Podcasts about salesman

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Car Sales Talk 101
#195 Road To The Sale Revisited

Car Sales Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 11:09


The road to the sales process has been around forever. Don't think its outdated and ineffective because it is the only proven process to selling cars that is successful. Commit yourself to becoming a master of the process and watch your commissions soar>

The Sales Podcast
Create Smooth Sales With This Cruise Ship Salesman, Nick Capozzi

The Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 62:09


Nick Capozzi sold luxury goods on a cruise ship for over a decade and took that experience to help you sell more to your prospects. Hear how on episode 594 of The Sales Podcast. Sales Growth Tools Mentioned In The Sales Podcast Take The CRM Quiz: get a free consultation with me Donate: Just because you like the show, the no-bullshit approach, and don't want to buy a book, software, or The Make Every Sale Program. The Sales Agenda: take control of every sales opportunity like a pro. Leadferno: Turn lurkers into leads Founders Card: Get $20,000 in free processing from Stripe, save 15% on Bose, save on hotels, travel, car rentals, you name it. Send Drunk Emails: ...that get opened and get you paid! Phone Burner: work the phone like a machine so you can be a human when you connect. Sendspark: Send video emails that make an impact so you can stand out from the noise. Use promo code SALESWHISPERER to get 33% off for 3 months GUEST INFO: Guest Site: https://www.demostack.com/ Guest Site: https://www.linkedin.com/company/socialsocialio/ Guest Twitter: https://twitter.com/NickCapozzi Guest LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nick-capozzi/ PODCAST INFO: Support The Sales Podcast: https://bit.ly/3JOJ6jC Podcast website: https://www.thesaleswhisperer.com/podcast Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3PeYzKL Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2nEwCF8 Vimeo Full Episodes SUPPORT & CONNECT: Check out the sponsors above, it's the best way to support this podcast Support on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheWes Twitter: https://twitter.com/saleswhisperer Instagram: https://instagram.com/saleswhisperer LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thesaleswhisperer/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thesaleswhisperer Medium: https://medium.com/@saleswhisperer

No Limits Real Estate Investing Podcast
How a Former Lawn Care Salesman Closed Almost $300k His First Year in Business

No Limits Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 38:10


Zach was working in sales when a family member introduced him to real estate. He got started and was able to generate almost $71k while working full time. In January of this year, he decided to go full time and he's closed about 30 deals and generated almost $300k! Checkout today's NLREI podcast episode to... Read More

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Seller Beware [THA 304]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 43:12


Matt Fanslow shares a recent interaction with a salesperson that wanted to help in the sale of the business. There were some warning signs, and with a call to an industry peer, Hunt Demarest, Matt stopped what could have been a costly mistake. Watch Episode HERE Matt Fanslow, Riverside Automotive, Red Wing, MN, Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z Podcast Hunt Demarest, CPA, Paar Mellis and Associates, Business by the Numbers Podcast Show Notes: Succession plan for Riverside Automotive- Matt buys out the current owner Salesman stops into the shop offering consultation work (not automotive based)- consultant comes the next week looking into receipts and paperwork. Tells the owner his accountant is doing a poor job and asks what their ballpark agreement for sale price tag is. Immediately tells the owner it is priced too low and he could write a check for him today for more. Also adds in a scare tactic with IRS and 'gift tax.' Explains his team could get this deal done for around $40,000 Hunt Demarest- aggressive salespeople will pray on the owner's goals, insecurities and dreams with pressure behind it. The importance of valuations from someone that is versed in the automotive industry. Seller and buyer have to be on the same page with transparent communication What is your relationship with your banker? Be mindful of the opinions you are getting and who you are sharing information with Connect with the Podcast Aftermarket Radio Network Subscribe on YouTube Visit us on the Web Follow on Facebook Become an Insider Buy me a coffee Important Books Check out today's partners: Shop-Ware: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management getshopware.com Delphi Technologies: Keeping current on the latest vehicle systems and how to repair them is a must for today's technicians. DelphiAftermarket.com

The Jewish Lives Podcast
ARTHUR MILLER

The Jewish Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 23:21


Most famous for All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, and The Crucible, Arthur Miller (1915–2005) was a playwright who almost single-handedly propelled twentieth-century American theater into a new level of cultural sophistication.Join us with distinguished theater critic John Lahr, author of the new Jewish Lives biography Arthur Miller: American Witness, as we explore the fault lines of Miller's life—his family, the Great Depression, the rise of fascism, Elia Kazan and the House Committee on Un-American Activities, Marilyn Monroe, and the rise and fall of Miller's role as a public intellectual.

The Sales Life with Marsh Buice
Even If It Is Temporary, Learn As If It Is Permanent

The Sales Life with Marsh Buice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 9:50 Transcription Available


Unlike me, not everyone wants to devote half of their life to the sales profession, which is ok. What's important is what skills they amass while being in sales that they can take forward for the rest of their lives.Be ready for anything and achieve everything by developing the Sales Life Mindset. Start your coaching today @marshbuice.com See my daily stories on Instagram. @marshbuiceWatch this episode on YouTube. @thesaleslife Selling is more than a profession, it is a mindset you can apply to every area of your life to embrace uncertainty, handle adversity, and never settle again. Master 5 disciplines to be RFA: Ready For Anything. Go to marshbuice.com to start your coaching today.

Still Recording Podcast
How to Deal With a Pushy Salesman

Still Recording Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 72:45


In this episode, Quinnton tells a story about joining a gym and we play '2 Truths 1 Lie'! Watch This on YouTube. BTW- if you DO want to send us a voice message (ad), you'll have to do it from the Anchor app or our website. How to send us a message. Follow Us At: Instagram, Reddit and Our Discord Server! WATCH US LIVE ON TWITCH! Quinnton McKinnon Instagram Tony Hannides Instagram Twitch This episode is POWERED BY POD DECKS! Goto Pod Decks (poddecks.com) and use code: STILLRECORDING for 10% your FIRST order!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/stillrecording/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stillrecording/support

SIMPLE brand With Matt Lyles
Part 2 of Carmine Gallo - The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World's Greatest Salesman

SIMPLE brand With Matt Lyles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 30:56


In this week's episode of the SIMPLE brand podcast, I talk with Carmine Gallo, author of The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World's Greatest Salesman!This episode is Part 2 in my two-part series with Carmine. You can listen to Part 1 in Episode 91 here.Carmine's here to talk about his latest book - The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World's Greatest Salesman. In this episode, Carmine and I go further with his lessons and dig into more tools you can use to simplify your communications. And we talk about some of the habits that leaders instill to help them continuously improve how they communicate to and motivate their teams. Some of the topics we discuss include:Simplifying your communications is counterintuitive but powerfulReducing the number of words you use gives your message a stronger impactThe ability to take something complex and make it simple will help you stand out in your careerBLOT (Bottom Line On Top) is an effective way to help save your audience's time in your writingThe best leaders know that they're never done learning and improvingThe best communicators are voracious readersImproving your communications doesn't happen overnight - it's an iterative process over time RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE:SIMPLE brand #91 - Part 1 of this interview Carmine's websiteCarmine's book - The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets from the World's Greatest Salesman  Carmine's book - Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World's Top MindsCarmine's book - The Storyteller's Secret: From TED Speakers to Business Legends, Why Some Ideas Catch On and Others Don't Carmine's book - The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience

KRCU's Almost Yesterday
Almost Yesterday: Salesman Drowns After Car Rolls Over

KRCU's Almost Yesterday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 2:00


It seems like Almost Yesterday that a traveling salesman drowned in a drainage ditch along Highway 60 west of Sikeston, Missouri. The accident occurred at approximately 11:00 P. M., Friday night, May 17, 1946.

Car Sales Talk 101
#194 Pro vs Amateurs

Car Sales Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 11:24


Times are changing in the auto industry however, the typical car salesman still remains. It's time to set yourself apart from those salespeople. The real pros in the business do everything they can to legitimze the sales profession, yet the amateurs continue to hold us down and keep the consumers view of us at the lowest levels. Time to do something about it.

WBFO Brief
WBFO Brief Friday November 18, 2022

WBFO Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 17:06


We have the latest on the lake effect snows, including a chat with the National Weather Service, Also word of a upcoming guilty plea on state charges by accused Tops shooter Payton Gendron, the push for a statewide ban on crypto-currency mining, and ... if it's Friday, It's Theater Talk- this week with a Buffalo-born actor Stephen Stocking on Broadway in "Death of a Salesman"

I’m An Artist, Not A Salesman Podcast
I'm An Artist, Not A Salesman #15 w/ Special Guest Bookem (Bridges)

I’m An Artist, Not A Salesman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 70:41


Luis Guzman sits down with special guest Bookem, who is not only a proud police officer, but also a Hip-Hop artist! Bookem speaks about his community outreach and how his non profit organization "Bridges" is dedicated to bridging the gap between law enforcement and urban communities.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - WAYNE PERRY - Snake Charmer or Snake Oil Salesman

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 40:18


Leading authority on sound therapy, and acclaimed sound healer, Wayne Perry is the founder and director of the Sound Therapy Center of Los Angeles. Established in 1992, this was the first facility of its kind in California to offer vibrational healing services, sound therapy workshops, voice analysis, vocal toning training, and sound therapy products.For over 25 years, Wayne has traveled the globe sharing his unique vision and wisdom in presentations at leading health and wellness conferences. In 2007, his groundbreaking book, SOUND MEDICINE, was published by New Page Books for international distribution.**************************************BEAUTIFUL MIND COFFEE is delicious coffee your brain will love.Made with ethically sourced 100% Arabica coffee grown in the volcanic soil of the Tolima Columbia region, BEAUTIFUL MIND COFFEE is roasted and ground in small batches, to ensure each bag contains a wonderful full bodied artisan coffee.BEAUTIFUL MIND COFFEE contains herbal ingredients to aid in boosting your daily mental clarity and focus.Maca root powder, green tea extract and American ginseng have all been selected for their ability to support good brain health.Taking care of your brain's health now can help delay or prevent the onset of cognitive dysfunction, including dementia, Alzheimer's, and more general memory loss as you get older just by enjoying the delicious flavor of our roasted coffee and herbal ingredients found exclusively in BEAUTIFUL MIND COFFEE .For more information on BEAUTIFUL MIND COFFEE visit us online at www.beautifulmindcoffee.ca.BEAUTIFUL MIND COFFEE is NOW available at Amazon.ca

SIMPLE brand With Matt Lyles
Part 1 of Carmine Gallo - The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World's Greatest Salesman

SIMPLE brand With Matt Lyles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 35:41


In this week's episode of the SIMPLE brand podcast, I talk with Carmine Gallo, author of The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World's Greatest Salesman! I'm doing something a little different with this interview. I'm releasing it as a 2-part series. My interview with Carmine is jam-packed with so many lessons on improving your communication that I don't want you to get overwhelmed by having to digest it all in one listen. My hope is that splitting it up makes it a simpler listen for you.Some of the topics we discuss include:Learning to write well is actually hardNo matter your skills, you need to constantly be growing in themUsing metaphors is a powerful tool for helping your communications resonateThe questions to ask before you start to invest in customer service technologyDeveloping great writing and communication skills are valuable for all of your employees, no matter their role or functionWhy Jeff Bezos banned PowerPoint in Amazon meetingsFocusing on the “big idea” first will help your audience more easily buy into your messageHow “simple is the new superpower”For your communication to be effective, write for an 8th-grade-level audienceUsing short words helps create simple, and more powerful, communications RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE:Carmine's websiteCarmine's book - The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets from the World's Greatest Salesman

Caveat REALTOR
Death of a Vacuum Salesman

Caveat REALTOR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 9:37


Does Virginia have a right of recission for real estate contracts?

