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Congressional Dish
CD238: Losing Afghanistan

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 97:18


The war in Afghanistan is over. In this episode, we document how and why the Biden administration finally admitted defeat in our 20 year attempt to create a new government in Afghanistan and we take a hard look at the lessons we need to learn. Afghanistan is a country in a far away land, but there are disturbing similarities between the Afghanistan government that just collapsed and our own. We'd be wise not to ignore them. Executive Producer: Rachel Passer Executive Producer: Anonymous  Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD218: Minerals are the New Oil CD210: The Afghanistan War CD124: The Costs of For-Profit War How We Got Here Craig Whitlock. The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War. Simon and Schuster, 2021. Patrick Tucker. August 18, 2021. “Trump's Pledge to Exit Afghanistan Was a Ruse, His Final SecDef Says.” Defense One. Eugene Kiely and Robert Farley. August 17, 2021. “Timeline of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan.” FactCheck.org. Eric Schmitt and Jennifer Steinhauer. July 30, 2021. “Afghan Visa Applicants Arrive in U.S. After Years of Waiting.” The New York Times. Craig Whitlock, Leslie Shapiro and Armand Emamdjomeh. December 9, 2019. “The Afghanistan Papers: A secret history of the war.” The Washington Post. Mark Landler and James Risen. July 25, 2017. “Trump Finds Reason for the U.S. to Remain in Afghanistan: Minerals.” The New York Times. John F. Harris. October 15, 2001. “Bush Rejects Taliban Offer On Bin Laden ” Washington Post. The Evacuation: Those Left Behind William Mauldin. September 2, 2021. “Afghanistan Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Staff Left Behind.” Wall Street Journal. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Karni. August 29, 2021. “Series of U.S. Actions Left Afghan Allies Frantic, Stranded and Eager to Get Out.” The York Times. Sami Sadat. August 25, 2021. “I Commanded Afghan Troops This Year. We Were Betrayed.” The New York Times. Marjorie Censer. August 18, 2021. “US contractors rush to get former employees out of Afghanistan.” Defense News. Siobhan Hughes. August 18, 2021. “Afghanistan Veterans in Congress Trying to Prevent ‘a Death Warrant' for Helping America.” Wall Street Journal. Alex Sanz and Tammy Webber. August 18, 2021. “US friends try to rescue brother in arms in Afghanistan.” AP News. Seth Moulton. June 04, 2021. "Moulton, Bipartisan Honoring Our Promises Working Group to White House: Evacuate our Afghan Partners.” Contractors in Afghanistan Matt Taibbi. August 18, 2021. “We Failed Afghanistan, Not the Other Way Around.” TK News by Matt Taibbi on Substack. Jack Detsch. August 16, 2021. “Departure of Private Contractors Was a Turning Point in Afghan Military's Collapse.” Foreign Policy. Matt Stoller. July 15, 2021. “‘A Real S*** Show': Soldiers Angrily Speak Out about Being Blocked from Repairing Equipment by Contractors.” BIG by Matt Stoller. Lynzy Billing. May 12, 2021. “The U.S. Is Leaving Afghanistan? Tell That to the Contractors.” New York Magazine. Oren Liebermann. March 29, 2021. “Pentagon could open itself to costly litigation from contractors if US pulls out of Afghanistan this year.” CNN. Lucas Kunce and Elle Ekman. September 15, 2019. “Comment Submitted by Major Lucas Kunce and Captain Elle Ekman.” [Regulations.gov(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulations.gov). Aaron Mehta. Oct 25, 2016. “30 Years: William Perry — Reshaping the Industry.” Defense News. Jared Serbu. August 22, 2016. “DoD now awarding more than half its contract spending without competitive bids.” Federal News Network. 41 U.S. Code § 3307 - Preference for commercial products and commercial services. Money: Lost and Gained David Moore. August 23, 2021. “Lawmakers Benefit From Booming Defense Stocks.” Sludge. Lee Fang. August 20, 2021. “Congressman Seeking to Relaunch Afghan War Made Millions in Defense Contracting.” The Intercept. Anna Massoglia and Julia Forrest. August 20, 2021. “Defense contractors spent big in Afghanistan before the U.S. left and the Taliban took control.” OpenSecrets.org. Stephen Losey. April 16, 2021. “The Bill for the Afghanistan War Is $2.26 Trillion, and Still Rising.” Military.com. Eli Clifton. February 16, 2021. “Weapons Biz Bankrolls Experts Pushing to Keep U.S. Troops in Afghanistan.” Daily Beast. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Lobbying, 2021. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Money to Congress. Laws S.1790 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 Sponsor: Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Status: Became Public Law No: 116-92 on December 20, 2019 H.R. 3237: Emergency Security Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 Sponsor: Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) Status: Signed into law, 2021 May 20 House Vote Breakdown Congressional Budget Office Score Law Outline TITLE IV: BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXTENSION AND MODIFICATION OF THE AFGHAN SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM Sec. 401: Amends the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 to expand eligibility to include Afghans who worked not only for the US Government for more than 1 year but also our allies as an off-base interpreter or if they performed "activities for United States military stationed at International Security Assistance Force (or any successor name for such Force). Increases the number of Special Immigrant Visas (SIV) to Afghan partners by 8,000, for a total of 34,500 allocated since December 19, 2014. Sec. 402: Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security and Secretary of state to jointly waive for 1 year (maximum 2 years with an extension) the requirement that Afghan partners eligible for SIVs get a medical exam before they can receive their visa. The Secretary of Homeland Security has to create a process to make sure Afghan SIV holders get a medical exam within 30 days of entry into the United States. Sec. 403: Allows the surviving spouse or child or employee of the United States Government abroad to be eligible for immigration into the United States if the employee worked for our government for at least 15 years or was killed in the line of duty. It also expands entry permissions for Afghan SIV applicants in addition to those who have already been approved. This is retroactive to June 30, 2021. Policies for Visa Processing: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Policy Manual, Chapter 9: Certain Afghan Nationals U.S Department of State -- Bureau of Consular Affairs. “Special Immigrant Visas for Afghans - Who Were Employed by/on Behalf of the U.S. Government.” Audio Sources Gen. Mark Milley: "There was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days." August 18, 2021 General Mark Milley: The time frame of rapid collapse that was widely estimated and ranged from weeks to months, and even years following our departure, there was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days. Central Command submitted a variety of plans that were briefed and approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and the President. These plans were coordinated, synchronized and rehearsed to deal with these various scenarios. One of those contingencies is what we are executing right now. As I said before, there's plenty of time to do AARs(After Action Reviews) and key lessons learned and to delve into these questions with great detail. But right now is not that time. Right now, we have to focus on this mission, because we have soldiers at risk. And we also have American citizens and Afghans who supported us for 20 years also at risk. This is personal and we're going to get them out. President Biden on Afghanistan Withdrawal Transcript July 8, 2021 Sound Clips 01:30 President Biden: When I announced our drawdown in April, I said we would be out by September, and we're on track to meet that target. Our military mission in Afghanistan will conclude on August 31. The drawdown is proceeding in a secure and orderly way, prioritizing the safety of our troops as they depart 3:40 President Biden: Together with our NATO allies and partners, we have trained and equipped nearly 300,000 current serving members of the military, the Afghan national security force, and many beyond that are no longer serving. Add to that hundreds of thousands more Afghan national defense and security forces trained over the last two decades. 04:04 President Biden: We provided our Afghan partners with all the tools, let me emphasize, all the tools -- training, equipment -- of any modern military. We provided advanced weaponry, and we're going to continue to provide funding and equipment and we'll ensure they have the capacity to maintain their Air Force. 5:54 President Biden: We're also going to continue to make sure that we take on Afghan nationals who worked side by side with US forces, including interpreters and translators. Since we're no longer going to have military there after this, we're not going to need them and they'll have no jobs. We're [sic] also going to be vital to our efforts. they've been very vital, and so their families are not exposed to danger as well. We've already dramatically accelerated the procedure time for Special Immigrant Visas to bring them to the United States. Since I was inaugurated on January 20, we've already approved 2,500 Special Immigrant Visas to come to the United States. Up to now, fewer than half have exercised the right to do that. Half have gotten on aircraft and come commercial flights and come and other half believe they want to stay, at least thus far. We're working closely with Congress to change the authorization legislation so that we can streamline the process of approving those visas. And those who have stood up for the operation to physically relocate 1000s of Afghans and their families before the US military mission concludes so that, if they choose, they can wait safely outside of Afghanistan, while their US visas are being processed. 8:13 President Biden: For those who have argued that we should stay just six more months, or just one more year, I asked them to consider the lessons of recent history. In 2011, the NATO allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. In 2014, some argued one more year. So we kept fighting. We kept taking casualties. In 2015, the same, and on and on. Nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year of fighting in Afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely. It's up to the Afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. Others are more direct. Their argument is that we should stay with the Afghans and Afghanistan indefinitely. In doing so they point to the fact that we we have not taken losses in this last year. So they claim that the cost of just maintaining the status quo is minimal. 9:19 President Biden: But that ignores the reality, and the facts that already presented on the ground in Afghanistan when I took office. The Taliban is at its strongest militarily since 2001. The number of US forces in Afghanistan had been reduced to a bare minimum. And the United States and the last administration made an agreement that they have to with the Taliban remove all our forces by May 1 of this year. That's what I inherited. That agreement was the reason the Taliban had ceased major attacks against US forces. 9:55 President Biden: If in April, I had instead announced that the United States was going to go back on that agreement, made by the last administration, the United States and allied forces will remain in Afghanistan for the foreseeable future, the Taliban would have again begun to target our forces. The status quo was not an option. Staying would have meant US troops taking casualties, American men and women back in the middle of a civil war, and we would run the risk of having to send more troops back in Afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. Once that agreement with the Taliban had been made, staying with a bare minimum force was no longer possible. 10:34 President Biden: So let me ask those who want us to stay: how many more? How many 1000s more Americans' daughters and sons are you willing to risk? How long would you have them stay? Already we have members of our military whose parents fought in Afghanistan 20 years ago. Would you send their children and their grandchildren as well? Would you send your own son or daughter? After 20 years, a trillion dollars spent training and equipping hundreds of 1000s of Afghan National Security and Defence Forces. 2,448 Americans killed, 20,722 more wounded, and untold 1000s coming home with unseen trauma to their mental health. I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome. 11:51 President Biden: Today the terrorist threat has metastasized beyond Afghanistan. So, we are repositioning our resources and adapting our counterterrorism posture to meet the threats where they are now: significantly higher in South Asia, the Middle East and Africa. 12:07 President Biden: But make no mistake, our military and intelligence leaders are confident they have the capabilities to protect the homeland and our interests from any resurgent terrorist challenge emerging or emanating from Afghanistan. We're developing a counterterrorism over-the-horizon capability that will allow us to keep our eyes firmly fixed at any direct threat to the United States in the region and act quickly and decisively if needed. 12:38 President Biden: We also need to focus on shoring up America's core strengths to meet the strategic competition competition with China and other nations that is really going to determine our future. 14:58 Reporter: Is the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan now inevitable? President Biden: No. It is not. Because you have the Afghan troops, 300,000. Well equipped, as well equipped as any army in the world, and an air force against something like 75,000 Taliban. It is not inevitable. 15:45 President Biden: Do I trust the Taliban? No, but I trust the capacity of the Afghan military who is better trained, better equipped, and more competent in terms of conducting war. 18:07 Reporter: Your own intelligence community has assessed that the Afghan government will likely collapse President Biden: That is not true 18:53 President Biden: And I want to make clear what I made clear to Ghani, that we are not going to walk away and not sustain their ability to maintain that force. We are. We're going to also work to make sure we help them in terms of everything from food necessities and other things in the region. But there is not a conclusion that in fact, they cannot defeat the Taliban. I believe the only way there's going to be -- this is now Joe Biden, not the intelligence community -- the only way there's only going to be peace and secure in Afghanistan, is that they work out a modus vivendi with the Taliban, and they make a judgement as to how they can make peace. And the likelihood there's going to be one unified government in Afghanistan, controlling the whole country is highly unlikely. 21:30 Reporter: Mr. President, how serious was the corruption among the Afghanistan government to this mission failing there? President Biden: First of all, the mission hasn't failed yet. 22:00 President Biden: There were going to be negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan national security forces, and the Afghan government that didn't come to fruition. So the question now is where do they go from here? The jury is still out, but the likelihood there's going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely. 23:20 Reporter: Mr. President, "speed is safety," as you just said in your remarks. Are you satisfied with the timeline of relocating Afghan nationals? Is it happening quickly enough to your satisfaction if it may not happen until next month at the end? President Biden: It has already happened, there have already been people, about 1000 people have gotten on aircraft and come to the United States already on commercial aircraft. So as I said, there's over 2500 people, that as from January to now, have have gotten those visas and only half decided that they wanted to leave. The point is that I think the whole process has to be speeded up -- period -- in terms of being able to get these visas. Reporter: Why can't the US evacuate these Afghan translators to the United States to await their visa processing as some immigrants of the southern border have been allowed to? President Biden: Because the law doesn't allow that to happen. And that's why we're asking the Congress to consider changing the law. President Biden Remarks on Afghanistan Strategy Transcript April 14, 2021 Sound Clips 00:38 President Biden: I'm speaking to you today from the Roosevelt -- the Treaty room in the White House -- the same spot where in October of 2001, President George W. Bush informed our nation that the United States military had begun strikes on terrorist training camps in Afghanistan. It was just weeks, just weeks after the terrorist attack on our nation that killed 2,977 innocent souls, that turned Lower Manhattan into a disaster area, destroyed parts of the Pentagon and made hallowed ground in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and sparked an American promise that we would never forget. We went to Afghanistan in 2001, to root out al Qaeda to prevent future terrorist attacks against the United States planned from Afghanistan. Our objective was clear, the cause was just, our NATO allies and partners rallied beside us. And I supported that military action along with the overwhelming majority of the members of Congress. More than seven years later, in 2008 weeks before we swore the oath of office -- President Obama and I were about to swear -- President Obama asked me to travel to Afghanistan and report back on the state of the war in Afghanistan. I flew to Afghanistan to the Kunar Valley, a rugged, mountainous region on the border of Pakistan. What I saw on that trip reinforced my conviction that only the Afghans have the right and responsibility to lead their country. And that more and endless American military force could not create or sustain a durable Afghan Government. I believed that our presence in Afghanistan should be focused on the reason we went in the first place: to ensure Afghanistan would not be used as a base from which to attack our homeland again. We did that, we accomplished that objective. I said, along with others, we would follow Osama bin Laden to the gates of hell if need be. That's exactly what we did. And we got him. It took us close to 10 years to put President Obama's commitment into form. And that's exactly what happened Osama bin Laden was gone. That was 10 years ago. Think about that. We delivered justice to Bin Laden a decade ago. And we've stayed in Afghanistan for a decade since. Since then, our reasons for remaining in Afghanistan have become increasingly unclear, even as the terrorist threat that we went to fight evolved. Over the past 20 years, the threat has become more dispersed, metastasizing around the globe. Al Shabaab in Somalia, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, on Al Nusra in Syria, ISIS attempting to create a caliphate in Syria and Iraq and establishing affiliates in multiple countries in Africa and Asia. With the terror threat now in many places, keeping 1000s of troops grounded and concentrated in just one country at a cost of billions each year makes little sense to me and our leaders. We cannot continue the cycle of extending or expanding our military presence in Afghanistan, hoping to create ideal conditions for the withdraw and expecting a different result. I'm now the fourth United States President to preside over American troop presence in Afghanistan: two Republicans, two Democrats. I will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth. After consulting closely with our allies and partners, with our military leaders and intelligence personnel, with our diplomats and our development experts, with the Congress and the Vice President, as well as with Mr. Ghani and many others around the world. I concluded that it's time to end America's longest war. It's time for American troops to come home. 5:01 President Biden: When I came to office, I inherited a diplomatic agreement, duly negotiated between the government of the United States and the Taliban, that all US forces would be out of Afghanistan by May 1 2021, just three months after my inauguration. That's what we inherited. That commitment is perhaps not what I would have negotiated myself, but it was an agreement made by the United States government. And that means something. So in keeping with that agreement, and with our national interest, the United States will begin our final withdrawal beginning on May 1 of this year. 8:11 President Biden: You all know that less than 1% of Americans serve in our Armed Forces. The remaining 99%, we owe them. We owe them. They've never backed down from a single mission that we've asked of them. I've witnessed their bravery firsthand during my visits to Afghanistan. They've never wavered in their resolve. They paid a tremendous price on our behalf and they have the thanks of a grateful nation. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) High-Risk List Center for Strategic and International Studies Transcript March 10, 2021 Speaker: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Sound Clips 7:40 John Sopko: But right now, that state is under threat. In the wake of the February 2020 withdrawal agreement, all is not well. Compromise appears in short supply on either side. Taliban attacks have actually increased since the agreement was signed. Assassination of prominent officials, activists, journalists, aid workers and others have also increased, including an unsuccessful attack on one of the female members of the peace negotiating team. And the Taliban offensive on Kandahar city last October, as peace negotiations were ongoing, may well have succeeded, were it not for U.S. air support. Peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban have achieved little for Afghanistan so far, and only time will tell as to whether the new Biden administration initiative will bear fruit. And the Afghan people's fears for its own government survival are exacerbated by the knowledge of how dependent their country is on foreign military and financial support. 12:56 John Sopko: Another equally serious threat to Afghanistan's stability has also largely been ignored as we focus on the boots on the ground in Afghanistan. And that is the provision of last year's U.S.-Taliban agreement that stipulates that in addition to the departure of U.S. and coalition troops, or non-diplomatic civilian personnel: private security contractors, trainers, advisors, and supporting service personnel also must leave the country by May 1. Should this come to passSIGAR and many others believe this may be more devastating to the effectiveness of the Afghan security forces than the withdrawal of our remaining troops. Why is that? Because the Afghan government relies heavily on these foreign contractors and trainers to function. In the first quarter of fiscal year 2021 there are over 18,000 Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan, including 6000 Americans, and 7,000 3rd country nationals, 40% of whom are responsible for logistics, maintenance, or training tasks. Now, it is well known that the Afghan security forces need these contractors to maintain their equipment, manage supply chains, and train their military and police to operate the advanced equipment that we have purchased for them. For example, as of December, the Afghan National Army was completing just under 20% of its own maintenance work orders, well below the goal of 80% that was set and the 51% that they did in 2018. So that's actually going down. The Afghan National Police were just as bad if not worse, undertaking only 12% of their own maintenance work against a target of 35% and less than the 16% that we reported in our 2019 high risk list. Additionally, and more troubling. The Department of Defense does train, advise and assist command air, or commonly called TAC air recently reported that since late 2019, they have reduced their personnel in Afghanistan by 94%, and that the military drawdown now requires near total use of contract support to maintain the Afghan Air fleet. They assess that quote “further drawdown in the associated closure basis will effectively end all in country aviation training contracts in Afghanistan.” Again, why is this significant? Why do we view this as a high risk? Namely because contractors currently provide 100% of the maintenance for the Afghan Air Force, UAE 60 helicopters and CE 130 cargo aircraft and a significant portion of Afghans Light Combat Support aircraft. TAC air this January gave a bleak assessment, namely, that no Afghan airframe can be sustained as combat effective for more than a few months in the absence of contractor support. 17:51 John Sopko: Continued funding for U.S. reconstruction programs aimed at promoting economic development, rule of law, respect for human rights, good governance and security for the Afghan people may be more significant, because it may be the primary lever left for the US and other donors to influence that country. It appears that even the Taliban understand Afghanistan's dire need for foreign assistance. Because, as one of the few commitments that the US had to make last year was, “to seek economic cooperation for reconstruction, with the new post settlement, Afghan Islamic government.” Now how much the donor community wishes to stay involved will of course depend on what that government looks like and how it behaves. Numerous officials, including then Secretary of State Pompeo and Ambassador Halley, have stated that the US will be able to advance its human rights goals, including the rights of women and girls with the Taliban by leveraging or conditioning this much needed financial assistance. But unfortunately, as SIGAR has long reported, even when conditionality involved only dealing with the Afghan government, donors do not have a stellar record of successfully utilizing that conditionality to influence Afghan behavior. 27:19 John Sopko: Today our report suggests the donor community should realize the Afghan government is focused on a single goal, its survival. Afghanistan is more dependent on international support than ever before. It may not be an overstatement that if foreign assistance is withdrawn and peace negotiations fail, Taliban forces could be at the gates of Kabul in short order. Hearing: A PATHWAY FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN: EXAMINING THE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE AFGHANISTAN STUDY GROUP House Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on National Security February 19, 2021 Testimony was heard from the following Afghanistan Study Group officials: Kelly A. Ayotte, Co-Chair; News Corp Board of Directors since April 2017 BAE Systems Board of Directors since June 2017 Blackstone Board of Directors Boston Properties Board of Directors Caterpillar Board of Directors Board of Advisors at Cirtronics General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (Retired), Co-Chair Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the Obama and Trump presidencies. Lockheed Martin Board of Directors since February 2020 Nancy Lindborg, Co-Chair President and CEO of the David Lucile Packard Foundation Former President and CEO of the US Institute for Peace Former Assistant Administrator for the bureau for democracy conflict and humanitarian assistance at USAID During the mid-Obama years. Sound Clips 3:13 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I'd also like to take a moment to thank the nonpartisan US Institute of Peace for the support and expertise they provided to the study group during the course of its work. 3:23 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In the fiscal year 2020 omnibus bill Congress led by Senator Graham Senator Patrick Leahy and the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee of state foreign ops and related programs. They tasked the independent and bipartisan Afghanistan study group to quote, consider the implications of a peace settlement or the failure to reach a settlement on US policy, resources and commitments in Afghanistan. After nearly nine months of review and consultation with current and former US and Afghan government officials, allies and partners and other key stakeholders, the Afghanistan study group issued its final report earlier this month. 15:12 Kelly Ayotte: We recommend that US troops remain beyond may 1. We believe a precipitous withdrawal of US and international troops in May, would be catastrophic for Afghanistan, leading to civil war, and allow the reconstitution of terror groups which threaten the United States within an 18 to 36 month period. 15:41 Kelly Ayotte: Let me be clear, although we recommend that our troops remain beyond may 1, we propose a new approach toward Afghanistan, which aligns our policies, practices and messaging across the United States government to support the Afghan peace process, rather than prosecute a war. Our troops would remain not to fight a forever war, but to guarantee the conditions for a successful peace process and to protect our national security interests to ensure that Afghanistan does not become a haven again, for terrorists who threaten the United States of America. 37:15 General Joseph F. Dunford: Do we need to increase forces if the Taliban don't accept an extension past the first of May, and if they then would re initiate attacks against US forces? and Chairman, we heard exactly what you heard. In the fall. What we were told by commanders on the ground in the department of fence was that 4500 US forces, in addition to the NATO forces that are there was the minimum level to address both the mission as well as protection of our forces in the context of the conditions that existed in the fall in as you've highlighted, those conditions have only gotten worse since the fall so in in our judgment 2500 would not be adequate. Should the Taliban re initiate attacks against the United States Hearing: Examining the Trump Administration's Afghanistan Strategy House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on National Security January 28, 2020 Witness: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) Sound Clips 48:54 John Sopko: We've almost created a system that forces people in the government to give happy talk success stories because they're over there on very short rotations. They want to show success. The whole system is almost geared to give you, and it goes up the chain of command, all the way to the President sometimes. He gets bad information from people out in the field because somebody on a nine month rotation, he has to show success, and that goes up. 54:24 John Sopko: Maybe incentivize honesty. And one of the proposals I gave at that time,be cause I was asked by the staff to come up with proposals, is put the same requirement on the government that we impose on publicly traded corporations. Publicly traded corporations have to tell the truth. Otherwise the SEC will indict the people involved. They have to report when there's a significant event. So put that onus, call it The Truth in Government Act if you want, that you in the administration are duty bound by statute to alert Congress to significant events that could directly negatively impact a program or process. So incentivize honesty. 1:10:25 John Sopko: Over 70% of the Afghan budget comes from the United States and the donors. If that money ended, I have said before and I will stand by it, then the Afghan government will probably collapse. Wartime Contracting Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs September 21, 2011 Witnesses: Charles Tiefer: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Clark Kent Ervin: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Sound Clips 1:11:30 Charles Tiefer: Our private security in Afghanistan appears to be a major source of payoffs to the Taliban. Our report has the first official statement that it's the second-largest source of money for the Taliban. Sen. Carl Levin: After drugs. Charles Tiefer: After drugs, that's right. 1:25:18 Clark Kent Ervin: It's critical that the government have a choice, and that means that there needs to be at least a small and expandable, organic capacity on the part of these three agencies to perform missions themselves, so the next time there's a contingency, the government has a choice between going with contractors and going in-house and the determination can be made whether it's more effective to do it either way, whether it's cheaper to do it either way. As we said at the inception, right now the government doesn't have an option. Contractors are the default option because they're the only option. President George W. Bush announces U.S. Military Strikes on Afghanistan October 7, 2001 President George W. Bush: Good afternoon. On my orders, the United States military has begun strikes against Al-Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. These carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of Afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations and to attack the military capability of the Taliban regime. More than two weeks ago, I gave Taliban leaders a series of clear and specific demands: close terrorist training camps, hand over leaders of the Al-Qaeda network, and return all foreign nationals including American citizens unjustly detained in your country. None of these demands were met and now the Taliban will pay a price by destroying camps and disrupting communications. We will make it more difficult for the terror network to train new recruits and coordinate their evil plans. ** International Campaign Against Terrorism Senate Foreign Relations Committee October 25, 2001 Witness: Colin Powell: Secretary of State Sound Clip 27:00 Colin Powell: Our work in Afghanistan though, is not just of a military nature. We recognize that when the Al Qaeda organization has been destroyed in Afghanistan, and as we continue to try to destroy it in all the nations in which it exists around the world, and when the Taliban regime has gone to its final reward, we need to put in place a new government in Afghanistan, one that represents all the people of Afghanistan and one that is not dominated by any single powerful neighbor, but instead is dominated by the will of the people of Afghanistan. Executive Producer Recommendations Elect Stephanie Gallardo 2022 Krystal Kyle and Friends. August 21, 2021. “Episode 35 Audio with Matthew Hoh.” Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

