Podcasts about Sifo

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Best podcasts about Sifo

Latest podcast episodes about Sifo

Dr. Westin Childs Podcast: Thyroid | Weight loss | Hormones
6 Root Causes of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (Avoid/Treat THESE Triggers)

Dr. Westin Childs Podcast: Thyroid | Weight loss | Hormones

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 18:12


These are the 6 most common root causes of Hashimoto's thyroiditis including triggers that you should avoid. These triggers can CAUSE a Hashimoto's flare up. Today we are going to be discussing the most common root CAUSES of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease and must be triggered before it manifests in YOUR body. When we talk about the root cause of Hashimoto's what we are really talking about are those things that trigger Hashimoto's in thyroid patients. These triggers can either cause Hashimoto's directly or lead to a flare-up. Understanding these triggers is very important because it may help you direct and target your treatment. If you can do this then you may be able to reduce or reverse your condition. These are the top 6 most common root causes that I see: #1. Stress (emotional, physical, social) Stress from ANY cause is probably the single most common trigger of Hashimoto's that I see. This stress can either be physical such as a car accident, it can be social such as a divorce, or it can be emotional such as problems with your spouse/work life, etc. #2. EBV viral infection EBV stands for Epstein Barr virus and it is a virus in the herpes family. This viral infection has been known to trigger Hashimoto's in susceptible individuals. Some people end up with chronic low-grade EBV infections that can be treated. #3. H. Pylori bacterial infection H. pylori stands for Helicobacter pylori and it is the bacteria responsible for the development of gastric ulcers. It is also an important factor in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The good news is that this bacteria CAN be treated with prescription antibiotics and herbal antibiotics. #4. Nutrient deficiencies Nutrient deficiencies, especially Vitamin D, zinc, selenium, and iodine, can all increase your risk of developing Hashimoto's. Selenium and glutathione play a protective role in your thyroid gland and prevent damage from inflammation. #5. SIBO/SIFO (bacterial/fungal overgrowth syndromes) SIBO refers to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and SIFO refers to small intestinal fungal overgrowth. #6. Gluten sensitivity (Celiac & NCGS) Both Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity (nonceliac gluten sensitivity) result in damage to the gut lining and increase your risk of developing Hashimoto's. Avoiding gluten is an easy solution if this is your problem! Do you know what triggered or caused your Hashimoto's? This list isn't exhaustive but it includes some of the most common triggers! Disclaimer: Dr. Westin Childs received his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic medicine in 2013. His use of “doctor” or “Dr.” in relation to himself solely refers to that degree. Dr. Childs is no longer practicing medicine and does not hold an active medical license so he can focus on helping people through videos, blog posts, research, and supplement formulation. To read more about why he is no longer licensed please see this page: https://www.restartmed.com/what-happe... This video is for general informational, educational, and entertainment purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, treatment, diagnosis, prescription, or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Childs and you. You should not make any changes to your medications or health regimens without first consulting a physician. If you have any questions please consult with your current primary care provider. Restart Medical LLC and Dr. Westin Childs are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis, or any other information, services, or product you obtain through this website or video. #thyroid #hypothyroidism #hashimoto's

This EndoLife
My Small Intestine Fungal Overgrowth Protocol

This EndoLife

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 49:39


Okay, so a number of you have reached out to ask me whether I'm going to talk about my next steps for SIFO treatment, which I wasn't originally going to do as I have an expert in mind to invite onto the show, but as a number of you asked, I hope that sharing my story will be somewhat helpful for you!  So, unlike with SIBO where I had quite a long-term plan in mind, this I am more so feeling out my journey because as I discussed in my previous update, I'm not 100% sure if the issue is gut dysbiosis or SIFO. So, to recap, let's start with what SIFO is. SIFO stands for small intestine fungal overgrowth and it's when fungus like yeast (or other fungi) grow in the small intestine. We do have some normal, non-harmful levels of fungus and yeast in the large intestine, but they become a problem either when they overgrow or when they're found I the small intestine.  Unfortunately, the symptoms of SIFO are exactly the same as SIBO, so it can be very tricky to identify between the two. What makes it harder is that testing for SIFO is unreliable. Often the fungus hides in biofilms, which are protective mucosal-like layers, so they don't show up on tests and even if they do, there's no way, without a very invasive biopsy, to tell whether the fungus is in the large intestine or small intestine. What we do know is that the organic acids test tends to be the most reliable test, at least according to the practitioners I've trained with. We also know the candida tends to be the culprit behind SIFO in many cases, and just to be clear, that's the type of yeast which causes thrush, and we also know that about xxx of SIBO cases.  Now there are some extra tell-tale signs of candida specifically, if that's the fungus behind the problem, and those are…  ·       Allergies ·       Yeast overgrowth (vaginal, oral or on the skin) ·       Nasal congestion and excess mucus or phlegm  ·       Rashes ·       Joint pain ·       Brain fog and chronic fatigue ·       Headaches The difficulty is that unless you have the obvious thrush, whether oral, vaginal or on your skin, this symptoms are also typical of histamine intolerance, which you know if you listen to my podcast, is very common with our community and is also very common with SIBO, and hydrogen sulphide SIBO specifically.  As I had suspected hydrogen sulphide and for sure, have histamine intolerance, any possible SIFO really wasn't obvious. Until more recently. As you may know, about two months ago, I cleared my SIBO! But unfortunately, I still had the majority of the SIBO symptoms. I also had an unusual test result, which showed no hydrogen gas in my large intestine, which is where it should be. In a healthy negative result, you should see little hydrogen gas in the small intestine and then a rise in the large intestine, but I had a flat line. So, this indicates two possible issues – either hydrogen sulphide or a bacterial imbalance in my large intestine, essentially, the bacteria in my gut having been wiped out. Because I'd done so many treatment rounds and most of them would target all three types of SIBO, I felt it unlikely it was still hydrogen sulphide remaining, and my colleagues agreed. Secondly, I had done a round of antibiotics, and I react quite badly to them, having lots of diarrhoea, fatigue, and headaches, and after I finished the course, I got shingles, which you only get when you're very immune compromised. And 70% of the immune system is in and around the gut. If your healthy microbiome in the large intestine is wiped out, you can bet your immune system will be too. So, for sure, I was certain that there was some gut dysbiosis happening. But I didn't believe it was enough to cause all my symptoms.  And a few clues made me suspect SIFO.  Firstly, I was doing pretty well with symptom reduction until the third week of the elemental diet, which is full of simple sugars. Suddenly, I began to bloat up again. I also had a strong white film throughout the entire elemental diet, which indicated the sugars were feeding bacteria or yeast in my mouth, and secondly, I started having thrush symptoms during the elemental diet. Then, from the elemental diet, I went onto the antibiotics, and I got thrush symptoms again! Now Dr Siebecker warns that the elemental diet may cause yeast or fungal overgrowth in people who already have it, in contrast, Dr Ruscio uses the elemental diet for candida overgrowth, because he says the simple sugars are absorbed too quickly for the yeast to eat it. I think it's probably the case that both doctors are right, but that it depends on the individual and that they see different types of patients. Either way, it seemed quite clear to me that I had some yeast overgrowth as a result.  I went to my doctor at Vala, and they agreed that it looked like candida overgrowth in my mouth.  Additionally, I've always had a white film on my tongue, honestly ever since I could remember. I used to ask dentists about it, but they would shrug it off, and tell me it was down to what I had eaten, but I was waking up with it before I had eaten a thing. Back then I just took what they said as gospel. Then a few years ago, my boyfriend and I went through a real sweet tooth phase, long before I had gotten on top of my endo and eating an anti-inflammatory diet, and we were eating a lot of sugar. At that point, I got full on oral thrush, which thankfully was cleared with 24 hours of taking the medication – or so I thought! I've only ever had vaginal thrush a handful times, so again, initially, I really didn't think candida was an issue for me! However, the fact that I then started getting the symptoms from two things which we know may cause yeast overgrowth – the elemental diet and antibiotics – made me think that maybe I have had SIFO all along, but the white film never got out of control, and it wasn't really affecting my vagina too much. Now having said this, according to Dr Jacobi, candida can also cause a burning bladder pain, and for sure, that's what my pain feels like inside my bladder. Like I have a fire going on in there, and there's also a few rusty knitting needles sticking through it too!  So, alongside my colleagues who I trained with in SIBO and my doctor, I concluded I do likely have SIFO and gut dysbiosis.  The problem is, if you have SIFO, its usually quite hard to clear SIBO or to stay in remission, and even though I still had all the symptoms of SIBO, I felt like I relapsed about 2 weeks into my all clear. The changes were subtle, but they were there. I was still having bloating and loose stools, that hadn't changed. But what had improved is I could no longer feel fermentation happening in my gut, like active bubbles forming and moving around in my gut, which I used to get all the time – and that returned. The second issue was that my stools changed, and I won't go into the detail, but it was reminiscent of when my SIBO used to be really bad. Then I started getting the burping back, which was a new symptom originally, that started I think in 2019, but it went during treatment, and came back around the same time as these other symptoms. So, this occurred whilst I was in my prevention of relapse phase. So, when you clear your SIBO, you move into a three-to-six-month period where you put in place meal spacing, prokinetics (which are supplements or drugs which stimulate your migrating motor complex in the small intestine overnight, to clear out bacteria) and some kind of SIBO diet. There are also some additional extras you can do, which I was doing. I was pretty much doing everything perfectly, but I relapsed.  So, I was two weeks in, whilst deciding what treatment to start for SIFO. And at that point, sometime after my relapse, is when we decided to go to Greece.  Now originally, you'll know my plan was to do a very specific reintroduction of foods, following the usual elimination diet reintroduction phase, where you try one new food basically a week. But now I had relapsed, and I was at a point where I never didn't have symptoms. I bloated after every meal, despite being on the SIBO bi-phasic, so I couldn't get any more restrictive. So, trying to tell what I was specifically going to react to was going to be incredibly difficult and frustrating.  Also, we have been wanting to travel for years, but in addition to COVID, we hadn't because of my SIBO. I didn't want to be in a position where I had to eat outside of a SIBO diet and ended up relapsing. But now I had relapsed. And part of what may cause relapse is chronic stress and an elevated nervous system. I won't go into it now, but many of you know that I have felt very, very stressed and unsafe in our current home in Margate, but we've had continual circumstances that have prevented us from moving – one of them being that we didn't want to just move to a new flat, we really wanted to move overseas and roam around for a while. Additionally, we had mould, which we've cleared as much as we can, but there's likely a lot of hidden mould as the entire flat was flooded not long after we first moved in, and it was after that that I got very sick with histamine intolerance, which can flare up from mould triggering the immune system. But this is a stressor on the body and nervous system, and additionally, can cause relapse if your immune system is being compromised by something like mould. On top of that, I'd worked really hard, for really, really long and it had been a tough few years. So, we made quite an overnight decision to go to Greece for six week. You know, our original vision was to pack up, leave the flat entirely and just travel Europe for six months, because that's all we're allowed to do thanks to Brexit, but because of the restrictions with COVID, etc. it was just all so limited and so fingers crossed, we can do that this year. But we both decided enough was enough and we wanted a break from the house and a change of scenery, of course it was something we just wanted to do in life, but in a large part for me, my health was my motivation and my therapist even called it an intervention, and that's for sure what it felt like. So, I made the decision to go to Greece, knowing full well I wouldn't have total control about the reintroduction of food, but by this point I was pretty certain I had relapsed and giving that I still had the SIFO road ahead of me, a break away seemed not just like it wouldn't do much more damage, but that it would be good for me. So, my plan for SIBO and SIFO basically revolved around Greece because I would have to take all my treatment with me. And I established three goals, I mean I didn't, I'm not that organised, but that's this is what I focused on – ·       Keeping SIBO at bay and continuing the prevention of relapse to the best of my ability so it didn't progress rapidly. ·       Beginning to take on SIFO, but gently, to avoid any die off reactions whilst away. ·       And to rebuild my microbiome and improve my gut lining, which I was already working on anyway. So as a result, here's what my current protocol looks like:   Diet Before we went away, I began expanding with one to three new foods a week. Just some of the key ones that I thought I should try before we went, that I would likely rely on in restaurants, like lentils and some nuts. Then, as we planned for Greece, my aim was to eat as expanded as possible, so basically the more lenient end of a SIBO diet, which looks more like the expanded version of the low FODMAP diet and the paleo diet. This is fine by the way; you won't relapse if you expand. The point of the prevention of relapse phase is to expand to tolerance as rapidly as possible. Of course, I had no bloody idea what I was and wasn't tolerating, so I just decided to follow the low FODMAP serving guidance to help me to stay within some kind of relatively low carb (that's the basis of a SIBO diet) protocol. So, before we went, I basically started transitioning from the bi-phasic, which is very, very restrictive, to low FODMAP. Because we are here for six weeks, I had the advantage of not eating out all the time. So, I my plan was, and what I have implemented whilst here, was to eat low FODMAP during the week at home, and then at the weekend, to eat as low FODMAP or paleo friendly as I could manage whilst out and about, but also allowing for treats and just basically enjoying and appreciating a different cuisine. Now my doctor, who is a functional medicine doctor, sent me a candida diet. There are a few different versions, but essentially, it's a low carb diet to a degree, that removes yeasts and sugars. I had a look through it and because in terms of servings, it's generally less restrictive than the low FODMAP, I was essentially doing it, other than when I have some bread or ice cream over the weekend. But I didn't really want to go down a rabbit hole with that, especially as I'm not sure how suitable the candida diet is for SIBO and equally, some practitioners debate whether the candida diet is even necessary. So that's going to be a bridge that I cross when I get home. But for the most part, I am naturally doing it anyway. So, we've been here for about two weeks now and I've settled into a routine of this kind of pattern. The first weekend we were in Athens for 48 hours and were travelling and didn't really have time to seek out gluten free and dairy free, etc. We did stumble across a few places, thankfully, so that was great. But I ended up eating quite a bit of gluten, and by the third day I felt really nauseas and started getting an upset stomach. I also had dairy too, once, or twice, because it turns out that in Greece, it's really hard to eat vegan and gluten free in general restaurants. The protein options are mainly meat, fish or dairy and often the fish was things that I just wouldn't be able to stomach, like octopus, and as you know, I was hoping to transition back off of meat after having to eat on the bi-phasic, so I had some cheese every now and then, as being a health coach, blood sugar is important to me and so you do need protein with every meal. Also, my blood sugar is very suspectable to lows, so just having a plate of carbs would really mess me up and ruin the rest of the day, so I had to make choices about having enough fat and protein and that sometimes looked like a little dairy. Now I know I'm intolerant to dairy, which actually might be due to having SIBO, because it causes temporary lactose intolerance until you clear it, so I wasn't eating huge amounts and I tried to choose cheeses that I know I tolerate better, and I avoided cow's dairy and milk for the most part – except for a scoop of ice cream here or there, but in Athens I could get vegan.  So, because I was nervous about eating foods out, that I hadn't eaten for a long time, I took with me betaine HCL, which is stomach acid support; digestive enzymes; FODMATE, which is digestive enzymes specifically for FODMAP foods and charcoal capsules, which absorb gas if you have bloating and can also be helpful with diarrhea, and all of these have been really handy when out. I've still not had the happiest bowel movements, but I wasn't having sudden severe reactions whilst out and needing to dash to the loo, which is what I used to get and what I was scared of. So that's the diet side of things.   SIFO For SIFO, I didn't want to go in too hard core now and then have lots of die off reactions whilst away, which would leave me feeling really unwell. So instead, I started subtle. I have a one-week course of an anti-fungal from my doctor, but I am also taking a high dose of saccharomyces boulardii, which is a healthy yeast probiotic that competes with candida for space in the gut and has been shown to be very effective. I am also taking another probiotic called lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, which creates candida antibodies to kill it off.  I am also taking immunoglobulins, which are naturally a part of our immune system and line our gut, but I am very low on these. They bind to toxins and help expel them, and when they're low, we're more suspectable to infections, parasites, yeast, etc. So, I am taking them to help with both the SIBO and SIFO. Additionally, I am taking glutathione, which is an antioxidant that's absolutely essential to liver function, and so this is supporting my liver to clear out all the toxins as the candida, fungus, etc. clears, helping me by lessening the die off.    SIBO For SIBO, I am keeping it at bay with the strongest prokinetic, called prucalopride. This is a pharmaceutical drug, but unfortunately, the natural prokinetics aren't normally strong enough and this was certainly the case for me. I tried them all, and they just didn't do the job. Whilst doing that, I am of course doing the diet 80% of the time, and then meal spacing as much as possible. So that's 4 hours between meals and 12 hours overnight. Sometimes I can't manage the 4 hours between meals because I'm hungry or I need to support my blood sugar, but at a minimum we're required to do 12 hours over night. I think maybe three days I ended up doing less than that because of travelling, maybe 10 hours or something. And alongside that I am taking low dose allicin, which is an extract from garlic, and I use multiple times in my SIBO treatment with success, and allicin also kills off fungus. It's reportedly not strong enough alone to kill fungus and yeast, but it can help and in combination with the probiotics, I think it's a nice combo to keep the SIFO at bay at least, if not begin killing it off.  So, I am taking the allicin at a low dose to keep the SIBO at bay, and this is a common approach. Dr Siebecker doesn't use it, but some other doctors do use it between treatment rounds instead of a prokinetic, and it does work. So, it may not be enough to kill the SIBO, in fact I know it's not, but it just sort of keeps it from growing like crazy.  Then of course, the immunoglobulins help too.   Microbiome and gut lining repair So, I am taking high dose fish oil, about 2000mg, which helps to repair the gut lining.  I am taking 2000mg of quercetin, which again helps to repair the gut lining, and also lowers inflammation in the body and gut and is a natural antihistamine. I was taking l-glutamine before I left, which is the best leaky gut healer, but the tub was huge and was open, and is a white powder, so I thought I might get arrested for that one! Additionally, the saccharomyces boulardii also helps to repair the gut lining, and the lactobacillus acidophilus also contains two other strains which have been shown to repopulate the gut and increase levels of beneficial bacteria. Now normally, I wouldn't take so many probiotics with SIBO, because taking too many can cause a flare up and even cause it to grow, but it's about testing your tolerance. If you take a probiotic and you're bloating or SIBO symptoms get worse, it's probably not the best one for you because it's feeding your SIBO. In contrast, certain single strains are better tolerated. I like to build people up to a few strains, and I was already on two, so with this combo I'm on four, and I tested them out before I left to make sure I wasn't reacting. But essentially, I couldn't find a single strain of lactobacillus acidophilus for the life of me, so this was the best I could find!  And the immunoglobulins help to rebuild the gut lining and support the microbiome too.  Additionally, in general, I have been supporting my gut by using the app. Nerva, which improves the gut-brain connection and using Arvigo massage at night to stimulate the migrating motor complex overnight. Both of these also help to lower stress, which damages the gut lining and microbiome, so addressing a stressed nervous system and an anxious gut is really important too – and I see Greece as part of that. I have to say, I haven't been able to be consistent with the massage and the Nerva with all the travelling, but we're a week into our new temporary home now and we're here for another three weeks, so I can get back into my routine.  So that's my current protocol. When I return to the UK, I am going to move into a high dose of oregano and another yeast antimicrobial, likely Candibactin AR, but continue with the probiotics, and I'll of course retest for SIBO. If I am positive, I may do the elemental diet again, whilst taking anti-fungals, as that should kill it at the same time. I may then need to continue with the candida treatment for several months, as it can take some time to clear. But I think that will be judged on whether I am seeing any improvements, because if it's not candida, then I don't want to waste time treating the wrong issue. I'm hoping to do an organic acids test too, to see if any candida shows up. What I'll do is take an anti-biofilm for two weeks ahead of the test, and that will hopefully break up the biofilm so it can be detected. It doesn't always work, but we'll see. But there are plenty of natural anti-fungals to rotate through and I have all the doses from my course with Dr Jacobi, so I'll let you know which ones I'm doing as I go through the treatments. If it's not candida, I may be still having symptoms because of possible Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which I am being assessed for when I return, and I've been talking about that over on Instagram if you want to learn more about its connection to endo and SIBO. And it could also be that I am just rapidly relapsing and severely reacting because of an upregulated nervous system, in which case, there are two great courses for rewiring your brain if your body is very reactive, one is called DNRS and the other is the Gupta Programme, so I may consider those too. I see a lot of this with my clients, an upregulated nervous system from years of pain, inflammation, etc. It's really too early to say which route I'm going to go down until I see what my SIBO results say, and I see how I respond to the candida treatment that I try when I get back. So that's it. I hope that sharing my journey has given you some insight into your own, has maybe offered you some hope or some motivation to keep going. I know clearing these guys is tough, and I'm with you on that, but feeling well is possible.  Let's get social! Come say hello on Instagram or sign up to my newsletter. Sign up to my free Endo Belly Challenge here. To become a The Endo Belly Course Founding Member, email me at hello@thisendolife.com with ‘Yes' in the subject line. Sign up to the wait list for my course, Live and Thrive with Endo here. My cookbook This EndoLife, It Starts with Breakfast is out now! Get 28 anti-inflammatory, hormone friendly recipes for living and thriving with endometriosis. Order your copy here. If you feel like you need more support with managing endometriosis, you can join Your EndoLife Coaching Programme. A 1-to-1 three month health and life coaching programme to help you thrive with endometriosis. To find out more about the programme and to discuss whether it could be right for you, email me at hello@thisendolife.com or visit my website. This episode is sponsored by The Pod Farm. Learn all about how to start your own podcast with the complete course from The Pod Farm. Aimed at beginners, this course takes a simple and straightforward approach to planning, equipment buying, setting up, recording, editing and hosting your own podcast. With hours of audio and video materials, and downloadable guides and useful links, this multimedia approach aims to have something for every kind of learner. From now until April 15, newsletter subscribers get 20% off the course price. Visit www.thepodfarm.com to enroll or find out more This episode is sponsored by BeYou. Soothe period cramps the natural way with these 100% natural and discreet menthol and eucalyptus oil stick on patches and CBD range. Click here to find out more and to shop: https://beyouonline.co.uk   Show Notes Nerva DNRS Gupta Programme Arvigo massage practitioner  

Mensagens de vida
O espírito de Sísifo

Mensagens de vida

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 33:39


Sísifo foi condenado a eternidade toda a viver uma vida sem propósito empurrando uma pedra até o pico da montanha, e lá chegando, a pedra retornava ao início. Perceba o propósito de Deus na vida em meio aos dias ruins como aconteceu com Jó. Deus viu a integridade de Jó, seus amigos o viam e criaram especulações sobre sua dor, mas ele sabia que seu redentor soberano está vivo, cuidando dele.

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition
Fungal Overgrowth: Causes, Symptoms & Solutions

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 27:58


Today's episode is proudly sponsored by Paleovalley and its 100% grass-fed beef and 100% pasture-raised turkey meat sticks, one of the choice snacks in my household.  Hurry and grab yours from Paleovalley.com/jockers and be sure to use code JOCKERS at checkout for an extra 15% off!   BIG NEWS! Dr. Jockers just released his BRAND NEW book on Fasting! It's called — Fasting Transformation: A Functional Guide To Burn Fat, Heal Your Body, And Transform Your Life With Intermittent And Extended Fasting. AND we're so excited that it's now available on AMAZON! We'd love your support (and if you like the book) I know he'd appreciate a review too! Claim Your Copy Here.    The human body is so amazing that it can evolve and adapt and heal itself, even when faced with the most fatal killer in the history of mankind. But because of this ability to adapt, living organisms, good and bad, manage to thrive inside our bodies. Those bad organisms can be so damaging hence, it is important to get them under control before they grow even more. Dr. Jockers shares the natural tests you can do to check if you have candida or yeast overgrowth in your system and the natural solutions you can do to manage this overgrowth. He also identifies the different causes and factors of fungal overgrowth to minimize, if not inhibit, these factors from causing havoc inside our system.   “The way that our bodies have adapted is that we create a really potent chronic inflammatory response whenever we feel threatened.” - Dr. David Jockers   Subscribe to the podcast on: Apple Podcast Stitcher Spotify PodBean TuneIn Radio   In This Episode:   - The fierce 4 biotoxins and hazardous organic substances that damage our systems and how they can thrive in the body -- if they are not stopped.   - 5 major causes of small intestinal fungal overgrowth (SIFO) and how this nasty issue harms your overall health.   - The best-known of all the different fungi and yeast strains spreads THESE types of compounds, lighting up chronic inflammation.   - 8 common symptoms of SIFO and the 2 natural tests you can take to check to see if you have any symptoms.   - This ONE product goes deep to work great to clear up these problems (you can thank these 8 components for making it so effective).   - Top natural 9 solutions you will love that quell major flare-ups of fungal overgrowth.   Resources:   - Paleovalley Beef Sticks - Use Code JOCKERS for 15% off   - The Fasting Transformation by Dr. David Jockers   - Subscribe and leave a review today - https://ratethispodcast.com/jockers   Connect with Dr. Jockers:   - Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/drjockers/   - Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/DrDavidJockers   - YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/djockers   - Website – https://drjockers.com/   - If you are interested in being a guest on the show, we would love to hear from you! Please contact us here! - https://drjockers.com/join-us-dr-jockers-functional-nutrition-podcast/

This EndoLife
My SIBO Treatment: A Negative Test, Hydrogen Sulphide or SIFO?