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Sometimes the little guy just doesn't cut it.Let Me Run This By You: Time's a wastin' - giddyup, beggars and choosers.Interview: We talk to star of Parks and Recreation, Easter Sunday, and Barry - Rodney To about Chicago, Marquette University, Lane Tech,  getting discovered while pursuing a Chemistry degree, The Blues Brothers, Dürrenmatt's The Physicists, playing children well into adulthood, interning at Milwaukee Rep, Lifeline Theatre, Steppenwolf, doing live industrials for Arthur Anderson, Asian American actors and their representation in the media, IAMA Theatre Company, Kate Burton, and faking a Singaporean accent.FULL TRANSCRIPT (UNEDITED):1 (8s):I'm Jen Bosworth RAMIREZ2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand2 (15s):It. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (30s):How's your, how's your eighties decor going for your1 (35s):New house? Okay, well we closed yesterday. Well,2 (39s):Congratulations.1 (40s):Thank you. House buying is so weird. Like we close, we funded yesterday, but we can't record till today because my lender like totally dropped the ball. So like, here's the thing. Sometimes when you wanna support like a small, I mean small, I don't know, like a small bank, like I really liked the guy who is the mortgage guy and he has his own bank and all these things. I don't even, how know how this shit works. It's like, but anyway, they were so like, it was a real debacle. It was a real, real Shannon situation about how they, anyway, my money was in the bank in escrow on Friday.1 (1m 20s):Their money that they're lending us, which we're paying in fucking fuck load of interest on is they couldn't get it together. And I was like, Oh no.2 (1m 29s):They're like, We have to look through the couch cushions,1 (1m 31s):Right? That's what it felt like, Gina. It felt like these motherfuckers were like, Oh shit, we didn't actually think this was gonna happen or something. And so I talked to escrow, my friend Fran and escrow, you know, I make friends with the, with the older ladies and, and she was like, I don't wanna talk bad about your lender, but like, whoa. And I was like, Fran, Fran, I had to really lay down the law yesterday and I needed my office mate, Eileen to be witness to when I did because I didn't really wanna get too crazy, but I also needed to get a little crazy. And I was like, Listen, what you're asking for, and it was true, does not exist. They needed one. It was, it was like being in the, in the show severance mixed with the show succession, mixed with, it was like all the shows where you're just like, No, no, what you're asking for doesn't exist and you wanna document to look a certain way.1 (2m 25s):And Chase Bank doesn't do a document that way. And she's like, Well she said, I don't CH bank at Chase, so I don't know. And I said, Listen, I don't care where you bank ma'am, I don't care. But this is Chase Bank. It happens to be a very popular bank. So I'm assuming other people have checking accounts that you deal with at Chase. What I'm telling, she wanted me to get up and go to Chase Bank in person and get a printout of a certain statement period with an http on the bottom. She didn't know what she was talking about. She didn't know what she was talking about. And she was like, 18, 18. And I said, Oh ma'am, if you could get this loan funded in the next, cuz we have to do it by 11, that would be really, really dope.1 (3m 6s):I'm gonna hang up now before I say something very bad. And then I hung up.2 (3m 10s):Right, Right. Yeah. Oh my God, I know. It's the worst kind of help. And regarding like wanting to support smaller businesses, I what, that is such a horrible sadness. There's, there's no sadness. Like the sadness of really investing in the little guy and having it. That was my experience. My big experience with that was going, having a midwife, you know, with my first child. And I really, I was in that whole thing of that, that time was like, oh, birth is too medicalized. And you know, even though my husband was a doctor, like fuck the fuck the medical establishment we're just, but but didn't wanna, like, I didn't wanna go, as my daughter would say, I didn't wanna be one of those people who, what did she say?2 (3m 52s):You know, one of those people who carry rocks to make them feel better.1 (3m 57s):That's amazing. Super.2 (4m 0s):So I didn't wanna go so far as to be one of those rock carrying people to have the birth at my house, but at the same time I really wanted to have this midwife and then there was a problem and she wasn't equipped to deal with it. And it was,1 (4m 11s):I was there,2 (4m 13s):Fyi. Yes, you were1 (4m 15s):The first one, right? For your first one.2 (4m 16s):The first one.1 (4m 18s):Here's the thing you're talking about this, I don't even remember her ass. What I, she, I don't remember nothing about her. If you had told me you didn't have one, I'd be like, Yeah, you didn't have one. I remember the problem and I remember them having to get the big, the big doctor and I remember a lot of blood and I remember thinking, Oh thank God there's this doctor they got from down the hall to come or wherever the hell they were and take care of this problem because this gene is gonna bleed out right here. And none of us know what to do.2 (4m 50s):Yes. I will never forget the look on your face. You and Erin looking at each other trying to do that thing where you're like, It's fine, it's fine. But you're such a bad liar that, that I could, I just took one look at you. I'm like, Oh my God, I'm gonna fucking bleed out right here. And Aaron's going, No, no, no, it's cool, it's cool, it's cool. And then of course he was born on July 25th and all residents start their residency on July 1st. So you know, you really don't wanna have a baby or have surgery in July cuz you're getting at a teaching hospital cuz you're getting a lot of residents. And this woman comes in as I'm bleeding and everything is going crazy and I haven't even had a chance to hold my baby yet. And she comes up to me and she says, Oh cuz the, the midwife ran out of lidocaine. There was no lidocaine.2 (5m 30s):That's right. They were trying to sew me up without lidocaine. And so this nurse comes in, she puts her hand on my shoulder, she says, Hi, I'm Dr. Woo and I'm, and I said, Dr. W do you have any lidocaine? I need some lidocaine stat right up in there. Gimme some lidocaine baby. And she had to call her boss. You know who I could tell when he came in, of course he was a man and I could tell when he came in, he looks at my midwife and is like, Oh, this is what you did here. I see we have to come in and clean up. But sometimes that's the case. Sometimes it's really just true that, you know, it's that the, that the bigger kind of like more corporate option is better cuz it just works better.1 (6m 8s):Well, and they've done this before, like there is, they've done the job before in a way, and they've seen the problems. They know how to troubleshoot in a way because they just have the fucking experience. Now you could say that getting that experience is like super fucked up and patriarchal and, and all the isms, it's, and you'd be right, but when you are bleeding to death or when you know you are in a big financial negotiation that could go south at any moment and lead to not having a ho like a all feeling lost. You want someone who knows how to fucking troubleshoot, dude. Like, come on. And I, you know, and it is sad, it's heartbreaking when you like, fuck man.1 (6m 50s):I really wanted this, like Dr. Altman always said, and I have an update on Dr. Altman, my favorite psychiatrist mentor of mine. But he always said like, well when I was going through med titration, when they put this dingling at Highland Park Hospital, who tried her best but put me on lithium thinking I was bipolar and then I was and all the meds, right? All the meds. And he's like, well they could've worked2 (7m 15s):It could've worked it1 (7m 17s):All's. And I was like, you are right. So like, it could've worked, it could've gone differently, but it just didn't. So it's like, yeah, it's better to look at it like that because, or else it's just infuriating that it didn't work in the first place, Right? Like, you're like, well fucker, Well they tried.2 (7m 35s):Yeah. I use that all the time that it could have worked. Things that I got through you from Dr. Altman, you know, my husband is having like some major, you know, growth moments. Like come like those moments where all the puzzle pieces become clear and you go, Okay, my childhood isn't what I thought it was and this person has got this and this person has got that. Yes. You know? And, and whenever he's doing the thing that we all do, which is like lamenting the life, the family he wish he had had, I always say like, well, as Dr. Almond says, it could have worked. Yes, these parents could have been just fine for you if you were a different person, but you're you.2 (8m 16s):And so, and they're them and it wasn't a good match. And like that happens sometimes.1 (8m 21s):And I think it's really good with kids maybe too. Cause it's like, listen, like, like I say to my niece, like it could, this could have been whatever it is the thing or my nephew too that worked and like that you loved volleyball or that you loved this. Like you are just looking, and I think it's all about titration, right? Like it's all about figuring out where we fit in, where we belong, where we don't. And it's a fucking process, which is what he was saying and like, and that you don't, we don't get it right the first time. Even in medicine, even in it's maybe especially in medicine, maybe in especially in relationships, like, so it, it also opens the door for like, possibility, right? That like, it's an experiment and like, we don't know, even doctors don't know, Hey, run this by you, Miles did of course.1 (9m 14s):And done. What about you? What about you?2 (9m 17s):I'm gonna do it after this, after we're done recording today, I'm gonna go over and I always like to take one of my kids so they, you know, see that this is the process and you have to do it and it's everybody's responsibilities to do it. That doesn't mean that I didn't get all angry at my own party this week. You know, my mom has a great expression. I think it's her expression. She says it. In any case, all politics is local, right? Like where it really, where the really meets the road is what's happening in your backyard. And like, I have a lot of problems with my town,1 (9m 52s):So Right.2 (9m 53s):They don't wanna have, you know, they voted down this measure to put a a, like a sober living place, wanted to take up residence here. Couldn't think of a greater idea. Nobody wanted it. You know, it's a lot of nis not in my backyarders over here. And it really drives me crazy. And in the, in the paper this week, there was a big scandal because there's this particular like committee in our town, Okay. That was in charge of, there was gonna be this, what is it, like a prize maybe or an honor or not a scholarship Okay. But something where they were gonna have to name it.2 (10m 33s):Okay. And they were, you know, really looking around for names. They were trying to think up what names would be appropriate. And somebody put forward the name of this person who is already kind of a named figure in our town. Like, we had this beautiful fountain, it's named after him. He was, he was a somewhat of a big guy, you know, he was an architect, whatever. Sure. So this name gets put forward in this woman who's on this committee says, I don't think this is a great time to name something after an old white man. Now, to me couldn't be a more reasonable thing in the world to say everybody's calling for her resignation. And these, you know, the thing that I hate the most about, not just conservatives, but it seems like it's especially conservatives.2 (11m 20s):I hate this saying. And I remember, I think I've said this before on the podcast, I remember hearing some black activists saying a lot of white, you know, a lot of racism perpetrated by white people is like founded on pretending. Pretending like you don't see color pretending like, you know, saying things like, Oh, well why would you have had that experience, you know, walking down our street at night? Like, or why would you have had that difficulty getting that job? I don't understand. And pretending like they don't know that this person just got1 (11m 51s):That job because of2 (11m 52s):The color biscuit and that kind kind of a thing. So of course the way that people are coming down on this woman is to say, Well, I don't know about you, but I was taught that we have to look beyond race and we have to recognize the person before the color of their skin. And if you can't be, you know, representing the needs of white men, then I just don't really think that you, there's a place on this council. And of course, you know, somebody who I know and have in the past really respected was quoted in this article as