Podcasts about Popular Mechanics

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Popular Mechanics

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Best podcasts about Popular Mechanics

Latest podcast episodes about Popular Mechanics

Something You Should Know
Should You Really Believe in Luck & How to Accept Bad Things You Cannot Change

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 52:37


Given the price of gasoline, we all need to conserve every drop we can. While you have probably heard of some of the ways to save gas, there are a few you probably haven't heard before. This episode begins with some effective gas saving hacks from the people at Popular Mechanics. https://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/a39504408/how-to-improve-your-vehicles-gas-mileage/  Do you believe in luck? It probably depends on your definition. Some people believe luck is a mystical force while others think of luck as something grounded in probability and statistics. Still others believe you can create your own luck. To help sort out what luck really is and how it works is Jeffrey Rosenthal, professor in the University of Toronto's Department of Statistics and author of several books including Knock On Wood: Luck Chance and the Meaning of Everything (https://amzn.to/3uccXfh). Life can be cruel and unfair. Bad things happen to all of us. The challenge is – how do you accept and make peace with terrible things that inevitably happen so you can get on with your life? Clinical psychologist Janina Scarlet works with people everyday who must accept and come to terms with events that are unfair and often devastating. Janina is author of the book, It Shouldn't Be This Way: Learning to Accept the Things You Just Can't Change (https://amzn.to/3N7RpHb). If you've ever had trouble coping with something that is hard to accept, you will want to hear what she has to say. As people get older, it is natural to try to stay looking young. But there is a limit. Listen as I explain the negative consequences of trying to act or dress too young and what really works well if you want to appear younger than your actual age. http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/observer/obsonline/act-your-age.html PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! Helix Sleep is offering up to $200 off all mattress orders AND two free pillows for our listeners at https://helixsleep.com/sysk.  Go to https://Shopify.com/sysk for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features! If you're the type of person who's always thinking about new business ideas or wondering “What's the next side hustle I should spin up?” — check out the podcast My First Million! Today is made for Thrill! Style, Power, Discovery, Adventure, however you do thrill, Nissan has a vehicle to make it happen at https://nissanusa.com Discover matches all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year! Learn more at https://discover.com/match With Avast One, https://avast.com you can confidently take control of your online world without worrying about viruses, phishing attacks, ransomware, hacking attempts, & other cybercrimes! Download Best Fiends FREE today on the App Store or Google Play! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

1 Player Podcast
1P 260 - Popular Mechanics: Drafting

1 Player Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 34:09


This week Julius and I look at solo drafting games along with the helping, I'm sorry to say, of some barking dogs.  We talk a bit about what is or isn't a drafting game and briefly go over a half dozen or so games worth looking into.  While editing, I realized we completely overlooked a very obvious choice... Gates of Loyang. Darned, darned, darned.  It's an excellent example because the drafting mechanism in solo is much better than the multiplayer drafting. 03:45 - Clank! (BGG) 04:25 - Cascadia (BGG) 05:50 - Nations: The Dice Game (BGG) 07:30 - Hostage Negotiator (BGG) 12:55 - Canvas (BGG) 14:45 - Mechs vs Minions (BGG) 17:00 - PAX (BGG) 19:30 - Ilse of Cats (BGG) 21:50 - Imperial Settlers (BGG) 23:45 - Sylvion (BGG) & Aerion (BGG) 26:00 - Suburbia (BGG) 29:50 - Lux Aeterna (BGG)

The John Batchelor Show
2/2: #SpaceX: Starbase, Texas and the Mars Gateway moving to Florida. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth. @PappalardoJoe National Geographic.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 10:17


Photo: 2/2: #SpaceX: Starbase, Texas and the Mars Gateway moving to Florida. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth.   @PappalardoJoe National Geographic.   https://nationalgeographic.com/science/article/spacex-starship-gets-closer-to-launchbut-the-future-of-its-texas-starbase-is-in-doubt

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: #SpaceX: Starbase, Texas and the Mars Gateway moving to Florida. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth. @PappalardoJoe National Geographic.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 10:10


Photo: 1/2: #SpaceX: Starbase, Texas and the Mars Gateway moving to Florida. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth.   @PappalardoJoe National Geographic.   https://nationalgeographic.com/science/article/spacex-starship-gets-closer-to-launchbut-the-future-of-its-texas-starbase-is-in-doubt

The John Batchelor Show
2/2: #SpaceX: Tale of three boosters. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics; National Geographic; Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth. @PappalardoJoe

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 7:20


Photo: 2/2: #SpaceX: Tale of three boosters. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics; National Geographic; Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth.   @PappalardoJoe https://www.spacex.com/vehicles/starship/ https://www.spacex.com/vehicles/starship/

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: #SpaceX: Tale of three boosters. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics; National Geographic; Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth. @PappalardoJoe

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 13:20


Photo: 1/2: #SpaceX: Tale of three boosters. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics; National Geographic; Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth.   @PappalardoJoe https://www.spacex.com/vehicles/starship/

Behind the Shot - Video
In Public: Street Photography

Behind the Shot - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 45:34


George Schaub is a photographer's photographer, and that may be the best compliment I can give anyone. George has a been a professional photographer since 1966, when he was the House photographer for promotion, brochures, and events at International House, NYC - and he's been a writer for almost as long. From the 1970s through the 2000s his career took off, with articles published in Studio Photography magazine, followed by articles and illustrations in the New York Times Sunday Arts and Leisure section, Video Photography, Lens Magazine, Lens on Campus, Photographer's Forum, Camera Arts, Photo District News, and a monthly column in Darkroom Photography magazine. George was a regular contributor to Travel Holiday magazine and he had photo and technology related articles in consumer magazines such as Popular Mechanics, Travel & Leisure, Men's Journal, and American Photographer. After covering the L.A. olympics, George was hired as an Assistant Editor at popular Photography magazine, and later became a writer and copy editor, before eventually becoming the Executive Editor. With all of that experience, George has also been heavily involved on the education side of photography, through his writing, and his workshops through a number of educational outlets, including the famed Santa Fe Photo Workshops. He was an Adjunct Professor at New School University/Parsons School of Design, teaching courses that included a General Intro lecture course, a Masters Class in Black and White Printing, Digital Camera intro; Advanced Photo Techniques; Digital Photo Processing, and Digital Printing. He has also been an Adjunct Professor at Sitka University for online critiques and assignments. His body of work is extensive, and after a number of photo and illustration books, some of which have been self-published, George's latest book is In Public, which covers his street photography from 1970 through 2020. Join author, educator, and photographer George Schaub and me as we explore his approach to Street Photography, his new book In Public, and his photo Illusion Realite, on this episode of Behind the Shot. Connect with George Portfolio: gschaub.zenfolio.com Instagram: @gschaubphoto Facebook: facebook.com EBay: ebay.com George's Book In Public: blurb.com George's Photographer Pick W. Eugene Smith: magnumphotos.com

Rhett Palmer Talk Host
"The Rise of the American Mass Shooter"

Rhett Palmer Talk Host

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 80:42


Seamus McGraw is the author of a few books, including the critically acclaimed The End of Country: Dispatches from the Frack Zone, The Rise of the American Mass Shooterand the forthcoming Betting the Farm on a Drought: Stories from the Front Line of Climate change, due in April 2015 from The University of Texas Press.Seamus has been a regular contributor to many publications, incuding the New York Times, Huffington Post, Playboy, Popular Mechanics, Reader's Digest, The Forward, Spin, Stuff, and Radar, and has appeared on Fox Latino. He has received the Freedom of Information Award from the Associated Press Managing Editors, the Golden Quill Award, as well as honors from the Casey Foundation and the Society of Professional Journalists.https://seamusmcgraw.com

The John Batchelor Show
2/2: #Energy: Port of Corpus Christi preps for global demand. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth. @PappalardoJoe

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 5:40


Photo:   Coast Guard crews respond to dredge fire in the Port of Corpus Christi Ship Channel 2/2: #Energy: Port of Corpus Christi preps for global demand.  Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth.   @PappalardoJoe https://www.ccredc.com/index.php?src=news&srctype=detail&category=News&refno=43

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: #Energy: Port of Corpus Christi preps for global demand. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth. @PappalardoJoe

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 13:10


Photo:  Ship going through drawbridge entering port of Corpus Christi, Texas 1/2: #Energy: Port of Corpus Christi preps for global demand.   Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, Contributing Editor, & author, Spaceport Earth.   @PappalardoJoe  https://www.ccredc.com/index.php?src=news&srctype=detail&category=News&refno=43

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - SETH DAVID CHERNOFF - The Manual for Living

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 41:29


Seth David Chernoff is an award-winning author, two-time cancer survivor, gifted speaker, highly successful marketing professional and founder of multiple companies. His new book is Manual For Living: Reality, A User's Guide to the Meaning of Life. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, Popular Mechanics, Business Week, USA Today, and on national TV and Radio.- www.sethchernoff.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The Best of The 'X' Zone Radio/TV Show with Rob McConnell
Rob McConnell Interviews - SETH DAVID CHERNOFF - The Manual for Living

The Best of The 'X' Zone Radio/TV Show with Rob McConnell

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 41:29


Seth David Chernoff is an award-winning author, two-time cancer survivor, gifted speaker, highly successful marketing professional and founder of multiple companies. His new book is Manual For Living: Reality, A User's Guide to the Meaning of Life. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, Popular Mechanics, Business Week, USA Today, and on national TV and Radio.- www.sethchernoff.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #86: Realskiers.com Editor and 'Snowbird Secrets' Co-Author Jackson Hogen