This EndoLife

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 102:16


Today's episode is a SIBO update from me… and it's an exciting one! I FINALLY have a negative test - or is it? Yes, nothing in my treatment journey has been straight forward so far and apparently, that's not going to change any time soon! In today's episode, I share: My experience on the second round of the elemental diet and why I LOVED it! My struggles with the low histamine bi-phasic diet and what finally got me on track. My experience on antibiotics for SIBO (rifaximin, metronidazole and neomycin) and the not so great response from my immune system. The symptoms that got better - and the symptoms that got worse, despite a negative test result. The dilemma as to whether my SIBO test results are negative or a hydrogen sulphide flat line. Why I think I may have small intestine fungal overgrowth and what my next steps are with testing and treating. My prevention of relapse strategies including supplements, hypnotherapy, vagus nerve healing and more! This is a LONG episode but there was so much to catch up on, and I just hope that by being really honest about my journey, you'll be able to gain some insight and perspective on your own healing path with SIBO and endometriosis. Sign up to the wait list for my course, Live and Thrive with Endo here. My cookbook This EndoLife, It Starts with Breakfast is out now! Get 28 anti-inflammatory, hormone friendly recipes for living and thriving with endometriosis. Order your copy here. If you feel like you need more support with managing endometriosis, you can join Your EndoLife Coaching Programme. A 1-to-1 three month health and life coaching programme to help you thrive with endometriosis. To find out more about the programme and to discuss whether it could be right for you, email me at hello@thisendolife.com or visit my website. This episode is sponsored by The Pod Farm. Learn all about how to start your own podcast with the complete course from The Pod Farm. Aimed at beginners, this course takes a simple and straightforward approach to planning, equipment buying, setting up, recording, editing and hosting your own podcast. With hours of audio and video materials, and downloadable guides and useful links, this multimedia approach aims to have something for every kind of learner. From now until April 15, newsletter subscribers get 20% off the course price. Visit www.thepodfarm.com to enroll or find out more This episode is sponsored by BeYou. Soothe period cramps the natural way with these 100% natural and discreet menthol and eucalyptus oil stick on patches and CBD range. Click here to find out more and to shop: https://beyouonline.co.uk Show Notes Bladder test Organic acids test GI Map

Sin Filtro
¿La vida vale o no la pena ser vivida?: Camus y El Mito de Sísifo.

Sin Filtro

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 48:25


En este capítulo abordaremos el tema del absurdo y el sinsentido existencial desde la obra de Albert Camus.

Daily Detox with Stephanie Center
32. Healing Your Gut and Understanding SIBO with Dr. Melanie Keller

Daily Detox with Stephanie Center

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 68:11


Learn how to heal your gut using intuitive techniques and how to navigate SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) with Dr. Melanie Keller. Highlights SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth). Is not a disease, syndrome, or condition. It's too many bacteria in the wrong place. SIBO is with you. It doesn't have you. Learn the SIBO story. The gold standard for testing is not a breath test. SIFO (fungal) vs SIBO (bacteria). Intuitive eating for your gut health. Using knowledge about pH to balance your gut flora. Why you shouldn't use probiotics to heal SIBO. The link between food poisoning and SIBO. Why you should follow food safety news. Lipopolysaccharides and leaky gut. Dr. Melanie ND, “The Intuitive Edge Doctor”, helps people understand their lives and bodies better so they can take part in their own rescue by receiving the precise care they need. After having gut health problems over half her life, Dr. Melanie uses her expertise in gut health, medical and epigenetic intuition to get results. Many of the people she's worked with have often been seeking treatment for years and at major hospitals around the world. Dr. Melanie has spoken about gut health on numerous podcasts, summits and as a keynote symposium speaker. She contributed to the development of the SIBO Center in Portland, Oregon has been published in the Townsend Letter The Examiner of Alternative Medicine, Naturopathic Doctor News and Review (NDNR), Eat This, Not That!and will be featured on “The List TV”. Find Dr. Melanie: https://www.intuitiveedgedoctor.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stephanie-center/support

The Microbiome Report
Unexplained Symptoms? It Could Be SIBO

The Microbiome Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 49:33


Leave Us A Rating And Review! Dealing with bloating, gas, belching, pain or nausea? These are common symptoms of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, also called SIBO. And they're symptoms that our guest, Phoebe Lapine, knows all too well.  Andrea and Phoebe set the stage on what SIBO is, Phoebe's 10 “not so fun facts,” SIBO risk factors and so much more. If you're dealing with any random, unexplained symptoms that you just can't figure out, this episode could shed some light on the issue. The Microbiome Report is powered by BIOHM Health. Save 15% off at biohmhealth.com with the code POD15.  Find the transcript and show notes for this episode at biohmhealth.com/pages/podcast.  Questions? Ideas? Email us at themicrobiomereport@biohmhealth.com or reach out on Instagram @DreEats or @BIOHMHealth.

The Lindsey Elmore Show
How dysbiosis is making you sick | Norman Robillard, Ph.D.

The Lindsey Elmore Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 50:37


How dysbiosis is making you sick | Norman Robillard, Ph.D. Norman Robillard, Ph.D., Founder of digestivehealthinstitute.org is a microbiologist specialized in functional gastrointestinal disorders (acid and silent reflux and irritable bowel syndrome), dysbiosis (gut microbe imbalance and overgrowth including SIBO, SIFO, LIBO, and IMO), and related conditions. He helps his clients around the world based on his 3 pillar approach: 1. Dietary 2. Behavioral 3. Identifying and addressing underlying causes that are specific to individuals. His Fast Tract Diet approach that works without drugs or antibiotics was presented at Digestive Disease Week, an international gastroenterologist meeting and is currently part of a larger clinical trial. Topics covered in this episode: • A Three Pillar Approach to Heal the Gut: 1) Dietary 2) Behavioral 3) Identifying & Addressing • An overview of the diverse functions of the microbiome in our bodies. • The process of breaking down complex carbohydrates. • Shifting the microbiome towards greater diversity & greater functionality. • What supplements to take to improve brush border enzyme efficiency. • Foods that the gut bacteria will help foster lower inflammatory reaction. Referenced in the episode: ‘Protein Power: The High-Protein/Low Carbohydrate Way to Lose Weight, Feel Fit, and Boost Your Health-in Just Weeks!' by Michael R. Eades and Mary Dan Eades Words to look up: • Enzymes • Saccharides • Probiotics / prebiotics • Microbial herbs • Firmicutes • Proteostasis • Microvilli • Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) Free download called Fast Tract Diet Resource Guide at www.lindseyelmore.com/digestivehealth https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/fast-tract-diet-resource- guide.pdf Want to learn more about and from Norman Robillard, Ph.D. head to www.digestivehealthinstitute.org Wellness Made Simple is a new subscription platform; a one-stop-shop for everything you need to know about how to course correct or how to prevent symptoms from happening in the first place. Head over to www.wellnessmadesimple.us to sign up today. We hope you enjoyed this episode. Come check us out at www.lindseyelmore.com/podcast.

Filosoficamente Incorreto
Lá embaixo, no Mundo Subterrâneo dos Mortos: Hades; Tártaro: Campos Asfódelos; Campos Elísios/Sísifo

Filosoficamente Incorreto

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 5:06


Lá embaixo, no Mundo Subterrâneo dos Mortos: Hades; Tártaro: Campos Asfódelos; Campos Elísios/Sísifo --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pedro-mendes-ju00fanior/message

Comicverso
Comicverso 249: The Detective, El Mito de Sísifo y Stealth

Comicverso

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021


Fecha de Grabación: Domingo 13 de junio de 2021Algunas de las noticias y temas comentados:La editorial Bad Idea anunció que mantendrá operaciones sólo hasta fin de año antes de cerrar sus puertas. ¿Será definitivo o sólo esperan una inversión de capital?Respondemos preguntas de los auditores.¡...Y muchísimo más!Comentario de series y películas:Loki, episodio 1, serie desarrollada por Michael Waldron, con las actuaciones de Tom Hiddleston, Owen Wilson, Gugu Mbatha-Raw y otros. (Marvel Studios/Disney+)Sweet Tooth, primera temporada, serie original de Netflix desarrollada por Jim Mickle, con él mismo y Beth Schwartz como showrunners y con las actuaciones de Nonso Anozie, Christian Convery, Stefania LaVie Owen, Adeel Akhtar, Dania Ramirez y otros. (Netflix)El Mito de Sísifo, serie sudcoreana dirigida por Jin Hyuk para la cadena JTBC y con las actuaciones de Park Shin-hye, Cho Seung-woo, Choi Jung-woo, Sung Dong-il, Kim Byung-chul y otros. (Netflix)Lupin, segunda parte, serie francesa creada y escrita por George Kay y François Uzan, dirigida por Ludovic Bernard y Hugo Gélin y con las actuaciones de Omar Sy, Ludivine Sagnier, Soufiane Guerrab, Etan Simon y otros. (Netflix)Comentario de cómics:Batman: The Detective, cómic escrito por Tom Taylor, con arte de Andy Kubert y color de Brad Anderson. (DC Comics)The Nice House by the Lake, cómic escrito por James Tynion IV, con arte de Álvaro Martínez Bueno y color de Jordie Bellaire. (DC Black Label)Stealth, cómic escrito por Mike Costa, con arte de Nate Bellegarde y color de Tamra Bonvillain. (Skybound/Image Comics)Pueden escuchar el Podcast en este reproductor.Descarga Directa MP3 (Usar botón derecho del mouse y opción "guardar enlace como"). Peso: 91,2 MB; Calidad: 128 Kbps.El episodio tiene una duración de 01:39:19.Recuerden que ya está otra vez activa nuestra campaña en Patreon. Cada episodio del podcast se publica ahí al menos 24 horas antes que a través de los canales habituales, y cada mes grabamos un especial temático que es exclusivo de esta plataforma. Puedes sumarte a nuestros patreoncinadores™ con aportaciones desde 1 dólar al mes, y no existe un mínimo de tiempo para mantener su suscripción.También puedes encontrar nuestro podcast en los siguientes agregadores y servicios especializados:Comicverso en SpotifyComicverso en iVooxComicverso en Apple PodcastsComicverso en Google PodcastsComicverso en Amazon MusicComicverso en Archive.orgComicverso en I Heart RadioComicverso en Overcast.fmComicverso en Pocket CastsComicverso en RadioPublicComicverso en CastBox.fm¿Usas alguna app o servicio que no tiene a Comicverso? En la barra lateral está el feed del podcast, mismo que puedes agregar al servicio de tu preferencia.Nos interesa conocer opiniones y críticas para seguir mejorando. Si te gusta nuestro trabajo, por favor ayúdanos compartiendo el enlace a esta entrada, cuéntale a tus amigos sobre nuestro Podcast, y recomiéndalo a quien creas que pueda interesarle. Hasta pronto.Deja tus comentarios o escríbenos directamente a comicverso@gmail.com

#lerateondepuder - Contos e Poesias
Áudio Conto O Mito de Sísifo

#lerateondepuder - Contos e Poesias

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 4:46


Apresenta o Áudio Conto O Mito de Sísifo, contado por José Maria. Projeto #lerateondepuder: https://linktr.ee/prof.josepascoal.

Roger en Exa
Óscar Uriel nos habla de "El mito de Sísifo" y "El conjuro: El diablo me obligó a hacerlo"

Roger en Exa

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 6:03


No te pierdas las mejores críticas y recomendaciones cinematográficas con Óscar Uriel, entérate de todo aquello que puedes ver en cines y plataformas en este momento, sólo aquí con Roger en exa. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Papo em Série - Rafael Braz
O papo sobre as séries "O Mito de Sísifo" e "Ragnarok" - 2ª temporada

Papo em Série - Rafael Braz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 11:14


Nesta edição do Papo em Série, Rafael Braz destaca duas produções da Netflix. A primeira é a série coreana "O Mito de Sísifo". A segunda é a nova temporada da série nórdica "Ragnarok". Ouça os comentários do jornalista e saiba o que esperar delas!

¡Aplasta Arteche! Podcast
T02E27 - Sísifo y la piedra

¡Aplasta Arteche! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 98:48


Una semana más en lo más alto de la tabla, con una goleada abultada frente al colista, 5-0 y, encima, el Madrid se dejó 2 puntos contra el Getafe, con lo que aumentamos la ventaja a 3 puntos sobre ellos. Vamos, que el liderazgo del Atleti en esta liga es como la leyenda de Sísifo y la piedra. SUMARIO: 1.-  Presentación (0:00:40) 2.- Buenos días, ayer jugó el Atleti con @Monicaalacontra (0:06:32) 3.- Te Quiero Atleti con @1903Arcade (0:08:08) 4.- La opinión de los oyentes (0:26:25) 5.- Tertulia Atlética con @ChamiNorte @v1t0t3 y @MiguelNicolasOS (0:42:29)   6.- Cuando menos te lo esperas - Un relato de @MiguelNicolasOS (1:32:14) 7.- Despedida (1:37:45) Todo ello presentado por Eduardo de Atleti (@EduardoDeAtleti) Podéis dejar vuestras opiniones sobre este programa, tanto en los comentarios de esta entrada, como en Spreaker.com, Twitter y Facebook.

Kush
Sísifo - Mitologia y absurdismo (Albert Camus)

Kush

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 13:22


MOSTRAR MENOSHoy hablaremos del mito de Sísifo y del analisis que hace Albert Camus sobre este mito. Absurdismo y existencialismo, quedate para conocer mas. . . Spotify : https://open.spotify.com/show/5mbjmxE...​Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/kushpodcast...​. . . #medusa​​ #perseo​​ #mitologia​​ #mitologiagriega​​ #danae​​ #zeus​​ #acrisio​​ #oraculo​​ #profecia​​ #semidioses​​ #semidiosperseo​​ #grayas​​ #mitologia​​ #mitologiagriega​​ #odiseo​​ #laodisea​​ #poesia​​ #simbologia​​ #hermeneutica​​ #ulises​​ #zeus​​ #hades​​ #poseidon​​ #tartaro​​ #tiresias​​ #edipo​​ #homero​ #sisifo​ #camus​ #albertcamus​

Sikksakk
Episode 5 - Ingun Grimstad Klepp

Sikksakk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2021 65:12


Ingun Grimstad Klepp er seniorforsker ved forbruksforskningsinstituttet SIFO, ved Oslo Met.I sin forskning fokuserer hun på hvordan forståelse for klær kan bidra i debatter om miljø, demokrati og helse. Hun er også opptatt av forholdet mellom tekniske, sosiale og historiske innfallsvinkler til tekstiler.

Capítulos de Vida
Ep. 18 “El mito de Sísifo”- (Albert Camus) con Rafael Blando Torres

Capítulos de Vida

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 45:20


Rafael Blando Torres, fotógrafo artístico, nos comparte su experiencia con el libro “El mito de Sísifo de Albert Camus; un libro que lo llevó a replantearse su vida. Rafael nos narra momentos decisivos por los cuales ha pasado y su relación con la obra de Camus. Imperdible este episodio que te llevará a cuestionarte sobre la vida y lo absurda que está pueda ser.

Rational Wellness Podcast
Hydrogen Sulfide SIBO and SIFO with Dr. Preet Khangura: Rational Wellness Podcast 194

Rational Wellness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 65:09


Dr. Preet Khangura discusses Hydrogen Sulfide SIBO (Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth) and SIFO (Small Intestinal Fungal Overgrowth) with Dr. Ben Weitz. [If you enjoy this podcast, please give us a rating and review on Itunes, so more people will find The Rational Wellness Podcast. Also check out the video version on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/weitzchiro/]   […]

Samtidigt
122. Hultqvist snackar strunt

Samtidigt

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021 83:20


Dick har varit med i TV4-panel och pratat om “after she” vad det nu kan vara. Linus har tapetserat - och hatar det. Erik har köpt en bil och kommit i slang med bilförsäljaren som visade sig vara Trumpsupporter. Är det verkligen så att skolor i utanförskapsområden har för lite resurser, trots att man satsar oerhört mycket mer på dessa skolor? Hur uttrycker sig människor på faceboock och andra forum? Egen majoritet för det blågula blocket, enligt Sifo, hur kul? Ska IS-terrorister verkligen till Sverige, och är det i så fall “hem”? Försvatsminister Peter Hultqvist stod och ljög om Sverigedemokraterna i TV, var är rättelserna, fördömandena och avståndstagandet? Samtidigt podcast är en fristående ljudpod och en webcast av och med Dick Erixon, Linus Bylund och Erik Dahlin. Ansvarig utgivare är Dick Erixon, tidskriften Samtiden. Avsnitten finns i ljudformat "där poddar finns" och publiceras även som webcast på Samtidens, och från och till även på Sverigedemokraternas, youtubekanal.

Kush
Sísifo - Mitologia y absurdismo (Albert Camus)

Kush

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2021 13:23


Hoy hablaremos del mito de Sísifo y del analisis que hace Albert Camus sobre este mito. Absurdismo y existencialismo, quedate para conocer mas...Spotify : https://open.spotify.com/show/5mbjmxEGX9TOIvbsQQlHPW?si=TsidZ36wTyOSHXt0NY9dwQInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/kushpodcaster/?hl=es-la...#medusa​ #perseo​ #mitologia​ #mitologiagriega​ #danae​ #zeus​ #acrisio​ #oraculo​ #profecia​ #semidioses​ #semidiosperseo​ #grayas​#mitologia​ #mitologiagriega​ #odiseo​ #laodisea​ #poesia​ #simbologia​ #hermeneutica​ #ulises​ #zeus​ #hades​ #poseidon​ #tartaro​ #tiresias​ #edipo​ #homero #sisifo #camus #albertcamus

'Under The Bar'
UTB 124 Dave O'Brien - The Gut Repair Part 2

'Under The Bar'

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2021 54:44


The human gatling gun of gut repair Dave O'Brien is back for part 2 of his epithelium based extravaganza! In this episode we look at the different stages of his gut repair process and along the way discuss such topics as the nutritional value of organ meats, SIBO & SIFO and the impact these disorders have on energy and body composition, heavy metals in our food and environment, the impact of excessive stress on the GI lining, pros and cons of fasting, heart brain coherence and much more!

The Nathan Barry Show
018: Anne-Laure Le Cunff – Building a Loyal Audience & Growing Your Newsletter