saying, Oh, somebody who considers himself like a staunch liberal. Yeah. I mean, I just really can't think of any people of note from our town who weren't white men.2 (12m 34s):Sure. And this motherfucker let himself be quoted in our newspaper as saying this. Now maybe he feels fine about it. Maybe he doesn't think there's anything wrong with it. But I I I think it's completely, completely disgusting. Of course. So then I went and I just did this research of like all the people who have lived in our town historically, they're not just white men. We, there's other people to choose from. Needless1 (12m 58s):To say. Yeah. Well also, like, it's so interesting. I mean, it's just that that quote just is so problematic on so many levels. It like goes so deep. But like the other thing is like, maybe they miss, the only thing I can think of is that dude, did they miss the second half of your quote? Which was, and that's a problem. Like, like if, if you can't, if you can't finish that quote with, you know, I can't really think of like anyone of note in our being or anyone being recognized in our town in this way that wasn't a white dude and that's really crazy. We should really reevaluate how we're doing things here.1 (13m 39s):Period. You're so2 (13m 41s):To offer, you're so, you're so sweet to offer him this benefit of the doubt. Of course I don't offer that to him because this is a person who, you know, there's been a few people in my life who I've had the opportunity to, you know, know what they say privately and then know what they say publicly. Right? And I, and I know this, you know, I know this person personally. And no, it doesn't surprise me at all that, that that would've been the entirety of the quote. It would've been taken out of context. Now it might have been, and I don't know, and I'm not, I'm not gonna call him up to ask him, but you know, at a minimum you go on the local Facebook page and say, I was misquoting.1 (14m 20s):No, no, yeah. Chances are that this, this person just said this. And actually the true crime is not realizing if, if, if that's the case, that they, that that statement is problematic. So that's really fucked up. And also, like, think of all the native people that were on that land, on our land. Like, you're gonna tell me that just because you haven't done, they haven't done the research. They don't think that a native person from the northeast did something of greatness. Shut up, man. Excellent. Before it was rich.2 (14m 56s):Excellent point, Excellent point. Maybe when I write to my letter to the editor, maybe I'll quote you on that because Yeah, yeah. It's like, it's so, it's just, and I'm, by the way, I'm, I have been, I'm sure I'm still am guilty of the same thing too, of just being the laziness of like, well, I don't know, we'd love to, you know, hire a person of color, but none have applied. I mean, I have definitely said things like that and I just understand differently now I understand. No, no, no, they're not gonna be at the top of the pile of resumes that you're gonna get because historically these people haven't felt like there's a place for them at your table. So what you have to do is go above and beyond and say, we are specifically recruiting people of color for this position. I understand.1 (15m 35s):And how about even like, do some research online and find out who those people are and try to like, hire them away from wherever they are to and make them a great offer. You know what I mean? Like all those things. Well,2 (15m 48s):This experience did cause me to go on my little Wikipedia and look up, you know, people who have lived here and I was really like, surprised to learn how many people have known. Now it's true to say that, you know, when, when you're just looking up a list of famous people, it is gonna mostly be white men because that's who mostly, you know, sort of, she made, made history, made the news, whatever. But yeah, one of the very first things that come up, comes up when you look it up my town on Wikipedia, is that the fact that this was the Ramapo tribe that lived here. You know, this is who we took the land away from. I was also surprised to that.1 (16m 29s):I've never,2 (16m 30s):Yeah, Yeah. It was also interesting to learn, supposedly according to this, how many people of live here currently, including people like Harvey Firestein, who I have, I've never seen around town, but God I would really love to. And like some other, you know, sort of famous people. But anyway, That's1 (16m 50s):So cool.2 (16m 51s):Yeah. So, so I will be voting after this and I really, I don't have a great feeling about the election, but I'm, you know, I'm just like, what can you do? You can just sort of go forward and, you know, stick to your values. Yeah. I mean,1 (17m 7s):The thing is, stick to your values, move forward. And like my aunt, happy birthday, Tia, it's her birthday today, and she is like super depressed that, you know, she, she said, what she says is like, fascism is really, today is the day that we really something about fascism, it's like really dire and like really, Okay. So my, it's so interesting that I think boomers feel really bad because they had it so good, even though it wasn't really good, there was an illusion of goodness. Right? So I, I am depressed. But here's the thing, and I was, I was gonna bring this up to you.1 (17m 47s):It's like I, I had an experience last night where I went to this theater and saw the small theater, which I really wanna do my solo show in which is this famous theater called The Hayworth, which is, they show silent movies and all, but there's now it's like an improv sort of venue and, and it's really cute and throwbacky. But anyway, I went there and I just was thinking like, as I was watching these performers, like, oh, it is not even that, Like, it's literally that I spent 45 years thinking that I was worse than everybody else, right? And so now that I don't really think that, I actually don't have that much time left to accomplish what I would like to accomplish. So I, I spent all this time feeling like I couldn't do what she's doing.1 (18m 29s):I can't do what he's doing, can't do what theirs doing. They're, they are doing because I'm not good enough. Like literally. And now I'm like, Oh my God, I'm good enough. I have things to say. I really wanna leave a legacy. And literally the clock is ticking. Now, I'm not saying I'm running around like a nut, but what I'm saying is like, I, I, I do feel that I literally don't have the time left to participate in half-assed measures of art or whatever we're gonna do. We gotta make it purposeful because I w i, I spent all this time getting ready 45 years to not hate myself. And now the clock is ticking, I donate myself and there are things to do.1 (19m 13s):That's literally how I feel. So then when I see art or something where I'm like, Why are you using your platform this way? What are you talking about? What are you saying? Oh no, I can't, I even now I know why people leave movies early, plays early if it is, and some, for me anyway, like some people probably just assholes and like the, the person on stage doesn't look cute and they're out or whatever, but, or they're having panic attacks like I used to and I have to leave. But like, mostly I understand where it's like this is wasting my, my time, time I could be using to sort of plant seeds that may do something to be of service.1 (19m 53s):So I'm gonna jet and good luck to you. But yeah, it's the first, I just really feel like time is of the essence. And I always thought that was such a stupid thing that old people said, which was, you know, time is our most precious commodity. And I was always like, that is the dumbest thing I've ever heard. And now I'm like, oh shit. Yeah, it's really true Dude.2 (20m 15s):Yeah. Yeah. I actually had an experience some that I relate to with that, which is that, you know, I, I volunteered to be part of this festival of one act and you know, the thing we were supposed to do is read all of the submissions and then pick our top three. And then they were gonna do this rank order thing where they're attempting to put each director with one of their top three choices. Well, I read, it was like 10 plays I read them and I, I didn't have three, three ch choices. There was only one play that I felt frankly was worth my time.2 (20m 56s):And I felt really uncomfortable about having that feeling. And I was doing all of the like, who do you think you are? And you know, it's, you haven't directed something in three years and beggars can't be choosers in the whole thing. And I just thought, you know, I know what I'm gonna do if I don't stand up for whatever it is I think I can do here is I'm gonna resent the thing that I get, you know, pitted with and then I'm gonna do something self-destructive or I'm gonna kind of like blow up the relationship and I don't wanna do that. So I spend a lot of time thinking about how I was gonna write this email back saying basically like, I don't have three choices. I only have one choice. And I understand if you don't want to give that to me that this, I might not be a good fit for you.2 (21m 37s):You know? But I really, I really kind of sweated over it because when you don't, you know, when you're a very, if I was an extremely established theater director, you know, I wouldn't have thought twice about it. But I'm not, I'm trying to be established here and I, you know, so my, my, my go-to has always been well having opinions and choices and stuff like that is for people who, you know, have more than you do or have more to offer than you do. And it doesn't always work out that when you kind of say, This is me and take me or leave me. It doesn't always work out. But in this case it doesn't. They gave me my first choice. And so I'm, I'm happy about that, but there's a lot.2 (22m 18s):Thank you. Thank you. Yeah, there's a lot that just goes into the, it's all just work I have to do on myself. Like, I have this, a way of thinking about things is like, I have to do this work with this other person or I have to convince them why it has nothing to do with that. It's just that I have to do this.1 (22m 34s):Well that's what I'm realizing, like Gina, Absolutely. And good for you for like, coming at it from a place of like, okay, like this might not work, but I have to do it to see and put it out there and it may not work and they may say, go fuck yourself. But the alternative one is resentment, but also is like, hmm, not doing anybody else any favors either. If you aren't saying like, I actually don't have three choices here, I'm not gonna do justice. And I also, it brings me to my other thing, which I thought was so full of shit, which is so true. It's like most things are just not, it's about not being a right fit. It's not about you're bad and I'm good, I'm good and you're bad.1 (23m 15s):It's like, this is not a good match. And I, I think it just takes what it takes to learn that it is a not, it's about a matching situation. So like you knew that like those other two wouldn't be good matches and you wouldn't do a service to them or yourself. And it's not, And also like this thing about beggars can't be choosers. I fucking think it's so dumb because like most of us are beggars all the time and, and we, we settle for garbage. And it doesn't, like, I feel like we can, like beggars should be more choosy. And I also feel like, I'm not saying not be humble, but like, fuck you if you take away our choices, like we have to have choices.1 (23m 57s):That's the thing. It's like beggars have choices, whatever you call a beggar, we still have choices. Like how we're gonna interact and how and how we're gonna send emails and shit. I'm just like,2 (24m 9s):Yeah. Plus that whole phrase is so like, in a way rooted in this kind of like terrible supremacy structure that we're trying to fight against, which is like, we wanna tell, of course we wanna tell beggars that they can't be choosers cuz we just, we don't wanna think about them as people who have the same agency in life as we do.1 (24m 25s):Sure. And now I've started saying to people when I have this conversation about like, about unhoused, people like having tent encampments and I get it, like, you're going to school, you're walking your kid to Montessori and there's a fucking tent encampment in your front yard. You did not pay for that. You did not sign up for that. You are, I get it. And also my question is, what are we gonna do when the tents outnumber the people in homes? Because then it's a real fucking problem. So like, how are we gonna do that? You think it's uncomfortable? I think it's uncomfortable to walk by a tent encampment as I'm on my way to a coffee date with someone or whatever.1 (25m 8s):That's uncomfortable. But what are we gonna do when, like in India, the, the quote slums or whatever people, you know, whatever people choose to call it, outnumber the goddamn people in the towers. Then we, then it's gonna be a different problem.2 (25m 35s):Today on the podcast, we were talking