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Starting in June, paid subscribers will receive podcasts three days before free subscribers.WhoJackson Hogen, Editor of Realskiers.com, author of Snowbird Secrets, and long-time industry jack of all trades: ski designer, binding and boot product manager, freestyle competitor, retail salesman, risk management lecturer, ski instructor, marketing director, resort feature writer, OLN and RSN television host, extreme camp ski coach, Desperate Measures co-creator, four-time Warren Miller screenwriter, and research and development chief.Recorded onMay 9, 2022Why I interviewed himA long time ago, ski writers used to write about ski instruction. They were quite good at it. A couple years back, I recounted the value of these dispatches to me as a novice skier in the 1990s:I met skiing like a lawnchair meets a tornado, flung and cartwheeled and disoriented and smashed to pieces. I was 14 with the coordination and dexterity of a lamppost. The mountain was merciless in its certainty of what to do with me. It hurt.I tried again and was met like an invader at the Temple of Doom, each run a stone-rope-and-pulley puzzle I could not solve – a puzzle that invariably ended with me smashed beneath a rock.When two years later I tried a third time I had grown into my body and could without turning or otherwise controlling myself descend the modest hill on most runs intact. The following Christmas I asked for skis and got them and the fabulous snowy north unrolled with purpose and mission before me.Now I just had to learn how to ski.This was a bigger problem than it sounds like. No one in my family skied. None of my friends knew how to ski either – at least not well enough to show me how to do it. Lessons were not happening. If you think a 17-year-old who makes $4.50 an hour bagging groceries is going to spend the equivalent of a week’s pay on what is essentially school on snow when school is not in session, then you have either never met a 17-year-old or have never been one. As it was, I could barely afford the lift tickets and gas to get me to the hill.What I could afford was ski magazines. And ski magazines in the nineties were glorious things, hundreds of pages long and stacked with movie reviews and resort news and adrenaline-laced 14-page feature stories.And there was ski instruction. Pages and pages of it in nearly every issue.This seems arcane now. Why not just watch a video? But this was the mid-nineties. There was no YouTube. Hell, there was barely an internet, and only the computer-savviest among us had the remotest idea how to access it.My first ski magazine was the December 1994 issue of Skiing. It cost $2.50 and it looked like this:The volume of ski instruction in just this one issue is staggering. A nearly-5,000 word piece by venerable ski writer Lito Tejada-Flores anchored a 19-page (!) spread on the art and importance of balance, which was in turn prefaced by a separate front-of-the-mag editorial outlining the whole package. An additional eight pages of ski instruction tiered from solid-green beginner to expert complemented this. And all this in an issue that also included a 13-page high-energy feature on roaming interior BC and 10-page write-ups of Squaw Valley and Whiteface.Each month I bought Skiing, and most months I also bought Ski and Snow Country. I also bought Powder but even then Powder could not be bothered with ski instruction. The instruction wasn’t the first thing I read but I always read it and I usually read it many times.This was a process. Ski instruction articles are often dense and deliberate and usually anchored to numbered photographs or drawings demonstrating movements and technique. Think of it as drill instruction in extreme slow motion. It wasn’t all useful but what was useful became essential.I doubt anyone knows how to write about ski instruction with this kind of clarity and detail anymore, just like no one knows how to build a covered wagon anymore – it is a lost art because it is now an unnecessary one.But this is how I learned how to ski. And because this is how I learned and because I re-read each of the pieces that resonated with me so many times, this written instruction formed the indelible framework around which I still think about skiing.Read the rest:I would like to retract one part of the above essay: “it is a lost art because it is now an unnecessary one.” Re-reading the articles referenced in the piece above, I admire the clarity with which each of these writers dissected the process of skiing trees or bumps or steeps. There is no equivalent, that I am aware of, in the realm of instructional ski videos. And there is a simple reason why: videos can show you what you should be doing, but the visual hegemony makes their creators overlook something even more important: what you should be feeling, and how you should be reacting as you feel those things.There is at least one remaining master of this craft: Jackson Hogen. He understands how to talk about aspects of skiing other than the fact that it’s rad. Snowbird Secrets is a written masterclass for the wannabee expert, the one who’s maybe dropped into the double blacks laced off the Cirque Traverse and survived to the bottom, but knows it wasn’t their best work. Examples:From Chapter 4 – On Anticipation:Your upper body stays ahead of the activities going on underfoot, as though your head and shoulders were in a time machine that is forever stuck on transporting you a few milliseconds into the future. As mental anticipation morphs into the events that both end it and redeem it, physical anticipation allows for the happy confluence between the two states. Anticipation feels like a form of time travel for if you do it well, it shifts you into the future. You take care of business before it happens.Chapter 5 – On Being Early:The single biggest differentiator between the advanced skier and the true expert is the latter’s ability to get to the next turn early. There are several components to being early, each of which moves in concert with the others. The upper body must continue its constant projection down the hill and into the turn, the existential lean of faith that is a prerequisite for performance skiing. The uphill hand cues a shift in weight to the ski below it by reaching for the fall line. And the uphill ski begins to tilt on edge early, at the top of the arc, supporting your hurtling mass as it navigates gravity’s stream.Chapter 12 – On Hands and Feet:Every element that makes up the entirety of the skier is linked to every other, but nowhere is the bond greater than between hands and feet. The primal importance of hand position is never more evident than when your feet fail you. …Even when you’re not about to eat it, your hands tell the rest of your body what to do while your feet are busy making turns. Your torso is attuned to your hands’ bossy attitude; it will always try to follow their lead. So keep them forward, point them where you want to go and don’t get lazy with the uphill hand. Generations of skiers have been taught to plant the pole on the inside of the turn, so that hand often is extended, as if in greeting, to the fall line, while the uphill hand takes a nap somewhere alongside the thigh. Until you are a skier of world-class capabilities, you cannot afford sleep hands. The uphill hand that you’ve left in a mini-coma will be called upon in a trice to reach again downhill; it should be in an on-call position, not on sabbatical. It should be carried no lower than it would be if you were about to draw a sidearm from a holster. You’re engaged in an athletic endeavor, so try to look like it.You can tell how good someone is at writing about skiing by how self-conscious you feel as you read it. I’ll admit I clicked over to photos of myself skiing more than a few times as I made my way through Snowbird Secrets (I’d also recommend having the Snowbird trailmap handy). Great ski books are as rare as a Mountain Creek powder day. But great books on ski instruction are less common still, and this one’s worth your time:Instructional writing is not the point, however, of the Real Skiers website. It is, primarily, a gear-review and recommendation site. But there is no intelligent way to discuss ski gear without a foundational understanding of how to ski. It would be like trying to play hockey without understanding how to skate. The site, like Hogen’s knowledge, is voluminous, layered, cut with a direct and relentless wit. And it’s a tremendous resource in the online desert of ski media. As Hogen says in the interview, “I’d tell you that there are other places you could go to get the same information, but there isn’t.”What we talked aboutThis year in skiing; Mt. Rose; replacing the Snowbird trams; learning to ski at Bromley in the ‘50s; the evolution of sanctioned in-bounds air at ski areas; air as a natural part of good skiing; opening year at Copper Mountain; the life of a product sales rep; the early days of Snow Country magazine with industry legend John Fry; making bindings interesting; the novelty and courage of honest ski reviews; today’s “consequence-free environment for total b******t” in ski media; “there is no more complicated piece of footwear designed by man” than a ski boot; don’t ever ever ever buy ski boots online; the art of boot-fitting; the importance of custom footbeds to ski boots; how to keep warm in ski boots; how to pick skis; whether you should demo skis; the difference between skiing and ski testing; whether you should build a quiver; make friends at the ski shop; picking a binding; why you should avoid backcountry or hybrid bindings; thoughts on setting DIN; “nobody should take anything from the highest levels of the race world and applying it to alpine, regular skiing”; recounting every mistake that prefaced my spectacular leg break at Black Mountain of Maine in February; the problems created by grip-walk boot soles; how often we should be waxing and tuning our skis; the lifespan of skis and boots and how they break down over time; the importance of being present while skiing; ask for the mountain’s permission; Hogen’s incredible book, Snowbird Secrets; the writer’s trance; what makes Snowbird special and whether it has any equals; the mountain has already won; thoughts on Taos; the influence of population growth and the Ikon Pass on Little Cottonwood Canyon; the easiest path down the hill is a straight line; how to use your hands and feet while skiing; and the benefits of a Real Skiers subscription.   Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewNot to be too self-referential, but I’ll again quote myself here. Specifically, my February post recounting the gear failure at Black Mountain of Maine that led to my three-months-and-counting couch sentence:On my final run of the season we swung skier’s right off the lift, seeking shade, tracked-out snow for easier turns. We found them in Crooked glade. Emerged on black-diamond Penobscot. Ungroomed. Snow heavy in the sunshine. A little sticky. As though someone had caulked the hillside. Try this or more glades? Let’s try this. It was my 13th run of the day. My 460th of the season. It was 1:22 p.m. I let my skis run. Gained speed. Initiated turns. I was leaning into a right turn at 18.9 miles per hour when I lost it.I don’t really know what happened. How I lost control. I know what didn’t happen: the binding on my left ski – 12-year-old Rossies I’d bought on spring clearance at Killington – did not release. Amazing pain in my leg. My body folded over backwards, bounced off the snow. A rattling through the shoulder where I’d had rotator cuff surgery last summer. I spun, self-arrested. Came to a stop on a steep section of trail, laying on my left side, my leg pinned into bent-knee position.I screamed. The pain. I could not get the ski off. I screamed again. Removed my helmet. Let it drop. It spun down the hill. Adrenaline kicked in. A skier appeared. He helped me take my ski off. DIN only at 8.5 but the binding was frozen. Finally it released. I tried to straighten my leg. Couldn’t. I assumed it was my knee. Isn’t it always a knee? More skiers arrived. Are you OK? No, I’m in a lot of pain. They left to get help. Patrol arrived with snowmobiles and sleds and bags of supplies. Michael came walking back up the hill.Everything after, rapid but in slow-motion. Does that make sense? Gingerly onto the sled, then the stretcher, then the Patrol-shack table. EMTs waiting. Amazing drugs incoming. Off, with scissors, my ski pants. Removing the boot, pain distilled. Not your knee – your leg. Broken bones. Did not penetrate the skin. Into the ambulance. Rumford Hospital: X-rays and more pain meds mainlined. A bed in the hallway. From the next room a woman, emphatic, that she don’t need no Covid vaccine in her body. All night there. The staff amazing. I would need surgery but there were no surgeons available until the next day. A room opened and they wheeled me in. In a druggy haze they splinted my leg. A train of drunks and incoherents as the bars emptied out. Sleep impossible.Here’s what I didn’t include in that essay: the moment, last August or September, when I’d dropped my skis for a tune at Pedigree Ski Shop in White Plains. “We just need your boots for a binding check,” the clerk had told me. Said boots, stowed at that moment in my closet in Brooklyn, were unavailable, forgotten in my hastening to beat rush-hour traffic. “I’ll bring them when I come back to pick up my skis,” I said. I didn’t. I hadn’t planned on skiing on those Rossies. But at some point in the season, I blew an edge on my Blizzards, couldn’t find a replacement pair, reached in my roof box and there were those old skis.So I’ve had a lot of time to think about that decision chain and how careless I’d been with my own safety, and how to reset my approach so I minimize the chances of a repeat. After nearly three decades of skiing without a major injury (and just two minor ones), I’d gotten arrogant and careless. I’d like this ski season to be the last one that ever ends early. But what else could I do besides remember my boots next time?I’ve been reading Hogen’s site for a few years now. I hadn’t been in explicit need of gear prior to blowing that edge, but he’s an entertaining writer and I enjoyed the regular emails. I figured he was the best-positioned thinker to guide me (and hopefully all of us), into better gear choices and maintenance over the next several years.There was one more thing, one that transcends the empirical realms in which I normally dwell: the notion of mountain as entity. From Snowbird Secrets Chapter 3, On Vibrations:… Hidden Peak is riddled with quartz. Quartz is a crystalline structure, and no ordinary crystal at that. Like all crystals, it not only responds to vibrations, it emits them. Quartz has piezoelectric properties that allow it to store electromagnetic energy and to conduct it. This mountain pulls a pulse from your energy stream and sends it back with interest, but it also skims off a transaction that it stores in its gargantuan energy vault.“So what does the mountain do with all this energy?” Jackson asks, before answering his own question:As it turns out, everyone has a story for how they came to discover Snowbird, but no one knows the reason. Some have the vanity to think they picked the place, but the wisest know the place picked them. This is the secret that Snowbird has slipped into our subconscious; deep down, we know we were summoned here.I’m skeptical but interested. Snowbird is special. No one who has skied there can doubt that. It is different. Incomparable. It is one of the few places where I ever feel genuinely scared on skis. But also reverential, awed, a little miffed and disbelieving the whole time I’m skiing. It’s something else. And I’ve never really been able to figure out why, other than the 600 inches of snow and relentless terrain and location within bowling lane distance of a major airport.Whether or not you’re willing to consider this anthropomorphization of the ski area, Hogen’s call to humility in its presence is inarguable. From Chapter 19, On Gratitude and Asking Permission:Everyone can learn humility before the mountain. Nowhere is this more important than at Snowbird, where if you don’t approach the mountain with the appropriate measure of humility, the mountain will be more than happy to supply some.My final run of the season was on an open trail, ungroomed buy modestly pitched. I was tired, my turns lazy. I wasn’t really paying attention. I wasn’t respecting the mountain. And while that mountain was quite a different thing from Snowbird, it had no issue reminding me that my carelessness was a mistake.Questions I wish I’d askedDespite the fact that this was one of the longest podcasts I’ve ever recorded, we didn’t get to half the questions I’d prepared. I wanted to discuss the devolution of ski shop culture in the maw of the internet, the decline of the industry trade show, the unconstructive nature of a competitive mindset to recreational skiing, the history of Real Skiers, the evolution of ski and boot technology over the past several decades, and how fortunate we are to be alive during this singular epoch in which we can reach the hazardous summits of our most forbidding mountains with a 10-minute lift ride. Hogen also made several interesting comments that would have been worthy of follow-up, from his nomination of Greg Stump to the National Ski & Snowboard Hall of Fame to what he sees as the decline of certain professional ski organization’s institutional integrity. I’ll save it all for next time.What I got wrongI referred to the boot-fitter I’d used in Hunter as “Keith from Sun and Snow Sports.” The boot-fitter’s name is Keith Holmquist, but the name of the shop is, in fact, The Pro Ski and Ride.Sun and Snow Sports is the name of the ski shop I frequented when I lived in Ann Arbor. You can visit their site here.Why you should follow Real SkiersI will admit that I am very bad at winnowing the best gear from the multitudes. I get overwhelmed by choice. This is one reason I don’t buy gear too often: if what I have works, then why change? And it’s why I know enough to use a boot fitter when I do finally decide an upgrade is in order.But maybe what I have – and what you have – doesn’t “work” so much as function. And that’s not the same thing as functioning optimally. Most of us could probably make better choices. And to do that, we need information. Good information. It may seem that the fecundity of the internet precludes the imperative to seek out the hyper-specialized knowledge of a professional. But the vast majority of ski and boot advice is garbage, as Hogen fearlessly reminds us. From a recent Real Skiers post:My methods for capturing skier feedback may not be succeeding to the degree I would like, but at least I’m trying. Most arms of mainstream media that choose to pose as ski experts no longer possess even a patina of credibility. To name two particularly odious examples of advertising posing as editorial, Men’s Journal published a top-10 “Most Versatile Skis of 2022” that was wall-to-wall b******t, assembled purely to incite a direct sale from the supplier. Whatever quality might be shared by their ten selections, “versatility” isn’t even a remote possibility. I could vilify each selection for its exceptional inappropriateness, but instead I’ll just mention that the “writer” admitted that their tenth selection hadn’t even been skied by whatever panel of nitwits they assembled to manufacture this fraud.The second slice of inanity that deserves your contempt is a ruse by Popular Mechanics titled, The 8 Best Ski Boots for Shredding Any Slope. Despite a long prelude about boot selection and how they “tested,” intended to establish a tone of credibility, when they finally got around to picking boots, the editors responsible for this transparent hoax cobbled together an incoherent jumble with but one goal: based on their nothing-burger of a review, the reader is expected to buy his or her boots online, preferably on Amazon. It’s hard to think of a worse disservice to the ski-boot buying public than this inane exercise.At least that’s what I thought until I was invited to peruse The Ski Girl. I can’t say how desperately incompetent all the advice dispensed on this site is, but I can assure you the people assigned to write about skis are the opposite of experts. I’ll let this one example stand as indictment of the whole shebang: someone so well-known she goes simply by the moniker “Christine,” selected as the best ski for an intermediate (woman, one presumes) none other than the ultra-wide Blizzard Rustler 11. It would be hard to make a completely random choice and do worse. There is NOTHING about this model that is right for an intermediate. Period. It’s not merely wrong, it’s dangerous, for reasons that I’m certain would elude “Christine.” On top of it all, she has the witless gall to add, “Every ski review here comes recommended, so you really can’t go wrong.” This is emblematic of everything that’s wrong about what remains of ski journalism. A gross incompetent merrily goes about dispensing advice unblushingly, so the site can collect a commission on a direct sale THAT SHOULD NEVER HAPPEN.Please note that The Ski Girl hasn’t taken down its moronic buying suggestions, suggesting a smug certainty that there will be no serious consequences for its gross negligence. Such is ski journalism today. That sort of raw honesty, that anti-stoke, that unapologetic calling out of b******t, is so rare in today’s ski media that I can’t even conjure another instance of it in the past 12 months. Skiing needs more of this, more blunt and informed voices. At least there’s one. Get in on it here by subscribing to the Real Skiers newsletter (as with The Storm, there are free and paid tiers):The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 53/100 in 2022. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer. You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