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 59:52


Anne-Laure Le Cunff is the founder of Ness Labs, which applies neuroscience research to productivity and creativity. In addition to writing articles and running a growing community, Anne-Laure also writes a newsletter subscribed to by over 25,000 “mindful makers”. In this conversation, we talk about building up a newsletter audience from zero. Anne-Laure tells us why newsletters grow differently from other platforms, like YouTube channels, and why you shouldn't get discouraged when your subscriber numbers hit a plateau—often, if you just keep writing and sending great emails, the next wave of growth is right around the corner.We discuss the difference between Twitter and SEO as channels for gaining new subscribers, and the importance of saying “no” to all the things your business shouldn't focus on right now.Anne-Laure also explains why she's not pursuing brand awareness for her newsletter, and why she's focused on maintaining the contract with her readers first and foremost.Links & Resources Chris Guillebeau Tropical MBA Podcast Product Hunt Hacker News Quick Chat with Anne-Laure Le Cunff of Ness Labs - The Indie Hackers Podcast SparkLoop & ConvertKit The Nathan Barry Show e017: David Perell – Mastering Twitter to Grow Your Newsletter and Make Money - Nathan Barry Anne-Laure's Links Website: Ness Labs - Make the most of your mind Twitter: @anthilemoon Subscribe to Anne-Laure's Newsletter Episode TranscriptAnne: [00:00:00] Saying no. And always asking yourself, why am I doing this? And is it the right thing to do? That's the most important thing I thinkNathan: [00:00:13] In this episode of Art of Newsletters, I'm joined by Anne-Laure, talks about her journey from a product marketer at Google to running a very popular fast-growing newsletter. We talk about how she's earning a living her fresh products and so much more. So let's dive in. Anne-Laure, thanks for joining me today.Anne: [00:00:30] Thanks for having me, Nathan. Nathan: [00:00:31] So I would love to start with just why you started a newsletter. You've got a newsletter that's quite popular now, you know, you're, well-respected in, uh, all of our friend groups and all of that got a course that came out a ton of things. But going back to the beginning when you're like, all right, I'm going to create a MailChimp account.When I get going, like, what was the impetus behind that? Anne: [00:00:54] Initially that was more of a personal challenge. I went back to university a couple of years ago to study neuroscience and I wanted to have a forcing mechanism to write about it. And I'm someone who actually feels quite uncomfortable with disappointing people.So publicly committing to sending a weekly newsletter about the topics I was studying at school was a way to force myself. To keep on doing it. I didn't want people to be like, where's the newsletter. I should say she would have it. Right. So that's like, that's where I was just, I just told people, Hey, every Thursday you can expect an email about when you were a science for me.Nathan: [00:01:35] Yeah. So were you able to hit the every Thursday? Did you stay on that? Anne: [00:01:40] Actually pretty much. So I only missed three newsletters. In one year, two of them were planned. The other one is when was when I lost my grandmother and that was on the day I was supposed to send a newsletter. And what's crazy is that I almost went like, okay, I don't want to think about it.I'm going to keep on writing. And then I was like, that's like, no, that's not healthy. Are you doing stuff? Writing? This is okay. And, um, the two other times, I actually announced it in the, the edition before, because I read it out about mental health and balance and mindful mindfulness. And this is part of it too, knowing when it's better to just skip one newsletter so you can stick to it over the long run.Rather than burning out because you're trying to be overly sustainable to a point where you're hurting your own mental health. So I did skip a few ones, but I'm okay with it. I think what's more important is to be able to stick with it over the long run. Nathan: [00:02:37] Yeah, I think that makes perfect sense. And I like your point about being intentional about it and saying.I'm not missing a newsletter, I'm taking a break. And I think that's something that, um, Paul Jarvis has done really well where, you know, he's had his newsletter going for many, many years, and then he'll say like, okay, I'm taking December off or I'm taking the summer off, you know, something like that. And it's just, uh, a good way to give yourself that break so that you can, you know, have the consistency and then, you know, readers know what to expect.We are consistent with newsletters, so that. Readers can check in and know, uh, you know, really consistently what to pay attention to. I remember one of the, the first people that I followed is Chris Guillebeau. Uh, he wrote the a hundred dollars startup and a bunch of other great books. And he would post every Monday and every Thursday at like 10:00 AM or 9:00 AM on the dot.And I, for whatever reason, I wasn't on his email list. I don't know why. But I would actually just be like, Oh, it's Monday at 10. Like, and I would go and like, look for the poster. And if it was there on nursery day, it would go read it. And it's just interesting how like, well, you can get trained to, you know, go to the place where the good content is.If the creator sticks to the schedule. Anne: [00:03:51] Absolutely. And you see that in lots of areas of content creation, right? Some of the most successful YouTubers are also following a pretty strict schedule where they tell people they're very similar to what you just mentioned. Two videos a week one on Monday at this time one on Thursday at this time, same for newsletters, uh, same for blogs in general, any kind of.And they're very worried. The person is trying to build an audience. You need to have some sort of contract with your audience where you tell them, Hey, you're giving me your email address. You're giving me access to the most intimate part of the internet for you. You're giving me that that's precious in exchange what I'm giving youthe contract is going to be—is that you're going to receive. One or two newsletters a week from me on these days and I'm not going to break that contract. So I think it's quite important to be consistent if you want to build that loyalty with your audience. Nathan: [00:04:50] Yeah. It reminds me of, um, one other podcasts that I listened to a lot, uh, called the tropical MBA.And I'm even realizing that in there, like sign-off for the show, they say, we'll see you next Thursday morning at 8:00 AM Eastern standard time. And. Like it doesn't even matter. Like I'm not looking for the podcast at that. Like, I'll play it the next time I'm in the car driving somewhere. I'm on a run, but it, it has that like, you know, at this exact time you will get it.And it's just interesting how prominently they put it into their show. Anne: [00:05:22] Absolutely. And that I agree with you that it doesn't mean that people are going to wait that 8:00 AM on the dots to see it. But if every week when they checked and it was the day after, or it was one hour later, or the fact that they can trust that when they're on the next run or the next drive and that this content is going to get there means that they're going to keep on trusting you.And they're going to keep on checking, but if they check in three times in the row, It's not there, then they're just going to find someone else's content to consume instead. Nathan: [00:05:55] Yeah. That makes sense. What was the first milestone, um, for your newsletter that you felt like was substantial where you're like, okay, this is an actual thing.This is working. Let's keep going Anne: [00:06:07] to me. It was probably when I reached about 2000 subscribers was when I had this moment where I was like, that's. An audience. They are, I don't know, 2000 people in real life. So I felt like 2000 people, there are people in there I've never met in person who are not my close friends who are not my mom.So this is in the audience basically. So yeah, 2000 subscribers was when I started looking at it as something that could grow and that could become a more serious part of my life. Nathan: [00:06:41] What was like most impactful for getting those 2000 subscribers. And how long did it take? Anne: [00:06:47] I got there in a couple of months and as much as I'm a big advocate for consistency, the truth is that if you look at my growth curve—and it's the same with lots of my friends who run really big newsletters—there were spikes where something happens and sometimes it's something you control.in my case, for example, I launched my newsletter on product Hunt And I got a thousand subscribers just from that, which felt insane at the time because, you know, you just kind of double your newsletter in one day. And then there are others that I didn't control. Like one of my articles going viral on Hacker News and insane.You get quite a few subscribers. So, um, it's, uh, It's a mix of things that I control like launches and stuff like this, and a mix of stuff. I didn't control. The one thing though, that was really important was just to keep on posting every week. Right. And to make sure that I didn't wait for people to find my content, I would write the content publish the newsletter.And then I would promote the newsletter on Twitter and different places, etc And while I couldn't control which editions of the newsletter would go viral, by making sure that I would keep on doing this consistently, I was just increasing the chances one of them would be picked up by someone and shared with a bigger audience.Nathan: [00:08:10] Yeah. That makes sense. When, if someone was considering launching on product hunt, what are the, some of the things that. You know, you think would make that go well, like one thing that I can think of right away is you have very specific focus for your newsletter. It's, it's unique and engaging rather than just being like, Oh, these are Nathan's musings on whatever, if I'm a random percent approximate, I don't care about that.Um, so I'd love to hear your take on like what you think would work. Well there. Anne: [00:08:37] Few things. The first one is that it's called product con. So I think this is what you were saying by, it needs to have a focus. And this is, uh, you know, I mean, you, you nailed it. This is exactly that it needs to feel like a product.So I would really work on the landing page and try and think about it as a product. What's your value proposition? Uh, what are you offering here? What is the service, the product, uh, who is it for? Who's the audience? What are they going to get out of it, et cetera, et cetera. What are the features, which in the case of the newsletter, you can describe what the frequency is going to be the length.Is it something that's going to take two, three minutes every time to read so quick bites or are you offering more long form contents that people can read on their commutes? For instance, So features audience value proposition, et cetera, I'm really presenting it. Like a product has really been France.The second thing is that because of the way production works, you need your product to be quite popular in the first couple of hours when you're posting it. So I really recommend waiting until you have about a Keystone, a thousand or 2000 subscribers. With a good chunk of them who are fans of your work, because then when you launch on product hunt and you can't ask it's against the rules to ask for a votes.So you don't do that. If your audience is big enough and your content has been valuable enough to them, you don't need to do that. People are going to come and comment on your post on product condensate. I've been reading this newsletter for two months. It has been very useful for me. This is what I learned.I really recommend signing up, et cetera. This is the most powerful thing that can happen when you're not the one selling your newsletter anymore. It's members of your audience who are doing it for you. They become ambassadors. So for that to happen, if you only have a hundred subscribers and half of them only are opening it.So wait until you have an audience and make it look like an actual product. Nathan: [00:10:41] Yeah, that makes sense. Cause I think so many people, um, say like, Oh, it's just a newsletter and they treat it too casually and exactly how you position. It really matters because if you think about it, um, I'm trying to think of an example right now, but, uh, there are a lot of almost like software companies or a lot of real products that under the hood are just a newsletter and it's just in the, in the packaging and positioning.And how you talk about it. That you're delivering that value. And so that really matters. And going back to the contract idea that you mentioned earlier, you know, if you're spelling out, this is what you're going to receive on average is going to take five minutes to read, or, you know, like these are Epic long form essays, research driven.And if you're spelling that out on the product page, then, uh, you know, people will understand what they're signing up for. There's a lot clearer expectations. So that makes a lot of sense. Anne: [00:11:34] And I just want to add that the other advantage of making it very clear is that you're also making it easier for your audience to share with people who may also appreciate the newsletter.If it's not clear. Even if they enjoy your newsletter, but they're really struggling to articulate to a friend why they like it, right. It's very hard for them to share and making the effort as a reader to share the newsletter with someone else is already a lot of work. So you want to make it as easy as possible for them.And you should tell them, this is what it is. Here are three bullet points that explain what the newsletter is about and why it's so good, then they can just. Either copy and paste this or reformulated a little bit if they want to, but at least it's clear. So you're not on me making it easier for yourself to grow your audience bank directly acquiring it.You're also making it easy for yourself to grow your audience by increasing word of mouth by making it cure what it is about. Nathan: [00:12:31] Yeah. So I think that, that, you know, one or two sentence description is really important, um, for a newsletter or any product. What's, what's the description that you have now for your newsletter.Like if I, if I asked what what's your newsletter about? And then maybe how has that evolved over time? Or has it always been the same? Anne: [00:12:48] The current one is a neuroscience-based content for knowledge workers. Um, and the very earliest one, which didn't work well was make the most of your mind. I'm in really good and catchy, but I think lots of people were like, okay, cool.What is this thing? So now it doesn't sound as catchy, I think, but it actually works better because people are like, Oh, this is the content I'm getting, and this is the audience. Am I part of this audience or not? Do I think this content could be valuable or not. So, yeah, it's, uh, it, it took me a while to switch because I really liked like the sound of the first one, but sometimes you have to be able to fall out of love with your own ideas and to pivot.So that's what I did for the technique. Yeah. Nathan: [00:13:41] Yeah. Well, it's this balance between clear versus clever and you started with clever and then later went to like, okay, let's just be clear and direct and descriptive. And I think that makes sense. Uh, so the SIFO where the newsletter is that now you've, you've scaled it up quite a lot.What are some of the current numbers? Anne: [00:14:00] Uh, I'm at 24,000 subscribers now and yeah, I'm still at, around in between 45 and 55% open rates on the, the subject line that I'm using a lot. The, uh, the one that had the highest open rates in. And forever with was productivity porn. And the second one was idea sex.And now I'm thinking, is it the pattern here? Should I just talk about sex more? Is that where they say that sex sells? Right. So it really depends. Sometimes I have more boring subject science and so it goes a little bit more, sometimes higher and, um, yeah, that's, uh, I don't have other numbers in mind right now.Those are the two main ones. I look at how many new subscribers and what the open rate is like. Nathan: [00:14:51] Yeah, I think that's a good number to pay attention to because if you become too fixed to get too fixated on one or the other than, you know, like. It's actually not that difficult to grow a really large newsletter that no one pays any attention to.You know, and then, um, if you're only focused on open rate, then you'll probably end up with this really small group. And so I like to talk about engaged subscribers as the metric to optimize for, and that's just, you know, open rate times total this size. And then if you can grow that over time, then you're doing really well.Anne: [00:15:24] Yeah. One number I used to look at negatively before was the number of unsubscribers at the beginning, every time someone would unsubscribe, I would feel so hurt because I was like, are you breaking up with me Why are you doing this to me? And now I realized. Two things. Um, from a human standpoint, this is good that they're breaking up with me.It means I'm not bringing them the value they expected they were going to have, so it's good. We're not wasting our time anymore. Staying in a relationship. No one wants to be in on the business side of things two Most email service providers charge based on your number of subscribers, right?Actually Actually I Should thank them for unsubscribing. So I'm not paying for someone who's not going to read my emails. I've become actually quite positive about people unsubscribing where I'm like, this is great. Uh, we can both move on and I'm not going to have to pick up the bill. So that's great. Nathan: [00:16:28] That's right.Yeah. You don't want to be paying for dinner for someone that's no longer invested in the relationship. So, um, what are some of the things that are driving growth now? Um, on the, on the subscriber side, like what's working to you bring in the most subscribers, Anne: [00:16:45] my, the main one is still Twitter. Uh, and. It may stay like this for a while, even though my fastest-growing acquisition channel is search engines I'm very excited about that actually, because Twitter works great for me in terms of acquiring new subscribers, but it is definitely correlated to how active I am on the platform. And I've never actually run the numbers, but intuitively speaking, looking at my analytics in Twitter and my analytics in my newsletter, there's definitely some sort of correlation going on here where the more I tweet, the more people sign up to the newsletter, which is great because you can just tweet more and you get more subscribers, but it's not sustainable.And there are times where actually you want to take a break from Twitter. my newsletter definitely suffers from that in terms of growth. So that's quite interesting. Whereas for, with SEO and search engines I'm literally acquiring subscribers in my sleep I can go to bed. And then, you know, if an article I posted is actually doing a great job at answering the question people are wondering about, then I get a bunch of new subscribers.And I really like that. I like SEO because I can reach people that are Way outside of my personal circle with Twitter, it's one or two, maybe three degrees removed from me, but there's still a connection somewhere. Whereas with SEO, I can have access to people who probably don't even have a Twitter account have never heard about any of the people in my circle.And who just need help with a specific question and then I help them. And if they start browsing the website and the previous editions of the newsletter they're like great. I'm going to sign up because I want to hear more from this person, Nathan: [00:18:39] right? Oh, that's so interesting. I love that. You're making the correlation between.The active work versus the passive work or like which one is the treadmill? Um, which, you know, we're actually big fans of treadmills. Like you can use them to get really fit. Um, but, and then, which is the system or the flight. Oh, that's working for you. And so, yeah, cause for me, it's the same thing with Twitter.Um, my Twitter audience and my newsletter really grow when I invest the time into it. And so I guess in that way, it's good. Right. If you pour the time into it, you, you do really get returns from it. But then when you want to take a break, it's like a cool, well, we'll be here when you need it, but also you don't get anything in the meantime, whereas with search, you know?Yeah. There's these subscribers and this traffic that just keeps coming. Um, what are some of the things that you've done? Um, to optimize for search. Is that something that you've learned a lot about yourself or that you've contracted out to someone or is it that you just focus on great content and let everything else take care of itself?Anne: [00:19:38] Um, so I want to preface this by saying I'm not an SEO expert, everything I've learned on my own. I have, um, I've never worked with a contractor on this because I've been focusing. I used to work at Google before, and I knew some people who worked on the team, looking at the search engine. And even though.They never gave me any secrets because that's way too precious to be shared like this. So they never gave me any of the particulars, but definitely there's been a trend in the past few years where Google is focusing on the quality of the content, rather than at structural bits of the article that you're publishing.So in the past you could probably improve your SEO a lot by just saying, okay, I need to have a meta description and these tags and these things, et cetera. But now the they're using machine learning much more. You really need to think to put yourself in the shoes of someone who needs help with a particular question in kind of thing.Okay. And there are tools of to that help you look at that, like a RAF, et cetera, but. It's more about putting yourself in the shoes of the person looking up something and like, how would they ask that question? How would they phrase it? And if I was the one looking up this question, what would I find helpful?And what's interesting is that for some questions, actually, I want to read a quick one paragraph answer. I just want something really quick. Right. And for others, I need something that's more in that. So it's also changed the way I've been looking at it, where in the past, I always thought I needed to write.Really long articles to give value to people. And I feel really comfort. I have articles that are 300 words and they're doing really great because they're the only one answering that particular question. So it's like long tail content. The way I've been going about it is just experimenting, reading about it, looking at my own data rather than looking at it.Kind of like blanket statements, types of tutorials telling you what to do. I'm just looking at my data and looking at what are the articles are performing best and trying to figure out what works well. And I'm using a couple of plugins on WordPress as well. They're just flagging when I'm making. A massive mistake in an article where I'm trying to rank for a keyword and I'm linking on those keywords to another website.So I'm giving them all of my juice basically. So a couple of plugging and helping with this, but it's mostly trial and error. Nathan: [00:22:07] Yeah. That makes sense. So SEO is a big factor. Um, what are some of the things that you've tried? Have you done any partnerships with the people who are running newsletters or cross posts or anything like that?Anne: [00:22:18] I've done these. And so I have definitely tried exchanging links and newsletters with other people. It hasn't worked pretty well for me. I know that some people swear by that say that's amazing. I kind of suspect that it may work for maybe smaller newsletters where it's like, Hey, like everyone is so committed to you that they're just going to go and sign up to whatever you say.Um, for, for bigger newsletters, like me, it's really hard to find another newsletter that is hitting exactly what I'm offering to my audience. Right. And so I think one of the reasons why I didn't work really well was because. The newsletter I linked, you were only half relevant to my audience and it was the same for them.They linked to me and was kind of like half event. So yeah, for me, it hasn't worked when you, well, exchanging links like this. Nathan: [00:23:15] Yeah, that makes sense. I think that probably someone who has a really broad topic, like if you're talking to startup growth, then maybe there's 10 others on startup growth or writing or some of these things.Um, but yeah, you might be a lot better off. Like promoting a single article or something like that. You know, I I've definitely done like, cause I haven't done it recently, but years ago to grow my newsletter, I would do things like write a guest post, um, for another newsletter or a blog. And that would, I guess it would usually drive more awareness and an engagement than it would necessarily newsletter subscribers or like as directly.And so it worked, but it wasn't like, Oh, I did this thing and here's another thousand newsletter subscribers instantly. Anne: [00:23:59] I think what you're saying is very interesting because I, in the PA in a past life, I used to work in marketing and I think most people have heard of the concept of the funnel, right.Awareness and then conversion and then loyalty. And I think for a newsletter, especially when you're at the early stages, Uh, you know, even if someone has 20,000 or 30,000 subscribers—most people I know who are in this range there's still one person running the newsletter. They don't have a team. It's not like morning brew or whatever.The hustle, massive newsletters with millions of subscribers. I would say that for most people up to 50,000 people, you're still writing the content yourself, et cetera, in. Maybe to me working on pure brand awareness at the beginning of the journey, may be a bit of a waste of time because—it's notorious in marketing.That brand awareness is what costs the most time and money to put together and is also the hardest to measure in terms of success. And at the beginning of your journey, when you run a newsletter, It's probably more important to focus on stuff you can measure and improve, and that has a direct impact on your numbers.And once you become wildly successful and you have hundreds of thousands of subscribers and you have extra money where you can start experimenting with more brand awareness stuff. Yes. It's not that brand awareness is bad. It's more about figuring out when you're kind of stretched at the beginning. What are the places where you should invest your time and your energy that.are having a direct impact. Nathan: [00:25:44] Yeah. And what's returning money. So it's trying to talk about, you know, monetization and actually earning money from the newsletter. There's a ton of different ways to do it. Uh, whether it's, you know, sponsorships selling digital products, memberships, um, you know, paid newsletters are really popular.Now I'd love to hear what, what you're doing now. And, and Y you know, out of all of the options you chose, what, what you're doing. Anne: [00:26:08] So I first experimented with paid. EBooks that I was selling on the website and the newsletter was just a way to drive people to that. And I made it a little bit of money, but really not enough to pay the rent.And I very quickly felt like either. And I know you've been, you've had some very successful eBooks for yourself, so. Either I would create a new book and make it the product I would be focusing on and give it all of the love and the, the, the energy time, et cetera, that it would need to be a successful launch, but just running a newsletter and saying in the newsletter here's my ebook was probably not a great way to go about it.So there's probably better ways to do it by, but that didn't work for me. What's worked really well for me. And what I'm still doing is running a membership community. Next to the news letter and the content of the newsletter is free. I know that some people do paid newsletters, but for me, the newsletter has been such an amazing way to attract people to the website and to start nurturing them that I don't want to close down this acquisition channel by putting it behind a people.So I want to keep the music for free. And this way, people who just need to read my content, they're still getting value and this is great. But for the subset of people who want more, they don't want to just read the content. They want to talk about it. They want to make suggestions. They want to ask questions.They want to ask, how can I apply what I read into my life and how are other people doing it? And how can I improve my own systems for all of these people who are. You know, probably like th at the time, it's about 5% of the people who are subscribed to my free newsletter for those 5%, I'm offering more.And again, I'm just one person running everything. So I'm giving them extra value. And I'm saying, do you want to pay for that extra value? And the ones who want you, they can vary the part of the community. So that's my model right now with the free newsletter and the paid community. Nathan: [00:28:16] Yeah. So I love what you're saying about not wanting to cut off the acquisition channel.Cause that's like, that's the biggest challenge that I've had with paid newsletters or what content you put behind a paywall, because if you write something incredible, you're like, Oh, this should go to my page like this, this is worth paying for, but then you're like, But I need that. I need that piece of content and to go attract new subscribers and it should be free because this could actually pick up another 500 or another thousand subscribers, maybe just from the single article.And so you're always in this tension between the best work that I put out, where should it go? And the conclusion that I came to is, well, I should do, I need to create more of my best work. And then that started to turn into like, okay, I'm actually not that prolific writer. I'm not, I don't have the ability to create incredible work for two different, uh, two different channels.So how do you think about, or like, what do you deliver to people in the paid community? Uh, that isn't for the newsletter. Anne: [00:29:22] First and in the community in itself, that's why for at first I launched with just the community features. So they have access to an online forum where they can talk about the articles.They have access to week fees, zoom, meetups, altogether. When you pick a topic that's been covered in the newsletter and we actually talk about it, um, We also have we invite experts where we do with them and they can tell us how we had one with Paul Jarvis, actually recent vivre. He came and talked about how he runs his newsletter.So the 80% of it is the community in and off itself. Recently I've started adding more exclusive content. And the way I do it is that I make them PDF reports. About something that I know the community is interested about. So one that we did a few months ago was cognitive biases and entrepreneurship. And another one I did last month was tools for thought and personal knowledge management PDFs are useless for SEO in any case.So there would be no point in just putting it on my website. So I optimize the page itself where people can build it for SEO. I tweet about it. So people know that this is available, but then only members of the community can download the full thing. And that's been really helpful because first it's been really good as an acquisition channel.Some people are like, I don't have time for another community, but I'm going to read this report. So I'm just going to go with this. And the current members of the community they're super happy because I never told them that they would be getting this. It's like just a surprise saying, Hey, you're a member.Thank you for being here. Here's some extra content for you and it makes them, I think, but like they want to stay for longer because getting extra content. Yeah. Nathan: [00:31:24] That makes sense. And then you also probably don't have the same, um, Burden on yourself of like, Oh shoot, what's the, what's the Epic PDF that I'm going to come out with this month because you sold them on the community and the connection and these other things that don't take nearly as much of your time.And then you're just delivering value over the top with a PDF, you know, a great report when you, you know, are inspired or have the energy. Anne: [00:31:50] Exactly. And that's probably one of the most important things in general. We talked about consistency earlier. But not creating artificial consistency where you can stick with it is also still plants.And that's why, what I love about having the paid community is that what I tell them is that here's a community. We're going to do stuff together, the exact stuff I didn't commit to anything. So I'm someone that we can get bored pretty easily. I'm never bored with the community because I can wake up one Monday and say, Ooh.What if we do a series of coworking sessions this week, let's do that. Like, I feel lazy and I'm procrastinating this week. You want to come and all jump on the zoom call and let's work together. Uh, Amy would like pull drivers that was planned a week before. And that was again, if you go on our landing page for the membership, I'm not saying you're going to get that.It just happened. So I think finding the right balance between saying I'm offering you a community and we're just going to do cool stuff together and I'm going to be here and you can engage with me the exact details, like just common. Find out. Obviously the landing page is a bit more detailed than this, but have her comment on stuff.And for the newsletter is the same. I'm not necessarily committing to an exact format or to what exactly people are going to get. What I committed to. And that's the contract is it's every Thursday and these are the general topics I'm going to be talking about. And that's what I can promise you. And I'm not, I'm never going to break that promise, but then if I feel a bit, yeah, like playing with the format or trying something new one week, I feel comfortable doing this because I'm not breaking the contract.Nathan: [00:33:40] Yeah, that makes sense. Um, can you share some of the numbers from the pay community? And I know you shared them on Twitter and you're very public with that, but I'd love to give people that context. Anne: [00:33:50] I'm, uh, I met for 200 members, paid members, I think now. And, uh, In terms of, uh, Jimmy can't remember, uh, I think that the monkey recurring revenue is around 6,000.Nathan: [00:34:09] Okay. Yeah. Cause you're at $50 a year for the community membership. 50 Anne: [00:34:13] to $50 a year. Yeah. But some of it, I have two pricing. I have a $5 a month and $50 a year. So that's why the numbers have been all over the place. And I've made so far. I launched back in March, made about $65,000 with the community. Nathan: [00:34:31] Oh, that's awesome.So one thing that I wanted to touch on, cause you have a course that you, you launched the firm created from collector to creator, and I thought it was really interesting that that is. Uh, that's not a separate thing it looks at and correct me if I'm wrong. It looks to be, you know, a new acquisition channel for the, for the community, because it's all one payment it's still the $50 a year.Uh, yeah. Talk about that. Anne: [00:34:57] Yeah. So two parts for this first, as I mentioned earlier, I really liked the idea of saying through the community join, and then you're just going to get a lot of good stuff and you. You have to do it. You can't tell people they're going to do that. I'm good stuff. And there's no good stuff.So that's the first part, surprising people like this becomes a way of them wanting to stay because they're like what what's coming next. There's always good stuff going on. The second part is yes. And the acquisition channels, for sure, because some people and I've had so many people tell me I've been on the verge on the fence of joining.For the past few months, but I wasn't sure exactly if it was for me. And now this is this time bound thing where it's like, Hey, it starts on this date. It finishes on this one. So if you want to join, you have to do it. Now. You're going to miss this thing versus something that's always there. And people just keep on pushing back from the time they actually.Do it, so that's another thing. The third one is just logistical. It's so much easier for me to manage everything as a community and say, Hey people, that's the community. Everything is happening there. And when you have so many different channels to manage between Twitter, between the newsletter, uh, you know, I'm part of several telegram groups.Obviously I have 24,000 people who have my email address. So I also get a lot of emails that I need to reply to. And having every, everything in the circle community is a great way for me to not have more channels than I can handle. And I can just log in there, replay to everyone, make sure that I'm present and that I'm here to answer their questions.So, yeah, there's also a massive logistical aspect to it. Nathan: [00:36:48] I think there's a lot of really good points in there, but the simplicity for you to manage as a creator is so important. I've watched a lot of friends and convert customers and other people over say like the last seven or eight years. One is like get to a good amount of success and get to the point where they're earning, you know, tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars from what they've created.And then they, you know, release higher price products and they layer on more products and they're cross selling to this other thing. And not only does their email marketing get really confusing and complicated, especially as you're like looking back like three years ago. Why did I. Why did I create that tag?I don't actually even know what that was for, but then also your, just your schedule and like mental space gets so crowded. Cause you're saying, okay, what is for this community? And what's for that. And hold on, did I promise updates for this product? Or was that just thing should this, you know, and so you end up with this really complicated, overwhelming, uh, you know, thing to maintain.And so what you're doing is basically saying. When I'm inspired to create something new, I can go, whether it be a PDF, a, uh, a zoom call with a friend on a particular topic, um, or, you know, a full new course, I can create that I'm going to promote it like a full lunch. So it gets all this attention out in the market, like, okay.And Laura just came out with this great course, you should pay attention to it. But then I get to fulfill it just through the same thing that I was always doing and have that simplicity, um, and then just drive more sales there. So I think it's brilliant because you're finding this balance between, you know, driving more revenue and keeping your life simple.Anne: [00:38:35] I love that you're saying this because I've seen so many of my friends quit their corporate job because the state, they wanted more freedom and they ended up creating this new monster of a bus for themselves. Where the committed to so much that I genuinely think that their life today as an independent creator is actually more stressful than it was when they were an employee.And I really don't think it has to be this way, and I'm not worried for them because I know that this is part of the learning process and they're probably going to figure it out and, and, you know, change their processes and simplify them. But. I think most independent creators have had to go through this space.And myself included, obviously, like I didn't just wake up and figure it out in one go. I've had weeks where I felt like this was too much work and this is why I'm being very mindful of my time time now. But there's always this tension between being able to, to do whatever you want to do, because you're technically your own boss.But also learning that it's not because you technically can do whatever you want to do, that you should try to do all the things you need to make choices. And you need to remember that there are only a certain number of hours in the day. And one of the big reasons you probably left your corporate job was to have some freedom and to feel less stressed.So it's important to keep that in mind. I think. Nathan: [00:40:07] Yeah, that's good. And it was listen to, uh, your India hackers podcast episode. And you talked about burnout on there, um, and how, like that's such an important thing to be mindful of and be aware of. Um, because yeah, like I am my own boss and it turns out I can be a terrible boss, you know, especially if I'm also the only employee.Um, are there any other things that you've done in either systems and processes or things you've committed to, or, or deliberately said no to. To maintain that level of freedom. Um, yeah, as you've gotten the audience?Anne: [00:40:42] One of the things that have helped me so much, and I felt so uncomfortable doing it at the beginning is that I added to my website into my newsletter form too.Paid for my time. If people want to talk to me, they can book there for one hour and we have a zoom call together. But as my audience has grown, I've had more and more people reaching out to pick my brains, which just gets my opinion on their product or on their newsletter. And it's not that I don't enjoy doing it that you love doing it.This is great. I love connecting with people. As I said, we only to have a certain number of hours in the day. So the number of days in the week and. At some point, I found myself in all of those calls with people from all around the world, which very quickly went from exciting to overwhelming. So now I have this form where people reach out to me.I'm like, yeah, I'm very happy to talk. Uh, you can sign up here. And if you want you, if you're willing to pay for an hour of my time, I'd be more than happy to review whatever you want to review together. So that's been a great way to protect my time. And that's also been a source of revenue, which is great.And yeah, that's like the only thing I can think about right now, I think that the main, the main rule that I'm trying to have is to try to say no more often. I've been asked for example, by so many people, I generally get two, three people asking me every week. When are you launching your podcast? And I know it's ironic because we're currently recording for us together, but I have no plans of launching a podcast right now.I don't have time. I don't have the energy. I don't think this is what I would be doing best. I'm great at writing. I don't think I'm that good at interviewing people kind of like talking and stuff like that. So. No, I'm not going to do it and it's not big. I could technically do it, but I'm not going to do it.And as an independent creator or a solo founder, this is the most important thing saying no more often than you're saying yes and always asking yourself, am I saying yes, because this is what everyone seems to be doing, or am I saying yes, because it's the right thing for my own content business, the paid newsletters you talked about earlier, for example, if, for me it's a great example.I feel like everyone and their mother and their dog are launching paid newsletters right now. I'm not saying they're good or bad. They're just a tool. And a communication channel they're completely neutral. But as such you need to ask yourself, is it the right thing for me and for my business, is it really what I should be doing?Or am I doing it because it's the latest trend and it was the same for podcasts last year. And it's probably going to be the same for something else next year. So saying no, and always asking yourself, why am I doing this? And is it the right thing to do. That's the most important thing Nathan: [00:43:38] Yeah, I, that makes so much sense. And having that awareness, um, really matters because. I mean, I always think of the Richard Branson quote, uh, opportunities are like buses. There's always another one coming. And as a founder, you know, as a creator, you can look at that and you're like, Oh, this would be amazing.Oh, that's working. You know, I heard on a podcast that, um, you know, paid newsletters are incredibly good or that sort of thing. So let me jump on it and always. Uh, you know, hop on all of these buses and instead you can sit back and go, okay, that is great. I'm really happy that that's working so well for that creator.That's not me, or that will be me after I do this thing that I've already committed to and I'm going to protect my time. I'm going to protect my energy and, um, you know, follow through on this one thing. That's something that I've given, um, a lot of advice to people. Who are starting multiple newsletters, which to me is, is a little bit crazy, but one newsletter is enough work, but I think you see how, how fun it is.And, you know, the growth is like, Oh, let me start another newsletter on this topic. And I always try to encourage people to bring it back and like pour all of that energy into this one thing, right? Like if you have 5,000 subscribers today, then if you, if you stick with it and pour energy into it, then you'll get to the 25,000 subscribers.And. I think the other thing that people miss with newsletters is the ceiling is incredibly high. Like Tim Ferriss, James clear Ryan holiday, Gretchen Rubin, they're all in the like, say, well, I guess I threw a couple of people in there who are the 300, 400,000 subscriber range, but most of that group is in the million subscriber or more range as individual creators.And so that's the crazy thing with the newsletters. If you keep with it for a long time, Then like, like, I wouldn't be surprised if you and I are talking, you know, I don't know, two, three, four years from now. And you're like, yeah, I have 200,000 subscribers on the newsletter and this is what results from it.If you stay really, really consistent, Anne: [00:45:43] it's a great point is there's no ceiling or the ceiling is very high as you say, but. The growth can be very inconsistent and compared to platforms like YouTube, where there's an algorithm that is going to keep on bringing people through your content. So lots of people on YouTube, for example, they see exponential growth.If they manage to stick with it for, let's say one year, a year and a half, and they do one or two videos a week for that time. And the content is good, obviously like you can never. I mean, I don't know about YouTube because there's backpack I'm doing really, really well, but you have good content, then you're consistent.The algorithm is going to help you and help here and use our growth, your sorry, your YouTube channel grow. Whereas with a newsletter you don't have such a mechanism that you need to get to quite high numbers before this starts having some sort of a feedback loop. I know you're working with for example.So I'm going to change in the future, but up until now, there was no viral element to build into the newsletter because of this. I think lots of people get discouraged whenever there's two weeks or three weeks or one month where the growth seems to be kind of, flat and that's when they fall prey to the shiny-toys syndrome and they're like let's launch a second newsletter or let's start a podcast or let's do something else.Whereas what I have found in my very short amount of time of experience in my one year, and some months with my newsletter, Is that if I managed to keep going during those couple of weeks where it felt quite slow, then it would pick back up again because of an edition that did particularly well. lots of my friends, they have this staircase type of growth also with their newsletter where you can see spikes when something happens.But these spiked spikes happen only because they stick with it. So, yeah, I think you do need. More persistence and patience with the newsletter than you would with other types of platforms. Nathan: [00:47:50] Well, I think you bring up a really important point that there's no built in distribution or, um, discovery platform for newsletters.It just doesn't exist. Whereas on Instagram, Tech-Talk YouTube, um, even search right for blogs. That it's there and, and you can grow an audience from it. And so that is a huge negative for newsletters. If that is not built in, on the flip side, the big positive is that all the distribution channels are available to you.And this is like a double-edged sword where on one hand, they're all available to you. And so you can grow in all of these ways in, in a way that like, say if I'm going all in on YouTube, It's I'm pretty much doing YouTube's algorithm. Like I'm not also going to use Twitter to grow my YouTube channel to the same extent, um, because the, the value of each subscriber isn't nearly as high on YouTube as, as it is sound newsletter.Um, so you have this, like with the newsletter, you can use any channel, but also which one do you focus on? And that's where I was. I'm really encouraging people to like, It's sort of a hub and spoke model. And so you have the hub, which is your newsletter. And then instead of saying like, here's the 10 spokes that we could be doing, you actually just choose two and start with that.And it sounds like for you, you've chosen a search and Twitter, and those are the two. And then when you're focused just on two, like it's a lot easier. It's not as overwhelming as trying to be like, let me pull subscribers from YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, search and everything else. Does that sound accurate?Anne: [00:49:29] Yeah, absolutely. I think you can have more channels in the future once. It's exactly what you saying earlier about. It's not that I'm never going through these things that I'm going to do them once. I nailed the first few channels, most big newsletters that are also doing YouTube, who are also doing all sorts of different platforms and channels.There's a team. Behind the, the newsletter, like the face of the newsletter, you could get Tim Ferriss. If you look at James clear, she looked at all of these very successful people with their newsletters who are doing podcasts and lots of different things. Did you start doing all of these things in their first year, they only started doing it once they had the payment energy and people to help them do it.So I a hundred percent agree with you, I think at the beginning. And at least once it's just you and you haven't figured out your channels, two is great. It already takes a lot of work to get to channels rights. So get this to right. Once that's the case, you'll also know a lot more about your audience.And where else it makes sense to reach them. Whereas at the beginning, you may not even know, you may be investing a lot of times in five different channels and three of them are actually useless for you. So, yeah, I agree with you start with two channels. And once you get your way later in your journey, why not explore it more channels, but you'll be much better equipped to do it.Nathan: [00:50:57] Yeah. One, going back to the point you made about product hunt early on. As you pursue this new channel or new growth opportunity, having the momentum and subscribers already makes a big difference. So like in the same way that you're saying, you know, get 500 or a thousand or more subscribers before you go on product hunt, because they'll help you get momentum in that distribution and discovery algorithm.Uh, it's the same thing. Let's say, if we're like, okay, we're now ready to do YouTube. Then you show up there and you bring your 25,000 friends with you and they like watch your videos. And then the YouTube algorithm says like, Oh, Wow. People are coming from outside, YouTube watching this, sticking around, subscribing, you know, getting more, watch time on it.You too let's this must be a really good video. Let's promote it. And the same thing is true of let's say later, you know, you decided to write a book and release it on Amazon. Well then instead of like, hoping for readers there and like begging every reader to give you a view, it said, you just come in and say, Hey, all of you, will you please buy this and write a five star review.Thank you very much. And then magically you're like, Oh, how how'd I get 500, five star reviews, you know, within a week. And it's just because you like leveraged their stairsteps, you know, one platform into the next. Anne: [00:52:17] Exactly. Yeah. The network effects of your audience can be incredibly powerful if you're using it wisely.I would say because it's the same with everything you mentioned. Like if among them launching YouTube and then I'm fighting, I'm asking them to write reviews on Amazon and you always need to keep a balance in terms of value you're delivering and value. You're asking from your audience. Right. So just, you know, focusing on one or two things at the same time is also a really good way to not confuse them and to get the most out of the help.They're very willing to give you a, you need to be clear as to what you're trying to achieve and not ask too much either. Nathan: [00:52:57] Yeah, that makes sense. Um, one of the last things that I want to dive in on back in the monetization topic is. You've gone with, um, a very low price point of the $5 a month, $50 a year.Um, what are your thoughts on that versus say that the very opposite end of things, you know, like David Perell was, uh, the, the guest before and he's got his, um, Write of Passage, uh, course, and he's charging thousands of dollars for that. Um, what's your thinking on choosing one end of the spectrum versus the other.Anne: [00:53:31] I would need to ask David exactly how he got to 2000, but the first I think most creators I know around me, they didn't start with 2000 straightaway. Right? Most of them, they start at a way lower price point and most of the ones that are, or today around the 2000 price point, they've been running their course for a little while.They've had a few cohorts and they raised the price every time because there's more and more value in the course. And it makes sense to raise your price when there's more value. So. First, I think it's a full secret to meet you say cure here's 2015. So 15 for me is my very, very first course. Um, and in terms of just your general question about price point, um, two things first, I think, can you think about, are you delivering something that's useful for work or that's more personal because then your audience is going to be a little bit different.And I know that lots of people, if it's something they can use for work, they can expense it. So the friction is a bit lower. They can tell their boss, Hey, I'm going to take this writing course, because obviously you want me to be a better writer and. Manager is going to say, okay, I'll cover half of the price or I'll just pay for it.Whereas for people in my community were like, Hey, I want to take care of my mental health. I want to feel more creative. These are very valuable things on the personal level, but they're harder to sell to your bus. So they're paying with your personal card. So that's one thing to take in mind. The second one is what are you going to Denver?And if you charge 2000, you need to have. Incredible levels of support for the community and, you know, David and Tiago, they have a team of several people working with them. They have extra sessions, they have all of this incredible content. And so it makes change. It makes sense to charge 2000 because you're almost positioning yourself against.The cost of a course in elite university that wouldn't have the teaching assistant access to the labs and all of this material and the library, et cetera. So, yeah. Okay. 2000. That's nothing compared to what it would be paying for an Elliot university, whereas in my case and what I'm telling people, very honestly, as I curious this community, and I'm going to give you live workshops together and it's just me and it's very new.And there are going to be technical hiccups. And the reason why charging solo for this first version is because I've really want your feedback, help me build this become co-creators of the course. So that's why I'm charging at this price point. And I've also made it very clear with people that the second cohort is going to be more expensive.The third one is going to be more expensive and then may get to a price point that is similar to what they visit sharing is charging at some point. But I'm not there yet. So that's how I'm thinking about pricing. Nathan: [00:56:27] Yeah, I think that's so good. And that's exactly what I wanted to, to focus on because when you start at the level that you did, and I love the way that you like, you even position it as a founding member, right.If someone comes in, they're getting in early, they're getting rewarded for that. They're helping shape this with you. And you're being very direct and upfront about where you are on your journey as a, as a course creator, you know, and everything else. And so you're not saying like you're not coming in and charging a ton of money for something where, you know, you might not be a hundred percent confident that that level of value is there because to your point earlier on freedom, like that completely messes up, um, You know, the whole freedom equation for you.Cause then you'd be constantly stressed about it. I would be constantly stressed about am I providing this level of value, but if I charge a low enough amount, then I'm like, Oh, I'm providing 10 X that value easily. And then as I add to it, I, you know, you also have the, uh, the urgency in that side of things.So like, okay. You know, founder membership is, you know, doubling to a hundred dollars a year now and get in before that happens. Or, you know, when you get to step it up with the value and, you know, not only are the early fans even more invested in and think you're great, but then, you know, you get to have launches all the way.Anne: [00:57:50] Yeah, exactly. And I just, I really liked the idea of co-creating a community with the members versus just me broadcasting stuff. So, you know, I've already got lots of feedback on the first session of the course that I did yesterday, and I don't think people would be so comfortable sharing this feedback if I didn't insist so much on the fact that I really wanted it at the end of the first session, I told people.Did you enjoy this? If you did, the best thing you can do is take the time, like right back to me telling me what you liked, what you didn't like, what could be better, et cetera. And when they launched the second cohort, I'm also hoping that because they participated in the first one and they co-created the second one with me, they'll probably also feel more comfortable sharing it with other people saying, Hey, I took part in the first one and I know the second one is going to be even better because I helped making it better, Nathan: [00:58:52] right? Yeah. That's so good. Well, I think that's all the time that we have. Thanks for, thanks for sharing everything. Where should people go to sign up for the newsletter and join the community? Anne: [00:59:02] So for the newsletter, they can go to nesslabs.com/newsletter. And, uh, there's going to be a link in there for the course.So that's probably the easiest way to go about it. Nathan: [00:59:13] That sounds good. Well, it's been really fun to watch you, you know, take off on Twitter and with your newsletter over the last a year or so. And I'm just excited to see where you take it. Anne: [00:59:23] Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. That was a fun conversation.