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Business Drive
Afghan Leaders To Meet Biden At The White House

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 1:13


Afghan leaders Ashraf Ghani and Abdullah Abdullah will meet United States President Joe Biden at the White House on Friday for a high-stake discussion likely to shape Afghanistan's future as the US withdraws forces nearly 20 years after invading.President Biden is expected to offer assurances of US backing for the Afghan government in Kabul and is likely to press Ghani and Abdullah to unify their rival political factions in the face of rising Taliban assaults, analysts say.Ghani and Abdullah are expected to appeal to Biden for specific and concrete pledges of financial and diplomatic support, including continued technical assistance for embattled Afghan military forces.Director of the Afghanistan programme at the US Institute of Peace, Scott Worden, says the security situation is alarming and it's deteriorating.

News Express
Afghan Leaders To Meet Biden At The White House

News Express

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 1:13


Afghan leaders Ashraf Ghani and Abdullah Abdullah will meet United States President Joe Biden at the White House on Friday for a high-stake discussion likely to shape Afghanistan's future as the US withdraws forces nearly 20 years after invading.President Biden is expected to offer assurances of US backing for the Afghan government in Kabul and is likely to press Ghani and Abdullah to unify their rival political factions in the face of rising Taliban assaults, analysts say.Ghani and Abdullah are expected to appeal to Biden for specific and concrete pledges of financial and diplomatic support, including continued technical assistance for embattled Afghan military forces.Director of the Afghanistan programme at the US Institute of Peace, Scott Worden, says the security situation is alarming and it's deteriorating.

Diplomacy Games
Interview with Isabelle Vladoiu

Diplomacy Games

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2021 68:10


The guys interview Isabella Vladoiu from US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights about how the game relates to real life Diplomacy. Plus they discuss their games and a public service announcement from all Mods. Intro and Diplomacy news The guys are still at the Empire Hotel.  Amby disses Google.  They do a drinks update (0 mins 10 secs) They give a Diplomacy face to face update and ideas to get more people into the game (3 mins 30 secs) Interview with Isabelle Vladoiu from US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights The guys set the scene for their interview with Isabelle Vladoiu, founder of US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights, a not for profit organization (6 mins 30 secs) Kaner and Amby welcome Isabelle to the show. Kaner asks about the sort of work she does (7 mins 30 secs) Kaner reflects on reputation and asks how a diplomatic negotiation takes place (12 mins 30 secs) Amby asks about soft skills in breaking through an impasse and re-establishing trust (17 mins) Amby asks Isabelle about her understanding of the game Diplomacy (19 mins 30 secs) Kaner touches on Isabelle's point about linguistic barriers, and throws to Amby to discuss his previous experience with Google Translate Diplomacy (24 mins 45 secs) Kaner asks about backdoor diplomacy, they go onto discuss deliberate false statements (30 mins) They start wrapping up the interview reflecting on the role of etiquette and where listeners can learn more about US Institute of Diplomacy and Human Rights (38 mins) The guys reflect back on the interview and their thoughts on its application to the game Diplomacy (40 mins 45 secs) Ar-Kansas chat Amby gives Kaner an update on the pronunciation of Arkansas (45 mins 30 secs) Around the grounds Kaner asks Amby about how he's going in their joint game "Ratty Bastards 2" (49 mins 30 secs) Amby reflects on the fog of war nature of the game (52 mins 15 secs) Amby talks about his other anonymous game, "DSA" a Divided States game (56 mins 15 secs) Public service announcement As a Mod at vDip, Kaner gives an example of what NOT to do when dealing with mods at webDip, playDip, Backstabbr etc (1 hr 0 mins) The guys wrap up the show (1 hr 8 mins) Venues: Empire Hotel, Brisbane Drinks of choice: Kaner: Mahogany American Brown Ale by Brendale Brewing Company Amby: Maxwell's Silver Hammer shiraz from the McLaren Vale Just a reminder you can support the show by giving it 5 stars on iTunes or Stitcher. And don't forget if you want to help improve the audio equipment... or get the guys more drunk, you can also donate at Patreon, plus you get extra podcast episodes! Lastly, don't forget to subscribe so you get the latest Diplomacy Games episodes straight to your phone. Thanks as always to Dr Dan aka "The General" for his rockin' intro tune.

FORward Radio program archives
Solutions To Violence | Drs. Darren Kew & Karen Ross | May 10, 2021

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 53:13


Solutions to Violence features Dr. Darren Kew and Dr. Karen Ross. Darren Kew has been a consultant on democracy and peace initiatives to the United Nations, the US Institute of Peace, USAID (US Agency for International Development), the US State Department, and to a number of NGOs (Non-Governmental Organizations) , including the Carter Center in a 1999 effort by former President Carter to mediate conflicts in Nigeria. Karen Ross is an assistant professor in the Department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security, and Global Governance and a senior fellow at the Center for Peace, Democracy, and Development, both at the McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. Karen's teaching and research focuses on issues at the intersection of dialogue, peace-building, social activism, and education. She conducts basic and applied research to help understand the impact of grassroots peace-building interventions and the way these interventions fit into societal level peace-building efforts.

Wall Street Weekly – Podcast mit Sophie Schimansky
Der große Krypto-Kick - Express

Wall Street Weekly – Podcast mit Sophie Schimansky

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 3:25


Außerdem: Beeindruckende Bank-Bilanzen.Der heutige Handelstag ist in vielfacher Hinsicht spannend, da diverse Impulsgeber für Bewegung sorgen. Im Mittelpunkt steht der Börsengang der Kryptowährungsplattform Coinbase. Es ist ein Meilenstein in der Geschichte der Digitalwährungen, deren Akzeptanz deutlich gesteigert werden könnte. Der Bitcoin hat schon vor dem Listing ein weiteres Mal reagiert und ist erneut auf eine Rekordmarke geklettert.Ein weiterer Fokus liegt auf den Banken, die heute in die neue Berichtssaison gestartet sind. Die ersten Zahlen der führenden US-Institute sehen gut aus. Wie stark deren Aktien in Bewegung geraten, hört ihr in der heutigen Ausgabe.Darüber hinaus geht der Blick nach Deutschland, wo SAP neue Zahlen vorgelegt hat. Das baden-württembergische Software-Unternehmen geht deshalb mit der Aktie des Tages in die Analyse.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Burning Man LIVE
Bonus Episode: Culturally Attuned with the US Institute of Peace

Burning Man LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 24:37


It’s true. Really. The United States has an Institute of Peace. It’s also true that they partnered with Burning Man Project to create a new podcast called Culturally Attuned, about how we can all work effectively across our world’s cultural divides. That podcast complements USIP’s online, self-paced course on Cultural Synergy. Stuart talks with the Executive Director of the Institute about cultivating the skills to do good work in a diverse world. They share an episode featuring Kim Cook, Burning Man Project’s Director of Strategic Initiatives. The title of that episode is: Stay in the circle: Patient listening can connect across cultureshttps://www.usip.org/culturally-attunedhttps://www.usip.org/academy/catalog/cultural-synergyLIVE.BURNINGMAN.ORG

The Newsmakers Video
Afghan Peace Process

The Newsmakers Video

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 25:40


In 2001 the US military entered Afghanistan to oust the Taliban from power. But twenty years later, US and Afghan authorities are struggling to negotiate peace with the very insurgents they once hoped to eliminate. Washington says it wants out of ‘endless wars', but it's also acutely aware that instability in Afghanistan creates a security threat for the US. The Trump Administration set May 1st as the deadline for pulling out all foreign troops, but with that date quickly approaching and intra-Afghan peace talks struggling, will the US really be able to withdraw from Afghanistan as soon as it agreed to? Guests: Javid Faisal Adviser to Afghanistan's National Security Council Luke Coffey Foreign Policy Studies Director at The Heritage Foundation Johnny Walsh Senior Afghanistan Expert at the US Institute of Peace Habiba Sarabi Only Female Member of the Afghan Government's Peace Negotiation Team

Studio Sherpas
220: How to Build a Better Business by Cutting Back w/ Wesley Dean

Studio Sherpas

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 48:21


If only you had that one piece of gear you could take your business to the next level, right? Well, more often than not, you’ll just end up spending money on something that won’t truly help move your business. Today’s guest and I talk about the most important factors when considering a new expense so that you can actually focus on what’s best for your business. Key Takeaways When trying to find your niche, think about different areas of expertise that you have that overlap. This will set you apart more from your competition and allow you to play to your strengths.  There are likely parts of your business that are unnecessary. Cut those out not only to save money but to give you enough bandwidth to focus on the truly important parts of your business. About Wesley Dean The founder of InterMotion Media, Wesley Dean has a passion for helping nonprofits, churches, higher education, and development organizations succeed. He loves the work that they are doing to make the world a better place and wants to see them succeed. He has traveled around the world from the Andes mountains in Ecuador to the rice paddies of Cambodia, helping nonprofits communicate the impact of their work. Wesley is also passionate about helping educate people as well as inform, which is why InterMotion Media has produced a large number of online courses in partnership with the US Institute of People, the United Nations, and the World Bank. Focusing on what you and your business really need With a decade of experience as a business owner, Wesley has learned a lot of lessons. He shares how he learned the need to create a refined hiring-process, the importance of proper team management, and the true meaning of success. More than anything, Wesley understands the need to take care of yourself as a business owner. A great way to go about this is to seriously think about the unnecessary parts of your business. What’s sucking up resources and time that you could do without? Once that’s identified, you can get rid of it and focus on the more important things. How your business can do more with less One thing that Wesley understands is how constraints lead to solutions. Instead of buying gear you don’t need or hiring an employee you can’t afford, consider how you can accomplish the same thing with fewer resources.  When you know what your business doesn’t need, you can better focus on your actual vision. Niching down, identifying your ideal client, developing strategy, and so much more can happen once all the unnecessary noise, expenses, and distractions are jettisoned. What unnecessary expense can you cut from your business? How can you utilize overlapping skills to create a new niche?  Leave a comment on the episode page!   In This Episode: How a career in video allows you to create the work that excites you the most [5:10] Discovering the unnecessary parts of your business and getting rid of them [12:40] Utilizing the power of community and a mentor to help with big decisions [21:12] Challenges and solutions to niching down [26:30] Leveraging the advantage of warm leads during downturns in business [36:48]   Quotes “Focus on yourself. Focus on making sure you’re profitable and taking care of yourself as a business owner.” [14:40] “Take care of yourself. Make sure you’re paying yourself first versus assuming that buying the latest camera or having a bigger studio is going to automatically lead to more work.” [16:22] “You just have to be exponentially better at one particular thing in order for people to actually want to involve you on the strategy side of things.” [33:10]   Links: Get access to the free Client Budget Workshop Join the Onward Summit Waitlist Core Storyblocks Find Wesley Dean online Follow Wesley on Instagram | Facebook | Linkedin InterMotion Media Your Video Roadmap Profit First By Mike Michalowicz   Additional Links: Check out the full show notes page Do you have something to share on this podcast? Fill out this form here. Be sure to take the Studio Sherpas survey for a chance to win some incredible prizes (if we do say so ourselves!) Stay up to date with everything we're doing at Studio Sherpas Tune in to our weekly Facebook Lives Follow Studio Sherpas on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram If you haven't already, we'd love it if you would take 1 minute to leave us a review on iTunes!

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Biden Administration Resumes Talks With Taliban

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 12:20


The State Department has announced negotiations with the Taliban and the Afghan government will resume in Qatar. The Biden administration looks to be reviewing a deal made by the Trump administration while the Taliban has warned any change to a promised May 1st exit deal would 'doom' talks.  FOX’s Trey Yingst speaks with Scott Worden, the Director of the Afghanistan and Central Asia programs at the US Institute of Peace, about the peace negotiations and the difficult balancing act of keeping Afghanistan stable and out of a civil war.       

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
Evening Edition: Biden Administration Resumes Talks With Taliban

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 12:20


The State Department has announced negotiations with the Taliban and the Afghan government will resume in Qatar. The Biden administration looks to be reviewing a deal made by the Trump administration while the Taliban has warned any change to a promised May 1st exit deal would 'doom' talks.  FOX's Trey Yingst speaks with Scott Worden, the Director of the Afghanistan and Central Asia programs at the US Institute of Peace, about the peace negotiations and the difficult balancing act of keeping Afghanistan stable and out of a civil war.       

#7TageMaerkte
Ausblick KW02 - US-Banken, Teamviewer, CES, Wirecard-Untersuchungsausschuss

#7TageMaerkte

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2021 18:08


In der zweiten Kalenderwoche des neuen Jahres liegt ein wesentlicher Fokus auf den US-Banken J.P. Morgan Chase, Citigroup, Wells Fargo und PNC, die mit ihrer jeweiligen Zahlenvorlage den Startschuss zur Berichtssaison geben. Norbert Kuls, New Yorker Korrespondent der Börsen-Zeitung, erläutert im Gespräch mit Franz Công Bùi die Lage und die Perspektiven der US-Institute. Weitere Themen, die in der kommenden Woche viel Aufmerksamkeit auf sich ziehen werden, sind Teamviewer, die Konsumelektronikmesse CES sowie der Untersuchungsausschuss zu Wirecard.

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Recent Peace Agreements Change The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2020 12:31


Recent peace deals between Israel and Arab countries have not included the Palestinians. The Palestinians have viewed those deals as somewhat of an betrayal by other Arab states but future deals could hinge on making progress in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. FOX’s Trey Yingst speaks with Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen, the Director of Israeli Palestinian Conflict program at the US Institute of Peace, about the ever changing peace process between Israel and the Palestinians. 

Level 3: Stories from the Heart of Humanitarian Crises
RH Episode 6 | Multilateral reform

Level 3: Stories from the Heart of Humanitarian Crises

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2020 59:10


As we close out a year in which the UN marked its 75th anniversary, we’re taking a hard look at whether reform of multilateral agencies has a chance. Two guests with extensive backgrounds in diplomacy and international service are joining co-hosts Heba Aly and Jeremy Konyndyk on this sixth episode of Rethinking Humanitarianism, the podcast series exploring the future of aid. Fabrizio Hochschild-Drummond, UN under secretary general and special advisor on the UN 75th anniversary, looks at areas of resistance as well as progress in the reform agenda, drawing on his long experience within the UN and in the field. Ambassador Hesham Youssef, a career diplomat with the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and now a senior fellow at the US Institute of Peace, discusses power and the influence of southern blocs over the reform process and political agendas. Join them in this episode to delve into just what it is about the governance and power structures of multilateral agencies that makes reform so difficult.