1 Player Podcast
1P 255 - Popular Mechanics: Worker Placement

1 Player Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 30:25


This week Julius and I discuss worker placement games.  Drat, I forgot to write down the games we talked about in order.  I'll have to do that later on when I listen to the episode once it comes out.  If you want an exact, clickable list and you don't see it in the notes in your podcast player, visit 1PlayerPodcast.com and view the episode notes there.   Drat.  

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner
Rock Star Secrets to Branding Brilliantly for Entrepreneurs Like You

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 22:03


BRANDING BRILLIANTLYBranding brilliantly, like a rock star, might sound like something that's out of reach for a small or mid-size business. But today's guest says it's not. When we come back, discover how you can message your business in a way that is both fresh and unique. What You'll Discover About Branding Brilliantly (highlights & transcript):https://businessconfidentialradio.com/?p=185054&preview=true# (HIGHLIGHTSCLICK HERE FOR AUDIO TRANSCRIPT) * The difference between branding, marketing and advertising * The difference between branding and branding brilliantly * What keeps us from branding brilliantly * How to conquer obstacles that keep us from branding brilliantly * How to differentiate yourself in the process of branding brilliantly * Best ways to start branding brilliantly * AND much more. ♥ Share this episode with someone you think will benefit from it. ♥ ♥ Leave a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential (Lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential )♥ Guest: Ann BennettAnn Bennett is the founder of http://www.renegadebranding.com/ (RenegadeBranding.com), an International Speaker, Best Selling Author, Coach and Brand Profit Builder. Ann uses her marketing and branding genius to help women entrepreneurs (and a few good men) build their STAND OUT personal brands and boost their profits. Ann works with purpose-driven entrepreneurs who do transformational work, so they can liberate and ignite their unique genius, authentic voice and build a profitable brand platform. Ann has 25 years' experience in visual and graphic design and has brought her talents to many major magazines from Popular Mechanics to Vogue. Ann's personal slogan and the cornerstone of all her programs is, “It's smart to fit in…but it's brilliant to stand out.” Related Resources:Contact Ann and connect with her on https://www.facebook.com/AnnBennettMarketing/ (LinkedIn), https://mailtrack.io/trace/link/a5072041694432399e04345204b2f4f7905ace7d?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAnnBennettMarketing%2F&userId=4197630&signature=cd054913569c1ed6 (Facebook), Twitterhttps://twitter.com/annpbennett (https://twitter.com/annpbennett), https://www.facebook.com/AnnBennettMarketing/ (Instagram), and https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtI0bkFq0FUwlmUUY4i4Zbw (YouTube). Join, Rate and Review:Rating and reviewing the show helps us grow our audience and allows us to bring you more of the rich information you need to succeed from our high powered guests. Leave a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential (Lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential) Joining the Business Confidential Now family is easy and lets you have instant access to the latest tactics, strategies and tips to make your business more successful. Follow on your favorite podcast app http://bit.ly/bcnlisten (here) as well as on https://twitter.com/businessconfid (Twitter), https://facebook.com/businessconfidentialnow (Facebook), https://www.youtube.com/c/HannaHaslKelchner (YouTube), and https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/business-confidential-now-with-hanna-hasl-kelchner (LinkedIn). Download ♥ Follow ♥ Listen ♥ Learn ♥ Share ♥ Review ♥ Comment ♥ Enjoy

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Six Impossible Episodes: Prison Breaks

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 39:27


Dramatic prison escapes often have some common themes -- they often include a lot of tunneling. Here are six highly ingenious and low-violence prison breaks from history.  Research: "Warriors, witches and damn rebel bitches: The Scotswomen who stood their ground." Herald [Glasgow, Scotland], 15 Sept. 2019. Gale In Context: Global Issues, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A599477490/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=32ea1a50. Accessed 18 Apr. 2022. Abashiri Prison Museum. https://www.kangoku.jp/multilingual_english/ Alcatraz History. “The Great Escape from Alcatraz.” https://www.alcatrazhistory.com/alcesc1.htm Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Pennsylvania system". Encyclopedia Britannica, 20 Jul. 1998, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Pennsylvania-system. Accessed 20 April 2022. Callow, John. “Maxwell, William, fifth earl of Nithsdale.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 10/27/2010. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/18413      Carlos, Marius Jr. “Yoshie Shiratori: The Incredible Story of a Man No Prison Could Hold.” Breaking Asia. 2/3/2020. https://www.breakingasia.com/gov/yoshie-shiratori-the-incredible-story-of-a-man-no-prison-could-hold/ Cho, Hahna. “Escape from Libby Prison.” Backstory Radio. 9/28/2018.  https://www.backstoryradio.org/blog/escape-from-libby-prison/ Detwiler, Jacqueline. "How Popular Mechanics inspired the most Famous escape in history." Popular Mechanics, vol. 195, no. 1, Jan.-Feb. 2018, pp. 74+. Gale In Context: Science, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A522758178/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=e0949ca7. Accessed 18 Apr. 2022. Eastern State Penitentiary https://www.easternstate.org/ Eastern State Penitentiary. “"That's Where the Tunnel Is".” Via YouTube. 10/12/2010. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dgaKHfbGlo Eicke, Leigh. "Maxwell [née Herbert], Winifred, countess of Nithsdale (1672–1749), Jacobite courtier." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  23. Oxford University Press. Date of access 20 Apr. 2022, FBI. “Alcatraz Escape.” https://www.fbi.gov/history/famous-cases/alcatraz-escape Kurohi, Rei. “French gangster escapes prison a second time: 5 other serial jailbreakers from around the world.” The Straits Times International Edition. 7/2/2018. https://www.straitstimes.com/world/french-gangster-escapes-prison-a-second-time-5-other-serial-jailbreakers-from-around-the-world Lewis, Robert. "Alcatraz escape of June 1962". Encyclopedia Britannica, 4 Jun. 2021, https://www.britannica.com/event/Alcatraz-escape-of-June-1962. Accessed 20 April 2022. Murray, Jean. “The Law Must Take Its Course – Limerick Women Sentenced to Transportation.” Limerick Civic Trust, September 2005 – August 2006. https://www.limerick.ie/sites/default/files/atoms/files/limerick_women_sentenced_to_transportation_by_jean_murray.pdf  Schreiber, Mark. “News outlets quick to fall in love with prison break coverage.” Japan Times. 5/5/2018. Slater, Sharon. “9 Limerick Women Escape Prison in 1930.” Limerick's Life. 10/17/2013. https://limerickslife.com/limerick-women-prison/ Stamp, Jimmy. “The Daring Escape From the Eastern State Penitentiary.” Smithsonian. 11/13/2013. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-daring-escape-from-the-eastern-state-penitentiary-180947688/ Stater, Victor. "Herbert, William, styled first marquess of Powis and Jacobite first duke of Powis (c. 1626–1696), Jacobite courtier." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  24. Oxford University Press. Zombek, Angela. "Libby Prison" Encyclopedia Virginia. Virginia Humanities, (07 Dec. 2020). Web. 20 Apr. 2022 https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/libby-prison/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Art of Making Things Happen (Bluefishing)  Steve Sims

Internet pioneer Will Pemble built and sold Web, one of the largest web hosts on earth. As a Top 100 Domain Name Millionaire and serial entrepreneur, Will has been building and growing businesses of all shapes and sizes for over 25 years. In addition to Web.com, Will built and sold a national technical training company, and one of the first Internet Service Providers in San Francisco. Through his executive and personal consulting and coaching, Will brings his passion for giving back to millions of people in person and online. Will's success extends well beyond the business world. Known worldwide as "CoasterDad," Will and his kids have built several backyard roller coasters which have been featured on Good Morning America, Discovery Channel, CBS News, NBC News, ABC News, and dozens of television shows worldwide. Will has been featured in hundreds of online media outlets, including AOL.com, Hackaday.com, Popular Science, Popular Mechanics, Make Magazine, Edutopia, to name a few.

Indefensible Ink
Iron Man: Crash

Indefensible Ink

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 40:15


Today, many comics artists work completely digitally, but in 1988, creating a comic book using a computer was a noteworthy novelty. Is Mike Saenz's cyberpunk thriller Iron Man: Crash--billed on its cover as "The First Computer-Generated Graphic Novel"--just a gimmick, or is there a story behind the low-rez bitmaps? And if there is a story...is it any good? Justin takes a look at what could either be described as "The Dark Knight Returns, but for Iron Man" or as "Popular Mechanics, crossed with Tales of Suspense." Along the way, this episode attempts to examine anti-Japanese xenophobia in American media of the '80s and also--improbably--contains spoilers for Hercule Poirot's character arc in Kenneth Branagh's Death of the Nile. Also discussed in this episode: naked sauna days, undercover robots at the post office, and the possible re-exposure of Pentagon secrets that have been buried for 30 years.  BONUS: Who are the creators of Venom? It's a tangled web of what constitutes "creation" and when, but Justin offers his perspective. 