Sicherheit für die Ohren
Remmos gegen Tschetschenen

Sicherheit für die Ohren

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2020 68:17


Es war das wichtigste Thema in der Berliner Unterwelt – der „Friedenschluss“ zwischen Tschetschenen und Mitglieder der Familie Remmo. Als „Friedensbotschafter“ agierte der Ex-Berliner Boxweltmeister Mahmoud Omeirat Charr. Peter Rossberg und Axel Lier sezieren den Beginn des Konfliktes rund um das Gesundbrunnen-Center zwischen beiden Parteien bis hin zur Einschätzung der Polizeipräsidentin zur aktuellen Lage. Und: Beide Reporter haben noch etwas zu Corona zu sagen...

Dr. Ruscio Radio: Health, Nutrition and Functional Medicine
Updates on Hydrogen Sulfide SIBO & SIFO w Dr. Preet Krahgura

Dr. Ruscio Radio: Health, Nutrition and Functional Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020 55:32


Until recently, there hasn’t been a reliable way to test for hydrogen sulfide SIBO, and SIFO (small intestinal fungal overgrowth) can complicate the clinical picture. In today’s podcast, Dr. Preet Khangura, a SIBO and SIFO expert, shares about a new test for hydrogen sulfide SIBO, key clinical signs and symptoms of hydrogen sulfide SIBO and SIFO, and how to manage treatment for patients with these disorders. https://drruscio.com/updates-on-hydrogen-sulfide-sibo-sifo My book Healthy Gut, Healthy You is available at https://drruscio.com/getgutbook/ Looking for more? Check out https://drruscio.com/resources  

Mejor Con Gaby Vargas
Sísifo y su piedra 05 Octubre

Mejor Con Gaby Vargas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2020 5:21


