoy this podcast. My guests, Maura Carlin and Christie Derrico, have an awesome podcast called The Balance Dilemma. Yes, the title is exactly what we want to share with our audience today. Need some help balancing all the different parts of your life? Listen in! Watch and listen to our conversation here How to help women and men have families, careers, and a life to live A little background: Maura and Christie are both attorneys. Maura describes herself as: “Litigation attorney turned journalist, writer, podcaster, still asking questions.” Christie is an entrepreneur, lawyer, podcaster and author who combines her multi-disciplinary talents with her passion for giving back. Making work life and home life successfully coexist together shouldn't be so hard, but as most of us know, it is. Even after decades of women trying to balance their lives and their careers, very little has changed. Sadly, we're still trying to figure it out. Questions the three of us delved into which affect all of us When we consider the declining birth rate, the later ages at which women are getting married and the limitations of childcare, as well as its cost, we as a society must step back and rethink, What we are doing? What do we value? How do we provide a more balanced life, and why is it even more essential to do it now? Listen in and enjoy. And please share with us your ideas at info@simonassociates.net.  To contact Maura and Christie You can connect with Maura on LinkedIn or email her at mauracarlin@gmail.com. You can find Christie on LinkedIn. Want a deeper dive into how you can achieve work-life balance? Start with these:  Podcast: "Work PAUSE Thrive" with Lisen Stromberg Podcast: Melissa Greenwell—Gender-Balanced Leadership Doesn't Just Happen Blog: Rising To The Occasion, Women Are Proving To Be The Heroines In This Crisis Additional resources for you My two award-winning books: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Businessand On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Our website: Simon Associates Management Consultants   Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink With Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. I'm your host and your guide. And as you know, my job is to get you off the brink. We've moved into our 300+ podcast and it truly is an honor to celebrate with you. Every time we have a new one, we get lots of people across the globe coming to us asking for more. How do I get you off the brink? How do I help you soar? Well, I do that by letting you listen to people who are doing just that. They help you see, feel and think in new ways so you can add some tools into your portfolio. The world is going through a great transformation. So today, I bring you two amazing women. I have Maura Carlin and Christie Dericco. I met them through a mutual friend who then introduced me and I was absolutely honored to be on their podcast, The Balance Dilemma. This was a terrific in-person WVOX recording of a podcast. And today we're going to talk a little bit about podcasting. Actually a lot about podcasting, because I do them with great pleasure. I haven't monetized it. I don't want to, I don't want have advertisers. I just want great people to help you see, feel and think in new ways. So today, let me tell you a little bit about these two wonderful women. And then they'll tell you about their own journey. But listen carefully to their own experiences. There's something there for you, each of you, to begin to understand how in our life's journey, we continue to soar only if we get off the brink. So here we go. I have Maura Carlin here, who spent over 15 years as a litigator at law firms. Now remember, I could have been an attorney or an anthropologist. But it was my husband who said to me, "Be an anthropologist and I'll be here for you," and he doesn't mind my telling you that because it was 55 years ago and I am still an anthropologist. But she started as a litigator while raising her family and left law and focused on journalism, working as a producer and host on LMC media's news programming. So this is an interesting blend here. Her natural talent and live on-air interviews was on display weekly during roundtable discussions with elected officials, newsmakers and more. She received a BA from Cornell and a JD with honors from George Washington. But she is really on another part of her own journey. Now Christie Derrico grew up in a world encouraged by female entrepreneurs and she and I love to share stories about those female entrepreneurs. I often thought I should write a book called What I Learned On My Grandmother's Knee because it was my grandmother who taught me all about how to count money at the end of the day. It was so interesting, beginning with Christie's grandmother and continuing to her mother, a tech entrepreneur. She established her law practice in 1998 and tailored her firm to meet her community and family needs. She lives in Westchester. Maura has three sons, and Christie has four children. They are truly the epitome of "the balance dilemma." Thank you for joining me today. I'll start with Christie. What's your journey? And then I'll get to Maura and then we'll go deep into what has podcasting taught us and what we're trying to do with it. Christie, how about yourself? Christie Derrico: Well, Andi, like many people, I was inspired by reading To Kill a Mockingbird. I knew that I wanted to be a lawyer from freshman year of high school when that is usually assigned. And I went right from college to law school, and I was a college athlete. And then I went to compete in law school. As you know, more than I can attest, law school is not an easy feat. Each level you go up in your education, it's harder and harder. But I have loved being an attorney. And I've handled litigation, handling many cases, criminal and civil. And I also established a local practice where I got to connect with people in the community. And that's one of my favorite things. I'm not very good at tracking my pro bono hours because there are just so many of them. If someone walks in with a problem, I'm there to help even if sometimes they can't pay what would be the customary rate. So I met Maura on a show a few years ago. And we just struck up a friendship and started a conversation that became The Balance Dilemma and it had a launch in this pandemic where many people had an opportunity to pivot and try new things. And that's our story. Andi Simon: What I love about it, you must know Adam Grant's book, Give and Take. Givers just really are essential to the beauty and joy of our society. And as you said about your pro bono, givers, you know, it's sort of like, How can I help? As opposed to, How can you pay me? And that is a real mark of a woman I want to have on my podcast. Maura, what about you? Maura Carlin: You know, it's funny, I hadn't even realized how similar Christie and I were in those beginning years because I too wanted to be a lawyer after reading To Kill a Mockingbird in eighth or ninth grade. And I did not come from a family of lawyers or business people, for that matter. My father was an artist. And my mother was a teacher, and both grew up poor. And I didn't want to do what they did. And I wanted to be a lawyer. So I went to college. I too, was a college athlete for a couple of years, and went straight to law school also. And during law school, I really didn't know much about the practice of law as it turned out, and ended up going to a big firm in New York City, and started my law career that way. And then along the way, like two intense career couples with children, couldn't really make it work very well. And there were things going on at home. And I went home thinking it was temporary. And we then actually had a third kid, and I got involved in local journalism, which is something I had always been interested in. I did radio in college, and I really pursued that while I was home. I needed flexibility, I needed to be around. So there we have it. And Christie and I met on the set of this new show, which was a combination of news and a discussion roundtable. And we hit it off right away talking about the struggle. Andi Simon: The struggle has accelerated during the pandemic. It was there before, people talked about work-life balance, and I used to say, Why is work not life? I couldn't quite figure out what this balance was that we were trying to get. But it was always about women in that work-life balance. And it is an interesting time for us to take a look at how women have creatively solved an unexpected challenge. And now we're trying to figure out how the next challenge is going to put more strain or opportunities for creative ideas to come forth, as people are being asked to come back to the workplace. And I'm hearing this constant recurring theme: Well, you knew before the pandemic, to work at home was a gift you gave me. It was part of my benefits. During the pandemic, you gave me a day to figure out how to do it. And now you want me to come back to the office. And some folks are going back in the office and sitting on zoom in the office because their colleagues are still removed. We haven't figured this out. So go ahead. Christie Derrico: So Maura and I, the three of us, have used the same word: flexibility. So adding to my bio, I had a formula for flexibility from having a mother and a grandmother who were working mothers. And I learned things, and things have been tweaked through the generations. I have my mother's sisters who still run the family business and they have children. And so I had a benefit of things that many women don't: I have rules. I try to keep things hyperlocal like Maura. I'm very involved in the community. So if something falls apart, you're a known entity and somebody can swoop in and drive your kid home or something like that. But what really brought Maura and I together was an article that was at that time, 30 years old: Confessions of a Superwoman. Maura why don't you tell Andi about how this spawned our project? Maura Carlin: This is actually a funny story. Your parents dump everything in your attic when you have a house to get you out of theirs. So at that time I was finally hitting the boxes and I found this article from December 1980. I don't know where or how I got it, but I clearly didn't read it. And this woman was trying to do it. And this was what really hit me. She was trying to have this high flying career and she was a prominent scientist. And she had a child and she couldn't make it work. And what really struck me and what Christie and I talked about 30 years later, was very little had changed, and even more so, we were speaking about it in the same terms and that was just unbelievable and kind of horrifying at the same time. Christie Derrico: And I will just add to that, that in the pandemic, even leading up to it, progress has been with fits and starts. And we've seen in our community, I think there are less day cares here than when I moved here in the late 90s. Why is that? And how can we move forward unless we address the elephant in the room—childcare—and other issues that help women stay in the workforce. And our project, The Balance Dilemma, has been a super interesting social science, so to speak, analysis of all the machinations of this work-life balance. What has been most interesting to me is that our guests have been entrepreneurs, re-inventors, creators, executives, parents, partners. We have had fine artists, other types of artists, writers, all people telling the story, not just women. There are men too of how they have made a life for their families and themselves and keeping their identity and making livings and things like that. It's been absolutely fascinating. Andi Simon: I'm curious, maybe you can provide perspective on this. How do we make changes, because to your point, there's less childcare, there are fewer childcare workers. I didn't have childcare, I had to hire a nanny. I remember my husband and I navigating the complex waters of who was going to work on which days, and I worked Wednesdays and Saturdays at the university, so he could take care of the kids on Saturdays. There was always navigating. But on the other hand, we never really thought back and said, What did we do here? This was sort of just how we got it done. But how do we make the changes that are going to be necessary to create something we're calling a work-life balance or something? I'm not quite sure that vision of what we're going toward, and I'm not sure how to help us get there. Maura Carlin: I think we need to figure out the childcare piece of it, as Christie was saying. Someone has to be there at some time, whether it's a parent, or another family member, or someone you hire. I don't see another solution. But it's something that keeps getting ignored. And one of the things on the balance limb is, interestingly, we don't talk politics, but this is the one policy area where we kind of have to go into it and see how different people have handled it. And it always seems, and this is where my husband and I actually had a problem because it comes back to this: someone seems to have some flexibility. You know, even our last guest, who was the lead parent, she from the very beginning was able to work from home long before work from home was a thing. And that allowed her to be around for the children. She also hired someone that you could delegate to, but she had the flexibility. And I don't know how you do it otherwise. Why are children the afterthought instead of the thought in our society? Christie, do you have perspective? Christie Derrico: Absolutely, I mean, we've had some common links with Frank Schaeffer. I found his book, Fall in Love, Have Children, Stay Put, Save the Planet, Be Happy. It's a big, big, long title. But I found some of the things, I'm not saying Frank and I agreed on everything, but it was refreshing that he was discussing it and putting it out there. And we were discussing just this weekend with my mother when she was finishing her college degree and she was at community college, there was a childcare facility. And I remember being there. That didn't mean I was there 7-to-7, but in the time that she had to take some classes, I could go there. I wonder how many colleges have childcare facilities these days? I don't think many. And it has made it an afterthought. But childcare is just one component of it. The thing that Maura and I have touched upon is planning. Young people, young women, young men, don't often think about, How do I want my life to look 20 years from now? They kind of spontaneously go into things that they like without really thinking, Oh, wait, is this going to be the career that gives me the best work-life balance? And Maura and I were not fond of the book...what was the name of it, Maura? It had a Wall Street exec in London and it was so depressing that she would come home at night and couldn't stand to see her husband. She would buy store-bought pies and distress them to bring them into school for the school play. Like it was such a Debbie Downer of a working woman. I couldn't stand to read the book, not that it wasn't well written or entertaining, it just hit a nerve with me. So how can we make this, as you say, something that there is some forethought, or there is some flexibility. I think the change in the marketplace in the economy is allowing people in general to change careers easier. You're not staying in one place. So we have to be open to, Maybe I'm going to shift to this, maybe I won't earn as much money, but I'm in it. And maybe I need to be there for four years, and then it could shift again. So hopefully these changes that were coming out of this pandemic can facilitate that flexibility that did not used to exist. I also think that the flexibility is coming from employers. If you ask for it, because of the pandemic, allowing people to work from home or understanding that people do have other people to watch over. And it's not just children, it's their elderly, elderly families as well, which is also huge. Andi Simon: Let's think big. Frank Schaeffer was on the podcast and I loved his ideas. And I said, So why is it so hard for employers to realize that if they opened up a child-friendly culture, they could attract people who would not only come and want to come and stay, but see them aligned with their own values? Is that such a foreign idea? As we're talking about it, and he and I talked about it, I said, Frank, this isn't so hard, just open up the gap. My daughter worked for The Gap. The Gap had a daycare where you can bring them in at three months. And they did it. So why is this such a mystery? And why do they fight it? Well, you don't have to go into politics and figure out why society and government doesn't. But how many businesses could do it tomorrow? Christie Derrico: Well, I think we have to look at successful examples. So we're lawyers, and Maura and I love to research. So I am a fact-, evidence-based person. So we can have a theory and it sounds great, but if I can't find the data to support that, even if it's a good formula, I'm not going to be behind it. And I won't bore you, Maura knows, I've gone down the rabbit hole of some of these issues. And we have a running Google document with our research that I find absolutely fascinating on the issues of family and work. But we have to do things here that have been proven to be successful. The evidence just shows that if you have flexibility, women do stay in the jobs longer. But we have to be in agreement that there's some professions that you just can't bring your kid to work. So maybe this is why I think it needs to be a broader societal solution. And another thing that we found is, it's a lot easier to achieve flexibility when you're at the top of your game. If you're having to do this at the beginning of your career, before you've had the chance to do internships and put in long hours and prove yourself, it is a lot harder. So these are the discussions that we have to have and stop kicking the can down the road. Andi Simon: Well, is that why the birth rate in this country is declining and declining at a very high rate and marriage rate is declining. And people aren't getting married till they're older. They are having kids at high risk levels and 40% of the kids are born to single parents and not to the guys. And so now you have an interesting demographic. Now, it's telling us something to your point, How can we not plan ahead? Well, we are planning ahead, sort of, which is, I'm not going to get married, we live together, I've done my savings. I think that the generation that's coming is so different from the Boomers and even different from Gen X and Gen Y somewhat. But they see this and they're beginning to talk about the changes they can bring. And I'm hoping that they can visualize something that addresses the balance dilemma. Christie Derrico: We have discussed this quite a bit. Our oldest children are the same age and they're in a similar line of work. But we can't answer whether these are for social scientists to study but I was curious. I did read the book. It's a dialogue with the Boomer and the Millennial. And it did open my eyes to see some of the reasons why some of the things you are talking about exist. We can't sit there and say, Well, back in my day we did it this way. There's a reason they feel insecurity. They went through some national crises, the 2008 meltdown, 911. These are part of the reasons that they feel they need huge security before they go on to that next step, aside from the socio expectations and living together and things like that. So I think that we have to look at them, address them, and try to give support, otherwise this is going to keep trending and we're not alone. All developed countries have low birth rates, but some have been more successful than others. And I think when we say fact- or evidence-based, that's what we need to look at: How do they do it in the countries where it's worked? And how can we have takeaways from those examples? Maura Carlin: Well, I actually don't 100% agree with Christie in terms of the age groups just because looking at them, I don't think that our older children fall into that. And it may be because I think they're considered young millennials, as opposed to the older millennials. So at least for my son, I don't think he was affected by those things the way some of the older ones were. I also think what they've seen is, how hard it is. I don't think it's just because of external things like crashes and, you know, real big crises, like 911. I think that they've seen their parents trying to figure out how to do this. And my eldest was keenly aware of the decision that I made, that someone needed to be there. And there, they haven't seen a solution. Andi Simon: Let me shift the focus aspect. Men. I'm married to a fantastic guy who went into his own business. When I was an executive at a bank, and I'm traveling up to Buffalo, and he's taking care of the kids, not that he's not employed, working and building his own business. But without Mr. Mom, it would have been more challenging. And we always had nannies, but they weren't the same. My kids' relationship to Mr. Mom is fantastic. And I think that's because he did become like a mom. And he was the guy who made sure they had a driver to pick them up and take them. And he was the one who picked them up and took them out for dinner. And we made it work. And they are both professional women doing the same. How are the men handling the roles they play? Are they shifting? Are they reinventing what masculine means? Are