Podcasts about Mental health first aid

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Best podcasts about Mental health first aid

Latest podcast episodes about Mental health first aid

Power Couples Rock Podcast
Beate Chelette - Turning Adversity Into Authority: EP 056

Power Couples Rock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 58:06


In this episode, Beate Chelette, the Growth Architect and Founder of The Women's Code shares her expertise in providing visionaries and leaders with strategies for growing their authority and scaling their impact in business. She works with clients including Amazon, Reckitt, Chevron, Merck, Johnson & Johnson, the Women's Legislative Caucus of California, Cal State University Dominguez Hills, Shelter Inc., Mental Health First Aid, and thousands of small businesses. She is recognized in PeopleHum's "Top 100 Global Thought Leaders" and HuffPost's “One of 50 Must-Follow Women Entrepreneurs" lists.Beate Chelette is also the author of the #1 International Award-Winning Amazon Bestseller “Happy Woman Happy World – How to Go from Overwhelmed to Awesome”–a book that corporate trainer and best-selling author Brian Tracy calls “a handbook for every woman who wants health, success and a fulfilling career.”Beate Chelette is a first-generation immigrant who bootstrapped her passion for photography into a successful global business and sold it to Bill Gates for a multimillion-dollar deal, despite facing $135,000 in debt as a single parent.

The Deep Wealth Podcast - Extracting Your Business And Personal Deep Wealth
Beate Chelette On How To Create A Winning Mindset That Unlocks Success (#194)

The Deep Wealth Podcast - Extracting Your Business And Personal Deep Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 45:20 Transcription Available


“Just because the existing system doesn't work for you doesn't mean that there is no system that does.” - Beate CheletteBeate Chelette is the Growth Architect and Founder of The Women's Code and provides visionaries and leaders with strategies that grow your authority so that they can scale their impact.A first-generation immigrant who found herself $135,000 in debt as a single parent, Beate bootstrapped her passion for photography into a highly successful global business and eventually sold it to Bill Gates in a multimillion-dollar deal. She is amongst the “Top 100 Global Thought Leaders” by PeopleHum and “One of 50 Must-Follow Women Entrepreneurs” by HuffPost.Recent clients include Amazon, Reckitt (the maker of Lysol), Chevron, Merck, Johnson & Johnson, the Women's Legislative Caucus of California Cal State University Dominguez Hills, Shelter Inc., Mental Health First Aid and thousands of small businesses.Beate is the author of the #1 International Award-Winning Amazon Bestseller “Happy Woman Happy World – How to Go from Overwhelmed to Awesome”–a book that corporate trainer and best-selling author Brian Tracy calls “a handbook for every woman who wants health, success and a fulfilling career.”Click here to subscribe to The Sell My Business Podcast to save time and effort.SELECTED LINKS FOR THIS EPISODEbc@beatechelette.comBeate Chelettehttps://twitter.com/BeateChelette/Beate Chelette (@beatechelette) • Instagram photos and videosGrowth Architect - Home | FacebookGrowth Architect - YouTubeBeate Chelette - Growth ArchitectBusiness Growth Architect Show Podcast on Amazon MusicCockroach Startups: What You Need To Know To Succeed And ProsperFREE Deep Wealth eBook on Why You Suck At Selling Your Business And What You Can Do About It (Today)Book Your FREE Deep Wealth Strategy CallContact Deep Wealth: Tweet @JeffreyFeldberg LinkedIn Instagram Subscribe to The Deep Wealth Podcast Email podcast@deepwealth.com Help us pay it forward by leaving a review.Here's to you and your success!As always, please stay healthy and safe.

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson
Climb - the Documentary; Human Trafficking; Mental Health First Aid; Goodwill and the Job Market

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 38:10


During the holidays, we're all looking for that feeling of hope and inspiration. Enter Climb - a heartwarming documentary about a triathlete's inspirational journey back from a near-death accident. Neil Myers is an amateur triathlete – sometimes competing in individual triathlons (where he completes all three - swim, bike and running portions), and sometimes as part of a relay team as their cyclist. Four years ago, at the age of 61, Neil and his relay team had just won the biggest race of their life, the NYC Triathlon. Four weeks later - he was fighting for his life in the Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital ICU. Neil joins Michelle to share his story and his new documentary.Human trafficking is a serious and complex problem that affects millions across the globe, including right here in the United States. For over a decade, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Blue Campaign has been committed to increasing awareness on the issue to combat and ultimately end human trafficking. Brandi Bynum, DHS Blue Campaign Program Manager, talks about the prevalence of human trafficking in the U.S. and how to recognize and report suspected trafficking.