to Rodney Toe. Rodney is an actor, you know him from Parks and Recreation, Barry good girls Rosewood. He was in a film this summer called Easter Sunday. Anyway, he's a delight. He's also a professor of theater at USC and he's charming and wonderful and we know you are going to love listening to him as much as we loved talking to him. So please enjoy our conversation with Rodney Toe.3 (26m 8s):Can you hear me? Can you hear me okay?2 (26m 11s):Yes, you sound great. You sound1 (26m 13s):Happy. No echo. You have beautiful art behind you. We can't ask for a2 (26m 17s):Better Easter Sunday. We were just talking about Easter Sunday, so we're gonna have to ask you Oh sure about it, Beth. But first I have to say congratulations, Rodney tell you survive theater school.3 (26m 28s):Oh, thank you. Yes, I did. I sure did. Was2 (26m 31s):It usc? Did you go to3 (26m 32s):Usc? No, I, I'm a professor. I'm currently a professor at usc. So1 (26m 36s):We just assumed you went there, but where did you go3 (26m 38s):To No, no, no, no, no. I, that, that came about like in a roundabout way, but no, I, I totally, I went, went to Marquette University. Oh, in Milwaukee?1 (26m 46s):In Milwaukee. Oh my gosh. Yeah. So3 (26m 48s):Everybody's reaction, everybody's reactions like, well1 (26m 53s):I actually love Mil, I'm from Chicago and Evanston you do and then you are,3 (26m 58s):Yeah, born and raised north side. My family's still there. What1 (27m 1s):The hell? How did I not know this? Yeah, I'm from Evanston, but lived in Rogers Park and went to, we went to DePaul.3 (27m 7s):Well I hear the park. Yes, yes. Born and raised. My family's still there. I am a Chicago, I'm an undying Chicago and through and through. Yeah.1 (27m 15s):Wait a minute. So, so, okay, okay, okay. So you grew up on the north, you grew up in, on the north side.3 (27m 20s):Yeah, I grew up in, I, I grew up and I went to Lane Tech. Oh1 (27m 24s):My gosh, that's where my niece goes right this very minute. She goes, Yeah,3 (27m 28s):It's1 (27m 28s):Quite the school. I dunno how it was when you went, but it went through a hard time and now it's like one of these3 (27m 34s):Go, I mean when I went it was, it was still considered a magnet school. And I I, you know, I think like in like it went maybe through a period of like, sort of like shifting, but then it's like now it's an incredible school. I'm September 17th is apparently Rodney to day at Lane 10. No, Yeah, it just happened. I mean it's, it's silly. It's Easter significance. No, cause of Easter Sunday they did like a bunch of, you know, I do a lot of advocacy for the Asian American for Asian-American representation. So sort like all together1 (28m 4s):That movie had broke so many, broke so many barriers and was, I mean it was a phenomenal, and also I just feel like it's so obviously so needed. Duh. When people say like, more representation is needed, I'm like, okay, no shit Sherlock. But it's true. It bears repeat again. Cause it still is true that we need more representation. But I am fascinated. Ok, so you went to Lane Tech and were you like, I'm gonna be a famous actor, comedian? No, what,3 (28m 34s):What anything about it? Didn't I, you know, it's called Lane Tech for a reason, right? It's a technical school. Correct. So like we didn't, you know, it didn't, I mean there were arts, but I, it never really, you know, it was one of those things that were like, you know, I guess like when you were a kid, it's all like, hey, you wanna learn how to like macrame. But there were theater arts in my, in my high school, but it wasn't like,1 (28m 54s):In fact, my mother did macrame. And let me tell you something, it has come back in style. And the shit she made, we could be selling for $199 at Urban Outfitters right now. I'm just,3 (29m 4s):Oh yeah, it's trendy now. Yeah. It's like, yeah, it's in style.1 (29m 7s):Anyway, side note, side note. Okay, so you were like, I'm not doing, there was no performing at Lane Tech. There was no like out there, there,3 (29m 13s):There was, and there was, but it wasn't, again, you know, in terms of representation, there was nothing that like, I mean there was nothing that that showed me any kind of like longevity in, in, you know, it didn't even really occur to me that this was a business that people sort of like, you know, pursued for themselves. So it wasn't until I went to Marquette that I discovered theater. And so it was one of those things that like, I was like, oh, there's something here. So it wasn't like, it wasn't fostered since I was a kid.1 (29m 43s):This,2 (29m 44s):And this is my favorite type of origin story because it means, you know, like there are people who grow up in LA or their, their parents are in the industry. And then, so it's always a question like, am I gonna go into this industry? But, but people like you and like me and like Boz, who, there's no artist in our family, you know,3 (30m 4s):You2 (30m 4s):Just have to come to it on your own. So I would love to hear this story about finding it at Marquette.3 (30m 10s):So like the, this, I, I've told this story several times, but the short version of it is, so I went to college for chemistry. And so again, because I came from, you know, that that was just sort of the path that, that particularly, you know, an Asian American follows. It's a very sort of stem, regimented sort of culture. And when I went to Marquette, my first, my sort of my first like quarter there, it was overwhelming, you know, I mean, college was, was a big transition for me. I was away from home and I, I was overwhelmed with all of the STEM courses that I was taking, the GE courses. And I, I went to my advisor and at the time, you know, this is pre-internet, like he, we sat down, I sat down with him and he pulled out the catalog.3 (30m 52s):Oh yeah, the catalog, right? I1 (30m 54s):Remember the catalog. Oh yeah.3 (30m 56s):And so he was like, let's take a class that has nothing to do with your major. Oh,1 (30m 60s):I love this. I love this advisor. I love this advisor. Do you know, can he you say his name3 (31m 7s):At the, was it Daniel? Dr. Daniel t Hayworth. I mean, it's been a while I went to college with Dahmer was arrested. So that's been a1 (31m 15s):While. Okay. Yeah's, same with us. Same with me. Yeah.3 (31m 18s):Yeah. So like, I think it was Daniel Daniel Hayworth. Yeah. Cuz he was a, he was a chemistry professor as well. So he opened up, he opened up the, the thing in the, the catalog and it said acting for non-majors. And I remember thinking, that sounds easy, let's do that. And then I went to the class, I got in and he, he, he was able to squeeze me in because already it was already in the earl middle of the semester. And so I, the, the, the, the teacher for that class was a Jesuit priest. His name is Father Gerald Walling. And you know, God rest his soul. And he, his claim to fame was he had like two or three lines on Blues Brothers, the movie.1 (31m 59s):Amazing. I mean like great to fame to have Yes. Get shot in Chicago. Yeah. And if you're a Jesuit priest that's not an actor by trade, like that is like huge. Like most people would like die to have two to three lines on Blues Brothers that are working anyway. So, Okay, so you're, so he, so how was that class?3 (32m 19s):So I took the class and he, after like the first week he asked me, Hey is, and it was at 8:00 AM like typical, like one of those like classes that I was like, Oh my gosh, I'm gonna go in here miserable. Yeah. But he said to me early on, he said, Do you have any interest in doing this professionally? And I said, no. And he's like, and he, he said, and he said, I was like, You're hilarious. You know,1 (32m 43s):You're a hilarious Jesuit.3 (32m 45s):Yeah. I'm like, Good luck with God. He, he then he was directing, he was directing the university production of, and he asked me to audition for it. And I was, I don't even know what an audition was. That's amazing. So like, it was one of those things that I didn't really know how to do it. I didn't know much about it. And so he's like, Can you come in and audition for it? And I did and I got it and it was, it was Monts the physicist,1 (33m 12s):What the fuck is that?3 (33m 14s):Oh man, I love that play. It's Amont, it's the same, you know, it's the same. He's, you know, Exactly. It's really, it's one of those like sort of rarely done plays and it's about fictitious Albert Einstein, the real, lemme see if I, it's been so long since I recall this play. The real, So Isaac Newton and what was the other Mobius? A fictitious, So the real, I'm sorry, The real Albert Einstein, The real, the real Albert Einstein, the real Isaac Isaac New and a fake, a fictitious play scientist named Mobius.3 (33m 55s):And they were, they were all in, in a mental institution. And I1 (33m 60s):Think that I have this play and my shelves and I just have never read it before. Okay, so3 (34m 4s):Who did you play? It's extraordinary. Extraordinary. And so I played, I played a child like I did up until my mid thirties. I played a child who had like one line, and I remember it took, it took place in Germany, I believe. And I remember he's like, Do you have a German accent? I was like, No. You're1 (34m 20s):Like, I I literally am doing chemistry 90.3 (34m 23s):Yeah. I was all like, you're hilarious. Yeah. Only children do accents, You know what I mean? Like, it was totally, I was like, whatever's happening, I don't even know what's happening. And, and then I made up a European accent. I mean, I, I, I pulled it on my ass. I was like, sure, don't even remember it. But I was like, one of,1 (34m 39s):I love when people, like, recently Gina showed me a video of her in college with an accent. Let me tell you something, anytime anyone does an accent, I'm like, go for it. I think that it's so3 (34m 51s):Great. Yeah. I've got stories about, about, I mean, I'm Asian, right? So like, I mean it's been one of those things that all my life I've had to sort of navigate people being like, Hey, try this on for Verizon. I was like, Oh gosh. And you know, anyway, I can go on forever. But I did that, I had a line and then somebody saw me in the production with one line and said, Hey, this is at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater, somebody from the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. It's huge1 (35m 18s):Theater. Fyi. Right,3 (35m 20s):Right. Again, it's, it's to this day. And so they asked if I would intern, if I would be considered interning while I was in school. And I said, I didn't even know what that was. So I met with them. And when I walked into that theater, it was one of those, it's one of the biggest, most extraordinary music theaters in the wor in the country. Right. Won the regional, Tony and I, again, I had no frame of reverence for it. So walking in, it was like this magical place. And so I started, I started interning right, right off the bat. And it was one of those like life changing experiences. I, I mean, to this day, the best acting I think I've ever seen, you know, face to face has been on that stage. It's, you know, many of those actors are still, I'm still in touch with to this day.3 (36m 3s):Some of them have passed away. However, it was the best training, right? I mean, I got thrown into the deep end. It was like working with some of the greats who never, no one ever knew. Right. So it really, it was really a wonderful experience. And that's when I sort of, you know, that's when I was like, Oh, I actually can do this for a living. So it was,1 (36m 21s):Oh yeah, Milwaukee rep. I've seen some amazing stuff there. And also what would've been great is, yeah, we like, I mean there's so many things that would've been great at DePaul at the theater school, but one of them would've been, Hey, there's all these regional theaters, like if you wanna make some dough, it was either like, you are gonna be doing storefront and Die of Hunger, or you're gonna be a star. Hilarious was no like, what about Milwaukee Rep? What about the Guthrie? Like all the things3 (36m 50s):Gut, Yeah. Never1 (36m 51s):Told at least. Or I didn't listen or I was like in a blackout drunk state. But like, I just feel like hilarious. I just feel like that is so amazing that you got to do that. So then, Wait, did you change3 (37m 2s):Your It wasn't, I did. I eventually did. Yes. So I have both. And so now it was one of those, like, it was, it was harrowing, but eventually, I mean, I did nothing with my chemistry degree. Nothing. Like literally nothing. That's,2 (37m 16s):Most people do nothing with their theater degree. So, so it all evens out. Wait, I have a question. Now. This is a question that would be difficult for me to answer. So I wouldn't fault to you if it's difficult for you. What do you think it was in you that this person saw and said, have you ever considered doing this professionally? I mean, just trying to be really objective about the, the asce the essence of you that you bring to the table. Always. How, what did that person identify, do you think, if you3 (37m 44s):Had to guess? You know, I'd