they good at staying at home? Moms: I had some executive coaching clients where the guys were sitting on the couch, and the kids were crying, and they were on the phone with me, on Zoom. And they said, How do I deal with this certain child who's a husband and two children who are children? Christie Derrico: We've had two guests, and we've had a number of men, but we've had two guests, for sure, men who did that. One in particular. And he really was. He liked to be called Mr. Dad, as he told us. His wife is a very prominent orthopedic surgeon, and he took over the homefront. And that was in fact the title of our episode. It was a choice he made, he was a lawyer also. And he was happy with having done that. And the kids grew up, they're happy. And they probably do, according to him, give a hard time to mom sometimes for that. Another one was a teacher, a journalist, who flew all over the world, and was never around. And ultimately decided that he would step back from that and take things that kept him around more. So I mean, they are starting to make those kinds of decisions. But what it's showing us is not that two people can have these high-flying careers at the same time, but rather that somebody has to step back, and it almost doesn't matter who it is. Someone has to step back. Go ahead, step back at home. So the other guest we had was a teacher. And he gave us an insight on paternity leave. And what he told us, one question we had had was when men take paternity leave, what are the stats? Are they home while the wives are home just giving a hand or they really, you know, coming in and staying home with the child alone, because obviously that's a big difference. And Steph explained, as did another guest of ours, a female guest, that they staggered the paternity leave so that someone who was a family member could be home with a newborn, and they could stretch out the time before they needed to hire a caregiver or bring them to a daycare. This is where analysis is important to understand how these families are cobbling it together. But as I'm hearing it, Andi, your perspective, you know, your voice here is men and how they're handling the situation. Women, we have found, also do something called gatekeeping. They're used to running the house, they say how the laundry is folded, dinner, what's prepared. We have to let go of some of those, our anal habits, and I'm speaking for myself, and just allow someone else. My husband did the shopping yesterday. I have to stop thinking in my head, all the things he forgot, or all the things that he bought that I don't like or don't usually buy. It's okay. And if he decides to make a meal during the week, I've got to eat it. I'm sure it's gonna be healthy. And I can't be the gatekeeper, which will be which penalizes me at the end of the day, if I can't delegate, if I can't accept that my children put their laundry away 60% perfect and some clean stuff goes back in the laundry bin or whatever they do, or dirty into the drawers. It's okay. And that's part of this discussion that we have to take up, maybe a little less perfect because we will be liberated if we can do that. Now we're gonna start sharing. Andi Simon: Your evidence is also grounded in a history where when the men came back from the war, the women who were doing just fine working were put back into their home. And welcome to the suburbs where they had their home. And I've met men who have wanted to sell the home, only to find out that it was a castle that the woman had controlled and built, and she was not going to sell that home. He thought it was a house. And she said, I'm not selling this, I built it. It was her career in a complementary fashion. Their identity is connected to their job, which was to care for the home. And I met another woman whose husband was an accountant, and she had dinner for him every night, the same time, when he came home. I'm going to think of it as theater, they knew those roles really well. They could play them in a heartbeat. Could they change roles and play a new one? Oh, it was terrifying. The thought of, How will I do this? So there's so much complexity into something that on the tip of our tongue says, But of course you can. And I'm not sure it's that easy. Maura Carlin: Something I don't think we talk about enough is the work demands and how they've changed over the generations. No jobs or few jobs are nine to five anymore, or even less than that. And I'll just tell you that my mother was a teacher, she was still home in the afternoon. My father, while he wasn't a businessman, actually negotiated for shorter hours and did freelance on the side. And he was home on Fridays. But even when he worked full time in the city, it wasn't the same kind of hours that we are expected to work now. And you know, that makes it harder. For one, to deal with the children, but it's harder to get childcare for those who want to work 9-7 or 7-9. So that's another piece that I don't think we talk about enough. Christie Derrico: I'm sorry, the entrepreneurial solution. That's, I don't advocate any 9-9. No. And believe me, I work hard. But a lot of my work and my husband's work, we do bring it home. What I was going to say, before we did mention Confessions of a Superwoman. But another great article is, Why I Want a Wife, which I had to write an essay on in high school. One of my teachers had me write an essay and it has nothing to do with, you know, partners, sexual partners. It's a support system. And this hidden workload. Running a house is laborious if you are cleaning in COVID. So many people couldn't have their cleaning help come in and they realized, this is really tough work. And there's a lot more I think that can go into parenting than just, you know, the ministerial making the sausage, as they call it. I mean, there are issues that come up with children, or at least in some families, that can't be addressed by other people. Andi Simon: Yep, they need their parents. Now that leads to the role of parents. Because, you know, we started the conversation: Has our society put on the side burner the child? And it worries me because rather than the child being the foremost most important thing that we should be working for, that we should be developing society around, it's almost a sidebar, and as Frank was discovering by taking care of his grandchild, this is exciting. It's wonderful. It's exhilarating. Why are we all built around our children? So as you're doing your research, why aren't we all built around the children? What is it in our American society where children are hard, both wonderful, but also challenging. How do we get our values on that stuff? Christie Derrico: The word helicoptering has come up. And in the course of our research, the UN study on birth rates has found that over-parenting has contributed to the lower birth rates, the expectations, and truthfully, I think children are less independent. The days of "just be home at six" are gone. They're very orchestrated with lots of activities. And a lot of parents' involvement is required driving. Even if you hire someone to drive, you have to be careful that it has to be somebody who's very skilled with your precious cargo. But that is a part of this discussion. And now we found again, with the pandemic, with the schools closed, a huge bulk of the support system that parents had disappeared overnight. And not only did you have them home, you are expected to do their schooling in front of a computer. But I will say that from the guests we've spoken to and our personal experiences, I actually don't think people have put the parenting on the backburner. I think that they're expecting to do it all. And they're expecting to do parenting at a much higher level than at least my parents did. Some of it's from society, and some of it is internal. Yeah, and some of it is the kids. Andi Simon: You're raising some interesting questions about society because I remember that I was pretty free and I had a bike, and I could ride my bike after school over to Lord and Taylor's and I had my own allowance. I could spend it however, I didn't have to explain much of anything. We went outside onto the street and played kickball, whoever was around. I still know my next-door neighbor. And Bobby and I laugh sometimes how free we were to be, and to learn through that becoming. But today, everything is different. And if you don't have them in lacrosse, and then soccer and then rugby, then they hang around with nothing to do because nobody's outside hanging out playing kickball. So you're caught between the two. So let's assume that's just going to be our society for a while. As you look forward to coming out of the pandemic, any thoughts for the women who are willing to look for that balance dilemma and somehow address it in some fashion because the businesses are full of a balance dilemma. Maura Carlin: I think it's going to have to be flexible. And it's going to have to be flexibility coming from the employers. The problem that I see, and I think about this all the time is, it's one thing to be flexible. But if the workload doesn't change, it's very hard. And I'm not talking about those who allow the workload to fill as many hours as you have. But there are things that just can't be flexible. I tried it at one point. After having kids, if the judge needed me to be in court, I had to be in court. And it really didn't matter whether it wasn't my day, or I had a parent-teacher conference. So, you know, there's a society piece in control. And those are two good insights. Christie Derrico: Well, I have managed to make my career flexible. And I have been before judges and I can remember a couple of tough experiences. I did have one story. My husband cut his finger one morning, and all I had was a Mickey Mouse or princess Band-Aid. And I said, "This is it. You're gonna have to go to court with this." So he puts it on and he goes, "This is great. The jury is gonna love this. They'll know I'm a dad." And I walked out and I said, "Ah, if I had walked in with the Mickey Mouse Band-Aid, I think that they would have thought, She's a terrible mom. She can't even get a Band-Aid. See the symbolism? Isn't it the same Band-Aid? In any event, this comes back to the issue of change. You know, when deciding careers and which position, the thing that we have addressed on our show are pivots, divots, pitfalls, curveballs...they happen, and how do you handle it. Or if you did decide to stay home for 10 years for great reasons, we have to stop thinking of parenting as pure drudgery. It's the most wonderful time and you only get that one chance. So if you decide to stay home, what happens? It takes a lot of courage. And we have featured many guests who have done return-ships. One woman was like a 40-year-old intern. And we didn't get to address this in one of our recent shows, but it was on my mind. She said that she felt that her managers could turn to her and talk about business problems because she was the only adult in the room, or, you know, a senior adult, not somebody who was 22 years old and didn't even know where to put the stamp on an envelope. So there are aspects, and now we can look at different careers, see where we might fit in best and aim for that. It probably takes us a couple years to reenter. But looking at these pivots, I think you have to just build yourself up and do it. Andi Simon: It's interesting listening to you because I hope those who are listening to us begin to think to themselves, How do we begin to change our attitudes or values, our minds? I did a workshop for the Petroleum Association in Pennsylvania in June last year, and they're all struggling without drivers. I said, Have you thought of hiring women? And they looked at me. I said, Well, listen, what is wrong with having drivers from 10-3? And let them do it when they drop the kids off at the schoolbus and pick them up after? And they looked at me. I said, You're short, you know, you have a challenge. And how can you then compliment them differently? How do you start to think about it from the eyes of what's possible? Because they're all sitting there waiting for jobs. And you simply say, Well, that's not our job. Why? Christie Derrico: These are the discussions we need to have because benefits are tied to employment. So if you have an employee, and they have a benefits package, it's harder to rationalize what is part time. Does a person want to take that on and have no benefits? So those are the solutions and the discussions we need to have. So we can have people that just can't commit to 40 hours a week, or 38-42 hours a week. And there are places for them. The biggest thing though when you return to the workforce is your family and getting them to adapt to loading the dishwasher, doing their own laundry, picking up a night to cook something. This is part of the cooperation. Andi Simon: You know, as a conductor of the family orchestra, everyone had an instrument to play. And if you conducted it well, they enjoyed it, it was an opportunity to shine as opposed to a penalty box because they were trialed. We can talk about how I trained my family, because part of it was to give them the confidence that they could have the opportunity to learn the training, and not to do and to be them. I was the enabler, the facilitator, the lover, the hugger, but not the "I'll take charge, you really messed it up" person. And that requires maturity on our part, to see this as a conductor might, where they aren't all playing their instruments yet, but nobody's trained them to play them. And so the metaphor that works for me might be something to share as you're thinking about them. I do have two thoughts to talk about. What is self-care? We have a 30-day challenge, actually a 60-day challenge, for a group of women presidents down in Nashville, it's going on now. And it's called Time to Take Care of You. And they're all stressed out. But the research is extraordinary that self-care can reduce stress. And what's happened is that for many successful women, they think it's guilty to take care of themselves. What does that mean, anything from having a cup of coffee on their porch, to working out, to setting aside time on their calendar for quiet time, a quiet walk, to go and have a hobby that they can do and how to program it so that it's part of their day. What are you seeing in terms of self-care, because this is our third and I'm going to be doing these as often as I can because everyone who gets into them doesn't want it to stop. Taking care of themselves is something to overcome, called guilt. And then when they do it, they go, "Oh, this makes me feel like I'm valued. I'm worth something." What do you see? Maura, do you want to start? Maura Carlin: Well, I mean, personally, I'm one of those people who needs to exercise. I need to move. Not everyone feels that way. I think the problem is finding the time. It's very hard to set aside that time. And Christie and I do talk about that you need to have friends. If that's important to you, you need to get exercise for health reasons. But for some people, it's sort of like what energizes them. I think you need time to yourself. And I will tell you that I have started doing a gratitude compassion class that I'm failing at miserably. But that's okay. And the big part of it is being kind to yourself. Yes. And I think that's what we all need more of. Andi Simon: Well, I find that the challenge is just fascinating. Because once they get into it, it takes a day or two or three, and then all of a sudden, they don't want to stop it. And it has a gratitude part at the end and the wall of wins with a high-fiving each other. Christie, do you find people with self-care as the afterthought also, because without it, you can't be happy? Christie Derrico: Well, in the evolution of my family, my grandmother unfortunately passed away before she was 60. And I feel that she nearly worked herself to death. She did have an illness, but she was not good at the self-care aspect of it. And she had the biggest heart. And I think of her all the time in terms of the lessons as a business owner, and a mother. And my mother brought that to the table to say, You got to have sports, you have to have friends. So it's something that's been part of my life. I get up very early to do my exercise, which sometimes can be, you know, exhausting, but it's maybe you do it three days a week, and not five, you know, you find a way to accommodate it. But in talking about pivots and trying new things, I went back to school, and I am almost halfway through a Masters in English. And I see our podcast as something that Maura and I did. That was a personal hobby that turned into something. We learned new things. And we had to make room for this. I mean, Maura edits the audio for our shows, I do the newsletter and the graphics. I can't even believe I've learned how to do that. I think it's really important to keep learning new things, especially with all the new technology. And it can be very frustrating. But I think actually keeping up with it is really important. From a mental standpoint, and to not feel like the world has passed. Andi Simon: So we are about ready to wrap up. So if that is your first: the world doesn't pass you by, you must stay up on top. Do you have one or two other things more and then I'll let Christie do hers. Maura Carlin: The thing that I keep telling myself that I wished I told myself earlier was to be bolder and be braver. And things that scare me, I have to go do them. Andi Simon: I love that be bolder, be braver. I never thought of it that way. But you're right. To be brave I think is what we need to be because the times have always been tough. And somehow we all had families that mustered through them. And I think these are going to be exciting times to come out and be brave, be courageous. Christie, your last thoughts. Christie Derrico: With the gratitude theme, sometimes we have to stop and reflect and really applaud ourselves about what we've achieved. Stop focusing on what we didn't do, the things that didn't turn out great. Never. You must love to have experienced love loss, like it's all part of it. And I think that Maura and I do a post mortem at the end of our season, and even sitting here today, I was thinking this weekend, how much we achieved on the goals we set for ourselves. And if some don't happen, that doesn't really matter. That's okay too. But it's important to take stock and be appreciative and compliment yourself that you've done a good job. Andi Simon: You know, the brain research I love because it's, you know, being an anthropologist and looking at culture, that the brain, the human being, needs gratitude, appreciation. It needs to have those three things every day that you did well. And all of a sudden, the car is actually toasted and the rain goes flying around and that love hormone makes you feel warm and fuzzy. If you don't, the cortisol has a great time making you feel angry. Somebody said to me at a meeting, "I have a friend who's angry all the time. How do they change?" He said, "Just take control of your mind. There's nothing in your mind. That's anger. It's just the way you think. So now what's happening is you're happy." How do you turn lemons into lemonade because nobody can do it but us. And we can each do it so that we can then smile every morning. So the first thing that my little 30-day challenge tells you to do is to wake in the morning and smile. And all of a sudden, the day looks very cool. Why not? It's perfect. This has been such fun. If they want to listen to The Balance Dilemma, or get a hold of you, where and how do they do that? Christie Derrico: We are on the internet at thebalancedilemma.com where you can find old episodes. We have show notes and things recommended by our guests. We're also on social media at The Balance Dilemma podcast on Facebook and LinkedIn. And any place you listen to your podcasts, which could be Apple, iTunes, Google Spotify. The Balance Dilemma, you can find all the episodes and listen in. We appreciate it. Andi Simon: You were bold and brave and courageous and true. And I loved having both of you here. So for my listeners, all of you have done a great job making us in the top 5% of global podcasts. I don't know how many podcasts there are, so I don't know what that actually means, other than it's fun to share. And we're in the top world 20's futures podcast. So I'm a real fan of Futurism because the signals are coming to us every day. And today's podcast makes me remember that there are signals coming to us that the times are changing fast. We know that. But how can we do this in a way that will be stronger for our kids and their kids and create a real strong culture and society where children are in the forefront of what we're doing and how we're doing it? And that doesn't mean just popping them in the car and helicoptering them over to the next lacrosse game. I mean, there's something broader here and even getting them to love to read and understand the joy of exploring ideas and staying on top of what's happening because they're going to lead us. These are great, great stories. You can reach me at info@andisimon.com. My books are on Amazon, Barnes & Noble: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business and On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights from which this whole podcast developed. And as we move into our post-300th podcast, I'm really happy to be sharing lots and lots of great stories. Thanks for coming. Have a great day. Stay well and enjoy the joy of living.

