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Best podcasts about french canadian

Latest podcast episodes about french canadian

Historia Canadiana: A Cultural History of Canada
70 - The Seats of the Mighty: French-Canadian Nationalism Rises

Historia Canadiana: A Cultural History of Canada

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 77:44


In which our heroes talk about aspects of emerging French-Canadian nationalism in Canada in the late 19th century. We talk about the national anthem, Henri Bourassa, Gilbert Parker's novel The Seats of the Mighty, and more. Get 2 months of free podcast hosting by going to: https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=CANLIT --- Support: Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/historiacanadiana); Paypal (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/historiacanadiana); the recommended reading page (https://historiacanadiana.wordpress.com/books/) --- Contact: historiacanadiana@gmail.com, Twitter (@CanLitHistory) & Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/CanLitHistory). --- Sources/Further Reading: Harris, Robert. Song of a Nation: The Untold Story of Canada's National Anthem,  McClelland & Stewart, 2019. Parker, Gilbert. The Seats of the Mighty, 1896. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/6229/6229-h/6229-h.htm Rothenburger, Sunnie. “Terror, Love, and the National Voyeur: Gilbert Parker's The Seats of the Mighty.” English Studies in Canada, vol. 34, no. 2, 2008, pp. 91-112. Stockdale, John C. “The French Canadian According to Gilbert Parker.” Modern Language Studies, vol. 3, no. 2, 1973, pp. 97–105. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/3194458. Waterston, Elizabeth. “The Politics of Conquest in Canadian Historical Fiction.” Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, vol. 3, no. 1, 1969, pp. 116–24. http://www.jstor.org/stable/24776196.

Fireside Canada
Big Joe

Fireside Canada

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 65:25


"The best man in Ottawa was Mufferaw Joe," according to the famous song by legendary Canadian singer/songwriter Stompin' Tom Connors. "Big Joe Mufferaw" is often regarding as Canada's answer to Paul Bunyan: a family-friendly lumberjack whose monumental feats of strength literally changed the Ontario landscape. But the lovable, larger-than-life character is based on a real person: Joseph Montferrand, a French-Canadian folk hero whose exploits made him a living legend in 1800s Montreal and Ottawa. In this episode we'll look at the man, the myth, and the legend, and explore how one man went on to inspire a series of children's books, a hit Canadian folk song, and a CFL mascot.See the entire show notes and more at FiresideCanada.ca

The Research Like a Pro Genealogy Podcast
RLP 236: Strategies for Overcoming Endogamy

The Research Like a Pro Genealogy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 55:59


Today's episode of Research Like a Pro is about endogamy, its effect on DNA analysis, and strategies to overcome these challenges. We discuss a client case with French Canadian and Acadian lines as well as making a network graph and analyzing it. Join us as we discuss calculating average segment size, sorting by longest segment, segment mapping, and more. Links RLP Mini Challenge Group on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/622136844888483/posts/1390406798061480/  Strategies for Overcoming Endogamy -by Nicole - https://familylocket.com/strategies-for-overcoming-endogamy/ Paul Woodbury, “Dealing with Endogamy,” 14 Oct 2020, webinar, Legacy Family Tree Webinars (https://familytreewebinars.com/webinar/dealing-with-endogamy/ : accessed 4 Jan 2023). Leah Larkin, “Contribute to the Endogamy Study,” 25 Feb 2021, blog post, The DNA Geek (https://thednageek.com/contribute-to-the-endogamy-study/ : accessed 3 Jan 2023). View a larger screenshot of the table here: https://i0.wp.com/thednageek.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Screen-Shot-2021-02-25-at-2.04.53-PM.png?resize=768%2C432&ssl=1  Research Like a Pro Resources Research Like a Pro: A Genealogist's Guide book by Diana Elder with Nicole Dyer on Amazon.com - https://amzn.to/2x0ku3d Research Like a Pro Webinar Series 2023 - monthly case study webinars including documentary evidence and many with DNA evidence - https://familylocket.com/product/research-like-a-pro-webinar-series-2023/  Research Like a Pro eCourse - independent study course -  https://familylocket.com/product/research-like-a-pro-e-course/ RLP Study Group - upcoming group and email notification list - https://familylocket.com/services/research-like-a-pro-study-group/ Research Like a Pro with DNA Resources Research Like a Pro with DNA: A Genealogist's Guide to Finding and Confirming Ancestors with DNA Evidence book by Diana Elder, Nicole Dyer, and Robin Wirthlin - https://amzn.to/3gn0hKx Research Like a Pro with DNA eCourse - independent study course -  https://familylocket.com/product/research-like-a-pro-with-dna-ecourse/ RLP with DNA Study Group - upcoming group and email notification list - https://familylocket.com/services/research-like-a-pro-with-dna-study-group/ Thank you Thanks for listening! We hope that you will share your thoughts about our podcast and help us out by doing the following: Share an honest review on iTunes or Stitcher. You can easily write a review with Stitcher, without creating an account. Just scroll to the bottom of the page and click "write a review." You simply provide a nickname and an email address that will not be published. We value your feedback and your ratings really help this podcast reach others. If you leave a review, we will read it on the podcast and answer any questions that you bring up in your review. Thank you! Leave a comment in the comment or question in the comment section below. Share the episode on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or your favorite podcast app. Sign up for our newsletter to receive notifications of new episodes - https://familylocket.com/sign-up/ Check out this list of genealogy podcasts from Feedspot: Top 20 Genealogy Podcasts - https://blog.feedspot.com/genealogy_podcasts/

Join Us in France Travel Podcast
A Dream Trip to France Becomes a Reality, Episode 424

Join Us in France Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 54:29


My guest on today's trip report is Nicole Morin Scribner. She was born in Quebec and moved to the United States when she was 6. She always dreamed about visiting France and made her dream trip to France a reality in the summer of 2022. Discussed in this Episode Check out the town of Blere Biking in the Loire Valley One-way bike rentals with OuiBike Stop at train crossings Don't speed at all or you'll get a ticket Eat at French meal times Table of Contents for this Episode [00:00:16] Intro [00:00:39] Today on the podcast [00:01:31] Podcast supporters [00:02:23] Newsletter [00:02:54] Dream to Reality [00:03:56] Finding your roots in France [00:05:17] Tracing the ancestors [00:07:20] Visiting the ancestors' house [00:08:10] Bringing the aunts along[00:08:10] Bringing the elderly aunts along [00:09:17] Immigrating to Canada [00:10:17] The French Canadian Podcast [00:11:11] What else did they do on the trip? [00:11:44] Biking [00:12:13] When was the trip? [00:12:23] Car rental [00:13:17] Chambord [00:13:58] Renting a bike [00:15:28] Car rental places are not open on weekends generally [00:16:08] OuiBike is national bike rental company [00:17:14] Parisian French and Canadian French [00:18:32] Returning to France [00:19:52] Biking around Loire Valley [00:22:02] Check restaurant schedules [00:22:50] Be careful at train crossings [00:23:58] Follow the speed limits [00:25:27] Eat at meal times [00:26:30] Getting the train [00:27:24] Trains sell out fast in France, especially around holidays [00:28:34] Seeing the Eiffel Tower [00:31:48] Visiting the museums [00:34:34] Getting around Paris [00:35:45] e-bikes [00:36:10] What she didn't like about Paris [00:36:16] Big ads over buildings in Paris [00:37:49] Where are the people in the villages? [00:38:44] What else did she enjoy? [00:39:42] Book recommendation [00:42:31] Outro [00:42:58] New patrons [00:43:07] Preparing a trip to France? [00:44:02] Self-guided tours [00:44:43] Expect strikes in early 2023 and how to deal with them [00:48:43] Personal update [00:50:39] If you love this podcast share the new trailer on your own timeline! [00:51:52] Next week on the podcast [00:52:21] Copyright More episodes about visiting France for the first time #FrenchCanadian, #Genealogy, #Dreams, #FamilyConnections #Travel, #FrenchOrigins, #Podcast

The Hake Report
No 'Brownies' in Canada! Exacerbate 'Hate' Crimes! | Fri. 1-13-23

The Hake Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 119:08


Anti-racist Girl Guides of Canada! Anti-Asian "hate crime" by a black! Irish Paul Ryan calls TRUMP "loser"! RINOs vs Dems on insurrections!  The Hake Report, Friday, January 13, 2023 AD MUSIC: "Rocketown" - Michael W. Smith (1986, The Big Picture)  //  "Hosanna" - Michael W. Smith (1984, II)  // CALLERS…comingTIME STAMPS* 0:00:00 Fri, Jan 13, 2023 AD* 0:02:00 Hey, guys! Better…Not Bitter (BOND tee)* 0:04:30 Canadian Girl Guides rename "Brownies"* 0:13:57 Nick translates French Canadian* 0:21:13 NYC man's "hate crime" against Asian man* 0:32:48 Matt Walsh on USA: Human rights, bigotry* 0:42:36 Paul Ryan calls Trump a proven loser* 0:53:06 "Rocketown" - Michael W. Smith* 0:57:09 Hake reads chat (during music)* 0:59:06 Supers: Girl Guides KKK? Neil deGrasse Tyson* 1:03:13 RICK, VA: Happiness vs panic attacks, etc* 1:10:32 RICK, VA: Reparations won't make them better* 1:16:15 Kevin Howe on Ukraine vs Russia; Legitimate Rape?* 1:24:04 GILBERT, CA: Idol worship started in the garden* 1:29:26 WILLIAM, CA: Keep talking about the blacks* 1:33:33 Gerannamo: They're targeting blacks! Vaxx illegals?* 1:37:29 Kevin McCarthy may release J6 footage* 1:43:04 Dems condemn Jair Bolsonaro "insurrection"* 1:47:39 FALSE START w/ FREDERICK* 1:48:07 MAZE: Y'all comatosed. Comatoast?* 1:54:08 FREDERICK: Fund veterans, homeless, blacks* 1:56:14 "Hosanna" - Michael W. SmithThe Hake Report LIVE M-F 9-11 AM PT (12-2 PM ET) Call-in 888-775-3773 – thehakereport.com BLOG https://www.thehakereport.com/blog/2023/1/13/the-hake-report-fri-1-13-23 ALSO ON SUBSTACK / PODCASTHAKE LINKSVIDEO  YouTube  |  Rumble*  |  Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Odysee*  ||  Archive  BitChute  PODCAST  Apple  |  Spotify  |  Castbox  |  Podcast Addict  |  Pocket Casts  ||  Substack  *SUPER CHAT  Streamlabs  ||  SUPPORT  Substack  |  SubscribeStar  |  Locals  ||  SHOP  Teespring Also see Hake News on The Jesse Lee Peterson Show, and Hake's recent Appearances on other shows. Get full access to The Hake Report at thehakereport.substack.com/subscribe

13 O'Clock Podcast
Flickers Of Fear: Martyrs (2008)

13 O'Clock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023


Jenny talks about one of the most disturbing horror films ever made, the brutal French/Canadian movie directed by Pascal Laugier. Audio version: Video version: Please support us on Patreon! Don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram. Also check out Jenny's horror channel, The Scare Salon, and her true crime channel, Crime … Continue reading Flickers Of Fear: Martyrs (2008)

Telepathy
49. Pee Jogging

Telepathy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 41:00


In this episode the boys talk about some French-Canadian girl, travel annoyances, and the most intimidating athlete on the planet.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Friday, January 6th, 2023 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 15:49