Losing Control
Episode 4: Target Panic in Archery and the Yips in Golf

Losing Control

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 37:50


The yips is not only present in a sport like gymnastics, which requires an almost unparalleled degree of athleticism, but also in sports like archery and golf, which demand extraordinary mental fitness. In archery, it's known as target panic, and in this episode of Losing Control, we explore the mental game of one of the world's top archers, Paige Pearce, who has battled–and is currently managing–target panic. But it's in golf that the term yips, used to describe an involuntary movement that interrupts a golfer's putt, chip, or swing, is believed to have originated. Arguably, golf is also the sport in which the yips have been the most widely studied, and Justin talks it over with David Owen, who has been writing about golf for decades, and who has spent time with some of the top pros in the game, including none other than Tiger Woods.      Paige Pearce, a world champion, record-breaking professional archer and one of the top-ranked compound archers in the world  David Owen, a staff writer at The New Yorker, contributing editor at both Golf Digest and Popular Mechanics, and author of more than a dozen books, including four books about golf See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Official Do Good Better Podcast
The Official Do Good Better Podcast Season Six Ep12 Nonprofit Leader, Speaker & Author Aaron Hamlin

The Official Do Good Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 36:55


He's started two nonprofits from scratch and has a great way of making the complex easier to understand...Aaron Hilman joins Patrick to share insight and discuss just how political your nonprofit should be. Aaron is the executive director of The Center for Election Science as well as a co-founder. He's been featured as an electoral systems expert on MSNBC.com, NPR, Free Speech TV, Inside Philanthropy, 80K Hours, Popular Mechanics, and has given talks across the country on voting methods. He's written on election topics for Deadspin, USA Today Magazine, Independent Voter Network, and others. Additionally, Aaron is a licensed attorney with two additional graduate degrees in the social sciences. Aaron's other interests include defeating lock systems, playing chess, and training jiu-jitsu.Learn More About Aaron:  https://www.aaronhamlin.com/Learn More About Center for Election Science:  https://electionscience.org/Support This Podcast! Make a quick and easy donation here:https://www.patreon.com/dogoodbetterSpecial THANK YOU to our sponsors:Donor Dock - The best CRM system for your small to medium sized nonprofit, hands down! Visit www.DonorDock.com and use the Promo Code DOGOODBETTER for a FREE month!Brady Martz - The Nonprofit Audit Specialists! Visit www.BradyMartz.com to connect with folks to make your fiscal life a heckuvalot easier!About The Official Do Good Better Podcast:Each episode features (fundraising expert, speaker, event creator and author) Patrick Kirby interviewing leaders and champions of small & medium nonprofits to share their successes, their impact, and what makes them a unicorn in a field of horses. Patrick answers fundraising questions and (most importantly) showcases how you can support these small nonprofits doing great big things!iTunes: https://apple.co/3a3XenfSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2PlqRXsYouTube: https://bit.ly/3kaWYanTunein: http://tun.in/pjIVtStitcher: https://bit.ly/3i8jfDRFollow On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoodBetterPodcast/Follow On Twitter: @consulting_do #fundraising #fundraiser #charity #nonprofit #donate #dogood #dogoodBETTER #fargo #fundraisingdadAbout Host Patrick Kirby:Email: Patrick@dogoodbetterconsulting.comLinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fundraisingdad/Want more great advice? Buy Patrick's book! Now also available as an e-book!Fundraise Awesomer! A Practical Guide to Staying Sane While Doing GoodAvailable through Amazon Here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1072070359

Cody's Car Conundrum
CCC Sunday Special - A 100 MPG Car In The Modern Day

Cody's Car Conundrum

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 26:49


In this Sunday Special, I read an article from Popular Mechanics that talks about what it would take to build a 100 MPG car.   Original Article: https://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/a769/3374271/   Check out my YouTube Channel here: https://youtube.com/codyscarconundrum New: CCC Teespring store with more merch: https://my-store-10138012.creator-spring.com New: My Ko-Fi page (a Patreon alternative): https://ko-fi.com/codyscarconundrum Purchase my Car Tshirt merch at:  https://tinyurl.com/y8tjl3jw Stay up to date by visiting my (Newly Updated!!!) website: http://www.codyscarconundrum.com/ 

The Alien UFO Podcast
The Alien UFO Podcast Ep16 Dr. Irena Scott

The Alien UFO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 60:58


This week I am talking to Dr. Irena Scott about her book 'Beyond Pascagoula: The Rest of the Amazing Story'.What is best known about the UFO events of October 1973 is the Pascagoula abduction account of Charles Hickson and Calvin Parker. It began as an extremely credible report, but unlike many reports, intensive research has uncovered a number of additional reports of UFO sightings in the area at around the same time. This number continues to grow and more are given here. This has added to its credibility and because of this, it has been termed the best-documented alien abduction account on record.But much is not known about many elements associated with this event. It had numerous unique aspects, such as that the instruments the beings appeared to use to scan the men resembled such modern devices as the computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan. Such unique factors are compared to additional reports from the same time. This may be the first report of a new type of abduction event; there may have been a second abduction, by the same object at around the same time as Parker and Hickson's. Abductions appear to happen as single events, but this may have been extremely different and the first reported. And there may have even been several abduction attempts on the same night as the Pascagoula abduction.In addition much happened at the same time as the Pascagoula abduction, such as reports of close UFO encounters, a thunderous boom, and similar episodes that swarmed in to bewildered operators in many states across the USA. These events ushered in a massive UFO wave, possibly the largest wave ever experienced and possibly the last wave.The strange boom was no ordinary sound; it was one that, with the exception of the Krakatoa volcanic eruption of 1883, could be the most widespread audible sound ever recorded. It did not happen in some out of the way place; it happened in the nation's vital centers. It was felt in Washington DC, over areas of the nation's highest population density, its heartland, and several vital cities.This sound was analyzed according to the latest NASA research on sounds. The boom was quite unnatural and remarkable in many ways. The width of the sound would mean that the object causing it would be many miles high, in outer space, and in a location where there should be no overpressure. However, there was a large area of overpressure such that it broke windows in a swath over at least three states and it appeared able to cause ground movement over a large area. It appeared to defy the laws of physics. Unlike most UFO associated phenomena where there is no hard scientific proof, this sound was recorded on two seismographs, which may provide scientific proof of the existence of anomalous UFO phenomena associated events.BioDr. Irena Scott received her PhD from the University of Missouri in physiology, did post-doctoral research at Cornell University, has been an Assistant Professor at St. Bonaventure University, and has done research and teaching at The Ohio State University, the University of Missouri, the University of Nevada, and at Battelle Memorial Institute. She worked for the Defense Intelligence Agency and the Aerospace Center in satellite photography, was a volunteer astronomer at the Ohio State University Radio Observatory, and has taken flying lessons. Her publications include books, and works in scientific journals, magazines, newspapers, and she was a correspondent for Popular Mechanics magazine. She served on the MUFON Board of Directors (1993 to 2000), is a MUFON consultant in physiology and astronomy and a field investigator. She co-edited eight symposium proceedings, has been a State Section Director for Ohio MUFON, was a founding member of the Mid-Ohio Research Associates (MORA) and its journal editor, and has published UFO material in books and journals (including scientific journals).https://www.amazon.com/BEYOND-PASCAGOULA-REST-AMAZING-STORY-ebook/dp/B09FBNBT2L/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1650111250&sr=8-1http://www.pastliveshypnosis.co.uk/https://www.patreon.com/alienufopodcast

E for Explicit Podcast
Episode #67: Columnist Chris Maag

E for Explicit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 108:06


In the 67th episode, I chat with Columnist Chris Maag! Christopher Maag's column focuses on the unique characters and overlooked beauty of New Jersey and the New York metropolitan region. His stories combine investigative reporting, narrative writing, and characters who leap off the page. A graduate of Grinnell College and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Maag has been a frequent contributor to The New York Times, TIME, Fortune, Popular Mechanics, and Mother Jones. He's also worked as a staff writer at monthly magazines, daily newspapers, and alternative newsweeklies.

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Two Accidental Inventions

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 39:37


Often, inventions that are made quite by accident end up becoming an everyday part of life. This episode covers two of those: the microwave oven and the chocolate chip cookie. Research:  Balsley, Betsy. “Microwave Ovens Put the Space Age in the Kitchen.” Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Dec. 4, 1968. https://www.newspapers.com/image/271185585/?terms=radarange&match=1 Ratheon Company. “Technology Leadership.” https://web.archive.org/web/20130322044917/http://www.raytheon.com/ourcompany/history/leadership/ Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "microwave oven". Encyclopedia Britannica, 26 Oct. 2018, https://www.britannica.com/technology/microwave-oven  Weiss, Stanley I. and Amir, Amir R.. "Raytheon Company". Encyclopedia Britannica, 7 Apr. 2016, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Raytheon-Company “Amana.” Whirlpool. https://www.whirlpoolcorp.com/2010annual/brand-amana.html “Percy Spencer.” Atomic Heritage Foundation. https://www.atomicheritage.org/profile/percy-spencer#:~:text=Percy%20Spencer%20was%20an%20American,at%20a%20local%20paper%20mill. “Tappan Stove Company.” Ohio History Central. https://ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Tappan_Stove_Company#:~:text=In%201955%2C%20the%20Tappan%20Stove,too%20expensive%20for%20home%20use. Jorgensen, Timothy J. “Hot Food, Fast: The Home Microwave Oven.” Smithsonian. March 16, 2017. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/hot-food-fast-home-microwave-oven-turns-50-180962545/ “Patent No. 2,495,429 – P.L. Spencer – Method of Treating Foodstuffs.” United States Patent and Trademark Office. January 24, 1950. https://pdfpiw.uspto.gov/.piw?PageNum=0&docid=02495429&IDKey=261705CF6164&HomeUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fpatft.uspto.gov%2Fnetacgi%2Fnph-Parser%3FSect1%3DPTO1%2526Sect2%3DHITOFF%2526d%3DPALL%2526p%3D1%2526u%3D%25252Fnetahtml%25252FPTO%25252Fsrchnum.htm%2526r%3D1%2526f%3DG%2526l%3D50%2526s1%3D2495429.PN.%2526OS%3DPN%2F2495429%2526RS%3DPN%2F2495429 “Revolution in Kitchens Is Created by Amana's Microwave Radarange.” The commercial Appeal. Sept. 30, 1968. https://www.newspapers.com/image/770831761/?terms=radarange&match=1 Wyman, Carolyn. “The Great American Chocolate Chip Cookie Book: Scrumptious Recipes & Fabled History From Toll House to Cookie Cake Pie.” Countryman Press. 2013. Roberts, Sam. “Forgotten No More: Overlooked No More: Ruth Wakefield, Who Invented the Chocolate Chip Cookie.” New York Times. March 21, 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/21/obituaries/overlooked-ruth-wakefield.html “CONTROL IS SOUGHT OF LAMONT, CORLISS.” New York Times. December 23, 1949. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1949/12/23/84292752.html?pageNumber=29 Blitz, Matt. “The Amazing True Story of How the Microwave Was Invented by Accident.” Popular Mechanics. Sept. 2, 2021. https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/gadgets/a19567/how-the-microwave-was-invented-by-accident/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1 Player Podcast
1P 250 - Popular Mechanics: Multi-Use Cards

1 Player Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 27:59


This week Julius and I embark on a new journey of exploring interesting game mechanics.  We start off with multi-use cards.  It's more than which card should I play play.  It's which card should I play and how should I play it?  That mechanic, when done well, adds for interesting choices.   03:33 Bruge (BGG) 04:00 La Granja (BGG) 07:00 Oh My Goods! (BGG) 09:00 Lewis and Clark (BGG) 11:30 The Bloody Inn (BGG) 14:50 Imperial Settlers (BGG) 17:20 Gloomhaven (BGG) 18:00 Newton (BGG) 19:00 Race for the Galaxy (BGG) 19:30 Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition (BGG) 22:30 Batman: The Dark Night Returns (BGG) 24:20 Rove (BGG) 25:25 Spaceshipped (BGG)

Keith and The Girl comedy talk show

Chemda had the most exciting weed purchasing experience of her life, Keith and Chemda discuss the KATG polls associated with the 2022 Oscars Slap and Louis C.K.'s 2022 Grammy win, and Keith's dad is quoted in a Popular Mechanics article over $500,000,000 in missing Civil War gold.