Mission to the Moon Podcast
ทำไมการเรียนรู้จากบุคคลต้นแบบ ถึงสำคัญ? | Highlight Remaster EP.84

Mission to the Moon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 1:57


เริ่มเป็นนักเรียนรู้ในสไตล์ Adam Grant อย่างไรดี? . รับชมฉบับเต็มได้ที่ https://bit.ly/3cSPnON . #MissionToTheMoonPodcast #Remaster #TheMaster

Mission to the Moon Podcast
กลัวไม่ได้ลองทำ ดีกว่า กลัวล้มเหลว | Highlight Remaster EP.84

Mission to the Moon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 1:55


"กลัวไม่ได้ลองทำ ดีกว่า กลัวล้มเหลว" ถอดบทเรียนจาก "Adam Grant" นักเขียนเจ้าของหนังสือชื่อดังอย่าง Think Again . รับชมฉบับเต็มได้ที่ https://bit.ly/3cSPnON . #MissionToTheMoonPodcast #Remaster #themaster

The Next Chapter by American Express Business Class
Adam Grant on “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World”

The Next Chapter by American Express Business Class

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 35:02 Very Popular


Adam Grant is an organizational psychologist, best-selling author and the top-rated professor at one of the world's most prestigious business schools for seven years running. Grant's influential book “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World” makes the case for an outsider approach to problem solving, drawn from years of his own academic research, the groundwork of others and interviews with famous freethinkers. In this episode, Cardiff Garcia sits down with Grant to examine how organizations can encourage a culture of originality, and how his thoughts have shifted since the book's publication in 2016.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
599: Drs. Audrey Elias & Jenn Bell: Doing Continuing Education Different w/ Trailhead Learning Collective

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 40:32


In this episode, Co-Founders of Trailhead Learning Collective, Jenn Bell, PT, ScD, COMT, and Audrey Elias, PT, PhD, OCS, talk about their work doing Continuing Education different. Today, they talk about the current state of Continuing Education, integration of information, and addressing Continuing Education courses. How is Trailhead Learning Collective different? Hear about active learning techniques, some upcoming retreats, and get Audrey and Jenn's advice to their younger selves, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “Our patients are human, but we, as clinicians, are human, and it's important to respect that.” “There is a time and place for everything.” “There is an alternative way to get your continuing education done that also takes care of yourself.” “Remain flexible and keep watching for those opportunities.” “All of it is worth it. All those experiences are things that you can draw on.” “It's alright to go do different things that aren't exactly on your path.”   More about Audrey Elias and Jenn Bell Jenn Bell, PT, ScD, COMT, and Audrey Elias, PT, PhD, OCS, are co-founders of Trailhead Learning Collective. Audrey is clinical faculty in the University of Montana School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences. She completed her DPT in 2009, did her residency with Therapeutic Associates in Washington state, and then completed her PhD in clinical  biomechanics at the University of Montana in 2015. She then did a post-doc at the University of Guelph before returning to UMPT as clinical faculty, training entry-level students and residents in the DPT program and in the UMPT clinic. Her primary area of research involves how psychological factors play into movement, particularly following knee injury. Most importantly, she loves being outside, whether skiing, running, hiking, paddle-boarding, or lounging around a campfire with her son and husband. Jenn is the Program Director and Director of Clinical Education at UMPT. She completed PT school in 2006, then completed her COMT in 2012 and her ScD from Texas Tech in 2013, all while treating patients in a variety of settings in rural Alaska. She has treated patients and taught in PT programs in virtually every setting all over  the world, including Kenya, Ethiopia, and Malawi, and is an internationally-recognized expert in inter-professional education and global health. She is also the co-Primary Investigator and Team Advisor for Montana Inter-Professional Student Hotspotting, improving outcomes in underserved populations in rural Montana. Above all, she is always, always, having a good time outside with family, friends, food, and an adventure, setting an example for her two young daughters. Together, and through the values of adventure, growth, authenticity, collaboration, and respect, Jenn and Audrey are working to build a collective of compassionate, confident, critical thinkers who utilize best-practices in their field.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, ConEd, Education, Learning, Research, Networking, Integration, Innovation, Collaboration,   Resources Prevention & Wellness for the Running Athlete. https://www.trailheadlearn.com/healthywealthysmart   Get 10% off your first retreat: Mention Healthy, Wealthy, & Smart at Registration.   To learn more, follow Audrey and Jenn at: Website:          https://www.trailheadlearn.com Facebook:       Trailhead Learning Collective Instagram:       @audreyroseelias                         @jennbell427                         @trailheadlearning   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:07 Welcome to the healthy, wealthy and smart podcast. Each week we interview the best and brightest in physical therapy, wellness and entrepreneurship. We give you cutting edge information you need to live your best life healthy, wealthy and smart. The information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only and should not be used as personalized medical advice. And now, here's your host, Dr. Karen Litzy.   00:35 Hey everybody, welcome back to the podcast. I am your host, Karen Litzy. I want to thank you all for joining us today. And again, if you haven't then definitely subscribe to the podcast on any platform in which podcasts are streamed. So today's episode, we are talking about doing continuing education different and my guest today are Dr. Jenn Bell and Dr. Art Audrey Elias. They are cofounders of Trailhead learning collective. Audrey is a clinical faculty in the University of Montana School of Physical Therapy and rehabilitative sciences. She completed her DPT in 2009 Did her residency with therapeutic associates in Washington state and then completed her PhD in Clinical biomechanics at the University of Montana in 2015. She then did a postdoc at the University of Guelph before returning to you and PT as clinical faculty training entry level students and residents in the DPT program and in the UN PT clinic. Her primary area of research involves how psychological factors play into movement, particularly following knee injury. Most importantly, she loves being outside weather, skiing, running, hiking, paddleboarding, or lounging around a campfire with her son and her husband. Jen is the program director and clinical and Director of Clinical Education at UMP T. She completed PT school in 2006 then completed her Colm T in 2012, and her side Dee from Texas Tech in 2013, all while treating patients in a variety of settings in rural Alaska. She has treated patients and taught and PT programs in virtually every setting all over the world including Kenya, Ethiopia and Malawi, and is an internationally recognized expert in interprofessional education and Global Health. She is also the CO primary investigator and team advisor for Montana interprofessional student hotspotting improving outcomes in underserved populations in rural Montana. Above all, she is always having a good time outside with family friends food and an adventurer setting example for her two young daughters together and through the values of adventure growth and authenticity, collaboration and respect. Jen and Audrey are working to build a collective of compassionate, confident critical thinkers who utilize best practices in their field. Now, like I said, they are the founders of Trailhead learning collective. And Jen and Audrey have a special offer for healthy, wealthy and smart listeners. If you go to their website, which is on the podcast dot healthy, wealthy dot smart page, and you want to check out their next learning opportunity. Then you get 10% off because you're listening to this podcast. So if you go to Trailhead learned.com Or go to the podcast website, and when you apply to be part of their next learning opportunity, and mentioned this podcast will get 10% off. So a big thank you to Jen and Audrey for that. And in the meantime, everyone enjoyed today's episode. Hello, Jen and Audrey. Thank you so much for coming on to the podcast today to talk about the innovative way you guys are doing continuing education courses. So doing Con Ed differently, and I love it. But before we get into that, Jen, why don't we start with you say a little bit about yourself. So the viewers know or the viewers, the listeners know who's who.   04:12 Yeah, it sounds great. So I'm Tim Doyle and I'm the Program Director and the Director of Clinical Education at the University of Montana's physical therapy program. I've been at UN for nine years. I'm just going in to start my 10th year there, which is wild to think I've been doing this for almost a decade. And prior to moving to Montana, I was in Rural Clinical Practice in Alaska. And so I lived in a town of 2500 people at the end of the road for bed hospital. So got to kind of treat whatever walked in the door. It was a really great opportunity. And during that time, I was working on my doctorate of science who Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. So yeah, it's all about   04:53 Excellent, Audrey. Go ahead a little bit more about yourself.   04:59 Thanks, Karen. And I'm Audrey Elias. I am also at the University of Montana and clinical faculty there. I treat patients in the clinic, but most of my time is actually treating patients with students. So I'm a preceptor in our integrated clinical education program. And then I also teach in the DPT program, as well. I did my PhD at the University of Montana, I did my DPT at the University of Montana. So I pretty much have been in Montana for a very long time. But I also practiced in Washington, in the far west, on the Olympic Peninsula, in rural areas where we saw lots of different folk. Yeah, and then Jen and I are also cofounders of Trailhead learning collective. So we're heavy, heavy University of Montana. But we're also doing this other thing.   06:02 And we are going to talk about that today. But before we get into that, let's talk about the why behind it. So what has your clinical education or continuing clinical education been like in the past where you thought you know, this, I'm not connecting with this and I need to do something different. So talk a little bit about your journeys.   06:26 And you go ahead   06:29 yeah, um, so you know, carrying that's a great question kind of what informed us to get to this place or we decided to found Trailhead learning collective. You know, I've done I've been in clinical practice and a PT for 15 years, and I've done everything from going to CSM was 17,000 of my closest friends to Education Leadership Conference with the APTA Academy of Education, to, you know, the weekend course that someone brings into their clinic. And what I find oftentimes is that I'm in these courses. And, you know, I'm, I'm finding myself kind of not super engaged with the learning, there's a lot of lecture. And, you know, sitting around going from being in a really active profession where I'm doing everything from crawling around on the ground with my patients to helping them stand up and walk to sitting oftentimes at a plant in a clinic all weekend long, being lectured to. And so I was really looking for something different from that. Actually, what's your experience been? Well,   07:39 I did my orthopedic residency right out of school, and in private practice with therapeutic associates in Port Angeles, Washington, and I averaged one three day weekend of Con Ed a month for almost a year and a half. And I hosted those courses, I got the bagels, I got the coffee, I made sure the bathrooms were clean, I did all of that. So I've done a lot of that. And I've been I did my PhD and went to CSM was 17,000 of my closest friends over and over and over again. I've done like every kind of Con, as you can imagine, I've done you know, 45 minute online things through Harkness school for dance injury. I've done level one pelvic floor. And, you know, they got real intimate with 15 brand new people. And to be so to be my authentic self here, I will fall asleep if I am sitting down for more than 20 minutes. And I will not remember a single thing. Anyone tells me if I'm being lectured at, if I'm not actively engaged in I fell asleep in my first class in undergrad. I it's just how I work. So I have to have really engaging Con Ed, you know, if I'm going to learn anything, otherwise, I do it all on my own afterward, right? So I'll go to 18 hours on a weekend where I don't get to go on my run. I don't get to spend time with my family. I have a 10 year old now I don't get to do these other things that I wanted to do. And then I would have to go home and I'd have to review it all on the treadmill. Because now I'm moving I'm doing stuff and then I can actually learn or I'd have to like go for a run with Jen and tell her all about what we just did in order for me to actually process and I just thought to myself You know, I want something different. I want, I want to use this, I want to use this information immediately. And I also think, doing my PhD, we did, I did a randomized clinical trial, post ACL reconstruction stuff, and just trying to get help people understand how to use that. I can't just tell them, it does not work. It doesn't work. We have to do it, we have to not just show we have to do and work together on it. So yeah, I think it's just a long time of realizing that there's a place and a time for everything. And but there's but there needs to be this thing as well, that can serve people like me.   10:57 And, you know, you kind of described what a lot of continuing education courses are in the PT world where you go, you sit at a plan, you're taking notes, maybe you get a stretch break, you have like some sort of pastry, and coffee. And the question I always had with those in particular is, what if it's not your learning style? What if you need a little something different, like something that involves more demonstration, more movement, more, getting up more? Just a different style of learning. So what have Have you seen the current state of continuing education? And do you feel like we're really maximizing professional development? Go ahead, Jen.   11:44 Oh, Audrey, go ahead. Oh, well, I feel like what's really interesting is that in a physical therapists are super committed to learning. Just in general, I was actually so we're both huge nerds. So he's doing quite a lot of literature search on this. And if I was trying to write an abstract for CSM, I wouldn't be able to, because you have to have at least five papers within the last five or seven years or something. And there just aren't any, there's no literature on what's going on. With Con Ed, currently, there's a paper just this year about so in the PT and PT J, with continuing education courses for orthopedic and sports PTs in the US often lack supporting evidence. And so they went through and review available intervention courses. So great paper. But there was one by Adrian Lowe this year, looking at the impact of a three hour PMP course, on low back pain, and how people did. It was pretty good. It was really interesting. But otherwise, well, next paper is 15 years ago, that I combined. So we don't really know what's going on in the form of knowing that I'm familiar with, we don't really know, in terms of my anecdotal experience, go, the learning environments that I have experienced are not really set up to maximize learning based on pedagogical evidence. So we know that active learning is important. And it just, it makes it like it's really, really hard. We just don't see a ton of that. And I think what happens is that, then we get where content becomes like a chore, right? It's a box, you have to tick, I gotta get Montana, I have to have 20 hours every two years. So I think 3030 Whatever it is, I have to have it and I have to go and check in order to check them tick that box. And I think it ends up becoming problematic on a lot of different levels. Yeah. I don't know if I answered that question completely.   14:15 I think so. Jen, do you need to fill in any blanks there? Yeah, well,   14:20 you know, I think what Audrey was hitting on thinking about in our continuing education courses, we can bring in the pedagogical research, just like we bring in to physical therapy research. And until you know, we do this a lot in our entry level program, we're thinking about what are the best ways that adults learned? How can we convey this information in a way that's effective that's going to address our learning outcomes, not just our patient outcomes. And so that's really one of the things that Audrey and I are looking to bring to our Trailhead learning collective courses and retreats is bringing in the research on active and learning mean, and teaching adult learners. And so bringing that in, you know, really minimizing the amount of lecture that we do engaging in active learning techniques, whether it's going through cases together, having discussions, you know, putting up big whiteboards and doing some, you know, throwing out ideas and looking at other people's ideas, you know, that way really kind of shifting the paradigm from being teacher centered to being learner centered. So you know, when you're in that lecture based course, it's about this expert that's standing in front of you talking and conveying to you what you should be doing in clinical practice. We're really trying to flip that and bring all of these learners together, oftentimes have, you know, decades of clinical practice, have all of these pearls all of this knowledge, and asking them to share it with one another. And we'll bring in the evidence on, you know, the the content that we're teaching on. But really, not bringing a group of people together that have years of clinical practice, and have learned a lot and asking them to not talk to one another and just listen to what an expert says. So really trying to kind of flip that model and really focusing in on the learner experience, and learner engagement.   16:16 Right. And that kind of leads me to the next question, what a perfect transition is, you know, going from a traditional model, which can be effective in getting information from me, the teacher to you, the student? But is it effective when it comes to information processing integration into clinical life? So can you kind of talk about the those concepts as perhaps not being equal and not being the same? And how can we get better integration of information?   16:58 Yeah, can you make a great point, you know, lecture is a really effective way to just transfer knowledge. But that piece of integrating it and making changes is where we see that active learning tends to be more effective. Like Audrey said, there's really not great evidence about, you know, do continuing education courses, impact and change how people engage in clinical practice, we hope and we believe that, you know, if we can effectively teach you something, then you'll use that information. So that's like, that's a gap in the research. But we do know that active learning techniques, improve retention, and kind of consolidation of information, and kind of thinking that information deeper into our longer term memory. And so that's why we use active learning techniques. There's also some really cool, early research coming out on looking at the impact of exercise of aerobic exercise, on learning. And so boom strand and inco, Hall and 2020 published a study and they looked at a single bout of aerobic exercise. And what they found is that it improves attention, concentration, and learning and memory functions and young adults. And so there's some studies like that coming out showing that if we can incorporate this component of physical activity, with our learning, either right before, during or after there's some different sides looking at the different benefits of those, then we can improve learning and retention as well.   18:33 And can you give some examples of active learning techniques? Because we've said that a couple of times, and I can just picture people being like, Okay, that's cool.   18:42 But what does that mean? It was so fun. Because I mean, we've both been teaching. For so long, both I will say we've taught both in the entry level DPT program. And then we've also we teach continuing ed courses before this as well. And mostly in that lecture based thing, we're like, oh, I don't like to teach that either. And I think we both were like, Okay, we need to change this up. So we've gone to a week long training on for the National Institute of scientific teaching, and just teaching how to teach in this way. In the sciences. It's very, it's pretty easy to do in the humanities. But in the sciences, it can be very, like, Oh, I just need to get this information across. Right. So in STEM fields, it's like, well, I just need to know how to pipette or whatever in chemistry. So there are lots of different ways so we can do like gallery walks, put up things with small groups. They process the information put up different ways and how they would do it around the room the rest of the day, and then their entire group walks around the process, we can do two to one, activities, give a prompt, everyone has a minute, maybe, to think on their own individually, maybe write something down there is that reflective cognitive process that comes from actively hand writing something down, that there are mental changes who have to write it down, turn to their neighbor, talk about the individual thing, and then come back in a larger group and, and everybody has to go around and say what their partner did, and pros and cons thereof. So lots of discussion. Obviously, when Jen, you had a really good one that you are doing,   20:50 what are the ones that I do with some of my classes is that I, when I start to teach about a new topic, the first thing I do is kind of the same scenario that Audrey just talked about candidate seat by myself, think with a partner and think with a group. But I prompt the group and the learner is to think about what it is you need to know about this topic. So based off your experiences you've had so far, kind of brainstorm, what are the things that you need to know? So we're really priming them to, you know, what is it that I do know? What is it that I don't know? What are things that are what are those, maybe when we share out to group, then people are going to identify those unknown unknowns that they didn't know, they needed to know. And so we can kind of start off by kind of forming a list of everything we're gonna need to go through and talk about, it's great for me, because then I can be like, oh, I need to make sure that we you know, dig into this some more and, and then at the end, we can go back through that list and be like, did we do we know everything we needed to know going into this? And so oftentimes, you know, instead of just starting off with me, like, hi, welcome. And then I start lecturing, why don't we start with you kind of digging into what it is that you want to learn about a topic, and going from there?   22:07 Yeah, I love that that's very similar to a course that I took last year through Goldman Sachs called the Goldman Sachs 10 KSB program, which is 10,000 small business program. And it is exactly what you just described, we would get the information, we would they would give us prompts to do ourselves, we have a paired partner, where we would talk about them, then we go into the larger group and talk about what our partners did. And the partners would talk about what we did. And it was really, really helpful. And that's the first time I've experienced that I've never experienced that at a continuing education course. So in it, it it really, like when you're done, you're like, Oh, I yeah, I know this, I understand it, I get the concepts, it's like rooted in there, because you had so many conversations about it with one on one with your instructor and with the group.   23:00 I think physical therapy can be so at work, we are so busy, right? Seeing 12 to 20 people a day, sometimes you have to be going, I know, and getting your documentation done all this stuff. It's rote, you're just going, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. And so going into a Con Ed course and learning a clinical Pearl for five minutes. And maybe you even talk briefly with your buddy about how you might use that. The sad fact is that on Monday, when you go in your brain, you are going to drop down into habitual levels that just are, especially if you've been in practice for more than six months. And it takes a lot of energy to, to, in the moment, reflect back on what you did and saw and actually incorporate it deeply into your body. But with these techniques, we can get at least a tiny little tendril, of a root. And hopefully that can grow and root a little deeper, so that we see more change in how we're actually working. And we're actually treating patients   24:17 and does it sounds like we're becoming a little too robotic. A little too robotic, maybe in work a little too robotic in continuing ed. You know, like, you're okay, I have to go. I'm going to sit, I'm going to listen to these lectures. I'm going to get through it. I'm going to get my CPUs and then I'm going to do this on Monday and then it just doesn't happen. So then what what happens to that continuing education? Does it just fall out of your head like what happens?   24:47 Well, how many times have you take learned anatomy of the hip? Every single continuing education course you teach anatomy of the hip? I have taught I learned it. I've taught it many, many times. Each and every single time, I forget it. And I need that review because those things do drop out of our heads so quickly. And it's not bad. It's not saying that we're wrong or awful, that is normal. That is being a human, we can't get away from it.   25:18 One of the things that we try to do with these opportunities to really engage with the different people that are there in this in this group with you learning together, is giving you the opportunity to take that that new knowledge, or maybe that review of knowledge you've learned before, and take it and look at it a different way. And think about how you know, the person you're working with is going to use that in their practice, and then really work as a team to think about how can I take this knowledge in on Monday, in my setting, I mean, you know, here in Montana, I have clinicians that are going back to, to dot Montana, and are practicing in the next PT is 100 miles away. So how can they incorporate that into their clinical practice, versus the clinician, you know, that's in a sports specialized clinic in Bozeman, Montana. And so we really want to empower clinicians not just to suck in all the information that we're giving to them, but actually really dig into the material and think about how they can use it. And so one of the things we're trying to do with our courses is challenge the assumption that in these 15, CEUs, that you're going to earn, that we have to pack in as much material as possible. That's really not an assumption that we're working off of. So we're we're going to kind of switch that paradigm and say, instead of having this massive breadth of information, we're gonna give you a smaller amount of information, but we're gonna go a lot deeper. And we're really going to dig into how you can use this in clinical practice. And so it's just a kind of a shift in that assumption.   27:01 Yeah. And that leads me into the next question, again, a great lead in how is Trailhead learning collective different? How were you set up differently,   27:10 one of the things that we talked about a lot. And going back to when you said, it sounds like we're getting a little robotic. I think one of our kind of prime values, our main values is authenticity and respect. And that's respecting everything from the land that we're on to the humans that we're working with. We are working with humans, our patients are humans, but are we as clinicians are human. And I think it's important to respect that, like taking that much time away is hard. And burnout is very, very real and extremely prevalent. So one of the things that we are really wanting to do is make a trailhead learning retreat, actually, that like it's a retreat, it is the time to rediscover joy. In physical therapy, it's a time to go to a cool place, have someone take care of you. So all inclusive, your housings included, it's delightful, you're on a mountain or on a beach or wherever we happen to be in the desert. In house chef cooking your meals that are delicious, and primed for you. And having active learning where you're an active participant and feeling engaged, and validated and real, and also get to go out and adventure like experience the place. Yeah, I've been to so many cool places for continuing education, and ended up sitting in a plant in a clinic or in a conference room for the entire day. And then, in order to get any exercise at all, I just went for a run on the treadmill in the hotel. And I didn't get to experience anything about that place. So I think one of the thing that is making Trailhead different is we're really trying to treat the learner as a whole human being and make this time worth it both personally and professionally. In kind of all of those different aspects when you go for a cool trail run, we can make that happen. And you can get 15 hours you can tick that box for sure. And we'll make it worth your time. And you get to be taken care of for a little while.   29:44 Yeah, kind of reminds me of when you see on social media people saying How come I didn't take Monday off of work after having this continuing ed course it was too much and now I'm like totally burned out. So it sounds like maybe this would quell that a little bit. it. And the other part I wanted to talk about is something that we spoke about before we went on. And that's making a connection with the people in the course with you. Because so often we go to these courses, maybe there's 20 people, maybe there's 100, and you end up knowing no one, when you leave. Right. So how, how are you addressing that?   30:21 Yeah, Karen, that's a great point, I went to a continuing education course, a few years ago in San Francisco, and coming from, you know, at the time I was practicing in rural Alaska. And so I really would have loved to get to know more about, like, what is clinical practice, like, in San Francisco compared to, you know, what I am navigating and I left not knowing a single person, you know, part of that is on me, I didn't, you know, I did the thing that a lot of us do it kind of courses, I sat at my phone in the plant, I said, some, you know, small talk at the coffee. And so we're making a really deliberate effort, we're all in the same housing, we're sharing all of our meals together, and engaging in physical activity together, in addition to the time that we're doing the act of learning and getting those continuing ed credits done. And so really creating a space for folks to show up authentically. So I don't expect anyone to show up to her courses, having had 100% success with every single patient they've ever treated, but we want folks to show up and, you know, talk openly and honestly about the places that they struggle in their clinical practice, and, you know, had those conversations and to have this network develop, as we're in this space together. The the course that we're teaching in October is, of course, provincial wellness for the running athlete. And, you know, Audrey is gonna start us off with some really great conversation about bias and how our beliefs about ourselves as runners impacts how we believe and talk to our running athlete, patients. And so you know, being able to kind of explore those parts of ourselves and how they inform our clinical practice, or maybe, at times, potentially cloud our judgment, we can start to have those more intimate conversations as clinicians and people and start to build that network so that when you leave, you have this collective of physical therapists that you know, that you've created some bonds with.   32:25 Yeah, so kind of being a little more social. And, you know, off it sounds to me, like business retreats that I've gone on, you know, even if it's a one day mastermind, you leave with these people who, even after one day, kind of stay with you, because you've purposefully made those bonds.   32:46 Yeah, exactly. And I think that's one of the things that, that the business role does really well is that if we're gonna bring all these people together, we're going to, you know, put them in spaces and create opportunities for them to network on that deeper level. And in physical therapy, we are so focused on getting our patients better at all are we're so focused on the patient, that oftentimes the time when we gather for continued education, we're not speaking about each other as clinicians. And, and like Audra said those hope people that show up. And so that's one of the ways that we are approaching this differently.   33:24 Yeah, it sounds it sounds delightful. And now as we start to wrap things up, what do you want the listeners to take away? What are your big talking points? Or maybe there's only one? I don't know. But what do you want people to take away from? How and why you're doing things differently?   33:47 I think one of the one of the things that I want people to understand for themselves is that there is a time and place for everything. And sometimes you need that quick online 30 minutes learning about FAI, or stroke or whatever, because you have a patient who's really like, right, then you need a little bit and you should get some credit for the work that you do in that moment. I think that's excellent. I really like the you know, read for credit that JLS PT does, I had a paper that was a read for credit paper and I was like, This is great. Somebody's gonna like get value, monetary value from reading my paper. That is excellent. traditional lecture has its place but then I think it's fine. I think it's important for people to say you know what, this is what I need. I I need this time and I'm okay with going and getting it I deserve that. I am a value as well. And this is important. So I think you know valuing Oh, that kind of experience a little more. want somebody to take that away? Well, you know, I think that   35:09 I have two small daughters. And oftentimes the parenting people say, you know, it's really important to take care of yourself so that you can better take care of your kids. And I think that we have to remember that as clinicians, and so finding ways to really take care of ourselves as, as people and humans, as we're doing this continuing education, certainly there's those times where like Audrey said, you need that quick Con Ed. But there, there is an alternative way to get your continuing education done. That also takes care of yourself.   35:43 Yeah, I love it. I love the concept around it. And I, I think you guys are going to be successful in this because it sounds like it's plugging a hole in the continuing education world that people really want. And I also think it's outstanding that you are both been educators for close to a decade. And you can bring all of that to, to continuing education courses. Because I think that's really important. Now, let's talk about when the course is where people can find it social media, where can they find you give us all the details.   36:28 Yeah, so our upcoming courses October 7, eighth, and ninth in Whitefish, Montana. So as I said earlier, so of course on prevention and wellness for the running athlete that is paired with guided trail running with our friends and partners with Alpine reading diets. So you can find information about our course and upcoming courses, we're about to announce a winter course that snowshoeing skiing, and biking, fat biking. That's all on our website, Trailhead. learned.com,   37:01 I wanted to say that we're gonna do 10% off the first retreat for healthy, wealthy and smart listeners, just we so the way we do it is we get your information, and then call you this is a very intimate environment. So we want to start off that way. So you would send us your information that you're interested in the course we call you, we get everything. And at that point, just say that you heard about it from healthy, wealthy and smart.   37:29 The last question is what I asked everyone, and knowing where you are now in your life, and in your career, what advice would you give to your younger self and your younger self, let's say maybe right out of PT, school,   37:43 you know, the advice that I would give to my younger self, is actually advice that I continue to get to my, I'm not gonna say older self, but current self. And we'll get to my future self. You know, I read this great book, by Adam Grant called Think again. And in the book, he talks about, you know, really staying flexible in your thinking. And I think there's been a lot of times in my life that I've had a five year plan, and I'm going to fix my five year plan. And I think I would encourage my younger self to have maybe a very loose plan, but to not get too stuck on what the five year plan is, there are certainly times in life where that five year plan helps you stick it out, like when you're doing your doctorate or science. But there's been so many opportunities that if I was, you know, had pigeon holed myself into that five year plan, I would have missed them. And so to remain flexible, and keep watching for those various opportunities.   38:42 Yeah, I love it. Audrey, how about you?   38:47 I think they would give the same advice to myself now that I did, that I would give to my younger self as well. And it's advice that I give to my students. And that would be that it's all worth it. Like all of those experiences are things that you can draw on for your as you're talking to patients. And as you're thinking critically, I teach clinical reasoning, and all of those experiences give you some flexibility of thought. And I think that's really important. So like going and just experimenting and being okay, like it's alright to go do different things that aren't exactly on   39:30 your path. Excellent advice from both of you. And I do want to thank you so much for coming on the podcast and talking about doing continuing education different with Trailhead learning collective. I think it's it sounds like a great opportunity, and I encourage all the listeners to check it out. We'll have links at the podcast, follow them on social media. So thank you so much for coming on and sharing all of your fun stuff. Coming up. Thanks so much.   40:03 Thanks for having us. Ontarian it's been great to chat with you. Yes. Awesome.   40:06 Thanks so much,   40:07 and everyone thanks so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.   40:13 Thank you for listening and please subscribe to the podcast at podcast dot healthy, wealthy smart.com. And don't forget to follow us on social media