like to say it was talent. I'd love to be that person and be like, you know, they recognized in me in one line that ordinary artist was going to emerge into the universe and play children into his thirties. I, I wish I could. It was that, I mean, honestly, I looked different than everybody else on that's a white school and Milwaukee rep, you know, God, forgive me for saying this, but it was a sensibly all white institution.1 (38m 12s):Super white. Super white. Yeah.3 (38m 14s):So in comes this little Asian guy who like they thought might have had potential and also is Asian. And I checked off a lot of boxes for them. And you know what I could easily say, like I, I could easily sort of, when, if you asked me like 20 years ago, I was like, Oh, I was talented, but now I'm like, no, I made my way in because of, because I, I checked boxes for people and, and1 (38m 37s):Talented,3 (38m 38s):You couldn't,1 (38m 39s):You3 (38m 39s):Couldn't have done it if you didn't have talent to thank you. And I can, I can, you know, whatever, I can own that now. But the, but the reality is like, I made it in and that's how I got in. And I'm okay with that. And I'm not saying that it's not taking anything away from talent, but the reality is it's like you gotta get in on the inside to work your way out. And if I didn't have that exposure early on, I certainly wouldn't have had the regional career that I did for a little while. You know? So like that credit, like you, like you said Jen, it's like, it's a, it's a huge credit. So like I would not have made it in any other way. Right. And I certainly,1 (39m 12s):Yeah, I just am like noticing also like my reaction to, Yeah, it's interesting too as other humans in this industry or any industry, it's like, it's like we have had to, especially those of us that are, you know, I'm 47 and like those of us who have made it in or sort of in for, in my, I'm just speaking for myself. Like I, I sort of, right, It could have been fucked up reasons or weird reasons that we got in the door or even filling someone's need or fantasy. But then it's like what we do with it once we're in the room, that really, really matters. And I think that yeah, regardless of how you ended up in Milwaukee rep, like I think it's smart and like I really like the idea of saying okay, like that's probably why I was there.1 (39m 58s):I checked, I've checked boxes, but Okay. But that's why a lot of people are a lot of places. And so like, let's, let's, let's, you could stop there and be like, that is some fucked up shit. Fuck them. Or you could say, Wait a second, I'm gonna still have a fucking career and be a dope actor. Okay, so you're there, you're, you're still, you graduate from Marquette with a double major, I'm assuming, right? Chemistry and, and was it theater, straight up theater or what was your degree?3 (40m 23s):It's, well, no, no, it's called, it's, it's, it's the, at the time it's called, they didn't have a theater degree. Right. It was called the, you graduated with a degree in Communications. Communications,1 (40m 32s):Right? Yes. Okay, okay. Yeah. My, my niece likes to say Tia, all the people in communications at UCLA are the dumbest people. I'm like, No, no, no, no, no. That would've been me. And she's like, Well, anyway, so okay, so, so you graduate and what happens? What happens to you?3 (40m 54s):So, you know, I, I went from there. I went to, I got my equity card pretty ear pretty early cuz I went for my, I think it was my final between my, the summer, my junior year and my senior year I went to, because of the Milwaukee rep, I got asked to do summer stock at, at ppa, which is the Pacific Conservatory, the performing Arts, which is kind of like an Urda contract out in the West Co on the west coast. And so I was able to get credits there, which got me my equity card very quickly after, during that time I didn't get it at the institution, but I got like enough, you know, whatever credit that I was able to get my equity card. And again, at the time I was like, eh, what are the equity? I didn't even know know what that was really.3 (41m 34s):I don't know if anybody truly knows it when they're, when they're younger. So I had it and I went, right, I had my card and I went right to Chicago because family's there. So I was in Chicago. I did a couple of shows, I did one at at Lifeline at the time. I did one at North. Yeah. So it was nice to sort of go back and, and, and, and then I, you know, right then I, it's my favorite story, one of my favorite stories. I, I got my, my my SAG card and my after card in Chicago that summer, because at the time the union was separate. That's how old I am. And I got my SAG card doing a Tenax commercial, and I got my after card doing, I'm not sure if they're still there.3 (42m 18s):I think they are actually. It is a company called Break Breakthrough Services and they did it live industrial. Oh yeah.1 (42m 24s):They, I think they still wait live. How does that work? Yeah,3 (42m 29s):Exactly. So it's a lot of like those training, you know, you see it a lot, like the people do it, like corporate training stuff. Right. So they used, at the time it was really new. So like they used a lot of actors and they paid well.1 (42m 42s):Well, I did an Arthur Anderson one that like paid my rent3 (42m 45s):Long time. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So exactly when Arthur Anderson was still a, I think I did one too. So like, they,1 (42m 53s):Rodney,3 (42m 55s):Were you in St. Charles, Illinois?1 (42m 57s):I don't know. I had to take the Amtrak. It could have been,3 (42m 59s):Yeah. In St. Charles. Right? That's where they were centered. Yes. Yeah.1 (43m 2s):Okay, go ahead. Go ahead. So you, okay, so you got your, I know our world. Do you live, Where do you live?3 (43m 8s):I'm in, I'm in LA right now. This is my home. Yeah.1 (43m 11s):Okay. Well I'm coming to your home. Okay, great. I'm in Pasadena right now. Okay. Anyway, go ahead. Oh yeah.3 (43m 17s):Okay. So we, yeah, I went to Chicago, got my cards, and then was there for, you know, a hot minute and then I moved to New York. Okay.1 (43m 25s):Wait, wait, wait. Moved. Did you have, what years were you working in Chicago? Like were we still, were Gina and I in school? What, what, what years were that were you were like, Tampa, a man Chicago.3 (43m 35s):I did God bless that commercial. Yeah, it was so good. I did, let's see here, I grad, I was there in 90, let's see, 97,1 (43m 47s):We were there. Well, Gina was graduating and I, I was, yeah. Anyway, we were there.3 (43m 52s):And then I moved to New York in 98 and then I moved to New in 98. So1 (43m 55s):You were only in Chicago a hot minute? Yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (43m 57s):Okay. Yeah. But then I came back, I came back in 2004 five to do a show at Victory Gardens. Oh. And then I did a show at Victory Gardens, and then I did a workshop at Stepin Wolf. So it was nice. Look at1 (44m 12s):Victory Gardens. Victory Gardens. That was a whole,3 (44m 15s):I'm sorry, what was that?1 (44m 16s):R i p, Victory Gardens.3 (44m 17s):Oh, yeah. I mean, well I was there pre-K. Yeah. And so, but it was, yeah, r i p I mean, r i it was truly one of the most magnificent, magnificent shows that I've been part, but I mean,1 (44m 30s):Okay, so wait, wait, wait. Okay, so why New York? Why weren't you like, I'm gonna bust out and go to LA and be a superstar on,3 (44m 38s):It's all about representation. I mean, I didn't see at the time, and you know, if you think about it, like there were people on television, but, you know, in terms of like the, the, the, it wasn't pervasive. It was like sort of every once in a while I'll turn on my TV and I'll see like Dante Bosco or I'll see like, you know what I mean? But it wasn't like I saw like, you know, I wasn't flooded with the image of an Asian American making it. However, at the time, you know, it was already Asian Americans were starting to sort of like flood the theater world, right? So I started, you know, through James c and, and Lisa Taro in Chicago, and like, people who are like, who are still friends of mine to this day, Asian American actors, they were doing theater. And so I was like, you know what, I'm gonna do theater. And so I, it was just one of those, like, I went to, and I already had these credits.3 (45m 19s):I had my equity card, I had some credits. My natural proclivity was then to go to, to, to first theater in New York. So it wasn't, I didn't even think about LA it wasn't like, oh, let me, let me like think about doing television and film. So I went1 (45m 32s):To York. I just feel like in LA it's so interesting. As an actor, writing is a little different, but as an actor, it, most of us, if we plan to go to LA as actors, we're gonna fail. I just feel like you have to end up here as an actor by accident because you do something else that you love and that people like, and then they're like, I just, it's not the most welcoming. Right. Medium film and tv. So like, it's so hard. So I think by accident is really sort of the only way, or if you're just already famous for something else, but like, anyway, So you're in New York. Did you, did you love it? Wait, can I,2 (46m 9s):Can I hang on Buzz, Can I do a timeout? Because I've been wanting to ask this just a little bit back to, you know, your undergrad experience. Did you wanna be, did you love chemistry or did you just do that because Oh, you did, Okay. So it wasn't, it wasn't like, oh, finally I found something that I, like you liked chemistry.3 (46m 29s):Yeah. To this day, to this day, I still like, it's still very much like, you know, the, the, the values of a stem field is still very much in how I teach, unfortunately. Right? Like, I'm very empirical. I, I, I need to know an, I need to have answers. Like, you know, it tends to, sometimes it tends to be a lot of it, like, you know, you know, sort of heady and I'm like, and now I need, I need, I'm pragmatic that way. I need to understand like why, Right? That2 (46m 53s):Doesn't seem unfortunate to me. That seems actually really fortunate because A, you're not the only artist who likes to think. I mean, you know, what about DaVinci? Like, a lot of people like to think about art in a, in a, I mean it's really, they're, they're, they're really kind of married art and science.3 (47m 8s):Yeah. They really are people. I, I think people would, It's so funny. Like people don't see it as such, but you're absolutely right. I agree. It's so more, Yeah. There's so much more in common.1 (47m 18s):The other thing that I'm glad Gina brought that up is cuz I'm questioning like, okay, so like, I don't know about at Marquette, but like at DePaul we had like, we had, like, we had these systems of, you got warnings if you, you weren't doing great and I bet like you probably didn't have the cut system cause that just is okay, good. But okay.3 (47m 36s):Well we were, we remember we were, we weren't a conservatory, right? So we were very much a, a liberal programming.1 (47m 42s):Yeah, I love it. Oh God, how I longed for that later, right? But anyway, so what would've helped is if someone with an empirical, like someone with more a stem mind sat down with me and said, okay, like, here are the things that aren't working in a practical way for you, and here are the things that you can do to fix it. Instead, it was literally this nebulous thing where my warning said, You're not living up to your star power now that's not actually a note. So that, that, that Rick Murphy gave me, and I don't, to this day, I'm like, that is actually, so I would love if I had someone like you, not that you'd be in that system, but like this to say like, okay, like here's the reasons why.1 (48m 25s):Like there was no why we were doing anything. It was like, you just do this in order to make it. And I said, Okay, I'll do it. But I was like, what the hell? Why are we doing this? That's,3 (48m 35s):That's like going to a doctor and a doctor being like, you're sick. You know what I mean? And you're like, but can, that's why I'm here is for you to help me get to the root of it and figure it out. Right. Being like, you're,1 (48m 46s):I think they didn't know, Here's the thing, I don't think it, it3 (48m 50s):Was because they're in.1 (48m 51s):Yeah. I I don't think it was because they were, I mean, they could have been rude in all the things. I literally, now that I'm 47, looking back on that experience, I'm like, Oh, these teachers didn't fucking know what they were, how to talk. And3 (49m 3s):This is how I came. Yeah, yeah. Which is how I came back to usc. So like that's,1 (49m 7s):Anyway, continue your New York adventure. I just wanted to know.3 (49m 11s):No, no, no. New York is was great. New York is New York was wonderful. I love it. I still love it. I I literally just got back with it. That's why, remember I was texting you, emailing you guys. I I just got back, Yes. The night before. Some amazing things. My husband would move back in a heartbeat if I, if I like texted him right now. And I was like, Hey, like