Congressional Dish
CD225: Targets of the Free Marketeers

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 117:35


While the focus of the world has been on the COVID-19 pandemic, Congress has been busy preparing a war authorization for the incoming Joe Biden administration. In this episode, we examine the advice given to Congress in nine recent hearings to learn which countries are on the World Trade System naughty list, as Jen prepares to read the NDAA that's soon to become law. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Click here to contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank’s online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536 Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Episodes CD208: The Brink of the Iran War CD195: Yemen CD191: The Democracies of Elliott Abrams CD190: A Coup for Capitalism CD186: National Endowment for Democracy CD167: Combating Russia NDAA CD131: Bombing Libya Bills H.R.526: Cambodia Democracy Act of 2019 Congress.gov H.Res.751: Reaffirming the partnership between the United States and the African Union and recognizing the importance of diplomatic, security, and trade relations. Congress.gov H.Res.1120: Urging the Government of Tanzania and all parties to respect human rights and constitutional rights and ensure free and fair elections in October 2020, and recognizing the importance of multi-party democracy in Tanzania Congress.gov H.Res.1183: Supporting respect for human rights and encouraging continued democratic progress in Ethiopia, and for other purposes. Congress.gov Articles/Documents Article: Belarus Will Be an Early Challenge for Biden, By Gregory Feifer, Slate, December 18, 2020 Article: Expanded "America Crece" Initiative Launch Event, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, December 17, 2020 Article: Court Finds Evidence of Crimes Against Humanity in the Philippines, By Jason Gutierrez, The New York Times, December 15, 2020 Article: 2,596 Trades in One Term: Inside Senator Perdue’s Stock Portfolio, By Stephanie Saul, Kate Kelly and Michael LaForgia, The New York Times, December 2, 2020 Article: Africa: From caravan networks to investment projects, By Ahmet Kavas, Daily Sabah, November 25, 2020 Article: Ethiopia’s Problems Will Not End with a Military Victory, By Aly Verjee, United States Institute of Peace, November 24, 2020 Article: Tanzania: Repression Mars National Elections, Human Rights Watch, November 23, 2020 Article: DoD Policy Chief Quits As Leadership Vacuum Expands, By Paul McLeary, DefenseNews, November 10, 2020 Article: Biden landing team for Pentagon announced, By Aaron Mehta, DefenseNews, November 10, 2020 Article: Africa in the news: Unrest in Ethiopia, contentious elections results in Tanzania and Côte d’Ivoire, and a new UK-Kenya trade deal By Payce Madden, Brookings, November 7, 2020 Article: US doing its best to lock China out of Latin America By Vijay Prashad, Asia Times, November 4, 2020 Article: Ethiopia Proposes Holding Postponed Vote in May or June 2021: FANA By Addis Ababa, Reuters, October 30, 2020 Press Release: Crisis in Mali, By Alexis Arieff, Congressional Research Service, October 21, 2020 Article: América Crece: Washington's new investment push in Latin America By Jeff Abbott, Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador, October 8, 2020 Article: Ethiopian Region Holds Local Elections in Defiance of Prime Minister By Simon Marks and Abdi Latif Dahir, The New York Times, September 10, 2020 Article: IRI Expert Discusses COVID-19, Protecting Democracy in Europe and Protests in Belarus in Testimony to House Foreign Affairs Committee International Republican Institute, September 10, 2020 Article: Nile dam row: US cuts aid to Ethiopia, BBC News, September 3, 2020 Press Release: Belarus: An Overview, By Cory Welt, Congressional Research Service, August 24, 2020 Press Release: Rep. Omar Leads Letter to Condemn Trump Administration’s Plan to Invest in Controversial Projects in Honduras, Ilhan Omar, August 13, 2020 Article: China Dominates Bid for Africa’s Largest Dam in New Pact By Pauline Bax and Michael Kavanagh, Bloomberg Green, August 7, 2020 Article: Nile dam row: Egypt fumes as Ethiopia celebrates By Magdi Abdelhadi, BBC News, July 29, 2020 Article: Remarks by CEO Boehler at the América Crece Event With President Hernández of the Republic of Honduras U.S. International Development Finance Corporation, July 21, 2020 Article: Can Malian President Keita survive growing anti-gov’t protests? By Hamza Mohamed, Aljazeera, July 10, 2020 Article: Pundits with undisclosed funding from arms manufacturers urge ‘stronger force posture’ to counter China By Eli Clifton, Responsible Statecraft, May 14, 2020 Article: The Three Seas Initiative explained By David A. Wemer, Atlantic Council, February 11, 2020 Article: FORMER OBAMA OFFICIALS HELP SILICON VALLEY PITCH THE PENTAGON FOR LUCRATIVE DEFENSE CONTRACTS By Lee Fang, The Intercept, July 22, 2018 Article: Is John McCain's Pick to Lead the International Republican Institute a Strike Against Donald Trump? By Timothy J. Burger, Town & Country, August 10, 2017 Article: The River That Swallows All Dams By Charles Kenny and John Norris, Foreign Policy, May 8, 2015 Document: The Grand Inga Illusion By David Lunde, University of Denver, 2014 Article: Can DR Congo's Inga dam project power Africa? By Maud Jullien, BBC News, November 15, 2013 Article: A New Take on the 1961 Murder of Congo’s Leader By Slobodan Lekic, Los Angeles Times, September 3, 2006 Article: How Biden’s Foreign-Policy Team Got Rich By Jonathan Guyer, The American Prospect Article: Christopher Fomunyoh Grabs Man Of The Year Award By Bama Cham, Eden Newspaper Article: Reform in Ethiopia: Turning Promise into Progress, Yoseph Badwaza and Jon Temin, Freedom House Article: Beijing and Wall Street deepen ties despite geopolitical rivalry, Financial Times Article: THE HISTORY OF DR CONGO TIMELINE, Welcome to the Congo Reform Association Article: Business: The Big Dreamer, By LOUIS EDGAR DETWILER, TIME, August 01, 1960 Additional Resources About The Jamestown Foundation Agenda 2063: The Africa We Want. African Union Alyssa Ayres Council on Foreign Relations DEREK MITCHELL National Democratic Institute Douglas Rutzen International Center for Not-For-Profit Law Daniel Serwer, LinkedIn Daniel Serwer, Middle East Institute Daniel Twining LinkedIn Dr. Daniel Twining International Republican Institute Elbridge Colby, LinkedIn Elbridge Colby, The Marathon Initiative Elbridge Colby, Senior Advisor, Westexec Advisors Employment Timeline: Albright, Madeleine K OpenSecrets.org Eric Farnsworth, LinkedIn Eric Farnsworth Americas Society Council of the Americas Flagship Projects of Agenda 2063 African Union History: IDEA TO REALITY: NED AT 30 National Endowment for Democracy Investing in Development U.S. International Development Finance Corporation Jamie Fly The German Marshall Fund of the United States Jamie Fly U.S. Agency For Global Media Janusz Bugajski, The Jamestown Foundation Jon Temin Freedom House Joshua Meservey, LinkedIn Lauren Blanchard, LinkedIn Michael Camilleri, The Dialogue Mission Statement, Growth in the Americas Monica de Bolle International Capital Strategies Our Experienced Team McLarty Associates Philip Reeker, LinkedIn Summary: Albright Stonebridge Group OpenSecrets.org Susan Stigant, United States Institute of Peace Team, The Beacon Project, October 2020 Team ALBRIGHT STONEBRIDGE GROUP Therese Pearce Laanela, Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance Yoseph Badwaza, Freedom House Sound Clip Sources Hearing: THE BALKANS: POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE NEXT ADMINISTRATION, Committee on Foreign Affairs, December 8, 2020 Watch on C-SPAN Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Madeleine Albright Chairman of the National Democratic Institute Chairman of the Albright Stonebridge Group, a global strategy firm Chairman of Albright Capital Management , an investment advisory firm Member of the Council on Foreign Relations 2003-2005: Member of the Board of Directors of the NYSE 1997-2001: Secretary of State 1978-1981: National Security Council Staff Daniel Serwer Director of American Foreign Policy and Conflict Management at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University Former Vice President at the US Institute of Peace Former Minister Counselor at the State Department during the Clinton years Janusz Bugajski Senior Fellow at the Jamestown Foundation Former Senior Fellow at the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA) Hosts a tv show in the Balkans Transcript: 40:03 Rep. Eliot Engel (NY): Serbia has been importing Russian fighters and tanks and conducting military exercises with the Russian Army. A US Defense Department report told us that Belgrade's drift towards Moscow has mostly occurred since President Vučić took power. The same time democratic space in Serbia has shrunk in recent years. Freedom House describes Serbia as a, 'hybrid regime', not a democracy because of declining standards in governance, justice, elections and media freedom. If Serbia wants to become part of the European Union, and the North Atlantic family of nations, it needs to get off the fence and embrace a Western path. 56:17 Madeleine Albright: As you know, Mr. Chairman, the President Elect has been personally engaged in the Balkans since his time in the Senate. And he was one of the most outspoken leaders in Congress calling for the United States to help end the complex and I was honored to work closely with him throughout my time in office. And I know that he understands the region and its importance for the United States. The national security team that President Elect Biden is putting in place is deeply knowledgeable and committed to helping all the countries of the region move forward as part of a Europe that is whole free and at peace. And that's important, because today this vision is in peril. The nations of the Western Balkans are suffering deeply from the health and economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. Corruption remains a serious problem, and nationalist leaders continue to stoke and exploit ethnic tensions. China and Russia are also exerting new influence in the region, with Serbia in particular the target of much anti Western propaganda. As the pandemic eases there will be an opportunity for the United States and Europe to help the region build back better, particularly as Western European countries seek to bring supply chains closer to home. And as new funds become available to invest in energy diversification and environmental protection. 59:36 Madeleine Albright: The answer is for the United States and the EU to work together to champion initiatives that help custom Bosnia and others build economic ties to Europe and the neighborhood while also pushing for needed political reforms. 1:00:00 Madeleine Albright: On Bosnia, the Dayton accords stopped a war and continue to keep the peace. But the governing arrangements are not captured by leaders among the three groups that negotiated the peace. They want to hold on to power even if it means holding their society back. While Bosnia is neighbors move toward EU membership, the United States and the European Union must focus their efforts in Bosnia on the abuse of government and state owned enterprises. Taking away the levers of power that keep the current system in place. 1:05:30 Daniel Serwer: Europe and the United States want a post state in Bosnia, they can qualify for EU membership. That Bosnia will be based not on ethnic power sharing, but rather on majorities of citizens electing their representatives. [?] entities as well as ethnic vetoes and restrictions we'll need to fade. the Americans and Europeans should welcome the prospect of a new Civic constitution. But no one outside Boston Herzegovina can reform its constitution, a popular movement is needed. The United States along with the Europeans needs to shield any popular movement from repression while starting the entities with funding and redirecting it to the central government and municipalities. 1:12:07 Janusz Bugajski: Moscow views Serbia in particular, and the Republic of Srpska in Bosnia as useful tools to subvert regional security and limit Western integration. 1:12:40 Janusz Bugajski: Western Balkan inclusion in the Three Seas Initiative and its North South transportation corridor will enhance economic performance and help provide alternatives to dependence on Russian energy and Chinese loans. 2:00:41: Rep. Gerry Connolly (VA): Why do you think longer term in the Balkans its Chinese influence we need to be focused on? Janusz Bugajski:Thank you very much for that question. Let me begin with why Russia is not a longer term danger. Russia is a country in serious decline, economic decline. Its economies size of a medium sized European state. China has the second largest economy in the world. Russia has internal problems with its nationalities with its regions, with increasing public unrest with increasing opposition to put in them even be power struggles during the succession period over the next four years, Russia faces major internal problems. China, on the other hand, unless of course, there is opposition to the Chinese Communist Party from within, is in a different stage. It continues to be a very dynamic country in terms of its economic growth. It doesn't face the sort of internal contradictions and conflicts that Russia does. And it's increasingly.. China's always looked at the longer term. In other words, they don't even have to look at succession cycles, because of the dominance of the Communist Party. They are looking eventually to replace Russia as the major rival of the United States. And the best way to do that is to increase their influence not only militarily in East Asia, South Asia and other parts of the world, but economically, politically, diplomatically, culturally, and through the media and that's precisely what they're doing, not only in Europe, but in other continents. 2:18:38 Madeleine Albright: I think that democracy and economic development go together also. Because as I put it, people want to vote and eat. Hearing: THE UNFOLDING CONFLICT IN ETHIOPIA, Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, December 3, 2020 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Yoseph Badwaza Senior Advisor for Africa at Freedom House Former Secretary General of Ethiopian Human Rights Council Susan Stigant Director of the Africa Program at the United States Institute of Peace Former program director at the National Democratic Institute, focused on South Sudan Tsedale Lemma Editor in Chief and Founder of Addis Standard Magazine Lauren Ploch Blanchard Specialist in African Affairs at the Congressional Research Service Former East Africa Program Manager at the International Republican Institute Transcript: 35:32 Yoseph Badwaza: The devastating developments of the past four weeks have brought inmeasurable human suffering and the destruction of livelihoods and appear to have returned to yet another protracted civil war and nearly 30 years after it emerged from its last. These tragic events have also dealt a deadly blow to what would have been one of the most consequential democratic transitions on the African continent. 37:09 Yoseph Badwaza: A series of missed opportunities in the last two and a half years led to the tragic derailment of a promising democratic experiment. A half hearted effort at implementing reforms by a ruling party establishment reluctant to shape its deeply authoritarian roots. Roots stands in the way of a genuine inclusive political process. Hearing: U.S. DEFENSE POSTURE CHANGES IN THE EUROPEAN THEATER, Committee on Armed Services, September 30, 2020 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Dr. James Anderson Former Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Department of Defense (resigned the day after Trump fired DoD Secretary Mark Esper) 2006-2009: Director of Middle East Policy for the Secretary of Defense 2001-2006 - Gap in LinkedIn resume 2000-2001: Associate at DFI International, a multinational consulting firm 1997-1999: Research Fellow at the Heritage Foundation Lt. Gen David Allen: Director for Strategy, Plans, and Policy, Joint Chiefs of Staff Transcript: 17:14 Dr. James Anderson: As we continue to implement the NDS or efforts at enhancing our European posture beyond Eucom Combat Command Review, have shown recent successes, including the signing of the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement with Poland in August that will enable an increased enduring US rotational presence in that country of about 1000 US military personnel. Hearing: DEMOCRATIC BACKSLIDING IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, September 30, 2020 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Christopher Fomunyoh Senior Associate for Africa at the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs Has been at NDI since 1993 Has worked for the Cameroon Water Corporation and Cameroon Airlines Corporation Dorina A. Bekoe, PhD Research Staff Member at the Institute for Defense Analyses Jon Temin Director of the Africa Program at Freedom House Freedom House gets most of its funding from the National Endowment for Democracy 2014-2017: U.S. Department of State’s Policy Planning Staff Director of the U.S. Institute of Peace’s Africa Program Member of the Council on Foreign Relations Non-resident Senior Associate with the Center for Strategic and International Studies Joshua Meservey Senior Policy Analyst for Africa and the Middle East at the Heritage Foundation since 2015 Former Associate Director of the Atlantic Council Former Field Team Manager for the Church World Service Resettlement Support Center Former Volunteer with the US Peace Corps Former intern for the US Army Special Operations Command Former Loss Prevention Coordinator for Dollar Financial Corporation Transcript: 7:13 Rep. Chris Smith (NJ): I fear that 2020 may see an even greater decrease in democracy on the continent. Today's hearing is also timely, as elections are approaching next month in Tanzania and the Ivory Coast, both countries which appear to be on a downward trajectory in terms of governance and respect for civil and political rights. And I want to note that Chairwoman bass has introduced legislation with respect to Tanzania, and I'm very proud to be a co sponsor of it and I thank you for that leadership. 8:37 Rep. Chris Smith (NJ): For example, was quite obvious to outside observers in the DRC that the declared winner of the latest presidential election held in late 2018. Felix Tshisekedi received less votes than Martin Fayulu low because of a corrupt bargain between the outgoing strongman Joseph Kabila Tshisekedi. The Constitutional Court packed by Kabila declared him to be the winner. What happened next was troubling, as our State Department issued a statement that said and I quote, 'the United States welcomes the Congolese Constitutional Court certification of Felix Tshisekedi as the next president of the DRC,' which was apparently driven by a handful of diplomats, including our ambassador. 9:26 Rep. Chris Smith (NJ): Elections in Nigeria were first postponed by sitting President Buhari and marred by irregularities in advance of the election date, quitting arson attacks on the independent national Electoral Commission offices in opposition strongholds in Buhari's his removal of Supreme Court Justice Walter Onnoghen. 10:40 Rep. Chris Smith (NJ): Before Sudan is delisted as a state sponsor of terrorism, I also believe there must be justice for all victims of its past bad acts including the victims of 911, many of whom live in my home state of New Jersey and in my district. 14:44 Rep. Karen Bass (CA): Most concerning is the situation in Tanzania, which I recently addressed in House Resolution 1120 where current leadership is repressing the opposition and basic freedoms of expression and assembly in a blatant attempt to retain power. 15:00 Rep. Karen Bass (CA): We see similar patterns in Cote d'Ivoire as the executive branch legalizes the deviation in democratic institutions to codify non democratic actions. We have similar concerns about Guinea and are going to be very watchful of upcoming elections there. And in Burkina Faso, the Central African Republic, Chad, Gabon, Ghana, Nigeria and Somalia. 15:57 Rep. Karen Bass (CA): What concerns me most is the democratic backsliding is not limited to Africa and we seem to be in a place of retreat from democracy that I only hope is an anomaly. In Europe, we see the egregious behavior of Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko, who claimed success in a disputed August 9 election and sought support from extra national resources such as Russia to justify his claim to power. 17:28 Rep. Karen Bass (CA): President Duterte of the Philippines is accused of lawfare, or weaponizing the law to deter or defeat freedoms, personalities and establishments that promote human rights, press freedoms and the rule of law while also cracking down on individual freedoms. 24:39 Christopher Fomunyoh: NDI has over three decades of technical assistance to and support for democratic institutions and processes in Africa and currently runs active programs in 20 countries. 26:09 Christopher Fomunyoh: Notably, West Africa, previously commanded as a trailblazer region has seen serious backsliding, as Mali experienced a military coup, and major controversies have arisen about candidacies of incumbent presidents in Guinea, Conakry and Cote d'Ivoire. The Central Africa region remains stocked with the three with the highest concentration of autocratic regimes with the three longest serving presidents in the world. In that sub region, notably Equatorial Guinea forty one years, Cameroon 38 years, and Congo Brazzaville 38 years. 26:50 Christopher Fomunyoh: In southern and East Africa, continued persecution of political opposition and civil society activists in Zimbabwe and similar worrying signs or patterns in Tanzania since 2016 seriously diminished citizen participation in politics and governance and also stand my prospects for much needed reforms. 31:31 Dorina A. Bekoe: Mali's 2012 coup took place even though there was a regularly scheduled election just one month away. And the coup in August of this year took place despite the fact that in 2018 there was a presidential election and last year there were legislative elections. 38:44 Jon Temin: The United States should consider changes to term and age limits that allow incumbent leaders to extend their time in office as essentially a coup against the constitution and respond accordingly. These moves by leaders who have already served two terms are an usurpation of power, that deny the country and its citizens the many benefits of leadership rotation. 40:07 Jon Temin: In Sudan the long overdue process of removing the country from the list of state sponsors of terrorism may soon conclude, but that is not enough. The United States needs to support the civilian component of Sudan's transitional government at every step of the long road toward democracy and do all that it can to revive Sudan's economy. 40:25 Jon Temin: In Ethiopia, there are deeply concerning signs that the government is reaching for tools of repression that many hoped were relegated to history. Nonetheless, Ethiopia remains on a tentative path to democratic elections that can be transformative. In this context, the decision by the United States to withhold development assistance from Ethiopia in a quixotic and counterproductive effort to influence Ethiopia's negotiating position concerning the grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is bad policy that should be reversed. 41:00 Jon Temin: Nascent democratic transitions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Gambia and Angola also call for strong US support. 1:10:21 Rep. Ilhan Omar (MN): I want to start with Dr. Fomunyoh. In your testimony you discuss the massacres committed in the Anglophone region of Cameroon. Did the United States provide training funding or arms to the Cameroonian security forces who committed those massacres? 1:12:20 Rep. Ilhan Omar (MN): Did the Millennium military officers who led the recent coup [??] receive US military training? And if you can just say yes or no, because I have a few more questions and we have limited time. 1:29:23 Jon Temin: Freedom in the world, which we do every year rates every country in the world that includes the United States, the United States score was decreasing before this administration, we have seen a slow slippage of democracy in America for some time, rating based on our scores. That decrease has accelerated under this administration. 1:30:00 Jon Temin: I think part of it has to do with freedom for journalists. I believe there's been some concern there. Part of it has to do with corruption and some of the indications that we've seen of corrupt activity within government. I'll leave it there. We're happy to go dig into that and provide you more detail. And I'm sure that when we look at the scores again later this year, there will be a robust conversation on the United States. Hearing: THE ROLE OF ALLIES AND PARTNERS IN U.S. MILITARY STRATEGY AND OPERATIONS, Committee on Armed Services, September 23, 2020 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Christine Wormuth On Joe Biden's presidential transition team 2018- present: Director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at the RAND Corporation 2017-2018: Founding Director of the Adrienne Arsht Center for Resilience at the Atlantic Council 2017-2018: Senior Advisor for the Center for Strategic and International Studies 2010-2014: Various DoD positions, rising to Under Secretary of Defense for Policy 2004-2009: Senior Fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies 2002-2004: Principal at DFI Government Services, an international defense consulting firm Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges Center for European Policy Analysis Board of Advisors for the Spirit of America (not listed on hearing bio) Board of Directors is made up of CEOs of mulitnational corporations Board of Advisors is full of corporate titans and big names, including Michelle Flournoy, Jeh Johnson, Kimberly Kagan, Jack Keane, James Mattis, Stanley McChrystal, H.R. McMaster, & George Shultz 2014-2017: Commanding General of the US Army in Europe Elbridge Colby Principal and co-Founder of the Marathon Initiative Formed in May 2020 Senior Advisor to WestExec Advisors (not listed on hearing bio) Co-Founded by incoming Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Michelle Flournoy, who told the Intercept in 2018, "we help tech firms who are trying to figure out how to sell in the public sector space, to navigate the DOD, the intel community, law enforcement." 2018-2019: Director of the Defense Program at the Center for a New American Security Northrup Grumman is one of its biggest donors, also gets funding from Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, Bell Helicopter, BAE Systems, General Dynamics, Boeing, and DynCorp. 2017-2018: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and Force Development Lead official in the creation of the 2018 National Defense Strategy 2010-2017: Center for a New American Security GWB administration (not listed on his LinkedIn) 2005-2006: worked with the Office of the Director of National Intelligence 2004-2005: President GWB's WMD Commission 2003: worked with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq Transcript: 17:14 20:08 Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges: Second point of emphasis requires us to place importance on the greater Black Sea where. I believe the great power competition prevents great power conflict, failure to compete and to demonstrate interest and willingness to protect those interests in all domains, power vacuums and miscalculations which can lead to escalation and to actual conflict. This is particularly true in the greater Black Sea region, where Russia is attempting to maximize its sphere of influence. The Black Sea region should be the place where the United States and our NATO allies and partners hold the line. The Black Sea should matter to the west in part because it [was to the Kremlin.] taking the initiative away from the Kremlin denies the ability to support the Assad regime in Syria and then to live will reduce the flow of rich into Europe, or General Breedlove called the weaponization of refugee. Limit the Kremlin's ability to spread his thoughts of influence in the Balkans which is the Middle East and North Africa. 21:28 Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges: We must repair the relationship between Turkey and the United States. And see Turkey [?] as an exposed ally at the crossroads of several regions and challenges. Turkey is essential for deterrence of the Kremlin in the Black Sea region. And it is a critical both against ISIS and Iran we need to consider this relationship to be a priority, [but] condone or excuse several mistakes or bad choices about the Turkish Government. There are times are very quiet, but we think long term. The current Turkish administration will eventually change. But the strategically important geography of Turkey will never change. 23:31 Elbridge Colby: Allies and partners are absolutely essential for the United States in a world increasingly defined by great power competition, above all with China. Indeed, they lie at the very heart of the right US strategy for this era, which I believe the Department of Defense's 2018 National Defense Strategy lays out. The importance to the United States of allies and partners is not a platitude, but the contrary. For the first time since the 19th century, the United States is not far and away the world's largest economy. More than anything else, this is due to the rise of China. And that has become very evident. Beijing is increasingly using its growing power for coercive purposes. 24:08 Elbridge Colby: United States faces a range of other potential threats, including primarily from Russia against NATO, as well as from transnational terrorists, Iran and North Korea. In other words, there exists multiple challenges to US national security interests. Given their breadth and scope, America can no longer expect to take care of them essentially alone. Accordingly, we must address this widening shortfall between the threats we face and the resources we have to deal with them by a much greater role for allies and partners. 24:59 Elbridge Colby: Because of China's power and wealth, the United States simply must play a leading role in blocking Beijing's pursuit of hegemony in Asia. This means that the US defense establishment must prioritize dealing with China and Asia and particularly vulnerable allies and partners such as Taiwan and the Philippines. 25:24 Elbridge Colby: In particular, we will not be able to dedicate the level of resources and effort to the Middle East and Europe that we have in the past. We will therefore need allied partners to do their part not just to help defend our interests and enable a concentration on Asia but to defend themselves and their interests. 26:00 Elbridge Colby: The contemporary threats to us interest stem from China across Asia. Transnational terrorists largely in the Middle East, Russia and Eastern Europe, Persian Gulf area and North Korea in Asia. 26:11 Elbridge Colby: Yet the United States is traditional, closest and most significant allies are largely clustered in Western Europe in Northeast Asia. Many of these countries, especially Europe feel quite secure and are little motivated to contribute to more distant threats. This leaves wide areas such as South and Southeast Asia and the Middle East, for which long standing US alliances are of minimal help. The natural way to rectify this is for the United States to add partners and form necessary alliances to help address these gaps. 35:13 Elbridge Colby: In this effort, though, we should be very careful to distinguish between expanding our formal alliances or [?] alliances from expanding our partnerships, the former should be approached derivatively while the latter can be approached more liberally, when we extend an alliance commitment or something tantamount to it as in the case of Taiwan, we tie our credibility to that nation's fate. We should therefore be [cheery] about doings. In light of this, we should seek to expand our partnerships wherever possible. In particular, we should focus on increasing them in South and Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, where China otherwise might have an open field to [subordances] and add them to its pro hegemonium coalition. 