Salvador Mingo -Conocimiento Experto-
291- En Busca de la Excelencia - Lecturas Recomendadas Conocimiento Experto

Salvador Mingo -Conocimiento Experto-

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 32:50


¿Qué hay para mi dentro del libro de lecturas recomendadas del programa conocimiento experto En Busca de la Excelencia de Ryan Hawk? Descubre como Los Patrones de Comportamiento, tu Entorno Personal y las Relaciones Transformadoras tendrán un gran Impacto en tu Progreso Personal Adquiere el Libro: https://amzn.to/3bgC3CI Accede a nuestro grupo privado en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/conocimientoexperto Monetiza tus Redes Sociales: https://impactoexperto.com/ Participa del Reto 60/100 para ser una Mejor Versión: https://conocimientoexperto.com/reto60100 Accede a mi sito oficial y desarrolla tu modelo de negocio: https://www.salvadormingo.com/ Accede al Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principios Obtén mi libro: https://amzn.to/2KmHMXa Mis programas: * Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principios * Libro Conocimiento: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/unavidaconproposito * Programa Posicionamiento de Expertos en Internet: https://conocimientoexperto.com/programaexperto * Más contenidos gratuitos: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org * Aplicación Móvil Conocimiento Experto: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/apps/ * Programa Conocimiento Experto Elite: https://conocimientoexperto.com/elite Mis redes: * Sígueme En Instagram en: https://www.instagram.com/salvadormingo/ * Sígueme en Facebook en: https://www.facebook.com/Conocimientoexperto * Sígueme en Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/SalvadorMingoConocimientoExperto * Sígueme en Twitter en: https://twitter.com/s_mingo He aquí una pregunta para ti: ¿Qué prefieres conseguir, el éxito o la excelencia? Bien, sí, los dos pueden parecer sinónimos, pero hay una distinción importante. El éxito sólo se puede determinar haciendo comparaciones con otros, mientras que la excelencia es algo que puedes medir contra ti mismo. El éxito puede ser fugaz. Puede ir y venir, y la forma en que se define a menudo puede estar fuera de tu control. Por eso, perseguir el éxito puede acabar siendo una tontería insatisfactoria. La búsqueda más significativa y gratificante es la excelencia. La única cuestión es el crecimiento personal. ¿Estoy mejorando? ¿He aprendido algo o he hecho algo hoy para estar un poco mejor que ayer? En el libro de Ryan Hawk, The Pursuit of Excellence (La búsqueda de la excelencia), analizaremos los pormenores de esta búsqueda. Hawk entrevistó a cientos de expertos y empresarios de renombre mundial para determinar qué hábitos y prácticas parecían más eficaces, y lo redujo a tres puntos esenciales. Vamos a repasar estos tres puntos, y veremos cómo la búsqueda de la excelencia puede conducir a una mayor satisfacción en la vida, así como a un crecimiento más emocionante en tu carrera. Edicion Enero 2022 Ryan Hawk es el creador y presentador de The Learning Leader Show, un podcast empresarial de primera categoría que se centra en el aprendizaje de los líderes más inteligentes y reflexivos del mundo. Ha entrevistado a más de 450 líderes, entre los que se encuentran personalidades como Simon Sinek, Seth Godin, Kat Cole, Jim Collins y Adam Grant. The Learning Leader Show tiene oyentes en 156 países de todo el mundo. Forbes lo calificó como "el podcast de liderazgo más dinámico que existe", y la revista Inc. incluyó el programa como uno de los cinco mejores podcasts para "ayudarte a liderar de forma más inteligente". Un conferenciante profesional muy solicitado, Ryan es el autor de Welcome to Management, que Forbes calificó como "el mejor libro de liderazgo de 2020." Enfoque Disfruta Tu Proceso Personal Se Firme Salvador Mingo Conocimiento Experto #Procesopersonal #Habitos #Excelencia