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Friday, January 6th, 2022. Happy Friday everyone! Let’s start this newsbrief off with a little, on this day in history! On this day in history for January 6th: 1681 First recorded boxing match is engineered by Christopher Monck, 2nd Duke of Albemarle; his butler vs his butcher How about a famous wedding? 1759 US 1st President George Washington marries Martha Dandridge Custis at White House Plantation 1941 US President Franklin Roosevelt makes his "Four Freedoms" speech (freedom of speech and worship; freedom from want and fear) during his US State of Union address 1942 Pan American Airlines becomes the first commercial airline to schedule a flight around the world ("Pacific Clipper"). 1975 "Wheel Of Fortune" debuts on NBC-TV 1979 The Village People's Y.M.C.A becomes their only UK #1 single. At its peak it sold over 150,000 copies a day. 1987 Astronomers at University of California see 1st sight of birth of a galaxy 2021 Supporters of US President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington during congressional certification of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris's win. And that… was on this day in history… brought to you by… Classical Conversations Classical Conversations supports homeschooling parents by cultivating the love of learning through a Christian worldview in fellowship with other families. They provide a classical Christ-centered curriculum, local like-minded communities across the United States and in several countries, and they train parents who are striving to be great classical educators in the home. For more information and to get connected, please visit their website at ClassicalConversations.com. Again that’s ClassicalConversations.com. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/matt-gaetz-continue-speaker-stalemate-until-mccarthy-concedes Matt Gaetz vows to continue speaker stalemate until McCarthy concedes or limits power One of Rep. Kevin McCarthy’s most stubborn opponents in his House speaker bid is vowing not to fold and to continue the current stalemate until the California Republican either agrees to the defectors’ demands or drops out altogether. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), who has been one of McCarthy’s most vocal opponents, pledged not to back down in the House speaker showdown, intensifying what has already been a dayslong fight as the chamber looks to elect its next leader. “I think this ends one of two ways,” Gaetz told Fox News after the House adjourned on Wednesday. “Either Kevin bows out, realizing there is no path to become speaker of the House even with one or two or three or five of the 20 who have opposed him half a dozen times on the floor, or he essentially has to wake up, bring the House into session, and put on a straitjacket with a rules package that we’ve presented to him that doesn’t allow a lot of discretion for the speaker of the House.” After failing to make headway in three rounds of roll call votes on Wednesday, McCarthy proposed a new bout of concessions to some of his most stubborn opponents in a last-ditch effort to win their support before the chamber reconvenes. As part of his latest concessions, McCarthy agreed to a proposal to add more Freedom Caucus members to the House Rules Committee, as well as further lowering the number of members needed to call for a floor vote to oust a sitting speaker, according to CNN. The compromise builds on previous concessions in which McCarthy agreed to lower the number of votes needed to oust him from the position possibly should he be elected, marking a significant win for far-right conservatives such as Gaetz. “The reason we’ve demanded that is we do not trust Kevin McCarthy, and it’s not a small body of work,” the Florida Republican said. Even if those demands are met, however, Gaetz has vowed not to back McCarthy’s bid. Twenty GOP lawmakers voted against McCarthy to back Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL) in the latest round of voting, with one Republican voting present. Donalds initially voted for McCarthy in the first two roll call votes before backing Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) in the third round on Tuesday, conceding that “at the end of the day, we’ve got to get to 218." https://thepostmillennial.com/black-couple-given-plot-of-land-in-reparations-sells-it-back-to-la-for-20-million?utm_campaign=64487 Black couple given plot of land in reparations sells it back to LA for $20 million The heirs to Bruce's Beach, the prime beachfront property in California's Manhattan Beach, have sold the land back to the county for $20 million after receiving it just over a year ago in an act of restorative justice. The direct descendants of the black couple who were run off of their land and business got a form of "reparations," according to LA County. In 1912, Charles and Willa Bruce, a black couple, bought the plot of land for $1,225 and opened up a black beach club, reported the Los Angeles Times. These clubs were common in southern California during that period, when segregation kept black people out of "whites-only" beaches. Facing mounting pressure from racist individuals and groups, including the Ku Klux Klan, city officials condemned the property to eminent domain in 1924, claiming that they needed it to build a park. According to the Los Angeles County website, no park was actually built until nearly 30 years later, and the real reason for seizing the land was racially motivated. "It is well documented that the real reason behind the eminent domain process was racially motivated with the intention of bringing an end to the successful Black business and to thwart other African Americans from settling in or developing businesses in Manhattan Beach," the government site reads. The county ended up forcing the black couple off of their land, paying them only $14,000 when the plot was actually valued at $70,000, according to Daily Mail. The Bruces left the beach and closed their business. According to their family, they never financially recovered. In July 2022, LA County returned the land to direct descendants Marcus and Derrick Bruce as well as Derrick's sons, Anthony and Michael. "It destroyed their chance at the American Dream. I wish they could see what has happened today," Anthony said when the land was finally returned. On Tuesday, it was announced that the Bruces had opted to cash out on the land instead. The chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, Janice Hahn, stated that the selling of the land will help rebuild "generational wealth" that the family lost out on after their great-grandparents' business was destroyed. "This fight has always been about what is best for the Bruce family, and they feel what is best for them is selling this property back to the county for nearly $20 million and finally rebuilding the generational wealth they were denied for nearly a century," she said. "This is what reparations look like and it is a model that I hope government across the country will follow," the county official added. https://townhall.com/tipsheet/madelineleesman/2023/01/04/indigenous-arts-leader-revealed-as-white-n2617839 ‘Non-Binary’ Founder of Indigenous Artists’ Collective Accused of Faking Native American Heritage The co-owner of a “queer Indigenous artists’ collective” in Wisconsin reportedly faked her Native American background and “used the front to make money,” the New York Post reported. Kay LeClaire, a woman who identifies as “non-binary,” was accused in an online forum of being white after claiming for years that she was of Metis, Oneida, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, Cuban and German descent. LeClaire is a founding member of an art collective and is well-known in the Indigenous arts community in Madison, Wisconsin. LeClaire went by the Indigenous name “Nibiiwakamigkwe,” the Post noted. Reportedly, LeClaire earned artist stipends, a paid residency at the University of Wisconsin, paid speaking gigs, and art exhibitions based on her Native American background. But, a “hobbyist genealogist” who did not reveal their identity posted evidence of LeClaire’s real ancestry on an online forum. It showed that LeClaire is of German, Swedish, and French Canadian descent. “I am sorry,” LeClaire reportedly told local outlet Madison365. “A lot of information has come to my attention since late December. I am still processing it all and do not yet know how to respond adequately. What I can do now is offer change.” The art collective said in an Instagram post that it had parted ways with LeClaire on Dec. 31, 2022. The anonymous user who published LeClaire’s ancestry online went by the screen name “AdvancedSmite.” They spoke with Madison365 and revealed they are of Native American heritage. Townhall reported that several high-profile activists had been caught pretending to have Native American ancestry, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Canadian academic Carrie Bourassa, and actress Sacheen Littlefeather, whose sisters came forward late last year after her death to reveal that she was of Mexican descent. Redballoon Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! www.redballoon.work As we head into the weekend… why don’t we talk about some entertainment! https://boundingintocomics.com/2023/01/03/indiana-jones-and-the-dial-of-destiny-reportedly-pacing-far-behind-transformers-rise-of-the-beasts-and-guardians-of-the-galaxy-vol-3/ Indiana Jones Theme Song [HD] Play 0:00-0:21 ‘Indiana Jones And The Dial Of Destiny’ Reportedly Pacing Far Behind ‘Transformers: Rise Of The Beasts’ And ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 3’ In Audience Interest A report from Puck’s Matthew Belloni claims that Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny significantly underperformed compared to Transformers: Rise of the Beasts and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 after the three films released trailers during Brazil Comic Con back at the beginning of December. According to studio source Belloni reports that Transformers: Rise of the Beasts racked up over 506 million views in two weeks across YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 drew in 187 million views while Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny only brought in 79 million views. Taking a peek at the YouTube numbers, as of today, the Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny trailer only has 10 million views on the Lucasfilm YouTube channel. Transformers: Rise of the Beasts has 26.3 million views on the official Paramount Pictures YouTube channel. While Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 isn’t trailing Transformers: Rise of the Beasts as much as Belloni reported after two weeks, Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny is still significantly off the pace compared to Transformers: Rise of the Beasts and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3. In fact, both films have more than doubled up on trailer views compared to Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny. Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny is not only trailing these films when it comes to trailer views as noted by both Belloni’s inside source as well as spot-checking YouTube, but Belloni also claims the film is already at a disadvantage because Stephen Spielberg is not directing the film and Harrison Ford is 80 years old and is supposedly the leading man in a film franchise known for its action adventure heroics. The film’s promotion has also been plagued by director James Mangold’s antagonistic behavior to concerned fans about what he and Lucasfilm have planned for the film. Lucasfilm has a track record of destroying their male-led franchises, one needs only look at the the desecration of Han Solo in The Force Awakens that turned his character into a deadbeat dad, who then gets murdered by his own son. This anti-male theme would be doubled down on in Rian Johnson’s The Last Jedi that shows Luke Skywalker as a man who has abandoned everything he believed in and even tosses his lightsaber away like a piece of garbage. This theme is not isolated to the sequel trilogies, The Mandalorian turns what was pitched as a ruthless bounty hunter living in the outer reaches of the galaxy into a glorified baby sitter for a child-like Yoda character that is apparently not a child at all. The Book of Boba Fett also turned the famed bounty hunter into an incompetent town manager. Given this track record, fans have a healthy skepticism of what Lucasfilm and Mangold will do to the franchise and have especially had their hackles up following the casting of self-proclaimed feminist Phoebe Waller-Bridge. In response to one fan concern, Mangold decided to attack him and then proceeded to lie about his attacks on the fan. Matthew Kadish shared his concerns writing on Twitter, “To anyone thinking Indiana Jones 5 might be good, just let me point out… 1. Steven Spielberg is not directing. 2. Kathleen Kennedy is producing. 3. Harrison Ford is 78 years old. 4. It’s written by Jonathan Kasdan, who wrote SOLO.” Mangold responded writing, “Thanks, Matt! 1) Keep making the world a better place crapping on things in the 1st week of production from your basement. 2) Never seen a script by Jon. Nothing against him. Just reality. Butterworths & I started from a blank page. 3) 1-3 r hugely talented & all at my side.” Clearly, Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny does not appear to be connecting to people via trailer views and on top of that it has an antagonistic director who not only confirmed fan fears about Lucasfilm’s production are legitimate, but he’s openly degrading them for expressing such concerns.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, January 6, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsChristmas Weekday Lectionary: 209The Saint of the day is Saint Andr BessetteSaint André Bessette's Story Brother André expressed a saint's faith by a lifelong devotion to Saint Joseph. Sickness and weakness dogged André from birth. He was the eighth of 12 children born to a French Canadian couple near Montreal. Adopted at 12, when both parents had died, he became a farmhand. Various trades followed: shoemaker, baker, blacksmith—all failures. He was a factory worker in the United States during the boom times of the Civil War. At 25, André applied for entrance into the Congregation of Holy Cross. After a year's novitiate, he was not admitted because of his weak health. But with an extension and the urging of Bishop Bourget, he was finally received. He was given the humble job of doorkeeper at Notre Dame College in Montreal, with additional duties as sacristan, laundry worker and messenger. “When I joined this community, the superiors showed me the door, and I remained 40 years,” he said. In his little room near the door, he spent much of the night on his knees. On his windowsill, facing Mount Royal, was a small statue of Saint Joseph, to whom he had been devoted since childhood. When asked about it he said, “Some day, Saint Joseph is going to be honored in a very special way on Mount Royal!” When he heard someone was ill, he visited to bring cheer and to pray with the sick person. He would rub the sick person lightly with oil taken from a lamp burning in the college chapel. Word of healing powers began to spread. When an epidemic broke out at a nearby college, André volunteered to nurse. Not one person died. The trickle of sick people to his door became a flood. His superiors were uneasy; diocesan authorities were suspicious; doctors called him a quack. “I do not cure,” he said again and again. “Saint Joseph cures.” In the end he needed four secretaries to handle the 80,000 letters he received each year. For many years the Holy Cross authorities had tried to buy land on Mount Royal. Brother André and others climbed the steep hill and planted medals of Saint Joseph. Suddenly, the owners yielded. André collected $200 to build a small chapel and began receiving visitors there—smiling through long hours of listening, applying Saint Joseph's oil. Some were cured, some not. The pile of crutches, canes and braces grew. The chapel also grew. By 1931, there were gleaming walls, but money ran out. “Put a statue of Saint Joseph in the middle. If he wants a roof over his head, he'll get it.” The magnificent Oratory on Mount Royal took 50 years to build. The sickly boy who could not hold a job died at 92. He is buried at the Oratory. He was beatified in 1982 and canonized in 2010. At his canonization in October 2010, Pope Benedict XVI said that Saint Andre “lived the beatitude of the pure of heart.” Reflection Rubbing ailing limbs with oil or a medal? Planting a medal to buy land? Isn't this superstition? Aren't we long past that superstitious people rely only on the “magic” of a word or action. Brother André's oil and medals were authentic sacramentals of a simple, total faith in the Father who lets his saints help him bless his children. Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Fight Laugh Feast USA
Daily News Brief for Friday, January 6th, 2023 [Daily News Brief]

Fight Laugh Feast USA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 15:49


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Friday, January 6th, 2022. Happy Friday everyone! Let’s start this newsbrief off with a little, on this day in history! On this day in history for January 6th: 1681 First recorded boxing match is engineered by Christopher Monck, 2nd Duke of Albemarle; his butler vs his butcher How about a famous wedding? 1759 US 1st President George Washington marries Martha Dandridge Custis at White House Plantation 1941 US President Franklin Roosevelt makes his "Four Freedoms" speech (freedom of speech and worship; freedom from want and fear) during his US State of Union address 1942 Pan American Airlines becomes the first commercial airline to schedule a flight around the world ("Pacific Clipper"). 1975 "Wheel Of Fortune" debuts on NBC-TV 1979 The Village People's Y.M.C.A becomes their only UK #1 single. At its peak it sold over 150,000 copies a day. 1987 Astronomers at University of California see 1st sight of birth of a galaxy 2021 Supporters of US President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington during congressional certification of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris's win. And that… was on this day in history… brought to you by… Classical Conversations Classical Conversations supports homeschooling parents by cultivating the love of learning through a Christian worldview in fellowship with other families. They provide a classical Christ-centered curriculum, local like-minded communities across the United States and in several countries, and they train parents who are striving to be great classical educators in the home. For more information and to get connected, please visit their website at ClassicalConversations.com. Again that’s ClassicalConversations.com. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/matt-gaetz-continue-speaker-stalemate-until-mccarthy-concedes Matt Gaetz vows to continue speaker stalemate until McCarthy concedes or limits power One of Rep. Kevin McCarthy’s most stubborn opponents in his House speaker bid is vowing not to fold and to continue the current stalemate until the California Republican either agrees to the defectors’ demands or drops out altogether. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), who has been one of McCarthy’s most vocal opponents, pledged not to back down in the House speaker showdown, intensifying what has already been a dayslong fight as the chamber looks to elect its next leader. “I think this ends one of two ways,” Gaetz told Fox News after the House adjourned on Wednesday. “Either Kevin bows out, realizing there is no path to become speaker of the House even with one or two or three or five of the 20 who have opposed him half a dozen times on the floor, or he essentially has to wake up, bring the House into session, and put on a straitjacket with a rules package that we’ve presented to him that doesn’t allow a lot of discretion for the speaker of the House.” After failing to make headway in three rounds of roll call votes on Wednesday, McCarthy proposed a new bout of concessions to some of his most stubborn opponents in a last-ditch effort to win their support before the chamber reconvenes. As part of his latest concessions, McCarthy agreed to a proposal to add more Freedom Caucus members to the House Rules Committee, as well as further lowering the number of members needed to call for a floor vote to oust a sitting speaker, according to CNN. The compromise builds on previous concessions in which McCarthy agreed to lower the number of votes needed to oust him from the position possibly should he be elected, marking a significant win for far-right conservatives such as Gaetz. “The reason we’ve demanded that is we do not trust Kevin McCarthy, and it’s not a small body of work,” the Florida Republican said. Even if those demands are met, however, Gaetz has vowed not to back McCarthy’s bid. Twenty GOP lawmakers voted against McCarthy to back Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL) in the latest round of voting, with one Republican voting present. Donalds initially voted for McCarthy in the first two roll call votes before backing Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) in the third round on Tuesday, conceding that “at the end of the day, we’ve got to get to 218." https://thepostmillennial.com/black-couple-given-plot-of-land-in-reparations-sells-it-back-to-la-for-20-million?utm_campaign=64487 Black couple given plot of land in reparations sells it back to LA for $20 million The heirs to Bruce's Beach, the prime beachfront property in California's Manhattan Beach, have sold the land back to the county for $20 million after receiving it just over a year ago in an act of restorative justice. The direct descendants of the black couple who were run off of their land and business got a form of "reparations," according to LA County. In 1912, Charles and Willa Bruce, a black couple, bought the plot of land for $1,225 and opened up a black beach club, reported the Los Angeles Times. These clubs were common in southern California during that period, when segregation kept black people out of "whites-only" beaches. Facing mounting pressure from racist individuals and groups, including the Ku Klux Klan, city officials condemned the property to eminent domain in 1924, claiming that they needed it to build a park. According to the Los Angeles County website, no park was actually built until nearly 30 years later, and the real reason for seizing the land was racially motivated. "It is well documented that the real reason behind the eminent domain process was racially motivated with the intention of bringing an end to the successful Black business and to thwart other African Americans from settling in or developing businesses in Manhattan Beach," the government site reads. The county ended up forcing the black couple off of their land, paying them only $14,000 when the plot was actually valued at $70,000, according to Daily Mail. The Bruces left the beach and closed their business. According to their family, they never financially recovered. In July 2022, LA County returned the land to direct descendants Marcus and Derrick Bruce as well as Derrick's sons, Anthony and Michael. "It destroyed their chance at the American Dream. I wish they could see what has happened today," Anthony said when the land was finally returned. On Tuesday, it was announced that the Bruces had opted to cash out on the land instead. The chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, Janice Hahn, stated that the selling of the land will help rebuild "generational wealth" that the family lost out on after their great-grandparents' business was destroyed. "This fight has always been about what is best for the Bruce family, and they feel what is best for them is selling this property back to the county for nearly $20 million and finally rebuilding the generational wealth they were denied for nearly a century," she said. "This is what reparations look like and it is a model that I hope government across the country will follow," the county official added. https://townhall.com/tipsheet/madelineleesman/2023/01/04/indigenous-arts-leader-revealed-as-white-n2617839 ‘Non-Binary’ Founder of Indigenous Artists’ Collective Accused of Faking Native American Heritage The co-owner of a “queer Indigenous artists’ collective” in Wisconsin reportedly faked her Native American background and “used the front to make money,” the New York Post reported. Kay LeClaire, a woman who identifies as “non-binary,” was accused in an online forum of being white after claiming for years that she was of Metis, Oneida, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, Cuban and German descent. LeClaire is a founding member of an art collective and is well-known in the Indigenous arts community in Madison, Wisconsin. LeClaire went by the Indigenous name “Nibiiwakamigkwe,” the Post noted. Reportedly, LeClaire earned artist stipends, a paid residency at the University of Wisconsin, paid speaking gigs, and art exhibitions based on her Native American background. But, a “hobbyist genealogist” who did not reveal their identity posted evidence of LeClaire’s real ancestry on an online forum. It showed that LeClaire is of German, Swedish, and French Canadian descent. “I am sorry,” LeClaire reportedly told local outlet Madison365. “A lot of information has come to my attention since late December. I am still processing it all and do not yet know how to respond adequately. What I can do now is offer change.” The art collective said in an Instagram post that it had parted ways with LeClaire on Dec. 31, 2022. The anonymous user who published LeClaire’s ancestry online went by the screen name “AdvancedSmite.” They spoke with Madison365 and revealed they are of Native American heritage. Townhall reported that several high-profile activists had been caught pretending to have Native American ancestry, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Canadian academic Carrie Bourassa, and actress Sacheen Littlefeather, whose sisters came forward late last year after her death to reveal that she was of Mexican descent. Redballoon Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! www.redballoon.work As we head into the weekend… why don’t we talk about some entertainment! https://boundingintocomics.com/2023/01/03/indiana-jones-and-the-dial-of-destiny-reportedly-pacing-far-behind-transformers-rise-of-the-beasts-and-guardians-of-the-galaxy-vol-3/ Indiana Jones Theme Song [HD] Play 0:00-0:21 ‘Indiana Jones And The Dial Of Destiny’ Reportedly Pacing Far Behind ‘Transformers: Rise Of The Beasts’ And ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 3’ In Audience Interest A report from Puck’s Matthew Belloni claims that Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny significantly underperformed compared to Transformers: Rise of the Beasts and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 after the three films released trailers during Brazil Comic Con back at the beginning of December. According to studio source Belloni reports that Transformers: Rise of the Beasts racked up over 506 million views in two weeks across YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 drew in 187 million views while Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny only brought in 79 million views. Taking a peek at the YouTube numbers, as of today, the Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny trailer only has 10 million views on the Lucasfilm YouTube channel. Transformers: Rise of the Beasts has 26.3 million views on the official Paramount Pictures YouTube channel. While Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 isn’t trailing Transformers: Rise of the Beasts as much as Belloni reported after two weeks, Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny is still significantly off the pace compared to Transformers: Rise of the Beasts and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3. In fact, both films have more than doubled up on trailer views compared to Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny. Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny is not only trailing these films when it comes to trailer views as noted by both Belloni’s inside source as well as spot-checking YouTube, but Belloni also claims the film is already at a disadvantage because Stephen Spielberg is not directing the film and Harrison Ford is 80 years old and is supposedly the leading man in a film franchise known for its action adventure heroics. The film’s promotion has also been plagued by director James Mangold’s antagonistic behavior to concerned fans about what he and Lucasfilm have planned for the film. Lucasfilm has a track record of destroying their male-led franchises, one needs only look at the the desecration of Han Solo in The Force Awakens that turned his character into a deadbeat dad, who then gets murdered by his own son. This anti-male theme would be doubled down on in Rian Johnson’s The Last Jedi that shows Luke Skywalker as a man who has abandoned everything he believed in and even tosses his lightsaber away like a piece of garbage. This theme is not isolated to the sequel trilogies, The Mandalorian turns what was pitched as a ruthless bounty hunter living in the outer reaches of the galaxy into a glorified baby sitter for a child-like Yoda character that is apparently not a child at all. The Book of Boba Fett also turned the famed bounty hunter into an incompetent town manager. Given this track record, fans have a healthy skepticism of what Lucasfilm and Mangold will do to the franchise and have especially had their hackles up following the casting of self-proclaimed feminist Phoebe Waller-Bridge. In response to one fan concern, Mangold decided to attack him and then proceeded to lie about his attacks on the fan. Matthew Kadish shared his concerns writing on Twitter, “To anyone thinking Indiana Jones 5 might be good, just let me point out… 1. Steven Spielberg is not directing. 2. Kathleen Kennedy is producing. 3. Harrison Ford is 78 years old. 4. It’s written by Jonathan Kasdan, who wrote SOLO.” Mangold responded writing, “Thanks, Matt! 1) Keep making the world a better place crapping on things in the 1st week of production from your basement. 2) Never seen a script by Jon. Nothing against him. Just reality. Butterworths & I started from a blank page. 3) 1-3 r hugely talented & all at my side.” Clearly, Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny does not appear to be connecting to people via trailer views and on top of that it has an antagonistic director who not only confirmed fan fears about Lucasfilm’s production are legitimate, but he’s openly degrading them for expressing such concerns.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, January 6th, 2023