27:41 Elbridge Colby: I do not see a near term need to add any allies to the US roster. But I do think we will increasingly need to consider this as the shadow of Chinese power darkens over the region. 27:53 Elbridge Colby: Our effort to expand our network of allies and partners should really be focused on states with shared threat perceptions. It has become something of a common place that shared values form the bedrock of our alliances. It is true that such values help allies, but the most useful alliances generally proceed from shared fears. The best motivator to fight is self defense. The states that have a shared interest in preventing Chinese or Russian or Iranian hegemony selves have a natural alignment with our own. This is true whether or not they are democracies. 29:00 Elbridge Colby: In Asia, given the scale proposed by Beijing, we should concentrate most of our allies like Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and Taiwan on readying to defend themselves alongside US Armed Forces and provide access to US forces in the event of a contingency. 29:16 Elbridge Colby: Meanwhile, we should assist partners like Vietnam, Singapore, Indonesia, with whatever means available to enable their defense against an ever more powerful China while concurrently seeking greater access and logistics support for US and other allied forces. 29:39 Elbridge Colby: Europe Finally, the overall us goal should be while preserving the fundamental us commitment to NATO's defense to have Europeans especially in northern and eastern Europe shoulder more of the burden of defending the Alliance from Russia assault. The reality is that given the stakes and consequences, the United States must prioritize Asia. United States must therefore economize in its second theater Europe. 35:13 Elbridge Colby: And move away from using these tools as leverage for key partners for domestic political reform or secondary geopolitical objectives. United States should always of course, stand proudly for free government that treats its people with dignity. We must keep our eye on the prize though China is the primary challenge to our interest in the world, including our government, both at home and abroad. Our top priority must therefore be to block its gaining predominance in Asia, which is a very real prospect. This means strengthening states in the region against Chinese power, whether or not they are model democracies. 35:15 Rep. Adam Smith (WA): When we should we just say, look, we're not going to worry about your domestic politics. We want to build the Alliance, however possible. How would we deal with extreme human rights abuses, as are alleged in the Philippines in terms of extra judicial killings, or in the case of India, and of course, we're dealing with this with Turkey and Europe as well, as you know, doing the arm sales with Russia, should we significantly back off on our sort of sanctions policy for those things? And if so, how do we signal that without without undermining our credibility? 40:55 Elbridge Colby: In a sense, what we're going to need to do to leverage this greater power of this network, you know, allies, partners, whatever their role is going to be interoperability, the ability to work to different standards to communicate with each other. That's partially a technical problem and an equipment problem, but a lot of it is human training and an organizational issue. And Taiwan, I think I'm very enthusiastic about the arms sales to Taiwan. And I know that one was recently reported, I hope it goes through because it's the kind of equipment that we want to see this kind of A2AD denial kind of capabilities to Taiwan, but actually, where I think would be really valuable to move forward with. And that's a sensitive issue, but I think this would be within the context of our trade policy would personally be on training, you know, and that's something we could think about with Vietnam as well. Obviously, the Indians have a very sophisticated military, but they're maybe we can offer there too. So I think that's a real sort of force multiplier. 42:00 Rep. Mac Thornberry (TX): Turkeys geography, history, critical role is always going to be important is certainly valid. And yet, not only are there human rights and governance issues, the current leader of Turkey has policies that contradict the, in many ways the best interests of the United States. So, take that specific example. We don't want to make enemies of Turkey forever. But yet, what do we do now? To to preserve that future when there's a different government, but yet make clear or in some way help guide them on a better policy path? 57:50 Christine Wormuth: We need to make adjustments to our posture in the region to be able to better deal with China. And so the announcement by Palau, for example, that it's willing to host US airfields and bases could be quite helpful to us. Even though they're relatively small. We do need to diversify our footprint. 1:24:52 Christine Wormuth: The challenge is that the many of the countries in the indo Pacific don't want to have to choose between the United States and China. They want to engage with China for very clear economic interests, while most of them lean towards the United States for security interests, and I think they're trying to sort of thread that needle. 1:32:07 Christine Wormuth: Turkey is a very challenging geostrategic problem. I was in the Obama administration when we were fighting ISIS, and we knew there was tension between the necessity to have partners on the ground and the Syrian Democratic Forces were what we had. We knew Turkey had issues with that. In my experience, however, the United States worked very hard and very closely with Turkey to try to assuage their concerns and nothing was ever enough for them. So we do have a challenge, they are very important in terms of where they are located, but the authoritarianism that Erdogan has turned to is concerning. So I think we have to keep the dialogue open and continue to try to keep turkey inside the fold, but at the same time, communicate that doing whatever they want is not acceptable. And the the S400 for example, is a key example of that. 1:34:07 Christine Wormuth: AFRICOM’s Zero Based review, I hope will shed light on which kinds of activities are helping us and helping our African partners. 1:35:36 Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges: The UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain all have extensive efforts going on in Africa. So this is an opportunity once again, where we can work with allies to achieve what our objectives are. 1:40:00 Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges: What for sure brings a lot of military capability air landed forces to the a lot and that if for some reason, you know that it would have to be filled by us or the state or other allied to then that's a problem right? Sorry. But more importantly is control the strokes that can help the blacks in the Mediterranean. And so having a NATO ally has control and sovereignty over the strait we have the mantra. Hearing: Stemming a Receding Tide: Human Rights and Democratic Values in Asia, Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, and Nonproliferation, September 22, 2020 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Derek Mitchell President of the National Democratic Institute Returned to NDI in September 2018 after leaving in 1997 2012-2016: Former US Ambassador to the Republic of the Union of Myanmar (Burma) 2011-2012: U.S. Department of State’s first Special Representative and Policy Coordinator for Burma 2009-2011: Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian and Pacific Security Affairs (APSA) 2001-2009: Senior Fellow and Director of the Asia Division of the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) 1997-2001: Special Assistant for Asian and Pacific Affairs in the Office of the Secretary of Defense 1993-1997: Senior Program Officer for Asia and the former Soviet Union at the National Democratic Institute 1986-1988: Foreign policy assistant for Sen. Ted Kennedy Dr. Alyssa Ayres Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations Consultant for the Japan Bank for International Cooperation Senior Advisor for McLarty Associates A global consultant firm "at home in corporate board rooms & government cabinet rooms, anywhere in the world" Member of the United States Institute of Peace 2010-2013: Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Southeast Asia 2008-2010: Founding director of the India and South Asia practice at McLarty Asssociates 2007-2008: Special Assistant to the Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Daniel Twining President of the International Republican Institute since 2017 Picked by outgoing President, Sen. John McCain 2009-2016: Former director of the Asia Program at the German Marshall Fund 2007-2009: GWB State Department Policy Planning staffer 2001-2004: Foreign Policy Advisor to Sen. John McCain Transcript: 16:12 Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges: Last year I introduced the bipartisan Cambodia democracy act which passed the House overwhelmingly, it would impose sanctions on those in Cambodia responsible for undermining democratic rule of law in the country. We must be especially cognizant of democracies in Asia in danger of backsliding into autocracy, with China's help with their alternative to Western democracies, and that is Chinese socialism with Chinese characteristics that is communism, regardless of how they paint it and try to rename it. 21:10 Derek Mitchell: For nearly four decades, my organization, the National Democratic Institute, working alongside our partners at the International Republican Institute, and the National Endowment for Democracy has assisted the spread and institutionalization of democracy around the world. Let me say at the start that we can only do this work thanks to the sustained bipartisan support of Congress, including from this subcommittee. So for that we are truly grateful. 21:50 Derek Mitchell: Today NDI maintains nearly a dozen offices in the Indo-Pacific region. And last week we just received clearance from the Taiwan government to open an office in Taipei, which we will do soon. 30:07 Dr. Alyssa Ayres: Sri Lanka after a five year period of improvement is now moving in the other direction with the return of the Rajapaksa government. The new political configuration will not pursue progress on reconciliation and accountability for the end of the Civil War, and the newly elected parliament is already hard at work, the constitutional amendment to expand presidential powers. 34:21 Daniel Twining: Beyond China the past year has seen countries once viewed as bright spots for democracy like Malaysia and Sri Lanka, regress due to political infighting, personality politics and failure to deliver promised reforms. 1:48:50 Dr. Alyssa Ayres: I do believe that the creation of the DFC is important. It is my understanding that it is not quite up and running 100%. So we have yet to really see what it can do as a potential alternate to these kinds of infrastructure under writings. The other piece of the DFC is that is it in part designed to help crowd in private sector engagement and private sector investments. So that's another part of the story. I think we may need more time before we're able to see how effective this mechanism can be. 1:49:22 Dr. Alyssa Ayres: I would note that we also had another very effective source of US government assistance that depends on, his premise on good governance indicators. And that's the Millennium Challenge Corporation. And I would just caution that in the South Asia region, we have now seen two examples in Nepal and in Sri Lanka, were the long process of engaging toward a Millennium Challenge compact agreement, large investments, about 500 million in each case towards transportation and power infrastructure. These have actually been held up in both of those countries because of political concerns. The Nepali government doesn't want to be part of the US-Indo Pacific strategy or feel that it is somehow being brought into the Indo-Pacific strategy. The Rajapaksa government is suspicious of the US MCC. So I would just offer those two examples of cases where we've got a terrific tool, but it's run into some challenges for political reasons and the countries of concern. 1:50:29 Daniel Twining: Thank you, Congressman, you've been such a leader, including with your Cambodia democracy act. And you know, that's a reminder that we do have the tools and, and leverage. The Europeans in Cambodia have suspended trading privileges that they had offered to Cambodia. Cambodia is very reliant on our GSP still. So some of these economic instruments matter in both a negative sense, but also in a positive sense. When countries do well, we should be working with them on new trade and financial arrangements, the Chinese do come in and do this in their own way. And we should get back to that as a country. Sir, you mentioned, do we withdraw support when a country backslides, on democracy? You know, I would argue that most of our support for country should not go directly to their governments, should go to independent civil society, free media, independent institutions and not just go into a central coffer that disappears. In the past, we've gotten a lot smarter about this as a country, but in the past, a lot of us development assistance disappeared because we were giving it to friendly autocracies in some cases, who did not have any means of accounting for it. So let's make sure that we invest in these democracy and governance instruments because we want to make sure that US taxpayer money is being used well. Hearing: U.S. ENGAGEMENT IN THE INDO-PACIFIC AND BEYOND, Committee on Foreign Relations, September 17, 2017 Watch on C-SPAN Read Transcript Witnesses: Julie Chung Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Western Hemisphere Affairs at the State Department Philip T. Reeker 2019 to present: Acting Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs 2017-2019: Civilian Deputy to the Commander of the US European Command 2014-2017:Principal Officer and Consul General at the US Consulate General in Milan, Italy 2011-2014: Deputy Assistant Secretary of State fo rEuropean and Eurasian Affairs 2008-2011: US Ambassador to Macedonia 2007-2008: Counselor of Public Affairs at the US Embassy in Iraq 2004-2007: Deputy Chief of Mission at the US Embassy in Hungary 1999-2004: Spokesman for the US State Dept David R. Stilwell Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs at the State Department Transcript: 17:44 David R. Stilwell: For years, we in the international community credited Beijing's commitments that facilitating China's entry into the rules based international order would lead to increasing domestic reform and opening. Beijing's persistent flouting of these commitments has shattered those illusions. It is now clear to us and to more and more countries around the world that PRC foreign and security policy seeks to reshape the international environment around the narrow interests and authoritarian values of a single beneficiary. That is the Chinese Communist Party. 22:19 David R. Stilwell: We sincerely appreciate congressional leadership in establishing the new counter China influence fund in fiscal year 2020 Appropriations Bill. This very important provision provides the department with a flexible mechanism that will bolster our efforts to strengthen our partners resiliency to Chinese malign influence worldwide. The initial round of CCIF funding solicitation resulted in over 400 project submissions from around the globe, with demand far outstripping the appropriate funding. 29:57 Philip T. Reeker: By using platforms like the One Belt One Road initiative, the Chinese Communist Party endeavors to create dependencies and cultivate client state relationships through the 17 Plus One initiative which involves 12 countries that are both NATO and EU members primarily in Central and Eastern Europe, China aims to achieve access and ownership over valuable transportation hubs, critical infrastructure, ports and industries. 31:09 Philip T. Reeker: Using authorities granted by legislation members of this committee introduced, as mentioned the bipartisan Build Act and the European Energy Security and Diversification Act, we've been able to begin leveraging the New Development Finance Corporation to try to catalyze key investments in strategic projects. Most notable I'd point to Secretary Pompeo. His pledge at the Munich Security Conference earlier this year of $1 billion, a commitment to the Three Seas Initiative in the Czech Republic which Secretary Pompeo visited just last month, they have transformed from a target of Chinese influence to a leader in the European awakening. 33:29 Philip T. Reeker: Although China's GDP is about eight times the size of Russia's, Russia remains the primary military threat to Europe and the strategic priority for most of our allies and partners, particularly those in Central and Eastern Europe. Russia and China are more closely aligned strategically than at any point since the 1950s. And we see growing cooperation across a range of diplomatic, military, economic and information activities. 46:15 Julie Chung: In terms of [cepheus], and investment screening, we have extensive engagements in the region. We have been sending technical delegations to countries in the region to explain how public procurement processes and transparent processes work. We have helped governments build that capacity through the America Crece initiative. We have 10 mo use now signed with countries throughout the region. And that's part of the the tool to use in addressing the corruption issues that China is bringing to the region. How do we ensure the countries have the right tools in place, the practices in place, the procurement practices and regulatory framework to the private sector companies want to come and invest in those countries and ensure they have a level playing field to be working through the America Crece initiative. 47:17 Julie Chung: DFC has been a wonderful tool and resource that we've been able to now utilize more than ever, in from the former OPEX utilities, not expanding that broader base in Latin America and the Caribbean. So DFC in our region has already invested and has pledged to invest $12 billion in just the Western Hemisphere alone, and in Central America, $3 billion. So it's already invested in Central America, in El Salvador, for instance, on an LNG project, and other projects that are forthcoming. 1:17:16 Philip T. Reeker: Three Seas Initiative was developed by countries dozen countries in the Central and Eastern European region to provide alternatives particularly in a north-south direction for trade and infrastructure, and we have stepped in to support the Three Seas not as a member, but as an interested partner. And Secretary Pompeo outlined, as I mentioned, that the development Finance Corporation is offering up to a billion dollars in matching investment funds for opportunities throughout that region. 1:35:00 Julie Chung: Taiwan and the United States are working together in Latin America. So they announced financing to provide SME loan support for Latin American Central American region through the kabe. The Central American Bank of Government Integration. So that's one example of where we're providing that funding into the region. There's also a $26 million loan that DFCS provided to provide telecom towers in Peru and Ecuador 500 telecom towers, and this addresses both our strategic interest as well as a 5G telecommunications interest that where China is trying to take over and really control that that sector. 1:50:29 Julie Chung: In terms of DFC and working on digital authoritarianism, there's no better example in the region then in Maduro's regime, the authoritarian regime of Maduro and working in close concert with China, and China's ZTE has long had a relationship with the Maduro regime and providing the carnet de patria which spies on civil society and opposition leaders and determines how who gets what food allocations within that country. And so right now, of course, we are not engaging in DFC in Venezuela. But in a democratic future. When we have a democratic transition in that country. We would love to bring DFC into it and help rebuild. Hearing: THE HEALTH, ECONOMIC, AND POLITICAL CHALLENGES FACING LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN, Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, Civilian Security, and Trade, September 15, 2020 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Monica de Bolle, PhD Professor of Latin American Studies at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics Senior Advisor with International Capital Strategies (not listed on her hearing bio) Former professor of macroeconomics at the Pontifical Catholic Universtiy of Rio de Janeiro Managing partner of Galanto MBB Consultants, a macroeconomic consultancy firm based in Brazil Former economist at the International Monetary Fund Michael Camilleri Director of the Peter D. Bell Rule of Law Program for Inter-American Dialogue Senior Advisor at WestExec Advisors since February 2018 (not listed on his hearing bio) The firm founded by the incoming Secretary of State, Antony Blinken Former Western Hemisphere adviser on Obama's Secretary of State's Policy Planning Staff and Director for Andean Affairs at the National Security Council from 2012-2017 Former human rights specialist at the Organization of American States Former senior staff attorney at the Center for Justice and International Law Member of the Council on Foreign Relations Eric Farnsworth Vice President of the Council of the Americas since 2003 Former Managing Director of ManattJones Global Strategies, a consulting firm from 1998-2005 Former member of the global public policy division of Bristol-Meyers Squibb, a multinational pharmaceutical company Former Senior Policy Advisor to President Bill Clinton from 1995-1998 Former Foreign Affairs Officer at the State Department from 1990-1995 Former Services and Investment Industry Analyst at the Office of the US Trade Representatives in 1992 Transcript: 25:10 Rep. Francis Rooney (FL): US international development Finance Corporation will play a crucial role in investments in the region, which I believe can help the recovery and also as long term economic well being 2:08:13 Eric Farnsworth: Notably, Washington is taking actions to build a forward looking economic recovery agenda. Among them the Americas Crece, a program announced at the end of 2019 and enhanced financing facilities through the newly minted Development Finance Corporation. 2:09:21 Eric Farnsworth: Economic Recovery must be at the forefront of the pending summit of the Americas. Latin America already suffers from one of the lowest levels of intra regional trade worldwide, for example. The gains from expanded intra regional trade would establish sounder economic footing while helping to moderate the cyclical nature of commodities markets, as well. Nations across Latin America and the Caribbean can focus more attention on improving their respective investment climates. Mr. Rooney, the ranking minority member has made this case effectively many, many times. For its part, the United States should come to the 2021 summit with a robust economic expansion initiative. Absent a massive economic financial package of debt relief and new lending, renewal of a hemispheric trade and investment agenda will be the best way to promote regional recovery, support US and regional economic interests and renew a regional strategic posture that China has begun to challenge. 2:11:03 Julie Chung: So how does the United States continue to advocate democracy in Venezuela? I say sham of legislative election and the end of Guaido's mandate are rapidly approaching. How do we do that? Well, I don't if know if [inaudible] wanted this question. 2:13:03 Eric Farnsworth: There are huge amounts of illicit money being made and moved in Venezuela through illegal activities, illegal gold mining, drug trafficking and the like. And one of the best ways I think to get at the regime is to stanch the flow of those financial resources. And frankly, to identify and to freeze those funds and then also to begin to seize them and take them back at once the economic incentives for illegal behavior are removed or at least reduced, perhaps the political dynamic in Venezuela will change that people will begin to see that they really have to find a way out from this mess frankly, that Nicolas Maduro has created. 2:14:14 Monica de Bolle, PhD: It will be very hard to get other Latin American countries to focus on the issues in Venezuela given that they have runaway epidemics in their own countries. And we shouldn't lose sight of the fact that amongst the 10 countries that have the largest or the highest per capita death rate in the world right now are all in Latin America. 2:16:00 Michael Camilleri: Unfortunately, the Guaido interim government, the the National Assembly, the G4 are not in the same position they were in a year or your half ago, the balance of forces on the ground in Venezuela has tilted in favor of the Maduro regime. And so that will that will require us to calibrate our own efforts and invite view we need to be realistic about the fact that some sort of negotiated pathway to free and fair elections ultimately is the most realistic and the most peaceful, frankly, path out of the the awful situation that the country finds itself in. 2:23:21 Monica de Bolle, PhD: Apart from corruption, which is certainly a problem in the oil sector as well as in other parts of the Venezuelan economy, there's also been dramatic underinvestment in the oil industry, which has now led the country to this situation where, rather than being a very big net oil exporter, as they used to be in the 1980s in the 1990s, they've now become a net oil importer, which shows exactly how much you can squander your country's resources and just basically run an economy to the ground. 2:33:58 Eric Farnsworth: And what we're seeing is some concern in the investor community about actions that have been taken perhaps on the backtracking on the reform agenda around energy in particular, but in other sectors as well, canceling contracts that have been previously agreed, and some other actions like that and the investment community is very cautious. Hearing: PROTECTING DEMOCRACY DURING COVID–19 IN EUROPE AND EURASIA AND THE DEMOCRATIC AWAKENING IN BELARUS, Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia, Energy, and the Environment, September 10, 2020 Watch on Youtube Witnesses: Douglas Rutzen President and CEO of the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law Professor at Georgetown University Law Center Advisory Board member of the United Nations Democracy Fund Therese Pearce Laanela Head of Electoral Processes at the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance Joanna Rohozinska Resident Program Director for Europe at the Beacon Project at the International Republican Institute Senior program officer for Europe at the National Endowment for Democracy at least as of 2019. She has worked there for about a decade Jamie Fly Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund and Co-Director of the Alliance for Security Democracy Senior Advisor to WestExec Advisors Co-founded by incoming Secretary of State, Antony Blinken Former President and CEO of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty in 2019 & 2020 Former counselor for foreign and national security affairs for Sen. Marco Rubio from 2013-2017 Former Executive Director of the Foreign Policy Initiative from 2009-2013 Former member of GWB's National Security Council from 2008-2009 Former member of GWB's Office of the Secretary of Defense from 2005-2008 Transcript: 53:30 Joanna Rohozinska: Lukshenko must be held responsible for his choices and actions. Word mating strategies with transatlantic allies should be priority and to call for dialogue, immediate release of political prisoners and support for the political opposition's demands for holding elections under international supervision and beginning negotiations on a Lukshenko transition. 53:56 Joanna Rohozinska: Support for democracy requires patience as well as long term commitment and vision. This has been made possible with the support of Congress to IRI and the family. Thank you and I look forward to your questions. 1:03:05 Therese Pearce Laanela: Institutions that are as strong...What we are seeing... those that are able to safeguard and against disinformation for example, they are working in innovative ways because this isn't a challenge that existed really as much before social media and one of the things that we're seeing is a kind of interagency cooperation, a partnership between private and public. That's really hasn't been seen before. Let me just take Australia as a case, but the working together with social media companies and government agencies and security agencies and election officials for rapid reaction to anything that comes in and that kind of seamless communication between agencies, that is one of the ways in which we can protect. 1:04:15 Jamie Fly: We have tools. Radio Free Europe, Radio Liberty has a Bella Russian language service Radio Svoboda which has significant of followers inside Belarus. The problem is that Lukashenko like many other authoritarians have realized that when they face significant pressure, they should take the country offline. And Belarusian authorities have done that on a regular basis, which makes it much more difficult to communicate and allow information to spread freely. So what they really need outlets like Svoboda and other independent media are access to internet circumvention tools, which are also funded by the State Department and the US Agency for Global Media. 1:09:57 Douglas Rutzen: China is providing surveillance technology to countries including Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Serbia. They also provided a $2 billion dollar loan to Hungry to construct a railway which Hungry then classified as a state secret in terms of the construction. 1:19:28 Brian Fitzpatrick: In 2013, in 2000, and he saw large scale protests in Ukraine, following what many believed to be a falsification of elections by their federal officials. So my first question for the entire panel, do you believe that Belarus protests could lead to a revolution similar to the one we saw in Ukraine and secondarily, on Tuesday, President Lukashenko, refused to rule out the idea of holding new elections, and acknowledge that he may have overstayed his time at office, whether or not you see revolutions similar to Ukraine, do you think that these protests could lead to an actual change in leadership? Joanna Rohozinska: So I take it as a question to me. I mean, I think that things have been building up and I would say that with this similarity to Ukraine was that there was also a deep seated frustration with corruption. Here, it's less about corruption. But it's still meets, where you have the accountability and transparency aspect of it that I was mentioning in my testimony. And I think that the frustration with the lack of responsive government and being treated like animals, frankly, is what they say, is what finally boiled over, but there's been, there's been an uptick in protests in Belarus, if you watch these kinds of things over the past two years, over the parasite tax, for example, which was also was a special tax that was put on unemployment, and on to penalize people who are unemployed, is trying to target civic activists, but it ended up reaching far farther than that. So you can see things percolating below the surface for quite a long time. Now. You never know when it's going to blow. Here, I think that there was just the COVID, underlay everything and it mobilized such a broad swath of society, that the trigger event was finally the elections, which again, demonstrating a degree of hubris they decided not to put off right, they figured that holding the elections at the beginning of August was the best thing to do, because there is always a low torque turnout and all this, frankly, because people tend to go out to the countryside. So they simply miscalculated. They did not understand how the people were feeling