SuperFeast Podcast
#86 Gut Health and Healing SIBO with Dr Nirala

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 53:11


We know that gut health is trending, it's pretty hot right now, right?! Well, tune in to today's episode as Mase explores SIBO with a bonafide SIBO doctor. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, it's a deep dive today, exploring what the heck is this actually?! Mason and Dr Nirala cover the nuanced approach required to treating SIBO, exploring why it may be overdiagnosed and other gut symptoms (constipation, food sensitivities and more).   If you've ever traveled to a third world country, got some sort of bug, 'fixed it' and then realised you never truly recovered, then today's episode is for you! (Also, if gut health and immunity are important to you, you are going to love today's episode.) Dive in, here are some of the stuff discussed in today's episode: The nuanced nature of SIBO when compared to irritable bowel syndrome To heal from SIBO, a strategic approach is required, not just a one-size-fits-all What role chronic stress plays in suffering from SIBO How hypothyroidism, mould exposure and other autoimmune diseases are connected to SIBO The misunderstanding around 'reseeding' the gut How the 'breath' test works in diagnosing SIBO Which foods to avoid during SIBO Dr Nirala's dietary treatment plan Dr Nirala covers the three possible treatment plans (herbs, antibiotics, diet) A brief touch on the Blood Type diets   Who is Nirala Jacobi? Dr. Nirala Jacobi, BHSc, ND (USA) graduated from Bastyr University in 1998 with a doctorate in naturopathic medicine. Dr Nirala practiced as a primary care physician in Montana for 7 years before arriving in Australia and is considered one of Australia’s leading experts in the treatment of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), a common cause of IBS. Dr Nirala is the medical director for SIBOtest, an online testing service for practitioners. Dr Nirala is so passionate about educating practitioners that she founded “The SIBO Doctor”, an online professional education platform. Dr Nirala lectures nationally and internationally about the assessment and treatment of SIBO and is the host of the popular podcast The SIBO Doctor podcast for practitioners. Dr Nirala is the medical director and senior naturopathic physician at The Biome Clinic, center for functional digestive disorders in Mullumbimby, New South Wales. Dr Nirala is the co-founder of the Australian Naturopathic Summit. When she is not actively researching, seeing patients or lecturing, Dr Nirala can be found enjoying the beauty of nature   Resources: Dr Nirala's Instagram The Human Microbiome Project Dr Nirala's  FREE SIBO Questionnaire The SIBO Success Plan 8 Hour Course SIBO Mastery Program (for practitioners) Visceral Manipulation Barral Institute Feeding Your Microbiome (Dr Nirala Podcast with Dr B) The Blue Zones book Healthy to 100 book Blood Type Diet   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast?   A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We’d also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Hi, Nirala.   Nirala Jacobi: (00:02) Hi, Mason.   Mason: (00:03) Did I pronounce your name correctly?   Nirala Jacobi: (00:04) You did.   Mason: (00:06) Okay. Nirala Jacobi?   Nirala Jacobi: (00:07) Very good.   Mason: (00:08) Yeah, yay.   Nirala Jacobi: (00:12) Yes.   Mason: (00:13) Okay. Guys, got to do it in person today, which is-   Nirala Jacobi: (00:17) What were the chances of that?   Mason: (00:19) Considering you live in Wilson's Creek, I think they're pretty good. But in terms of the chances of doing it, two people, that's a party but I think that's a legal party at these times, isn't it?   Nirala Jacobi: (00:29) These days, it is.   Mason: (00:31) Oh, pretty legal. Goji is sitting in the room if you hear Goj wrestling around, but dogs don't count. Guys, we're talking about SIBO. We got the SIBO Doctor here. I'm following you on Instagram for, I think, like three years.   Nirala Jacobi: (00:51) Wow. Okay.   Mason: (00:51) Yeah. I've been aware of your work. SIBO has been one of those things I used to say, facetiously, that it got trendy about three years ago in terms of I don't know where you see the mass awareness come about in the naturopathic and medical circles or whether it's even really accepted in the medical circles but, obviously, you would have watched the trend occur and then the mass misdiagnosis and then realisation that we're actually able to test and find out that it is this SIBO, which we'll find out from you what it is. Why did it, all of a sudden, hit mass consciousness? What I see a few years ago anyway.   Nirala Jacobi: (01:42) I'm going to go back nine years. I've been a naturopathic doctor for about 22 years now. I have practised in Montana and saw everything from heart disease to urinary tract infections to actual IBS or irritable bowel syndrome. We had really good result rates, but there was always a subset of patients that just did not improve. Then fast forward nine years ago, I sat in a lecture at one of our conferences and heard about SIBO. It was like a light bulb went on because it explained those cases that just didn't improve with conventional naturopathic approaches even to irritable bowel syndrome.   Nirala Jacobi: (02:27) Then, I started to become an expert in SIBO. I moved here about 15 years ago, Australia, but I became an expert and started lecturing for other supplement companies and to practitioners and started a breath testing company because there was just nothing here at all about SIBO. I think one of the reasons why it has really exponentially grown the interest is if you think that about 11% of the world's industrialised nation has IBS. IBS, according to conventional medical texts and the conventional medical approach, has no real cure.   Nirala Jacobi: (03:18) To find something that actually is the cause of IBS that is so profoundly responsive to treatment, I think, really gave hope to a lot of people. Now, of course, with that comes the fact that SIBO is often, as you mentioned, I do think there is an element of overdiagnosis. Everybody just basically treats according to the symptoms, which is not what I recommend at all. Because in that case, you can use antimicrobials and things like that for far too long.   Nirala Jacobi: (03:53) I think it has to do with the fact that there really wasn't other options for people. They really improved when they began to treat SIBO, or I saw a dramatic improvement in my patients when we finally treated the cause rather than just giving probiotics and giving fibre and giving all of the stuff that we know how to do, and people were actually getting worse, not better with those approaches. That was really my journey into this.   Mason: (04:22) That was probably about a time when I think naturopathic medicine got a little bit more integrated even. There were all these different pockets. All of a sudden, naturopaths, even though they were specialising in particular areas, became aware of just all these different specialisations, became I did say trendy for that reason, because it was about the end of that era where people were really trusting health coaches who would read up about the symptoms of SIBO and, therefore, put their clients onto an antimicrobial or whatever it was and just flying blind. You've got the breath test of your business where I see it's like if you're in Chinese medicine, you are doing pulse and tongue and the questions diagnosis. If you're in naturopathic medicine, you need that testing most of the time, I'd imagine.   Nirala Jacobi: (05:25) Yeah. I'm a gastrointestinal specialist. I don't just do SIBO. I specialise in functional gastrointestinal disorders, so I do a number of tests. This, I think, is a big shortcoming of practitioners where they consider the finances of ordering a test for a patient. I always tell practitioners that I teach, "You're not their accountant. You don't know if they want to test or not want to test, but it's your job to give them the best options and the diagnosis," because if you're just reading, you're not going to get better because SIBO is a really distinct condition that requires a really strategic approach. There's different kinds of SIBO.   Mason: (06:10) That's always what happens. Yeah. It's the same with PCOS or whatever it is. There's different arms. Obviously, there's different sources. There's mainly four major causes, is that right?   Nirala Jacobi: (06:25) There's four major groups of causes.   Mason: (06:27) Okay, okay.   Nirala Jacobi: (06:29) But maybe what we should do is backtrack and really define what SIBO is, right?   Mason: (06:33) Yeah, good idea. Well leading, you can tell you have a podcast.   Nirala Jacobi: (06:35) Yeah. All right. Let's talk about ... so that people can really understand that it's not just bacterial overgrowth, and as soon as you kill the bacteria, boom, that's it, you're cured. In some instances, that's the case, but it's actually the exception rather than the norm. But SIBO stands for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. It's a condition where bacteria that are typically usually found in the large intestine are, for some reason, found in the small intestine.   Nirala Jacobi: (07:03) Now, the surface area of your small intestine is about the surface area of a double tennis court. Imagine having a massive bacterial overgrowth right where you absorb your nutrients, where you release your enzymes, where you do all of these different important digestive functions and, all of a sudden, that surface area is just chock-a-block with bacteria. These bacteria ferment the food that you're eating into hydrogen gas. There's a group of bacteria or a phylum called proteobacteria. The main gram-negative bacteria in that group are Klebsiella, Proteus, E. coli, those types of bacteria that are the biggest culprit for causing SIBO.   Nirala Jacobi: (07:47) Why is this happening? This is how we get into the underlying causes. I think one of the main driving cause of SIBO is, imagine you've gone to Bali, you had a case of food poisoning, or if your listener is in America, you've gone somewhere else and you had food poisoning. You came home, it resolved, but then you still have ongoing digestive symptoms. Actually, over time, they become worse, you go to the doctor, they diagnose you with IBS. That is the classic scenario.   Nirala Jacobi: (08:19) What happens there is the bacteria that caused the food poisoning are not the bacteria that are causing SIBO, but they're the bacteria that are damaging to the enteric nervous system, which is really the motility, the brain of your gut. You are meant to have this innate ability to clear bacteria from the upper gut, because the body doesn't want them there. You're supposed to sweep them all towards the small intestine. When you've had a case of food poisoning that results in this damage, you actually cannot effectively clear these bacteria from your upper gut.   Mason: (08:55) What is it that's affected in the small intestine and it stops you from having the motility to move it out?   Nirala Jacobi: (09:03) This part of the nervous system is called the migrating motor complex. It's a part of the enteric nervous system. Enteric just means digestive or your gut. It's basically the brain in the gut. This particular section of the small intestine is meant to clear these bacteria out every 90 minutes on an empty stomach. Imagine that you've had this food poisoning and it damaged that section or that particular part of what clears the gut out in the upper gut.   Nirala Jacobi: (09:32) That actually can be tested with a blood test. We're trying to get it to Australia. Because of COVID, we've had some issues. But we do want to offer this test for people to test for these antibodies, because if you know that's the cause, the proper treatment for SIBO for you would be to have antimicrobials, whether that's the conventional antibiotics that are indicated for this or herbs. Then you must follow it up with something called a prokinetic, which is a medicine that aims to reset this migrating motor complex. That's probably the biggest group of people that have this as an underlying cause.   Nirala Jacobi: (10:10) But then you also have people that just were totally stressed out for a long time. Chronic stress, as you probably have discussed this before, causes you to be in this chronic fight or flight. If you're in chronic fight or flight, you're not in rest and digest, it turns off your digestion. These natural antibiotic fluids, like hydrochloric acid, bile, digestive enzymes that are meant to kill bacteria are very poorly produced and, therefore, you suffer not just from maldigestion, but then also bacterial overgrowth. That's a different kind of cause of SIBO that then wouldn't necessarily require the prokinetics.   Mason: (10:50) Like a stealthy, slow-grown...   Nirala Jacobi: (10:54) Yeah, yeah.   Mason: (10:54) I like that you're just actually bringing up those antibacterial fluids. I was going to ask you, and you did it straight away.   Nirala Jacobi: (11:04) Yeah. Then the other one, there's more, the fourth group ... The first one would be a matter of a problem with motility. That is not just this, what we call, post-infectious IBS. It can also be hypothyroidism, other autoimmune diseases, mould exposure. All kinds of things can cause this problem with motility. Then you have these digestive factors, and not a big one because a lot of people don't think about this, but previous abdominal surgery that causes scar tissue known as adhesions that actually attach to the small intestine in the abdominal cavity and cause like a kink in the garden hose. That prevents bacteria from leaving the small intestine. Also for that, you would need prokinetics. You can see how it's so much more intricate than just, "Here are some antibiotics," or "Here's berberine and here's Allimax."   Nirala Jacobi: (11:59) One last thing I'll say about SIBO before the next question is that there are two groups. I've mentioned the proteobacteria that produce hydrogen. There's another group of ancient organisms. They probably live on Mars, too. Honestly, they're like extremophiles. They live on the bottom of the ocean. There are these ancient archaea. They're not even bacteria. They produce methane. Methane, we know, causes constipation. If you're somebody that's been diagnosed with SIBO methane or SIBO-C or SIBO constipation, it's likely that your methane is high. That's a different kind of treatment. That's starting to be thought of as actually a separate condition. That's advanced SIBO discussion.   Mason: (12:46) I like that. We always got this travelling of these bacteria up through the ... Is it the ileocecal valve?   Nirala Jacobi: (12:55) Ileocecal valve.   Mason: (12:57) Ileocecal valve. Is that a constant occurrence of reality?   Nirala Jacobi: (13:00) No.   Mason: (13:00) No?   Nirala Jacobi: (13:01) No, that is not how it happens. These bacteria, they are normal in very, very small amounts. Nothing in your body is really sterile. Nothing really, even though we think it is, but it's not really.   Mason: (13:17) But we've been told it is.   Nirala Jacobi: (13:17) Yes, exactly.   Mason: (13:17) Programmed.   Nirala Jacobi: (13:18) Yeah. It's like modern medicine at the time thought that's what it was, but it turns out that one of the most famous bacteria that survives the stomach is H. pylori. We know it can survive very well there. But you have maybe 1,000 bacteria or colony-forming unit per mil in the upper gut, just below the stomach, the duodenum. Then as you progress towards the large intestine, actually, the diversity and the sheer number of bacteria increases. That's normal.   Nirala Jacobi: (14:00) These bacteria, even though gram-negatives that cause SIBO, are actually not pathogens. They're called pathobionts. Pathobionts are organisms that you normally find in low amounts. But when they get overgrown, they become pathogenic. I often tell people, my patients, I say, "Your gut is like a white supremacists neighbourhood. It's just one kind of bacteria, and you need diversity and you need low numbers of those organisms." That's what we're aiming for.   Mason: (14:36) There's, I guess, an as above, so below, we've sterilised everything in our environment, in our house, and we have low bacterial biodiversity there, we're going to see low bacterial biodiversity internally. Is there a particular macro or even micronutrient cycles that that gram-negative bacteria ... What did you say? What was the group?   Nirala Jacobi: (15:02) The group is called proteobacteria.   Mason: (15:03) Proteobacteria. Is there anything that would feed them excessively?   Nirala Jacobi: (15:08) No, it's basically food. Those bacteria are usually found in higher amounts in the large intestine. They're normal there. A pathobiont becomes problematic when it outgrows its environment or the other bacteria in that location. They've actually just did a microbiome assessment study on the small intestine. I think the other reason, just to briefly sidetrack to get back to your first question, why is this such a big deal now, is because we know so much more.   Nirala Jacobi: (15:44) The Human Microbiome Project that's undergoing, it's like discovering the universe, because what happened before we were able to actually understand what was happening in the small intestine, we couldn't culture out these organisms because they would die. They were anaerobes. They couldn't be cultured out. Now that we have this different technology that uses RNA and DNA, we can understand far more. Now we actually understand the normal microbiome of the small intestine a lot more. It's totally fascinating to be in this field of microbiome research.   Mason: (16:26) Of the large intestine bacterial testing and analysis of the biome, testing has got a little bit more efficacy with that, is that right?   Nirala Jacobi: (16:33) Oh, way more.   Mason: (16:34) Way more?   Nirala Jacobi: (16:36) Way more, because it used to be culture-based, it turns out it's like fairy dust of what actually is in the large intestine as a representation of the ... We know about Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. That is literally just 2% to 5% of your entire microbiome. There are so many more species that do fascinating things.   Mason: (16:59) We've had the chat on the podcast a couple of times of why just throwing a probiotic in the gut is ... Quite often, you can get a little bit more sophisticated.   Nirala Jacobi: (17:09) I think we're at that place now where ... I'm somebody who used to just do a probiotic. "Yeah, just a couple of Bifido, couple of Lacto, you're good." But now, I'm way more strain-specific. I would use Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 if you're constipated. I'm not going to necessarily give a whole combination of products, or I give you Lactobacillus rhamnosus if you have leaky gut and eczema, for example. It's a lot more fun now than it used to be.   Mason: (17:46) Yeah, I can imagine. It's like rather than just having your shotgun, you got the Men in Black chamber. You walk and there's all different types of guns and grenades all over the wall, but in a more life-giving kind of ... Like a seed gun.   Nirala Jacobi: (18:01) I like that. Actually, this brings up a really important point, is that even when I went to naturopathic medical school, it was taught to us that we could reseed the gut. Remember that?   Mason: (18:15) Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Nirala Jacobi: (18:15) We cannot do that. These Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, they are response modifiers. They actually do something that is not involving reseeding. If you've lost a lot of your native species because you were on chronic antibiotics for acne, or Lyme disease, or whatever that may be, if you've lost a lot of your species or have really reduced them, probiotics will not reseed what you've lost. You can't do that. It's a really important point because some practitioners still preach this method, but I had to really switch my thinking. I tell my patients, "I'm going to give you this probiotic for this symptom. I'm not going to give it to you because you're reseeding." You can't do that. Not if it's 5% or 2% of the gut.   Mason: (19:01) In terms of it being for the symptoms specifically, is that because the probiotic is able to do it like having a short-term effect within the gut and then it's on its way?   Nirala Jacobi: (19:11) Yes, exactly. Exactly. That's what probiotic research is really good at, is seeing what symptoms a particular strain can alleviate.   Mason: (19:24) Obviously, we've touched that medication and antibiotics can be another reason why we could lead to SIBO and IBS.   Nirala Jacobi: (19:33) Medications like proton pump inhibitors that stop stomach acid, there's some debate whether or not, but I have seen people definitely have a problem with SIBO after using chronically proton pump inhibitors, and others that are more slowing the gut down. Medications like opiates and things like that, morphine will really slow it down. But then that's pretty temporary, you're not going to see chronic SIBO with that.   Mason: (20:05) Yeah. The stress factor, you're looking at a combination, mould exposure, stress, and antibiotic here and there, it's kind of a cocktail of reasons, I imagine.   Nirala Jacobi: (20:18) This is always the overwhelming part for people. It's like, "Oh, my God, where do I even begin?" But this is where a really skilled practitioner can ... I actually have a questionnaire that you can get on thesibodoctor.com. That is a questionnaire about finding the cause for SIBO. You can download it, it's free, as is the diet that I've devised for SIBO. You can take that to your practitioner and it can whittle it down to what the possible causes are. It goes through these four groups of causes.   Mason: (20:52) That's cool. Something that I really like about your approach is I'm hearing just on your website right here, you've got the patient course, practitioner course. Obviously, you're a practitioner and you've got a focus on the patient being able to understand it and get to the source themselves, getting, for lack of a better word, empowered around it, getting informed, and then bridging the way that they can then take that questionnaire and they can create a dialogue between them and their practitioner.   Mason: (21:25) It's something we always ... You go there automatically. It's why I like your work. It's something we always try to do and talk about on the podcast when we're chatting with practitioners as well, because it diffuses it. You've even got great resources there of like once you've treated yourself, how are you going to stay out of that practitioner office, which it's overlooked quite heavily. I don't know what your thoughts are on that.   Nirala Jacobi: (21:49) The SIBO Success Plan, which is the patient course, it's an eight-hour course that goes through everything from leaky gut to all these different things, it really was born out of a necessity. In a perfect world, everybody would have a practitioner that is SIBO savvy that can nail this thing for you. But I got calls from people or emails from people in Finland and from all over the world that just said, "There's no one here. No one can help me." This is the course that really had to be made for people like that. They don't have a practitioner.   Mason: (22:26) You go straight to sibodoctor.com/sibo-success-plan/. So good. Eight hours?   Nirala Jacobi: (22:35) It's eight hours because it's eight modules. One of the reasons I shouldn't say I love SIBO, because SIBO is a medical condition, but if a practitioner is listening to this, if you can master SIBO, you got the gut down. You understand practically most of the things that can go wrong with the gut, bearing in mind that there are other issues that are more anatomical problems and stuff.   Nirala Jacobi: (23:06) But everything from, like I mentioned, leaky gut, the effects of stress on the gut, what to do when you're constipated, how to help yourself with different home treatments, I have an online dispensary guide that guides you through all the major products that are out there that are for SIBO, and pros and cons and stuff like that, and food sensitivities, histamine intolerance, salicylates, oxalates, SIFO. SIFO is small intestine fungal overgrowth, which often accompanies SIBO. There's a lot there that I had to cover to really make it comprehensive for people.   Mason: (23:46) Do you do a leaky gut analysis on a patient as well? Is there always going to be a presence of SIBO and therefore-   Nirala Jacobi: (23:55) Not always. No.   Mason: (23:57) No?   Nirala Jacobi: (23:57) The thing is SIBO can cause leaky gut.   Mason: (24:00) Can cause... Right.   Nirala Jacobi: (24:00) But just because you have leaky gut doesn't mean you have SIBO. But it is a major cause of it. They've even done research on, all right, well, one month after clearing SIBO, the intestinal permeability was also resolved. If you have the wherewithal and the fortitude to get rid of SIBO, then you can also get rid of leaky gut.   Mason: (24:24) I think it's important that you said you do love SIBO because it's, as I mentioned before in the podcast, we're at that point where my mum, she's nine years post-aneurysm, 24-hour care, in a wheelchair all the time. We've done well to keep her off medications and keep her going well, but it's just this bloating that's been there and it finally got to the point where we're like, "Right, we got to test for SIBO," and so we've got there. We're doing the breath test thing. Is it five days?   Nirala Jacobi: (24:52) No, it depends on if you're constipated.   Mason: (24:55) All right.   Nirala Jacobi: (24:55) If you're constipated, it's a 48-hour prep for this test because what we want to do is have bacterial fermentation really down, really reduced before you then start the test, which is a three-hour test where, first, you get up in the morning, you drink this very sugary drink. That's a prebiotic substance that promotes the growth of those bacteria that you've starved over the past two days, one or two days. Then you're measuring your breath every 20 minutes. If we see a rise of hydrogen or methane before 90 minutes, that's the window of SIBO.   Mason: (25:36) Yeah. If you get the methane, then we're going into that real nerdy, new sector of SIBO. Is that right?   Nirala Jacobi: (25:46) Yeah. [Laughing].   Mason: (25:47) For that instance, my stepdad, he's managing that and he's just looking at like, "All right, test, okay, we can handle it," and trying to get a bunch of carers to all unite and align on that and then looking at having the management of the diet. I think the SIBO diet is the thing. That's why I say I appreciate you saying that you love SIBO because ... But I am curious when you're approaching, how do you keep the excitement up with your patients when you're-   Nirala Jacobi: (26:21) That's a really good question. I think that even just this morning, I spoke with somebody who has been ill for so long, and I'm not saying that just curing her SIBO is going to be the be-all, end-all. People are complicated. There's no one approach to it. You can have somebody who has childhood trauma. We know from studies that even childhood trauma can cause what they call adverse childhood events. It can cause a major shift in the microbiome, for example.   Nirala Jacobi: (26:53) You can have somebody like that that you work with in finding a good practitioner around trauma and regulating their own nervous system. Then you have somebody who just discovered that their house was full of mould, or you have somebody who has an autoimmune disorder or chronic viral infection. It always is different presentations. It forced me to really become really good at all these different conditions, and that's why I think if you can really not just look at SIBO, but the underlying causes for me is where it's really at where I continue to learn also.   Mason: (27:32) Yeah. I guess that's the exciting part, is knowing that you're not just going to have another random go at figuring out what's wrong with you, but you're actually ticking things off to be like, "Look, if it's not this, great. We know it's not this. We know it's not this. We know it's not moulds. That means you're getting closer." I think just the trouble is finding a good practitioner.   Nirala Jacobi: (27:56) We have an answer for that. On thesibodoctor.com, we have also the SIBO Mastery Program for practitioners. After they've completed all three levels, they're eligible to be listed free as a SIBO doctor approved practitioner, so all the people that are listed in there. We had to purge a whole bunch. We had to start fresh from scratch this January. As we go along, this list will get bigger and bigger, but they all have taken these very extensive training courses that covers all of these topics. I think you're pretty safe. A lot of them do Zoom calls. I will say that. Nowadays, we're forced to do more and more virtually.   Mason: (28:37) Which is amazing.   Nirala Jacobi: (28:39) It's amazing. It has its drawbacks. I do, as a practitioner, a hands-on practitioner that does physical assessment and certain manoeuvres, I miss that part but-   Mason: (28:50) Can you explain what the physical assessment and manoeuvres are?   Nirala Jacobi: (28:54) In America, we're trained like physicians. We're actually like naturopathic GPs, if you will. We're trained in physical exams. I always enjoyed that part of my practise, too. Some people have things like the ileocecal valve problem, which is the valve between the small and the large intestine and it can be stuck open, and then you have this backflow problem with bacteria. You can easily manipulate that with using different manoeuvres, or the hiatal hernia manoeuvre, which is part of the stomach moving into the thorax. It's those kinds of things, as well as physical exam and stuff like that. You get a lot of information from looking at somebody's body, for sure.   Mason: (29:39) Yeah, 100%. I can get the drawback, if we can get back to getting in-person as much as possible, great. Otherwise, if you're in Finland and you don't have a practitioner, "Oh, well, that's wonderful."   Nirala Jacobi: (29:49) Honestly, well, 90% of my practise is virtual, and then sometimes I'm like, "Okay, stand up, lift your shirt, press there." That will have the work.   Mason: (29:58) Yeah, you do what you have to do.   Nirala Jacobi: (29:59) Yeah.   Mason: (29:59) Do you ever recommend for people to be physically manipulating their own gut with massage as treatment?   Nirala Jacobi: (30:07) That's a great question because let's hypothetically say ... Well, let me rephrase it. Yes, if it's for just the ileocecal valve. I do have a little video on my Facebook page, The SIBO Doctor, where I go through how to do it, how to actually release the ileocecal valve yourself. It's not going to be as great as when a trained practitioner does it, but it's good. The massaging of the gut, let's hypothetically say that you're a patient that's listening to this and you're like, "Oh yeah, I may have SIBO."   Nirala Jacobi: (30:45) You may have had abdominal surgery for things like you may have had caesarian or you may have had your appendix out or you may have your gallbladder out or the myriad of other things that would be considered routine surgeries, and you have adhesions. That is not a good thing to massage your own belly because it can trigger more scar tissue formation, but light touch, we're just talking light touch. For that scenario, I usually refer to a visceral manipulation practitioner.   Mason: (31:17) What's that?   Nirala Jacobi: (31:19) Visceral manipulation, so the viscera are the organ up in the abdomen. It's extremely light touch but they are trained to actually feel the rhythms of these organs. Don't ask me what that is.   Mason: (31:31) Actually, Tahnee, my fiancée, she's a Chi Nei Tsang practitioner. Do you know that? It's Daoist abdominal massage.   Nirala Jacobi: (31:37) Oh, okay. Yeah.   Mason: (31:38) We've talked a little bit about it. I was wondering whether that's what you were talking about.   Nirala Jacobi: (31:41) Right. No. Visceral manipulation, as far as I know, there's a group from The Barral Institute and they have a very specific technique to very gently break down scar tissue or break up scar tissue.   Mason: (31:58) Okay. That's good to get that resource because there's people listening to the podcast, like Tahnee's not practising and she gets asked a lot about doing abdominal massage, so to be able to tune in with another group of practitioners that are doing this I think will help a lot of people. All right. Well, that's going to be in the show notes, gang. When we do get to treatment and, obviously, the dietary charts, there's different phases of healing of SIBO?   Nirala Jacobi: (32:27) No, so what happened is, okay, so in a nutshell, the food that promotes or that feeds the bacteria are foods that are high in fibre. That makes sense. Those are healthy foods that feed our own microbiome. That's why we want to eat them. In a case of SIBO, the bacteria are like miles further up so they're fermenting in the wrong place, and so you want to minimise those foods. Those foods are known as from FODMAPs, so Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, and Polyols. Did I miss it all? Did we miss one? Anyways, so these are fermentable fibres.   Mason: (33:06) Forgot the A?   Nirala Jacobi: (33:09) And.   Mason: (33:09) Oh, okay.   Nirala Jacobi: (33:13) I know, right? Those are the foods that typically are to be avoided when you suffer from SIBO. What I did is I took that diet from Monash. Fantastic work that they did over there to really pinpoint this. Before then, we didn't really know. I took that and put my own spin on it because I found even with that, people were reacting. I made it more restrictive, also added in SCD stuff and that type of thing, because I'm a very structured person and I don't like wishy-washy, vague treatment plans, and so I needed to structure it for myself.   Nirala Jacobi: (33:49) What I found is that I got very good results by having a diet that was in two phases. Then I called it the bi-phasic diet. Phase one was the most restrictive part where you have almost no grains and no fruit and really the high-fermenting foods, and you are basically getting tested for SIBO and you're waiting for your test result. I was already seeing dramatic improvement by the time they came back and yes, indeed, the test says it's SIBO, so then we initiated antimicrobials. That then prevented a massive die-off reaction of just throwing in antimicrobials in a system that was still really activated.   Mason: (34:33) Okay. You've got them going for, what, a couple of weeks now?   Nirala Jacobi: (34:35) A couple weeks, yeah. Yeah. I really did it for practitioners so that they could also tailor it. It still has different food ... Some people are very sensitive to histamines when they have SIBO, and that means no fermented foods, so no sauerkraut, those kinds of-   Mason: (34:55) That was very confusing for people, I think, about 10 years ago when capers and sauerkraut and body ecology diet and all that were going off real big time, and then some people will just get these intense levels of bloating every time they'd eat sauerkraut and kimchis and they wouldn't get it. They're like, "What's going on? This is a healthy food."   Nirala Jacobi: (35:14) "Persist. Persist. Keep it up. It's just your body detoxing." No, it's your body reacting.   Mason: (35:18) Yeah. Herxing became the ultimate. Just, "Oh, it's just a Herx."   Nirala Jacobi: (35:20) Yeah, yeah. Exactly.   Mason: (35:24) Is that normally enough to reduce the die-off from being too hard for someone just recently getting on the diet for a couple of weeks?   Nirala Jacobi: (35:32) It depends. The other thing is if somebody's really constipated, I don't start antimicrobials until at least even with the aid of magnesium oxide or something, I get their bowels moving, because if you add in antimicrobials in a really constipated system, you really are begging for a Herxheimer reaction because the river is not flowing, there's algae growing, it's muddy, it's not moving, it cannot clear out these toxins. I get the system ready before I add in antimicrobials.   Mason: (36:06) That's the most important part, is getting the river flowing.   Nirala Jacobi: (36:11) If you're constipated.   Mason: (36:11) If you're constipated.   Nirala Jacobi: (36:12) Yeah, I would say that that's often when people feel really horrible, when they start something like that and it's just not working. It's ironic because with these archaea or these methanogens as we call them, these organisms that produce methane, once it's actually reduced by the help of antimicrobials, you can expect that the bowel returns to normal, but you can't expect it if you're using some form of garlic extract to combat your methanogens. It will take you a couple of months, or if not longer, to really reduce that level to such an extent that you can have spontaneous bowel movements.   Mason: (36:53) What antimicrobials are you normally using?   Nirala Jacobi: (36:57) When we talk about treatment, there's three kinds. You have your herbs. You have your conventional antibiotics, and these are very specific antibiotics that are not for ear infections or sinusitis. Then you have a third treatment called the elemental diet. Herbs are usually berberine-containing plants, some essential oils like oregano, clove, those kinds of things. There's a bunch of herbs that I use and an extract or a low-fructans kind of garlic. Garlic typically is a FODMAP food, but if we use it with a high-allicine content, we can use quite a lot of it without a problem for these archaea, and we know that they're really effective for that. Then when you look at antibiotics, you're looking at rifaximin, which is a type of antibiotic that stays in the small intestine, doesn't get absorbed, and it's bile-soluble so it works in that perfect environment.   Mason: (37:57) Like the way doxycycline works, I think.   Nirala Jacobi: (38:00) No, doxy is way more broader and you will absorb some of that. Rifaximin is not absorbed. It stays in the upper gut. Then you have neomycin for the methanogens. Some people use metronidazole or Flagyl, and I shy away from that because I think as practitioners, we're the custodians of our patient's microbiome and we have to really respect that. Some people, I have seen some shocking microbiomes, let me tell you, by just looking at stool tests and things like that. Stool tests will not give you any information about the small intestine but, very often, it's not like it's only in the small intestine. Problems continue on with the large intestine.   Mason: (38:44) You're going to have an overgrowth most likely in the large intestine?   Nirala Jacobi: (38:45) Yeah. I've seen microbiomes that are completely denuded, like a clear-cut rainforest, and you're trying to regrow it and no wonder they're so reactive. You had actually mentioned my last podcast guest on my show was the guy who wrote Fibre Fueled, Dr. B., Dr. Will B.   Mason: (39:10) Dr. Will B. Yeah, that's what I call him instead of [mumbling].   Nirala Jacobi: (39:11) Bulsiewicz. I think it's Bulsiewicz.   Mason: (39:15) Yeah, I can never... We were in Arizona.   Nirala Jacobi: (39:19) Oh, right.   Mason: (39:20) I met him at the mindbodygreen weekend. We had a we called it dads gone wild night...   Nirala Jacobi: (39:28) Oh, do tell. Do tell.   Mason: (39:29) Yeah, it wasn't that exciting. It was just me, the DJ, and Dr. B just having chats about the gut and veganism and getting on the gluten-free beers.   Nirala Jacobi: (39:44) All right. That sounds like a hell of a party.   Mason: (39:49) Yeah, it actually was. I think tequila made its way at some point, which is wonderful.   Nirala Jacobi: (39:54) You were in Arizona after all.   Mason: (39:55) Exactly.   Nirala Jacobi: (39:56) Anyway, I really appreciated having him on the show because here he was, a gastroenterologist, epidemiologist, highly, highly trained specialist, and he had a sort of "Come to Jesus" moment when he really started to study the microbiome and started to work on it for himself. Now, he's like a complete convert about protecting the microbiome and regrowing it. I just think he's done a really good job with that book.   Mason: (40:25) Is that where his book is coming from? From that angle or-   Nirala Jacobi: (40:28) Fibre Fueled, yeah. I'm not his publicist, but I have the book and I read it and it's pretty good. Half the book is recipes, so vegan recipes, and how to regrow it. One word of caution, don't start with SIBO with that. We had this conversation. You can listen in on The SIBO Doctor podcast if you want to listen to the Feeding Your Microbiome. That shift is slowly happening. There's a lot more respect for the microbiome. I know of a lot of physicians who look back on medicine, on what it's done with antibiotics with real regret of like this was the wrong thing to do to just prescribe amoxicillin for every child's ear infection, or to prescribe for sinusitis, for these types of things. Still, to this day, it's happening day in, day out not just here but across the world where it's just way over prescribed, and it will catch up with you.   Mason: (41:33) It's an important part of any practitioner's arsenal to be able to reflect on what they're doing and not be too concrete and make sure you don't have too much morality and judgement of yourself if you did just follow the doctrine at the time, but make sure you've got the capacity to... motility to actually move on to what's important, because I know I wasn't really up on the conversation on testing the microbiome and I think we were chatting about that.   Mason: (42:01) Since then, I've got a naturopathic friend who he's basically moved a huge amount of his practise over to testing the microbiome and talking about how it takes out a lot of the guesswork, not only is it the antibiotics and seeing exactly the effect that they're having, which is great as well because you know what you've wiped out, but just dietarily as well, if it's vegan, high-carb, if it's carnivore or just high ... Whatever it is.   Nirala Jacobi: (42:32) Yeah, carnivore, I would never promote. Never because it is so hard on the microbiome. It just is. That's basically just meat, and unless you live in countries where, for centuries, that's what you did and I just ... Anyways, that's digressing but they are, and we agreed on that. We totally agreed that most diets, really if it already has a diet, then it's a fad mostly. What we know is where people live the longest and, to me, that's evidence and that's the Blue Zones.   Nirala Jacobi: (43:14) That's Dan Buettner's work. He wrote a book called the Blue Zones where people lived to be the oldest in the world, fully functional, still doing their daily work, very cognitively attentive, and very happy. There were seven hotspots in the world. They all had different things, but what they all had in common was 80% plant-based diet. For me, I'd go by that. I'd go by that. If people do well on veganism, then do that because the more plants you can eat, the more diverse your bacterial blueprint will be.   Mason: (43:56) That's always with the Blue Zones. Yeah, I first heard about it ... The book I got was Healthy Till 100, I believe it was. That book included a couple of other places. I'll put it in the show notes, guys, the scientifically proven secrets of, I think, the world's longest living people. Vilcabamba was in there in Ecuador, which I think isn't in there with Dan's work but, otherwise, it's like Okinawa, Sardinia.   Nirala Jacobi: (44:26) Yeah, and Loma Linda which is like eating processed vegetarian food.   Mason: (44:33) I think that their faith gets involved.   Nirala Jacobi: (44:33) Yeah, I don't know, but they got there in there, Sardinia.   Mason: (44:37) Maybe they're just right.   Nirala Jacobi: (44:38) Maybe. Well, who knows?   Mason: (44:40) Maybe their prayers are just better than health.   Nirala Jacobi: (44:41) Yeah, respect Loma Linda, California.   Mason: (44:44) Oh, that's right, John Robbins was the author of that book I was talking about. I like him. He balances out, because I think the thing with Dan's work which always I'm like, "So good," then he's like ... because I'm only talking about his behalf and it's like because it's 80% to 90% plant food and then 100% is the obvious conclusion, which I don't find to be the obvious conclusion.   Nirala Jacobi: (45:09) No, because I think and I will say if you look at the standard bi-phasic diet just to keep it in the SIBO spectrum, the standard bi-phasic diet is very animal protein heavy. Then I created a vegetarian bi-phasic diet, which is very amenable to vegans, and it's not just about taking the meat. That was a lot of work that I co-authored that with our clinical nutritionist, Anne Criner, here at our clinic. Then we have a third one which is the histamine bi-phasic. But there is something.   Nirala Jacobi: (45:41) A lot of people have tried veganism and it's just like, constitutionally, they just couldn't do it. I don't know what the answer is for those people because there are some people that just they get weak. Dr. B would probably argue that he thinks that everybody can live like ... I think, I shouldn't speak for him, but I don't know. I find that everybody is a bit different.   Mason: (46:09) Yeah, I'm with you as well. I find if you take one part of the body and solely focus on it, same if you're only focusing on the large intestine and the microbiome and not cellular, in particular cellular markers, then I can see how it would be really easy to justify a vegan diet. I was vegan and raw foodist for quite a while and then moved away from that direction and just was really questioning my need to eat a certain amount of domesticated vegetable and fruit matter.   Mason: (46:46) Then once I got back into the microbiome, I've really come to peace and to terms with the fact that, "No, you know what, that's ..." I was really rocking. I was rocking with that majority of my well-being, and even moving back into lentils and legumes and beans, which had a huge chip on my shoulder about. But then just staying open to ensuring there's potentially ... Like in the Blue Zones, meats are normally a side dish, and I like that.   Nirala Jacobi: (47:15) Yeah. I do, too. I know myself, I haven't eaten red meat in 40 years probably but I eat chicken occasionally. That's my one and only animal that I eat because also the carbon footprint. It's whole 'nother conversation, Mason. Nothing to do with SIBO. But in a nutshell, the diet is a therapeutic diet. It's not a stay-on-it forever diet.   Mason: (47:40) Greaaaaat distinction. I'm going to have to get excited about the diet. I'm going to have to get my mum, because I'll let you all know how. Maybe if I can have a chat again, get you back on here after, I'm going to use all your resources, all the listeners are going to ... I'll keep you in the loop of where mum's at, especially.   Nirala Jacobi: (48:02) Sure.   Mason: (48:03) Yeah, I'll let you know on an intro at some point where she comes back with in the test. If it's positive, then we'll go on that journey together. With meat and impact. Have you tried a wild, invasive deer or anything from around here. It's like-   Nirala Jacobi: (48:21) No, but I'm not opposed to it. I trust my body and I just have no affinity towards those things. Red meat, just no.   Mason: (48:35) Yeah, that's fair enough.   Nirala Jacobi: (48:38) We're really covering a lot of ground, but there's something about the whole blood type thing that I can tell you as a practitioner, that's been nearly a quarter of a century in practise that there's something about that. Blood type As tend to have a little bit harder time with digesting animal protein.   Mason: (48:58) Is that just going back to the classic book, The Blood Type Diet?   Nirala Jacobi: (49:02) Dr. D'Adamo.   Mason: (49:03) Yeah, D'Adamo. That's right.   Nirala Jacobi: (49:06) Yeah. Look, it's still got work to do, but I think there's elements that I certainly have seen be proved in practise. For me, I don't just need theories, I actually need evidence. For me, evidentially, I have seen that in practise, that people that are blood type O, they fade sometimes on a vegan diet because I don't know. I never got so fully into it that I can rattle off the science right now, but it has to do with rhesus factor and different ... Well, the theory was really that when we originated ... See, an evolution story.   Nirala Jacobi: (49:47) When we originated in Africa, everybody was blood type O because you needed to be able to eat dead animals and stuff. You had a very forgiving type of blood type that was not very reactive. Then as we moved north and into Europe, it wasn't really economical to eat your animals, and so you became more farmers and started to grow things, and that was blood type A. Then as you move further north, you had natural refrigeration, and that was the AB type or the B type, which can handle dairy really well. That's the theory anyways. I can tell you that much.   Mason: (50:22) It's a good theory.   Nirala Jacobi: (50:23) It's a good theory.   Mason: (50:23) That was always the thing with The Blood Type Diet.   Nirala Jacobi: (50:26) It checks out.   Mason: (50:27) It checks out. I remember The Blood Type Diet was a funny one because every practitioner I've talked to has said there is something to this-   Nirala Jacobi: (50:35) Yeah, there's something to it.   Mason: (50:36) But the science was never rock solid so it was open for criticism, yet anecdotally, it was on point. I love it. It's good to know. It's good to go into that world because as soon as you get into, as you said, you made that decision, it's why it's hard sometimes to listen to a practitioner talk about diet long-term because you know that the mindset is based on healing. Then as you said, this is a healing-   Nirala Jacobi: (51:03) Therapeutic.   Mason: (51:03) Therapeutic diet. Huge distinction because, otherwise, you stay in a "I'm sick" mentality long-term.   Nirala Jacobi: (51:11) Right. Look, I always tell my patients when you travel ... Well, it's a different world now, but if you were going to see Paris, I don't want you on this diet. I want you to eat baguette and dip it in the cafe au lait. I want you to eat things that you enjoy. Most of the time, when people travelling and they suffer from food sensitivity, it actually miraculously goes away. Of course, celiac disease is a different story, but there is this element of you just having just more endorphins and your secretory IgA goes up and all of that, and people can tolerate a lot of foods that they would not normally tolerate in a happy setting and a happy live-your-life, I want you to drink wine if you're in Italy. Why restrict ourselves to this myopic thinking, it has to look this way?   Mason: (52:03) It's refreshing. I like the way that you're bridging over there. It's something that I've always liked about your accessible approach because it's like bridge into what's actually going on and then I'm going to see your bridge out over there to live your life because, obviously, people do get addicted to being sick and something being wrong and then the fear of if I do something outside of the therapeutic-   Nirala Jacobi: (52:23) There's a lot of fear. There's a lot of food fear and there's this whole new term of orthorexia.   Mason: (52:29) Yeah, exactly.   Nirala Jacobi: (52:30) That's a real thing. A lot of people are so concerned about having made some small error on the bi-phasic diet. I'm like, "You've made no error. It's fine." Not just the bi-phasic diet but also anything, really. They get very, very hooked on that they did something wrong, and there's a lot of food fear and that. Imagine, you're sitting down to eat your meal and you're already worried about the food. Sometimes, I tell people sit for two minutes and just appreciate the food, just take a moment and get into a rest and digest before you eat.   Mason: (53:13) That's where the prayer comes in, the grace.   Nirala Jacobi: (53:16) It used to be prayer, it used to be grace, all of that. That's all. It's a thing.   Mason: (53:21) I feel like we go down this rabbit hole, that's probably another podcast talking about the orthorexia. I know it very well. I've had to go. I was so down the rabbit hole of raw foodism. I had to go and start eating things that I swore I would never eat again to start cracking myself out of just like that scrubbing myself clean with my diet. It's hardcore, and it isn't orthorexia, and it isn't eating disorder in varying degrees. But thanks for bringing it up, because especially when you're promoting a therapeutic diet, I always think the duty of care comes with making sure that people and patients are aware not to get stuck in it. Thank you for that.   Nirala Jacobi: (54:00) My pleasure.   Mason: (54:02) I had really a lot of fun chatting with you.   Nirala Jacobi: (54:03) I did, too. We've covered a lot of ground.   Mason: (54:06) We've covered a lot of ground. We run really fast on this podcast. Look, let's just repeat it again. The SIBO Doctor podcast, and it was episode 64 and 65 that we just talked about with Dr Will B. Worth probably checking out.   Nirala Jacobi: (54:26) It's on iTunes. It's on everywhere. You can go to The SIBO Doctor and just look around. There's resources. All the guides are free downloads, the handout on bringing that to your practitioner in terms of what caused you SIBO. It's a free download. There's a lot of videos, lots of stuff. I'm on Instagram, Dr. Nirala Jacobi, the SIBO Doctor.   Mason: (54:46) Perfecto. Thank you so much.   Nirala Jacobi: (54:48) Boom.   Mason: (54:49) Boom.   Nirala Jacobi: (54:50) Mic drop.   Mason: (54:52) All right. All right. That didn't work. That was a terrible mic drop.   Nirala Jacobi: (54:55) No, that's a very sensitive, very fancy road microphone.