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 15:49


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief for Friday, January 6th, 2022. Happy Friday everyone! Let’s start this newsbrief off with a little, on this day in history! On this day in history for January 6th: 1681 First recorded boxing match is engineered by Christopher Monck, 2nd Duke of Albemarle; his butler vs his butcher How about a famous wedding? 1759 US 1st President George Washington marries Martha Dandridge Custis at White House Plantation 1941 US President Franklin Roosevelt makes his "Four Freedoms" speech (freedom of speech and worship; freedom from want and fear) during his US State of Union address 1942 Pan American Airlines becomes the first commercial airline to schedule a flight around the world ("Pacific Clipper"). 1975 "Wheel Of Fortune" debuts on NBC-TV 1979 The Village People's Y.M.C.A becomes their only UK #1 single. At its peak it sold over 150,000 copies a day. 1987 Astronomers at University of California see 1st sight of birth of a galaxy 2021 Supporters of US President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington during congressional certification of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris's win. And that… was on this day in history… brought to you by… Classical Conversations Classical Conversations supports homeschooling parents by cultivating the love of learning through a Christian worldview in fellowship with other families. They provide a classical Christ-centered curriculum, local like-minded communities across the United States and in several countries, and they train parents who are striving to be great classical educators in the home. For more information and to get connected, please visit their website at ClassicalConversations.com. Again that’s ClassicalConversations.com. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/matt-gaetz-continue-speaker-stalemate-until-mccarthy-concedes Matt Gaetz vows to continue speaker stalemate until McCarthy concedes or limits power One of Rep. Kevin McCarthy’s most stubborn opponents in his House speaker bid is vowing not to fold and to continue the current stalemate until the California Republican either agrees to the defectors’ demands or drops out altogether. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), who has been one of McCarthy’s most vocal opponents, pledged not to back down in the House speaker showdown, intensifying what has already been a dayslong fight as the chamber looks to elect its next leader. “I think this ends one of two ways,” Gaetz told Fox News after the House adjourned on Wednesday. “Either Kevin bows out, realizing there is no path to become speaker of the House even with one or two or three or five of the 20 who have opposed him half a dozen times on the floor, or he essentially has to wake up, bring the House into session, and put on a straitjacket with a rules package that we’ve presented to him that doesn’t allow a lot of discretion for the speaker of the House.” After failing to make headway in three rounds of roll call votes on Wednesday, McCarthy proposed a new bout of concessions to some of his most stubborn opponents in a last-ditch effort to win their support before the chamber reconvenes. As part of his latest concessions, McCarthy agreed to a proposal to add more Freedom Caucus members to the House Rules Committee, as well as further lowering the number of members needed to call for a floor vote to oust a sitting speaker, according to CNN. The compromise builds on previous concessions in which McCarthy agreed to lower the number of votes needed to oust him from the position possibly should he be elected, marking a significant win for far-right conservatives such as Gaetz. “The reason we’ve demanded that is we do not trust Kevin McCarthy, and it’s not a small body of work,” the Florida Republican said. Even if those demands are met, however, Gaetz has vowed not to back McCarthy’s bid. Twenty GOP lawmakers voted against McCarthy to back Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL) in the latest round of voting, with one Republican voting present. Donalds initially voted for McCarthy in the first two roll call votes before backing Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) in the third round on Tuesday, conceding that “at the end of the day, we’ve got to get to 218." https://thepostmillennial.com/black-couple-given-plot-of-land-in-reparations-sells-it-back-to-la-for-20-million?utm_campaign=64487 Black couple given plot of land in reparations sells it back to LA for $20 million The heirs to Bruce's Beach, the prime beachfront property in California's Manhattan Beach, have sold the land back to the county for $20 million after receiving it just over a year ago in an act of restorative justice. The direct descendants of the black couple who were run off of their land and business got a form of "reparations," according to LA County. In 1912, Charles and Willa Bruce, a black couple, bought the plot of land for $1,225 and opened up a black beach club, reported the Los Angeles Times. These clubs were common in southern California during that period, when segregation kept black people out of "whites-only" beaches. Facing mounting pressure from racist individuals and groups, including the Ku Klux Klan, city officials condemned the property to eminent domain in 1924, claiming that they needed it to build a park. According to the Los Angeles County website, no park was actually built until nearly 30 years later, and the real reason for seizing the land was racially motivated. "It is well documented that the real reason behind the eminent domain process was racially motivated with the intention of bringing an end to the successful Black business and to thwart other African Americans from settling in or developing businesses in Manhattan Beach," the government site reads. The county ended up forcing the black couple off of their land, paying them only $14,000 when the plot was actually valued at $70,000, according to Daily Mail. The Bruces left the beach and closed their business. According to their family, they never financially recovered. In July 2022, LA County returned the land to direct descendants Marcus and Derrick Bruce as well as Derrick's sons, Anthony and Michael. "It destroyed their chance at the American Dream. I wish they could see what has happened today," Anthony said when the land was finally returned. On Tuesday, it was announced that the Bruces had opted to cash out on the land instead. The chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, Janice Hahn, stated that the selling of the land will help rebuild "generational wealth" that the family lost out on after their great-grandparents' business was destroyed. "This fight has always been about what is best for the Bruce family, and they feel what is best for them is selling this property back to the county for nearly $20 million and finally rebuilding the generational wealth they were denied for nearly a century," she said. "This is what reparations look like and it is a model that I hope government across the country will follow," the county official added. https://townhall.com/tipsheet/madelineleesman/2023/01/04/indigenous-arts-leader-revealed-as-white-n2617839 ‘Non-Binary’ Founder of Indigenous Artists’ Collective Accused of Faking Native American Heritage The co-owner of a “queer Indigenous artists’ collective” in Wisconsin reportedly faked her Native American background and “used the front to make money,” the New York Post reported. Kay LeClaire, a woman who identifies as “non-binary,” was accused in an online forum of being white after claiming for years that she was of Metis, Oneida, Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, Cuban and German descent. LeClaire is a founding member of an art collective and is well-known in the Indigenous arts community in Madison, Wisconsin. LeClaire went by the Indigenous name “Nibiiwakamigkwe,” the Post noted. Reportedly, LeClaire earned artist stipends, a paid residency at the University of Wisconsin, paid speaking gigs, and art exhibitions based on her Native American background. But, a “hobbyist genealogist” who did not reveal their identity posted evidence of LeClaire’s real ancestry on an online forum. It showed that LeClaire is of German, Swedish, and French Canadian descent. “I am sorry,” LeClaire reportedly told local outlet Madison365. “A lot of information has come to my attention since late December. I am still processing it all and do not yet know how to respond adequately. What I can do now is offer change.” The art collective said in an Instagram post that it had parted ways with LeClaire on Dec. 31, 2022. The anonymous user who published LeClaire’s ancestry online went by the screen name “AdvancedSmite.” They spoke with Madison365 and revealed they are of Native American heritage. Townhall reported that several high-profile activists had been caught pretending to have Native American ancestry, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Canadian academic Carrie Bourassa, and actress Sacheen Littlefeather, whose sisters came forward late last year after her death to reveal that she was of Mexican descent. Redballoon Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! www.redballoon.work As we head into the weekend… why don’t we talk about some entertainment! https://boundingintocomics.com/2023/01/03/indiana-jones-and-the-dial-of-destiny-reportedly-pacing-far-behind-transformers-rise-of-the-beasts-and-guardians-of-the-galaxy-vol-3/ Indiana Jones Theme Song [HD] Play 0:00-0:21 ‘Indiana Jones And The Dial Of Destiny’ Reportedly Pacing Far Behind ‘Transformers: Rise Of The Beasts’ And ‘Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 3’ In Audience Interest A report from Puck’s Matthew Belloni claims that Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny significantly underperformed compared to Transformers: Rise of the Beasts and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 after the three films released trailers during Brazil Comic Con back at the beginning of December. According to studio source Belloni reports that Transformers: Rise of the Beasts racked up over 506 million views in two weeks across YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 drew in 187 million views while Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny only brought in 79 million views. Taking a peek at the YouTube numbers, as of today, the Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny trailer only has 10 million views on the Lucasfilm YouTube channel. Transformers: Rise of the Beasts has 26.3 million views on the official Paramount Pictures YouTube channel. While Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 isn’t trailing Transformers: Rise of the Beasts as much as Belloni reported after two weeks, Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny is still significantly off the pace compared to Transformers: Rise of the Beasts and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3. In fact, both films have more than doubled up on trailer views compared to Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny. Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny is not only trailing these films when it comes to trailer views as noted by both Belloni’s inside source as well as spot-checking YouTube, but Belloni also claims the film is already at a disadvantage because Stephen Spielberg is not directing the film and Harrison Ford is 80 years old and is supposedly the leading man in a film franchise known for its action adventure heroics. The film’s promotion has also been plagued by director James Mangold’s antagonistic behavior to concerned fans about what he and Lucasfilm have planned for the film. Lucasfilm has a track record of destroying their male-led franchises, one needs only look at the the desecration of Han Solo in The Force Awakens that turned his character into a deadbeat dad, who then gets murdered by his own son. This anti-male theme would be doubled down on in Rian Johnson’s The Last Jedi that shows Luke Skywalker as a man who has abandoned everything he believed in and even tosses his lightsaber away like a piece of garbage. This theme is not isolated to the sequel trilogies, The Mandalorian turns what was pitched as a ruthless bounty hunter living in the outer reaches of the galaxy into a glorified baby sitter for a child-like Yoda character that is apparently not a child at all. The Book of Boba Fett also turned the famed bounty hunter into an incompetent town manager. Given this track record, fans have a healthy skepticism of what Lucasfilm and Mangold will do to the franchise and have especially had their hackles up following the casting of self-proclaimed feminist Phoebe Waller-Bridge. In response to one fan concern, Mangold decided to attack him and then proceeded to lie about his attacks on the fan. Matthew Kadish shared his concerns writing on Twitter, “To anyone thinking Indiana Jones 5 might be good, just let me point out… 1. Steven Spielberg is not directing. 2. Kathleen Kennedy is producing. 3. Harrison Ford is 78 years old. 4. It’s written by Jonathan Kasdan, who wrote SOLO.” Mangold responded writing, “Thanks, Matt! 1) Keep making the world a better place crapping on things in the 1st week of production from your basement. 2) Never seen a script by Jon. Nothing against him. Just reality. Butterworths & I started from a blank page. 3) 1-3 r hugely talented & all at my side.” Clearly, Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny does not appear to be connecting to people via trailer views and on top of that it has an antagonistic director who not only confirmed fan fears about Lucasfilm’s production are legitimate, but he’s openly degrading them for expressing such concerns.