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Mark Leonard's World in 30 Minutes
All eyes on Ethiopia: What the EU and the US can do

Mark Leonard's World in 30 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 29:50


ust over a month ago, Abiy Ahmed, Prime Minister of Ethiopia and 2019 Nobel Peace Prize winner, ordered a military offensive against regional forces in Tigray. Since then, the situation has been spiralling out of control, with increasing international concern over access to the Tigray region and reports of attacks against UN personnel trying to gain access. ECFR’s Susi Dennison takes over in this week’s episode to discuss the regional implications of the conflict and the prospects for transatlantic cooperation around the issue. She is joined by Theo Murphy, Director of ECFR’s Africa programme, Payton Knopf, Senior Advisor to the Africa programme of the US Institute for Peace, and Alexander Rondos, ECFR Council Member and EU Special Representative to the Horn of Africa. This podcast was recorded on 9 December 2020. Further reading: - “Final Report and Recommendations of the Senior Study Group on Peace and Security in the Red Sea Arena”, American Institute for Peace: https://buff.ly/2JS25Pq Bookshelf: - “Afropean: Notes from Black Europe” by Johny Pitts - “America in the World: A History of U.S. Diplomacy and Foreign Policy” by Robert Zoellick - “The Shadow King” by Maaza Mengiste - “Swimmer Among the Stars” by Kanishk Tharoor

Coronavirus: Expert Conversations
Global Pandemic: Iraq's Youth Want To Break From Iran

Coronavirus: Expert Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2020 14:22


Sunday marked one year since anti-government protests in Iraq turned bloody kicking off a new wave of demonstrations demanding political reform. Those demonstrating are being met with tear gas and water cannons while calling for new elections, more economic development and less foreign influence. FOX’s Trey Yingst speaks with Sarhang Hamasaeed, the Director of Middle East Programs at the US Institute of Peace, about the demonstrations and how the Iraqi youth could be the key to real change. 

The Cognitive Crucible
#11 Jacob on Social Norms, Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2020 35:44


During this episode, Dr. Jacob Udo-Udo Jacob drops by the Cognitive Crucible to discuss with John Bicknell his strategic communications research as well as his work with the United Nations global program focused on disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) missions. Dr. Jacob observes that many strategic communications campaigns tend to focus on messaging and messaging strategy. He asserts, however, that these components should be secondary and that understanding networks is a critical component for any successful strategic communications campaign. Shifting the focus to networks and influences tends to drive social norms. We also discuss a course he teaches at the US Army War College: The Media in War and Peace which explores the role of the media in war and in peace including the techniques adopted by state and non-state actors to influence media performance before, during and after violent conflicts. Click here for full show notes & resources Bio: Dr. Jacob Udo-Udo Jacob is Visiting International Scholar in the International Studies program at Dickinson College. Dr. Jacob earned his Ph.D. in Communications Studies, with a focus on strategic communications, from the University of Leeds in the UK. Dr. Jacob has worked with the United Nations on the revision of the Public Information and Strategic communications module of the Integrated Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration Standards during peace operations. He also leads Dickinson College’s Bridge Program which provides educational opportunities to young people from regions of the world experiencing conflict and natural disasters—and for whom higher education would otherwise be impossible. Dr. Jacob co-leads the development of a methodological and ethical guide for violent extremism research at the RESOLVE Network--a research program hosted at the US Institute of Peace. Find out more about the Virtual Panel on Convergence and Information Advantage, which is co-sponsored by IPA and AFCEA Alamo Chapter. IPA is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, you can connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell on LinkedIn. Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, 1) IPA earns from qualifying purchases, 2) IPA gets commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti
HEAPY Michael Berning and MEP Emerging Trends

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2020 30:18


Michael is responsible for the development of new markets and services and to provide corporate leadership for HEAPY (the wholly owned subsidiary the Design/Build construction services company HEAPY.). In this role, his team develops the “what's next” to enhance client service experience and produce colleague advancement opportunities. To emphasize a keen focus on the HEAPY Vision of “Building a more Resilient and Sustainable Society”, new markets and services are centered on Smart Technologies Integration, Distributed Energy Resources, Resiliency Planning, Energy as a Service (EaaS), etc. Michael has presented at several National and Regional Conferences including: Greenbuild, AIA National Convention, International Living Futures UnConference, National Conference on Building Commissioning, the World Energy Engineering Conference, Greening the Heartland and the US Institute for Theater Technology Conference. He is on the Industrial Advisory Committee for the University of Dayton Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and served as a Fellow for the Hobart Center for Food Service Sustainability. He was a member of the Editorial Advisory Board for the former EDC Magazine, writing a column focused on Sustainability. He leads sustainability on the local level as Co-Chair of the Dayton (Ohio) Regional Green Initiative (DRG3.org) and is a past Regional Chair for the U.S Green Building Council's College and University based USGBC Students Program. He recently served as Chair of USGBC Ohio. HEAPY is a nationally recognized MEP&T Systems Design, Sustainability, and Planning & Commissioning Services firm. Heapy has an outstanding record of providing practical sustainable-based smart solutions for today's high performance buildings. The HEAPY HQ achieved LEED PLATINUM. Michael's experience with projects in both the public and private sectors shows, when properly planned and executed throughout the entire design and construction process, every project can be Resilient, Environmentally Responsible, Energy Efficient AND Cost Effective.   Show Highlights    Building holistically by looking at the entire client's portfolio to create a plan that blends standards  Position your green building projects and jobs to be recession proof  Michael's unique building systems as an innovation officer on solar and smart grids Concepts that look at how you make the best use of renewables and what's next in buildings Stick to your convictions when determining the path for your career Outside of the box thinking that impacts long term needs and deferred maintenance for green building   “This market is still ginormous. This is the opportunity to help move the world, your community, and your family forward by being green and by living green. Helping others to do that too will give you a rewarding and impactful life. That's what we're all looking for. How can I be of impact? Being in the sustainability movement certainly is. It is questions answered.” -Michael Berning   Michael Berning Transcript   Michael Berning's Show Resource and Information Be Fearless by Jean Case 4 Disciplines of Execution by Jim Huling Chris McChesney, Sean Covey  Jerry Yudelson  Twitter LinkedIn HEAPY “The Godfather of Green” – Jerry Yudelson podcast episode  Connect with Charlie Cichetti and GBES Charlie on LinkedIn Green Building Educational Services GBES on Twitter Connect on LinkedIn Like on Facebook Google+ GBES Pinterest Pins GBES on Instagram   GBES is excited our membership community is growing. Consider joining our membership community as members are given access to some of the guests on the podcasts that you can ask project questions. If you are preparing for an exam, there will be more assurance that you will pass your next exam, you will be given cliff notes if you are a member, and so much more. Go to www.gbes.com/join to learn more about the 4 different levels of access to this one-of-a-kind career-advancing green building community! If you truly enjoyed the show, don't forget to leave a positive rating and review on iTunes.  We have prepared more episodes for the upcoming weeks, so come by again next week! Thank you for tuning in to the Green Building Matters Podcast!   Copyright © 2020 GBES

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Youth mental health researchers awarded $33 million from US institute

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2020 7:08


The Australian youth mental health organisation Orygen was given a massive boost overnight, receiving a $33 million grant from the National Institutes on Health in the United States.

Encounter  - Voice of America
Lebanon in Crisis

Encounter - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2020 25:00


In the aftermath of the devastating explosion at the port of Beirut, Lebanon, Mona Yacoubian, Senior Advisor to the Vice President of Middle East and Africa at the US Institute of Peace (USIP) and Hussein Ibish, Senior Resident Scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington (AGSIW), discuss the economic, political and humanitarian ramifications with host Carol Castiel.

The Whole View
Episode 416: How We're Thriving with ADHD in Quarantine & Virtual School

The Whole View

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2020 98:43


Welcome back to the Whole View, episode 416. (0:27) As our regular listeners can tell, it is opposite day, as Sarah is kicking off the podcast. This week we are going to be talking about Stacy's experience with children with ADHD, and how they have been handling quarantine and virtual schooling. Stacy has received this question from a lot of people, especially as we are all getting ready for another school year to begin. Sarah's kids' start date for school was delayed by two weeks so that all of the teachers could get training on the virtual platforms. They are in the ramp-up to school phase in their home. In Virginia, schools were set to begin in August, but have been pushed by a two-week delay as well. Everyone is looking at how to set their families up for success. We are going to talk about how Stacy's family has worked to set themselves up for success.   Listener's Question This week we have a really great question from Brooke. (2:35) "Long time podcast listener - yes, I’ve stuck with you since the early days and love how your podcast has evolved over the years.  I’m a mom of 3 boys all with varying degrees of ADHD. My husband has more than a dusting himself but is not formally diagnosed. Stacy, I loved your description of living in a house of 80%ers - it made me giggle because it totally resonated. I’d love to hear more about how you look after you, maintain some semblance of normal family life, deal with ADHD behaviors in public and live in a house that’s not a tip when you’re surrounded by ADHD. In short, how do you not lose your mind with the challenging aspects? Knowing that the men in my life didn’t choose this just doesn’t cut it anymore.  Many thanks, Brooke."   Stacy's Experience To introduce everyone to Stacy's experience with this, she has two children - one with ADD and one with ADHD. (5:05) Her husband is formally diagnosed with more than a dusting. This also runs on his side of the family, with Matt's brothers all having varying forms. Stacy wants to note that these are almost always paired with sleep and mood disorders. A lot of depression and anxiety also pairs in with these conditions. So when we think about an attention disorder we think of a child who is a busy bee, so to speak or someone who can't focus on a test. It is a lot more than that though, with a formal diagnosis it affects more than just their ability to focus on simple tasks. As we talk about the context of this, it is important to remind yourself that this is a medical condition and that it really can't be helped. While we can do things to modify the lifestyle factors, likely a person in your life that you love has conditions that have some sort of aspect of this. Stacy would be surprised if there was someone who didn't know someone with depression at some point in their life. She also shared the way that she processes her feelings around these conditions. In this week's episode, Stacy hopes to shares tools that are applicable to those who have family members with one of these conditions.   Communication is Key First things first, is to communicate. (10:34) If you are not talking about something, that is just making it worse. Sometimes it is hard to say you are frustrated or to find the words, but this is something that Stacy really encourages in their household. This is not something to be ashamed of or embarrassed by. In fact, it’s helpful to be able to point to an explanation of behavior. For example, one of the brothers who doesn’t have ADD/ADHD gets quite frustrated when another gets distracted and doesn’t do chores. There’s a feeling of inequality that can then be explained with a medical condition. This helps to serve as an explanation, not an excuse.   Patience The next thing is patience. (12:27) Stacy knows this is a hard one, she is there, but she expects to need to repeat herself before she is truly heard. To set people up for success, Stacy sets people up with jobs that are consistent, they have a list, they have things they can refer back to for reminders, and they have tasks that are best suited for them. Stacy reminds herself that it’s not intentional, that their brain literally forgot what they were doing and they went on to do something else. However, these are tasks that each of the kids picked from a list of everything that needed to be done. Stacy has raised her kids to be independent, to feel empowered, and to feel that they can succeed in the things they know they have done before. As they have a new family member, the chores that this family member has are things they have done before. Again, it boils down to setting them up for success, empowering them, and building their confidence. It minimizes frustrations to set kids up for success and pride. With ADHD, this has been critical to their success in quarantine in general. They approached this season in life as a team and looked at all the shared responsibilities and how to support each and every member of the family. Most of the time they are happy to help, and they do get an allowance as well. Stacy and Matt use an app called Green Light, which allows them to manage their chores and pay them via a card that they can load. Don't have unrealistic expectations. We as adults are tired of this pandemic as well.   Pick Your Battles This leads Stacy to her next point, which is to let somethings go and pick your battles. (20:50) Stacy is far less concerned with the boy's beds being made, than she is with them being kind to one another or if they are generally, genuinely being helpful. So this is the perspective she tries to maintain when she is frustrated. Stacy will often ask herself if something is worth it when she finds herself angry or frustrated. One example that Stacy shared is one of her kid's clothing preferences and giving him room to make those choices. What he is wearing in not the battle Stacy wants to pick. It is far more important to Stacy that when her son is outside he helps their elderly neighbor carry her bags into her house, as opposed to what he is wearing. As a parent, Stacy feels that it is her job to help them become the best version of themselves that they can be. To also shape them into kind, helpful adults. She doesn't want to change them to fit the mold that she wants them to be. One of the things that Stacy does is ask herself, "if this was a behavior that they were exhibiting as an adult, would it be appropriate and would it be beneficial?".   Creating Space Sarah asked Stacy if she has any strategies for how to defuse anger in the heat of the moment. (28:58) Stacy does try to do breathing. Just as a situation is starting to build up and overwhelm you, it is helpful to do that deep breath through the nose and out the mouth. If you do a deep pattern a few times in a row, it will give you a break to collect yourself before you react. The thing that is more effective for Stacy personally that her kids and husband respond to is to walk away from things when they are not time-sensitive. When things are not going in a positive direction, they take a break and talk about it again in a few hours. Matt does really well if he goes outside and takes a walk to separate himself from what is physically happening. Self-care resonates with Stacy when she is taking a break. Creating any space where you can give yourself a break is going to really help. Use these techniques to ask yourself if your expectations are reasonable, if you could create flexibility or small wins, or can you better understand their perspective. Whatever is happening to you, you are not alone. This just happens to be a concentrated season when you feel like you can't get a break. So you need to create that space to take your break. Sarah shared that one of the things she has struggled with most during quarantine is the loss of alone time. There is an overstimulation aspect. As a family, they have had to have a conversation about how to respect each other's personal time and space. This ensures that when they come together as a family, that time actually serves as quality family time. It has been helpful to have spaces where they each could retreat to while they defuse the stuff that is meaningless.   Sarah's Experience Everyone in Sarah's family is an introvert and everyone needs their recharge time by themselves. (36:14) They all get more energy from time alone. In addition to being introverts, they are all very social, so also need social time together. If they haven't had kind and respectful social time if they haven't had recharge, alone time. So this has been one of the things they have had to navigate over the summer months. And they will again have to find a new system as the kids begin school in a few weeks. Sarah's girls happen to be planners and having an idea of what to expect really helps them. Knowing what to expect helps them adjust better to change. Right now they are talking through the different interpretations of the academic schedule and what they could mean for their daily routines. In Sarah's house, routine is essential. Sarah shared information from an interview she recently watched that featured a psychologist discussing some of the challenges with quarantine from a mental health perspective. One of the things that he said is that the brain doesn't know the difference between a big decision and a small decision. The brain doesn't know the difference between the higher levels vs. lower levels of stress when making a decision. When we can take decisions out, and rely on routine, this helps to decrease the decision burden on the brain. This is something that Sarah has really internalized in terms of how they approach their time when every day feels the same.   Routines Stacy completely agrees with having some sort of schedule, list, or plan that the kids can expect. (40:01) Regardless of age, or conditions, or personality types, all humans want to know what to expect. It feels like chaos for most people to go into the day without a plan. Stacy sets the expectation of what she needs to accomplish each day, and she does the same for the kids. For the kids, she makes it clear what needs to be accomplished before they have screentime or before they do 'x'. This way it is up to them to set the pace on their tasks. Otherwise, there is not much else for them to do besides playing together, being active, reading, etc., which are all things Stacy is in full support of. This also allows them to have a little sense of control and independence that is really needed for kids as they get older. Stacy noted how you could set up a toddler for success in their schedule as well. This can look different and be tailored to each family, but some kind of structure is key for all humans. The only thing that Stacy would add to Sarah's alone time recommendation is to add in some quality positive time. You need to proactively create that time that you are spending together either playing games, telling stories, or watching shows together. Cultivate positivity around the time that you spend together so that when you are together as a family, it doesn't feel like is all you are doing is chores or nagging.   Creating a Process The last thing that ties into all of this is to create a process that works for the child. (44:22) Specifically speaking within the context of ADD and ADHD, oftentimes by instinct we do the things that work for us. However, your child might thrive in a different environment, so it is really important to tailor and figure out exactly what is ideal for that child. Stacy knows that this is difficult and is something that she continues to work on. It is our job as adults and parents to bend what we need to do to at least meet our child in the middle to help them be the most successful as they can be. You can adjust and tailor this over time, and it will get easier as they get older. For Stacy, for her child to process what she is asking of them, she has to make sure that they are looking at her in the eyes as she talks to them. She has to go to them and squat down to their level. Stacy also has to be able to read if/how they are distracted and connect with them physically while she is talking to them to further make sure she is heard. Sometimes she will also have her child repeat what she said to make sure they heard her properly. The other thing that Stacy needs to learn and adjust to is to not delegate more than two things to her child with ADHD. Stacy will delegate one task and then have her child report back once that is done, and delegate another task accordingly. This is how her child is successful, and he has gotten better. They have made a lot of progress and they will continue to make progress as he gets older. But you have to meet your kids where they are, no matter what their difficulties are. This has been Stacy's guide to success.   Phrasing & Cues One of the things that are important as you communicate and have patience is to have words for when things are going in a direction that is not positive. (49:34) When Stacy sees impulse control is a problem, she will say to them, "it seems like you are not in control of your body why don't you go take a break." In Stacy's house, they have this phrase that they use that helps them recognize what Stacy means and what she is talking about. This makes it so that Stacy doesn't have to explain herself each time or point out the bad thing they did. Is all she has to do is say, "Hey - it looks like you are having a moment. Let's take a break and we will come back together later to talk about this." They also have code words in their family when people are being triggered for things. Each member of the family uses the code words when they need to, and everyone else respects the rules associated with that word accordingly.   The Lifestyle Things - Family Meetings Some of the things that Stacy wants to lead into that Sarah can provide input to are the lifestyle things. (52:17) Family meetings are one of those lifestyle things. These are used as a way to connect, to get on the same page together as a family, and are not places where Stacy yells at people. The family meeting is not the place for that. If things start to get frustrating and voices become elevated, Stacy and Matt will try to pull it back a little bit as parents. They will encourage their kids to use the 'I feel' phrase to express what they are feeling at that moment. Creating a forum where everyone feels like they are heard is really critical for not letting situations be a snowball that gets worse over time. They call family meetings for everything. Stacy tries to make sure it is not a negative space.   Movement & Diet Some other lifestyle and diet changes, which Stacy is not going to go super deep into because we discussed them in this episode. (54:29) You can hear the growth and progress in Cole's life from that episode to now. One of the things that were big for Cole when he was younger was to provide relief for the physical need for movement. They did this by using a yoga ball for a chair, providing a tool they could physically fidget with, and ensured that there were breaks. People with ADHD and ADD have physical energy that builds up in their body and they need physical breaks. Going gluten-free and limiting dairy were also helpful pieces they incorporated. They did eliminate dairy for a long time but have brought back high-quality dairy in high-fat forms and in limited quantities. Stacy has also found that avoiding food dye is also very helpful for her kids. All of these things help them maintain the highest level of control over their body. Sarah shared her experience with how one of her daughters react when she eats something with food-dye. The best way to gauge what your child is affected by is an elimination diet. There are a million different tests that your pediatrician can run to see what your child is allergic to. However, the only way to see how your child reacts to things is to remove the foods in question from their diet and reintroduce.   Supplements We did a show dedicated to melatonin, which you can find here. (1:01:09) Melatonin has been so helpful because adequate sleep is critical. Kids with ADHD and ADD often have a difficult time sleeping, especially if they are on a stimulant medication. Even without medication though, it has been so helpful for Wesley. He gets anxiety at night and goes through phases when he needs melatonin at night. Probiotics, because as we have talked about on this show, gut health is health. He takes Just Thrive probiotics just like Stacy does. The other two things that Stacy recently mentioned are fish oil and coffee. Sarah has some science on these two things though, so Stacy is going to turn things over and let her explain the research behind these two supplements.   Omega-3 Supplementation Coffee needs an update since episode 145 was the last time we covered that, and we haven't covered fish oil supplementation for ADHD in greater scientific detail. (1:02:55) There have actually been enough studies now looking at fish oil supplementation as a primary approach to ADHD and ADD. We have studies showing that people with ADHD tend to have much lower levels of the long-chain omega-3's, especially DHA in their blood cells. There are researchers that actually think that a deficiency in DHA and EPA drives the neurotransmitter imbalances that are causing the behavioral manifestations and cognitive manifestations of ADHD. Studies have shown that supplementation of doses of at least 500 mg per day very significantly improves both the clinical symptom scores, as well as cognition measurements that are associated with ADHD.   Anoter Listener Question Sharon asks, "In your recent podcast you discussed your doctor's recommendation to increase your son's fish oil.(1:09:00) You said he was taking Rosita cod liver oil and I was immediately concerned. Fish oil and cod liver oil in particular has some major differences. Cod liver oil is extremely high in Vitamin A. It can be toxic in large doses and cod liver oil has a large dose, according to WebMD. You probably know this and are doing just fine, but I wanted to give you this info, just in case."   Vitamin A Toxicity Sharon is absolutely right that there is a big difference between any fish liver oil and fish oil. (1:09:33) It is because of the oil from the organs versus the oil from the muscles. They are both very high in omega-3's, but fish liver oil has a much higher vitamin content. It has quite a bit of vitamin A, but also a high dose of vitamin D, and it has a little bit of E and K as well. This is one of the reasons why Sarah chooses cod liver oil because vitamin A dietary insufficiency is very common. A teaspoon serving of Rosita extra virgin cod liver oil has about 3900 IUs of vitamin A. That is 78% of the adult daily value. It also has 395 IUs of vitamin D, which is 98% of the adult daily value. However, there is a really interesting common misconception about vitamin A toxicity. The US Institute of Medicine's daily tolerable upper-level intake for vitamin A has been set quite low. Some vitamins have what is called a UL, an upper level, where they basically say that staying below that level means that you are in a safe zone for avoiding toxicity levels. So the upper level for vitamin A is different for age and gender. However, for children ages 9 to 13, it is about 5600 IUs per day, and for adults, it is about 10,000 IUs per day. This is set based on a couple of different things. The things that they are looking at to set the upper level are changes to bone mineral density, birth defects, and abnormalities in liver health. So the data that is going into the UL is basically very narrowly defined. What is important to understand about vitamin A is that toxicity is extremely rare in the context of whole foods. It is basically been seen in the consumption of seal liver, polar bear liver - forms of the liver that can literally have millions of units of vitamin A in a very small amount. And it is typically seen in the context of supplementation in conjunction with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin A toxicity requires very high doses of vitamin A. So in children, we see acute vitamin A toxicity at 300,000 IUs a day, which is an accidental dose. If you are going to be taking high doses of vitamin A, it is important to know where your vitamin D levels are at. Test don't guess - and then retest. There is a growing body of scientific literature showing that vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency is associated with ADHD and that supplementation has been shown to improve symptoms.   The Latest Science on Coffee Sarah was really interested to see what new research had been published since we did episode 145. (1:17:55) There are more animal studies looking at caffeine and ADHD. Caffeine was first adjusted as a management tool for ADHD in 1973, and there have been a variety of studies that have looked at caffeine pills or coffee for symptom management. Most of the studies have been uncontrolled, and most have been relatively small. Caffiene is psychoactive for all of us. Sarah explains how it works in the body, in addition to the downstream effects. Studies have shown that caffiene consumption works best as a low dose. Optimal doses are somewhere around 150 milligrams of caffiene per day. So the studies show that coffee is more effective than nothing, and probably not as effective as various medication options for ADHD. Of course, the side effects of caffiene consumption are much more tolerable than some of these medications, as some of these medications have really undesirable side effects and higher rates of adverse reactions. There is a call for coffee to be reconsidered as the first course of action in treatment. Sarah noted that it would be ideal to address the nutrient deficiencies that are contributing to the neurotransmitter imbalances. Then use caffiene as a management tool. Sarah explained the findings from this study released in April, in addition to this paper from 2018. If you look at the body of scientific literature over the last five years, there is still the same need for big scale, randomized placebo-controlled, clinical trials. However, the mechanistic understanding has become more robust and has made a stronger case for someone to go and do those big clinical research trials. Stacy has found it to be more effective and less effective at different times for the kids.  It is one of those things that as you are looking to help your ADHD, the need fluctuates. And Stacy does feel like it relates to the other things you are doing in your life as to how much caffiene you might need.    Medication Stacy will say that they were fortunate that none of their boys have gone on medication. (1:26:24) They have been able to focus on the lifestyle and supplements they have talked about throughout this episode.  Stimulant medication for ADD and ADHD often have side effects that Stacy is trying to avoid. Matt has been on them from a young age and they are very difficult to come off of as an adult.  The side effects become more dangerous over time, which is also a really hard thing to deal with. If you are feeling like you need additional support now that you are at home, you could ask your medical professional about a non-stimulant medication that can now potentially be used.  Stacy noted that what is really great about it is that it is not a controlled substance.   Closing Thoughts Stacy thinks she covered everything. (1:29:34) Sarah agreed that this was a wide-ranging episode in terms of strategies, but that is the big take home.  This is not about implementing one strategy but instead looking at this from a whole-life, whole-family approach.  Sarah feels that this isn't information that is only relevant to those living with family members with ADHD.  These techniques are helpful to anyone who is trying to adapt to quarantine life. Putting these strategies into place can help to set us all up for success in not just this new environment, but beyond.  Sarah feels that it is nice to have an episode where we tackle a broad range of strategies because it is grounding.  It helps to reflect on our current strategies to see where to fine-tine. So much of this is broadly applicable, and yet so much of it needs to be individualized to a child's unique temperament and needs. The most important thing during this really challenging time is to give all of ourselves some grace.  We are being challenged in ways that are completely new.  This has never happened in human history. It is a process, and it is ok if it is not easy.  We as parents or caretakers oftentimes want things to be perfect, but it is the difficult times that we work through where we learn and grow the most. If we let our children learn how to do things that they might not know how to do right away or how to do well, but how to work through their frustrations, this will help them as an adult in a positive way. If they think they need to just suck it up, then as an adult they are stuck not knowing how to positively and constructively communicate with others.  This has been really important for Stacy as a parent, to remind herself that she is teaching them how to do this better as an adult.  Again, learning how to constructively communicate with other people is a skill that almost all adults want or need to work on.  Thank you listeners for asking these questions.  Stacy hopes that it was helpful.  She is just a mom, as well as a foster mom, and makes mistakes, which is part of what being a parent is.  Every day is not going to be perfect or great.  There will be bad days and good days, and that is ok.  We hope that this inspires you to at least be honest with yourself about those things and to maybe hold a family meeting and share how you are feeling with your family.  Thank you, listeners! We will be back again next week! (1:38:01)