The Healthy Skin Show
154: Candida Rashes + SIFO w/ Dr. Christine Maren

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2020 32:17


Many of us are familiar with SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth). But have you heard of its cousin, SIFO (small intestine fungal overgrowth)? My guest today will explain in detail what it is, and how it may be related to skin rash issues. My guest today is Dr. Christine Maren, an osteopathic physician and the founder of a functional medicine practice in Colorado, Michigan and Texas. She is also the co-founder of Hey Mami, an online resource to help women navigate a healthy and happy mamihood. Dr. Maren was introduced to functional medicine after struggling with pregnancy complications and recurrent miscarriages. A functional medicine approach helped her address underlying health issues associated with gut infections, food sensitivities, hypothyroidism, hormone imbalance, and mold exposure. Now a mother of 3, she's devoted her professional life to helping other women optimize their health during pregnancy, thrive postpartum, and get their life back. Dr. Maren is board-certified in Family Medicine and is an Institute for Functional Medicine Certified Practitioner (IFMCP). Join us as we talk about SIBO, SIFO, and skin rashes. Has your skin rash been triggered by fungal overgrowth? Let me know in the comments! In this episode: What is SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth)? What is SIFO (small intestine fungal overgrowth)? Are they gut issues? Can you test for SIFO? Is there a connection between SIBO, SIFO, and rosacea? Causes of SIFO Treatment options that you should consider Quotes “SIBO is small intestine bacterial overgrowth. SIFO is small intestine fungal overgrowth. So you could have one, or you could have both concurrently.” [2:37]  “I see patients with fungal overgrowth who have all sorts of stuff. They have skin issues, sometimes psoriasis, sometimes eczema, whatever it might be. So skin issues, digestive issues, sometimes even urinary symptoms and yeah, I think that treating it helps things go in the right direction. It's like your body spins back into orbit once we can rebalance things.” [26:18] Links Find Dr. Maren online here and here Download Dr. Maren's FREE ebook, 12 Ways to Detox Your Home Healthy Skin Show ep. 019: SIBO-Rosacea Connection w/ Dr. Leonard Weinstock Follow Dr. Maren on Instagram here and here | Facebook here and here

The Cabral Concept
1635: LIFO & SIFO: The 2 New Digestive Disorders? (TWT)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2020 25:55


I've stated before that there are 4 main digestive overgrowth imbalances in the gut... These are the reasons why many people suffer from "unexplainable" health issues that affect their memory, mood, skin, digestion, and immune imbalances... On today's #CabralConcept 1635 I'd like to share with you 2 "new" takes on LIFO & SIFO as the latest digestive disorders to be used as "diagnoses" in the health world - Enjoy the show and let me know what you thought! - - -   Show Notes & Resources: http://StephenCabral.com/1635 - - - Dr. Cabral's New Book, The Rain Barrel Effect https://amzn.to/2H0W7Ge - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: http://CabralSupportGroup.com - - -   Dr. Cabral’s Most Popular Supplements: > “The Dr. Cabral Daily Protocol” (This is what Dr. Cabral does every day!) - - - > Dr. Cabral Detox  (The fastest way to get well, lose weight, and feel great!) - - - > Daily Nutritional Support Shake  (#1 “All-in-One recommendation in my practice) - - - > Daily Fruit & Vegetables Blend  (22 organic fruit & vegetables “greens powder”) - - - > CBD Oil  (Full-spectrum, 3rd part-tested & organically grown) - - - > Candida/Bacterial Overgrowth, Leaky Gut, Parasite & Speciality Supplement Packages - - - > See All Supplements: https://equilibriumnutrition.com/collections/supplements  - - -   Dr. Cabral’s Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Organic Acids Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Thyroid + Adrenal + Hormone Test  (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Adrenal + Hormone Test (Run your adrenal & hormone levels) - - - > Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Omega-3 Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels)

Devocionales Cristianos para Adultos
2020-07-08 | Adultos | UN CORAZÓN ALEGRE - SÍSIFO Y SU CARGA PERPETUA

Devocionales Cristianos para Adultos

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2020 4:08


Devocional Cristiano para Adultos - UN CORAZÓN ALEGRE Fecha: 08-07-2020 Título: SÍSIFO Y SU CARGA PERPETUA Autor: Julian Melgosa, Laura Fidanza Locución: Dagoberto Garzón http://evangelike.com/devocionales-cristianos-para-adultos/

Sicherheit für die Ohren
Grünes Gewölbe, Fler und Prozess gegen Arafat

Sicherheit für die Ohren

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2020 28:31


Ist die Beute aus Dresden bereits irgendwo aufgetaucht? Diese Frage beantworten Peter Rossberg und Axel Lier im neuen Podcast. Außerdem: Alles zum heutigen Prozess gegen Clan-Boss Arafat Abou Chaker und die aktuellen Entwicklungen bei Rapper Fler.

Sicherheit für die Ohren
Der „Pate von Berlin“ hat ein Buch geschrieben!

Sicherheit für die Ohren

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2020 42:33


Ende des Jahres veröffentlicht ein Verlag ein Buch von Mahmoud Al-Zein, dem selbsternannten „Paten von Berlin“. Wir erklären, wer das ist und warum bereits die Ankündigung fragwürdig ist. Außerdem: Zwei Festnahmen in der Familie Abou-Chaker, Ermittlungen gegen Ex-Box-Weltmeister Arthur Abraham und der „Erlebnisbericht“ von einer 12-Stunden-Schicht auf einer Feuerwache in Berlin-Kreuzberg.

Sicherheit für die Ohren
So lief der 1. Mai in Berlin!

Sicherheit für die Ohren

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2020 50:04


Wir müssen reden: Über die Corona-Maßnahmen-Kritiker, die Alu-Hüte und Verschwörungstheoretiker, die Stimmung rund um den Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, die brutale Attacke auf das ZDF-Team, die Situation am Abend in Kreuzberg – und das Verhalten die Berliner Polizei.

Nutrition with Judy
Adrenal Health, Gut Health, Weight Management on Carnivore. Intro to Carnivore Snax!

Nutrition with Judy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2020 72:22


In this episode I had so much fun sitting down and talking with Sylwia Tabor, better known as @biohacking.chick and the co-founder of Carnivore Snax.  We talk about: 1. All about Sylwia’s journey to health2. Sylwia’s carnivore journey3. When she realized that Meat and Water was not all-healing for her health journey4. Gut health issues: SIBO, SIFO, MRSA, C.Diff and how she healed5. Weight gain and carnivore. How she managed and lost the weight6. A day of eating7. Fasting and adrenals8. Supplements and carnivore9. Recommendations for carnivore starters10. Carnivore Snax and when it’s available11. Advice for Carnivore  This episode was originally a video on my YouTube channel.——–ADDITIONAL SHOW NOTESThey can be found on the original YouTube post here. ——-MY BOOK**Carnivore Cure**Carnivore Cure provides a step-by-step approach to optimal health while also providing extensive nutritional information and evidence-based support for following a meat-based lifestyle (with hundreds of colored visuals and coveted Nutrition with Judy nutritional graphics). Carnivore Cure debunks nutritional misinformation and provides lifestyle support through the lens of holistic health.www.carnivorecure.com--------DISCLAIMER: The content is for educational purposes only. While I am a nutritional therapy practitioner and provide nutritional support, I am not providing medical advice. Whenever you start a new diet or protocol, always first consult with your trusted practitioner.

UpliftFit Nutrition
Ep. 114- Hair Mineral Analysis Testing, Acne Problems, and Gut Pathogens with Vivien Allred

UpliftFit Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2020 49:58


Please welcome Vivian Allred, holistic nutritionist in the UK, as we discuss: -Hair Mineral Analysis Testing (HTMA): What can they tell us about hormonal & thyroid disorders & how do heavy metals contribute to hormonal and thyroid disorders? What are the most common imbalances seen? -Acne Problems: Discussing hormonal, inflammatory, and diet connections! What steps can someone take to help prevent or eliminate their acne? What could be the cause of their acne? What skin care products can be best for helping or can worsen acne issues? -Gut Pathogens: Outside of SIBO, SIFO, and Candida- what can occurs with parasites and pathogens in the gut that can be the root cause of digestive or health chaos? What are the most common mistakes with testing and treatment? My info: Website: www.upliftfit.org Instagram: www.instagram.com/faithandfit Twitter: www.twitter.com/laceyadunn Coaching and email: fitandfaith@gmail.com Vivien's info: Website: https://www.vivanaturalhealth.co.uk Instagram: www.instagram.com/vivanaturalhealth Please share and review this podcast if you enjoyed this episode!!

Podcast Noviembre Nocturno
"El Mito de Sísifo" de Albert Camus

Podcast Noviembre Nocturno

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 52:52


Cuentan que hace mucho tiempo, entre las sagradas ciudades de Atenas y Esparta se alzaba la también la hermosa Éfira... Allí gobernó uno de los más astutos, avaros, impetuosos, y embaucadores mortales que los Dioses hayan visto. Sísifo, que fundó los Juegos Ístmicos en honor a Poseidón y favoreció el crecimiento del comercio y las rutas de navegación. Pero también recurrió al engaño para incrementar su poder y riqueza. Y desde los tiempos de Homero, Sísifo tuvo fama de ser el más inteligente de entre todos los pobladores de la antigua Grecia en cuando Grecia era el centro del mundo... Quizá fue por eso que el escritor francés Albert Camus decidió publicar en 1942 un ensayo filosófico con el título, la piedra de Sísifo... Y prologarla con una cita de Píndaro: No te afanes, alma mía, por una vida inmortal, pero agota el ámbito de lo posible. Las pasiones, virtudes y defectos de la humanidad cobran en Sísifo un sentido último para el maestro Camus, que con este relato no pretende aleccionar o moralizar, sino mostrar la crudeza de la vida en todo su esplendor, abrazar el reto que supone el simple de hecho de estar vivos, por dura que pueda ser nuestra existencia y dejar en manos del que escucha el interpretar el mito, pues los mitos, como toda buena historia, siempre dejan una parte del enigma para el que escucha...

New Frontiers in Functional Medicine
Episode 78: SPONSORED: Clinically Effective Applications for SIBO, SIFO, and Dysbiosis

New Frontiers in Functional Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2020 55:12


Dr. Jocelyn Strand is the Director of Clinical Education at Bio-Botanical AND a great clinician herself. Prepare yourself: this is a very actionable podcast for clinicians using bioB. And for me, a huge pearl on refractory SIBO was unaddressed oral microbiome! In this episode of New Frontiers, learn how Dr. S addresses sibo using BB products. To test or not to test? And the underlying pathophysiology: tune in and listen to current thinking from a great clinician – she’s got to say and you’re going to learn a lot. Then, if you would be so kind, please leave us a rating and review wherever you listen to New Frontiers! I so appreciate your time and ears – thanks for listening! ~DrKF

Love & Guts
Dr Satish Rao | Small Intestinal Fungal Overgrowth

Love & Guts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2020 61:44


#140 Satish Rao completed his training in internal medicine at several academic centers in UK and a clinical research fellowship in gastroenterology at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, University of Sheffield, UK. Dr Rao is one of a rare breed of academics who has excelled as an outstanding researcher, distinguished educator and as a Master Clinician. Dr. Rao’s research interests focus on the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS, food intolerance, gas and bloating especially SIBO and SIFO, dyssynergic defecation and fecal incontinence.  He has pioneered several new techniques and devices and has received several patents. He pioneered the technique of biofeedback therapy for dyssynergic defecation, and neuromodulation therapy for fecal incontinence. He is the only physician who has received all 3 meritorious honors from the American Gastroenterological Association, the AGA Distinguished Clinician Award, AGA Masters Award for Outstanding Clinical Research and the AGA Distinguished Educator Award.  A very productive, federally (NIH) funded investigator who has recently been awarded an $18 million NIH grant, and sought-after speaker, Dr. Rao has edited 8 books, published over 400 articles with a H index of 63 and 10,500 citations. He has been selected as one of the “Best Doctors in America” and as America’s Top Doctors for over 20 years. He has mentored several Physicians from across the world, many of whom are leaders in their own countries. He is Past President of the American Neurogastroenterology Motility Society. He is a master clinician, and patients travel from all over the USA and abroad to seek his expertise in managing difficult motility problems. In this episode we cover What SIFO is and how he discovered it The common signs and symptoms of SIFO What drives SIFO The correlation between SIBO and SIFO How SIFO is identified Treatment for SIFO And so much more  

SIBO Made Simple
EP 34 | Living Pantry: Using Prebiotic and Probiotic Foods to Cook For Greater Gut Health with Chef David Bouley

SIBO Made Simple

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2020 73:37


When it comes to nutritional science, there are so many complicated variables to sort through in determining whether or not an ingredient is good for your health. One that doesn’t get talked about enough? How it’s cooked. In today’s episode, we’re heading into the kitchen with one of the most renowned chefs in the world, David Bouley. Over the last decade, chef Bouley has made it his mission to marry his classical French training with nutritional wisdom from ancient cultures. To do so, he’s traveled the world to learn more about how Blue Zones—areas with the largest populations of centenarians—source, prepare and eat certain ingredients. During our conversation, chef Bouley shares how we can apply some of these learnings at home by stocking our cabinets, fridge, and spice rack with the highest quality items—a concept he refers to as building a living pantry. We talk about the power of fermentation, the role of certain prebiotic ingredients, and which often overlooked items can become digestive gold when prepared properly. If you’re a food nerd in addition to a health nerd (like me), you’re going to love this conversation. And even if you’re not, hopefully chef Bouley’s ideas will open your mind to a whole new world of possibility in the kitchen as you heal your gut after SIBO. A quick taste of what we’ll cover: How traditional Japanese techniques has influenced our cooking in the West Preparations that make certain hard to digest ingredients like cabbage and rice more bioavailable and easy on the gut Building blocks that chef Bouley swears by and what’s on his spice rack The importance of researching where your food comes from Why healthy fats matter and which ones to stock your kitchen with And so much more... Resources, mentions and notes: Chef David Bouley's website Chef Bouley's Chef & Doctor Series Items in Chef Bouley's pantry: Ceylon Cinnamon, Vanilla Bean, Turmeric, Himalayan Pink Salt, Gaba Rice, Spirulina, Flax Seed Oil, Pumpkin Seed Oil, Apple Cider Vinegar EP 06 - Prebiotic and Probiotic Protocols with Dr. Jason Hawrelak Phoebe’s book, The Wellness Project, on her journey with Hashimoto’s Join the SIBO Made Simple Facebook Community Page Subscribe to receive a free low FODMAP cookbook   This episode is brought to you by Epicured, a low FODMAP meal delivery service that understands that food is medicine. Each menu is created by Michelin star chefs and honed by doctors and dieticians at mount sinaii to restore digestive health for those with IBS, SIBO, Celiac and IBD. Everything they serve is 100 percent low FODMAP and gluten-free, with no cooking required! My favorite part about their dishes is the healthy spin on takeout gems like shrimp laksa and PAD THAI! Their version had a great balance of fresh veggies mixed in with the noodles that left me feeling both satisfied and completely free of my usual carb coma. Listeners to this podcast can get $20 off their order by using code PHOEBE. Just click here to learn more.  Disclaimer: The information in this podcast does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, or treatment. The information discussed is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or professional care.