Launch Left
Rooney Mara Launches Suay Sew Shop

Launch Left

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 57:51


Rooney Mara joins Rain on LaunchLeft and launches Suay Sew Shop. The conversation begins with family, film, music, and activism before welcoming Lindsay Rose Medoff, CEO and Lead Designer of Suay. Lindsay tells us about the mission and services that this unique retail shop provides. The best news is that Suay is cultivating a workforce of textile recyclers dedicated to eliminating post-consumer waste and giving opportunities for under-appreciated workers fair pay and recognition. With its original location in Los Angeles, Suay will open another location in New York. Don't miss this episode of LaunchLeft to catch up with Rooney Mara and learn all about Suay Sew Shop. -----------------  LAUNCHLEFT OFFICIAL WEBSITEhttps://www.launchleft.com  LAUNCHLEFT PATREON https://www.patreon.com/LaunchLeft  TWITTER https://twitter.com/LaunchLeft  INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/launchleft/  FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/LaunchLeft  --------------------- LaunchLeft Podcast hosted by Rain Phoenix is an intentional space for Art and Activism where famed creatives launch new artists. LaunchLeft is an alliance of left-of-center artists, a curated ecosystem that includes a podcast, label and NFT gallery. --------------------- IN THIS EPISODE: [02:52] Rooney Mara reflects on her childhood.  [06:10] Choices made in life, deciding not to relinquish control in an acting career and her film, Women Talking.  [16:30] Rooney discusses motherhood and being a co-partner in a two-actor home and the creation of the production company, Valentine Pictures.  [21:29] Reflecting on a catalog of work starting with Girl with a Dragon Tattoo, how music played a role, and living the life of a vegan.  [36:37] Rooney launches Suay Sew Shop. Lindsay Rose Medoff, CEO and Lead Designer of Suay, describes their mission and services.  [42:44] Empowering manual laborers and paying for the value they bring to the table. The difference between saying you want to help make a change and being willing to be uncomfortable and make the change. KEY TAKEAWAYS:  Rooney Mara takes on causes, films, lifestyle, and “shopping” in ways that she can be proud of and that can positively impact the world.  Suay Sew Shop in Los Angeles is a unique business employing skilled manual laborers. They provide free clothing to the needy that they have repurposed. In addition, they are working on becoming worker-owned, which empowers workers that otherwise would remain an overlooked population.  There are ways to close the gap between the impoverished and business tycoons. It's a decision to share the wealth and take less in profits. It's one thing to stand on a soap box and “talk” about making a difference and quite another thing to put people over profits. RESOURCE LINKS Website - Rooney Mara Instagram - Rooney Mara Facebook - Rooney Mara Website - Suay Sew Shop Instagram - Suay Sew Shop Facebook - Suay Sew Shop LinkedIn - Lindsay Rose Medoff BIO:  Rooney Mara:  Actress and philanthropist Rooney Mara was born on April 17, 1985 in Bedford, New York. She made her screen debut in the slasher film Urban Legends: Bloody Mary (2005), went on to have a supporting role in the independent coming-of-age drama Tanner Hall (2009), and has since starred in the horror remake A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010), the biographical drama The Social Network (2010), the thriller remake The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), and the romantic drama Carol (2015). Patricia Rooney Mara is one of four children of Kathleen McNulty (née Rooney) and NFL football team New York Giants executive Timothy Christopher Mara. Her grandfathers were Wellington Mara, co-owner of the Giants, and Timothy Rooney, owner of Yonkers Raceway, and her grand-uncle is Steelers Chairman Dan Rooney, the former Ambassador to Ireland. She is the great-granddaughter of Art Rooney, the founder of the Pittsburgh Steelers football franchise. Her father has Irish, German, and French-Canadian ancestry, and her mother is of Irish and Italian descent. After graduating from Bedford's Fox Lane High School, she went to Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia in South America for four months as part of the Traveling School, an open learning environment. She attended George Washington University for a year and then transferred to New York University, where she studied international social policy psychology and nonprofits. She took her degree from New York University in 2010. Her studies focused on non-profit organizations, as her family has a tradition of involvement in philanthropic causes. She had thought of acting after watching old movies and attending musical theater, but did not think of it as a serious vocation and was afraid she might fail at this. As a result of her reservations, she appeared in only one play while in high school. She began seriously focusing on acting when she was at New York University, appearing in student films. Inspired by her older sister, actress Kate Mara, she began to pursue the craft, auditioning for acting jobs at age 19. She appeared with her sister Kate in the video horror movie Urban Legends: Bloody Mary (2005), billing herself as "Patricia Mara". As "Tricia Mara", she had guest roles on television and won her first lead in the movie Tanner Hall (2009), which was shot in the fall of 2007. She originally auditioned for the supporting role of Lucasta in "Tanner Hall", a $3-million independent film, but director Tatiana von Fürstenberg was so impressed by the young actress, she had her return to audition for the lead role of Fernanda, which Mara won. Furstenberg was delighted with her nuanced performance, saying, "Still waters run deep". Continuing to call herself Tricia Mara, this was during the making of "Tanner Hall" that she considered changing her professional name to Rooney Mara, soliciting the advice of the cast and crew. After premiering at the 2009 Toronto International Film Festival, her performance in "Tanner Hall" brought the rechristened Rooney Mara a "Rising Star" award at the 2009 Hamptons Film Festival and a "Stargazer Award" at the 2010 Gen Art Film Festival. She received her first lead role in a major feature, in the $35 million remake A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010). The movie proved disappointing at the box office, grossing only $63 million domestically and racking up a worldwide gross of just under $116 million. However, she was noticed by critics in the small but pivotal role of the Boston University undergrad Erica Albright who dumps Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network (2010). Director David Fincher subsequently cast her as the lead, Lisbeth Salander, in his thriller remake, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), based on Stieg Larsson's Millennium book series. She received critical acclaim for her performance, and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress and a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture - Drama. She starred in the thriller film Side Effects (2013), the independent drama Ain't Them Bodies Saints (2013), and the acclaimed sci-fi romantic drama Her (2013). The following year, she starred in the adventure drama Trash (2014). She garnered further critical acclaim for her performance in Todd Haynes' romantic drama Carol (2015), for which she won the Best Actress Award at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, and was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture - Drama and the SAG, BAFTA, and Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. In the spirit of her family's philanthropic endeavors, Rooney created Faces of Kibera, a charity that provides food, medical care and housing to orphans in Nairobi, Kenya's Kibra district, a small slum that houses a million people. There are many orphans as AIDS is rampant in the slum.   Lindsay Rose Medoff, CEO and Lead Designer of Suay:  SUAY SEW SHOP is creating a culture of community and reuse. As our global community demands change from corporations, our dedication to design, coupled with a drive for activism, is putting reclaimed products at the center of a social, economic and environmental revolution. Cultivating upcycling as the priority will not only massively impact our planet, but our daily quality of life. SUAY is a Los Angeles based 100% vertical sewing, production and consulting shop founded in 2017 by CEO, Lindsay Rose Medoff.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Overcome
How fitness changed my life with Al Sabo

Overcome

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 33:11


Al Sabo is a French Canadian woman who lives in British Columbia. At the age of 19 she overcame addiction and was introduced into the world of bodybuilding by a local coach in Squamish. Al works as a counselor building her own business which will focus on helping her clients with grief, loss & transitions. In addition, she also works as life coach helping people with their mindset & becoming their best authentic selves. In this episode Al is going to talk about how journey which includes competing four times in the bikini division, her transition to figure division and her plans to compete in wellness division.

Rusty's Garage
Owen Kelly - Part 3

Rusty's Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 65:46


We're releasing this during the holiday season and the conversation is flowing so well, we want you to enjoy a third instalment on us. Owen Kelly wins in a Late Model when he wasn't supposed to, subs for Marcos Ambrose and races with Boris Said. Join Greg 'Rusty' Rust as Owen Kelly laughs about getting lost among French Canadian road signs on the way to practise and a secret test in Jimmy Johnson's NASCAR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Making It: Women in Film
#64 | Mothers and Daughters with Co-Directors Carmine Pierre-Dufour & Sandrine Brodeur-Desrosiers ("FANMI")

Making It: Women in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 93:51


Enjoy this episode with the French-Canadian co-directors Sandrine and Carmine! Stick around to the end for Lauren and Evita's holiday film recommendations, and as always, why don't you give us a quick 5 star rating and make sure you're subscribed? In the spirit of holidays, and all that. Produced by Bonnie and Braw and LS Films. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/makingitwomeninfilm/message

Dog Days of Podcasting Challenge
Nutty Nuchtchas : Nutty Bites

Dog Days of Podcasting Challenge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022


Tourtiere is a French-Canadian dish that is seen everywhere, you can get it at St Hubert and in the grocery store all across Canada. When I first moved here I learned to make it and this year I am sharing … Continue reading → The post Nutty Bites Tourtiere for Day 05 of the 12 Days of Podcasting 2022 appeared first on NIMLAS Studios.

Nutty Bites
Nutty Bites Tourtiere for Day 05 of the 12 Days of Podcasting 2022

Nutty Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 5:40


Tourtiere is a French-Canadian dish that is seen everywhere, you can get it at St Hubert and in the grocery store all across Canada. When I first moved here I learned to make it and this year I am sharing … Continue reading → The post Nutty Bites Tourtiere for Day 05 of the 12 Days of Podcasting 2022 appeared first on NIMLAS Studios.

Sagittarian Matters
Episode #266-Remembering GENEVIÈVE CASTRÉE with PHIL ELVERUM & MARIANNA RITCHEY

Sagittarian Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 64:32


This week we welcome Phil Elverum and Marianna Ritchey to talk about the life and art of Geneviève Castrée.    Geneviève Castrée was a French Canadian cartoonist, illustrator and musician. She was the author of the books Susceptible, A Bubble, and more. She had art exhibitions around the world and toured musically under the names O Paeon and Woelv.    Geneviève passed away on July 9, 2016, at only 35 years old.    She is one of my favorite artists.     Drawn and Quarterly just released her complete works, a giant beautiful book organized, edited and assembled by her husband, Phil Elverum (Mt. Eerie, Microphones).      Marianna Ritchey is  a professor, a musician, and the author of the book Composing Capital: Classical Music in the Neoliberal Era .    She's an old friend of mine, and a longtime friend of Genevieve's.    Towards the end of her life, Geneviève created an oracle deck from collaged magazines, and Ritchey was listed as one of her collaborators. If you get the book, which I really hope you do, you'll see little bits of Ritchey sprinkled throughout, in a diary comic from Australia with her band Lloyd and Michael, and in lists.    I invited her on to talk about the oracle deck and her late friend.    "She was so great. She was a beautiful, wonderful, totally unique person, and I hope everyone will look through this book, and just think about how special she was, and how much she put into the world in such a short amount of time that she was here."  -Ritchey 

The Arise Podcast
Season 4, Episode 12: Kitsap County Panel on Health, Wellbeing and Racism i