Conocimiento Experto
291- En Busca de la Excelencia - Lecturas Recomendadas Conocimiento Experto

Conocimiento Experto

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 32:51


¿Qué hay para mi dentro del libro de lecturas recomendadas del programa conocimiento experto En Busca de la Excelencia de Ryan Hawk? Descubre como Los Patrones de Comportamiento, tu Entorno Personal y las Relaciones Transformadoras tendrán un gran Impacto en tu Progreso PersonalAdquiere el Libro: https://amzn.to/3bgC3CIAccede a nuestro grupo privado en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/conocimientoexpertoMonetiza tus Redes Sociales: https://impactoexperto.com/Participa del Reto 60/100 para ser una Mejor Versión: https://conocimientoexperto.com/reto60100Accede a mi sito oficial y desarrolla tu modelo de negocio:https://www.salvadormingo.com/Accede al Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principiosObtén mi libro: https://amzn.to/2KmHMXaMis programas:* Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principios* Libro Conocimiento: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/unavidaconproposito* Programa Posicionamiento de Expertos en Internet: https://conocimientoexperto.com/programaexperto* Más contenidos gratuitos: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org* Aplicación Móvil Conocimiento Experto: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/apps/* Programa Conocimiento Experto Elite: https://conocimientoexperto.com/eliteMis redes:* Sígueme En Instagram en: https://www.instagram.com/salvadormingo/* Sígueme en Facebook en: https://www.facebook.com/Conocimientoexperto* Sígueme en Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/SalvadorMingoConocimientoExperto* Sígueme en Twitter en: https://twitter.com/s_mingoHe aquí una pregunta para ti: ¿Qué prefieres conseguir, el éxito o la excelencia? Bien, sí, los dos pueden parecer sinónimos, pero hay una distinción importante. El éxito sólo se puede determinar haciendo comparaciones con otros, mientras que la excelencia es algo que puedes medir contra ti mismo.El éxito puede ser fugaz. Puede ir y venir, y la forma en que se define a menudo puede estar fuera de tu control. Por eso, perseguir el éxito puede acabar siendo una tontería insatisfactoria. La búsqueda más significativa y gratificante es la excelencia. La única cuestión es el crecimiento personal. ¿Estoy mejorando? ¿He aprendido algo o he hecho algo hoy para estar un poco mejor que ayer?En el libro de Ryan Hawk, The Pursuit of Excellence (La búsqueda de la excelencia), analizaremos los pormenores de esta búsqueda. Hawk entrevistó a cientos de expertos y empresarios de renombre mundial para determinar qué hábitos y prácticas parecían más eficaces, y lo redujo a tres puntos esenciales. Vamos a repasar estos tres puntos, y veremos cómo la búsqueda de la excelencia puede conducir a una mayor satisfacción en la vida, así como a un crecimiento más emocionante en tu carrera.Edicion Enero 2022Ryan Hawk es el creador y presentador de The Learning Leader Show, un podcast empresarial de primera categoría que se centra en el aprendizaje de los líderes más inteligentes y reflexivos del mundo. Ha entrevistado a más de 450 líderes, entre los que se encuentran personalidades como Simon Sinek, Seth Godin, Kat Cole, Jim Collins y Adam Grant. The Learning Leader Show tiene oyentes en 156 países de todo el mundo. Forbes lo calificó como "el podcast de liderazgo más dinámico que existe", y la revista Inc. incluyó el programa como uno de los cinco mejores podcasts para "ayudarte a liderar de forma más inteligente". Un conferenciante profesional muy solicitado, Ryan es el autor de Welcome to Management, que Forbes calificó como "el mejor libro de liderazgo de 2020."Enfoque Disfruta Tu Proceso PersonalSe FirmeSalvador MingoConocimiento Experto#Procesopersonal#Habitos#Excelencia

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel
SPOS #837 - Catherine Price On Why Fun Is Better Than Tech

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 61:22


Welcome to episode #837 of Six Pixels of Separation. Here it is: Six Pixels of Separation - Episode #837 - Host: Mitch Joel. This week, TED released a new talk titled, Why fun is the secret to a healthier life, that was delivered by Catherine Price on the main stage at TED in Vancouver a few months back. It's an event that I have been attending for well over a decade, and Catherine's talk was - without a question - one of the best talks at this year's event. In a strange twist of fate, Catherine wound up joining myself and others for one of the "open night" dinners that I had organized. We became fast friends. This led me down the rabbit hole of the amazing work that she has done. A special thanks to Adam Grant for making the connection and introduction. Here's how Catherine describes herself: "I help people scroll less, live more, and have fun." She is a science journalist, speaker, teacher, consultant, and the author of many books including, The Power of Fun - How to Feel Alive Again, How to Break Up With Your Phone and Vitamania - How Vitamins Revolutionized the Way We Think About Food. Her writing has appeared in places like The Best American Science Writing, The New York Times, Popular Science, and many more. Her passion is using her background as a science journalist to help people question their assumptions, make positive changes in their lives, and see mundane things (like fun, phones, vitamins) in an interesting and more philosophical light. She is also the founder of Screen/Life Balance, a resource hub dedicated to helping people create more intentional relationships with technology and reconnect with what really matters to them in life. Her newsletter is also a bright and intelligent light for your inbox (you can subscribe right here). Enjoy the conversation... Running time: 1:01:21. Hello from beautiful Montreal. Subscribe over at Apple Podcasts. Please visit and leave comments on the blog - Six Pixels of Separation. Feel free to connect to me directly on Facebook here: Mitch Joel on Facebook. or you can connect on LinkedIn. ...or on Twitter. Here is my conversation with Catherine Pric. The Power of Fun - How to Feel Alive Again. How to Break Up With Your Phone. Vitamania - How Vitamins Revolutionized the Way We Think About Food. The TED Talk: Why fun is the secret to a healthier life. Screen/Life Balance. Catherine Price's newsletter. Follow Catherine on Instagram. Follow Catherine on LinkedIn. Follow Catherine on Twitter. This week's music: David Usher 'St. Lawrence River'.

Firing Line with Margaret Hoover

Organizational psychologist Adam Grant joins Margaret Hoover to talk about the importance of reconsidering one's established views, and why he believes doing so could be the key to healing America's divisions. The Wharton professor's most recent bestseller, “Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know,” explores the science of thinking and rethinking, as well as the most effective strategies for changing someone's mind. Grant discusses how his research applies to political debates, the difference between a politician flip-flopping and evolving their views in light of new information, and why partisans are so resistant to evidence that challenges their deep-seated beliefs. Grant, host of the TED Talks WorkLife podcast, also addresses the mental and emotional fallout from COVID-19, the factors driving the Great Resignation, and whether the pandemic has permanently changed how we work. Support for “Firing Line for Margaret Hoover” is provided by Stephens Inc., Robert Granieri, Charles R. Schwab, The Fairweather Foundation, Asness Family Foundation, The Rosalind P. Walter Foundation, Damon Button, and The Marc Haas Foundation.

Meg Living Inside Out
The Importance of Asking for Help

Meg Living Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 14:21


In today's episode we talk about how asking for help gives people a reason to invest in you emotionally and build a friendship with them. Not asking for help is not a strength, it's guardedness. Ron Nash explains why communism is bad: https://www.biblicaltraining.org/advanced-worldview-analysis/ronald-nash (Create a free account, you can listen to all the audio!) Adam Grant explains how a healthy society need givers and matchers https://youtu.be/YyXRYgjQXX0 Want to connect with a mentor? Visit http://inversedream.com/podcast/friendship

Life & Faith
Pandemic Fatigue

Life & Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 32:08


We're languishing (still!) after two years of the pandemic. Can a burnout psychologist help?  --- Feeling a bit blah mid-way through 2022… still?  In 2021, organisational psychologist Adam Grant named that pandemic feeling. He called it “languishing” and described it as “the absence of well-being”.  “You're not functioning at full capacity. Languishing dulls your motivation, disrupts your ability to focus, and triples the odds that you'll cut back on work,” he wrote in the New York Times.  In this episode of Life & Faith, we call it something else: pandemic fatigue. Or just “not coping”. Natasha gives us her take on “not coping” being the new “busy” - in other words, the standard reply to the question “how are you?”. And she tells us how potatoes relate to pandemic fatigue.  We also ask clinical psychologist Dr Valerie Ling how exhaustion and burnout relate to all of the above. For even if these conditions go by different names, they all seem to describe similar things.   It's enough to make you want to throw your hands in the air and go, “Potato, potahto, tomato, tomahto, let's call the whole thing off”.   --- Explore:  Natasha's piece on “not coping”  Adam Grant's article that named the blah we feel  Dr Ling's ebook My Burnout Prevention Plan: From a psychologist who knows the cost of burnout  The Centre for Effective Living  Our episode on burnout with Jonathan Malesic

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove
For the Back of the Room: Amit Singh, Chief Architect for the Intel Sector of BlueHalo.

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 50:51


Equity, Taking Chances, and Keeping it Fun.In this episode of The Outspoken Podcast, host Shana Cosgrove talks to Amit Singh, Chief Architect for the Intel Sector of BlueHalo. Amit explains how he ended up studying electrical engineering at the University of Virginia. He also discusses the recent sale of Asymmetrik to Blue Halo, revealing why giving equity to his employees felt natural and how the sale affected him emotionally. Pranks and humor are how Amit keeps things light in the business world, and we hear how they not only helped him survive college but found their way into software on April Fools' Day. Lastly, Amit argues for the importance of executive coaches, lists impactful books, and divulges his collegiate athletic achievement. QUOTES “I like to start things, I don't necessarily have to finish them. I think of myself as a zero to one kind of guy” - Amit Singh [16:50] “I've tried to reduce the barriers or eliminate the barriers between the engineers and the end user. Because [there's] all kinds of ways to separate the engineers from the mission, and I feel like it's very important to remove those obstacles to be successful.” - Amit Singh [34:56] “As a subcontractor, you have the luxury of saying no. As a prime, you don't have that luxury anymore, so you're going to have to say yes to some things that you may not have done before. But that's where partnerships and relationships with other companies can help fill those gaps.” - Amit Singh [45:53]   TIMESTAMPS  [00:04] Intro [01:31] Meet Amit Singh [05:20] Amit's Role Today [06:40] How Amit Decided on Electrical Engineering [12:10] Leaving NASA and Starting Asymmetrik [15:23] Working for Himself [22:50] Finding a Partner [25:40] Reflections on how Asymmetrik Handled Equity [28:46] Amit's Emotional Reaction to Selling [29:59] Where Amit's Confidence to Take Risks Originated [35:37] Easter Eggs in Grapevine [38:06] How Amit Found Balance in Responsibilities as CTO [41:44] Discussing Marriage [46:43] Books that have Impacted Amit [48:15] The Value of Having an Executive Coach [50:31] Outro     RESOURCES https://arlingtoncap.com/ (Arlington Capital Partners) https://bluehalo.com/ (BlueHalo) https://www.vsu.edu/ (Virginia State University) https://www.virginia.edu/ (University of Virginia) https://www.odu.edu/ (Old Dominion University) https://www.nasa.gov/ (The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)) https://www.nasa.gov/goddard (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) https://vt.edu/ (Virginia Tech) https://www.jhu.edu/ (Johns Hopkins University) https://www.nro.gov/ (National Reconnaissance Office (NRO)) https://www.darpa.mil/ (The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)) https://www.inscom.army.mil/ (United States Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM)) https://www.idc.com/ (International Data Corporation (IDC)) https://www.nsa.gov/ (National Security Agency (NSA)) https://www.saic.com/ (Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)) https://www.esop.org/ (Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs)) https://www.cia.gov/ (Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)) https://datacommons.cancer.gov/cancer-data-aggregator (Cancer Data Aggregator at National Cancer Institute) https://www.airforce.com/ (United States Air Force) https://www.synopsys.com/glossary/what-is-cicd.html (CI/CD) https://osintframework.com/ (Open Source Intelligence (OSINT Framework)) https://www.amazon.com/Small-Giants-Companies-Instead-10th-Anniversary/dp/014310960X (Small Giants by Bo Burlingham) https://www.radicalcandor.com/ (Radical Candor by Kim Scott) https://www.amazon.com/Good-Great-Some-Companies-Others/dp/0066620996 (Good to Great by Jim Collins) https://www.amazon.com/Think-Again-Power-Knowing-What/dp/1984878107 (Think Again by Adam Grant) https://www.amazon.com/Zero-One-Notes-Startups-Future/dp/0804139296 (Zero to One by Peter Thiel and Blake Masters) https://simonsinek.com/ (Simon Sinek)...

Nopadol's Story
EP 1474 Adam Grant บุคคลต้นแบบ

Nopadol's Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 22:59


EP 1474 Adam Grant บุคคลต้นแบบ ตอนนี้ขอเล่าเรื่อง Professor Adam Grant อาจารย์จากมหาวิทยาลัย Pennsylvania ที่ผมเลือกเป็นบุคคลต้นแบบในสายอาชีพที่ผมทำ มารู้จักอาจารย์กันในมิติต่าง ๆ และผมได้นำเอาอาจารย์มาเป็นต้นแบบในเรื่องอะไรบ้างกันนะครับ

Better Together with Maria Menounos
496. How to Retrain Your Mind To Think Positively w/ Adam Grant

Better Together with Maria Menounos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 79:19 Very Popular


Originally Aired: March 10, 2021 Ted talker, best selling author and organizational psychologist, Adam Grant, addresses the Heal Squad on the process of 'rethinking' and how it promotes success and fulfillment. Adam also defines givers, takers and matchers in business and in life - which of the three to embrace and avoid - and the surest means to attain success, based on data. He shares strategies on how to achieve Mental Fitness via a 3 step process as well and so much more. If you're seeking a means to detox your brain and to open it up to new pathways to success, this is a must watch and listen! BETTER TOGETHER'S RESOURCES: Maria is continually updating this page to find the best of the best so you don't have to do the work! And as a reminder, even if you don't see something you like here but having something in mind you do want to buy at Macy's, please support us and use the link. Every purchase through this link helps us keep the show going :) Maria's personally curated Macy's page: www.macys.com/bettertogether Check out www.mariamenounos.com for the “cliff notes” of all our episodes where we compile the life-changing lessons into one blog called "life-hacks." Plus, we share Maria's favorite new products & her must-haves!

This is Joy & Claire
135: Hard Conversations with Close Friends

This is Joy & Claire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 54:34


We talk about the listener question, “How do I talk to my pro-life friend?” and review ways to have meaningful, compassionate conversations in a divisive world. We take time to celebrate NINE years of podcasting!! Claire talks about John Hay's Goldenseal secret and we answer a few fun listener questions! Adam Grant post Sign up Read More » The post 135: Hard Conversations with Close Friends appeared first on This is Joy & Claire.

Science In-Between
Episode 97: Is the Future Online?