Global in the Granite State
Global in the Granite State #21 - The Africa Episode

Global in the Granite State

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2020 35:12


During this episode we cover a wide range of topics on issues facing the African continent. Through our discussions with Susan Stigant, Director of Africa Programs at the US Institute of Peace, you will learn about the current state of Sudan, one year after they overthrew the dictator, Omar al-Bashir. Also, in conversations with Rain for the Sahel and Sahara, we cover the COVID-19 pandemic in the region, and the work of this organization to build resiliency through education and training. Susan Stigant: Susan Stigant is the director of Africa Programs at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) where she oversees programming in South Sudan, Nigeria, Sudan, CAR, DRC, Tanzania and Kenya and with the African Union. Susan’s thematic focus is on the design and implementation of inclusive constitutional reform and national dialogue processes. She has and continues to advise government officials and civil society actors on inclusive processes in Sudan, South Sudan, Libya, Somalia and elsewhere. Susan also serves as co-chair of USIP's national dialogue working group. Prior to joining USIP, she managed constitutional development, citizen engagement and election observation programs with the National Democratic Institute (NDI). From 2005-2011, she served as program director with NDI in South Sudan, where she supported the implementation of the peace agreement. She also worked with the Forum of Federations on comparative federalism and with the research unit of the Western Cape Provincial Parliament in South Africa. Rebecca Black: Rebecca recently returned to the US after 25 years with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Most recently, she was Mission Chief in Cambodia, managing a diverse assistance portfolio with emphasis on governance and health. Prior to that, she served as Mission Chief in Mali during a period of turmoil following a Coup d’Etat and rebel take-over of the northern two thirds of the country. She also co-led a $2.5 billion assistance program in Afghanistan, and managed economic development and urban environment programs in India, South Africa, and Eastern Europe. Rebecca has a Masters in City Planning from MIT. Susan Fine: Susan began her career as a Peace Corps Volunteer and ultimately spent 30-years with the US Agency for International Development (USAID), including two years as Senior Deputy Assistant Administrator responsible for development policy and representing the U.S. in multilateral forums. Susan led USAID’s technical and logistical support to Southern Sudan’s 2011 self-determination referendum. As Mission Director for Senegal and the Sahel she guided a ground-breaking resilience program in Niger and Burkina Faso. Susan holds a Masters in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School. Susan is based in Sunapee, NH and serves as a Senior Associate with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Katherine Kolios: Katherine’s experience spans education, sexual and reproductive health, nutrition, and malaria prevention. She joined RAIN in 2017 having lived, worked, and studied in Francophone communities throughout Africa, South America, and Europe. Katherine has experience working in the field and in headquarters of organizations large and small. Currently, she leads RAIN’s strategic planning, serves as the liaison between Niger and U.S. operations, and ensures RAIN has the resources needed to implement programs effectively in tandem with community partners. She is a graduate of Brandeis University’s Health: Science, Society and Policy program.

More and More Every Day
1.37. You Need to Un-Learn the Things You Were Taught (with Miranda Rivers)

More and More Every Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2020 34:56


Miranda Rivers from the US Institute of Peace joins us to talk about nonviolent action, protest, and social change in the #COVID19era. She's the first people we've interviewed outside of the field of education to get some perspective on the role of schools, teachers, and students in the move toward a better future.Miranda's watershed moment was the national reaction to the murder of George Floyd in May 2020. She finds herself pondering why our current social, economic, and political environments shaped the call to action in May and June 2020. Along with her nonviolent action team, Miranda argues that "building movements requires dialogue and negotiation skills," and she believes that educators play a phenomenal role. Now is the time, she believes, to rethink our curriculum in order to create systemic change. She reflects, "Racism is not new. Police brutality is not new. What is new is COVID. That makes me feel like... we can get through it." She's hoping that out of this we see more empathy and more honestly. Hear Miranda's interview wherever you get your podcasts.Show notes: Take a look at Miranda's articles on peace and nonviolent action. Request an interview with Miranda, contact: interviews@usip.orgConnect with Miranda by emailing her: Miranda.Rivers14@gmail.com Interview Date: 7/2/20Connect with us:Click here to tell us your story.Why is it called More and More Every Day? Click here to read our first More and More post. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @smcchistoryClick here to join our mailing list.

No Fat Cats - A Podcast for Creative Teams
43. Congressman John Lewis — Commemorative Podcast

No Fat Cats - A Podcast for Creative Teams

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2020 20:13


Welcome to a special edition of No Fat Cats, where we are going to take a break from our normal programming to honor someone who very much embodies so many values that our country needs today, Representative John Lewis. I have the privilege of filming the video and audio of an interview with him back on May 6th, 2014 as a part of a team from the US Institute of Peace. Representative John Lewis is know as one of the big six leaders of the Civil Rights Movements. He was arrested and beaten over 40 times, but still stayed true to his principles of nonviolence. To quote from the website JohnLewis.house.gov he is often called quote, "one of the most courageous persons the Civil Rights Movement ever produced” John Lewis has dedicated his life to protecting human rights, securing civil liberties, and building what he calls "The Beloved Community” in America. His dedication to the highest ethical standards and moral principles has won him the admiration of many of his colleagues on both sides of the aisle in the United States Congress. With his passing I felt that it was appropriate to release his full interview in audio format to honor his legacy. Here is the interview that George Lopez conducted with Congressman John Lewis. You will hear his voice off the main mic. Thanks to the team that made this trip possible which included, Anne Hingeley, Laurie Schultz Heim, George Lopez Daryn Cambridge Dominic Kiraly Bill Fitzpatrick You can check out the finished product from that interview here: https://vimeo.com/132440072

More and More Every Day
1.32. Weekly Recap II (with Andrea and Summer)

More and More Every Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2020 69:39


Back in the studio, talking all things #COVID19, #BlackLivesMatter, and #CulturallyRelevantTeaching. We remind ourselves  of the Your Divided Classroom concept. We ask age old questions, like "Are we the sum total of 5 with whom we spend the most time?" "Where did the term social distancing come from?" "What can I do?" and, "How many pumpkins does one person need?" Weekly Recap Highlights:Interviews with the remarkable Dr. Timothy K. Eatman and student-entrepreneur Megan of Texas A&MMiranda Rivers' collaborative piece on nonviolence. Looking ahead to the coming weeks:Eps: Miranda Rivers of the US Institute of Peace, Dr. Keith Catone of Roger Williams, and Guy Goodman of SMCC.Summer presenting on remote interviewing with SOHA on 7/31! Interviews with Dr. Sara Simons of UT and the Black Engineering Faculty Speak team.Andrea and Summer hosting a listening learning session on race and culturally responsive teaching in August. Reach out if you're interested.Shout outs to: Longtime listeners, Wasim, Andrew, Steve and Susan. And greetings new listeners Mike and Chelsea! ASU's Chicano Research CollectionFree oral history training from Columbia UniversityPOD NetworkAndrea's watching #Ozark on Netflix Summer recommends Prince's The Politics of Black Women's Hair, McGivney's Pure Land and Learning in a Burning House - fingers crossed Sonya Douglass Horsford comes on the show! Connect with us:Write for us.Tell us your story.Read our first More and More post.Join our mailing list Follow us on social media @smcchistoryFind us on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts!Recording date: 7/10/20

Moments of Clarity with Tiffany
Manal Omar, International Fixture in Peace Building Here to Discuss Joy and Pleasure for Our Mental Health

Moments of Clarity with Tiffany

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 49:03


Manal Omar is an internationally known figure on the world stage when it comes to peace building, women’s rights negotiations, and so much more more. Manal has several times been named by various media and educational institutions such as Georgetown University as one of the most influential Arabs in the world. There was a great conversation about women's rights, freedoms, access to joy and pleasure, as well as delving in to some more delicate topics. The mood was positive throughout. We have a show with laughter and conversation that flows freely amongst two people who have just become friends, Manal Omar, Founder of Across Red Lines as well as International Superstar Peace Builder working with NGOs and Presidential Administrations and world government and spiritual leaders to protect women and to negotiate peace treaties

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL'S ON STORY PODCAST
GLOW + Crazy Ex-Girlfriend

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL'S ON STORY PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2020 53:56


This week on On Story we’re bringing you discussions with the creative teams behind two hit comedy series. Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch will discuss their Netflix series – GLOW, which chronicles the lives of the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling - a 1980’s women's wrestling circuit. And later, creators Aline Brosh McKenna and Rachel Bloom join filmmaker Katie Hyde to discuss the musical comedy series Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and the documentary Oh My God I Think It’s Over - which chronicled the creation of the final season. Clips of GLOW courtesy of Netflix Clips of Crazy Ex Girlfriend courtesy of  CBS Studios Inc. and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc, and The CW Network On Story is part of a growing number of programs in Austin Film Festival’s On Story Project, including the On Story PBS series, The On Story radio program and podcast and the On Story book series. To find out more about On Story and Austin Film Festival, visit www.onstory.tv or www.austinfilmfestival.com On Story is brought to you in part by the Alice Kleberg Reynolds Foundation, a Texas family providing innovative funding since 1979. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department, the Texas Commission on the Arts, the US Institute of Museum and Library Services and Texas Library and Archives Commission. This program is also made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas the state affiliate for the National Endowment for the Humanities. On Story is supported in part by DePaul University's School of Cinematic Arts. The show is produced by Barbara Morgan, our associate producers are Colin Hyer, Maya Perez, and Kaetie Turner. Our editors are Jamal Knox and Travis Neeley. Audio capture by Travis Kennedy. Music is by Brian Ramos. Production assistance comes from Sound Lab Inc. Travis Kennedy and KUT 90.5 in Austin. Go to AustinFilmFestival.com to find out more about the Austin Film Festival & Conference in October.

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL'S ON STORY PODCAST
On Writing Veep + Beverly Hills Cop

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL'S ON STORY PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2020 53:56


This week on On Story we’ll bring you conversations with two comedy titans. VEEP showrunner and Seinfeld writer David Mandel will discuss the widely successful HBO series that wrapped in 2019 and legendary screenwriter Daniel Petrie, Jr. will examine the 1985 comedy classic Beverly Hills Cop which earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. Clips of Veep courtesy of Home Box Office, Inc Clips of Beverly Hills Cop courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation On Story is part of a growing number of programs in Austin Film Festival’s On Story Project, including the On Story PBS series, The On Story radio program and podcast and the On Story book series. To find out more about On Story and Austin Film Festival, visit onstory.tv or austinfilmfestival.com On Story is brought to you in part by the Alice Kleberg Reynolds Foundation, a Texas family providing innovative funding since 1979. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department, the Texas Commission on the Arts, the US Institute of Museum and Library Services and Texas Library and Archives Commission. This program is also made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas the state affiliate for the National Endowment for the Humanities. On Story is supported in part by DePaul University's School of Cinematic Arts. The show is produced by myself, Barbara Morgan, our associate producers are Colin Hyer, Maya Perez, and Kaetie Turner. Our editors are Jamal Knox and Travis Neeley. Audio capture by Travis Kennedy. Music is by Brian Ramos. Production assistance comes from Sound Lab Inc. Travis Kennedy and KUT 90.5 in Austin. Go to AustinFilmFestival.com to find out more about the Austin Film Festival & Conference in October.  

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
What Kim Jong Un's Health Rumors Teach Us About North Korea

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2020 19:19


If you have been following news recently out of the Korean Peninsula, you may have seen a report that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un was gravely ill. He had, according to this report, undergone heart surgery and was fighting for his life. The thing is, we have no way of knowing whether or not this is true. Patricia Kim joins me to discuss the significance of the rumor about Kim Jong Un's ill-health. She is the senior policy analyst with the China program at US Institute of Peace. We also analyze what we know about North Korea's experience with COVID-19, and what lies ahead for nuclear diplomacy between the United States, North Korea, South Korea, and China.    The bonus episode for premium subscribers this week is a conversation with Richard Haas, the longtime head of the Council on Foreign relations.   https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches https://www.undispatch.com/

Beyond The Game
Kevin Malone Interview - 3/20/2020 - US Institute Against Human Trafficking

Beyond The Game

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 26:31


Kevin Malone joins the program. The former General Manager of the Montreal Expos and LA Dodgers is the founder and president of the US Institute Against Human Trafficking. He talks about the work his ministry is doing and answers some general awareness questions regarding human and sex trafficking.

Encounter  - Voice of America
The Crisis in Syria/Idlib

Encounter - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2020 25:00


Mona Yacoubian, Senior Advisor to the Vice President of Middle East and Africa at the US Institute of Peace and Hussein Ibish, Senior Resident Scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington discuss the current political and humanitarian crisis in Syria, including the fragile ceasefire deal in Syria's Idlib region between Russia and Turkey, with host Carol Castiel. 

DemWorks, a podcast by the National Democratic Institute
16. How do you build inclusion amongst youth? (w/ Lauren Van Metre)

DemWorks, a podcast by the National Democratic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2020 21:57


What are the challenges of democracy and governance work and how you build inclusion, especially amongst youth? DemWorks is back at the US Institute of Peace to continue the discussion on the role of governance in the prevention of violence and to fight violent extremism. NDI’s Lauren van Metre is once again joined at the US Institute of Peace by activists Emna Jeblaoui (Tunisia), Jacob Bul Bior (South Sudan), Samson Itodo (Nigeria) and Aluel Atem (South Sudan).

DemWorks, a podcast by the National Democratic Institute
15. How can we advance democracy and peace? (w/ Lauren Van Metre)

DemWorks, a podcast by the National Democratic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2020 19:28


In the latest episode of DemWorks, NDI’s Lauren van Metre is joined at the US Institute of Peace by global activists Emna Jeblaoui (Tunisia), Jacob Bul Bior (South Sudan), Samson Itodo (Nigeria) and Aluel Atem (South Sudan). They discuss new thinking about mobilizing good governance and the challenge violent extremism poses to democracy.

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL'S ON STORY PODCAST

This week on On Story, CHERNOBYL creator Craig Mazin discusses his HBO five part mini-series. The series tells the true story of the world’s worst nuclear disaster and the remarkable acts of bravery and sacrifice that followed. Mazin’s previous writing credits include IDENTITY THIEF, THE HANGOVER 2 and 3 and THE HUNTSMAN: WINTERS WAR. Mazin spoke at the 26th Austin Film Festival about transitioning from comedy to drama, the difference between writing for film and television, and the responsibility behind fictionalizing a true event. Clips of Chernobyl courtesy of Home Box Office, Inc. On Story is part of a growing number of programs in Austin Film Festival’s On Story Project, including the On Story PBS series, The On Story radio program and podcast and the On Story book series. To find out more about On Story and Austin Film Festival, visit onstory.tv or austinfilmfestival.com. On Story is brought to you in part by the Alice Kleberg Reynolds Foundation, a Texas family providing innovative funding since 1979. This project is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department, the Texas Commission on the Arts, the US Institute of Museum and Library Services and Texas Library and Archives Commission. This program is also made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas the state affiliate for the National Endowment for the Humanities. On Story is supported in part by DePaul University’s School of Cinematic Arts and TooFar Media, immersive story experiences by Rich Shapero. The show is produced by myself, Barbara Morgan, our associate producers are Colin Hyer, Maya Perez, and Kaetie Turner. Our editors are Jamal Knox and Travis Neeley. Audio capture by Travis Kennedy. Music is by Brian Ramos. Production assistance comes from Sound Lab Inc, Travis Kennedy and KUT 90.5 in Austin. Go to AustinFilmFestival.com to find out more about the Austin Film Festival & Conference in October.