The Arise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 109:00


    Danielle (00:00:37):Welcome to the Arise Podcast, conversations on faith, race, healing, and justice. And I wanna welcome you to this panel conversation. I'm about to have, uh, just stunning women doing wonderful work in this community and in the areas of justice in government. Listen in,Kali (00:01:07):All right. I am Kali Jensen. I am a licensed mental health counselor in the state of Washington. Grew up in Washington. Um, I am obvious I'm a white American. I am German, native American, and French Canadian. And, and yeah, coming to you on the land of the Suquamish as we enter today.(00:01:33):My name is Jessica Guidry. I'm the Equity Program manager at the Kids at Public Health District. I also like Kaylee, um, joined this meeting from the land of the Suquamish. I actually live, um, and what was, which is still the, the Port Madison Reservation. So closer to Indianola. Um, and I, I guess ethnic ethnically I am, um, Asian, English, scotch Irish, and maybe some other British isles there. But, uh, um, I actually grew up in Bangkok, Thailand, and I've been in the US though for a long time. And I was born in the States(00:02:08):Next, um, Maria Fergus. I'm the community en Engagement specialist at, uh, Kita Public Health District. I've been in this role for, um, a little bit over a month. And one of the reasons why I applied for this job is because I, uh, I know that last year the Kita Public Health District declared racism at public health crisis. Um, and I wanted to be part of what they were doing. I, my pronouns are her, and she, I was born in Mexico, but I grew up in California. English is my second language, and I've been in Washington state for about seven years and working with our communities, um, our Spanish speaking communities as a volunteer for different organizations since the end of 2015.Well, good morning everyone. Um, I stepped away cause you know what I was doing, but, um, , uh, just bring, kinda bring me up to speed. We just doing our introductions.Just so you are, where you're located, um, what you're up to, and, um, yeah. And then we'll jump in.(00:03:34):Okay. Well, good morning everyone. Good afternoon now. Um, my name is Karen Vargas and, um, I am on Bainbridge Island, um, working with our kids across Kitsap County. I am, um, one of, uh, the co-founders, um, for Latch, uh, living Life Leadership and Kitsap Black Student Union. Um, we have been working over 30 plus years with our school districts, um, with our multicultural advisory council here on Bainbridge Island, working on equity issues, uh, really since I, um, moved here from the East Coast. So, um, what we're working on now with Kitsap Race Coalition is to, um, to have our, our county have a commission on Truth and Reconciliation that would, uh, actually deal with some of the issues that we see manifesting here in our county, um, with our bipo communities and with our students of color, uh, within the school districts and in the community.Um, and, and hoping that we, we would be able to, um, move our communities forward in a healthier way, to be able to address some of the, the issues that have been, um, you know, uh, showing up, whether it's in our churches or whether it's in our, our communities or on our jobs or, or in our school districts, even in our health districts. You know, how do we move forward when there has been, um, these type of, of issues that continue to manifest, you know? And I think that when we can move forward doing intervention and prevention, um, to address these issues, it would help us to reconcile them more in, in a healthy way. Um, and so, um, that's kind of the work that we've been working on. And so,Danielle (00:05:49):Thanks. Um, well, welcome everybody. I, I know we kind of all have connected and collaborated around, um, what is happening in Kitsap County. And perhaps if you're listening, you're not in Kitsap County, but you are in a county or a, a town or a section of a town, even a larger town. We, we all have these, like, there's like the 30,000 foot view of like the larger area where we're at. And we have these smaller cultural microcosms I think that happen in the areas where we actually physically root our bodies in housing and, um, business and life and school and our raise our children. And so we're coming to you from one location. Um, it's not, it's not gonna be the same as every location, but hopefully what we talk about can be something that we can, we can learn from you if you reach out and we hope you can learn just from us as we have a conversation.But Kaylee and I, like, we've been really close since the pandemic. She helped me survive the pandemic. She had her office next to mine and we would yell at each other down the hall or, um, check in, especially when all of our clients were online. And we had started these groups. One of the first groups we ever started, um, I think it was like the second or third group right after the murder of George, George Floyd, to engage white people that identify as white or in a white body, um, and what that means to their racial identity. And so Kaylee and I started these groups and we jumped in cuz I said, Hey Kaylee, do you wanna do this? And she's like, yeah, sure. And we jumped in, we're like, whoa, we don't know if we know what we're doing. And then pretty soon we're like, actually, I think we don't know what we're doing, but we do know what we're doing in some ways.So offering good care, listening, um, reflecting stories, being witness to stories, engaging, uh, the traumas that have been that turn into weapons against bodies of color. So those, some of the ways Kayleigh and I have talked about things and, you know, we both Kayleigh and I both have students in the local school system and have had kids that are, uh, part of marginalized communities or adjacent to marginalized communities. And it's, we've also noticed the mental health of our students and our families and, you know, become more and more passionate about it because obviously why it might not be obvious, but it's something we deal with in our everyday real life and, and we care deeply for, I think I can say that on behalf of both of us. But Kayleigh, you can speak for yourself obviously, but that's how I come to the conversation as a, a Mexican woman in the town of Poulsbo, Washington on Suquamish land, married to an immigrant, and, um, we speak Spanish and English at home. And so just, you know, just curious to hear, you know, how that intersects with your different areas of work and, and your passions here in Kitsap County.Kali (00:08:59):Well, I guess I can go first just cuz Danielle was just talking a lot about me, . Uh, but yes, uh, Danielle did invite me into starting groups and I went with her with fear and trembling. Um, had done some work on my own, around my own racism for a while. My graduate program, this at the Seattle School of Theology and Psychology really, um, helped me to begin that work at a deeper level. And so then I did some work on my own, but had a real awareness when I started groups around racism that I definitely have racism still a part of my world as I grew up in a very white, uh, community and Spokane. And, um, as we began those groups, we did predominantly reach out to other white people or people in white passing bodies and, um, have found some like goodness in diving deeper into people's stories around racism.And that's kind of where we started, um, wondering with people around like, when did you notice your own racial identity? When, when did you become aware of racism? Um, kind of going all the way back to the beginning to help people make connections to like, what is still going on inside their bodies when they try to have these hard conversations with people in the community. Um, so I have learned a lot. I still have a lot to learn. Um, and along with what Danielle said, I also am a mental health therapist and work with a lot of teenagers in our community here in Kitsap County from different school districts. Plus like she said, I have some teenage children. All of my children are white, um, and, and have diverse friend groups. But I have become increasingly, well, I've always been concerned about the issues of racism in our community.I, I remember as a young little girl calling it out in my own parents, and that didn't always go well. Um, but then it was very under the surface as a white person, uh, you didn't see it as overtly as it has become now in 2020 since the election of Donald Trump, the, like, overt, blatant racism has, uh, been shocking. And yet it's always been there. So, um, but as I work with my own children and then work with students in my practice, I'm just, I am deeply concerned about the mental health of our kids. I think it's hard enough as an adult to go through these past few years, but I am concerned about our teens and what they are facing, um, of all races. I I think even my white daughter is very disturbed by the racial slurs that she constantly hear in the hallway and doesn't really know how to even go about addressing it or feel safe enough to even say anything. Um, so that's part of why I'm here today. And, um, had the privilege of going to a meeting, uh, last weekend with Kitsap Race. And so, yeah, I, I just, I hope for continued leadership amongst adults to like help our students and help our communities, even our adults in our communities, especially. I have a passion for the white people in our community. I help them be able to take steps forwards to be able to sit in these conversations and, and be productive and not as harmful. So that's how I enter this work.Speaker 5 (00:12:34):So I entered this work, um, because I grew up in California and it was very diverse. Um, and when I moved up here to Washington, uh, there just wasn't as much diversity, especially in the PAL area. And my daughter, um, who was a sophomore at the time, was invited to join the North Kids Up Equity Council. And so I started participating in that and started hearing stories, and I started working with the parents and children that are Spanish speaking. And, well, I kept hearing more stories and, uh, realized that I needed to be a little bit more proactive. And so I, I joined, um, stand up for racial justice search and I attended some other meetings, got some training, realized that I have a lot of internalized racism and racist behaviors myself and what ency ideology that, uh, I hadn't been aware of. Um, that was part of my thinking.And so, um, over time I continued to stay involved. At the beginning of this year, I heard about the student direct equity campaign under a base and became a adult, um, volunteer to support the, the students that were in the campaign and have been doing that since then. Um, also participated in the race forward, uh, healing together, meeting that we had this last, um, two weekends ago with, uh, with the race and try and stay as active as I can in the community to to hear, um, hear the stories. So I, I know what's going on and just stay updated and what's going on in my community.Jessica (00:14:41):Years, you know, the health district was, you were very, you were very light can Oh, okay. Is this better? Yeah, sorry about that. That, um, so how I got started in this work, so for 13 and a half years at the, you know, at the health district, I was their public health emergency preparedness and response program manager. And to be honest, I didn't really address equity head-on, um, in the emergency management field. Um, we, instead of using the term, you know, equity injustice, we used terms like access and functional needs, which to me doesn't really get to the core of the issue, but that was kind of the verbiage. But first it was vulnerable population then at risk and things like that. But it wasn't until, you know, the pandemic, um, that my role was able to switch a little. Um, I supervised initially our Covid vaccine equity liaison, and that was the first time at the health district that we had somebody with the word equity in their title.And she was specifically hired, her name was, but this was the first time we hired someone to specifically look at differences and, and how we can address those differences and outcomes and access. And, and so it was really exciting to have Holly on board. And as Holly was doing outreach with the community, um, and she built this Vaccine Equity collaborative, she started hearing from folks, you know, you know, this is great that the health district, you know, wants to address equity and vaccine, but what are you going to do about racism? And before the pandemic? Well, um, you know, we, we've talked about it and in public health circles, racism as a public health issue was kind of c was circulating, right? But I think it wasn't until the pandemic when we saw the differences in, um, who was getting hospitalized.You know, the covid who was getting sick because of covid and who, um, didn't get vaccinated because of access issues to stress of government and, you know, rightful distress of government, um, where all this came about. So when Holly heard this feedback and heard, you know, are, you know, is, is public health going to claim, um, racism as a public health crisis? You know, she came to me and some other folks and asked about this and we said, you know, yes, let's talk about this as an agency. And our leadership was very supportive and wanted to know more about declaring racism as a public health crisis. So, you know, at that point I was more of a cheerleader more than anything else. You know, I was involved in some groups kite race or you know, that, um, which Aku helped found, um, you know, equity, um, race and community engagement coalition kind of, you know, here and there.But when the Public Health Board declared racism a public health crisis, that was in response to community demand or a request, if you will. Um, and I could talk more about how that process came about, but as a result of that resolution, the health district actually allocated resources to equity. Before equity was more of, you know, if, if certain programs were, sorry, I use the word program. If certain teams within the health district were passionate about equity, they would incorporate it, but it was not, um, universal within the health district. And we didn't have like a, a, a shared terminology, things like that, or shared expectation even that we would address equity. Um, but with the, the, the resolution, it has several commitments in it. And one of them has to do with actually having staff. And this is really important because other resolutions across the country don't have commitments.They don't allocate resources. And just telling a government agency, oh yes, you'll handle equity without putting a budget line item means that it'll be kind of an afterthought, right? Or it's kind of like another layer among other layers. So this resolution said that, you know, you'll hire a community liaison and what our leadership ended up doing is say, no, this needs to be a separate program. We're going to hire a program manager first. So that was really important with that resolution. Another thing, another component of that resolution is that the health district will have, and I think the, um, certain training, and I believe the topics were, um, cultural competency, anti-racism and health literacy plus other topics. But those are the three topics, if I remember correctly, that were called out in the resolution. And the, and then one of the other commitments was that we would co-create solutions to systemic inequities with our community partners.And the reason why I said this is pretty huge for us is because, you know, often we look at health topics like health, excuse me, like healthy eating, active living, smoking cessation, or food safety, but actually dealing with poverty, racism, you know, I don't think we've, no, no, I might not be being, I might be unfair about this, but I don't think we've necessarily ha handled its head on, right? We've maybe gone to some housing meetings, but really more like in our limited public health capacity. So to me, this co-creation of solutions with community partners is huge. And I, and I do believe that often in government, we think we know best, right? And so we're like, oh, well, we're gonna do our research and we're gonna find best practices. But instead, you know, our community often has the answers to our, to our, to the issues that we have.It's just bringing them to the table, giving them equal voice and you know, honestly compensating them and treating them like consultants and, you know, a as equals, not just, oh, we're gonna, you know, get community input and then we're done, kind of thing. But that, that continued partnership. So anyway, um, so when this resolution passed, um, then my position was, was created. I applied for it and I was very lucky to get it. Um, and I, I started in this position full-time about last October or so, the resolution declaring racism of public health crisis start, um, it, that, that passed in May, 2021. So it's been about a almost a year and a half now. And to my knowledge, we're still the only governmental entity in Kitsap that's really addressed this and has staffing for it. Now, this might change because I, I, I'm not saying that the health district started anything, and I think really it's more the advocacy of folks like [inaudible] and, and Kitsap Race and all these other organizations that are pushing government.But I think we, we may start to see city governments actually investing in hiring and equity, uh, either race equity or all equity consultants or, or, um, staff member to really push that issue forward in their org organization. Um, so in this past year, um, there have been a couple things that I've been working on. So one is looking at our internal structure and our internal culture. Um, we don't talk about, you know, a year ago we didn't talk about equity as much. Um, so it was doing, you know, as, as designing employee training, meeting with all our different, prog all of our different teams. So talk about equity because, uh, oh, is Jessica, you know, the politically correct police, is she going to white shame me? So it's really the, the first year I had to really build those relationships. And luckily, because I've been at the health district so darn long, people knew, oh, you know, they, they were familiar with me.They, they knew that I wasn't just gonna shut them down. And then, and, and just being present, and as I talked with different teams, I realized, you know, they, they do have equity mindsets, but they just don't call it equity. But we have some teams who are really focused on poverty, but they might have actually had the conversation about how does racism affect poverty? How is that a driver for poverty? So, you know, anyway, so, so with this, so we have this internal bucket of work. So looking at training and, and right now our, our first training with the employees is gonna deal with identity and power. We're calling it positionality training. And the idea is that our, our training has to deal with the individual, the organization, the community, and the society. So that's, so we're building a training program based on that. We did do an internal equity assessment to figure out what we can do better.And, and I don't if I had to do about this Maria, but honestly, one of the biggest takeaways from that assessment was our staff doesn't know how we react to community input related to our priorities. So that needs to change, you know, either it's, it's a lack of awareness in our agency, or maybe we don't do it enough. So there, there's that piece. And then with, with community partnerships, you know, really trying to look at how we engage with community and how we see them as partners differently. Um, so the fact, like one thing I I also encourage, like me and Marina do, is just to be at community events without an agenda. It's not a grant deliverable. And actually, Aku really, um, helped bring this light for me. And I, and I should have realized this years ago, but you know, when, when Holly, the Vaccine Equity Collaborative, um, excuse me, the Vaccine Equity Liaison.So her position was eliminated due to, you know, that, that that phase of work was done. But I think what was missed was the community impact, because she built such amazing relationships in the thick of the pandemic where people were really looking for someone to trust in government. And I remember in Aku, I I, I think about this a lot, um, when we had our, her, um, goodbye party, I had one person, a community leader who was angry about it. Yes. And rightfully so. And, and you know, one of the things I've had to learn about in, in this position is not to be defensive and not to be like, well, our leadership didn't see enough work for a person. And just to be like, you know what? It is okay to be angry. I'm angry. I don't want her to leave. This was not my decision.I was not consulted about this. And, and, and that's, and, and, and I think what, what I'm, what I'm hoping to build and, and, and, and get some feed, you know, and, and, and, and build my own muscle and getting community feedback without having to be like, well, our agency policy exist. So at that meeting, not only was I not chewed out, I should say, but, um, I had someone speak very passionate to me, and he's said, Jessica, this is not about you. I'm like, no, I, I see that. And I said, you know, so acknowledging that hurt and letting my agency know also, hey, it hurts when your, when your main contact an organization leaves, you can't just replace that. So there's that piece. But then even a Kue telling me, you know, Jessica, you know, with, and, and I'm paraphrasing cuz a a kue says so much more eloquently than I do, you know, in government you have these grant deliverables and you go to community and you ask community to help and community will do the labor for you, you know, doing outreach, looking for places, for example, to do vaccine clinics and other stuff.But then when your grant deliverables are done and the grant funding's over, you leave. So that really stuck with me. And, um, one of the great things about how our equity program is funded is not funded by grants. And so one of the big things, you know, for us to build relationships is to go to meetings that are not just grant driven. Um, just to listen. So for example, Marie and I are gonna be going to the com, the, the community and police policing together, you know, the PACT meeting that, um, uh, pastor Richmond Johnson and, and, uh, partnering for Youth Achievement and others are having this, this, this, um, this week. I don't know if the health district has ever participated in that, but in order for us to know what's important to the community, we actually have to be there in meetings. So that's, and, and I'm so sorry to be taking up so much time, but this is trying some of the ways I'm trying to change how we do things at the health district.The funny thing is, and I get asked, well, Jessica, can you send this to so-and-so? And it's like, you know, yes, but do you know how much we invest in going to meetings and building those relationships? But we're, we're seeing re returns. But another thing that we're doing is we are launching what we call the Health Equity Collaborative. So I mentioned that during the pandemic we had the Vaccine Equity Collaborative. It was very limited though. Cause it was just looking at vaccine with the Health Equity Collaborative, there is no deadline for this because health inequities exist and they will continue to exist until we really address those hard issues. Right. So I'm really excited about the Self Equity collaborative because the collaborative will decide what topic we talk about. And that's that piece I was talking about, about co-creating solutions. Um, it's not the Health District saying, oh, we need to focus on someone that's public healthy.No, we're gonna, um, in, in January come together, you know, we'll look at data, we'll, we'll listen to stories, we'll listen to input from the collaborative members and then figure out we wanna address. And then, you know, I I, I've also committed to Maria in my time to actually address and, and support the work that the collaborative will eventually think of. Um, but what's different about that collaborative also is that we're paying people who participate and are not being paid there by their organizations. That is not something that we typically do in government. But, um, some of you may know that the Public Health Board expanded last year. No, actually it was earlier this year, excuse me, due to a state law that passed last year. And we now have non-elected members, which is huge because across the country you saw politics getting involved in public health.Now we have, um, now we actually have five, I think, new members. And it's amazing. So we now have a member, so we have a member on, on our board from each of our neighboring tribes. We only had to have one per law, but our board decided that they wanted to have a spot for the Suquamish tribe and the Port Gamble ALM tribe. I just found out today that our Port Gamble ALM tribe position is filled. And the person's gonna be Jolene Sullivan, who's a health services director with the Port Gamble Skm tribe from the Squamish tribe. And, and, and she's sorry. And Jolene is a tribal member of the Port Gamble Skm tribe, with the Squamish tribe. We're gonna have the health services director there. His name is, um, Steven Kutz, and he's a member of the Cowlitz Tribe. So he is originally from, you know, southwest Washington.And then we have, um, Drayton Jackson and who's really ex and that's really exciting. He's on our board. We also have Dr, um, Michael Watson. He's with, uh, Virginia Mason, Franciscan Health. And then we have, um, Dr. Um, Taras, oh my gosh. Kirk sells who's, I believe, a public health research researcher. So we have this expanded board, and our board members who are not elected are also being compensated. So we followed off that model because, you know, sometimes it's kind of a wait and see. But that was precedent setting for us. And I think because we are compensating our board members, were non-elected, we have this, I was able to, to, to propose to our leadership, Hey, if we're gonna be doing this health equity collaborative, we need to pay our, you know, our, our folks who are not being paid by their organizations. There's national precedent for this.You're seeing that more national, you know, nationally with governments paying their consultants, right? We pay our d e i consultants, we pay strategic planning consultants. You know, Akua is a huge, um, community consultant and we need to start paying folks like that. But like her, like, you know, um, all the other folks are giving us input. So anyways, so we have this collaborative, we had our first meeting earlier this month, and we're having our, our visioning meeting in January. And Aya, I remember, you know, earlier this year you talked about how as a community we need to have this visioning process. And one piece of feedback I got from the collaborative meeting that we had earlier this month was, well, Jessica, we need to also include Citi and county officials. Cuz the only government officials at that meeting we're public health folks. So in the future, you know, also bringing other governmental folks.So there, there's a, there's a lot going on. Um, and, and I think another thing, and, and I promise I'll, I'll stop is, um, is elevating the concerns of our community within the health district. So, for example, and I really wanna give Maria credit for this because of her passion on working with youth. I, I, you know, I, I, I don't mentor youth. I have my two kiddos, and that's kind of the, the, the extent of, of, of my impact on youth. But, um, you know, it was through conversations with her, you know, meeting you Danielle, and, and hearing about other community meetings, you know, concerned about mental health, especially of our Bipo youth. Um, you know, elevating that to our leadership, letting our leadership know, hey, this is an a concern. And what's exciting is, um, when I mentioned this to our community health director, Yolanda Fox, she's like, well, you know, this other department, you know, our chronic disease prevention team, they may have funds to help with these kind of initiatives.So it's also networking within my own agency and Maria and my agency to see who can help with these, with these issues and figuring out, okay, well how can this also fit? Because the health district is also doing strategic planning, um, starting early next year. We're also participating in Kitsap community resources, um, community needs assessment. Ray and I both have been note takers and, um, contributors to their focus groups, for example. But then also I've been doing some keen form of interviews for Virginia Mason, Franciscan Health, um, community assessment. So we're hearing from community leaders, but then also going to community meetings about their needs. And we're trying to elevate that as well to our, to our leadership. And that's, so there's a lot going on from the health district, I think. Kuya, you're up.Akuyea (00:30:32):Yes. Oh my God. Go Jessica, go run, girl, run you and Maria, this is how we elevate, this is how we transform. This is how we begin to shift the paradigm for the opportunity to be heard. Oh, cross, we are gonna level the playing field for leveling. When I say level, I mean our young people, our parents, our community, our school districts, our, you know, health districts, our government. How do we do this collective work? Especially when you're dealing with historical institutionalized racism that we know is a crisis across the line. I don't care. It's a, not just in the health district, it's in our community, it's in our school, it's in our families, it's in our history. It's in the d n a of this country. So how do we begin to address that and move that where we can begin to reconcile, we know the history is there for us to sit here and, and, and act as if that this has not been a problem in an issue in our nation for hundreds.And it is not just that, it's in our nation, it our, our institutions. Were built on it. We, we, we have these systemic pieces that we have to deal with. That's why it was important when we started Kitsap e rates that we said, we gotta look at our schools, we gotta look at our health districts. We gotta look at our city government. We gotta look at our faith-based organizations, which Danielle, you know, that it exists within all of these institutions. We gotta look at our businesses that say, and I said, you know, when you come in and, and you try to do this type of work, and especially these organizations have in their mission statement that we're undoing racism, or we got, we're gonna be looking at equity, inclusion, diversity, multicultural. And they say that this is all within their mission and they check the box, but there's no accountability.There is no moving these, these issues to a place. If it's not in there, where is their, uh, district improvement plan? If it's not written in there, where is there, where is it in their budget? It's not in there. It, it doesn't exist. It's just they check the box to say they're doing this, but they're not the, the, the, the organization is not being held accountable for what they say is in their goals. Cuz they wrote 'em in their goals. They, they, they, they've got it language in their goals, but then how do you begin to hold them accountable to say they are? And so I was so, I was like, yes, Jessica, because if it's not in the budget, if they're not intentional, if they're not moving equity and inclusion and diversity forward in these institutionalized policy practice and procedures, then it, it really, you know, it doesn't exist.You know, it is that thing that's out there in la la land. So when you file, how do we begin to, to look at that, the training? Where is the training? Because you gotta shift the mindset. You've gotta begin to transform how people are going to step into this work of equity and inclusion. And you gotta give them tools. You gotta be able to say, look, you need training. What is cultural competency training? What is the gear training? What are these trainings that are available? Where is the training from the People's Institute? Where is the training for? Because actually, if you look in our history, we've got a lot of history that have the Freedom schools and all of them, they were doing