The Smoking Tire
Brett Berk (Automotive journalist)

The Smoking Tire

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 101:11


Brett Berk @therealbrettberk is an automotive journalist who has had his work published literally everywhere (see the list below). He has a unique perspective on cars that he shares with brilliant and humorous concision. We talk about mobility, the EQS, scary 765LTs, fast e-bikes, and a lot of other random stuff. Recorded March 21, 2022 Check out his archive: http://brettberk.com/https://www.instagram.com/therealbrettberk/Brett's work can be found in: AFAR, Architectural Digest, Autoblog, Automobile, Autoweek, BBC.com, Billboard, Black Ink, Bloomberg Businessweek, Bloomberg Pursuits, Car and Driver, Celebrated Living, Centurion, CNN.com, Departures, DETAILS, The Drive, ELLE Decor, Entrepreneur, Esquire, Forbes GQ, The Globe & Mail, Hagerty, The Huffington Post, Jalopnik, The Los Angeles Times, Maxim, Men's Fitness, Men's Health, Men's Journal, The New York Times, Popular Mechanics, Road & Track, ShowBoats International, Travel + Leisure, Vanity Fair, The Verge, Vogue, WIRED, and Yahoo!   Head to policygenius.com to get your free home and auto insurance quotes and see how much you could save. Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/TIRE Want your question answered? Want to watch the live stream, get ad-free podcasts, or exclusive podcasts? Join our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thesmokingtirepodcastTweet at us!https://www.Twitter.com/thesmokingtirehttps://www.Twitter.com/zackklapmanInstagram:https://www.Instagram.com/thesmokingtirehttps://www.Instagram.com/therealzackklapman

Hunting Matters
David M. Wirth

Hunting Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 39:53


David Wirth is an inventor and entrepreneur who holds two degrees in Aerospace Engineering from UCLA and is currently pursuing his PhD in nanoengineering of materials. Before beginning his doctoral studies, he served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force and co-founded a metal 3D printing company, Fabric8Labs, which was recently funded by Intel ventures. In 2016 he was personally invited to the White House to discuss topics related to additive manufacturing with industry and academic leaders. In 2017 he left Fabric8Labs to partner with Jason Murray and founded Arcflash Labs, LLC with the goal of advancing electromagnetic propulsion technologies.Together they developed a new type of high-density power inverter and offered a number of coilgun and gauss rifle prototypes for sale, including the GR-1 "Anvil" which was recently featured on Forgotten Weapons. David has been featured on the Forbes' 30 under 30 list in the area of manufacturing, and his projects have been featured on the Discovery Channel, Popular Mechanics, New Scientist, The Drive, and Popular Science.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. IRENA SCOTT, PHD - Sacred Corridors

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2022 46:34


Dr. Irena Scott received her Ph.D. from the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine in physiology, did post-doctoral research at Cornell University, and has had a professorship at St. Bonaventure University. Her MS was from the University of Nevada, her BS from Ohio State University in astronomy and biology, and she has done research and teaching at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, and the University of Nevada. The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) employed her in Ph.D. level (GS-11) research in satellite photography including in its Air Order of Battle section, which involved aircraft identification with above top-secret security clearances. She was employed in MS level work as a Physical Scientist/Cartographer in the DMA Aerospace Center/Aerospace Center using satellite photography, and she worked at Battelle Memorial Institute. She has been sent for work-related purposes to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. She was a volunteer astronomer at the Ohio State University Radio Observatory (noted for the WOW SETI signal), is an amateur astronomer, has taken flying lessons, and is a drone pilot. She was a correspondent for Popular Mechanics magazine. Her publications include books and works in scientific journals, magazines, and newspapers. Her photography has been shown on television and in magazines, books, and newspapers. She served on the MUFON Board of Directors (1993 to 2000), and is a MUFON consultant in physiology and astronomy and a field investigator. As the MUFON Director of Publications, she co-edited eight symposium proceedings, including several of the most important MUFON publications. She was a founding member of the Mid-Ohio Research Associates (MORA) and an editor for the Ohio UFO Notebook. Her UFO publications include numerous articles in the MUFON UFO Journal, the International UFO Reporter, and FATE Magazine. She has taken a scientific approach to UFO phenomena and published papers about UFO data in peer-reviewed scientific journalsTo listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

Future of Mobility
#91 – Pete Bigelow | Shift & Automotive News - Automated Driving, Electrification, Sustainable Aviation & the Role of Journalism

Future of Mobility

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2022 58:29


Pete Bigelow is a senior reporter at Automotive News in Detroit, where he covers the convergence of transportation and technology. Key topics in this conversation include The responsibility for media to accurately present complex technical topics The current state of automated driving technology and how this technology is likely to progress How Pete decides which topics to cover The intersection of technology, public perception, and regulation The future for more effective and sustainable aviation Links: Show notes: http://brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/petebigelow Pete's LinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pete-bigelow-a947263/ Pete's Twitter: https://twitter.com/petercbigelow Shift podcast: https://www.autonews.com/shift-podcast-mobility About Pete: Pete Bigelow is a senior reporter at Automotive News in Detroit, where he covers the convergence of transportation and technology. He's the host of Shift: A Podcast About Mobility, a weekly show that features conversations with top newsmakers from across the transportation landscape. Pete's previous work has appeared in publications like The New York Times, Popular Mechanics and Car and Driver. A one-time certified flight instructor, he's now ground-based in southeast Michigan, where he lives with his wife, three children and dog. Future of Mobility: The Future of Mobility podcast is focused on the development and implementation of safe, sustainable, and equitable mobility solutions, with a spotlight on the people and technology advancing these fields. linkedin.com/in/brandonbartneck/ brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!
“Debunking the Real 9/11 Myths: Why Popular Mechanics Can't Face Up to Reality”

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2022 122:28


Did Popular Mechanics really debunk 9/11 Conspiracy theories as claimed? Or did they debunk themselves?  Popular Mechanics claims to have consulted more than 300 experts and sources in their “Debunking 9/11 Myths” hit piece but neglected to even mention the 1,600 of “Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth” who were demanding a new WTC investigation at the time of their 2012 reprint? My guest is Adam Taylor who has been an activist and researcher in the 9/11 Truth Movement since August of 2007. During his years of research, Adam primarily worked as a contributor to the site Debunking the Debunkers of the 9/11 Truth Movement (at 911debunkers.blogspot.com). He has also contributed research to sites such as Architects & Engineers for 911 Truth and ScientificMethod911.org. He has appeared on numerous online programs, such as Pump It Out Radio, 9/11 Free Fall, Tales from the Rabbit Hole, and Truth Teller's Radio." He exposes the erroneous and deceptive arguments made by Popular Mechanics in its most recent edition of Debunking 9/11 Myths, published around the ten-year anniversary of September 11, 2001.Taylor writes, “Popular Mechanics has been the primary cheerleader in the mainstream media in defense of the NIST reports ever since its book, Debunking 9/11 Myths: Why Conspiracy Theories Can't Stand Up To the Facts, was published in 2006.” Many years later, the books and articles by Popular Mechanics continue to be frequently cited by members of the media as the definitive refutation of the controlled demolition hypothesis. Adam Taylor's dismantling of Debunking 9/11 Myths should be required reading for anyone who tries to hold up Popular Mechanics as an authoritative source on the cause of the World Trade Center destruction.Learn more at RichardGage911.org

The Daily Dive
How the U.S. Could Cut Off Russia's Tech Supply

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 22:43


Russia continues to make moves for a full-scale invasion of Ukraine with reports that troops are ready to go. In the meantime the U.S. is considering tougher sanctions and even going a step further with export control methods that could keep Russia from obtaining U.S. and foreign made tech. This would degrade industrial production in Russia by keeping things like commercial electronics, semiconductors, and aircraft parts out of their hands. Alexandra Alper, White House reporter at Reuters, joins us for more. Next, new research shows that everything we see could be from 15 seconds in the past. Our eyes and brains create an illusion of stability so we don't feel dizzy or nauseated. Instead of analyzing every single visual snapshot, we perceive an average of what we saw in the past 15 seconds. Caroline Delbert, contributing editor at Popular Mechanics, joins us for what this new research says. Finally, a feel good story about community coming together to help without even asking why. Claire Rowan's 16 year-old son Will, depends on a specific powdered infant formula as his only source of food. The problem happened when the FDA recalled that formula. That led to Rowan scrambling to find a replacement and posting to online groups where the community took it upon themselves to help track down more. Sydney Page, reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for how everyone came together to help. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Couple Pints Pod
Episode 88: Black Hole Hoax

Couple Pints Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 29:15


This week the boys catch up a little, and then get sucked into the Black Hole of a conspiracy posted by Popular Mechanics. Basically, in 2012 Earth got sucked into a Black Hole and we're hurdling though space and time waiting for the planet to implode on itself! Issa doozy! Check out our Audio Episodes and go cop some Merch: https://castpie.com/584c6 Follow us on Instagram: @couplepintspod --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Defrag
Rise of the QR Codes

The Defrag

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 13:12


Before the pandemic, QR codes were largely viewed as a bit of a novelty. Many people didn't know how they worked, and you'd rarely see them in the wild. Perhaps you might spot one on an advertising campaign at a bus stop, or as a way to enter a promotion. However thanks to the pandemic, the humble QR code has seen a revival.Vince Guerrieri's story for Popular Mechanics: https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/apps/a39048000/history-of-qr-codes/FBI PSA over QR Codes: https://www.ic3.gov/Media/Y2022/PSA220118Listen to Command Line Heroes: https://link.chtbl.com/commandlineheroes_cyoa?sid=s9.podcast.thedefragBecome a member of The Defrag to get ad-free and bonus episodes at our website https://thedefrag.com/ - or become a member of The Defrag+ on Apple Podcasts.Join our Discord: https://discord.gg/rHb7JVHz42Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube.