let's move back. The house would be packed and we'd, he'd be ready to go. He loves, we both love it. You know, Am I in love with New York? I, that, that remains to be seen. I mean, you know, as I get older that life is, it's a hard life and I, I love it when there's no responsibilities when you can like, skip around and have tea and you know, walk around Central Park and like see shows.3 (49m 53s):But you know, that's obviously not the real, the reality of the day to day in New York. So I miss it. I love it. I've been back for work many times, but I, I I don't know that the life is there for me anymore. Right. I mean, you know, six fuller walkups. Oh no. Oh no. I just, yeah, I1 (50m 11s):Just like constantly sweating in Manhattan. Like I can't navigate, It's like a lot of rock walking really fast and3 (50m 20s):Yeah. And no one's wearing masks right now. I just, I just came back and I saw six shows when I was there. No one's wearing masks. It's like unnerving. And again, like, you know, you know, not throwing politics in it. I was like, you guys, like, how are you okay with it? I'm just like, how are you not unnerved by the fact that we're cramped in worse than an airplane? And everyone's like coughing around you and we're sitting here for three hours watching Death of a Salesman. I mean, like, how was that1 (50m 43s):Of an2 (50m 45s):Yeah know?3 (50m 46s):I mean,2 (50m 47s):So what about the, so at some point you, you pretty much, I mean, you don't do theater anymore, right? You transition to doing3 (50m 55s):Oh, I know, I do. Very much so, very much. I'm also the associate, Yeah. I'm the associate artistic director of, I am a theater company, so like I'm, I'm very much theater's. I will never let go. It's, it's just one of those things I will never as, as wonderful as television and film has been. It's, it's also like theater's, you know? It's the, it's my own, it's my first child. Yeah.2 (51m 19s):Yeah.1 (51m 20s):We have guests like Tina Parker was like that, right? Wasn't,2 (51m 23s):Yeah. Well a lot of, a lot of people. It's also Tina Wong said the same thing.3 (51m 26s):He and I are different. She's part, we're in the same theater company. So Yeah. Tina's.2 (51m 30s):That's right. That's right. That's right. Okay, now I'm remembering what that connection was. So I have a question too about like, when I love it, like I said, when people have no idea anything related to performing arts, and then they get kind of thrust into it. So was there any moment in sort of discovering all this where you were able to make sense of, or flesh out like the person that you were before you came to this? Like a lot of people have the experience of, of doing a first drama class in high school and saying, Oh my God, these are my people. And never knowing that their people existed. Right. Did you have anything like that where you felt like coming into this performing sphere validated or brought some to fullness?2 (52m 14s):Something about you that previously you hadn't been able to explore?3 (52m 18s):Yeah. I mean, coming out, you know what I mean? Like, it was the first time that people talk, you know? Of course, you know, you know, I was born to, you know, like was God, I said I was born this way. But that being said, like again, in the world in which I grew up in, in Chicago and Lane Tech, it's, and, and the, you know, the technical high school and, and just the, the, the, I grew up in a community of immigrants. It's not like it was laid out on the table for one to talk about all the time. Right. It wasn't, and even though I may have thought that in my head again, it wasn't like, it was like something that was in the universe and in the, in the air that I breathed. So I would say that like when I got to the theater, it was the first time, you know, the theater, you guys we're, we're theater kids, right?3 (53m 2s):We know like every, everything's dramatic. Everything's laid, you know, out to, you know, for everyone. Everyone's dramas laid out for everyone. A the, and you know, part of it was like sexuality and talking about it and being like, and having just like, just being like talking about somebody's like ethnic background. And so it was the first time that I learned how to talk about it. Even to even just like how you even des you know, you know how you even describe somebody, right? And how somebody like, cuz that again, it's not, it wasn't like, it wasn't language that I had for myself. So I developed the language and how to speak about people. So that's my first thing about theater that I was like, oh, thank God.3 (53m 43s):You know? And then, you know, even talking about, you know, like queer, like queer was such a crazy insult back when I was a kid. And then now all of a sudden queer is now this embraced sort of like, badge of honor, Right? And so like, it was just like that and understanding like Asian and Asian American breaking that down, right? And being Filipino very specifically breaking that down, that all came about from me being in theater. And so like, I, I'm, I owe my, my life to it if you, and, and because I've, yeah, I didn't, you know, it's so funny how the title of this is I Survived Theater School for me. It's, Yes, Yes.3 (54m 23s):And I also, it also allowed theater also gave, allowed me to survive. Yes.2 (54m 31s):Theater helped you survive. Yes. That's beautiful. So in this, in the, in this spectrum or the arc, whatever you wanna call it, of representation and adequate representation and you know, in all of our lifetimes, we're probably never gonna achieve what we think is sort of like a perfect representation in media. But like in the long arc of things, how, how do you feel Hollywood and theater are doing now in terms of representation of, of specifically maybe Filipino, but Asian American people. How, how do you think we're doing?3 (55m 3s):I think we, you know, I think that there's, there's certainly a shift. You know, obviously it, we'd like it to be quicker than faster than, than it has been. But that being said, there's certainly a shift. Look, I'm being, I'll be the first person to say there are many more opportunities that are available that weren't there when I started in this, in this business, people are starting to like diversify casts. And you know, I saw Haiti's Town, it was extraordinary, by the way. I saw six shows in New York in the span of six days out of, and this was not conscious of me. This is not something I was doing consciously. Out of the six shows, I saw every single show had 90% people of color.3 (55m 43s):And it wasn't, and I wasn't conscientious of it. I wasn't like, I'm going to go see the shows that like, it just happened that all I saw Hamilton, I saw K-pop, I saw, you know, a death of a Salesman I saw. And they all were people of color and it was beautiful. So there's definitely a shift. That said, I, for me, it's never, this may sound strange, it's not the people in front of the camera or on stage that I have a problem with. Like, that to me is a bandaid. And this is me speaking like an old person, right? I need, it needs to change from the top down. And for me, that's what where the shift needs to happen for me. Like all the people at top, the, the, the people who run the thing that needs to change. And until that changes, then I can expect to starter from1 (56m 25s):The low. It's so interesting cuz like, I, I, I feel like that is, that is, we're at a point where we'd love to like the bandaid thing. Like really people really think that's gonna work. It never holds. Like that's the thing about a bandaid. The longer the shit is on, it'll fall off eventually. And then you still have the fucking wound. So like, I, I, I, and what I'm also seeing, and I don't know if you guys are seeing it, but what I'm seeing is that like, so people got scared and they fucking started to promote execs within the company of color and othered folks and then didn't train them. And now are like, Oh, well we gave you a shot and you failed, so let's get the white kid back in that live, you know, my uncle's kid back in to, to be the assistant.1 (57m 6s):And I'm3 (57m 7s):Like, no people up for success is a huge thing. Yeah. They need to set people up for success. Yes, yes, for sure.2 (57m 12s):Yeah. So it's, it's performative right now. We're still in the performative phase of1 (57m 16s):Our, you3 (57m 17s):Know, I would say it feels, it, it can feel performative. I I'm, I'm definitely have been. I've experienced people who do get it, you know what I mean? It's just, Sunday's a perfect example of somebody who does get it. But that being said, like again, it needs to, we need more of those people who get it with a capital I like, you know, up at the top. Cause again, otherwise it's just performative, like you said. So it's,1 (57m 38s):Does it make you wanna be an exec and be at the top and making choices? Yeah,3 (57m 42s):You know, I've always, people have asked me, you know, people have asked me what is the next thing for me. I'd love to show run. I've, I just, again, this is the, this is the stem part of me, right? Like, of us, like is I'm great at putting out fires, I just have been that person. I'm good with people, I'm, I'm, you know, and I've, I, you know, it's, it's, it's just one of those things that like I, I see is a, is a natural fit. But until that happens, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm also, you know, a professor is very much a version of show learning. So I've been doing that every day.1 (58m 14s):We talk about how, cause you've mentioned it several times about playing children into your thirties. So a lot, we have never had anyone on the show that I'm aware of that has had that sort of thing or talked about that thing. They may have had it. Mostly it's the opposite of like, those of us who like, I'll speak for myself, like in college, were playing old people at age, you know, 16 because I was a plus size Latina lady. And like that's what what went down. So tell me what, what that's what that journey has been like for you. I'm just really curious mostly, cuz you mentioned it a couple times, so it must be something that is part of your psyche. Like what's that about? Like what the, I mean obviously you look quote young, but there's other stuff that goes into that.1 (58m 57s):So how has that been for you and to not be, It sounds like you're coming out of that.3 (59m 1s):Yeah, I mean, look, all my life I've always been, you know, I mean I'm, I'm 5, 5 6 on a good day and I've always just been, I've always just looked young. Like, I mean, I mean, and I don't mean that like, oh I look young. Like I don't mean that in any sort of self-aggrandizing way. I literally just am one of those and you're built, like me, my one of my dear friends Ko, God rest his soul, he was always like, Rodney, you're like a little man look, looks, you're like a man that looks like a boy. And I was like that, that's hilarious. Like, and look, I for growing up little in, in high school and, and it, it was one of those things that I was always like, you know, like I was always chummy with people, but I was never sort of like, like there's a look, let's face it.3 (59m 45s):Like we're, we're a a a body conscious society and when you're, whatever it is, you can't help. There's implicit bias, right? Implicit bias, right. Supremacy at it's most insidious. And so I am not all my life, I was like always trying to, you know, the Napoleon complex of always trying to sort of be like, prove that I was older than I was.1 (1h 0m 6s):How did you do it? How did you do, how were you, what kind of techniques did you use? For3 (1h 0m 10s):Me, it wasn't even my technique. It was about doing everything and anything I possibly could. I mean, I was like president or vice president, I a gajillion different clubs. So it1 (1h 0m 18s):Was doing, it was doing, it was not like appearance. Okay, okay. So you3 (1h 0m 23s):Was actually yeah, I couldn't do anything about this. Yeah.1 (1h 0m 25s):Right. So yeah, but like people try, you know, like people will do all kinds of things to their body to try to, But for you, it sounds like your way to combat that was to be a doer, like a super3 (1h 0m 36s):Duer. And I certainly, I certainly like worked out by the time I got to college I was like working out hardcore to try and masculinize like, or you know, this. And, and eventually I did a gig that sort of shifted that mentality for me. But that being said, I think the thing that really, that the thing that, that for me was the big sort of change in all of this was just honestly just maturity. At some point I was like, you know what? I can't do anything about my age. I can't do anything about my height, nor do I want to. And when that shifted for me, like it just ironically, that's when like the maturity set in, right? That's when people started to recognize me as an adult.3 (1h 1m 17s):It's when I got got rid of all of that, that this, this notion of what it is I need to do in order for people to give me some sort of authority or gimme some sort of like, to l