this work back in the day, but there was a shift back in the day where they stopped when they started killing off the leaders and started, you know, manipulating city governments and working in legislation and all of these things.You know, we, there was a halt during that period, period when they were doing all the civil rights and trying, you'd think of it, all those leaders that they, they really assassinated that was moving race equity and, and inclusion forward. You know, our presidents, our our black leaders, all of those leaders that they were taking out, you know, look at that history, look at what was being done in legislature, what was being done, set in place. So we have to look at the systems that continue to hold these inequities in place so that we can't move forward. And then there was a point in time, you know, during, um, this last couple of years that just really highlighted all the inequities, all the disparities, all of the, the racist, you know, uh, uh, practices and policies that was in place that really hindered us. And we said we needed to look at these things.Um, you know, with the killing of George Floyd and the murders that was going on with the pandemic, the pandemic really set it off because we could see if it was actual, we could see how disconnected and how, how all of these disparities were, were being, you know, manifest showing. They would just, they were just in your face. How you gonna not address stuff that's in your face and then all of the racial, you know, um, one of the things that we started when I think it was even before Pandemic, before George Floyd was all of the, um, things that was being manifested during the, the, uh, during the presidency of, of our wonderful President , we won't say his name, we won't say his name, you know, and that's the thing. We won't say his name, but we know who, who, who that was, that perpetuated a lot of racial tension in our nation and begin to cultivate it, to begin to really nurture all of that unhealthy, you know, behavior and mindset.And, and, and when, when we look at the history and we understand that racism has always been a crisis in our nation. And if we just looked at it and looked at the concerns of racial diverse communities and understand that it, it hasn't, it, it has never been a healthy, uh, history, but when we tuck it away and sweep it under the ground as if it doesn't exist, we do ourself a harm. And then when we look at how education plays a role, when we look at how health plays a role, you know, health and education are interdisciplinaries, and if we not looking at how all of these systems are connected that continue to perpetuate all of these internalized structures that perpetuate these disparities, then I think we're not doing, uh, a good job at being able to undo the institutionalized pieces of, of racism and how we we begin to, to break down those barriers and begin to level the playing field and begin to get services, you know, and begin to get opportunities and the financing.You know, um, racism has played a key in poverty. It's play a key role in health disparities. It's played a key role in education. If you guys think about it, you know, back in the day when they were building all these institutions, you know, um, we weren't a la even allowed to read or write in the sixties when they wanted, you know, when they were talking all about let's integrate these schools and everything, oh, you know, look at the racial tension there was just from us to be able to go to school with one another. And that's not been that long. That's been in our lifetime, it hasn't been hundreds of years ago. Oh, little Rock nine and all of that unrest and all that has not civil rights and all that. That's, that's not been long at all. We've not come that far. And there was a halt to all of that work on undoing all of those institution life pieces. And, and when, and I can say it, when, when those assassinations begin to happen, there was a shift where everybody was pulling back from trying to do that work, but yet it didn't go away. It still needs to be done. So as we move forward, we talk about how do we, how do we begin to look at models and, and the work, the foundation of that work that was laid prior to us, even now, if you go back in, in the sixties, you'll see boy, they had it going on.Those models, those sit-ins and all those things that they were doing to change policy, to change institutional practices. You know, there's no need for us to reinvent the wheel. We've just gotta begin to, to pick up the work and, and start doing the work again. There was a definite fear that came, uh, into our communities and our nations when they begin to kill our leaders for standing for what was right. The murders of Medgar Evers and Martin Luther King, and all of them, you know, you look back at that time, the, those ones that, even the Black Panthers, they exterminated those young people and they, and, and they put 'em in jail.There was two options. You, they were either exterminated or they were incarcerated, but they were definitely gonna dismantle those disruptors that was calling for equity. So, yeah. And, and when you have all kinds of hate mail and hate literature that's being flooded across our nation. Um, and I could tell you, um, back in 2018 when, when we started the Race equity Network, it was because there was hate literature being flooded across Kitsap County. Our churches was being people who are being attacked, racially slurred, and all kinds of things happening in the community. That community members went to our city council and said, what y'all gonna do about this stuff? Y'all see it's all coming up. You mean the government? Y'all gonna do nothing. Not gonna say nothing. What's up? So they decided they were going to, to at least have a race equity advisory council to the city council members that would deal with all these disparities and all these racial incidents that was popping off.But then, you know, they get in there and they wanna be political and tie their hands and say what they can and can't do, and don't even wanna take the training. I mean, by now, that was 2018, here we are going into 2023, our pobo still ain't got one South kit still ain't got one. We still don't got our commission on troop and reconciling. We, it's, it's still being pushed back. The pushback on moving equity, race equity forward, it's still, that's live and well. And for us to understand what we really are up against, you have to transform minds. And one of the things with, you know, with the education system banning books and all of these things, I said, what is that all about? You better know what that's all about. You have to have a greater understanding. Because my, my thinking is, if we don't even wanna be truthful about our history and teach true history and teach our young people in the schools, I said, that's dangerous ground. We're walk, walking on.But that's something that needs to be looked at very carefully because it starts in the educational system. If you're not even gonna teach to it, if you are not even going to give our young people true information, you know, when you're talking about, oh, these books can't be read, I was like, whoa, whoa, whoa. A red flag should be going up for all of us in our communities and all of us in the nation. What is that? Yeah, you better find out what's the, at the root of all of that. So we do have a lot of work to do. Did this, this, I mean, the work is plenties, the laborers are few.And then how do we that are doing the work, how do we come together and work in a collective collaborative way that can help us move these things forward in, in, uh, a healthy way? Many hands make light work. Many of us, you know, yes. My my area of of concentration might be education. Mine might be health, mine might be city government. Mine might be the, the faith community. Mine might be just community members. But what happens when we begin to cultivate unified work to address these issues across those barriers? Because we all have the same goal, but look at how we work in silos. What can we do to break down barriers and really build community between the community of those that are doing the work?You know, do we lay aside our own agendas? Just like Jessica was saying, we just wanna go to li How do we come alongside and support? How do we come alongside and just listen? How do we come in and hear what the community needs are and all of those things. But sometime we gotta set our own egos aside for the greater work because the work is bigger than we are. You know, it took back in the day, when I think about all of those civil rights leaders and, and it, and, and believe you me, the environment was more hostile to make that change back then. You know, you, you had people gunning, people holding people. Come on now the history's there, but yet we wanna erase some of that history and to say, no, this is the only part we wanna teach of that, that history. You know, we talk about our, our native, uh, and our indigenous communities that was here. And understand, and I'll keep saying it, as long as I have breath in my body, I come from a stolen people brought to a stolen land where they exterminated the indigenous tribes that was here to be able to capitalize on their land and everything else. And that history, you know, it's like, oh, we don't wanna talk about that.But when you don't address the atrocities that have happened, it will keep coming up because you never went back and never healed that land. You never healed all of that, uh, trauma and all those things. You know, one of the things that I always look at, I do look at, I do look at what happened over in Germany. That entire nation had to deal with the atrocities that Hitler committed. And it wasn't until they had to deal with their own atrocities that healing began to, to, to move those communities forward in a way where they could, you'll never be able to erase what happened. But they have to be able to heal those family, heal, move towards healing, move towards reconciling those things. But when you just step over all the atrocities you've committed and, and, and say, oh, oh, they ain't this and that ain't that. That is a shipwreck. That's a a, that's a recipe for destruction.And so how do we begin to do the work of healing? Because the health district, and I say this to Jessica and to the health district, y'all are supposed to be in the healing business. I mean, that's what you say. And then I say to the education people, y'all supposed to be in education. What are y'all doing? Health, health and education for some and not for all. And justice. Justice for who? Justice for some are justice for whom. See, we got to get, we, we have to understand that we have to begin to shift the mindsets of those that can't see these things.You know, we have to begin to say, how do we take the scales off of people's eyes so they can see clearly that these are things that we, we definitely have to, to work towards? How do we unstop the ears so that they can hear the voices and hear, um, the things that need to be heard? Because some people, you know, some, and I can say this cause one of my young people said to me, she said, you know, what do you do with people that just wanna fight? They don't, they, they're not trying to heal. They're not trying to, they just wanna fight.I said, so how do you become peacemakers in the fight? How do you, how do we step into that role that we can at least be able to, to speak words that can, um, prick hearts and minds and transform, uh, the communities that we're serving? Because we're all serving, we're all serving our communities in a way, you know? And I, you know, it, it, it's hard when you always gotta walk through dodoo. I don't know. You know, I'm just throwing it out there like that. You know, when you gotta crawl through feces every day, that's, you know, those that are in plumbing and stuff like that. I don't know how they do it, but is it needed? Definitely.So we, we do, we, we, we can look at that. We can do some collective visioning that can help our communities to move forward in a way that can really meet the needs. You know, because I, I always have said our county isn't so large that we can address this issue and that we can do this work and we can do this work. Well, we're not a King County, we're not a Pierce County. We're a Kitsap County. And collectively, we should be able to move things forward in a healthier way. That guess what could be a model, not just for our state, but for the nation. Uh, you know, a little Kitsap County has changed the way that they address inequities. The way that they, with racism, the way that they deal with disparities, the way that they deal with all of these unhealthy things that continue to hinder us all. I don't care what color you are. Hate comes in all colors. Mm-hmm. , white, black, yellow, green, whatever way. But if we can deal with some of those issues, the bitterness and those roots of bitterness, why are our communities so bitter? What's going on that we can't come together and talk about it? If you are mad, I'm, I'm cool with you being mad, but can we talk about it? Can, can we reason together in the multitude of council, there can be some safety. If we come in, in a collective way and deal with it, there can be some safety in that.Danielle (00:54:27):The, uh, I was just, and I see your hand, Jessica, I, I was like thinking so much. And Maria, I know you were there with me of our meeting last week with these families that, you know, they came out almost 50 families, you know, 50 people show up to a meeting Thanksgiving week.Maria (00:54:47):And, and I thought, there's so much hope. And just showing up and, and in the showing up, you know, the meeting was advertised. I saw some for like six 15, some for six 30. I got there at six because my phone rang and someone said, Hey, where are you? I said, well, I'm not there yet. They said, well, hurry up. We're here,Oh, it's like six o'clock. So I pulled up, you know, and I got there and the principal was opening the door. And I had emailed early in the day and I said, well, you know, I don't know who's gonna show up because this thing went out over Instagram. It went out, you know, word of mouth.Danielle (00:55:29):And when people got there, y you know, they, the setup was to share stories and then to work towards solutions. But you could see when the invitation was to work towards solutions, people just stayed quiet. Cuz they were like, no, we have more stories to share. And, and let me tell you, we we had to cut it off at like eight 15. Eight. Yeah. Because people were not done and not everybody got a chance to share there. But I think about those families ended, and Maria, you can speak to this too, like, they were like, when is the next meeting? And we had, you know, one of the main leaders from the Latina community was, was speaking and saying like, Hey, like we have problem, you know, we've had problems with the African American community and we, where are they? Like, we know they're suffering.Like, she didn't say it like that, but basically like, we are not the only people of color here that are experiencing this. So, um, that gave me a lot of hope. The ability to show up and the stories they shared, I think are compounded, like what you say, the history, when you name the history, I'm like, oh crap, we're repeating all of this right now in live time. Like, it's happened yesterday. It happened, probably happened today, probably happened tomorrow. Like, we actually haven't, like slowed it down. It doesn't feel like, but Maria, Jessica, like, feel free to jump in. That's kind of where I was at.Jessica (00:56:59):So Danielle, I guess I wanted to jump in. I guess a couple things, especially, you know, after hearing, you know, Aku talk, you know, one of the things I think government should be doing is, you know, addressing, you know, inequities head on. And, um, some of you might follow, uh, the health district on, on social media. But, um, two weeks ago, um, the health district did a Facebook post recognizing transgender Awareness week. Now, this is the first time the health district has ever done a post like that. And you wouldn't believe, well, actually you would believe the amount of hate that we got. But I have to tell you though, before we declared racism a public health crisis and really got deep into this work, I don't know if we would've ever done a post like that. Um, but you know, it was a conversation between the equity program and our communications program.Our, our communications folks were all on board. They even bumped this, this idea for this post up to our administrator who was supportive of it. He goes, Hey, just make sure that you include our mission statement that, you know, our job is to promote the health of all people in Kitsap County. And, and I was really proud of the agency because I, you know, as government, sometimes we have to be careful about how we speak and sometimes it's hard to be the first. But to be honest, I didn't see any other governmental entity. And you all can check, please check me on this. But I didn't see any other governmental entity make that comment, you know, make that statement that we support our lgbtq plus and our transgender neighbors, loved ones, community members. Um, and so this was a small thing, but this is where, you know, um, you know, there, there are these huge changes that we need to make as a culture, right?And, and, and government structures. But even if it's just the acknowledgement of the suffering of people and the fact that we are, we see them, we honor them, and we're there with them is huge. Um, and, and, you know, and I give kudos to, to, to to you Danielle and, and Aku. Cause I know y'all have been having these community conversations. So having, giving people a space to share their truth and their experiences is huge. And when you can bring government officials there to hear it, because often, and, and I, and I'm speaking broadly, I mean, I I I've been in government for almost 15 years, so I, not an expert, but I've been in it long enough. You know, we tend to like the quantitative data, right? The numbers. And I think as an public health in general, there's been this big movement about, and I'm gonna use my my nerd term, but disaggregating data.So looking at the numbers, but saying, oh, well, let's see, can we break this down? What is our Asian community experiencing? Or Pacific Islander? And that gives some depth to it. But then also realizing that there are sub-communities within this community. And, you know, um, Maria and I were talking about, um, VN Voices of the Pacific Island network. They had an event earlier this year, and they had some data that showed that not all Pacific Islanders have the same educational experiences and this educational outcomes. So on, on the one hand, you know, government, we love numbers. Well, we need to dig deeper into those numbers, right? Break things down and really figure out what our community's experiencing. And sometimes in public health, we're like, oh, if the community's too small, then the analysis might not be enough. Who cares? Just still bring that data up.And that's where you compliment it with the stories, right? The qualitative data. And this is something where I think when you think of governments as white supremacists, right? You know, there's this need for productivity. And you have to, for every media you go to, you have to show what specific outcomes you have. Well, that's also something I'm hoping to change slowly at the, at the agency too. But, um, but also with data and, and the, the importance of storytelling and catching these stories and elevating them. And one of the things that, um, and you know, Kang Marie can talk about this. When we had our first health equity collaborative meeting, I got a question by a community member who was skeptical, right? Because their experience was when they've worked with government, they have gotten roadblock after roadblock after roadblock. And having to be honest and be like, look, here's what I can do as a manager of a program of two people.But at that meeting, we had a, the health officer there, and he is one of our highest officials at the health district. He's like our Spock, um, if you're a Star Trek nerd, but, um, which Memorial Star Wars. But, um, you know, our chief science officer was there. My supervisor who was a director was there. So, I mean, one thing I'm also hoping with, with these collaborative meetings, if, if they're meeting community meetings, also just throw that out there where you think having the health district be present is important and you want somebody with a director or administrator in their title. That's also something that, um, you know, I can also, I can also help facilitate. But something also, Danielle or maybe actually, um, Kayleigh, to your point, you know, we talk about this work, but how do we support each other? So we support each other in terms of, um, you know, bring cross-disciplinary, but then also really elevating the fact that we need that self-care and that connection and the fact that this is such heavy work.Um, you know, Maria and I have mentioned, we, we, we've helped with some of these, uh, focus groups for the kids at community resources. The stories are, are just heartbreaking. Um, and whether it's our youth and how they experience bullying, our elders who are experiencing lack of care, you know, lack of resources, and they just need some additional help. And you don't have that necessarily multi-generational household like you did before. So they don't have the supports that they had in the past. There's so much going on. But I think also all of us doing this kind of work, taking care of each other as well, and then also letting people know it's, it's okay to not be okay. Um, so anyway, I just, I just wanted to throw that out there too.Maria (01:02:33):So I've been pondering Akuyea, uh, question towards the end and she said, how do we do this work? How do we, um, collaborate and, um, bring about solutions? And something that, uh, Jessica mentioned fairly early on when she spoke, she said, the importance of letting go of ego, right? Leaving our ego at the door and, uh, working collaborative with one each other o one another as we do this work. And then the second thing is listening. And that's the one thing I've really learned as, um, uh, community engagement specialists, uh, working with Jessica, is that when I bring concerns to her or other community members, bring concerns to her, she listens, and then she acts, she does, whether it's something that, it's a long-term thing that will take a while to address or something that we can address quickly. Uh, she keeps this wonderful worksheets and she keeps track of where she's at on different projects. And so I think being able to be transparent, because since she shares that information, she shared some of that information at the health equity, um, collaborative meeting that we had. Um, I think that's how we build trust with our community members, that when they come, uh, to our organization, that we will not just listen, but we will act now. It might not be immediate, but we will be taken action. Um, and so, um, that's something that I've learned just in my one month at the public health district with Jessica.Jump in. Thank you, Jessica. Thank you for that. One of the things that, you know, I was talking with one of my, um, equity sisters, Carrie Augusta, and as we were reading through the newspaper and stuff, you know, she said, you know, we need to be looking at patterns of oppression. Are we doing that in a collective way? Just looking at the patterns, those patterns keep manifesting. It doesn't matter if it's manifesting with the African American community, the Hispanic community, the Pacific Islander community, whatever community is, are we looking, are we looking at those patterns of oppression? That's key for us to move forward as we do the work. Because in order for us to address, uh, and undo some of these things, we gotta identify 'em. We've gotta take time to sit down and identify these patterns that keep, you know, go. You know, that just like when we were, were dealing with, you know, with, uh, the racism on Bainbridge Island, you know, uh, it manifests itself back in the nineties and then again in the two early 2000. But I said, look at the, they go on ground for a little while and then they come back out.But look at the patterns of how they begin to, to do that work, uh, of, of, um, you know, racism. Look at the pattern of it. Look at how it shows up. Look at how it, it manifests itself in our institutions, in our workplaces, you know, in those areas that we are in on a daily basis. Don't matter in the schools. Look, they've been dealing with racism in the schools forever. Ever since Little Rock nine, they've been dealing with racism in the schools. And that was because why? Because racism was alive and well, and LA racism is still alive and well. So how do we begin to move these things and begin to address these things in a way that's gonna shift the policy and procedures? It should not be allowed in the institutional, shouldn't be allowed in the schools, shouldn't be allowed in our city governments, if you're serving all of us, if you are serving every one of those students, why are we dealing with what's happening at North Kitsap School District? And, and there's some questions I think that we need to be asking to administration and to those superintendents and to those staff members, because they're the ones that hold those practices in place, whether they're just or unjust. Who are the gatekeepers?Yeah. You gotta see who's gatekeeping and who's gatekeeping what, and, and really doing the, that type of visioning to be able to address these disparities or, or address the racism or address all of these inequities. Because if you got a principal that's gate keeping it, why do you think it keeps coming up?Danielle (01:08:20):Because it's us who hold these things in, in place. Human beings hold these practices in place. None of us get away. All of us are accountable. Mm-hmm. , it's, it's not just, that's when that one, that one, no, it's us. It's all of us who hold these practices and these policies in place. It's whether you will or whether you won't.So tho those are the things I think when we can get down to those foundational principles on how to address, and really, are we asking the right questions? Because they'll have us running off on a, a wild goose chase on something that, that , I'm just saying that don't even that, that is totally gonna miss the mark. You know, because if we, if we just keep pruning this thing, pruning it, pruning it, and never getting down to the root of it, we ain't plucking up nothing. We, we, we, all we doing is making it flourish and thrive. Because why do we prune? We prune things so it can come back healthier and stronger. I'm just, I'm just using these parables so we can see what we doing. Are we just pruning this thing? Are we getting to the root of it so we can pluck it up? Because if we're not, I think we're missing, we need to go back and revision and revisit and re-question and ask those. What's the, because you all know what's the root causeWhat's the root cause to the disparities that's happening, Jessica, in your departments or at the health district? What's the root cause when you are up in these schools and these things keep on, um, coming up and manifesting? What's the root causeDanielle (01:10:43):Go back. Do, do that questioning, just ponder. Just look at it. But let's, let's get our chart out. Let's see what's happening, and then, then we can have a real good conversation about next steps and how we can move forward and what we gonna do.Danielle (01:11:07):Kaylee, I saw your hand raised. Um, and, and I just wanted to say, like briefly after that meeting, I had a post up on Instagram, uh, highlighting the article, and I had over 400 likes, but 300 of them were from local students. And I had over a hundred private messages to me, and I screenshot them. And, and it wasn't just Latino students, it was black students, it was white students, it was, you know, L G B T Q community. Like they're ba I, what I understood from that is like, come on, get to work. Like, and I've, I've sent the screenshots, you know, to Maria and a few to Kali and some toku, you know, um, because they're important. The messages they give were important. Um, but yeah. Kaylee, jump in.Kalie (01:12:00):Yeah, I just, I mean, I love the questions that are being asked and Aku, some of your metaphors are like so amazingly helpful. Um, the pruning, uh, like I, yes, like I, I think that that is part of it is not getting to the root. And I think one of the things that Danielle and I have been trying to work on in our groups is also what you mentioned Maria, is like, we have to be able to listen to each other. And I think like from a mental health standpoint and the impact of racism, like there is so much shame, so people cannot listen. I mean, especially speaking from a white person, my own racism, having to work through that and, and then when I, like me as a white person in these conversations, right? So many people cannot hear like, we're never getting down to that.And like that is part of what I think we're trying to address in those small group settings is like, how to teach people to dig down deep and actually, like, what is happening in your body in these conversations. And I think, like, I feel like this like top like both and like the accountability you're talking about a kue, like, has to be, because some people will never, ever be able to get to what is deep down and actually deal with it. And if there isn't accountability, I don't, we're not, we're not gonna cut any of that rot out . But I think like, yeah, like trying to continue to figure out how to get down to that root and deal with people's shame and the fear that like racism has taught you so that you can actually listen so that we can actually collaborate. Um, and I mean, I obviously am speaking to my white, uh, community members that it's like, that is our work as white people that we have to work down to, like what prevents us from listening and hearing and changing and holding other white people accountable. Um, so that's where that was taking me.Jessica (01:14:07):So Kue, you asked about, you know, the root cause of inequities. And I don't necessarily have the answer, but I wanna to share. Um, I, I've seen a growing conversation, um, kinda in public health circles about power as a social determinant of health. So when public health people use the term social determinants of health, they're looking at what social factors affect health. Um, there are different models out there, but most public health experts agree that more affects health besides what you eat and how much you exercise. It's the social and cultural factors. It's, it's, it's, um, the economy, it's your built environment like, you know, access to sidewalks, parks and things like that, racism, discrimination, so many things impact health. And what i, I appreciate about power as a factor in health is because that's where you see governments needing to stop holding onto power so much, right?And so there are some, um, agencies that are starting to dismantle that a bit. So I, I wanna elevate, for example, um, our, our colleagues in, so our public health colleagues in Tacoma Pierce County. So they have a budgeting process where they allow the community to help them set budget priorities. We're not there yet as a health district, I hope someday to actually advocate for that as well. But it's looking at how do we share power with our community and how do we also foster community building as well? So like, in, and, and you know, you'll probably know the Square than I do, but just as, as, as an observer, I've noticed like an increase in the number of nonprofits and people wanting to do really amazing work. Um, you know, um, helping other people. But there's that lack of capacity. Oh, you know, people might start nonprofit, but they might not have all the training that they need.Um, so as, as a community looking at power and how do we shift that and doing a power analysis, and I, I think you've talked to me about this, you know, really looking at who holds power in Kitsap County and how do we work together to, to to share that power. Um, so, so there, there, there's that piece. But then also, um, you know, Kuya talked about training, right? And so for me, a lo