Congressional Dish
CD247: BIF: The Growth of US Railroads

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2022 105:50


The infrastructure law provides the most significant investment in passenger rail in U.S. history, but substantial hurdles - including a powerful cartel - stand firmly in the way of a real national network. In this episode, learn the ways the infrastructure law paves the way for a better future for passenger rail along with the significant obstacles that it failed to address. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish YouTube Video What is the World Trade System? Contributors to Supply Chain Issues Matthew Jinoo Buck. February 4, 2022. “How America's Supply Chains Got Railroaded.” The American Prospect. “Cartel.” Merriam-Webster.com. 2022. “Energy Group Joins Shippers Alleging Price Fixing in Rail Transport.” January 6, 2020. The Houston Chronicle. Testimony of Dennis R. Pierce. Passenger and Freight Rail: The Current Status of the Rail Network and the Track Ahead. October 21, 2020. 116th Cong. U.S. Internal Revenue Service. December 31, 2019. “IRS issues standard mileage rates for 2020.” Dangers of Monster Trains and Rail Profiteering Aaron Gordon. Mar 22, 2021. “‘It's Going to End Up Like Boeing': How Freight Rail Is Courting Catastrophe.” Vice. U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. Dec 29, 2020. “Accident Report: Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Train MGRCY04 with a Stationary Train, Granite Canyon, Wyoming, October 4, 2018” [NTSB/RAR-20/05 / PB2020-101016.] Marybeth Luczak. Nov 30, 2020. “Transport Canada Updates Rail Employee Fatigue Rules.” Railway Age. U.S. Government Accountability Office. May 30, 2019. “Rail Safety: Freight Trains Are Getting Longer, and Additional Information Is Needed to Assess Their Impact” [GAO-19-443.] Christina M. Rudin-Brown, Sarah Harris, and Ari Rosberg. May 2019. “How shift scheduling practices contribute to fatigue amongst freight rail operating employees: Findings from Canadian accident investigations.” Accident Analysis and Prevention. Jessica Murphy. Jan 19, 2018. “Lac-Megantic: The runaway train that destroyed a town.” BBC. Eric M. Johnson. Dec 6, 2017. “Growing length of U.S. freight trains in federal crosshairs after crashes: GAO.” Reuters. Cumberland Times-News. Aug 12, 2017. “Last of Hyndman's evacuated residents return home.” The Tribune Democrat. Jeffrey Alderton. Aug 5, 2017. “Propane fire out at Hyndman train crash site, residents await news of when they can return.” The Tribune Democrat. Jeffrey Alderton. Aug 3, 2017. “Train derailment destroys Bedford County home, forces evacuation.” The Tribune Democrat. New Jersey Department of Health. Revised June 2011. “Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet: Sodium Chlorate.” Stephen Joiner. Feb 11, 2010 “Is Bigger Better? 'Monster' Trains vs Freight Trains.” Popular Mechanics. Lobbying and Corruption “CSX Corp: Recipients.” 2020. Open Secrets. CSX Corporation Lobbying Report. 2020. Senate.gov. “Union Pacific Corp: Summary.” 2020. Open Secrets. “Union Pacific Corp: Members Invested.” 2018. Open Secrets. Union Pacific Corporation Lobbying Report. 2020. Senate.gov. What you really pay for TV Gavin Bridge. Oct 27, 2020. “The True Cost to Consumers of Pay TV's Top Channels.” Variety. Laws H.R.3684 - Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act Sponsor: Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) Status: Became Public Law No. 117-58 Law Outline DIVISION A: SURFACE TRANSPORTATION TITLE I - FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS Subtitle A - Authorizations and Programs Sec. 11101: Authorization of appropriations Authorizes appropriations for Federal-Aid for highways at between $52 billion and $56 billion per year through fiscal year 2026 (over $273 billion total). Authorizes $300 million for "charging and fueling infrastructure grants" for 2022, which increases by $100 million per year (maxing out at $700 million in 2026) Authorizes between $25 million and $30 million per year for "community resilience and evacuation route grants" on top of equal amounts for "at risk coastal infrastructure grants" Authorizes a total of $6.53 billion (from two funds) for the bridge investment program Sec. 11102: Obligation ceiling Caps the annual total funding from all laws (with many exceptions) that can be spent on Federal highway programs. Total through 2026: $300.3 billion Sec. 11109: Surface transportation block grant program: Allows money from the surface transportation block grant program to be used for "planning and construction" of projects that "facilitate intermodel connections between emerging transportation technologies", specifically naming the hyperloop Sec. 11508: Requirements for Transportation Projects Carried Out Through Public Private Partnerships For projects that cost $100 million or more, before entering into a contract with a private company, the government partner has to conduct a "value for money analysis" of the partnership. Three years after a project is opened to traffic, the government partner has to review the compliance of the private company and either certify their compliance or report to the Secretary of Transportation the details of the violation. The certifications or violation notifications must be publicly available "in a form that does not disclose any proprietary or confidential business information." DIVISION B - SURFACE TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT ACT OF 2021 TITLE I - MULTIMODAL AND FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION Subtitle A - Multimodal Freight Policy Sec. 21101: Office of Multimodal Freight Infrastructure and Policy Restructures/eliminates offices at the Department of Transportation to create an Office of Multimodal Freight Infrastructure and Policy The person in charge will be appointed by the President and has to be confirmed by the Senate Authorizes "such sums as are necessary" Subtitle B - Multimodal Investment Sec. 21201: National infrastructure project assistance Authorizes $2 billion per year until 2026 ($10 billion total) on projects that cost at least $100 million that include highways, bridges, freight rail, passenger rail, and public transportation projects. The Federal government will pay a maximum of 80% of the project costs. Sec. 21202: Local and regional project assistance Authorizes $1.5 billion per year until 2026 ($7.5 billion) (which will expire after 3 years) for grants for local transportation projects in amounts between $1 million and $25 million for projects that include highway, bridge, public transportation, passenger and freight rail, port infrastructure, surface transportation at airports, and more. Sec. 21203: National culvert removal, replacement, and restoration grant program Authorizes $800 million per year through 2026 ($4 billion) for grants for projects that replace, remove, or repair culverts (water channels) that improve or restore passages for fish. Subtitle C - Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing Reforms TITLE II - RAIL Subtitle A - Authorization of Appropriations Sec. 22101: Grants to Amtrak Authorizes appropriations for Amtrak in the Northeast Corridor at between $1.1 billion and $1.57 billion per year through 2026 ($6.57 billion total). Authorizes appropriations for Amtrak in the National Network at between $2.2 billion and $3 billion per year through 2026 ($12.65 billion total). Sec. 22103: Consolidated rail infrastructure and safety improvements grants Authorizes $1 billion per year through 2026 ($5 billion total) for rail infrastructure safety improvement grants Sec. 22104: Railroad crossing elimination program Authorizes $500 million per year through 2016 ($2.5 billion total) for the elimination of railroad crossings Sec. 22106: Federal-State partnership for intercity passenger rail grants Authorizes $1.5 billion per year through 2026 ($7.5 billion total) for grants to states to expand intercity passenger rail grants Subtitle B - Amtrak Reforms Sec. 22201: Amtrak findings, mission, and goals Changes the goal of cooperation between Amtrak, governments, & other rail carriers from "to achieve a performance level sufficient to justify expending public money" to "in order to meet the intercity passenger rail needs of the United States" and expands the service areas beyond "urban" locations. Changes the goals of Amtrak to include... "Improving its contracts with rail carriers over whose tracks Amtrak operates." "Offering competitive fares" "Increasing revenue from the transportation of mail and express" "Encourages" Amtrak to make agreement with private companies that will generate additional revenue Sec. 22203: Station agents Requires that at least one Amtrak ticket agent works at each station, unless there is a commuter rail agent who has the authority to sell Amtrak tickets Sec. 22208: Passenger Experience Enhancement Removes the requirement that Amtrak's food and beverage service financially break even in order to be offered on its trains Creates a working group to make recommendations about how to improve the onboard food and beverage service The report must be complete within one year of the working group's formation After the report is complete, Amtrak must create a plan to implementing the working group's recommendations and/or tell Congress in writing why they will not implement the recommendations The plan can not include Amtrak employee layoffs Sec . 22209: Amtrak smoking policy Requires Amtrak to prohibit smoking - including electronic cigarettes - on all Amtrak trains Sec. 22210: Protecting Amtrak routes through rural communities Prohibits Amtrak from cutting or reducing service to a rail route if they receive adequate Federal funding for that route Sec. 22213: Creating Quality Jobs Amtrak will not be allowed to privatize the jobs previously performed by laid off union workers. Sec. 22214: Amtrak Daily Long Distance Study Authorizes $15 million for an Amtrak study on bringing back long distance rail routes that were discontinued. Subtitle C - Intercity Passenger Rail Policy Sec. 22304: Restoration and Enhancement Grants Extends the amount of time the government will pay the operating costs of Amtrak or "any rail carrier" partnered with Amtrak or a government agency that provides passenger rail service from 3 years to 6 years, and pays higher percentages of the the costs. Sec. 22305: Railroad crossing elimination program Creates a program to eliminate highway-rail crossings where vehicles are frequently stopped by trains Authorizes the construction on tunnels and bridges Requires the government agency in charge of the project to "obtain the necessary approvals from any impacted rail carriers or real property owners before proceeding with the construction of a project" Each grant will be for at least $1 million each The Federal government will pay no more than 80% of the project's cost Sec. 22306: Interstate rail compacts Authorizes up to 10 grants per year valued at a maximum of $1 million each to plan and promote new Amtrak routes The grant recipient will have to match the grant by at least 50% of the eligible expenses Sec. 22308: Corridor identification and development program The Secretary of Transportation will create a program for public entities to plan for expanded intercity passenger rail corridors (which are routes that are less than 750 miles), operated by Amtrak or private companies. When developing plans for corridors, the Secretary has to "consult" with "host railroads for the proposed corridor" Subtitle D - Rail Safety Sec. 22404: Blocked Crossing Portal The Administration of the Federal Railroad Administration would establish a "3 year blocked crossing portal" which would collect information about blocked crossing by trains from the public and first responders and provide every person submitting the complaint the contact information of the "relevant railroad" and would "encourage" them to complain to them too. Information collected would NOT be allowed to be used for any regulatory or enforcement purposes Reports to Congress will be created using the information collected Sec. 22406: Emergency Lighting The Secretary of Transportation will have to issue a rule requiring that all carriers that transport human passengers have an emergency lighting system that turns on when there is a power failure. Sec. 22408: Completion of Hours of Service and Fatigue Studies Requires the Administrator of the Federal Railroad Administration to start pilot programs that were supposed to be conducted no later than 2010, which will test railroad employee scheduling rules designed to reduce employee fatigue. They will test... Assigning employees to shifts with 10 hours advance notice For employees subject to being on-call, having some shifts when those employees are not subject to being on-call. If the pilot programs have not begun by around March of 2023, a report will have to be submitted to Congress explaining the challenges, including "efforts to recruit participant railroads" Sec. 22409: Positive Train Control Study The Comptroller General will conduct a study to determine the annual operation and maintenance costs for positive train control. Sec. 22418: Civil Penalty Enforcement Authority Requires the Secretary of Transportation to provide notice and an opportunity for a hearing to "persons" who violate regulations requiring railroads to report information about railroad crossings. Eliminates the minimum $500 fine for violating the regulations Allows the Attorney General to take the railroad to court to collect the penalty but prohibits the amount of the civil penalty from being reviewed by the courts. Sec. 22423: High-Speed Train Noise Emissions Allows, but does not require, the Secretary of Transportation to create regulations governing the noise levels of trains that exceed 160 mph. Sec. 22425: Requirements for railroad freight cars placed into service in the United States Effective 3 years after the regulations are complete (maximum 5 years after this becomes law), freight cars will be prohibited from operating within the United States if it has sensitive technology originating from or if more than 15% of it is manufactured in... "A country of concern" (which is defined as a country identified by the Commerce Department "as a nonmarket economy country"). Countries on the nonmarket economy list include... Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China Georgia Kyrgyz Republic Moldova Tajikistan Turkmenistan Uzbekistan Vietnam A country identified by the United States Trade Representative on its priority watch list, which in 2020 included... China Indonesia India Algeria Saudi Arabia Russia Ukraine Argentina Chile Venezuela State owned enterprises The Secretary of Transportation can assess fines between $100,000 and $250,000 per freight car. A company that has been found in violation 3 times can be kicked out of the United States transportation system until they are in compliance and have paid all their fines in full. These rules will apply regardless of what was agreed to in the USMCA trade agreement. Sec. 22427: Controlled substances testing for mechanical employees 180 days after this becomes law, all railroad mechanics will be subject to drug testing, which can be conducted at random. Bills H.R.1748 - Safe Freight Act of 2019 Sponsor: Rep. Don Young (R-AK) Status: Referred to Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 03/14/2019 Hearings Leveraging IIJA: Plans for Expanding Intercity Passenger Rail House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials December 9, 2021 During the hearing, witnesses discussed plans for expanding intercity passenger rail in their states, regions, and networks, and how the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which was recently signed into law, will support these efforts. Witnesses: Stephen Gardner, President, Amtrak David Kim, Secretary, California State Transportation Agency Kevin Corbett, President and CEO of New Jersey Transit, Co-Chair, Northeast Corridor Commission, On behalf of Northeast Corridor Commission Julie White, Deputy Secretary for Multimodal Transportation, North Carolina Department of Transportation, Commission Chair, Southeast Corridor Commission, On behalf of the North Carolina Department of Transportation and the Southeast Corridor Commission Ms. Donna DeMartino, Managing Director, Los Angeles – San Diego – San Luis Obispo Rail Corridor Agency Knox Ross, Mississippi Commission and Chair of the Southern Rail Commission Clips 8:52 - 9:12 Rep. Rick Crawford: Finally, any potential expansion of the Amtrak system must include the full input of the freight railroads on capacity and track sharing issues. The ongoing supply chain crisis only further emphasizes the value of freight railroads and efficiently moving goods across the nation. The important work the freight railroads cannot be obstructed. 16:49 - 17:10 Rep. Peter DeFazio The law is pretty clear: preference over freight transportation except in an emergency. Intercity and commuter rail passenger transportation provided for Amtrak has preference over freight transportation and using a rail line junction crossing unless the board orders otherwise under this subsection. Well, obviously that has not been observed. 