Sicherheit für die Ohren
Uniform, Schusswaffen, schubsen

Sicherheit für die Ohren

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2020 37:47


Libyen-Gipfel in Berlin. Das Bundeskriminalamt zeigte sich „irritiert“ wie die Leibwächter der geladenen Gäste in der Hauptstadt auftraten. Die Russen waren vermummt, in Kampfanzug unterwegs, die Türken schubsten eine Person, die ihrem Präsidenten den Mittelfinger gezeigt haben soll. Muss und kann die Berliner Polizei in solchen Situationen eingreifen? Außerdem reden wir über eine Leiche in einem Brandenburger Keller, „Babsis“ neue Brennpunkttruppe, eine Razzia in Barbershops sowie die Laib-Käse-Attacke auf die Polizei in Berlin-Neukölln.

SIBO Made Simple
EP 33 | All About Biofilms: Ways Your Bacteria and Fungi Band Together and How to Bust Them with Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum

SIBO Made Simple

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2020 39:06


Over the years, emerging research has illustrated how bacteria and fungi function in harmony in the body. When one population becomes deficient or overgrows, it has a profound effect on the delicate ecosystem of your gut. This is a concept we discuss in depth in episode 25, which is all about Candida and SIFO. In today’s conversation, we are going to discuss one specific function of this relationship: the joint colonies that bacteria and fungi form to ensure their survival. This defensive strategy is called a biofilm, and the presence of these fortresses in the gut is one reason why antibiotic or antimicrobial treatments like those used to target SIBO can fail. Many practitioners will recommend taking a “biofilm buster” as a prong of your SIBO protocol. In this episode, I’m joined by Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum, the author of the new book Total Gut Balance, to discuss how biofilms work, various strategies for their eradication, and how small tweaks to your diet can aid in the process. If you’ve been trying to treat SIBO and keep failing, learning more about biofilms may help you come up with a more effective plan B for beating your bacteria.   A quick taste of what we’ll cover: What mast cells’ role is in the immune system and why they contribute to chronic inflammation How mast cells issues relate to other autoimmune conditions The connection to histamine intolerance The genetic predispositions that could make someone more susceptible to immune issues like MCAS What a low histamine diet should actually entail Pharmaceutical options for MCAS and why it’s not the only answer Why it’s a good thing to be a sensitive canary! And so much more…   Resources, mentions and notes: Mahmoud Ghannoum’s website Mahmoud Ghannoum’s book, Total Gut Balance Biohm Probiotic Allicin Garlic EP 26 | Yeast and Other Beasts with Dr. Ami Kapadia Phoebe’s book, The Wellness Project, on her journey with Hashimoto’s Join the SIBO Made Simple Facebook Community Page Subscribe to receive a free low FODMAP cookbook   This episode is brought to you by Higher Dose, whose sauna blanket is my new self-care obsession. The blanket has all the benefits of a normal infrared sauna—the detoxification, the increase in blood flow and circulation, and the lowering of cortisol levels—but in a much more compact package that you use every day at home. I’ve been using it 3x a week and have noticed a huge improvement in my mood, sleep, skin, and general inflammation. My face and body feel less bloated and puffy, and my pants are even fitting better. For more information and a special discount visit higherdose.com and use code SIBO100 for $100 off. Wishing you all a very sweet and sweaty holiday season! Disclaimer: The information in this podcast does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, or treatment. The information discussed is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or professional care.  

Ben Greenfield Fitness
The Fungus Among Us: Why Fungal Overgrowth & SIFO Are A Hidden Health Epidemic (& What You Can Do About It).

Ben Greenfield Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2020 68:46


Most people understand the importance of a healthy gut microbiome for digestive health and overall wellbeing. But what about the mycobiome―the fungi that live inside our bodies? This podcast introduces this important component of the microbiome and explains how diet affects this population and how its balance or imbalance can cause you to feel―a poor balance of fungi can lead to weight gain, pain and bloating, and low energy, and can worsen symptoms for those with IBS or Crohn’s. Good news: Gut fungi respond quickly and dramatically to dietary and lifestyle changes. Within 24 hours, you can remake your mycobiome, supporting a path to weight loss, better digestion, and more energy. Alongside this accessible gut science, my guest, Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum, author of the new book "" outlines fast changes for fostering healthy fungi as well as 7- and 20-day diet plans, with more than 50 dietician-tested recipes, to cultivate a thriving mycobiome and methods for tweaking your lifestyle for long-term gut health. Dr. Ghannoum is a tenured professor and director of the Center for Medical Mycology at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Educated in Lebanon, England, and the United States, he received his PhD in Microbial Physiology from University of Technology in England and an Executive MBA from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University. He has spent his entire career studying medically important fungi and publish-ing extensively about their virulence factors, especially in microbial biofilms. Over the past decade, Dr. Ghannoum recognized the role of the microbial community (both bacterial and fungal) in human health and published the first study describing the oral fungal community, coining the term“mycobiome.”He described the bacterial microbiome (bacteriome) and the mycobiome in HIV-infected patients, and led the characterization of the interaction between bacteria and fungi as they relate to health and disease. In 2016, he published an opinion piece in The Scientist on the contribution of the myco-biome to human health and was consequently invited to speak at a number of meetings organized by the National Institutes of Health. He conducted a study characterizing the bacterial and fungal communities in Crohn’s disease patients that resulted in the first model of microbiome dysbiosis that implicated cooperation between bacteria and fungi in biofilms. This work resulted in a publication that received national and international coverage. Dr. Ghannoum is also a fellow of the Infectious Disease Society of America and a past President of the Medical Mycological Society of the Americas (MMSA). He has received many distinguished awards for his research, and in 2013, he was selected as“MostInteresting Person” by Cleveland Magazine. In 2016, he received the Rohda Benham Award presented for his continuous out- standing and meritorious contributions to medical mycology from the Medical Mycological Society of the Americas and the Freedom to Discover Award from Bristol-Myers Squibb for his work on microbial biofilms. In 2017, he was inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. He continues to be a pioneer in the characterization of the human microbiome. With over 400 peer-reviewed publications to his credit and six published books on antifungal therapy, microbial biofilms, Candida adherence, and related topics, Dr. Ghannoum continues to be a prominent leader in his field. The National Institutes of Health has continually funded his research since 1994, and he recently received a large NIH grant to study the mechanism(s) of bacterial/fungal interaction in intestinal inflammation, such as in colitis and Crohn’s disease. He has also consulted for many international pharmaceutical and biotech companies, and co-founded multiple successful and profitable companies, including BIOHM Health, launched in 2016, that engineer products and services to address the critical role of the bacterial and fungal com-munities in digestive and overall health and wellness. BIOHM Health was just awarded the Science and Innovation Award by Nutrition Business Journal. He lives in Cleveland with his wife, children, and grandchildren. During our discussion, you'll discover: -The story behind Dr. Ghannoum coining the term "mycobiome"...7:40 Mycology is the study of fungi; mycobiome refers to the fungi in our gut and parts of our body Focusing just on bacteria leads to overgrowth of candida Showed through research that over 100 fungal species exist in a typical human mouth -Why the human body benefits from having fungus inside it...10:15 We need fungi in our gut; good fungi, even candida in low doses, helps the body Helps in breaking down, fermenting food Candida or fungi at colonizer level cleans the immune system Gut Report to test fungus levels in the body Other microbiome tests examine the bacteria only -What are good and bad fungi, or are fungi levels the only factor?...14:18 It varies by the species Saccharomyces boulardii and Pichia are good all the way around The level of candida is the determining factor, good or bad There are different strains of candida -Signs and symptoms of a fungal overgrowth...18:32 Diarrhea Allergies Pain in the GI tract Damage to gut lining results -How biofilms protect the gut...21:38 Candida cooperates w/ E. coli and Serratia Marcescens (both pathogens) make a biofilm Plack on teeth is an example of a biofilm Organisms in the gut are not free floating; they stick to the gut Complex polysaccharides form around organisms; shields from drugs or immune cells Biofilms are resistant to being broken down Echinocandins inhibit the synthesis of the fungal cell wall: Caspofungin Micafungin Anidulafungin -How people get fungal infections...29:00 Immunocompromised patients typically have lots of antibiotics (killing useful bacteria and allowing candida overgrowth) Goes through GI tract and attacks blood Nurses and doctors  are carriers Surgery Steroids exacerbate susceptibility to candida infections -Differences and similarities between SIFO and SIBO...35:40 Similar symptoms Nausea is more prevalent and severe in SIFO patients Abdominal pain and gas is more prevalent in SIBO SIFO patients grow candida 19% of patients can have both SIBO and SIFO -How popular diets may contribute to fungal overgrowth...39:05 Mediterranean diet: Lots of grains, carbs, pasta (can encourage growth of candida) Follow the diet, provided you consume alcohol in moderation (sugars are problematic) Paleo diet may contain too little prebiotic content Mycobiome diet is customizable to the individual -What life looks like on the mycobiome diet...46:10 Goal is to limit growth of candida, and pro-inflammatory bacteria  People low in Vitamins A,B,C are vulnerable Encourage beneficial bacteria (fibers, resistance starches) Stop biofilms (harming gut lining and causing inflammation) Cruciferous veggies are anti-inflammatory and antioxidant The best food can still result in imbalance in the gut Lifestyle factors: Exercise, walk, hike, etc. Blood can divert from the heart, lungs during extreme exercise No full-fat dairy Herbs and spices that are particularly efficacious: Coconut oil Turmeric  Garlic Apple cider vinegar Supplements Probiotic w/ Saccharomyces boulardii (Biohm) Multivitamin w/ Vitamin A,B,C   Sample breakfast: Steel cut oatmeal w/ bananas, berries, honey Egg w/ tomatoes, turmeric, olives Sample lunch: Lentil soup, spring onions, lemon, chicken Salad w/ cucumber, spring onion, garlic, lettuce, salmon Pistachios are great for the biome Sample dinner: Asparagus, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts Chicken roasted, fish -How to find a physician who is knowledgeable in treating SIFO...1:05:11 -And much more... Resources from this episode: - - - - Episode sponsors: Boundless:  And click for info regarding the book launches coming up in NYC and Los Angeles! -: Building blocks for muscle recovery, reduced cravings, better cognition, immunity, and more. Get 10% off your order of Kion Aminos, and everything at the Kion site when you use discount code "bgf10" at checkout. -: Grow muscle 3x faster than you can with free weights! The X3 Bar will change the way you train forever. Get a $50 discount off your X3 bar when you use discount code: BEN -: Seriously comfortable compression socks designed to support your every move. Receive 20% off your Comrad purchase when you use discount code: KION -: Delivers healthy 100% grass-fed and finished beef, free-range organic chicken, and heritage breed pork directly to your door on a monthly basis. All their products are humanely raised and NEVER given antibiotics or hormones. For 2 lbs of 100% grass-fed beef and 2 lbs of pure bacon for FREE, PLUS $20 off your first box go to ButcherBox.com/BEN OR enter promo code BEN20 at checkout. Do you have questions, thoughts or feedback for Dr. Mahmoud Gannoum or me? Leave your comments below and one of us will reply!

Wellness For Life Radio
Mycobiome, the Forgotten Fungal Community with Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum

Wellness For Life Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2020


Learn more about the helpful and harmful fungi in your body.Small intestinal fungal overgrowth (SIFO) can lead to myriad digestive symptoms like bloating, gas, diarrhea, nausea, and more. While we need certain bacteria in our bodies for healthy function, harmful bacteria and fungi negatively impact wellness. The body’s fungal community is known as the mycobiome. Listen as Dr. Mahmoud Ghannoum joins Dr. Susanne Bennett to discuss your body’s fungal community.

The Bryant Land Show
Torica Making Waves w/ Torica Whitty

The Bryant Land Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2019 52:42


AB3, Host of The Bryant Land Country Podcast, talks with Torica Whitty, Tournament Site Director at Women's Bass Tour, wife, veteran, pro angler, public speaker, videographer, Bassin by faith, who is based in Rosepine, Louisiana. Torica Whitty talks about how she got involved in fishing and became a competitive angler, discrimination issues in fishing, her loyalty to her sponsors, and ways she encourages girls, women, and family members to get into fishing.    Episode Highlights:  AB3 is going to be talking about gift ideas for hunters on upcoming episodes.  AB3 is working on a book about his hunting experiences. Torica Whitty talks about her daddy/daughter fishing days.   Torica's husband introduced her to bass fishing but he isn't into fishing.  Who helped get Torica prepared for fishing?   How did Torica go from the Army to bass fishing, to being a competitive angler?  Torica talks about the current discrimination that she has seen in the sport of  fishing.   How has Torica Whitty chosen companies to partner with?   Does Torica do things to encourage women and girls to get involved in fishing?   What advice does Torica have to get kids interested in fishing?   What is the next big thing coming up for Torica Whitty When Torica is not fishing, she is into riding motorcycles.    3 Key Points: Loyalty is not always a two-way street. But the most loyal people demand it in the industry.   Spike-It and Power-Pole are company sponsors that have been loyal to Torica Whitty and what she is doing.  Torica Whitty recommends spending time with your family members to get them hooked on fishing by bonding and making it fun.   Tweetable Quotes: “I went to the bass club, and of course, I was the only person that was a female in the club and looked like me. And so, that is how I got introduced to bass fishing, and I fished my first tournament.” – Torica Whitty “When we went to Korea, I started an organization called SIFO, Soldiers International Fishing Organization where we would fish the local waters. For people that have been to Korea, it is not a pretty sight.” – Torica Whitty “They don't care whether you are a male or a female. They don't care whether you are white, black, purple, orange. Fish don't care. They care about the presentation of that lore that you present to them under the water.” – Torica Whitty   Resources Mentioned: The Bryant Land Country Podcast Follow Bryant Land on social media: Linkedin | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube Torica Whitty: Linkedin | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube  Torica Whitty's Website

SIBO Made Simple
EP 26 | Yeast and Other Beasts: The SIBO-Candida Connection, Diet & Treatment of Fungal Overgrowth with Dr. Ami Kapadia

SIBO Made Simple

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2019 56:53


Candida and fungi—just like bacteria—are a normal part of our gut’s ecosystem. And yet, for many of the same reasons a person might develop SIBO, if your digestive tract isn’t functioning properly, those organisms can overgrow and cause a host of problems. In today’s episode, we get into the issue of how to parse out whether you’re GI symptoms are being caused by a yeast or fungal overgrowth (SIFO), bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), or as is often the case BOTH. Joining me is Dr. Ami Kapadia, an integrative medicine practitioner at Kwan Yin Healing Arts Center, where she combines western and functional medicine diagnostics with traditional and complementary therapies to help patients reach their goals. In our conversation, we discuss the difference between local chronic yeast infections and when your body has an immune response to ordinary fungi inhabiting the digestive tract. We also talk about the best methods of treatment, how your diet should be adjusted to combat a yeast overgrowth, and how this dovetails with the low FODMAP approach for SIBO. A quick taste of what we’ll cover: The relationship between women’s hormones, chronic yeast infections, and candida overgrowth in the gut The process of investigating SIBO versus SIFO and the challenges in testing for fungi How environmental mold factors into fungal tolerance and your immune system Differences in treatment of SIBO and SIFO How to do a diet test to see if you’re sensitive to yeast or mold in foods The role that diet plays in overcoming a yeast overgrowth and what many in the wellness world get wrong How yeast sensitivities dovetail with histamine sensitivities And so much more... Resources, mentions and notes: Dr. Kapadia's website  Dr. Kapadia's yeast elimination diet protocol Dr. Kapadia's environmental mold guide Episode 13 with Dr. Aviva Romm on the vaginal microbiome Episode 15 on Histamine Intolerance  Herbal Anti-Fungals: CandiBactin-AR, BR; Thorne SF722 Formula or Undecyn Acid Join the SIBO Made Simple Facebook Community Page Subscribe to receive a free low FODMAP cookbook   This episode is brought to you by LoveBug Probiotics, whose patented delivery technology protects tablets against stomach acid and other rigors of digestion, so your probiotics reach the gut to perform their work. LoveBug Probiotics’ proprietary blends promote specific health benefits—from immune and digestive support to pre and post-natal health with their Labor of Love line. Lovebug also has the first staged line of probiotics for babies to build their microbiome from birth through childhood. Plus, the names like Yeast is a Beast to support vaginal health make taking your supplements everyday actually fun. SIBO MADE SIMPLE listeners can take 25% off their order with code SIBOMADESIMPLE. Simply go straight to https://www.lovebugprobiotics.comto take advantage of this offer. Disclaimer: The information in this podcast does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, or treatment. The information discussed is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or professional care.

Sicherheit für die Ohren
SifO-Spezial: „Sachseninvasion“ und Derby-Fieber

Sicherheit für die Ohren

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2019 31:51


Es ist Fußball-Kracher-Woche: Im Pokal spielt Hertha BSC im vollen Olympiastadium gegen Dynamo Dresden und danach geht es im Derby gegen den 1. FC Union um die Vormachtstellung in Berlin. Polizei und Vereine arbeiten seit Wochen an Sicherheitskonzepten, denn die Begegnungen gelten als Hochrisikospiele. In Dresden mobilisiert man unter dem Stichwort „Sachseninvasion – Alle in Gelb nach Berlin“, 30.000 Fans kommen in die Hauptstadt. Wie werden die Ultras und Hooligans aufeinander reagieren? Wie schätzen szenekundige Beamte die beiden Spiele ein? Was sagen Fananwälte? Wir analysieren die Lage.

Sicherheit für die Ohren
Nick Hein – vom MMA-Kämpfer zum Crime-Youtuber

Sicherheit für die Ohren

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2019 57:01


Nach elf Jahren als Bundespolizist quittierte Nick Hein seinen Beamten-Job und wurde Deutschlands bekanntester Mixed-Martial-Arts-Profikämpfer in der UFC. Im Juni verkündete er sein Karriere-Ende – und lässt seitdem seinen verstaubten Youtube-Kanal aufleben. Wie ein Reporter interviewt er jetzt Neonazis, Drogendealer im Görlitzer Park, Islamisten oder die berühmte „falsche Polizistin“ aus Berlin. Doch wie journalistisch ist sein Crime-Format? Wir haben Fragen. Auch zu Fler. Natürlich.

SIBO SOS™ with Shivan Sarna
005: What Methane In Cows Can Teach Us About SIBO w/ Dr. Kenneth Brown

SIBO SOS™ with Shivan Sarna

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2019 25:14


There’s no easy way to say it: Bloating causes more pain and discomfort for people than loose stools or constipation. And in the same vein, it’s more beneficial for our bodies if we treat the root cause of bloating before treating for the symptoms of the colon. Today’s guest, Dr. Kenneth Brown, is a gastroenterologist from Plano, Texas who runs a busy practice where he treats patients suffering with symptoms of bloating and abdominal pain. He has been instrumental in discovering the link between research into methane production in cattle and symptoms of SIBO in humans. Ken has used this information to develop the first all-natural supplement to help treat symptoms of methane production and SIBO. Atrantil comprises only three natural ingredients that work together symbiotically to reduce methane production in the gut. If you’ve been suffering from bloating for only a short while, Atrantil will work a lot quicker than if you’ve been dealing with SIBO symptoms for many years. And many people who have successfully reduced their bloating like to continue taking a maintenance dosage of the supplement. Atrantil is not only beneficial for those suffering from bloating, constipation, diarrhea, and other digestional issues. This supplement can also help people who show signs of gluten intolerance, rosacea, and other skin conditions, as well. In this episode, we talk about what causes bloating and how you can start treating it at home, without any additional supplementation. We also look at why modern antibiotics aren’t always the best option when it comes to treating SIBO. Finally, we compare SIBO to SIFO and discuss the differences between bacterial and fungal overgrowth in the gut. Do you suffer from bloating on a regular or semi-regular basis? How does your diet impact your gut health? What are you doing to combat the symptoms of your SIBO?   In This Episode: How the research into reducing methane in cows lead to a breakthrough for SIBO How the 3 ingredients that make up Atrantil work together to reduce methane production Why it depends on how long you’ve had symptoms of SIBO for the Atrantil supplements to start having a positive impact How can Atrantil help treat other symptoms like rosacea and gluten intolerance Why our modern day antibiotics don’t often work against gut bacteria Why you will feel so much better when you treat the bloating before you treat the symptoms of the colon What type of diet will work best to help reduce symptoms of bloating What the difference between SIBO and SIFO is Quotes: “Most of the people [in the clinical trial] started seeing a significant result between 10-20 days.” (7:33) “We do know that if we treat SIBO, a lot of other issues get better.” (12:08) “I think that bloating is probably the single biggest problem that really affects people. They can handle a little of loose stools, they can handle some constipation, but it’s the bloating that really is the disruptor.”(17:02) “I would say that the majority of people that believe they have a Candida problem, it’s probably a bacterial overgrowth and we’ll treat that first. If they don’t respond, then we start thinking, well, maybe there is a small component of this fungus.” (21:18) Links Join the SIBO SOS 2019 Speaker Series Find out more Dr. Kenneth Brown Online Buy Atrantil Online   Check out the full episode post here Keep up with everything SIBO SOS™ here Follow Shivan on Facebook | Twitter | Vimeo Join the SIBO SOS™ Facebook Community Get access to the complete SIBO SOS™ course catalog  

Learn True Health with Ashley James
310 Lyme Survivor Cures His Disease Then Helps Others Do The Same, Scott Forsgren, Mold, Histamine, Allergies, SIBO, SIFO, Candida, Parasites, EMF, Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt's Kryptopyrroluria , Lyme Induced Autism, Heavy Metal Toxicity and Detoxification