Science In-Between

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 44:39


In this episode, Scott and Ollie discuss recent experiences they've had that communicated that the future of K-12 education through online delivery. We discuss whether this is a realistic and what some of the hurdles schools and families will need to navigate to make that happen. In the episode, we briefly discuss the following: Adam Grant's Work Live podcast (https://adamgrant.net/podcast/) Modern Classrooms Project (https://www.modernclassrooms.org/) Things that bring us joy this week: Elie Mystal's book - Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy's Guide to the Constitution (https://www.harvard.com/book/allow_me_to_retort/) Top Gun: Maverick (https://www.topgunmovie.com/home/) Intro/Outro Music: Notice of Eviction by Legally Blind (https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Legally_Blind)

Public Health Insight
The Dreaded Imposter Syndrome & Ways To Overcome It

Public Health Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 23:34


In the words of Adam Grant, "Impostor syndrome is a paradox. Others believe in you. You don't believe in yourself. Yet you believe yourself instead of them. If you doubt yourself, shouldn't you also doubt your judgment of yourself? When multiple people believe in you, it might be time to believe them." In this episode of the Public Health Insight Podcast, we chat about:◼️ Our understanding of impostor syndrome with some examples, ;◼️ Factors that increase the likelihood of experiencing impostor syndrome;◼️ Distinction between self-esteem and (in)security; and◼️ Things you can do to overcome or harness impostor syndromePodcast Host◼️ Gordon Thane, BMSc, MPH, PMP®◼️ Purva Mehta, BMSc, MSc◼️ Leshawn Benedict, MPH, MSc, PMP®Subscribe to the NewsletterSubscribe to the newsletter so you don't miss out on the latest news, live events, jobs, professional development, and learning opportunities here.Leave Us a RatingIf you enjoy our podcasts, be sure to subscribe and leave us a rating on Apple Podcast or Spotify, and spread the word to your friends to help us get discovered by more people.Office HoursLooking for some support and guidance for the next steps in your education or to grow your career? Feel free to schedule a free 30-minute session by booking a one-on-one appointment here: https://thepublichealthinsight.com/contact/#officehours. Support the show

Mission to the Moon Podcast
ทักษะการส่งต่อความรู้ แบบ Adam Grant ต้นแบบของ ศ.ดร.นภดล | MM Remaster EP.84

Mission to the Moon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 33:52


‘Adam Grant' นักเขียนเจ้าของหนังสือชื่อดังอย่าง Think Again และ Option B ผู้เป็นทั้งนักพูดที่มีผู้ชมนับล้านวิวใน Ted Talk และอาจารย์ที่นักเรียนโหวตให้หลายปีซ้อน แต่ท่ามกลางทักษะมากมายหลายด้าน ‘ศ.ดร.นภดล ร่มโพธิ์' มองว่าทักษะที่สุดยอดและน่าเอาอย่างของ Adam Grant คือ “ทักษะการส่งต่อความรู้” นั่นเอง . วันนี้ อั้ม ศุภกร จะมาพูดคุยกับ ศ.ดร.นภดล ร่มโพธิ์ อาจารย์ นักเขียนและพอดแคสเตอร์ชื่อดัง เรื่อง Adam Grant บุคคลต้นแบบที่ได้มอบบทเรียนและทักษะให้เขานำไปปรับใช้จนประสบความสำเร็จ . รับฟังเรื่องราวและบทเรียนจาก The Master พร้อมๆ กันได้ใน รายการ MM Remaster EP. นี้

The Strength Connection
#86 - Thomas Benge: Ethos Of Strength

The Strength Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 55:50


In the 86th episode of The Strength Connection Podcast, Mike and our special guest, Pastor, Trainer, and Competitive Shooter, Thomas Benge, will talk about Thomas' origin story, his biggest inspiration, training recruits & clients, and more.Join us in this insightful and captivating talk! In this chapter, you will discover:(0:50) Introducing our special guest, Pastor, Trainer, and Competitive Shooter, Thomas Benge @ethos_of_strength(1:10) Shout out to John Odden @empoweredstrength_(1:45) Thomas and John Odden's original connecting point @empoweredstrength_(2:30) Walking cliche(3:00) Shout out to Nicole Benge @nicole.benge(3:35) Thomas's origin story(3:40) Playing basketball in college(3:50) Asking to be played professional football(4:35) Thomas' weight after graduation(4:45) Falling in love with strength training(4:55) Being a gym bro(5:00) Thomas's biggest inspiration(5:55) Shout out to Pavel Tsatsouline @strongfirst(6:10) Reading Pavel Tsatsouline's article @strongfirst(6:40) Trusting the process(7:05) Testing out after the program(7:20) Training and working in Police Academy(7:35) An eye for movement(7:45) Training clients and recruits(8:10) Suffering a knee injury(8:30) Teaching during the recovery time(8:30) Meeting the founder of CrossFit(8:35) From law enforcement to CrossFit gyms(9:35) Thomas' 51-year-old client(13:30) The desire to explore kettlebell(14:45) Thomas' first experience with TSC(16:45) Tribe by Sebastian Junger @sebastianjungerofficial(17:40) About Greg(18:30) Doing multiple TSCs at the gym(19:05) TSC brings people together!(20:00) Dealing with cadets(20:30) No requirement to stay fit in agencies (22:00) Low frequency, high work(22:55) Being fit for others!(24:55) Having standards for yourself(25:45) Physical fitness, a low-hanging fruit(26:25) “Your level of physical fitness was your first line of defense.” - Thomas Benge @ethos_of_strength(26:40) “There's a difference between being present and having a presence.” - Thomas Benge @ethos_of_strength(26:50) Two best compliments that Thomas got in the Academy(29:30) Shout out to Craig Marker(30:00) “You don't have to be the biggest person in the world to command a presence in the room.” - Michael Kurkowski @mike_strength_connection(30:10) Mike's observation while working at the gym(31:40) Participants of 30,000 training sessions(32:40) Strong Woman competitor(34:35) What did Thomas love about running his gym?(37:25) Benefits of connecting with people(39:05) Shout out to Dan John @coachdanjohn(39:30) One critical mistake most pastors and strength trainers do(40:30) Thomas' approach to the ministry(40:50) Jesus, the most relational person(42:00) Thomas' approach at his ministry(42:15) Think Again by Adam Grant @adamgranthttps://www.amazon.com/Think-Again-Power-Knowing-What/dp/1984878107 (44:00) “Business is a Spiritual Game.” - Tony Robbins @tonyrobbins(44:30) Book A more beautiful question(45:40) More about Thomas' client(46:20) Being curious(46:40) There is always something(47:05) “Curiosity is an antidote to ideology.” - Michael Kurkowski @mike_strength_connection(48:05) Being an eternal student(49:15) The biggest dangers for pastors(49:45) 40-minutes devotional listening and praying(51:00) “I always assume that there is something to see, even if I've seen it before.” - Thomas Benge @ethos_of_strength(52:45) One pieceWhere to find Thomas Benge? @ethos_of_strength

嗚喵備忘錄
#87 處女座到底招誰惹誰了?! 什麼時候能停止刻板印象的迫害《逆思維》嗚喵備忘錄

嗚喵備忘錄

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 52:14


嗚喵防曬優惠 活動時間: 07/11-7/18 優惠內容:https://www.fjb100.com/pages/NEKO1110711 ⧪零粉感控油美白CC霜 30ml SPF50 **** 全新防曬概念⸢ 美白抗皺✕膚色校正 ⸥ 校正膚色 UV記憶薄膜防曬 使用不悶清透 美白提亮 單支870 贈零粉感控油美白CC霜-2ml體驗3包(價值180) 三支2,610 贈零粉感控油美白CC霜 SPF50**** 正貨乙支(價值870) ⧪超輕感美白防曬乳 30ml SPF50 **** 全新防曬概念⸢ 美白抗皺✕防紫外線 ⸥ 防曬兼美白,使用不悶清透 美白提亮 單支870 贈超輕感美白防曬乳-2ml體驗3包(價值180) 三支2,610 贈超輕感美白防曬乳 SPF50 **** 正貨乙支(價值870) 節目流程 簡單聊聊如懿傳 處女座到底招誰惹誰?! 破除白人至上KKK的黑人 假如你的叔叔是佛地魔的擁護者 #華頓商學院 #逆思維 #突破盲點 #成功法 #自我成長 #溝通學

Moments To Momentum
Episode 80: Randie Dial

Moments To Momentum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 66:16


Randie Dial has more than 20 years of experience in providing valuation, forensic accounting and financial modeling services to a variety of publicly-traded and privately-held companies. He performs valuations of businesses and intangible assets for a variety of purposes including financial reporting, tax, merger and acquisitions, private equity investment, and capital budgeting.  Randie also works in transactional services such as due diligence. Randie is also the Managing Principal of the Indiana Practice for CLA.  He is committed to the firm's position as a professional services firm that delivers integrated wealth advisory, outsourcing and public accounting capabilities. Randie is also passionate about the CLA Promise, which is about knowing and helping our clients succeed personally and professionally. In this fun and insightful episode, Randie talks about growing up in Frankfort, IN, bonding with his father over sports, his love of math, figuring himself out after freshman year of college, a story about when he almost resigned from his role at CLA, why he loves Adam Grant's book, Give and Take, and the aha moment when he figured out there was a more human way to approach networking and making new connections.  Connect with Randie on LinkedIn Find out more about CLA  Sponsors: Ninety.io Straticos Buy your copy of Level-UP To Professional: Second Edition

Sacking Mental Illness
Work Life Is The Way To Be With Guest Adam Grant

Sacking Mental Illness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 98:58


Today's bonus episode with music includes guest Adam Grant with co-host Clint Mooney. Today's episode will touch basics with Adam regarding his upbringing, grief, loss and how he created the Work Life Apparel Company. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Marketing Today with Alan Hart
319: The Comeback Program with Danone North America's Surbhi Martin

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 30:18


Nearly 1 million women have left the workforce since the start of the pandemic in February 2020. This staggering statistic is why Surbhi Martin, VP at Danone North America and her team have launched The Comeback Program. In this episode, Alan and Surbhi discuss Danone's Light + Fit yogurt brand and their focus on helping women reacclimate to their careers after they've taken a break. Being one of the biggest B Corps in the world, purpose driven marketing leads the charge for Danone's marketing strategy, and The Comeback program aligns not only with purpose but with mission and values for the company's consumers. In this episode, you'll learn: All About Light + Fit's ‘The Comeback' program What a B-Corp isThe importance of purpose-driven marketing to connect the dots between company purpose, product, and consumer needs Key Highlights [01:35] Surbhi's career path [03:20] What is a B corp? [04:25] What Surbhi's role entails [05:16] Light + Fit's The Comeback program [06:47] Origination of the program [08:11] Partnership with Women Back to Work [10:10] Previous partnership with Dress for Success [13:31] Impact and throughline of overall marketing efforts of Danone through purpose-driven marketing [19:32] An experience that defines Surbhi [23:06] Surbhi's advice to her younger self [23:41] What Surbhi as a marketer is learning more about [26:10] Books Surbhi is reading now [30:13] The biggest opportunity or threat for marketers today Resources Mentioned: Danone North America B-Corp Light+Fit Brand The Comeback Returning to Work Program Women Back to Work – organization helping to design the program Dress for Success Support through new flavors Two Good brand – equal parts go to people in need when purchased Sustainable Brands and cofounder KoAnn Skrzyniarz | KoAnn on Marketing Today Book recommendations from Surbhi: Principles by Ray Dalio, Originals by Adam Grant, SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome by Mary Beard, Bhagavad Gita translated by Hari Chetan Alan's recommendation: When More is Not Better by Roger Martin Sponsor Message:  Did you know there's an automated marketing platform that's 100% designed for your online business? It's called Drip, and it's got all the data insights, segmentation savvy, and email marketing tools you need to connect with customers on a human level, make boatloads of sales, and grow with gusto. Try Drip free for 14 days (no credit card required), and start turning emails into earnings. Go to drip.com/go/marketingtoday Follow the podcast: Listen in iTunes (link: http://apple.co/2dbdAhV) Listen in Google Podcasts (link: http://bit.ly/2Rc2kVa) Listen in Spotify (Link: http://spoti.fi/2mCUGnC) Connect with the Guest: https://www.linkedin.com/in/surbhi-martin-b825483/ https://twitter.com/Danone Connect with Marketing Today and Alan Hart: http://twitter.com/abhart https://www.linkedin.com/in/alanhart http://twitter.com/themktgtoday https://www.facebook.com/themktgtoday/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/marketing-today-with-alan-hart/ Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/marketingtoday See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Model FA
The Nobility of Financial Advisors with Ray Sclafani

The Model FA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 52:00


Ray Sclafani is the Founder and CEO of ClientWise, a business and executive coaching firm working exclusively with high-performing financial advisory teams. He is a professional certified coach who holds a Master Certification in Neuro-Linguistics. In addition to being a public speaker sought after by industry leaders, Ray is the author of You've Been Framed, a step-by-step guide that helps financial firms achieve profitability and sustainability. Before founding ClientWise, Ray worked at AllianceBernstein for over 20 years, serving as its Managing Director before launching his own company. Ray joins us today to discuss the nobility of being a financial advisor. He explains how financial advisors can make an impact beyond their clients' lives and discusses building a relationship with the next generation of clients. He reveals the questions every financial advisor should ask during their client reviews and describes the unintended consequences advisors face when they become “accidental owners.” Ray also highlights the importance of succession planning for financial advisors and underscores the power of raising powerful next-gen teams.   “When an advisor makes a difference in the life of a client, they have a multigenerational impact on that client and their family. And that ripple effect is noble.” - Ray Sclafani   This week on The Model FA Podcast: Ray's background in asset management and his transition to the consulting business The multigenerational ripple effect and the nobility of financial advisors Engaging and building a relationship with the next generation of clients The ‘fee on AUM' model and the questions financial advisors should ask in client reviews The ClientWise Risk Assessment and why it's tough to segment clients based on revenue The “accidental owner” and how financial advisors get into the profession Succession and merger planning for financial advisors How financial advisors can communicate their succession plans for clients The shifts ClientWise had to make in the face of COVID-19   Resources Mentioned: Book: Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know by Adam Grant   Our Favorite Quotes: “Your business grows by increasing your value proposition on things you aren't compensated to do. People are attracted when you have a vested interest in them.” - David DeCelle “We need to help advisors think about the shifts taking place in the industry, what the next five years ahead look like, and how they can take advantage of the opportunities.” - Ray Sclafani “Your options increase the sooner you think about succession. Doing so gives you time to raise the next generation.” - David DeCelle   Connect with Ray Sclafani: ClientWise Book: You've Been Framed: How to Reframe Your Wealth Management Business and Renew Client Relationships ClientWise on LinkedIn ClientWise on Instagram ClientWise on Facebook ClientWise on Twitter Ray Sclafani on LinkedIn   About the Model FA Podcast The Model FA podcast is a show for fiduciary financial advisors. In each episode, our host David DeCelle sits down with industry experts, strategic thinkers, and advisors to explore what it takes  to build a successful practice — and have an abundant life in the process. We believe in continuous learning, tactical advice, and strategies that work — no “gotchas” or BS. Join us to hear stories from successful financial advisors, get actionable ideas from experts, and re-discover your drive to build the practice of your dreams.    Did you like this conversation? Then leave us a rating and a review in whatever podcast player you use. We would love your feedback, and your ratings help us reach more advisors with ideas for growing their practices, attracting great clients, and achieving a better quality of life. While you are there, feel free to share your ideas about future podcast guests or topics you'd love to see covered.    Our Team: President of Model FA, David DeCelle   If you like this podcast, you will love our community! Join the Model FA Community on Facebook to connect with like-minded advisors and share the day-to-day challenges and wins of running a growing financial services firm.