22:05 - 22:24 Stephen Gardner: With the $66 billion provided to the Federal Railroad Administration and Amtrak we and our partners can finally have the chance to renew, improve or replace antiquated assets like the century old bridges and tunnels in the Northeast, inaccessible stations around the nation, and our vintage trains. 23:44 - 24:11 Stephen Gardner: Additionally, we'll continue to work collaboratively with our partners where they see value in working with other parties to deliver parts of their service and with new railroad entities that aim to develop or deliver their own service. We simply ask that key railroad laws like the Railway Labor Act and railway retirement apply to new entrants, that the federal government gets equity and accountability for investments it makes in private systems, and that any new services create connections with Amtrak's national network 1:25:00 - 1:25:37 Stephen Gardner: We've been working very closely with a variety of host railroads on opportunities to expand, notably Burlington Northern Santa Fe and our work to expand the Heartland Flyer service between Texas and Oklahoma and potentially extend that North to Wichita, Newton, in Colorado along the front range also with BNSF, to look at opportunities there. With Canadian Pacific we've been having really good conversations about launching a new service between the Twin Cities, Milwaukee and Chicago. Similarly, I think there's opportunities for that Baton Rouge to New Orleans service that Mr. Ross mentioned. 1:54:24 - 1:55:10 Rep. Chuy Garcia: You've each had different experiences with freight railroads as the host railroad for your respective services. What can Congress do to help you as you discuss expanding and improving passenger rail service with your freight railroad? You'll have about 15 seconds each. Knox Ross: Congressman, thank you. I think it's enforcing the will of Congress and the law that set up Amtrak in the beginning is, as the Chairman talked about, in the beginning, that people have a preference over freight. Now we understand that we all have to work together to do that. But we think there are many ways that Amtrak and other other hosts can work together with the fright to get this done, but the law has to be enforced. 1:55:14 - 1:55:30 Julie White: I would say that the money in the IIJA is going to be really important as we work, for example, on the S Line it is an FRA grant that enables us to acquire that line from CSX and enables us to grow freight rail on it at the same time as passenger. 1:58:05 - 1:58:23 Rep. Tim Burchett: Also understand that Amtrak is planning to either expand or build new rail corridors in 26 states across the country over the next 15 years and I was wondering: what makes you think Amtrak will turn a profit in any of those communities? 1:58:43 - 1:59:29 Stephen Gardner: But I would be clear here that our expectation is that these corridors do require support from states and the federal government, that they produce real value and support a lot of important transportation needs. But we measure those not necessarily by the profit of the farebox, so to speak, even though Amtrak has the highest farebox recovery of any system in the United States by far in terms of rail systems, we believe that Amtrak mission is to create mobility, mobility that creates value. We do that with as little public funding as we can, but the current services do require support investment and I think that's fair. All transportation modes require investment. 2:00:12 - 2:00:24 Rep. Tim Burchett: Since you mentioned that you needed more funding down the line, don't you think it'd be better to make your current service corridors more profit -- or just profitable before you build new ones in other parts of the country? When Unlimited Potential Meets Limited Resources: The Benefits and Challenges of High-Speed Rail and Emerging Rail Technologies House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials May 6, 2021 This hearing featured twelve witnesses from a range of perspectives, exploring the opportunities and limitations associated with high-speed rail and emerging technologies, including regulatory oversight, technology readiness, project costs, and available federal resources. Witnesses: John Porcari, Former Deputy Secretary of the US Department of Transportation Rachel Smith, President and CEO of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce Phillip Washington, CEO of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Danielle Eckert, International Representative for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Carbett "Trey" Duhon III, Judge in Waller County, TX Andy Kunz, President and CEO of the US High Speed Rail Association Carlos Aguilar, President and CEO of Texas Central High Speed Rail William Flynn, CEO of Amtrak Josh Giegel, CEO and Co-Founder of Virgin Hyperloop Andres de Leon, CEO of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies Michal Reininger, CEO of Brightline Trains Wayne Rogers, Chairman and CEO of Northeast Maglev Clips 8:37 - 8:48 Rep. Rick Crawford: Rail is also considered one of the most fuel efficient ways to move freight. On average freight rail can move one ton of freight over 470 miles on one gallon of fuel. 18:05 - 18:46 Rep. Peter DeFazio: You know we have put aggregate with the essentially post World War Two, mostly the Eisenhower program, $2 trillion -- trillion -- into highways, invested by the federal government, a lot of money. But post World War Two $777 billion into aviation, airports, runways, air traffic control etc. And, and we have put about $90 billion total into rail. 22:45 - 23:25 John Porcari: As I evaluated ways to increase capacity in the Baltimore-New York City corridor, these were my choices: I could add air capacity between BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport and New York with 90% federal funding for runway and taxiway improvements, I could add highway capacity on I-95 to New York with 80% federal funding, or add passenger rail capacity with zero federal funding for that 215 mile segment. A passenger rail trip makes far more sense than driving or flying, yet passenger rail capacity was the least likely alternative to be selected. So if you wonder why we have the unbalanced transportation system we have today, follow the money. 23:26 - 23:54 John Porcari: It's an extraordinary statement of state priorities that the California High Speed Rail Authority's 2020 Business Plan anticipates 85% of its funding from state sources and only 15% federal funding for this project of national and regional significance. This is a remarkable state financial commitment and a clear declaration of the state's project priorities. Yet there's no ongoing sustained federal financial partner for this multi year program of projects. 23:54 - 24:28 John Porcari: To match the people carrying capacity of phase one of the high speed rail system, California would need to invest $122 to $199 billion towards building almost 4200 highway lane miles, the equivalent of a new six lane highway and the construction of 91 new airport gates and two new runways. The San Francisco-Los Angeles air loop is already the ninth busiest in the world, and the busiest air route in America. Doesn't it make sense to prioritize this finite and expensive airport capacity for trans continental and international flights? 24:28 - 24:40 John Porcari: For California the 120 to 209 billion of required highway and airport capacity as an alternative to high speed rail is double the 69 to 99 billion cost estimate for phase one of the high speed rail system. 25:05 - 25:18 John Porcari: Providing real transportation choices at the local and state level requires the establishment of a Passenger Rail Trust Fund on par with our Highway Trust Fund and Airport and Airway Trust Fund. 48:00 - 48:23 Trey Duhon: Texas Central promised this project was privately financed, and everything they've done today, including the EIS was based on that. So we say let it live or die in the free market and invest our tax dollars in more equitable transportation solutions. We should not have to pay for another train to nowhere while having our communities destroyed by the very tax dollars that we work hard to contribute. 49:48 - 50:42 Andy Kunz: High Speed Rail can unlock numerous ridership opportunities. Essential workers like teachers, police and firemen in the high price Silicon Valley could find affordable housing options with a short train ride to Merced or Fresno in California's Central Valley. Residents of Eugene, Oregon could access jobs in Portland's tech sector or booming recreational industry with a 35 minute commute. A Houston salesperson could prepare for an important client meeting in Dallas with dedicated Wi Fi and ample workspace while gliding past the notorious congestion on I-45. A college student in Atlanta could make it home for Thanksgiving in Charlotte while picking up grandma along the way in Greenville, South Carolina. International tourists visiting Disney World in Orlando could extend their vacation with a day trip to the Gulf beaches of the Greater Tampa Bay area. 51:41 - 54:58 Andy Kunz: High Speed Rail has an unmatched track record of safety. Japan, with the world's first high speed rail network, has carried millions of people over 50 years without a single fatality, in comparison as many as 40,000 Americans are killed every year in auto accidents on our highways. 52:22 - 52:45 Andy Kunz: China has invested over a trillion dollars in high speed rail, allowing them to build a world class 22,000 mile network in 14 years. Not taking a pause, China plans to construct another 21,000 miles of track over the next nine years. Modern infrastructure like this fuels China's explosive economic growth, making it challenging for us to compete with them in the 21st century. 52:46 - 53:10 Andy Kunz: On the other side of the globe, the United Kingdom is currently doubling their rail network with $120 billion investment. France has invested over $160 billion in constructing their system. Spain's 2000 mile High Speed Rail Network is the largest in Europe, costing more than 175 billion. These are considerable investments by nations that are similar in size to Texas. 1:08:00 - 1:09:00 Rep. Peter DeFazio: Are you aware of any high speed rail project in the world that isn't government subsidized? I know, Virgin in, you know, in Great Britain says, well, we make money. Yeah, you make money. You don't have to maintain the rail, the government does that, all you do is put a train set on it and run it. John Porcari: Yeah, that's a really important point, Mr. Chairman, virtually every one that I'm aware of in the world has had a very big public investment in the infrastructure itself, the operation by a private operator can be very profitable. I would point out that that is no different, conceptually from our airways system, for example, where federal taxpayer investments make possible the operations of our airlines, which in turn are profitable and no different than our very profitable trucking industry in the US, which is enabled by the public infrastructure investment of the highway system itself. 1:09:46 - 1:10:37 Philip Washington: The potential is very, very good to make that connection with the private railroad. And actually that is the plan. And we are working with that, that private railroad right now to do that. And that connection with the help of some twin bore tunnel will allow train speeds to be at anywhere from 180 to 200 miles an hour, getting from that high desert corridor to Los Angeles. And so it's a it's a huge, huge effort. It links up with high speed rail from the north as well, with the link up coming into Union Station as well. So I think the potential to link up both of these are very, very great. And we're working with both entities. 1:11:31 - 1:12:13 Philip Washington: Well one of our ideas very quickly is right now we have as you know, Mr. Chairman, assembly plants, assembly plants all over the country what we are proposing is a soup to nuts, all included manufacturing outfit in this country that manufactures trains from the ground up, forging steel, all of those things. So we have proposed an industrial park with suppliers on site as well to actually build again from the ground up, rail car passenger rail car vehicles and locomotives. It is the return of manufacturing to this country as we see it. 1:21:16 - 1:21:50 John Porcari: We have 111 year old tunnel in New York, we have a B&P tunnel in Baltimore, that Civil War era. Those are not the biggest obstacles. It is more a question of will. What we want to do as a country in infrastructure, we do, and we've never made rail, really the priority that that I think it needs to be. And we've never provided meaningful choices for the states to select rail and build a multi year rail program because we don't have the funding part of it. 1:21:55 - 1:22:19 John Porcari: Our passenger rail system in the US is moving from a survival mode to a growth mode. And I think that's a very healthy thing for the country. Whether you're talking about our cross country service, one of the coastal corridors or the Midwest service, all of that is really important. In just the same way we built the interstates, city pairs aggregating into a national system, we can really do that with the passenger rail system if we have the will. 1:27:13 - 1:27:41 Rep. Michelle Steel: My constituents are already taxed enough, with California state and local taxes and skyrocketing gas prices making it unaffordable to live. I just came back from Texas, their gas price was $2 something and we are paying over $4 in California. We must preserve our local economy by lowering taxes not raising them. And we must not continue throwing tax dollars into a high speed money pit. 1:30:53 - 1:31:11 Trey Duhon: The folks in Waller county the folks that I know, a family of four is not going to pay $1,000 To ride a train between Houston and Dallas, when they can get there on a $50 tank of gas an hour and a half later. It's just not going to happen. So it's not a mass transit solution, at least not for this corridor. 1:48:56 - 1:49:25 Andy Kunz: The other big thing that hasn't been mentioned is the the cost of people's time and waste sitting stuck in traffic or stuck in airports. It's estimated to be several 100 billion dollars a year. And then as a business person, time is money. So if all your people are taking all day to get anywhere your entire company is less competitive, especially against nations that actually have these efficient systems, and then they can out compete us 2:03:52 - 2:04:13 Seth Moulton: And I would just add, you know, we build high speed rail, no one's gonna force you to take it. You have that freedom of choice that Americans don't have today and yet travelers all around the world have. I don't understand why travelers in China should have so much more freedom than we do today. In America, high speed railway would rapidly rectify that 3:01:09 - 3:01:27 Josh Giegel: In 2014 I co-founded this company in a garage when Hyperloop was just an idea on a whiteboard. By late 2016 We began construction of our first full system test set, dev loop, north of Las Vegas. To date we've completed over 500 tests of our system. 3:01:38 - 3:01:48 Josh Giegel: Today we have approximately 300 employees and are the leading Hyperloop company in the world and the only company, the only company to have had passengers travel safely in a Hyperloop. 3:01:48 - 3:02:33 Josh Giegel: Hyperloop is a high speed surface transportation system. Travel occurs within a low pressure enclosure equivalent to 200,000 feet above sea level, in a vehicle pressurized to normal atmospheric conditions, much like a commercial aircraft. This, along with our proprietary magnetic levitation engine, allows us to reach and maintain airline speeds with significantly less energy than other modes of transportation. Not only is Hyperloop fast, it's a high capacity mass transit system capable of comfortably moving people and goods at 670 miles per hour with 50,000 passengers per hour per direction, on demand and direct to your destination, meaning no stops along the way. 3:02:54 - 3:02:58 Josh Giegel: We achieve all this on a fully electric system with no direct emissions. 3:11:34 - 3:11:53 Mike Reininger: Since our 2018 launch in Florida, we operate the only private high speed system in the US, showcasing the potential of American high speed passenger rail. We carried more than a million passengers in our first full year and learned a lot that is worth sharing from the investment of over $4 billion over the last 10 years. 3:12:45 - 3:12:57 Mike Reininger: We use existing road alignments and infrastructure corridors to leverage previous investments, reduce environmental impacts, lower costs, and speed execution as a basis for profitability. 3:13:00 - 3:13:28 Mike Reininger: In 2022, we will complete the extension into the Orlando International Airport, making our total route 235 miles, linking four of the largest cities in America's third largest state. 400 million annual trips occur between these cities today, 95% of them by car. By upgrading a freight railway first built in the 1890s and building along an Express Highway, we leveraged 130 years of previous investment to support our 21st century service. 