We Got Problems
Mental Health Is Health Get a NeckUp CheckUp with Joronda Montaño 

We Got Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023


For over 19 years, Joronda Montaño has been a strong public health and prevention leader. She co-founded NeckUp CheckUp, an organization that provides mental health checkups to help keep youth and families healthy. Joronda is credited with contributions to the development of innovative prevention programs at non-profit organizations in Phoenix and Mesa, Arizona as well as directly training thousands of youth and adults to maintain positive mental health outcomes. Joronda has been honored as a Tempe Champion for Youth, an annual award given to an adult who displays an outstanding commitment to reducing youth substance misuse. Her international experience spans 13 different countries on five different continents. Working in poverty reduction, microfinance, permanent agriculture, disaster relief, farming, and equity in education. She finds ease in implementing her strategic planning knowledge to tackle any community challenge. Joronda worked with NGO's, international businesses, and small village councils, addressing pressing environmental challenges for both large and small groups. Joronda holds both a Bachelor's and Master's degree from Arizona State University is skilled in preventing substance misuse, suicide, violence, negative self-image, risky digital behavior, and bullying. She is a trainer for Applied Suicide Intervention Skills and Mental Health First Aid. Fun fact, Joronda was also a nationally ranked high school track and field athlete before becoming an All-American Collegiate athlete at Arizona State University. She currently coaches' youth and lives in Phoenix with her husband and four kids.   To connect with Joronda, use the links below:   IG:https://www.instagram.com/jorondamontano/ Website: www.jorondamontano.com   For more information, visit the website or send an email.   email: wegotproblemspodcast@gmail.com Web: https://www.wegotproblemspodcast.com Networking Group Join We Got Problems After Dark   Our Websites https://wegotproblemspodcast.com https://curtisgmartin.com https://rhondawritesofficial.com https://thetrashvegan.com   Follow us on Social Media:  @curtismartin247  Curtis G Martin @therhondalbrown  Rhonda L Brown @the_trash_vegan_ Caliph Johnson Sr #curtisgmartin  #rhondalbrown  #caliphjohnsonsr #wegotproblemsafterdark #wegotproblemspodcast #therhondalbrown #the_trash_vegan_ #curtismartin247 #wegotproblems #wegotsolutions #CurtisGmartin #RhondaLBrown #CaliphJohnsonSr #ghettowaze #johnniedominoe #politics #vote

Mike‘s Search For Meaning
#53 - Matthew Helt on Mindfulness, Introversion in Entrepreneurship, & Mental Health First Aid

Mike‘s Search For Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 106:32


Matthew Helt is a growth and development coach for startup founders and CEOs under his coaching practice, Prairiesattva, based in Omaha, NE. Prior to starting his business in 2020, Matthew spent a little over 6 years with Techstars as the Global Director of Startup Week, a week-long event to catalyze and celebrate startup communities, and then joined the Ecosystem Development team where he served as the Senior Implementation Consultant, working with cities around the world to help them grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems. As a former startup founder, he's intimately aware of the stress and anxiety that comes with business ownership. It's for this reason that he created his coaching practice to help entrepreneurs navigate the highs and lows of business ownership, and ultimately come home to themselves to fully understand who they are as human beings. Additionally, I'll be donating to and raising awareness for the charity or organization of my guest's choice with each episode now. This episode, the organization is called Mental Health First Aid. Any and all donations make a difference! You can connect with Matthew on: Website Instagram LinkedIn Twitter   To connect with me: Interested in working with me as your coach? Book a complimentary 15 minute call here. LinkedIn Instagram Website Subscribe to my weekly newsletter YouTube Please leave a review for this podcast on Apple Podcasts!   Resources/People Mentioned: Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind - Shunryu Suzuki The Coaching Habit - Michael Bungay Stanier The Joy of Living - Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche The Body Keeps the Score - Bessel van der Kolk M.D. Ravi Rothenberg Jerry Colona Ram Dass Prairiesattva  

Ask a Christian Counselor: Christian Counseling | Biblical Counseling | Marriage and Family | Mental Health | Christianity