KFI Featured Segments
@HomewithDean - Homily 7/3

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 5:24


Tomorrow is July 4th. Tomorrow we celebrate what it means to be an American. And with that will come a lot of American pride. Some pride will be the best kind. The kind that looks like gratitude. But some of it, too much in fact, will be a hard, unyielding, arrogant kind of pride. The kind of pride that, as they say, comes before a fall.I'm grateful to be an American. But if I'm perfectly honest I find myself more and more dreaming of an America that I'm not actually living in. I love an America that is a Great Melting Pot. A place where very different people with very different life experiences and very different points of view come together and do the very hard work of listening to each other, learning about each other, warming to each other, and then melting into each other, even if just a little. I dream of the Melting Pot but I wake up to an America that has stopped melting. To melt is to soften, to change. Not change completely but enough to welcome another substance that has also softened and then together to become something new, an alloy, something greater than the sum of its parts. I guess my movement's hat would say MAMA on it—Make America Melt Again. Because I'm tired of hard right and hard left and hard people in general. I no longer see any form of unyielding extreme as strength. I believe we're all imperfect incomplete people. I believe none of us have all the answers. And if that's true then being hard and unyielding isn't a virtue. It's a vice.According to organizational psychologist Adam Grant, preaching and prosecuting are what have taken the place of melting in American culture. I agree. These days we're either preaching—telling everyone why we're so right—or we're prosecuting—telling everyone why they're so wrong. We've given preaching and prosecuting so much place that we're beginning to think that way to the exclusion of all else. Here's the problem … both preaching and prosecuting predispose us against changing our minds. They are walls, not bridges. They are not designed for melting. Which means while we're busy defending our positions what we're not doing is learning, changing, growing, melting. Unyielding hardness looks like strength, until you realize it never lives up to its promises. It never gets us anywhere. It's melting that takes real strength. To choose humility over pride, curiosity over conviction, and most importantly to look for the reasons why we might be wrong, not just why we must be right.So how do we get there? I don't know. That's kinda the point. I don't have all the answers. I think it probably starts with admitting we don't have all the answers. Admit that we still have a lot to learn. Give ourselves more permission to change, to disagree with the previous versions of ourselves and even, God forbid, grow. Perhaps instead of all the preaching and prosecuting we should prove how smart we really are by walking out into the world every day searching to discover what we're wrong about. You know, soften a little. Melt a little. I've seen it transform personalities, relationships, families. I can't help but think it might also transform nations. So, this Independence Day I will be dreaming of a Great American Melting Pot. Maybe you'll choose to dream with me. Dream of a day when we understand arrogance to be weakness, embrace our ignorance as a kind of strength, and allow ourselves—each and every one of us—to melt into something more beautiful. I think that's how we might be able to build a more beautiful country. I know that's how you can build yourself a beautiful life

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes
Turn Sadness Into A Superpower & Find Wholeness In Your Life EP 1287

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 87:05 Very Popular


Susan Cain is the #1 bestselling author of Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole and Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, which spent eight years on The New York Times best seller list, and has been translated into 40 languages. Susan's TED talks have been viewed over 40 million times. LinkedIn named her the Top 6th Influencer in the World, just behind Richard Branson and Melinda French Gates. Susan partners with Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Grant and Dan Pink to curate the Next Big Idea Book Club. They donate all their proceeds to children's literacy programs. Visit Susan at susancain.net.In this episode you will learn:How to embrace all of the emotions we have. How to resurrect the power of sadness. Why your vulnerability will build deeper connections. What the hero's journey really is.For more, go to lewishowes.com/1287Muniba Mazari on Becoming the Source of Your Own Joy & Finding Self-Love: https://link.chtbl.com/1282-podInky Johnson on Hacking Your Mindset To Overcome Life's Challenges: https://link.chtbl.com/1279-podLaura Berman on Releasing your Pain and Overcoming Trauma: https://link.chtbl.com/1273-podSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Texas Titans Podcast
July 1, 2022 Is Your Focus Being Stolen From You? This Week's Best Friday Ever

Texas Titans Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 17:00


NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Our ability to pay attention is collapsing. From the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream and Lost Connections comes a groundbreaking examination of why this is happening—and how to get our attention back. “The book the world needs in order to win the war on distraction.”—Adam Grant, author of Think Again “Read this book to […]

Surfing Corporate
How Choosing the Least Obvious Path Led Her to Become a Global Chief People Officer

Surfing Corporate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 47:26


What happens when instead of planning a career path, you're open to saying yes to opportunities that could sound slightly insane to others? This mind-set is what led our guest, Cristina Espejo, to leave the comfort of her hometown in Madrid, Spain, and accept work offers in Taiwan and Angola at a very young age.These uncommon choices (for a young recent college graduate) plus Cristina's fearless attitude led her from being a sales and marketing professional, to her discover her true passion: Human Resources. Today Cristina is a Chief People Officer, but more importantly, she's one of those HR executives who deeply cares about employees' well-being and growth (something that is not always the case).In this episode, she talks about fascinating cultural challenges she faced in during her career, she shares insights about how to grow your career, and explains why HR gets a worse rep than it probably deserves. Resources:The foundation Cristina worked for and highly recommends is AISEC.The book Cristina recommends is Adam Grant's "Give and Take."You can find the Give and Take assessment here.Highlights:3:03 Cristina talks about joining AISEC and how that changed her path.4:50 Cristina talks about her work in a start up in Taiwan.6:20 How she jumped to a career in HR9:45 from Angola to the US.10:42. The importance of employer branding to attract the right talent. How companies handle Glassdoor reviews.13:44 Where does HR's has bad rep come from. US compared to other countries.16:04 The Edelman trust barometer: employees don't trust their companies' leadership and less than a quarter believe their CEO is ethical.25:40 Advice for those seeking career growth: Find your advocates   / Do self-branding   /  Find mentors35:44 Fun stories about cultural differences.40:08 Corporate confessions

Zen Parenting Radio
Violins, Dancing, Outrage, & Love- Podcast #664

Zen Parenting Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 28:47


Cathy and Todd discuss the impact of the overturn of Roe V Wade, finding joy through the sadness, and how we can show up during difficult times.  We also mention this blog by Adam Grant titled How to Argue about Abortion

CultureLab with Aga Bajer
The 4 Deadly Sins of Work Culture | Adam Grant - WorkLife

CultureLab with Aga Bajer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:05


How do you avoid joining a company with a toxic culture—or build a healthy one when you are already a part of the organization? These are just a couple of questions addressed in this episode of Adam Grant's WorkLife that we are grilled to bring you as part of our new collab with TED Audio Collective. In this episode, Adam Grant explores how to recognize the four deadly sins of work culture when you're on the outside looking in, and shares strategies that can help shape a thriving workplace from the inside.  To join CultureBrained, go to tiny.one/culturebrained

Inside Outside
Designing Resilient Remote Teams: IO2020 Replay with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / Hubspot

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:37


In honor of our upcoming IO2022 innovation Accelerated Summit, which is happening September 19th and 20th in Lincoln Nebraska. Thought it'd be nice to pull some of the best interviews and sessions from our IO2020 virtual event. So, over the next few weeks, check out some of our amazing speakers and grab a ticket for the upcoming event. We'd love to see you there. Tickets and more information can be found at io2022.com. And now back to the show. Inside Outside Innovation is a podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / HubspotBrian Ardinger: We are excited to have Steph Smith here with the Hustle and Trends to talk about one of these amazing new trends that we're seeing. It's the whole move to remote work. Steph is the Head of Trends and Product Manager at the Hustle, which is a great newsletter, if you don't subscribe to that. Trends is their exclusive group. And I I've got to say it's, it's one of the best groups out there to talk about new things that are happening out there, new business leaders, things along those lines. She's got a new book out called Standing Out in 2020. Doing Content Right. And I know she's been doing a series of sessions on that. It's an eBook. You can check it out at stephsmith.io. She's been blogging for a ton of time. And she's also been in this world of remote work. Been a digital nomad for a while. So, with that, I'm going to just turn over to Steph. And we'll talk the trend of remote working. Steph Smith: Sweet. Thanks so much. That was a great intro, Brian. Today, I'm going to be talking about something that I care a lot about. I saw some other people in the chat mention that they've been working remotely for a long time. Two, I'm going to be talking about thinking past the office and designing what I call resilient, remote teams. And I do this in a little bit of a different way than I think most presentations on this topic are, which give you a lot of super, super concrete, like you must do this. I like to think of this more so as how do we think about what has changed? What does that mean? And what can we learn from this? So, I use three books and I'll get into that in a second to actually convey some of these points. But just quickly, I don't want to talk about myself very much. Brian gave me a great intro. All you need to know is that I have been working remotely for the last four or five years now. And I did that originally at a company called Top Tell, which was one of those kind of remote first companies built from the ground up to be remote. Now I work at a company called The Hustle and I've done some remote training for different companies. And in general, have been nomadding around for the last couple years as I work remotely. So that's enough about me. Let's talk about where we are in this world. As I mentioned before COVID there was a series of companies I'd say only a couple dozen of scale that were built up to be remote. From the ground up, they said, you know what, we're never going to have any offices. Or if we do, we're going to be remote first. Companies like Zapier Basecamp, Web Flow. All these companies were built from the ground up to facilitate positive remote working environment. Now, as we all know, you saw this kind of trend, the slow trickle of people that were searching for remote work overtime. This is Google trends from 2004 to present. Then as we all know, 2020. crazy year. We see this big spike and we're all remote, whether we want to be or not. And this includes huge companies like Google, Cora, Coinbase. Shopify that at least are either going to be remote for several, several years or in some cases like Shopify have just claimed that they are now remote first from here forward. The question then becomes with all of these companies with now millions, if not billions of people that are kind of thrown into this new environment, what happens. What happens to these organizations that weren't built from the ground up? Like Zapier, Base Camp, or Buffer. Some of the questions that I have here, allude to what I'll be talking about in this presentation. So how does remote work or the shift influence how people interact with one another? How does it influence the social fabric or culture of the company? How does this change how potentially leaders should or can operate at these organizations?And in general, this all brings me back to the title of this presentation. How do we build resilient teams? And resiliency in this case means teams that thrive in the environment that they're put in, right. It doesn't feel like they're kind of pushing against walls. It doesn't feel like there's friction to achieve certain things.It feels like they're put in an environment where they're put in a place to succeed by nature, by the nature of the environment that they're in. So, as I said, this presentation is really based on three books that I've read and, and I think are excellent. It's Give and Take, Algorithms to Live By and The Four Tendencies.And I like using books like this to really frame these conversations because these books are actually not based on remote work at all. They're based on human psychology. They're based on how people interact in given situations or environments. And then I just layer on a question. Is this still true with remote work or how does this change as people go from an in-person environment to remote. And so, we'll talk specifically about how giving and taking behavior may change with remote work. We'll talk about how we can design systems. So, using something From Algorithms to Live By, Game Theory. How do we incentivize people to actually act in their best interest? Because they don't always do that on their own. And how do we in general make remote work sustainable. And then I'll talk about the potential archetype of remote worker using this four tendencies framework. To preface the three books and the three things that we'll talk about, I want to jump back to summarize where we are.So, we as a society had a majority of people working in offices. And now we have a majority of people working remotely. And I like to kind of facetiously say that when you work in an office, you work in a box. And that box is predefined for you. And even though it's a little facetious in terms of the analogy, a lot of that is true in the sense that you have a lot of things, whether it's, you know, where you're physically working, how you're working exactly, when you're working. A lot of that is super predefined for you. And for some people that's actually better. Some people that's worse. I'm not trying to ascertain whether one is better or worse, but the idea is that before you had a lot of things mapped out for you, right? And now when you're working remotely, the way, the analogy that I like to give is that box is kind of like stripped clean.So, you get rid of the walls, you get rid of exactly when, how you work. And now a lot of people are left to figure out how to build their own box. And what I see a lot of people doing, whether it's individuals or companies is they basically do this Control C Control V where they basically say, you know, we had all these things, these processes, these systems, these frameworks that worked in our office. So, let's just take all those and let's paste them into our new environment. And that can work. But what I think we have a unique opportunity to do is in fact, rethink the box. So, build our new box from the ground up. So instead of just copying everything and saying, oh, this worked there. It should work here. Let's just rethink what are the things that we should operate by in this new environment? How do we rebuild our box? And something more important than that is instead of giving our employees a new box saying, hey, this is your box. Please take it. And again, abide by these rules or operations or logistics. Let's actually just give them the tools to build their own box. And this kind of summarizes part of what I'm, I'm getting to at least to preface three examples is, is a quote from Amir. Who's a CEO of Doist one of those kind of remote first and companies. And he says, basically, remote. Isn't just a different way to work. It's a different way to live. We have to acknowledge that we're kind of blurring these lines and people, you know, experience isolation, anxiety, depression. And in general, we need to figure out ways in systems to resolve this new, almost more complex issue where you have people, people's work and their lives just meshing into this continuous system.All right. So, what are the cornerstones of remote work? I mentioned this because this bleeds into some of the examples. So remote work overall, at least prior to COVID, when people weren't forced into it, really prioritized three things over three other things. Meaning output trumped input, which meant that didn't matter exactly how many hours you were working or exactly what you did to get to the impact that you're driving for a company.What mattered was the impact, the output. Similarly, remote work tended to favor autonomy over administration. Again, this idea that didn't matter exactly how you got from Point A to Point B. You had the autonomy to figure that out. And similarly, flexibility over rigidity. So, let's keep these cornerstones in mind throughout the presentation. And consider that even those cornerstones sound kind of resoundingly positive, all of us at face value are like, yes, I love being graded on my output. I love being graded or given the autonomy to figure out how I deliver that output. And I love being given flexibility. But let's just keep those in mind and consider that they're not always strictly positive. All right, so let's dive into the first example in the book, Give and Take. Obviously, these books are very in depth and I only covered one small sliver of them in this presentation. But the key takeaway from Give and Take is that Adam Grant, he's a professor at Wharton, amazing writer as well. He talks about three different types of individuals. So, Givers, Takers, and Matchers. All you need to know about them for the purpose of this presentation is that givers basically believe in this world as a positive sum game. Meaning they believe in mutually beneficial situations. They're willing to give without expecting anything in return. Takers are kind of the opposite of that. They think zero sum game. I'm sure you can imagine or conceptualize people in your life that you've encountered that really are trying to get ahead at the expense of other people.Now matchers fall somewhere in the middle. They basically believe, or kind of function off of this idea of reciprocity and fairness. All right. So with that in mind, the question or sorry, before I even get to the question, something I want to mention is that the whole premise of Adam Grant's book is a little surprising in that most people would expect that given Takers and Matchers and Takers in particular, their approach to life in terms of kind of utilizing other people to get ahead or prioritizing their own growth over other people, you would expect those people to be the most successful.Now, interestingly enough, he found that Givers were both at the very top of the spectrum of success, and the very bottom. You can notice two different types of Givers here. One is selfless. One is, is otherish. All you need to know here is that Otherish Givers are Givers but have found a way to prioritize their own needs.So really interesting that Givers not only elevate other people, but they are actually the most successful on their own. So, this is kind of a summary or a quote from Adams, which basically says they succeed in a way that creates a ripple effect, enhancing the success of others around them. You'll see that the difference lies in how Giver success creates value instead of just claiming it.So, in general, I think the obvious takeaway here is that we want more Givers at our organizations. Now the question becomes, and this will be a repetitive question throughout, is this the same with remote work. Or how does this change with remote work? Some of the sections here are based on actual data sources.This one, not so much. This is me more hypothesizing. And what I've come to in terms of my many years leading teams, interacting with teams, being individual contributors on teams is that because if we remember the cornerstones of remote work, we prioritize output. We prioritize impact. That which in remote, all that matters is that impact, right?Are you delivering value? Are you worth your salary? Are you hitting your KPIs. In person when you're in an office? All that stuff matters. But it's also weighed against certain unspoken things, unspoken rules, like the amount of time you're spending in the office. Whether you're on time for things, whether you stay late to help another employee in general, everyone knows who the team players are in an office.That's not always true when you work remotely. I think if you've worked remotely over the last couple months, especially if you were in an office before, you can probably resonate with this idea. In remote, there's a couple thing, other things that I want to know. This idea of staying on longer to, you know, as a Giver, let's say you're helping other people.That's super difficult to quantify because when you're working remotely again, our work life and our lifeline blend together. So, it's actually hard, if I were to ask anyone on this call, how many hours did you spend this week working remotely? I think a lot of people would struggle to actually quantify that.So then layering on, am I working extra? Am I not working enough? It's really hard to kind of parse that out. Additionally, if you support someone. Let's say I have a friend and her name is Sally at work. And she says, Hey Steph, can you help me with this project? And it actually takes like, you know, five hours out of my day.I end up helping her. All of that work for better or for worse is hidden online. Sally knows about it. But everyone else at work, didn't see me stay late to help Sally. They didn't see the output of that work. They didn't see the Giving behavior. And so, in addition to this, KPIs in general, when you work remotely by nature of trying to ascertain that output of people, tends to be more individual. You even hear people use terms like manager of one when they're working remotely.And in general, the idea that I'm trying to get across here is that by nature, when you're working remotely, because there are so much emphasis on output and impact, which has many positives, basically takes away the recognition that you typically get in an in-person environment of these Givers, and what happens is these Givers end up burning out, they become more of those selfless givers that you saw at the tail end. Instead of the Otherish givers that were the most successful individual. And something I want to call out here is that regardless of intentions, morals, or values, and what I'm saying here is it doesn't matter if someone's a good person or bad person. That's not what I'm trying to ascertain. Bad incentive structures result in bad behavior, no matter how good of a person you think you are. So, what's the takeaway here? Again, I'm trying to go through this quickly, so I won't go through everything. But the idea here is that you still won't have a water cooler. In the office, which almost acted like, you know, animals in the wild. There's like a certain hierarchy and there's a kingdom and, and it kind of regulates things, right. You just subtly, but it does. You don't have that anymore with remote, or at least it's not created without intentionality. And so, there are a couple quick things that you can do. The first thing is just ask your team very simply who helped you this week? Who did you work with? Where did you put in extra hours? Where did someone else put in extra hours for you? You must ask this because it will not be surfaced as naturally as in the office. The second thing is build KPIs to incentivize teamwork. This is a little harder to do because again, when you work remotely, you're trying to ascertain output. But think about how you can do this to incentivize teamwork. So, you're not kind of encouraging people to act more as Takers versus Givers. And then finally create an environment where you're not just recognizing good behavior or giving behavior, but you're actually rewarding it.So, some companies like GitLab have actually started things like micro bonuses, where in addition to the bonus structures or the compensation structures that you get from your boss, other people around you can actually reward you based on your giving behavior. Because that's really important. You're not just recognizing it in like kind of shout outs or things like that, but you're actually rewarding this behavior. So, you're incentivizing people to continue doing it. The final thing I want to call out is that you can do as much as you can once you have people at an organization to incentivize giving behavior. But you can also kind of integrate this into your hiring process. Which means bringing in people who are more naturally Givers.So, Adam Grant mentions in his book. This is directly from Give and Take where he, during the hiring process asks this question, can you give me the names of four people whose careers you have fundamentally improved? And the idea here is that people who are Givers tend to mention either people at the same level as them or below them in terms of the people that they've helped.And it's a natural response. Of course, this is again, not quite scientific versus Takers, tend to mention people that are above them. That they've helped, because again, there's this nature of people who are Takers, trying to get ahead and using things like status to get ahead. So, something to keep in mind as well as you're hiring.So, the second example that I want to go through is from Algorithms to Live By. Again, excellent book. This is a book where basically they take principles from software development or software engineering and use it to help us think through problems that are outside of that scope. So, things like Cashing Theory or Kneeling or making intractable problems tractable.The one that I want to talk about today is Game Theory. So, in Game Theory, I'm not going to go into depth, but it's this idea that within a game, there are certain rules. And within those rules, they incentivize people to act a certain way. And once a game is predefined, you tend to get to this equilibrium where all the players individually are acting their own best interest.But sometimes the kind of aggregate of those actions actually may result in outcomes that are worse for everyone. Again, depending on the rules that were set for that game. And this equilibrium that I'm specifically talking about is called the Nash Equilibrium. And it's this idea again, there's this kind of long definition and talks about a stable state.The idea here is the Nash Equilibrium is within an environment within a game. It's the outcome or the optimal state, where there's no incentive for any individual to deviate. Now, this may not sound super actionable. So let me give you a precise example of what I'm talking about. So, with remote work, a lot of remote first companies tend to go with unlimited vacation.And I think this is something that probably more companies will end up moving towards as well. But something you keep in mind here is the Nash Equilibrium of unlimited vacation approaches, zero days. And the reason for this it's a little counterintuitive because you think unlimited vacation sounds amazing. Sounds like a great perk. Well, what happens with unlimited vacation is that people look to be perceived as more loyal, more committed, more dedicated than their peers. And therefore, they look to take just slightly less vacation than their peers. And what happens is a cascading effect, which approaches zero.This is actual data from Buffer's Data Remote Report from 2019, where you can see in blue, the amount of vacation offered, and then in orange, the amount of vacation that was actually taken. So, you can see around 30, 35% of people had unlimited vacation. And if you look at how that's actually distributed, most of the people who had unlimited vacation took anywhere from no vacation to two weeks' vacation. Versus the people who had, you know, six weeks, five weeks, four weeks were likely to actually take that amount of vacation.So, what is my point here? Well, in Game Theory is this idea where basically you have a game and then those rules are set for the game. And then you just see what behaviors actually emerge from those given set of rules. Well, I think with remote work, we have to be a lot more intentional about not just kind of throwing rules out there, again, kind of redefining our box and, and not just taking a box that already exists. And you can do that through Mechanism Design, which is kind of flipping that script and saying, what are the behaviors that we actually want and what rules do we need to establish to actually generate those behaviors? So kind of again, reversing the question and figuring out what behaviors you want to incentivize. And then figuring out what rules need to be in place to actually achieve that.As I mentioned, the box has changed, the game has changed. So, here's a couple examples of things that people struggle with from the same report, when they're working remotely. It's things like unplugging, loneliness, distractions, culture, and communication. If you were to ask the same question to people who are working in an, in an office, these would not be the case, which shows us the game has changed. The problems have changed. The things that we're solving for have changed and therefore you must come up with rules or incentives so that people act in their own best interest. So again, you're thinking backwards. You're asking the question, what are the KPIs that you need to actively design to encourage people to, for example, have a work life balance outside of just the freedom to define their own. And this is really important because it sounds counterintuitive to say a I'm actually going to define more rules. Because flexibility sounds like a great perk or sounds like a great thing to have. But actually, you can help your employees in certain situations to actually help them again, this idea of building their own box.Something I want to call out here is again, is Wall Street, which is again, the most like capitalist type environment there is, has mandatory off hours. So that brokers don't push themselves to their Nash Equilibrium, which would be the sleepless equilibrium, where they're constantly trading. So, you have to think backwards and figure out how to design an environment that people succeed in.Quick couple examples before we move on to the third example. The third book are things like a minimum vacation policy, mandatory days that they must take off, allowing people to take back their calendars and actually block off significant parts so that they're not encountering what people call Calendar Tetris. I like this example from Keith, I don't know Keith personally, and this was pre COVID.But basically, he decided to close his office on Friday. Simple things like this, where he basically said it's a mandatory weekend. You are not allowed to work, even though it seems strange in a digital environment. And I'm giving you 50 bucks to go eat at your favorite restaurant. So, think about how you are intentionally designing systems for your employees.Finally, third example that I'll breeze through is the Four Tendencies. And I'll caveat this example with this quote directly from Gretchen Rubin, the author that says the happiest, healthiest, most productive people aren't those from a particular tendency, but rather the people who have figured out how to harness the strengths of their tendency, counteract the weaknesses, and build lives that work for them.So, what is the Four Tendencies? It's this idea that there as it sounds like four tendencies. Upholder, Obliger, Questioner, and Rebel. Now these two highlighted in green are not highlighted, because they're the best. As Gretchen said in that quote, it's just that they're they are the most common. Now the Four Tendencies is basically a two-by-two framework, which identifies how people respond to expectations or accountability.So, do they readily meet outer expectations? Do they readily meet inner expectations? Do they resist both of them or do they kind of fluctuate towards or air towards one or the other? So, I personally am a Questioner. I resist outer expectations and I meet inner expectations. To give a quick example, if I wanted to get fit, having a gym buddy as an outer expectation expecting me to show up that actually wouldn't help me. And that actually is something that I've tried to do throughout my life. Hasn't worked. Meanwhile, something like actually understanding the science behind why I should be fit or kind of convincing myself that my identity, or I want to be the type of person who, you know, respects their health. That works for me. So as a Questioner, I meet inner expectations. I resist outer expectations.Now I did a poll on Twitter a while ago, got around 400 votes from people who had been working remotely again, pre COVID. And it was interesting to see that the most popular tendencies among this again, non-scientific poll were Questioners and Rebels, and I thought, huh, that's interesting.If you remember questioners and obligers for the most common in the overall population with remote workers, or at least those who sought out remote work. Where questioners and rebels with the, the familiarity or the common thread here is that they both resist outer expectations. I thought that was really interesting.And I think that relates to this idea that there's a level of self-selection or misalignment with outer expectations of society, of people trying to at least identify their own work norms, identify their own vision or how they can actually build something, build their own box. And this isn't again, mean that they're more successful or less successful.It's just perhaps that they actively sought out this type of environment. Now, what's the takeaway here. This is a brief section compared to the other two, but it's the idea that people actually respond differently to inner and outer accountability. We used to have everyone in an office and that didn't necessarily work with everyone.Now we have everyone remote that doesn't necessarily work for everyone. So, I think the idea here is that leaders need to actually learn past, just the high level this person is good at these skills. This person is good at these skills. This is my top player. This is my, you know, less valuable player. And more so think about how to tailor their leadership stylers to figure out how to motivate their employees. Whether they're in a remote environment or not. But especially if you're in a remote environment, how do you incentivize, if we just quickly go back, how do you incentivize Upholders and Obligers when Questioners and Rebels tend to naturally seek out this environment?And on the flip side, if you're in an office, how do you naturally incentivize Questioners and Rebels so that they're motivated when Upholders and Obligers may more naturally fit into those traditional environments. So just something to consider. Right. This is the final slide I have, and I know we're running out of times, but the idea here is just, again, there are certain things or certain ways that humans tend to interact in, in an person environment.And they don't necessarily act the same ways in a remote environment. And in particular, they may not even act in ways that benefit themselves all the time. So, we must as leaders, if you're leading a team, if you're leading a company, It's good to consider some of these things and figure out A: How do I encourage Giving through discovering, hiring, promoting, and acknowledging and rewarding as I said before Givers. How do I select incentives or develop the right systems so that we're using Mechanism Design and not just throwing people into a game and hoping that they choose the best outcomes that are best for them or best for everyone?And then finally, how do we actually learn about our people past the face value in terms of their skills and figure out how to harness their unique strengths, whether they're in an in-person environment or a remote environment. If you want to find me, or if you have questions, happy to answer them now, but you're also welcome to email me or DM me on Twitter and that is it.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  Also don't miss IO2022 - Innovation Accelerated in Sept, 2022.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
478: Susan Cain - Using Pain To Be More Creative, Finding The Right Life Partner, & A New Way To Think About Death