Stemming the Tide
36 French Canadian Goodbye

Stemming the Tide

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 81:32


A feverish return to town is followed by a wee bit of local drama, research into the mysterious of Gauntlight, and some much needed R&R. UnchartedNorth.ca Patreon Instagram Facebook Twitter Abomination Vaults by Paizo Inc Music by Will Savino Maps by Narchy Artwork by GrayHood "Stemming the Tide" uses trademarks and/or copyrights owned by Paizo Inc., used under Paizo's Community Use Policy (paizo.com/communityuse). We are expressly prohibited from charging you to use or access this content. "Stemming the Tide" is not published, endorsed, or specifically approved by Paizo. For more information about Paizo Inc. and Paizo products, visit paizo.com.

The Vancouver Life Real Estate Podcast
Housing vs Population Growth - Who Will Win?

The Vancouver Life Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 25:22


This weeks podcast has us exploring the new rate hike thanks to the BoC's continued quantitative easing. While it's been difficult for many seeing rates up 400 basis points in 9 months - that's an eye watering 1,600% since the start of the rate hike cycle - and it has all but erased the credibility of the Bank of Canada who waited until inflation was at 6.7% before acting and indicated rates would be low until 2023. We explore the new debt levels faced by Canadians who have a whopping debt to GDP ratio of 117% or $75,000 per capita. These are the kinds of debt levels that will take a generation to pay off. As we look for solutions the only apparent saviour is immigration. Immigration has exploded this year as we hit 700,000 new immigrants in 2022 and 23% Canada's population (or 8.3 million people) were either permanent residents or immigrants before becoming citizens. Furthermore, immigrants now account for most of Canada's labour force and by 2032 most of Canada's increasing population base will be entirely new immigrants. As we close out 2022 and look towards more aggressive immigration targets in the years ahead, places like Quebec are reducing the amount of new immigrants (they will only take 10% as they intend to preserve their French Canadian heritage). This will eventually put more and more housing pressure on other metro's like Toronto & Vancouver in the years to come.Comparison as they say is the thief of joy - unless you're a Vancouverite comparing the housing market to our fellow Torontonians. Inventory levels are up 160% in some Toronto suburbs and while 2021 saw 12,000 pre-sale units sell, 2022 will end the year with about 3,000 pre-sales sold!! That's a jaw dropping fall off in sales volume. Furthermore prices have fallen beyond 20% in Toronto while Vancouver sits around 12-13% and inventory remains incredibly tight. For two major metros that often move in unison, we are starting to see the divergence of the marketplaces with Vancouver showing off its resilience in a difficult market. _________________________________ Contact Us To Book Your Private Consultation:

Vice and Easy
S02 E15: One Way Ticket

Vice and Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 46:32


This week on Miami Vice: A District Attorney is killed at a wedding in front of Crockett and Tubbs as he is working with the DEA on busting a group of French-Canadian gangsters. Crockett's old adversary, a sleazy defense lawyer working for these French-Canadian criminals struggles with his ethics and conscience as things heat up. Come for the action, stay for the unbuttoned silk shirts and smoking! Other topics include: class differences in law enforcement, the world being unfair, cheesy lawyer jokes, some horrific bridesmaid dresses, divorce, the red flags of lawyers owning private jets and more! Guest stars: Lothaire Bluteau and John Heard. Show Notes Gallery S2E15 (https://imgur.com/gallery/YQDOeJc) For more Vice and Easy Tiktok: @viceandeasypodcast Instagram: @viceandeasypodcast (https://www.instagram.com/viceandeasypodcast/?hl=en) YouTube: Vice and Easy Podcast (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm2ci7Vb75Tgf1uGMOjfvNQ)

Bro Nouveau Podcast
Chasing a Career in Music and Navigating Life Transitions with Philip Paolino

Bro Nouveau Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 61:38


082- Philip Paolino is a Canadian sales professional and former professional musician. After meeting at a corporate sales training in 2018, Phil and Thomas stuck up a friendship. In this conversation, they discuss Phil's background growing up Italian and French Canadian in Montréal, his years as fronting a rock band, and how his life has changed since becoming a father.Timestamps: 1:00 - Quebec 11:00 - Phi's career as a musician 25:00 - Leveraging music in a sales career 34:00 - Developing Open Mindedness 41:00 - Songwriting 49:00 - Seeking Authenticity 55:30 - Conversation Game Phil's Question: Do you like your job, why or why not? Thomas' Question: What is your favorite family tradition? Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Last Seen
Chinese pie

Last Seen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 32:20


Mashed potatoes, corn and ground beef. These aren't the ingredients for shepherd's pie, but for Chinese pie, a traditional and very famous French Canadian dish. WBUR producer Amanda Beland, grew up eating Chinese pie, or pâté chinois, with her French Canadian family. But the pie's origins have always been a culinary mystery. In this episode of Last Seen, Amanda talks to historians and culinary experts to reveal where pâté chinois comes from, and how it might have gotten that name. Tell us what you think of Last Seen! Please fill out our short survey.