Read to Lead Podcast
449: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman with Carmine Gallo

Read to Lead Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 43:29


Today's guest is a favorite of mine. That's right. He's been here before. In fact, today marks his third visit as a guest. His name is Carmine Gallo. He's written bestselling books like Talk Like TED and The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs. His brand new book, out today, is called The Bezos Blueprint: Communication […] The post 449: Communication Secrets of the World's Greatest Salesman with Carmine Gallo first appeared on Read to Lead Podcast.

Rebranding Safety
Rebranding Safety with Simon Jones - The Safety Salesman

Rebranding Safety

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 80:09


Author of "The Safety Salesman: Shoot From The Lip", Simon Jones takes his experience in the Police Force, specifically CID and with James, chats about selling something that no one wants to buy, safety first and Heinrich's Triangle among other concepts in the book. Thanks again, Simon, for joining us on the pod. Enjoy.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Backstage Babble & Richard Skipper Celebrate Remember Susan L. Schulman 11/12/22

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 72:00


For VIdeo Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/h9A2HhXJcag Susan L. Schulman, a longtime Broadway publicist whose five-decade career included such theater milestones as Applause starring Lauren Bacall, Death of a Salesman with George C. Scott and Bob Fosse's Dancin', passed away Wednesday, October 18, at Mt. Sinai West Hospital in New York City following a brief illness.Charles Kirsch (Backstage Babble) and I and a few friends are coming together for this virtual celebration. Charles Kirsch is the 14-year-old host of the Broadway podcast Backstage Babble, which since August 2020 has presented over 120 in-depth interviews with leading figures in the theater industry. Meg Bussert is an American actress, singer and a university professor. Kathleen Chalfant is an actress. She has appeared in many stage plays, both on Broadway and Off-Broadway, as well as making guest appearances on television series, including the Law & Order franchise. Michael Misita grew up in Ohio where he did musicals and danced with his sister around Cleveland and Lorain, his home town. He attended the Boston conservatory of Music and spent summers in summer stock at the Milwaukee Melody Top doing 16 different shows choreographed by Tommy Tune, such as Sweet Charity with Gretchen Wyler, Irma La Deuce with Chita Rivera and The Boyfriend with Jane Powell. He landed his first Broadway show, THE FIG LEAVES ARE FALLING on his first day in New York City, and eventually worked with Michael Bennett, Bob Fosse, Ron Fields Hal Prince, Steven Sondheim and a host of other well-known choreographers, directors and producers. He appeared in nine Broadway productions. Deborah Grace Winer: Writer, dramatist and concert/revue creator Deborah Grace Winer is a leading expert on the American Songbook and Musical Theatre. 

Drop In CEO
Bob Burg: Being Your Own Personal Brand Salesman

Drop In CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 35:39


On today's episode Bob Burg shares why the negative emotions surrounding salesmanship prevent the development of nurturing of relationships and business sustainability. Listen in as Deborah and Bob discuss how to create your own sales system that aligns with your values, the real reason why people buy from you, and how to cultivate mutually beneficial relationships in an authentic way.   For over 30 years Bob Burg has been successfully showing entrepreneurs, leaders, and sales professionals how to communicate their value and accelerate their business growth. Although for years he was best known for his sales classic, Endless Referrals, it's his business parable, The Go-Giver, coauthored with John David Mann that has created a worldwide movement.   While part of a four-book series, The Go-Giver itself has sold more than one million copies and been translated into 30 languages. It was rated #10 on Inc. Magazine's list of The Most Motivational Books Ever Written, and was on HubSpot's 20 Most Highly Rated Sales Books of All Time.   Bob is founder of The Go-Giver Community Network, the first of its kind online business community created by and for Go-Givers.   He is an advocate, supporter, and defender of the Free Enterprise system, believing that the amount of money one makes is directly proportional to how many people they serve. He is also an unapologetic animal fanatic and served on the Board of Directors of Furry Friends Adoption & Clinic in his town of Jupiter, Florida.   Whether you are a C-Suite Leader of today or tomorrow, take charge of your career with confidence and leverage the insights of The CEO's Compass: Your Guide to Get Back on Track.  To learn more about The CEO's Compass, you can get your copy here: https://amzn.to/3AKiflR See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Commercial Roofing Radio
31. Steve Bowden | How To Step Up Your Sales Game

Commercial Roofing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 30:16


This episode, we've got my man Steve Bowden on the podcast! Steve crushes sales at HD Roofing & Construction in Florida. He's an absolute sales rockstar, closing six million in sales last year and over 4 million already this year! He's talks problem-solving in sales, scheduling yourself for success and even his love for the PeakLeads.io system! If you're looking to up your sales game, this is the place to start!

TODAY
TODAY 3rd Hour: Latest midterm results. The Crown cast talks new season. She Made It: Founders of La Ligne. Wendell Pierce's historic Broadway role.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 36:28


A close look at all the key states and the midterm election results. Also, NBC correspondent Kier Simmons sat down with the cast of “The Crown” as the new season was released on Netflix. Plus, She Made It— the story behind the founders of La Ligne. And, Wendell Pierce in studio 1A to talk about his new role in the classical play “Death of a Salesman.”

Shaping Success With Wes Tankersley

We all know the sleezy salesman! Dont be that Guy!For merchandise, podcast and youtube:https://linktr.ee/wes.tankersleyJoin the Success Warrior Crew Facebook Grouphttps://www.facebook.com/groups/successwarriorcrew/This Episode of Shaping Success is brought to you by Terry Levy at Parkway Chevrolet in Tomball Texas. If you are in the market for a new car or truck give Terry a call at 346-273-1042 thats 346-273-1042 and let Terry help you out. Don't forget The best Way is Parkway!Check out our sponsor Tattooed and Successful @tattoedandsuccessfulco use code TANK at check out for a special Discount! https://tattooedandsuccessful.com/Check out our sponsor The Warriors Collection for coffee, gear and more use code TANK at check out for a special Discount!  https://warriorscollectionbrand.com/Follow Shaping Success https://shapingsuccesspodcast.buzzsprout.com/Email Wes@westankersley.com for guest ideas or to be on the show!This Episode of Shaping Success is brought to you by Terry Levy at Parkway Chevrolet in Tomball Texas. If you are in the market for a new car or truck give Terry a call at 346-273-1042 thats 346-273-1042 and let Terry help you out. Don't forget The best Way is Parkway! Check out our sponsor The Warriors Collection for coffee, gear and more use code TANK at check out for a special Discount! https://warriorscollectionbrand.com/Support the show

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart
Wendell Pierce puts ‘Death of A Salesman' in a whole new light

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 28:31


In this Washington Post Live conversation from Oct. 24, veteran actor Wendell Pierce discusses his starring role in the latest rendition of Arthur Miller's “Death of A Salesman,” and how having a Black family at the play's center shines a whole new light on the classic drama.

FIFTEEN MINUTE FILM FANATICS

What would happen if you took the kid from Shane and had him wander in a world without Shane?  Martin Ritt's Hud (1963) shows us the answer.  Join Mike and Dan for a conversation about the danger of Paul Newman's charisma and how this terrific film set in 1963 Texas evokes King Lear, Death of a Salesman, and, of course, Shane.  Put that radio in your pocket so you can listen as you look for your womanizing uncle! Please subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts and follow us on Twitter and Letterboxd @15MinFilm.  Please rate and review the show on Apple podcasts and contact us at FifteenMinuteFilm@gmail.com.  Incredible bumper music by John Deley. Twitter: https://twitter.com/15minfilm Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/15MinFilm/ Website: https://fifteenminutefilm.podbean.com/      

The Treatment
Chris Redd, Sharon D Clarke, and the friendship that's a treat for Tyler Perry

The Treatment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 56:33


This week on The Treatment, Elvis sits down with comedian Chris Redd, whose new special on HBO MAX is “Chris Redd: Why Am I Like This?” Then, Olivier Award winning actress Sharon D Clarke talks about her role in the Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's “Death of a Salesman.” And on The Treat, actor, director and producer Tyler Perry tells us about his friendship with another media powerhouse that's a treat for him.

Sales POP! Podcasts
World's Greatest Salesman with Don Gillmor

Sales POP! Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 20:43


Don Gillmor is today's Expert Insight Interview guest. He is a Canadian Journalist, novelist, historian, and writer of children's books. He is the recipient of many awards for journalism and fiction. He is the author of three fiction books and five non-fiction books. Gillmor's magazine writing has earned him three gold and seven silver Canadian National Magazine Awards, and he has been called "one of Canada's most celebrated profile writers". Don and Our host John discuss his recently published book about Harold F. Richie.

iDigress with Troy Sandidge
Ep 71. Too Big, Too Fast, Too Broad. Why You Need To Think Smaller, Move Slower, And Be More Specific With Your Audience To Get A Yes To Your Offer.

iDigress with Troy Sandidge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 22:35


Your target audience is too big. You're moving too fast. Your sales messaging is too broad. What you need to do is think smaller, move slower, and be more specific with your offer in order to grow your business. The reality is, in many cases, we either have too much zeal or too much fear to change directions when clearly we've hit a massive roadblock that is not going away anytime soon. If you're serious about leveling up the abundance of your business now and in the years to come, you might need to hit ctrl, alt, delete, and end all tasks. Clear everything. Then reprioritize your priorities, marketing and sales efforts, and your overall business approach to how you position, present, and project the value of your offer. P.S. If you leave me a review on this podcast and share a link when the review is posted on Twitter, tagging me (@FindTroy), I will send you a free copy of my book, Strategize Up, but only to the first 10 people. One lucky person will get a free strategy session with the Strategy Hacker as well! Good luck, and happy listening! Beyond The Episode Gems:See what the HubSpot CRM can do for your business at HubSpot.comSee all of the podcasts on the HubSpot Podcast NetworkRead my article on HubSpot's Marketing Blog : 3 Reasons So Many Business Strategies Fail (And How To Succeed)Get Two Free Months of Agorapulse on me: Social.Agorapulse.com/FindTroyDiscover how Agorapulse is helping businesses measure the impact of social media and prove ROIBuy my book Strategize Up to get the blueprint for maximizing the growth potential of your business.#####Support The Podcast & Connect With Troy: • Rate & Review iDigress: iDigress.fm/Reviews• Get Strategy Solutions & Services: FindTroy.com•  Buy Troy's Book, Strategize Up: FindTroy.com/Strategize-Up•  Follow Troy on Twitter: Twitter.com/FindTroy•  Follow Troy on LinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/in/FindTroy 

Redwood Bureau
"SALESMAN" - Redwood Bureau Phenomenon #0050

Redwood Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 45:57


Viral can refer to disease, but it often refers to media. In the case of "SALESMAN", it's a horrible mixture of both to create something else. Something beyond natural and very deadly. Hosted by Josh Tomar!  https://twitter.com/tomamoto https://www.twitch.tv/tomamoto Episode Story, Intro and Outro Written by Joe Ponce! https://www.clippings.me/users/josephmponce https://www.linkedin.com/in/joseph-ponce-9ba83a78/ Episode Composed by / Episode Story Narrated by The Disciple! https://twitter.com/CP_Disciple Episode Proofreading by TDNArtist! https://twitter.com/TDNArtist Episode Artwork by Giovanni Fim! https://twitter.com/ggtfimz Subscribe on Spotify!  https://open.spotify.com/show/5OgfQg3svBwSUiU0zGqhet Please Review us on Apple Podcasts!  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/redwood-bureau/id1597996941 Find more shows like Redwood Bureau at http://eeriecast.com/ Music and sound effects used in the Redwood Bureau has or may have been provided/created by:  CO.AG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Myuu: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiSKnkKCKAQVxMUWpZQobuQ Jinglepunks: https://jinglepunks.com/ Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ Kevin MacLeod: http://incompetech.com/ Dark Music: https://soundcloud.com/darknessprevailspodcast Soundstripe: https://app.soundstripe.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

BWAAA! King of the Hill Rewatch Podcast
Season 3 Episode 01: Propane Boom II - Death of a Propane Salesman

BWAAA! King of the Hill Rewatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 83:30


Rusty and Mike talk about their love of King of the Hill and what you can expect from this episode-by-episode podcast. Season 3 Episode 01: Propane Boom II - Death of a Propane Salesman. Buckley is killed in an explosion at Mega Lo Mart. Directors - Lauren MacMullan Wesley Archer (supervising director) Writers - Mike Judge Greg Daniels Alan R. Cohen Alan Freedland Stars - Mike Judge (voice) Kathy Najimy (voice) Pamela Adlon (voice) Brittany Murphy (voice) Johnny Hardwick (voice) Jim Cummings (voice) David Herman (voice) Toby Huss (voice) Jennifer Coolidge (voice) Joanna Gleason (voice) Chuck Mangione (voice) Stephen Root (voice) Dan Butler (voice) Eloy Casados (voice) Bertila Damas (voice) Alan Freedland (voice) Maurice LaMarche (voice) Lauren Tom (voice) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Head Above Hypocrisy
Traveling Carwash Salesman