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Some truly remarkable events are unfolding in Sudan, where protesters have secured the ouster of longtime ruler Omar al Bashir. After nearly thirty years as an authoritarian president and dictator, he was deposed in coup on April 11. But the protesters have not dispersed and are rallying against the cadre of military officials who have assumed control.   On the line with me to discuss these events is Payton Knopf. He is a former US diplomat and UN official who has worked on Sudan issues for many years. He is currently an advisor to the US Institute for Peace    We kick off discussing the events that lead to the ouster of al Bashir. But we don't dwell too much on that because I actually did a whole other episode about the protest movement and about al Bashir; I published that episode in January, just a few weeks after these protests began.   Rather, we spend the bulk of the conversation discussing this unfolding and fluid situation. Payton Knopf explains who these military rulers of Sudan are--and why it is significant that some of them have trained and deployed militias to Yemen and Libya. We also discuss the implications of an International Criminal Court arrest warrant for al Bashir and the unfolding geo-political dynamic that may influence how this political crisis is resolved.    Before we start, I have a question for you all.   One dynamic I have noticed having done this show for so long is how I, as a, journalist often bring you stories from parts of the world less covered by mainstream outlets or on topics that are globally important but really don't get much coverage--but then you, as a listener have taken some concrete action based on what you have heard. This action could be something as direct as buying the book of the author I interviewed or using your professional connections to follow up on an idea or issue raised in the show. I hear stories of this real world impact from time to time, but I would really love to collect them. So, could you please email me and let me know if an episode inspired you to take some real world action--whatever that may be? These stories of impact are very valuable to me so thank you in advance, You can send me an email using the contact button on Global Dispatches Podcast.com. I'll also post a link to my email in the description field of the podcast if you are listening on your phone.    Email me! 

The All Things Risk Podcast
Ep. 107: Anna Glover and Bryan Huneycutt - Uncertainty and Risk in Live Performances

The All Things Risk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2019 86:49


  This episode was put together as a bit of an experiment – and a very successful one at that. This was our first live recording with an audience and it took place in Louisville, Kentucky at the USITT 2019 conference. USITT is the US Institute for Theatre Technology – and it aims to advance the skills and technology of those working in theatre, entertainment, and the performing arts. Basically, if you think about live shows that might have pyrotechnics, crazy lighting and sound, special effects, amazing stunts and other things, then you aren't far off.  What's interesting about all this is that many of these shows are pushing boundaries and trying new things – and that means risk and uncertainty. Which of course means an open door for some amazing insights. That is exactly what we have for you. My guests are Anna Glover and Bryan Huneycutt.  If you are a long-time listener to the podcast, you will remember Anna as my guest on Episode 11. Anna is currently the Director of Organisational Health and Wellness at the Yale University School of Drama. Bryan works at Disney in Entertainment Safety. Both do cool jobs in helping directors and those involved in live theatre do amazing things and do them safely. We have a fascinating conversation that offers fantastic insights applicable to just about any domain. It also features some very thoughtful questions from the audience. We cover: How to speak truth to power and how to speak up; Building a “just” organisational culture; What to do when things go wrong; Why you should ask questions to which you already know the answers; How to learn from mistakes; Pigeons, yes – pigeons; Much more! Show notes: Anna Glover Consulting Anna on LinkedIn Anna on Instagram Yale School of Drama Bryan on LinkedIn Bryan on Instagram USITT The National Theatre War Horse Duncan Wardle on Creativity _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Like what you heard? Subscribe and/or leave a rating and review on iTunes: http://apple.co/1PjLmK Subscribe on Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/all-things-risk/the-all-things-risk-podcast Subscribe on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/ben-cattaneo Follow the podcast on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RiskThings Drop us a note: allthingsrisk@gmail.com  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Get your free audio book and 30 day free trial at Audible: US listeners: get your free trial and audio book at Audible UK listeners: get your free trial and audio book at Audible _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ I'd like to hear from you! I want to make the show even better – please take two minutes to complete our listener survey.

Unfunded List Open Door Philanthropy
Open Door Philanthropy Season Sh3 Episode 9: Alex Amouyel of MIT/SOLVE

Unfunded List Open Door Philanthropy

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2019 41:44


Open Door Philanthropy Season Sh3 Episode 9 features Alex Amouyel of SOLVE. Unfunded List snuck our microphones into the Nexus Summit at the US Institute of Peace this March. Nexus is a network of philanthropists and entrepreneurs from all over the world - Alex and Dave first met years ago at a previous Nexus gathering. Unfunded List’s Open Door Philanthropy Podcast gathers philanthropists, entrepreneurs, and changemakers of all stripes. Season Sh3 highlights women in our sector and explores the unique experiences of being woman-identified in philanthropy. Hosted by Dave Moss, Unfunded List’s founder who started Unfunded List in 2015 to help make sure that the next generation of changemakers get the feedback and recognition they need to be successful. Our mission is to demystify and open the door to private philanthropy for the general public while providing a platform for our guests to discuss their work. Unfunded List reviews funding proposals twice annually from small and mid-size nonprofits and social impact startups. The 200+ philanthropy experts on our evaluation committee give helpful and candid feedback about each grant proposal’s weaknesses & strengths. Then we publish the best proposals to our list that we circulate to a rolodex of foundations and philanthropists in the hopes that we can find some funding and partnerships for these amazing unfunded proposals. We are always looking for evaluators willing to volunteer time to give feedback to unfunded changemakers! Unfunded List is currently accepting proposals for our Fall 2019 evaluation round until August 15, 2019. We invite your org to join the 100+ projects our funding evaluators have given feedback to since 2015. Find out more at www.unfundedlist.com. *Note, this episode was conducted live on location in a less-than-ideal acoustic environment. We will make an effort to make episode transcripts available on our website.

Heidi Harris Show
Heidi Harris Show Podcast #148: Guest – Kevin Malone, President of the US Institute Against Human Trafficking

Heidi Harris Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2019


YES, sex trafficking is a problem. YES, people are being held against their will, even in America. Kevin Malone, former Dodgers VP and GM, has spent the last ten years trying to free people from the sex industry. He is the President of the US Institute Against Human Trafficking. Anyone who thinks making it “legal” […] The post Heidi Harris Show Podcast #148: Guest – Kevin Malone, President of the US Institute Against Human Trafficking appeared first on Heidi Harris Show.

Podcast Salam Lita
007 Salam Lita - Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative (YSEALI) Friendship

Podcast Salam Lita

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2019 27:20


Assalamu’alaikum! Salam teman-teman Sahabat Alam! Episode 6 kali ini, saya berkesempatan untuk sharing bersama sahabat saya Cut Ervida Diana. Kami kenal sejak tahun 2014 saat mengikuti program SUSI (Study of the US Institute) for Student Leaders atau sekarang nama bekennya YSEALI (Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative) for Academic Fellow Program dalam Bidang Lingkungan Hidup. Perjalanan kami semenjak 5 tahun yang lalu bisa dibilang sangat menarik diceritakan, makanya Episode 6 saya sebut “YSEALI Friendship”. Dari YSEALI saya mengenal persahabatan yang saling melengkapi satu sama lain. Penasaran cerita lengkapnya? Jangan lupa @satumejacom SatuMeja.com/PodcastSalamLita atau Anchor, Spotify hari ini ya. Stay tune untuk update selanjutnya. Bagi teman-teman yang pengen bertanya setelah Episode 6. tulis komentar di bawah ini ya

Congressional Dish
CD180: How Congress Spent Your Taxes in 2018

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2018 150:11


Every year, the President submits a budget request to Congress, but how much attention does Congress pay to those requests? In this episode, we compare the Trump administration requests to the amounts actually provided by Congress for fiscal year 2018. Please Support Congressional Dish - Quick Links Click here to contribute a lump sum or set up a monthly contribution via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish for each episode via Patreon Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Use your bank’s online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North Number 4576 Crestview, FL 32536 Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD062: The Farm Bill Additional Reading Report: Feds to give $1.5 million for Mississippi town's gas line, MyPlainview, September 4, 2018. Article: Federal grant aims to build drone industry near Del. River & Bay's NJ airport, Delaware Business Now, September 4, 2018. Community Bulletin: U.S. Department of Commerce awards $2 million for workforce training in Sylva, Mauntain Xpress, September 4, 2018. Article: How rising inequality has widened the justice gap by Robert H. Frank, The New York Times, August 31, 2018. Report: Agency gets $3.6M for affordable housing in NM by ABQJournal News Staff, Albuquerque Journal, August 30th, 2018. Report: BGSU helps get $1 million grant for Delta water improvements by BGSU Marketing and Communications, Sentinel-Tribune, August 29, 2018. Report: Agriculture department will pay $4.7 billion to farmers hit in trade war by Bill Chappell, NPR, August 28, 2018. Ranking: The 25 richest American families, ranked by Hillary Hoffower, Business Insider, July 28, 2018. Article: Got drones that can man the border? The DHS may have an opportunity for you. by Robert J. Terry, Washington Business Journal, May 4, 2018. Report: DHS is putting the finishing touches on a new personnel system for its cyber workforce by Nicole Ogrysko, Federal News Radio, March 8, 2018. Article: Michigan gambled on charter schools. Its children lost. by Mark Binelli, The New York Times, September 5, 2017. Article: CDFIs rack up colossal returns for the American people by Anthony Price, New York Business Journal, April 27, 2017. Article: If Trump cuts this little-known federal program, it will gut low-income communities by Eillie Anzilotti, Fast Company, March 16, 2017. Article: A sobering look at what Betsy DeVos did to education in Michigan - and what she might do as secretary of education by Valerie Strauss, The Washington Post, December 8, 2016. Article: Drones, so useful in war, may be too costly for border duty, by Ron Nixon, The New York Times, November 2, 2016. Report: DHS: 'We're not looking for the 30-year-career employee' by Nicole Ogrysko, Federal News Radio, July 5, 2016. Report: Do the employment requirements for eligibility apply to everyone? [Food Stamps], Eligibility.com, February 6, 2016. Report: OPM's Bailey to take on DHS' morale, engagement challenges by Jason Miller, Federal News Radio, January 6, 2016. Report: OPM OKs 1,000 cyber positions at DHS by Meredith Somers, Federal News Radio, November 10, 2015. Article: Teenage stowaway said to survive 2,300-mile flight to Hawaii in the wheel well of jet by Lindsey Bever, The Washington Post, April 21, 2014. Report: Walmart workers cost taxpayers $6.2 billion in public assistance by Clare O'Connor, Forbes, April 15, 2014. Resources About Page: CDFI Fund American Council on Education: A brief guide to the federal budget and appropriations process The American Presidency Project: Franklin D. Roosevelt Analysis: An analysis of the President's 2018 budget, Congressional Budget Office, July 13, 2017. Aviation Security International Info: Perimeter Intrusion Detection Systems for Airports, June 10, 2014. Congress.gov Resources: Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2018 Congressional Research Service: The Congressional Appropriations Process: An Introduction Congressional Research Service: Department of Homeland Security Appropriations: FY2018 EDA.gov: U.S. Economic Development Administration FedBizOpps.gov: Robotic Aircraft Sensor Program (RASP) - Borders (B) Medicaid.gov Info: Eligibility National & Community Service Info: What is Americorps? Office of Community Service Programs: Social Services Block Grant (SSBG) Programs Report: Nutrition Assistance Programs Repost May 2018 TSA Info: Screening Partnership Program U.S. Department of Labor Info: Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers Budget Outline   Department of Agriculture Child Nutrition Programs School breakfast program equipment grants Trump administration requested to eliminate the grants Congress increased funding by 20%, to a total of $30 million Total for all Child Nutrition Programs Trump administration requested a 6% increase Congress increased the budget by a little less than Trump wanted to a total of $24.2 billion Food Stamps: Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women (SNAP)  Trump administration requested a 6.5% cut, or almost $5 billion  Congress cut by a little under 6% for a total of a little over $74 billion  Foreign Food Assistance Trump administration requested an almost 90% cut Congress increased the budget by almost 8%, to a total of a little over $2 billion  Food and Drug Administration Trump administration requested to change how the FDA is funded Trump administration requested that the FDA’s tax money cut by 34% but then wanted to make up the almost $1 billion shortfall and add funding by increasing fees on drug producers. All of these fees are paid by the companies in order to fund the expedited FDA approval process for their products:   Medical devices and drugs for humans: Trump administration requested a 67% increase in prescription drug user fees  Congress increased by 21% Trump administration requested a 90% increase in generic drug user fees  Congress increased by 53% Trump administration requested an almost 350% increase in medical device user fees  Congress increased by 53% Animal drugs: Trump administration requested an over 300% increase in animal drug user fees Congress decreased by 23% Trump administration requested a 163% increase in animal generic drug user fees Congress decreased by 17% Tobacco fees Trump administration requested an almost 6% increase in fees Congress enacted Trump’s request  Crop Insurance Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Trump administration requested an about 5% cut, or $422 million Congress increased the budget by about 3%, to a total of almost $9 billion  Commodity Credit Corporation Fund Trump administration requested to cut “Reimbursement for net realized losses” by almost 18%, an almost $4 billion cut  Congress cut it more, by 33%, or $7 billion, to a total of $14.3 billion     Department of Commerce Total funding: $11.1 billion   Economic Development Administration Trump administration requested an 89% cut Congress increased the budget by 9%, to a total of a little over $300 million   Minority Business Development Administration Trump administration requested an 82% cut Congress increased the budget by about 15% to a total of $39 million      Department of Justice Total funding: $30.3 billion    Legal Services Corporation Trump administration requested a 91% cut Congress increased its funding by 6%, to a total of $410 million State and local law enforcement assistance Trump administration requested an over 30% cut Congress increased funding by over 30%, to a total of over $1.6 billion  Juvenile justice programs Trump administration requested a 44% cut Congress increased the funding by over 14% to about $280 million    Science Total funding: $28.5 billion   National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Trump administration requested a 16% cut Congress increased the funding by 4%, to a total of almost $6 billion  National Science Foundation Trump administration requested an 11% cut Congress increased their budget by 4%, to a total of $7.7 billion   Department of Defense Total funding: $647.4 billion   Total Funding Trump administration requested a 6% funding increase  Congress increased by over 10%, by more than $61 billion, to a total of over $647 billion  Global War on Terror Funding Total funding Trump administration requested a 5% funding increase  Congress increased funding just slightly more than Trump’s request, to a total of over $65 billion  War on Terror "Space procurement”  A new category requested by the Trump administration, Congress provided the over $2.2 million request.   War on Terror National Guard and Reserve Equipment  Trump administration requested to eliminate all $750 million in funding Congress almost doubled the National Guard’s War on Terror equipment fund to $1.3 billion.  War on Terror "Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative” Trump administration requested to eliminate all $150 million in funding Congress increased the funding by a third to $200 million War on Terror Afghanistan Security Forces Fund Trump administration requested to increase funding by 16% Congress increased funding by over 9%, to a total of over $4.6 billion War on Terror Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund Trump administration requested to increase by 83% Congress increased funding by Trump’s exact request, to a total of over $1.7 billion  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation  Trump administration requested a 14% increase, by more than $10 billion Congress increased funding by 22%, to a total of over $88 billion  Procurement Total Trump administration requested a 5% increase Congress increased funding by over 23%, to a total of $133.8 billion  Army aircraft Trump administration requested a 9% cut Congress increased the budget by 21%, to $5.5 billion Navy aircraft Trump administration requested a 7% cut worth over $1 billion Congress increased funding by almost 24%, by almost $4 billion, to a total of almost $20 billion Navy shipbuilding Trump administration requested a 3.5% cut  Congress increased the budget by 13% to a total of $23.8 billion  Army weapons and combat vehicles Trump administration requested a 8% increase Congress almost doubled the funding, to a total of almost $4.4 billion Air force aircraft Trump administration requested an 8% increase Congress decided to increase the budget by almost 30%, to a total of $18.5 billion    Military Construction and Veterans Defense Construction: $11 billion Department of Veterans Affairs: $185 billion  Grand total: $205.8 billion   "Overseas Contingency Operations" Navy Trump administration requested Navy OCO funding be eliminated Congress cut funding by 87%, to a total of $13 million Army Trump administration requested $124 million, up from $0 in 2017 Congress provided 5% more than the request, a total of over $130 million Air Force Trump administration requested funding to double Congress increased funding by 164%, to a total of over $275 million Reserve funding for every branch was eliminated Total Trump administration requested a 7% increase Congress increased funding by 8%, to a total of $750 million European Deterrence / Reassurance Initiative  Army Trump administration requested a 16% cut  Congress granted the Trump administration’s request for almost $16 million Navy Trump administration requested a 13% cut Congress cut funding by 7%, to a total of almost $20 million Air Force Trump administration requested a 300% increase Congress granted the Trump administration’s request for over $270 million Total Congress increased funding by 153%, to a total of over $306 million Military Construction Trump administration requested a 40% increase Congress provided a 42% increase, to a total of over $11 billion  Veterans Administration Medical and prosthetic research Trump administration requested a 5% cut Congress increased funding by 7%, to a total of $722 million  Veterans Administration Total: Mandatory and Discretionary Trump administration requested a 3% increase Congress provided 4.5% increase, to a total of over $185 billion    Department of Energy Total funding: $34.5 billion   Energy Programs Sustainable Transportation Trump administration requested a 70% cut Congress increased funding by 10%, to a total of $674 million Energy Efficiency  Trump administration requested a 70% cut, including the complete elimination of weatherization programs and energy program grants to the states.  Congress increased funding by 13%m to a total of $858 million  Renewable Energy Trump administration requested a 70% cut Congress increased funding by 15%, to a total of $519 million Solar energy: $241 million  Water power: $105 million Wind energy: $92 million Geothermal technologies: $81 million  Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Total Trump administration requested almost a 70% cut Congress increased funding by 11%, to a total of over $2.3 billion  Fossil Energy: Research and Development Trump administration requested a 58% cut Congress increased funding by 9%, to a total of $726 million  Nuclear Energy: Research and Development Trump administration requested to cut funding almost in half Congress increased funding by about 20%, to a total of $669 million  Coal Research, including Carbon Capture and Storage Trump administration requested a 73% cut  Congress increased funding by 14%, to a total of over $481 million  Fusion Energy Sciences: Research Trump administration requested a 25% cut Congress increased funding by 25%, to a total of over $410 million  Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Transmission Reliability Trump administration requested a 64% cut  Congress increased funding by 8%, to a total of $39 million Resilient distribution systems Trump administration requested an 80% cut Congress cut funding by 25%, to a total of $38 million Energy Storage Trump administration requested a 75% cut  Congress increased funding by 30%, to a total of $41 million Total Trump requested research be cut almost in half Congress increased funding by almost 8%, to a total of $248 million    Department of the Treasury Total funding: $727 million   Community Development Financial Institutions Fund  Trump administration requested a 94% cut Congress increased funding by less than 1%, to a even total of $250 million  Federal Election Commission Trump administration requested a 10% cut  Congress granted his exact request, for a total of about $71 million  Small Business Administration: Entrepreneurial Development Program  Trump administration requested a 22% cut Congress increased funding by less than 1%, to a total of $247 million     Department of Homeland Security  Total funding: $59.3 billion   DHS Management: Operations and Support  Trump administration requested to increase management budgets over 16% Congress increased their budgets by almost 19%  Chief Financial Officer: 12% increase Chief Readiness Support Officer: 31% increase Chief Human Capital Officer: 82% increase  Cybersecurity Trump administration requested a 19% cut Congress increased by 21%, to a total of $362 million  DHS Intelligence Trump administration requested a 4% cut Congress cut funding by 6%, to a total of almost $246 million Note: Congress instructed DHS to continue increasing field personnel to State and Major Urban Area Fusion Centers that provide outreach to “critical infrastructure owners and operators”    U.S. Customs and Border Protection  Total funding: $16.3 billion   Border Patrol Operations Border Patrol Assets and Support  Trump administration requested an increase of 17% Congress increased funding by 9%, to a total of  $625 million Border Patrol Office of Training and Development  Trump administration requested an increase of 43% Congress increased funding by 19%, to a total of $64 million Total Border Patrol Operations Trump administration requested an increase of 4.5% Congress increased funding by a little over 1%, to a total of $4.4 billion  Procurement, Construction, and Improvement Trump administration requested an increase of 167% Congress increased funding by 196%, almost double, to a total of over $2.2 billion   Note: "CBP is directed to work with federal and industry partners to evaluate the potential use of commercially developed, space-based technologies to provide persistent, real-time border surveillance...”   Immigration and Customs Enforcement Total funding: $7.4 billion   Enforcement and Removal Operations Custody Operations Trump administration requested a 33% increase Congress increased funding by 14%, to a total of over $3 billion Criminal Alien Program Trump administration requested a 32% increase Congress increased funding by 2%, to a total of $319 million Transportation and Removal Program Trump administration requested a 36% increase Congress increased funding by 4%, to a total of $369 million Alternatives to Detention Trump administration requested a 2% cut  Congress increased funding by 2%, to a total of $187 million  Total Funding for Enforcement and Removal Operations Trump administration requested a 31% increase Congress increased funding by 11%, to a total of $4.1 billion    Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Total funding: $7.8 billion   Salaries and Benefits Trump administration requested an almost 3% cut  Congress increased the funding by 0.2%, to a total of $3.2 billion  Training Trump administration requested a 2.5% cut  Congress granted the Trump administration’s request, cutting funding to a total of $233 million  Screening Technology Maintenance  Trump administration requested a 36% increase  Congress increased funding by 40%, to a total of $398 million  Note: Funding increase is aimed at implementation of a plan “to analyze and test perimeter intrusion detection and deterrence technologies”  Aviation Screening Infrastructure  Checkpoint Support Trump administration requested a 96% cut Congress cut funding by 39%, to a total of $68 million Note: the funding increases are meant to speed up the purchase of new x-ray equipment  Checked Baggage Trump administration requested a 44% cut Congress increased funding by 41%, to a total of $83 million Screening Partnership Program Trump administration requested a 1% cut Congress increased funding by over 5%, to a total of $185 million Airport Management Trump administration requested a 12% increase Congress increased funding by 13%, to a total of $646 million  Aviation Regulation Trump administration requested a 21% cut  Congress barely increased funding to $218 million    Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Total funding: $12.5 billion   Preparedness and Protection Trump administration requested a 10% cut  Congress granted the Trump administration’s request, cutting funding to a total of $132 million  Operations Trump administration requested a 3% cut  Congress cut funding by about 1.5%, to a total of a little over $1 billion  Emergency Disaster Relief Funds for 2017 disasters  $23.5 billion is appropriated in this law Grants State Homeland Security grant Trump administration requested a 25% cut Congress increased funding by 8%, tot a total of $507 million Public Transportation Security Assistance  Trump administration requested a 52% cut Congress maintained funding at $100 million  Port Security Trump administration requested a 52% cut Congress maintained funding at $100 million  Emergency Management Performance Trump administration requested a 20% cut Congress maintained funding at $350 million National Predisaster Mitigation Fund Trump administration requested a 61% cut  Congress increased funding by 149%, to a total of $249 million Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis Program Trump administration requested that the program be eliminated Congress increased funding by 48%, to a total of $262 million Emergency Food and Shelter   Trump administration requested that the program be eliminated Congress maintained funding at $120 million Total FEMA funding  Trump administration requested a 7% cut  Congress increased funding by 8%, to a total of $12.5 billion   Department of the Interior  Total funding: $13.1 billion   Bureau of Land Management  Wildlife and Fisheries Trump administration requested a 25% cut Congress maintained funding at $103 million  Endangered species  Trump administration requested a 6% cut Congress maintained funding at $22 million  Abandoned land mines Trump administration requested a 55% cut Congress maintained funding at $20 million Hazardous materials management Trump administration requested a 33% cut  Congress maintained funding at $15 million  Recreation management Trump administration requested a 12% cut Congress increased funding by 1%, to a total of $73 million Oil and Gas management  Trump administration requested a 12% increase Congress increased funding by 27%, to a total of $86 million Coal management Trump administration requested a 90% increase Congress provided a 10% increase, to a total of $12 million Renewable energy Trump administration requested a 45% cut Congress cut funding by about 2%, to a total of $28 million  U.S Fish and Wildlife Service  Trump administration requested to cut every single category, an overall 14% cut Congress increased the funding 5%, to a total of $1.6 billion National Park Service Trump administration requested a 13% cut Congress increased funding by 9%, to a total of $3.2 billion USGS Natural Hazards Earthquake hazards Trump administration requested a 20% cut Congress increased funding by 30%, to a total of $83 million Volcano hazards  Trump administration requested a 21% cut Congress increased funding by 52%, to a total of $43 million Water resources National Water Quality  Trump administration requested an 18% cut  Congress maintained funding at $90 million Water availability science Trump administration requested a 33% cut Congress increased funding by 2%, to a total of $46 million Overall  Trump administration requested a 19% cut Congress increased funding by almost 1%, to a total of $218 million Offshore Safety and Environmental Enforcement Environmental enforcement Trump administration requested a 47% cut  Congress granted the Trump administration’s request, cutting funding to a total of only $4.4 million  Wildland Fire Management Trump administration requested a 7% cut Congress barely increased the funding, to a total of $948 million    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)   Science and Technology Air and energy Trump administration requested a 67% cut Congress maintained funding at $92 million Safe and sustainable water resources Trump administration requested a 36% cut Congress maintained funding at $106 million  Clean Air  Trump administration requested a 48% cut Congress maintained funding at $273 million Enforcement Trump administration requested a 19% cut Congress maintained funding at $240 million  Geographic programs Trump administration requested all of them eliminated.  Congress increased funding by 3%, to a total of $47 million Indoor air and radiation Trump administration requested a 93% cut  Congress maintained funding at $28 million  Pesticide licensing  Trump administration requested a 17% cut  Congress increased funding by 7%, to a total of $109 million  Toxic risk review and prevention Trump administration requested a 30% cut  Congress increased funding by 4%, to a total of $109 million National estuary program / Coastal waterways  Trump administration requested that the programs be eliminated  Congress maintained funding at $27 million Human Health Protection Trump administration requested a 18% cut Congress maintained funding at $98 million Water quality protection Trump administration requested a 17% cut Congress maintained funding at $210 million Enforcement of the Hazardous Substance Superfund Trump administration requested a 40% cut Congress maintained funding at $166 million Superfund clean up Trump administration requested a 28% cut Congress increased funding by half a percent, to a total of $721 million Grants Pollution control Trump administration requested a 30% cut Congress maintained funding at $230 million State and local air quality management  Trump administration requested a 30% cut  Congress maintained funding at $228 million Public water system supervision Trump administration requested a 30% cut  Congress maintained funding at $102 million Underground injection control (UIC) Trump administration requested a 30% cut Congress maintained funding at $10 million  Pesticides enforcement Trump administration requested a 40% cut Congress maintained funding at $18 million Beaches protection  Trump administration requested that the program be eliminated Congress maintained funding at under $10 million Lead Trump administration requested that the program be eliminated Congress maintained funding at $14 million  Pollution prevention Trump administration requested that the program be eliminated Congress maintained funding at $5 million Total grant funding Trump administration requested a 44% cut Congress increased funding by 1%, to a total of just over $1 billion    Department of Labor   Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker programs Trump administration requested that the program be eliminated Congress increased funding by 7%, to a total of $87 million  Dislocated Worker Assistance National Reserve  Trump administration requested a 47% cut  Congress maintained the funding at $220 million Labor Dept. Management: Salaries and Expenses  Women’s Bureau  Trump administration requested a 75% cut Congress increased funding by 8%, to a total of $13 million International Labor Affairs Trump administration requested a 75% cut Congress maintained the funding at $86 million Chief Financial Officer Trump administration requested a 93% increase Congress Congress increased funding by 87%, to a total of $10.4 million Total Trump administration requested an 18% cut  Congress slightly increased funding, to a total of $13.7 billion    Department of Health and Human Services  Total funding: $843 billion   Training for diversity  Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding by 6%, to a total of $88 million Training in primary care medicine Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding by 26%, to a total of $49 million Dentist training Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding by 11%, to a total of $40 million Community health eduction centers Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding by 27%, to a total of $38 million Mental and Behavior health Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding by 270%, to a total of $37 million Nursing programs Trump administration requested a 64% cut Congress increased funding by 9%, to a total of $250 million  Maternal and Child Health Block Grants Trump administration requested a 4% increase Congress increased funding by 1.5% to over $650 million Healthy Start Trump administration requested a 24% increase Congress increased funding by 7%, to a total of $110 million Programs the Trump administration requested eliminated: Sickle Cell Anemia Demonstration Program Autism and other developmental disorders Heritable disorders Universal newborn hearing screening Emergency medical services for children Total Trump administration requested an 8% cut Congress increased funding by 3, including funding for two new programs:  Screening and Treatment for Maternal Depression  Pediatric Mental Health Care Access Birth defects, developmental disabilities  Trump administration requested a 27% cut Congress increased funding by 2%,  to a total of $140 million Rural Health  Trump administration requested an 82% cut  Congress increased funding by 86%, to a total of over $290 million  Centers for Disease Control  Public Health Preparedness and Response  Trump administration requested an almost 10% cut Congress increased funding by 3%, to a total of $1.45 billion   CDC Total Trump administration requested  a 20% cut  Congress increased funding by 14%, to a total of  over $7.2 billion National Institutes of Health Institutes that the Trump administration requested to eliminate:  National Cancer Institute  National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases National Institute of General Medical Sciences National Eye Institute  National Institute on Aging  National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences  National Institute on Deafness  National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism  National Institute on Drug Abuse National Institute of Mental Health National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities  The only thing he wanted to increase was a 40% increase to the “NIH Innovation Account, CURES Act2/“ (which Congress granted) and he wanted to create a new “National Institute for Research on Safety and Quality”, a request that Congress ignored.  Total: National Institute of Health Trump administration requested a  22% cut Congress increased funding by about 8%, to a total of about $3 billion Medicaid grants Trump requested and received an 8% increase, up to $284 billion  Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services Trump administration requested an 8% increase  Congress increased funding by a little more than requested, to a total of over $747 billion Low Income Home Energy Assistance Trump administration requested to eliminate the $3.3 billion program Congress increased funding by 7%, to a total of $3.6 billion Refugee and Entrant Assistance Unaccompanied Minors Trump administration requested to maintain funding Congress increased funding by 37%, to a total of $1.3 billion  Total Trump administration requested a 13% cut Congress increased funding by 11%, to a total of $1.8 billion Social Services Block Grant (Title XX) Children and Families Services Program Trump administration requested to eliminate the program Congress maintained funding at $1.7 billion   Programs for Children, Youth, and Families Preschool Development Grants Trump administration requested to eliminate the program Congress maintained funding at $250 million Total Trump administration requested a 9% cut Congress increased funding by 6%, to a total of over $12 billion     Department of Education  Total funding: $74 billion   School Improvement Program Trump administration requested an 84% cut Congress increased funding by 17%, to a total of over $5 billion  Charter School Grants Trump administration requested a 46% increase  Congress increased funding by 17%, to a total of $400 million  Student Financial Assistance Trump administration requested a 5% cut Congress increased funding by 1%, to a total of $24.4 billion  International Education and Foreign Language programs Trump administration requested to eliminate all programs - domestic and overseas Congress maintained funding at $72 million Total  Trump administration requested a 7% cut  Congress increased funding by 3%, to a total of $74 billion    Institute of Museum and Library Services Trump administration requested a 90% cut Congress increased funding by 4%, to a total of $240 million    Corporation for National and Community Service AmeriCorps grants  Trump administration requested a 99% cut Congress increased funding by 7%, to a total of $412 million   Corporation for Public Broadcasting Trump administration requested an over 99% cut Congress maintained the funding at $445 million   Department of State Total funding: $54.1 billion   International Organizations Total Trump administration requested a 35% cut  Congress cut funding by 2%, to a total of $1.7 billion Asia Foundation Trump administration requested to eliminate the program Congress maintained funding at $17 million East-West Center Trump administration requested to eliminate the program Congress maintained funding at $17 million US Institute of Peace Trump administration requested a 49% cut Congress maintained funding at $38 million National Endowment for Democracy Trump administration requested a 40% cut Congress maintained funding at $170 million Democracy Fund Trump administration requested to eliminate the fund Congress increased funding 2%, to a total of $215 million “Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia” Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased the funding by 157%, to a total of $750 million  “Independent Agencies” Inter-American Foundation Trump administration requested an 80% cut Congress maintained funding at $22.5 million US African Development Foundation Trump administration requested a 70% cut Congress maintained funding at $30 million  “International Security Assistance”  Drug War Trump administration requested a 22% cut Congress increased funding 7%, to a total of $950 million  Anti-terrorism and nonproliferation Trump administration requested a 37% cut Congress increased funding by 30%, to a total of $655 million Peacekeeping operations Trump administration requested a 10% cut Congress increased by 57%, to a total of $212 million Foreign Military Financing Program Congress provided:  Israel: $3.1 billion Egypt: $1.3 billion Other: $1.2 billion International Financial Institutions World Bank Group Trump administration requested an over 12% cut Congress cut funding by 10%, to a total of over $1.2 billion  Asian Development Fund Trump administration requested a 52% cut  Congress granted the Trump administration request, cutting to a total of $43 million African Development Bank Trump administration requested a 17% cut Congress granted the Trump administration request, cutting to a total of $204 million Total: Multilateral Assistance  Trump administration requested a 30% cut Congress cut funding by 12%, to a total of $1.9 billion   State: Global War on Terror (GWOT)   GWOT “Transition Initiatives”  Trump administration requested a 37% increase Congress granted the $62 million request GWOT Drug War Trump administration requested a 52% cut Congress increased by 1% to $418 million GWOT Nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, demining and related programs Trump administration requested a 7 % increase Congress cut almost 40%  GWOT Foreign Military Financing Program Trump administration requested a 66% cut Congress cut by 65% to $460 million  GWOT State Dept Total Trump administration requested a  27% cut Congress cut funding by 27%, to $12 billion    Department of Transportation   Total funding: $27.2 billion   National Infrastructure Investments Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding by 200%, to a total of $1.5 billion even Federal Railroad Administration Federal State Partnership for State of Good Repair Trump administration requested a 4% increase  Congress increased the funding by 900%, to a total of $250 million even Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety  Trump administration requested a 63% cut Congress increased funding by 770%, to a total of $592 million.  AMTRAK (National Railroad Passenger Corporation) Northeast Trump administration requested a 28% cut  Congress increased the funding 98%, to a total of $650 million National Network Trump administration requested a 55% cut Congress increased funding by 10%, to a total of $1.3 billion  Total Trump administration requested a 38% cut Congress increased funding 67%, to a little over $3 billion  Maritime Administration Operations and Training Trump administration requested a 2% cut Congress increased the funding by 193%, to over $500 million Ship disposal Trump administration requested a 70% cut  Congress increased funding by 241%, to $116 million Total Trump administration requested a 25% cut Congress increased funding by 87%, to a total of $979 million  Department of Transportation Total Trump administration requested an over 11% cut Congress increased funding by 47%, to a total of $27.2 billion.    Department of Housing and Urban Development   Tenant-based Rental Assistance Sec 811 vouchers Trump administration requested an 11% cut Congress increased the funding by 320%, to a total of $505 million Total:  Trump administration requested a 5% cut Congress increased funding by 8%, to a total of $22 billion Community Development Fund Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding by 10%, to a total of over $3.3 billion Congress added another $28 billion in emergency money  HOME Investment Partnership Program Trump administration requested to eliminate the funding Congress increased funding 43%, to a total of $1.3 billion Total Housing Programs Trump administration requested a less than 1% cut Congress increased over 8% to $12.5 billion   Sound Clip Sources   Video: White House Budget Briefing: Slowing Medicaid Growth Rate, C-SPAN, May 23, 2017. News Report: Trump's budget to cut billions to EPA, foreign aid, Fox News, March 16, 2017. News Report: Trump budget proposes cuts to state and EPA, boosts for defense and wall, NBC Nightly News, March 16, 2018. Video: 35 Classic Lines from "Spaceballs," YouTube, January 28, 2018. Radio Interview: Federal Drive with Tom Temin - Nicole Ogrysko on DHS: 'We're not looking for the 30-year career employee,' Federal News Radio, July 5, 2016. Video Clip: Sesame Street Clip, YouTube, August 30, 2012.   Community Suggestions See more Community Suggestions HERE. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)  