Music Life
Creating music is selfish with George Fitzgerald, SOAK, Marie Davidson, Mount Kimbie's Kai Campos and TOKiMONSTA

Music Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 34:53


George Fitzgerald, SOAK, Marie Davidson, Mount Kimbie's Kai Campos and TOKiMONSTA discuss how they make their music matter in today's transient world, whether an artist's work has to have a clear narrative, having to live with music that you're not 100% happy with, and accidentally writing knock-offs of your favourite artists. George FitzGerald is one of the most popular electronic producers and DJs in the UK right now. He was raised on garage and dubstep in his early years, before moving to Berlin to work as a translator and falling in love with the city's house and techno scenes. French-Canadian producer Marie Davidson's hypnotic style combines analog synthesizers and drum machines with “spoken text” vocals, leading to a prolific career both as a solo artist and member of creative trio L'Œil Nu. SOAK is a thought provoking singer-songwriter from Northern Ireland. Her effortless intimacy and moving lyrics have marked her as a voice for her generation, writing honest and introspective tracks that are mature beyond her years. After expanding the horizons of the dubstep scene in the late 2000s, Mount Kimbie's Kai Campos has gained a reputation for being an innovative producer, lending his skills to the likes of James Blake, King Krule and slowthai. TOKiMONSTA is a producer, DJ and prominent member of LA's underground dance music scene. She creates a futuristic style of electronic music that touches pop and instrumental hip-hop, and is also the boss of the Young Art label.

I Am Attorney Jessica
EP23: The Human Rights of Giving Thanks

I Am Attorney Jessica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 86:12


Released on Thanksgiving Day, this episode honors the rights and memories of Native Americans of the United States, Canada and South America.  Jessica and Guillame McMartin discuss the significance of the holiday, the history of Native peoples in the Americas and other related topics.  In 2021, the New York Times reported that thousands of Native children vanished in Canada. Guillaume reveals more of the history of this human rights abuse and that the children were taken forcibly from in many cases loving homes and raised as white Canadians.  Many of these children were abused in various ways and some murdered.  There were similar residential school abuses of Native American children in the United States including many deaths.  In this episode we discuss: Guillaume's background as a French Canadian with some Scottish heritage who felt a calling to help Native American people and later learned he had Native roots on his father's side of the family; Guillaume's depression after living a life as a firefighter in an environment that involved bullying; What Jessica was taught in school about the history of Thanksgiving; The residential school system and the murdered children in the United States and Canada; What Guillaume learned from talking to native  peoples; Guillaume's journey about being closer to nature and some of his roots;Guillaume's efforts to assist native Canadian communities in economic development and how he got in wrong in his view the first time around; Guillaume's work in real estate development in New York and why he left that life; Negative portrayals of native peoples in media; Guillaume's book and his message to the world; Guillaume's plan to go on a journey of exploration on horseback to visit native communities from Canada to Guatemala; The attempts by US and Canadian governments to remedy past abuses; How the near extermination of native populations amounts to a crime against humanity and genocide under the International Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide which did not come into legal force until later after the Holocaust; Jessica's experience of being trolled online by pro Turkish government genocide deniers trying to usurp the cause of Native Americans for their own political ends; The influence on Guillame of the book "Live In the City of Dirty Water" by Clayton Thomas-Muller a native Cree man who led the charge for environmental justice against big oil intesrests (see link below to the book); The elements of forced assimilation and forced marriage imposed upon native peoples in North America: How non-native peoples and white Americans and Canadians can remedy the harm of the past and try to forge a new path forward. BIOGRAPHIES JESSICA SMITH BOBADILLA (HOST)  Jessica Smith Bobadilla ("Attorney Jessica") is an immigration and human rights lawyer, media commentator and former law professor.  She can be reached at iamattorneyjessicapodcast@gmail.com or I Am Attorney Jessica on Facebook or Instagram GUILLAUME McMARTIN (GUEST) Guillaume McMartin is an author, speaker and visionary CEO.  Guillaume has made it part of his life path to uncover abuses and bring to light the abuses against native Canadians and other native North Americans. Guillaume has authored a book:  The Messenger:  The Untold Journey available on Amazon. CONVENTION ON THE PREVENTION AND PUNISHMENT OF THE CRIME OF GENOCIDE (1948)  Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 9 December 1948 The Contracting Parties, Having considered the declaration made by the General Assembly of the United Nations in its resolution 96 (I) dated 11 December 1946 that genocide is a crime under international law, contrary to the spirit and aims of the United Nations and condemned by the civilized world; Recognizing that at all periods of history genocide has inflicted great losses on humanity; and Being convinced that, in order to liberate mankind from such an odious scourge, international co-operation is required, Hereby agree as hereinafter provided: Article I The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish. Article II In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religions group, as such: (a)Killing members of the group; (b)Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; (c)Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; (d)Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; (e)Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. Article III The following acts shall be punishable: (a)Genocide; (b)Conspiracy to commit genocide; (c)Direct and public incitement to commit genocide; (d)Attempt to commit genocide; (e)Complicity in genocide. Article IV Persons committing genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III shall be punished, whether they are constitutionally responsible rulers, public officials or private individuals. Article V The Contracting Parties undertake to enact, in accordance with their respective Constitutions, the necessary legislation to give effect to the provisions of the present Convention and, in particular, to provide effective penalties for persons guilty of genocide or of any of the other acts enumerated in article III. Article VI Persons charged with genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III shall be tried by a competent tribunal of the State in the territory of which the act was committed, or by such international penal tribunal as may have jurisdiction with respect to those Contracting Parties which shall have accepted its jurisdiction. Article VII Genocide and the other acts enumerated in article III shall not be considered as political crimes for the purpose of extradition. The Contracting Parties pledge themselves in such cases to grant extradition in accordance with their laws and treaties in force. Article VIII Any Contracting Party may call upon the competent organs of the United Nations to take such action under the Charter of the United Nations as they consider appropriate for the prevention and suppression of acts of genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III. Article IX Disputes between the Contracting Parties relating to the interpretation, application or fulfilment of the present Convention, including those relating to the responsibility of a State for genocide or for any of the other acts enumerated in article III, shall be submitted to the International Court of Justice at the request of any of the parties to the dispute. Article X The present Convention, of which the Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish texts are equally authentic, shall bear the date of 9 December 1948. Article XI The present Convention shall be open until 31 December 1949 for signature on behalf of any Member of the United Nations and of any non-member State to which an invitation to sign bas been addressed by the General Assembly. The present Convention shall be ratified, and the instruments of ratification shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. After 1 January 1950 the present Convention may be acceded to on behalf of any Member of the United Nations and of any non-member State which bas received an invitation as aforesaid. Instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Article XII Any Contracting Party may at any time, by notification addressed to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, extend the application of the present Convention to all or any of the territories for the conduct of whose foreign relations that Contracting Party is responsible. Article XIII On the day when the first twenty instruments of ratification or accession have been deposited, the Secretary-General shall draw up a proces-verbal and transmit a copy thereof to each Member of the United Nations and to each of the non-member States contemplated in article XI. The present Convention shall come into force on the ninetieth day following the date of deposit of the twentieth instrument of ratification or accession. Any ratification or accession effected subsequent to the latter date shall become effective on the ninetieth day following the deposit of the instrument of ratification or accession. Article XIV The present Convention shall remain in effect for a period of ten years as from the date of its coming into force. It shall thereafter remain in force for successive periods of five years for such Contracting Parties as have not denounced it at least six months before the expiration of the current period. Denunciation shall be effected by a written notification addressed to the Secretary-General of the United Nations. Article XV If, as a result of denunciations, the number of Parties to the present Convention should become less than sixteen, the Convention shall cease to be in force as from the date on which the last of these denunciations shall become effective. Article XVI A request for the revision of the present Convention may be made at any time by any Contracting Party by means of a notification in writing addressed to the Secretary-General. The General Assembly shall decide upon the steps, if any, to be taken in respect of such request. Article XVII The Secretary-General of the United Nations shall notify all Members of the United Nations and the non-member States contemplated in article XI of the following: (a)Signatures, ratifications and accessions received in accordance with article XI; (b)Notifications received in accordance with article XII; (c)The date upon which the present Convention comes into force in accordance with article XIII; (d)Denunciations received in accordance with article XIV; (e)The abrogation of the Convention in accordance with article XV; (f)Notifications received in accordance with article XVI. Article XVIII The original of the present Convention shall be deposited in the archives of the United Nations. A certified copy of the Convention shall be transmitted to each Member of the United Nations and to each of the non-member States contemplated in article XI. Article XIX The present Convention shall be registered by the Secretary-General of the United Nations on the date of its coming into force. THE MESSENGER:  THE UNTOLD JOURNEY BY GUILLAUME MCMARTIN AT AMAZON.COM https://www.amazon.co.uk/Messenger-Untold-Journey-Guillaume-McMartin-ebook/dp/B0BJ9H5KFZ#:~:text=The%20Messenger%3A%20The,land%20in%20Northern LIFE IN THE CITY OF DIRTY WATER BY CLAYTON THOMAS-MULLER   Available on Amazon.com and other places https://www.bing.com/ck/a?!&&p=f5051042f837add0JmltdHM9MTY2OTA3NTIwMCZpZ3VpZD0wOGQxZmRjYS1kZmVjLTY4OTEtMTFlNS1lY2QwZGU2NDY5ZjcmaW5zaWQ9NTE5Ng&ptn=3&hsh=3&fclid=08d1fdca-dfec-6891-11e5-ecd0de6469f7&psq=THE+CITY+OF+DIRTY+WATER&u=a1aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZHJlYWRzLmNvbS9ib29rL3Nob3cvNDQ4MjQ3MTgtbGlmZS1pbi10aGUtY2l0eS1vZi1kaXJ0eS13YXRlcg&ntb=1

Page One Podcast
Ep. 20: Kate Manning: Gilded Mountain

Page One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 47:41


Page One, produced and hosted by author Holly Lynn Payne, celebrates the craft that goes into writing the first sentence, first paragraph and first page of your favorite books. The first page is often the most rewritten page of any book because it has to work so hard to do so much—hook the reader. We interview master storytellers on the struggles and stories behind the first page of their books.About the guest author:Kate Manning's most recent novel, GILDED MOUNTAIN, was named an Indie Book Pick for November 2022. Manning is also the author of the critically acclaimed novels My Notorious Life and Whitegirl. A former documentary television producer and winner of two Emmy Awards, she has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times Book Review, Time, Glamour, and The Guardian, among other publications. She has taught creative writing at Bard High School Early College in Manhattan, and lives with her family in New York City.About the host:Holly Lynn Payne is an award-winning novelist and writing coach, and the former CEO and founder of Booxby, a startup built to help authors succeed. She is an internationally published author of four historical fiction novels. Her debut, The Virgin's Knot, was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers book. She recently finished her first YA crossover novel inspired by her nephew with Down syndrome. She lives in Marin County with her daughter and enjoys mountain biking, surfing and hiking with her dog. To learn more about her books and private writing coaching services, please visit hollylynnpayne.com or find her at Instagram and Twitter @hollylynnpayne.If you have a first page you'd like to submit to the Page One Podcast, please do so here.As an author and writing coach, I know that the first page of any book has to work so hard to do so much—hook the reader. So I thought to ask your favorite master storytellers how they do their magic to hook YOU. After the first few episodes, it occurred to me that maybe someone listening might be curious how their first page sits with an audience, so I'm opening up Page One to any writer who wants to submit the first page of a book they're currently writing. If your page is chosen, you'll be invited onto the show to read it and get live feedback from one of Page One's master storytellers. Page One exists to inspire, celebrate and promote the work of both well-known and unknown creative talent.  You can listen to Page One on Apple podcasts, Spotify, Pandora, Stitcher and all your favorite podcast players. Hear past episodes.To get updates and writing tips from master storytellers, follow me onFacebook, Twitter, Goodreads, and Instagram.Until then, be well and keep reading!

Classical Post
Rediscovering Mozart: How Soprano Marie-Eve Munger Is Creating a Fuller Picture of the Composer on Her New Album, Maestrino Mozart

Classical Post

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 25:45


In early 2012, the coloratura soprano Marie-Eve Munger received an offer every opera singer dreams of — a lead role in a Mozart opera. But there was a catch. It wasn't a role in Don Giovanni, or The Marriage of Figaro, or any of the popular Mozart operas performed every season across the globe. The opera was Il sogno di Scipione, which Mozart wrote when he was just 16 years old. Munger had never heard of the opera before, but learning and performing it that year piqued her curiosity. How could Mozart write a compelling theatrical work like this at such a young age? And why was no one performing this music? Now, a decade later, that interest in exploring Mozart's early operas has blossomed into a new album from the French-Canadian soprano, Maestrino Mozart — a program of rarely heard arias Mozart composed between the ages of 10 and 16, which Munger performs with Les Boréades de Montréal under the baton of Philippe Bourque. "What I discovered in Il sogno di Scipione were incredible moments of musical depth and dramatic sense, an incredible mastery of the bel canto," Munger says on the latest episode of the Classical Post podcast. "Even at that early age, he was able to really capture the essence of what it is to be human." Over the course of the 12 arias featured on Maestrino Mozart, Munger shows us how the popular assumption that Mozart's earliest works are too simple or juvenile is just not the case. In these teenage works, one can clearly hear the maturity the composer would develop over the next 20 years. "[This music] sheds an interesting light on his later works as well. You can hear the seeds of Giovanni. You can hear the seeds of the Queen of the Night and Pamina. All of that is really in there already, and you can hear it. It's a very interesting way to rediscover a composer we think we know." In this discussion, we talk more about the new album and the parallels Munger sees between performing classical music and gastronomy. Plus, she shares how her yoga practice helps her cultivate her voice, the iPad app that's transformed her life as a traveling musician, and her pick for the best burger joint in New York City. Listen to Maestrino Mozart on Spotify, Apple Music, or wherever you download or stream music. Classical Post uncovers the creativity behind exceptional music. Dive into meaningful conversations with leading artists in the world today. Based in New York City, Classical Post is a touchpoint for tastemakers. Visit our website for exclusive editorial and subscribe to our monthly newsletter to be notified of new content. Follow us on Instagram and TikTok. Classical Post is an ambassador for NED, a wellness company. Get 15% off their products like CBD oil and many other health-based products by using our code CLASSICALPOST at checkout.