Head Above Hypocrisy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 37:56


90 Day Fiance Trash Talk
Ep 196. Traveling Pedicure Salesman

90 Day Fiance Trash Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 39:58


Kim buys an uphepful cow. Liz trespasses. Shaeeda makes a garlic smoothie. Sumit looks for someone to adopt. Michael denies Angela's cooch viewing.  90 Day Fiance Happily Ever After S7 Ep9 Youtube: www.youtube.com/c/TrashTalkPodcasts Instagram and Twitter @90daypodcast Traceycarnazzo.com Tracey Carnazzo @trixietuzzini Noelle Winters Herzog @noeygirl_ Bonus content at Patreon.com/TrashTalkPodcast dameproducts.com code FIANCE ettitude.com/fiance

Bloody Beaver
Frank James - The Old Shoe Salesman

Bloody Beaver

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 11:05


It's safe to say that a career as an outlaw doesn't lend itself to a long life. Billy the Kid was only twenty-one years old when he was killed. Cherokee Bill a year younger. The notorious Bloody Bill Anderson not yet twenty-five. Jesse James, Joaquin Murrieta, Rube Burrow, Bill Longley, the list goes on. Not a one of them over the age of forty. But of course, there are exceptions. Not ALL of the west's most dangerous men died young. Nor did they simply disappear at the turn of the 20th century. Some of ‘em stuck around and tried to adapt. This is one such story - someone you have most definitely heard of. A true legend of the old west; a killer. And yes, a shoe salesman.   Check out my website for more true tales from the wild and woolly west https://www.wildwestextra.com/   Email me! https://www.wildwestextra.com/contact/   Buy me a coffee! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wildwest   Join Patreon for bonus content! https://www.patreon.com/wildwestextra   Become a YouTube Paid Member for bonus content! https://www.youtube.com/c/WildWestExtravaganza   Join FREE Newsletter! https://wildwestjosh.substack.com/

All Things Peoria
All Things Peoria - Friday, October 28, 2022

All Things Peoria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 24:09


In today's episode, you'll hear the first story in WCBU's new transplant series: Welcome Home that covers 100 things to do in Peoria before you die. And get the latest on the Illinois Treasurer race between Democratic State Treasurer Mike Frerichs and his challenger Republican Illinois House member Tom Demmer. Plus, this week's episode of Out and About covers Corn Stock Theatre's production of the American classic, "Death of a Salesman".

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast
Brian pegged a salesman down to his knees [10-28-22, 8:00AM]

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 30:14


Let the record show, that's a quote.  Chicago's best morning radio show now has a podcast! Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts and remember that the conversation always lives on the Q101 Facebook page.  Brian, Ali, & Justin are live every morning from 6a-10a on Q101. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Salesman.org - Salesman Podcast, This Week In Sales, Sales School And More...
Value Proposition Design Framework: Find Your Ideal Buyer | Salesman Podcast

Salesman.org - Salesman Podcast, This Week In Sales, Sales School And More...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 14:51


The value proposition is a foundational component for any successful sales department. It tells salespeople like you which demographics to target. It clues you into your buyer's biggest hopes and fears. And it guides your strategy for closing deals and earning that oh-so-sweet “yes.” But what happens if your value proposition is wrong? What if the […]

All Of It
Wendell Pierce and Sharon D. Clarke in 'Death of a Salesman'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 24:48


For the first time ever on a Broadway stage, the Loman family of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" are being played by Black actors. Wendell Pierce, who stars as Willy Loman, and Sharon D. Clarke, who stars as Linda Loman, join us to discuss this interpretation of the classic play, which is running now at the Hudson Theater.

Duct Tape Marketing
The Communication Secrets Of The World's Greatest Salesman

Duct Tape Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 27:01


In this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, I interview Carmine Gallo. Carmine is the bestselling author of Talk Like TED and The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs. He is a Harvard instructor, CEO communication coach, and keynote speaker known for transforming leaders. He's the author of a new book we're talking about called – The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World's Greatest Salesman. More About Carmine Gallo: CarmineGallo.com Connect with Carmine on LinkedIn Take The Marketing Assessment: Marketing Assessment This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by the HubSpot Podcast Network.

Car Sales Talk 101
#191 Your Closing Ratio

Car Sales Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 11:12


Selling a certain number of cars is good but how do you do it and how do you sell more? The answer is increase your closing ratio. In this episode we will discuss closing and what it is, and we will talk about the things you need to do to get better.

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert
Wendell Pierce On The Timeless Themes Of Inequality In "Death of a Salesman"

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 9:56 Very Popular


Wendell Pierce stars in a new Broadway production of "Death of a Salesman," in which his character Willy Loman is African American, serving to heighten the play's message about institutional violence and the unattainable American Dream. "Death of a Salesman" is playing now at the Hudson Theater. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Paper Jam
Episode 76: Salesforce

The Paper Jam

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 72:15


Let us sell you on this episode - this week Mike & Kenny discuss their investment in Salesforce. They discuss Mike's real-world experience as a Salesman, committing to the bit, and how to remember names/faces.

Two Guys on Block Island
Ep. 78: David Lewis (Part 2)- The Codfish Tongue Salesman

Two Guys on Block Island

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 84:56


Part 2 of our chat with David Lewis

MichaelKushner
#73 - Carl Moellenberg: The Path to Survival

MichaelKushner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 57:27


“All of a sudden,” says Moellenberg. “While I was sitting there, I literally heard for about 15 - 20 minutes a deep, male voice, which I assumed was a higher being, telling me that I had a long life to live. It was going to be very productive and my purpose was to help create beauty in the world. And the suggestion was made that that beauty might be through helping to create theatre.” According to Carl, he came out at the absolutely worst time. And after being diagnosed with HIV in the 1980's, he found himself undergoing a transition. A transition of spirit, a transition of healing, and a transition from investment banker into a producer. He became many things – a Reiki master, a counselor, an ordained minister – all things focusing on what multi-hyphenating is all about.  Regardless, Moellenberg couldn't have started in a better place. The first project he invested in was Wicked and the first project he co-produced was Spring Awakening. Two very big hits. So what is a producer? What's their responsibilities? How does one become a producer? Check out this episode to learn more about what goes into producing on Broadway. Plus, in this episode check out why a ‘Why' Statement is incredibly important to have, how everyone can come together to make theatre more accessible, and learn about Carl's new book, Carl Moellenberg's Story: Broadway and Spirituality as a Path to Survival — available wherever you purchase books now. Carl began his career in banking, and after debilitating illnesses threatened his life, he took a new approach to spirituality and healing, and re-found his love and passion for Broadway. He has since gone on to be on the producing teams for some of Broadway's most successful shows: Spring Awakening, War Horse, Hair, Death of a Salesman, Pippin, All the Way, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Dear Evan Hansen, Angels in America, The Band's Visit, Oklahoma, Hadestown and Company. His aim has always been to tell compelling stories or to present stunning music which transforms people.  “I'm incredibly excited that I believe it is an inspirational story, and I believe it will encourage people that are maybe early in their career in the arts as you've been referring to. I believe it will be a story of surmounting obstacles in people's lives. That's my sole aim – I didn't write it, again, to talk about me or my career as a producer or going through each show and talking at length about all the shows I've been involved with – I did it to talk about a personal journey in hopes that my personal journey will inspire other personal journeys. That's what I'm excited about.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BroadwayRadio
This Week on Broadway for October 16, 2022: The New Broadway Revivals of Death of a Salesman and 1776

BroadwayRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 68:29 Very Popular


Peter Filichia, James Marino, and Michael Portantiere talk about the passing of Angela Lansbury. Reviews include the new Broadway revivals of Death of a Salesman and 1776. “This Week on Broadway” has been coming to you every week since 2009. It is the longest-running running Broadway and theatrical podcast with read more The post This Week on Broadway for October 16, 2022: The New Broadway Revivals of Death of a Salesman and 1776 appeared first on BroadwayRadio.

Righteous Pk Podcast
Episode 148: Death of a Phlegm Man

Righteous Pk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 24:19


J-L discusses Death of a Salesman, his Patreon and why he woke up thinking he was dying. Fun!J-L's Patreon is Patreon.com/JLCauvin

The Mundane Festival
Episode 604: A Quick One

The Mundane Festival

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 25:12


Chris talks about Death of a Salesman on Broadway, Raising Kanan, and enjoying stand-up. Website: ChrisLamberth.com Twitter: @MundaneFestival  @ChrisLamberth Patreon: Mundane Festival Email: mundanefestivalpod@gmail.com    

Two Guys on Block Island
Ep. 77: David Lewis (Part 1)- The Codfish Tongue Salesman

Two Guys on Block Island

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 55:12 Very Popular


David Lewis was born and raised on Block Island and his stories are of the stuff that draw most people to our podcast. Tales from the island's simpler days abound. From David's days as a schoolboy at the Block Island School to his college days at Harvard and beyond, one yarn spills into the next seamlessly.Although David was instrumental in starting the Land Trust, we mostly discuss the people that shaped David's life here.  And it's quite obvious that Mr. Lewis' life was filled with family and friends to whom he owes a great deal.So press play and learn about how a young entrepreneur who cornered the Codfish Tongue market at an early age went on to become one of the island's most venerable citizens.

Here & Now
Too young, too old, or just a woman?; Wendell Pierce stars in 'Death of a Salesman'

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 29:37


New York City Mayor Eric Adams the city needs tents to shelter migrants coming to the city including migrants sent by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott. Professor Felipe De La Hoz joins us. Then, "The Wire" and "Treme" actor Wendell Pierce stars as Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Death of a Salesman" which, for the first time on Broadway, centers around a Black Loman family. And, women are often seen as either too young or too old in our culture. Host Deepa Fernandes brings together two aging experts to talk about "gendered ageism."

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Stars of 'Death of a Salesman' revival on how casting impacts story

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 7:41


A new production opening on Broadway offers a different window into one of the great classics of American theater. "Death of a Salesman" has captivated audiences for more than 70 years by confronting American dreams and harsh realities. In the new production, the Loman family is Black. Jeffrey Brown talked to actors Wendell Pierce and Sharon D. Clarke for our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Andrew Schulz's Flagrant 2 with Akaash and Kaz
Schulz on Guy Accidentally Saying N-Word, Ronaldo vs Beyonce, & Try Guys Ned Fulmer CHEATING

Andrew Schulz's Flagrant 2 with Akaash and Kaz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 67:29 Very Popular


Happy Thursday flagrant family, LETS GET IT! INDULGE! 00:00 - Salesman calls Neighbor the n-word?! 08:54 - Weekend Sports Predictions 20:53 - Post Malone Breaks ribs :( 24:50 - Body Challenge - Schulz Vs Dov 28:34 - Most influential: Beyonce v Cristiano Ronaldo 39:35 - Taylor Swift rejecting the Super Bowl 43:41 - Rihanna is that guy 47:18 - The Try Guys Ned Fulmer and Boston Celtics Ime Udoka