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 57:49 Very Popular


Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You along with 10's of thousands of other learning leaders will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right! Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 Susan Cain is the #1 bestselling author of Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole and Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, which spent eight years on The New York Times best-seller list, and has been translated into 40 languages. Susan's TED talks have been viewed over 40 million times. LinkedIn named her the Top 6th Influencer in the World, just behind Richard Branson and Melinda French Gates. Susan partners with Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Grant, and Dan Pink to curate the Next Big Idea Book Club. Notes: "Compassion means to suffer together." How to use sadness? "Make the pain your creative offering." To suffer with other beings brings people together. When people are grieving the loss of a loved one, they often want to talk about that person. Aristotle wondered why the great poets, philosophers, artists, and politicians often have melancholic personalities… his question was based on the ancient belief that the human body contains 4 humors: each corresponding to a different temperament - melancholic (sad), sanguine (happy), choleric (aggressive), and phlegmatic (calm). Joseph Campbell said, “We should strive to participate joyfully in the sorrows of the world.” Connecting with what matters and taking committed action—moves us from bitter to sweet, from loss to love.” Everyone experiences loss. It is part of the human condition. How have you moved “from bitter to sweet, from loss to love”? Are there coping strategies you recommend? The bittersweet quiz — 1-10. If you scored between 5.8 and 10, you're a true connoisseur of bittersweetness: the place where light and dark meet. Questions: Do you tear up easily at touching TV commercials? Are you especially moved by old photographs? Do you react intensely to music, art, or nature? Have others described you as an old soul? Do you find comfort or inspiration on a rainy day? Are you moved to goosebumps several times a day? Do you feel elevated by sad music? Do you tend to see the happiness and sadness in things, all at once? Do you seek out beauty in your everyday life?" (I scored a 7.1) “The secret to life is to put yourself in the right lighting. For some, it's a Broadway spotlight; for others, a lamplit desk. Use your natural powers -- of persistence, concentration, and insight -- to do work you love and work that matters. Solve problems. make art, think deeply.” “The secret to life is to put yourself in the right lighting. For some, it's a Broadway spotlight; for others, a lamplit desk. Use your natural powers -- of persistence, concentration, and insight -- to do work you love and work that matters. Solve problems. make art, think deeply.” “There's zero correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas.” “If we could honor sadness a little more, maybe we could see it—rather than enforced smiles and righteous outrage—as the bridge we need to connect with each other. We could remember that no matter how distasteful we might find someone's opinions, no matter how radiant, or fierce, someone may appear, they have suffered, or they will.” “The secret that our poets and philosophers have been trying to tell us for centuries, is that our longing is the great gateway to belonging.” “The tragedy of life is linked inescapably with its splendor; you could tear civilization down and rebuild it from scratch, and the same dualities would rise again. Yet to fully inhabit these dualities—the dark as well as the light—is, paradoxically, the only way to transcend them. And transcending them is the ultimate point. The bittersweet is about the desire for communion, the wish to go home.” “Introverts, in contrast, may have strong social skills and enjoy parties and business meetings, but after a while wish they were home in their pajamas. They prefer to devote their social energies to close friends, colleagues, and family. They listen more than they talk, think before they speak, and often feel as if they express themselves better in writing than in conversation. They tend to dislike conflict. Many have a horror of small talk, but enjoy deep discussions.” Life and Career advice: You have to find a way to do it. Life can sweep you up quickly. Establish a backup plan. It frees you up to be more creative. Develop rituals for writing... Purely with pleasure.

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
276 The Voice In Your Head, Why It Matters, & How To Harness It with Psychologist & Author of “Chatter” Ethan Kross

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 76:56


On this episode of Christopher Lochhead: Follow Your Different, we talk about those voices in your head with our award-winning guest, Dr. Ethan Kross. Who knows, you might learn something useful from listening to it. Dr. Ethan Kross is an award-winning psychologist and professor at the University of Michigan and the Ross School of Business. He has a new book out called Chatter: the voice in your head, why it matters and how to harness it. Bestselling author Adam Grant says, “this book is going to fundamentally change some of the most important conversations in your life, the ones you have with yourself.” So if you want to know how you can work with those voices in your head to make your life better, stay tuned to this episode. Ethan Kross on the Voices in your head The conversation starts off with the topic of Ethan Kross' new book, Chatter. Ethan explains that we all have an inner voice, which is the ability to silently use language to reflect on our lives. “it's a tool of the mind. It's a tool that that distinguishes us from every single other animal species. You use language silently in your head to do all sorts of things like, simulate and plan for the future. You use this inner voice to do something I find to be magical, which is tell stories about our experiences in this world. Stories that help us understand who we are.” – Ethan Kross Chatter According to Ethan, there are times when this inner voice we possess doesn't work so well. “Sometimes when you experience adversity, you reflexively tried to use this tool to think through a problem, but you don't come up with a clear solution. You end up for lack of a better term spinning, worry, ruminating catastrophizing. And that's what I call chatter.” – Ethan Kross Chatter sometimes takes the form of an inner critic. Sometimes, it's a self-disparaging voice. Sometimes it's an inner monologue filled with anger and aggression. But the idea here is that you're just getting stuck in this negative thought loop, and you can't break free. Ethan Kross on Metacognition We bring up the topic of “thinking about thinking”, and Ethan shares his thoughts on the matter. For Ethan, most people actually do a lot of thinking about thinking, or metacognition. “Basically, Metacognition refers to exactly what you're talking about: thinking about thinking. And I think we spend a lot of time doing this in ways that create misery. And, like, when we're worried about stuff we keep on, you know, we start worrying, like, think about what worry is, there's something in the future that you're concerned about. At some point, you start worrying about the fact that you're worrying.” – Ethan Kross He then used sleep as an example. At first, it's simple: you sleep when you are tired. But as we think about other things like “are we getting enough sleep,” and the effects of not staying up late, etc. We start to worry about too many hypothetical things in our head, and we, ironically, lose sleep over it. To hear more from Ethan Kross and how to channel your inner voice to be more productive in life, download and listen to this episode. Bio Ethan Kross, PhD, is one of the world's leading experts on controlling the conscious mind. An award-winning professor at the University of Michigan and the Ross School of Business, he is the director of the Emotion & Self Control Laboratory. He has participated in policy discussion at the White House and has been interviewed on CBS Evening News, Good Morning America, Anderson Cooper Full Circle, and NPR's Morning Edition. His pioneering research has been featured in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The New England Journal of Medicine, and Science. He completed his BA at the University of Pennsylvania and his PhD at Columbia University. Links Connect with Ethan Kross! Website | LinkedIn | Twitter | More about Ethan | Chatter We hope you enjoyed this episode of Follow Your Different™!