Learn True Health with Ashley James

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2018 110:29


Scott's site: http://betterhealthguy.com TFIM: https://forumforintegrativemedicine.org LymeLight: http://lymelightfoundation.org   Dealing With Lyme Disease Naturally http://learntruehealth.com/dealing-lyme-disease-naturally Dealing with Lyme disease naturally seems impossible, but it’s not. My returning guest Scott Forsgren had ample experience dealing with Lyme disease naturally and is now helping others do the same. And he’ll teach us how he did all that in this episode. First and foremost, Scott Forsgren says his whole journey in dealing with Lyme disease naturally was influenced by Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt’s energetic testing. Scott Forsgren worked with practitioners for years that use his autonomic response testing and eventually got certified to administer the testing, too. Improving Gut Health Majority of the immune system and neurotransmitters originate in the gut. So, Scott Forsgren says the more we can optimize our G.I. health, the more we can improve our overall health. He advises to first look at diet. He believes it needs to be individualized but at the same time, remove the foods that are known to be more common stressors like gluten, cow dairy, and sugar. Scott Forsgren also recommends working with a nutritionist to find out which diet might make the most sense for someone to explore. “One that I observed helps most people dealing with Lyme disease is the low-histamine diet. It is not an easy diet to do. And it’s easier if people generally prepare their food at home rather than eat out,” said Scott Forsgren. “I see it helps reduce inflammation in people and to help with a lot of their symptoms just by changing the diet.”  He adds, “The more we can focus on reducing inflammation in general, while we are treating the underlying causes, or triggers of our health condition, the easier it is to get through that process. The less inflamed people are and the better they feel while they are being treated.”  Realities of Lyme Disease In dealing with Lyme disease naturally, you have first to understand the components of the disease. Scott Forsgren says if someone is dealing with Lyme, they probably have Bartonella and or babesia. Some other common co-infections or opportunistic infections that need to be explored as well. Again, he advises people to work with a practitioner who can start treating them with antibiotics, herbs, homeopathy or other tools. Food Sensitivity Testing Food sensitivity testing is worth exploring when you are dealing with Lyme disease naturally. This is also needed if people have very specific and unique foods that might be an issue for them. Scott Forsgren says avoiding those foods can be significant. He also says that gluten is non-negotiable on people with Lyme and mold-related issues. Furthermore, Scott Forsgren believes probably at least half, or more people would do better by eliminating cow dairy. “Avoid those things stressful to the system, which creates more inflammation and instead, incorporate foods that are as nutritionally dense as possible,” Scott Forsgren advises. “Not the prepared, processed food but getting real food into the diet. As much organic food as possible, eliminating the GMO foods and restricting the processed foods is important.”  He adds, “And then depending on whether or not people consume meat, organic grass-fed meat, pasture-raised poultry, and wild-caught seafood can be very helpful as well.”  Healthy Fats Scott Forsgren also says consuming healthy fats can help in dealing with Lyme disease naturally.  Healthy fats include butter or ghee, chia seeds, coconut oil, and olive oil. He also likes a lot of the plants and seed-based oils. What Scott Forsgren does daily is making a power shake, with high-quality protein, collagen powder, a blend of different fibers that helps not only with gut but also from a perspective of binding toxicity and supporting cell membranes. Scott Forsgren also likes to mix in these healthy fats in the form of flaxseed oil, sunflower seed oil, a tablespoon of chia seeds and organic almond milk or any nut milk.  It helps build muscle and structural integrity which is useful in overall health maintenance.  Mega SporeBiotic Mega SporeBiotic is a spore-based probiotic developed by Kiran Krishnan and Microbiomelabs. People tolerate it pretty well. Scott Forsgren says many other probiotics are a problem or an additional stressor if you have a histamine issue. “It can also help address leaky gut issues which are often a reason why we are so reactive to foods. And why we have some of the inflammation which is due to the immune system constantly being triggered by these food and other particles that are getting through the gut membrane,” said Scott Forsgren. Restore Another product Scott Forsgren recommends is Dr. Zach Bush’s Restore, which is a dietary supplement for gut health. Depending on each person’s situation, Scott Forsgren says looking at gut health will often go beyond the diet piece and the intestinal hyperpermeability piece but also into some of those microbial overgrowths, SIBO, SIFO, dysbiosis, and parasites. “The majority of our symptoms are the results of the inflammatory event that occurs — microbes for example. It’s not so much that the symptoms are from the bug. But it’s from the immune system’s reaction to those bugs that creates inflammation,” said Scott Forsgren. Mast Cell Activation Syndrome Scott Forsgren says that people may have heard of mast cell activation syndrome which is the overproduction of histamine. He says there are many other mediators besides the histamine. And this is something that has been known in the autism arena for many years. “Most people who are dealing with chronic infection, chronic toxicity, Lyme disease, and mold probably have some degree of mast cell activation and histamine-related issues,” Scott Forsgren said. “One of the primary triggers for mast cell activation is mold. Hence, it is the top thing people should look out.”  He adds, “But there are so many other triggers like parasites, Lyme disease, co-infections of Lyme disease-like Bartonella in particular. Environmental toxins like heavy metals, some medications, food, some supplements or temperature change can trigger mast cell reaction. Physical or emotional stress and electromagnetic field also trigger it as well.” Treatment Options Some practitioners might use some pharmaceutical medications like diamine oxidase. Scott Forsgren says it can be helpful for some people especially around eating time if foods trigger their mast cell issues. One product Scott Forsgren recommends is Neuroprotek from a company called Algonot. Lots of people in the autism area are familiar with that product because NeuroProtek reduces oxidative stress and inflammation. Another product that Scott Forsgren recommends is Dr. Ben Lynch’s probiotic combination. There’s also ProBiota HistaminX from seekinghealth.com, and vitamin c helpful as well. On the other hand, Beyond Balance’s Mast-Ease was formulated to support the body’s natural ability to normalize mast cell and histamine response, as well as aid in reducing inflammation. “People do find that they have an impairment. And they lose hope that they can get well. They feel as though their body is failing them in some way and not supporting them in their recovery,” said Scott Forsgren. “So, I think it’s critical to get into the gene conversation. to look at the epigenetics or what are the influencers of our genes rather than the potential for something to go wrong.” Sauna Therapy While Scott Forsgren recognizes the benefits of doing sauna sessions, he says it is essential to talk to your health practitioner to guide you. This is to make sure the timing is right, make sure they are sweating and that they got the proper support.  You must also make sure you are getting electrolytes and detoxifying well before doing saunas. “What we don’t often think about is the toxins that are getting inside the body after the sauna session is over. So, make sure your liver, kidneys, lymphatic system and extracellular matrix are all optimized,” said Scott Forsgren. EMR And EMF Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt was talking about the adverse effect of EMR and EMFs since way back 2006. However, there were a lot of skeptics then. But as the years went by, more studies show that EMFs are stressors to our cells. Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt also talks about how they make molds and other organisms that are within us more aggressive or produce more biotoxins. Scott Forsgren says to be alert if you have mold from water damage in your home environment. Because the exponential increase in EMF is probably another reason why those molds now produce more toxins that influence our health. “Endogenous retroviruses that we are conceived with are not necessarily viruses that we acquire. Historically, endogenous retroviruses have not caused us problems from a health perspective. Reducing EMF exposure certainly plays a role in some of those viruses that might be stressing our system as well,” said Scott Forsgren.  He adds, “It’s not possible to eliminate EMFs. The focus has to be how to reduce our exposure. Avoid exposure when sleeping because that is when the body is regenerating, restoring and repairing. Nothing should be plugged in. Dr. Klinghardt even recommended turning off the circuit breakers to the house. And minimize use during the day.” As for choosing the right bed to sleep in, Scott Forsgren says you don’t want metal in your bed or box spring. Bottom line, the mattress should have no metal and recommends OrganicPedic.  In dealing with Lyme disease naturally and all other chronic illnesses, even blankets should be safe and free of EMFs. A good brand is Little Tree Group, which according to their website, is a company who makes EMF/EMR Protective Blankets and Bed Canopies, plus other protective products, CES Units, and Earthing Products. Dirty Electricity Scott Forsgren also advises being wary of dirty electricity which runs on electrical outlets because it creates health stress. He also recommends getting meters to measure how much dirty electricity you have in your environment. “Have a building biologist to do some thorough testing to evaluate your home. EMF sensitivity is correlated to the level of heavy metals in the body and metal toxicity,” said Scott Forsgren. “And focusing on detoxification help over time to reduce electromagnetic hypersensitivity.” Scott Forsgren also reveals that you cannot detoxify when you are constantly exposed to EMFs. So, you have to be a little bit careful about how quickly you reduce your exposures. Kryptopyrroluria Kryptopyrroluria or KPU is a condition that Dr. Kinghardt feels that probably 80% or more of people with chronic Lyme disease and similar conditions are dealing with. Scott Forsgren says this is also common in the autism population. It can be something that we inherit or induced in us by different types of traumas or chronic infection. Or it can be something that is epigenetically turned on by influences like intrauterine or birth or childhood or transgenerational traumas, etc. Scott Forsgren says white spots on fingernails is a sign of zinc deficiency. Not recalling your dreams and depression are also symptoms of KPU. KPU is a significant loss of zinc, B6, biotin, manganese, omega 6 and other nutrients. “It can also lead to higher levels of heavy metal toxicities. Addressing KPU can also help from that perspective,” said Scott Forsgren. “Slowly detox because if you come in with huge amounts of zinc, you can start releasing metals and things in the body and create an inflammatory situation.”  Scott Forsgren also recommends the brand BioPure Core-S which contains KPU supporting nutrients. SIBO There are breath tests that you can do for SIBO that look at hydrogen and methane. Scott Forsgren says the GI-MAP (GI Microbial Assay Plus) stool test and MegaSporeBiotic help in this realm. Another worthy product to try is Bio-Botanical Research Biocidin. “Unfortunately, SIBO and SIFO seem to be fairly common issues that people are experiencing. Parasites can also play a role in this GI dysbiosis,” Scott Forsgren said.  He adds, “One of the challenges with parasites is that people often think of them as third world country problems. But it’s not true. Testing for parasites is poor. So do different systems of energetic testing like autonomic response testing or Dr. Simon Yu’s acupuncture meridian assessment.” But Scott Forsgren also says but you still have to know what questions to ask your practitioner to explore the issues for your specific system. “The more broadly we can cast the net, the broader the number of things we look at, the more likely it is that people can make progress with the number of things that we talked about,” said Scott Forsgren. Furthermore, Scott Forsgren says that the broader we cast the net, the less aggressive we have to be with any one of them because we’re just taking a more holistic approach. That’s why he believes Naturopathic Doctors are a phenomenal fit for a condition like Lyme disease since they are used to looking at all of the different factors. Dental Contributors Dental issues can be a significant factor for health. Scott Forsgren believes that dental problems can be part of setting the stage for why we later develop a condition from mold or Lyme disease. He says incorrectly removing mercury amalgams can lead to a more significant health problem. And it’s the same for root canals. “Tonsils can also play a big role. A little bit different from the dental piece. But it’s not uncommon for people to have tonsil issues,” Scott Forsgren said.  He adds, “People dealing with chronic Lyme disease and similar conditions do have some really good oral health program in place. When we reduce the burden of microbes in the oral cavity, we are also reducing stress on the rest of the body.” PANDA Scott Forsgren says PANDA is where Lyme disease might have been 10 to 15 years ago concerning acceptance and awareness. It stands for Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections. PANDA is a condition affecting a small group of children and results in a sudden and abrupt onset of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) symptoms. But Scott Forsgren doesn’t see PANDAS or PANS similar to autism, chronic Lyme disease or Alzheimers. He feels it’s more associated with chronic infections, chronic toxicity and the environment which we live. Because we have so many things that are just not supportive of our health. “Eventually we’ll see that there a lot of the same underlying factors. And the presentation tends to depend a lot on the age in which we encounter these things. It also depends on whether or not we’ve already neurologically developed or not,” said Scott Forsgren.  Lastly, he adds, “I definitely would not trade my experience because it has brought me to my purpose and passion. And the thing that excites me about is waking up every day and be able to help someone else that’s going through a similar journey. It’s really fun for me to be a part of seeing people make progress in their journey.”  Bio Scott Forsgren, FDN-P is a health coach, blogger, podcaster, health writer, and advocate. He is the editor and founder of BetterHealthGuy.com, where he shares his 21-year journey through the world of Lyme disease, mold illness, and the myriad of factors that chronic illness often entails. Scott Forsgren’s podcast “BetterHealthGuy Blogcast” interviews many of the leaders in the field and is available on his website, BetterHealthGuy.com, and on YouTube, iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and Spotify. He has been interviewed on numerous podcasts and has lectured on his recovery from chronic illness as an invited speaker of the Klinghardt Academy, at AutismOne, and on three Chronic Lyme Disease Summits.  Scott Forsgren has written for the Townsend Letter and other publications. He is the co-founder of The Forum for Integrative Medicine which hosts an annual conference bringing together some of the top integrative practitioners to share practical tools for treating complex, chronic illness.  He serves on the Board of Directors of LymeLight Foundation which provides treatment grants to children and young adults recovering from Lyme disease. Today, Scott Forsgren is grateful for his current state of health and all that he has learned on this life-changing journey. Get Connected With Scott Forsgren! Official Website TFIM LymeLight Facebook Twitter Recommended Links Episode 298 – Lyme Disease – Scott Forsgren Episode 225 – Dirty Genes – Dr. Ben Lynch Better Health Guy podcast Little Tree Group   ************************************ Learn How To Achieve Optimal Health From Naturopathic Doctors! Get Learn True Health's Seven-Day Course For FREE! 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Click Here! http://FreeYourAnxiety.com/webinar ************************************ Need Help Ordering The Right Supplements For You? Visit TakeYourSupplements.com, and a FREE health coach will help you! http://takeyoursupplements.com Do you have a blood sugar issue? I can help you achieve healthy, normal and balanced blood sugar naturally! ************************************ Visit BloodSugarCoach.com for your free 30min coaching call with Ashley James! http://www.BloodSugarCoach.com ************************************ I made a low-carb, gluten-free cookbook just for you! Download your FREE copy today! Visit learntruehealth.com/free-health-cookbook http://learntruehealth.com/free-health-cookbook ************************************ Join Learn True Health's Facebook community group! Visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/LearnTrueHealth or search Learn True Health on Facebook! ************************************ If this episode made a difference in your life, please leave me a tip in the virtual tip jar by giving my podcast a great rating and review in iTunes! http://bit.ly/learntruehealth-itunes Thank you! Ashley James http://bit.ly/learntruehealth-itunes ************************************ Enjoyed this podcast episode? Visit my website Learn True Health with Ashley James so you can gain access to all of my episodes and more! LearnTrueHealth.com http://learntruehealth.com ************************************ Follow the Learn True Health podcast on social media! Share with your friends and spread the word! Let's all get healthier & happier together! Learn True Health - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2LearnTrueHealth Learn True Health - Twitter: https://twitter.com/learntruehealth Learn True Health - Medium: https://medium.com/@unstoppable_ashley Learn True Health - Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/healthpodcast Learn True Health - YouTube: http://bit.ly/LTH-YouTube-Subscribe ************************************ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2LearnTrueHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/learntruehealth Medium: https://medium.com/@unstoppable_ashley Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/healthpodcast YouTube: http://bit.ly/LTH-YouTube-Subscribe

Learn True Health with Ashley James
248 Ph.D. MD Neurogastroenterologist Discovers Man Made Gut Issue Affecting Millions, SIFO, SIBO, Acid Reflux, Disbyosis, Fungus, Small Intestinal Fungal Overgrowth with Dr. Satish Rao and Ashley James on the Learn True Health Podcast

Learn True Health with Ashley James

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2018 80:55


http://www.augusta.edu/mcg/medicine/gastro/faculty SIBO And SIFO http://learntruehealth.com/sibo-and-sifo/ SIBO (Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth) and SIFO (Small Intestinal Fungal Overgrowth) are two health conditions plaguing many people today. SIBO stands for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and SIFO stands for small intestinal fungal overgrowth. Respected expert Dr. Satish Rao is here with us today to explain what SIBO and SIFO are all about and how to treat it. This episode was hard for me to do since Dr. Satish Rao is an allopathic doctor. His way of treating SIBO and SIFO is different from experts in Natural Medicine, but his research about SIBO and SIFO is worth talking about. I have been recently tackling topics about gut health and the best treatment for gut issues. So, I highly recommend everyone to listen to episodes 245 and 247. Family of Physicians Dr. Satish Rao came from a family of physicians. His father was a Professor of Medicine and a University Dean. When he was young, Dr. Satish Rao recalls that his father used to carry around a Sheaffer pen with a white dot on it. He wanted the pen, but his father told him only doctors could have that pen. That apparently became Dr. Satish Rao’s motivation to become a doctor. Dr. Satish Rao pursued medical studies in India and took post-graduate studies in England. He, later on, discovered that deficiency of selenium causes cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. Dr. Satish Rao also learned about gastroenterology and focused on research as well as an essential area of the gut called Neurogastroenterology and motility. That branch of medicine was still in its infancy in the early 80s. Dr. Satish Rao was mentored by two outstanding professors and has helped many patients. “We have been able to understand some key disorders and dysfunctions in the gut and find a remedy to help them. That’s been my journey over the past 25 years,” said Dr. Satish Rao. Understanding Nutrition Medical doctors are not taught nutrition and how food plays a significant role in our gut health. We are just given drug after drug. Dr. Satish Rao, on the other hand, identified a new illness that is man-made because of drugs and over prescription. He’s a very conventional doctor but is treated as an outsider by the community. Dr. Satish Rao says he would love to implement diet and a healthy lifestyle as a solution for health problems. Having practiced in three different continents—India, U.K. and the United States, Dr. Satish Rao feels it is tough to teach people proper nutrition, especially in the United States. “One of the hardest things I found in America is to change people’s behavior, culture and eating habits. Every patient in India, asks me restrictions on their diet,” shares Dr. Satish Rao. “But in the United States, I never get that question. Even when I advise them, it is very hard for people to change.”  He adds,”I do believe there are tremendous things one can do to change their lifestyle and behavior and that can do along with healing. But it has to be done in tandem with other things that we can do as physicians and the prescription drugs. It cannot be done without it.”  Right Mindset Dr. Satish Rao also makes it clear that in the long-term, it is not the drugs that are going to help and conquer the problem. He says it is probably their lifestyle issues that will give the long-term remedy. Unfortunately, American and Canadian cultures are similar. Americans and Canadians are not raised to see that their lifestyle has an impact on their health. Countries like India, on the other hand, is more in touch with Holistic healing. “In the U.K., the patient I had were very willing to institute changes and take on recommendations. In the United States, I don’t think people like to change. They may, under some duress but it’s not going to come soon,” predicted Dr. Satish Rao. We have seen a difference in the last five years. I remember having a demographer on the show who said the millennials—aged 14 to 33, have now outnumbered the baby boomers and the generation in between. Millenials have a different mindset, and I hope they would change their mind before it’s too late. Symptoms of SIBO and SIFO Dr. Satish Rao says he tends to see a challenging group of SIBO and SIFO patients from all over the country and internationally as well. He says people suffering from SIBO and SIFO usually have significant unexplained symptoms of bloating, pain and gas. “To characterize if there was indeed an infection in the gut, we look inside the stomach lining or small bowel lining and see if there is anything unusual. Then we’ll take biopsies. Or if there is celiac disease, we will take biopsies, too,” said Dr. Satish Rao. According to Dr. Satish Rao, there’s also a test wherein it takes 24 hours to study a patient’s gut motility. This is to see if the muscles and nerves are working or not. Another option is taking juice from the small bowel to study if there is an infection in the patient’s small bowel. Dr. Satish Rao then sends the specimen to the microbiology lab to see if it would grow any bacteria or fungal organisms. Test Findings Dr. Satish Rao reveals that he has encountered different findings over the years. In the mid-90s, doctors will treat patients with antibiotics if there is a bacterial infection. Treatment for fungus it is administered in another way. Then fast forward 2005 or 2006, Dr. Satish Rao thought of doing further research on SIBO and SIFO. The results became quite controversial. When Dr. Satish Rao and his team looked at the data carefully, they found that a quarter of the patients had exclusive fungal overgrowth. A quarter had a mix of bacteria and fungus. Another group had pure bacteria, and 30 to 40% of patients were clean. “Then I tried to publish that work. But lo and behold, if you’re ahead of the curve in the medical literature, you get frown upon. No one would accept it. They wanted to publish my work on SIBO thought my research about fungus was rubbish,” said Dr. Satish Rao. In around 2010, Dr. Satish Rao finally found a very reputable journal that was willing to publish his findings. For the first time, the SIBO and SIFO were published as a major G.I. article. Now, there was more recognition that this is a valid entity.  When Should We Be Alarmed? Dr. Satish Rao says that a significant growth pertains to a thousand colony-forming fungi per milliliter of fluid or more. Some of them grow a million or more. Aside from that, Dr. Satish Rao says we should also remember the area from where it is growing. “The stomach is full of hydrochloric acid. It has a strong way of attacking and killing bacteria, fungus, and everything,” explains Dr. Satish Rao. “The duodenum is the tube that comes out of the stomach, and we are sampling within the first 6-9 in of the stomach.”  He adds, “It is an area continuously bathed in stomach acid, and it has a very high exposure to the acidic environment. So, in that area, there should be no bacteria or fungus. If there is, then there is a problem.” Unfortunately, Dr. Satish Rao says, looking at symptoms profiles, we are not able to distinguish who has this condition or not. Those who have and don’t have an overgrowth have very similar symptom profiles. And he says that the only way to separate it is by doing the culture. Understanding Fungus Infection Dr. Satish Rao says that fungus infection can be anywhere in the body. Typically, he says people who have an underlying depressed immune system, like with cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, HIV infection, are strong candidates. “These are a prime group of individuals who don’t have the right immunity to ward off infection from fungus. And fungus is naturally present on our skin, in our mouth and areas exposed to the environment. It is normal for them to be there,” Dr. Satish Rao said.  He adds, “But when something happens inside the body like an infection, diabetes, overuse of steroids or antibiotics, it is a risk for fungus infection. But two factors stood out about our patients. One was the use of proton pump inhibitor and the presence of small intestinal dysmotility. They increase the risk to develop SIFO.” Impact of Drugs It is not surprising that the overuse of drugs has an impact on the gut. According to Dr. Satish Rao, the gut has a very interesting program of small intestinal dysmotility, typically the upper gut. Dr. Satish Rao explains that every 90 minutes or so, as long as you remain fasting, there is a beautiful, strong, sweeping process that goes through the gut and sweeps its way through the colon. It happens every 60 to 90 minutes. If this pattern doesn’t happen, they say you have a problem in your small bowel. This means you no longer have the capability to clean its contents. “The problem of SIBO and SIFO is unfortunately man-made. I have been practicing G.I. for 25 to 30 years, and I don’t believe I’ve seen that many patients with these kinds of symptoms for a long time,” said Dr. Satish Rao. “It’s no question that we recognize it, and we are diagnosing it. But we were never using these powerful drugs for this length of time.” Recommended Treatment Dr. Satish Rao usually tries to eradicate the problem through a 3-week course of antifungal therapy with fluconazole. Fluconazole gets absorbed into the bloodstream and acts on the problem. Dr. Satish Rao explains that he has to maintain people on antibiotics because of the underlying gut motility problem. Plus, patients need long-term treatment. “The other component of treatment gets rid of any potential and incriminating factors. If they have a motility problem, I can try and place them on drugs that stimulate motility. Unfortunately, we don’t have many good drugs, so I try to give those drugs in small amounts,” said Dr. Satish Rao. As for administering intravenous magnesium, Dr. Satish Rao has not used it to treat patients. He says magnesium tends to have a calming effect rather than a stimulating effect on gut motility. So that is why it is not Dr. Satish Rao’s drug of choice for his patients. Role Of Food Dr. Satish Rao recommends more acidic-containing food because the fungus hates an acidic environment. This way, we can kill off the fungal bacteria through acidic foods. “But more acidic food can also trigger reflux symptoms. There should be a fine balance between acidic and alkaline foods. Look also at your tolerance for different food products. I usually have my patients do a three-day food chart then come up with a formula diet,” clarifies Dr. Satish Rao.  Other Concerns Dr. Satish Rao also reveals that people who had surgery in the gut, particularly colon surgery, is the classic set up for SIBO. People who had this surgery have disrupted the normal barriers between the small and large bowel. But despite that, Dr. Satish Rao was quick to explain that he’s not disputing the reason for the surgery. He’s just saying that unfortunately, that group of individuals are highly susceptible and prone to SIBO and SIFO. “Most patients go on lifelong antibiotics because we have no other way of preventing it. But I don’t treat them with large doses. I recommend maintenance doses and the easiest regime usually a week to ten days or after a month. There are only a few who need continuously,” said Dr. Satish Rao. Bio Dr. Satish Rao received his MD from Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad, India, his Ph.D. from the University of Sheffield, U.K., and the Fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians (FRCP) in London, UK, in 1997. Having spent 20 years at Iowa where he was a Professor of Medicine and Director, Neurogastroenterology and GI Motility and Biofeedback Program, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Dr. Satish Rao recently moved to Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia where he is a Professor of Medicine, Division Chief, Gastroenterology/Hepatology and Founding Director, Digestive Health Center.  Dr. Satish Rao is one of a rare breed of academicians who has excelled as an outstanding researcher, distinguished educator and as a Master Clinician. His research interests focus on the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS, food intolerance particularly fructose intolerance, constipation and fecal incontinence and visceral pain, particularly esophageal chest pain.  Dr. Satish Rao is the only physician to date who has received all three meritorious honors from the AGA: the AGA Distinguished Clinician Award, AGA Masters Award for Outstanding Clinical Research, and the AGA Distinguished Educator Award. In 2005, he received an ACG Auxiliary Research Award, and in 2007 the ACG Novartis Motility research award for the best research paper.  Dr. Satish Rao has edited several books, Disorders of the Anorectum (2001), Anorectal and Pelvic Floor disorders (2008) for Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, Gastrointestinal Motility- Tests and problem-Oriented Approach and GI Motility Testing-a Laboratory and Office Handbook (2010, Co-editor). He has published over 300 articles.  Dr. Satish Rao is an astute clinician with an international reputation and has been selected as one of the “Best Doctors in America” and America’s Top Doctors for over 15 years. He is Past President of the American Neurogastroenterology & Motility society. Get Connected With Dr. Satish Rao: Augusta University Recommended links: Episode 226 – Demography – Kenneth Gronbach Episode 245 – Sunlighten Saunas – Connie Zack Episode 247 – Gut Issue – Evan Brand   The Links You Are Looking For: Support Us on Patreon & Join the Learn True Health Book Club!!! Patreon.com/learntruehealth https://www.patreon.com/learntruehealth ************************************ Become A Health Coach Learn More About The Institute for Integrative Nutrition's Health Coaching Certification Program by checking out these four resources: 1) Integrative Nutrition's Curriculum Guide: http://geti.in/2cmUMxb 2) The IIN Curriculum Syllabus: http://geti.in/2miXTej 3) Module One of the IIN curriculum: http://geti.in/2cmWPl8 4) Get three free chapters of Joshua Rosenthal's book: http://geti.in/2cksU87 Watch my little video on how to become a Certified Health Coach! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDDnofnSldI ************************************ Heavy Metal Summit: http://learntruehealth.com/summit ************************************ WATCH THE TRUTH ABOUT VACCINES...FOR FREE! VISIT: http://learntruehealth.com/vaccines LearnTrueHealth.com/vaccines ************************************ Do You Have Anxiety? End Anxiety Now! Learn Two Powerful Mind Tricks for Removing Anxiety, Ending Worry, & Controlling Fear So It Stops Controlling You! Attend my FREE Webinar that Will Teach You How! Click Here! http://FreeYourAnxiety.com/webinar ************************************ Do you have a blood sugar issue? I can help you achieve healthy, normal and balanced blood sugar naturally! Visit BloodSugarCoach.com for your free 30min coaching call with Ashley James! http://www.BloodSugarCoach.com ************************************ If this episode made a difference in your life, please leave me a tip in the virtual tip jar by giving my podcast a great rating and review in iTunes! http://bit.ly/learntruehealth-itunes Thank you! Ashley James http://bit.ly/learntruehealth-itunes ************************************ Enjoyed this podcast episode? Visit my website Learn True Health with Ashley James so you can gain access to all of my episodes and more! 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Let's all get healthier & happier together! Learn True Health - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2LearnTrueHealth Learn True Health - Twitter: https://twitter.com/learntruehealth Learn True Health - Medium: https://medium.com/@unstoppable_ashley Learn True Health - Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/healthpodcast Learn True Health - YouTube: http://bit.ly/LTH-YouTube-Subscribe ************************************ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2LearnTrueHealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/learntruehealth Medium: https://medium.com/@unstoppable_ashley Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/healthpodcast YouTube: http://bit.ly/LTH-YouTube-Subscribe