3:13:31 - 3:13:51 Mike Reininger: Brightline West will connect Las Vegas to Los Angeles, where today 50 million annual trips and over 100 daily flights occur. Traveling on trains capable of speeds of 200 miles an hour using the I-15 corridor, but cutting the drive time in half, Brightline West's better option expects to serve 11 million annual riders. 3:14:56 - 3:15:08 Mike Reininger: Consider allowing private entities to become eligible parties for FRA grant programs by partnering with currently eligible applicants as a simple way to stretch direct government investment. 3:29:39 - 3:29:54 Rep. Rick Crawford: Amtrak announced plans to expand its routes including to several small cities where there doesn't appear to be enough demand or population to warrant those new lines. Can you guarantee that those new routes will be self sustaining and turn a profit or will they lose money? 3:38:42 - 3:38:55 Bill Flynn: 125 miles an hour on existing track infrastructure is high speed. The newest Acelas we ordered will have a top speed of 186 miles an hour. 3:36:46 - 3:37:05 Rep. Seth Moulton: What is the top speed of the Acela service? Bill Flynn: The Acela service in the southern network, Washington to New York, top speeds 135 miles an hour, and then in New York to Boston top speed of 150 miles an hour across different segments of the track. 4:11:57 - 4:12:30 Bill Flynn: When we think about NEPA and the other permitting processes that take place, and then ultimately into construction, on many major projects, we're talking a decade or more. So without the visibility and predictability and the certainty of funding, these projects are all affected, they ultimately become more high cost, and they take longer than they should. So if I were to recommend one policy action, creating a trust fund, or trust fund like structure, for intercity passenger rail would be key. Full Steam Ahead for Rail: Why Rail is More Relevant Than Ever for Economic and Environmental Progress House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials March 10, 2021 The hearing explored the importance of rail to the U.S. economy and as a tool to mitigate climate change. Witnesses: Shannon Valentine, Secretary of Transportation, The Commonwealth of Virginia Caren Kraska, President/Chairman, Arkansas & Missouri Railroad Greg Regan, President, Transportation Trades Department, AFL-CIO Tom Williams, Group Vice President for Consumer Products, BNSF Railway Clips 18:17 - 18:50 Shannon Valentine: One of the worst rail bottlenecks, mentioned by Chairman DeFazio, along the east coast is at the Potomac River between Virginia and DC and it's called the long bridge which is owned by CSX. The bridge carries on passenger, commuter, and freight rail, nearly 80 trains a day and is at 98% capacity during peak periods. Due to these constraints, Virginia has been unable to expand passenger rail service, even though demand prior to the pandemic was reaching record highs. 18:50 - 19:42 Shannon Valentine: Virginia has been engaged in corridor planning studies, one of which was the I-95 corridor, which as you all know, is heavily congested. Even today as we emerge from this pandemic, traffic has returned to 90% of pre-pandemic levels. Through this study, we learned that adding just one lane in each direction for 50 miles would cost $12.5 billion. While the cost was staggering, the most sobering part of the analysis was that by the time that construction was complete, in 10 years, the corridor would be just as congested as it is today. That finding is what led Virginia to a mode that could provide the capacity at a third of the cost. 20:34 - 20:43 Shannon Valentine: According to APTA rail travel emits up to 83% fewer greenhouse gases than driving and up to 73% fewer than flying. 20:58 - 21:22 Shannon Valentine: Benefits can also be measured by increased access to jobs and improving the quality of life. The new service plan includes late night and weekend service because many essential jobs are not nine to five Monday through Friday. That is why we work to add trains leaving Washington in the late evening and on weekends, matching train schedules to the reality of our economy. 52:23 - 53:06* Rep. Peter DeFazio: I am concerned particularly when we have some railroads running trains as long as three miles. And they want to go to a single crew for a three mile long train. I asked the the former head of the FRA under Trump if the train broke down in Albany, Oregon and it's blocking every crossing through the city means no police, no fire, no ambulance, how long it's going to take the engineer to walk three miles from the front of the train to, say, the second car from the rear which is having a brake problem. And he said, Well, I don't know an hour. So you know there's some real concerns here that we have to pursue. 1:23:25 - 1:24:15 Shannon Valentine: When we first launched the intercity passenger rail, Virginia sponsored passenger rail, back in 2009, it really started with a pilot with $17 million for three years from Lynchburg, Virginia into DC into the new Northeast Corridor. And, and I had to make sure that we had 51,000 riders and we didn't know if we were going to be able to sustain it. And in that first year, we had 125,000 passengers. It always exceeded expectations for ridership and profitability. And today, that rail service which we now extend over to Roanoke, and we're working to get it to Blacksburg Christiansburg is really one of our most profitable rail services. In fact, probably in the country. It doesn't even need a subsidy because they're able to generate that kind of ridership. 2:10:21 - 2:12:11 Shannon Valentine: Our project, in my mind, is really the first step in creating a southeast high speed corridor, we have to build the bridge. In order to expand access, we need to be able to begin separating passenger and freight. And even before that is able to occur, building signings and creating the ability to move. We took a lot of lessons from a study called the DC to RDA again, it's the first part of that high speed southeast corridor. For us, it was recommended that we take an incremental approach rather than having a large 100 billion dollar project we're doing in increments. And so this is a $3.7 billion which is still going to help us over 10 years create hourly service between Richmond and DC. It was recommended that we use existing infrastructure and right of way so in our negotiations with CSX, we are acquiring 386 miles of right of way and 223 miles of track. We are also purchasing as part of this an S line. It's abandoned. It goes down into Ridgeway, North Carolina from Petersburg, Virginia, just south of Richmond. Because it's abandoned, we have a lot of opportunity for development for future phases or even higher speed rail. And we actually included part of Buckingham branch, it's an East West freight corridor that we would like to upgrade and protect for, for East West connection. All of these were incremental steps using existing right of way and tracks and achieving higher speeds where it was achievable. Examining the Surface Transportation Board's Role in Ensuring a Robust Passenger Rail System House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials November 18, 2020 Witnesses: Ann D. Begeman, Chairman, Surface Transportation Board Martin J. Oberman, Vice Chairman, Surface Transportation Board Romayne C. Brown, Chair of the Board of Directors, Metra Stephen Gardner, Senior Executive Vice President, Amtrak Ian Jefferies, President and Chief Executive Officer, Association of American Railroads Randal O'Toole, Senior Fellow, Cato Institute Paul Skoutelas, President and Chief Executive Officer, American Public Transportation Association Clips 27:31 - 27:59 Daniel Lipinski: Unlike Amtrak, Metra and other commuter railroads do not have a statutory federal preference prioritizing commuter trains over freight trains. Additionally, commuter railroads generally do not have standing to bring cases before the STB. Therefore, commuter railroads have very limited leverage when it comes to trying to expand their service on freight rail lines and ensuring that freight railroads Do not delay commuter trains. 35:42 - 36:27 Rep. Peter DeFazio: In fact, Congress included provisions to fix Amtrak on time performance in 2008. That is when PRIA added a provisions directing the FRA and Amtrak to work to develop on time performance metric standards to be used as a basis for an STB investigation. Unfortunately, those benefits haven't been realized. It's been 12 years since PRIA was passed. If our eyes metric and standards for on time performance were published this last Monday 12 years later, for the second time, and after this long and unacceptable delay, I look forward to seeing an improvement on Amtrak's performance both in in my state and nationwide. 38:01 - 38:32 Rep. Peter DeFazio: Worldwide, I'm not aware of any railroads, passenger railroads, that make money, although Virgin claims they do in England because they don't have to maintain the tracks. Pretty easy to make money if all you have to do is put a train set on it, run it back and forth. That's not the major expense. So, you know, to say that we shouldn't be subsidizing commuter or we shouldn't be subsidizing Amtrak is, you know, is just saying you don't want to run trains. Because everywhere else in the world they're subsidized. 43:45 - 44:30 Ann Begeman: Most intercity passenger rail service is provided by Amtrak, which is statutorily excluded from many of the board's regulatory requirements applicable to freight carriers. However, with the enactment of the Passenger Rail Investment Improvement Act of 2008 (PRIA) which both Chairman Lipinski and Chairman De Fazio has have mentioned in their opening comments, as well as the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act of 2015. FAST Act, the board assumed additional Amtrak oversight responsibilities, including the authority to conduct investigations under certain circumstances, and when appropriate, to award relief and identify reasonable measures to improve performance on passenger rail routes. 1:02:24 - 1:03:07 Stephen Gardner: Congress created Amtrak in 1970 to take on a job that today's freight railroads no longer wanted. In exchange for contracts assumption of these private railroads common carrier obligation for passengers and the associated operating losses for passenger service, the freights agreed to allow Amtrak to operate wherever and whenever it wanted over their lines, to provide Amtrak trains with dispatching preference over freight, and to empower what is now the STB to ensure Amtrak's access to the rail network. It's been nearly 50 years since the freight railroads and agreed eagerly to this bargain. And yet today, many of our hosts railroads fall short and fulfilling some of these key obligations 1:03:28 - 1:04:38 Stephen Gardner: Since our founding, Congress has had to clarify and amend the law to try and ensure host compliance. For example, by 1973, the freights had begun delaying Amtrak train so severely that Congress enshrined this promise of Amtrak preference into federal law, and in 2008, delays had gotten so bad that Congress created a new process to set Amtrak on time performance and provided the STB with the authority to investigate poor OTP. But for several reasons, these efforts haven't remedied the problems. For Amtrak and your constituents that has meant millions of delayed passengers and years of impediment as we try to add trains or start new routes to keep up with changing markets and demand. As the AAR are made clear and its litigation opposing the PRIA metrics and standards rule, many hosts see supporting our operation not as their obligation to the public, but as competition for the use of their infrastructure. But Amtrak wasn't created to relieve host railroads of their requirements to support passenger trains. It was created to help them reduce financial losses and ensure that passenger trains could still serve the country 1:04:38 - 1:05:15 Stephen Gardner: We need this committee's help to restore your original deal with the freights. For example you can provide us as you have in the moving forward Act, a way to enforce our existing rights of preference. You can make real Amtrak statutory ability to start new routes and add additional trains without arbitrary barriers. You can create an office of passenger rail within the STB and require them to use their investigative powers to pursue significant instances of for OTP. You can require more efficient STB processes to grant Amtrak access to hosts and fairly set any compensation and capital investment requirements. 1:06:19 - 1:07:57 Stephen Gardner: A rarely heralded fact is that the U.S. has the largest rail network in the world. And yet we use so little of it for intercity passenger rail service. A fundamental reason for this is our inability to gain quick, reasonable access to the network and receive reliable service that we are owed under law. This has effectively blocked our growth and left much of our nation underserved. City pairs like Los Angeles and Phoenix, or Atlanta to Nashville could clearly benefit from Amtrak service. Existing rail lines already connect them. Shouldn't Amtrak be serving these and many other similar corridors nationwide? 1:12:34 - 1:12:57 Randall O'Toole: Last year, the average American traveled more than 15,000 miles by automobile, more than 2000 Miles, road several 100 miles on buses, walked more than 100 Miles, rode 100 miles by urban rail, transit and bicycled 26 miles. Meanwhile, Amtrak carried the average American just 19 Miles. 1:13:35 - 1:13:55 Randall O'Toole: In 1970, the railroads' main problem was not money losing passenger trains, but over regulation by the federal and state governments. Regulation or not, passenger trains are unable to compete against airlines and automobiles. A 1958 Interstate Commerce Commission report concluded that there was no way to make passenger trains profitable. 1:14:52 - 1:15:20 Randall O'Toole: The 1970 collapse of Penn Central shook the industry. Congress should have responded by eliminating the over regulation that was stifling the railroads. Instead, it created Amtrak with the expectation that it would be a for profit corporation and that taking passenger trains off the railroads hands would save them from bankruptcy 50 years and more than $50 billion in operating subsidies later, we know that Amtrak isn't and never will be profitable. 1:15:40 - 1:16:10 Randall O'Toole: When Amtrak was created, average rail fares per passenger mile were two thirds of average airfares. Thanks to airline deregulation since then, inflation adjusted air fares have fallen by 60%. Even as Amtrak fares per passenger mile have doubled. Average Amtrak fares exceeded airfares by 1990 despite huge operating subsidies, or perhaps as has well predicted, because those subsidies encouraged inefficiencies. 1:16:50 - 1:17:15 Randall O'Toole: Today thanks to more efficient operations, rail routes that once saw only a handful of trains per day support 60, 70 or 80 or more freight trains a day. This sometimes leaves little room for Amtrak. Displacing a money making freight train with a money losing passenger train is especially unfair considering that so few people use a passenger trains, while so many rely on freight. 1:17:15 - 1:17:25 Randall O'Toole: Passenger trains are pretty, but they're an obsolete form of transportation. Efforts to give passenger trains preference over freight we'll harm more people than it will help. 2:42:40 - 2:43:50 Stephen Gardner: We think that the poor on time performance that many of our routes have is a significant impediment to ridership and revenue growth. It's quite apparent, many of our passengers, particularly on our long distance network, that serves Dunsmuir, for instance, you know their routes frequently experience significant delays, the number one cause of those delays are freight train interference. This is delays encountered, that Amtrak encounters when freight trains are run in front of us or otherwise dispatching decisions are made that prioritize the freight trains in front of Amtrak. And the reduction in reliability is clearly a problem for passengers with many hour delays. Often our whole long distance network is operating at 50% or less on time performance if you look at over the many past years. Even right now, through this period of COVID, where freight traffic has been down and we're only at 60% over the last 12 months on time performance for the entire long distance network. 2:52:44 - 2:53:23 Stephen Gardner: The difference between the US system and most of the international examples is that the infrastructure is publicly owned, publicly owned and developed in all of these nations, the nations that Mr. O'Toole mentioned, there is a rail infrastructure entity and they're developing it for both passenger and freight in some of those locations are optimized for passenger service primarily, that's for sure the case. China is a great example of a nation that's investing for both as a massive freight system and an incredible amount of investment for passenger rail. And again, they see high speed as a means of dealing with their very significant population and efficient way. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

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