food health women science community europe housing museum american children national geographic npr war terror state emergency video congress new york times training animal army president delta hawaii mental water donald trump air immigration safe research reserve refugees education oil transportation construction public recreation wind solar behavior gas medical development universal ship mississippi michigan toxic labor institute food stamps congressional budget office diabetes washington post medicaid shelter forbes fda c span programs donations navy interior safety veterans affairs underground abandoned youth national guard indoor corporations alcoholism wildlife fox news endangered migrant nursing commerce pollution coal spaceballs taxes urban development bureau salaries tobacco screenings national endowment nm national institutes human services business insider evaluation airports treatments fast company hwy coastal enforcement tenant alcohol abuse maternal health disparities allergy resilient renewable centers disease control music alley dhs customs epa energy efficiency pesticides jason miller border protection beaches lung alternatives land management carbon capture wildlife service spent reimbursement article how dental war on terror homeland security procurement expenses deafness assistance sylva eurasia ron nixon clean air volcanos betsy devos geothermal peacekeeping 6m juveniles robert h preparedness foreign languages environmental health sciences fiscal year dentists international education nbc nightly news superfund national oceanic mark binelli eligibility hazardous albuquerque journal neurological disorders washington business journal electricity delivery environmental protection agency epa public health preparedness congressional dish national cancer institute global war us institute minority health federal news radio national heart chief human capital officer new york business journal anthony price chief financial officers robert j labor dept heritable cover art design david ippolito military construction emergency food terror gwot nicole ogrysko maternal depression crestview
Rockstar Achievers
People Are More Afraid of Change Than the Pain They're Currently Living In - Ruth Nicholson, Nicholson Facilitation & Associates, LLC

Rockstar Achievers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2018 30:59


Ruth Nicholson is the manager of Nicholson Facilitation and Associates, LLC. She is an internationally Certified Professional Facilitator (CPF), visual and graphics facilitator, certified assessor, and trained mediator in private practice in Snohomish County, Washington. She is also a member of the US Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (USIECR) roster of mediators and holds a master’s degree in public administration. Ruth offers over 20 years experience in organizational development, facilitation, conflict resolution, public policy, and non-profit organization management. Ruth says, "I think one of the biggest roadblocks people have, regardless of what field they're in, is they will stay in uncomfortaable, painful situations for incredibly long periods of time because they're more afraid of change than they are of the pain that they're currently living in." She helps people see by acknowledging their pain and finding small steps and simple tools for making the situation better.

WorldAffairs
GPF17: Trust, Justice and the Conflict Continuum

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2017 59:01


If pluralism is essential to free and functioning societies, it is also the sine qua non of liberal democracy, and essential to the legitimacy – and sustainability – of the state. But when states fail to meet the needs of their citizens and collapse into violent conflict, what is the role of the international community and global civil society? Where does responsibility lie? We will explore interventions along the conflict continuum as well as global norms that assign responsibility. Will citizens trust their government, if access to health, education, jobs and even justice is uneven? And when governance fails, how can human security be assured? This conversation will focus on governments and the governed, with particular attention to access to justice and examples of conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict reconciliation. Throughout, the role of race, gender, religious affiliation and ethnicity will be explored. Robert Malley, incoming Vice President for Policy, International Crisis Group (moderator) David Miliband, President and CEO, International Rescue Committee John Prendergast, Founding Director, Enough Project Yifat Susskind, Executive Director, MADRE David Tolbert, President, International Center for Transitional Justice Robin Wright, Senior Fellow, The US Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson Center For more information about this event please visit: https://philanthropyforum.org/conference/gpf-2017/

National Council of Churches Podcast

As the war in Afghanistan continues into its 16th year, the United States continues down a course of continual warfare and blank-check funding of the American military.  Use of force often seems as though it’s both a first and last resort.  But the little-known US Institute of Peace maintains an important place in the American diplomatic sphere. As the federal budget debate gets underway, the US Institute of Peace’s funding is on the chopping block.  Today we will talk with Rev. Michael Neuroth, Policy Advocate for International Issues in the Washington office of the United Church of Christ.  Mike will fill us in on this important institution, its Christian beginnings, and how its future can be bolstered by people like you.  If you believe in peacemaking, listen carefully to what Mike has to say.

Encounter  - Voice of America
Whither Afghanistan

Encounter - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2017 25:00


Michael Kugelman, Deputy Director and Senior Associate for South Asia at the Wilson Center, and Moeed Yusuf, Associate Vice President of the Asia Center at the US Institute of Peace, discuss the forgotten war in Afghanistan with host Carol Castiel, including the balance of power among the Taliban, the Afghan government, and the emerging ISIS presence.

Law and the Library
Human Rights Day 2013: Rights of Refugees

Law and the Library

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2014 106:06


Jan. 7, 2014. In celebration of Human Rights Day, the Law Library of Congress hosted a panel discussion on refugee rights. Speaker Biography: Peter Roudik is director of the Global Legal Research Center at the Library of Congress. Speaker Biography: Olivia Bueno is associate director of the International Refugee Rights Initiative. Speaker Biography: Linda Rabben is a developmental editor at the US Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C. Speaker Biography: George Sadek is senior legal information analyst for the Global Legal Information Network (GLIN), Law Library of Congress. For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=6247

New Zealand Doctor Podcasts
No need to grieve, Prof Berwick says

New Zealand Doctor Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2012 2:19


Lucy Ratcliffe spoke to former president of the US Institute of Healthcare Innovation Don Berwick at the 2012 Conference for General Practice

Peace Talks Radio
Learning International Negotiation

Peace Talks Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2012 59:00


In the spring of 2012 - PEACE TALKS RADIO attended a training exercise put on by the US Institute of Peace in Washington DC. It's called SENSE - which stands for Strategic, Economic Needs and Security exercise. Forty to sixty people participate by taking on roles of business leaders, govt officials, security officers, non-governmental representatives and the like and, in three days, they work in a fictional world Akrona- a struggling state emerging from years of war and still vulnerable to violence. ( as some of the paraticipants have said, not unlike Afghanistan in the early 2000's.) A sophisticated computer program sets up the parameters of resources and circumstances. When one player makes one move in the game, it effects others. Parties have to negotiate to bring economies and quality of life into balance. Suzanne Kryder talked with some of the players to learn how it works and what they hope to learn and apply to their regular lives when they return from the exercise. She also has a conversation with Omar Samad, former Afghani Ambassador to both Canada and France.

WorldAffairs
After the Arab Spring

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2012 63:45


Recorded at WorldAffairs 2012, the World Affairs Council’s annual conference designed for global citizens seeking deeper insight, understanding and context surrounding critical issues of our day. In 2011, three dictators were overthrown as massive popular protests gripped the Middle East. A year after these movements began, what has changed inside Tunisia, Egypt and Libya? Have these unique opportunities for reform been successful? What have these changes done to affect the greater balance of power in the Middle East? And what challenges and opportunities will President Obama or his challenger face when formulating US policy toward the region? Ellen Laipson, President and CEO of the Stimson Center and Robin Wright, Senior Fellow at the US Institute of Peace, and a Distinguished Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, will discuss these topics.

KUCI: Fighting for Love
Mari Frank Interviews Paul Garb, Co-Director and Co-Founder of UC Irvine?s Center for Citizen Peacebuilding

KUCI: Fighting for Love

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2011


Paula Garb is Co-Director and co-founder of UC Irvine's Center for Citizen Peacebuilding. She is a lecturer in anthropology, director of the minor in conflict resolution, and director of the minor in civic and community engagement at the University of California, Irvine. She is a facilitator and researcher of citizen peacebuilding projects. Garb spent 17 years living and working in Moscow, where she received her M.A. in anthropology from Moscow State University and later completed her doctorate in anthropology from the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Anthropology. She ultimately secured a job as a field producer for CBS News in Moscow, where she worked until she came to UCI in 1991. After returning to live and work in the U.S. she has studied the mobilization of activists around environmental problems associated with the nuclear weapons complex in Russia and the role of citizen initiatives in the ethnic conflicts of the Caucasus. Since 1995, with funding from the University of California, the JAMS Foundation, United Nations Development Programme, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the US Institute of Peace, USAID, and the Winston Foundation for World Peace, she has been promoting citizen peacebuilding activities and research. Her primary project has focused on facilitating and studying peacebuilding efforts between Abkhaz and Georgian academics, journalists, representatives of nongovernmental organizations, and politicians. In 1999 she initiated a coordination network of peacebuilding projects and organizations working in the Georgian-Abkhaz conflict, and continues to foster the network. Garb has been using her long-term and in-depth experience and research data from the Georgian-Abkhaz conflict to examine and compare how citizens are helping to resolve disputes in other conflict zones, such as Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Middle East, Cyprus, and Northern Ireland. She draws on these experiences for courses in conflict resolution that she teaches for UCI students and Los Angeles gang intervention workers. Her work has also led to a number of publications in academic and other journals. www.ccpb.org

NutraIngredients-USA Podcast
GOED prepares petition for omega-3 RDA

NutraIngredients-USA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2009 4:22


Omega-3 trade group Global Organization for EPA and DHA (GOED) is preparing to petition the US Institute of Medicine (IOM) to establish a recommended daily allowance for the nutritional lipid. Shane Starling catches up with the organization’s executive director Adam Ismail at Expo West 2009.