The next offering of the Pastoral Care Specialist training program will be this January 2023. This is a 48-hour course that provides the knowledge and skills pastoral caregivers in churches and faith communities need to help others effectively, ethically, and safely. The content of this course is also applicable and valuable for lay leaders, church volunteers, or anyone who wants to help others more effectively.  Learn more at: https://www.arizonachristiancounseling.com/pastoral-care-specialist

Healing Centered Conversations
Episode 31: A Journey to Restore More with Founder Claudine Miles

Healing Centered Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 48:44


Welcome to the Healing Centered Conversations Podcast where we create space for conversations that heal. With your host Dr. Byron McClure, along with our special guests will give you the insight to promote collective healing by putting people first.In this episode, we have a special guest, Claudine Miles, Founder of Restore More!Claudine specializes in Restorative Practices, Mental Health First Aid, & Title I. Turnaround Work. Certified in Diversity & Inclusion Training: Initial Concepts & Unconscious Bias in the Workplace from Compliance Training Group.Guest detailsName: Claudine MilesTitle: Co-Founder CEOSocial: @werestoremoreWebsite                 Connect with ByronEmailTwitterInstagramFacebookTikTokAdditional ResourcesLearn more about the Healing Centered Conversations PodcastHealing Centered Conversations BlogHealing Centered MerchandiseJoin our email list 

Turmeric and Tequila
162. Adversity to Advocacy

Turmeric and Tequila

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 107:03


“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” -Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.   When you live it and learn it, you can lead it… hence I am so excited to welcome Dr. Lucille Johnson to the T&T mic! Dr. Lucille is an accomplished public health consultant with a wealth of knowledge and experience! She is on a mission to level up public health care, education, and awareness for communities of all socioeconomic statuses as well as being a strong representation on the business side of it all. Dr. Lucille shares her personal and business journey in health and wellness, sharing golden nuggets throughout on how you can stay mindful to stay healthy and tuned-in to what your body (and mind) are telling you. There is no better time than now to advocate for yourself so you can advocate for others- so you can ultimately chase the mission/dream and walk in purpose, whatever that might be.   Highlights: Health, wellness, and healing. Health care and lack thereof. Advocacy, education, and meeting people where they are at. Graceful disruption. Nutrition and health care in communities of color. Access and knowing your worth. Personal responsibility and due diligence, even when you think you are “healthy”. Therapy, Therapy, Therapy!   Dr. Lucille Johnson Lucille Johnson is an accomplished public health consultant dedicated to building social capital through community outreach, engagement, education, training, research, and advocacy. She served as an executive with the Center for African American Health for fifteen years before founding Affinity Consulting Services, LLC, of which she is CEO. Lucille also served as a PACT Community Research Liaison establishing working partnerships between academic researchers and individuals within community for 10 years.   As an advisory board member, trainer, and curriculum developer for the Center for Public Health Practice's Patient Navigator Training Collaborative, she collaborates with colleagues on the development, standardization, and sustainability of the growing patient navigation workforce. Dr. Johnson holds an Honorary Doctorate Degree in Public Service from the Denver Institute of Urban Studies and Master of Arts in Psychology and Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degrees from Regis University. She is an alumna Fellow of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation's Livingston Fellowship Program, Regional Institute for Health and Environmental Leadership Program, and a Mental Health First Aid instructor. Lucille is a dedicated advocate for, and encourager of well-being, healthy lifestyle behaviors, and supports and coaches' others to be intentional about self-care.   Connect with T&T: IG: @TurmericTequila Facebook: @TurmericAndTequila Website: www.TurmericAndTequila.com   Host: Kristen Olson IG: @Madonnashero Tik Tok: @Madonnashero Website: www.KOAlliance.com    

GAIN THE PASSION
Lorenzo McFadden - Where Kids Thrive: Innovative Mental Health for the Whole Family

GAIN THE PASSION

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 33:41 Transcription Available


Lorenzo McFadden is a 20-year veteran community leader and human services advocate who co-founded two New Jersey-based services organizations. An alumnus of Morehouse College with Fortune 100 experience, McFadden's impactful programming has played an integral role in helping local school systems provide subsidized and grant-sponsored mental health services.In addition to serving as Director of Operations at The Thrive Network, McFadden has also led American Training Center to the only federally approved apprenticeship program for certified medical assistants in South Jersey. American Training Center has also been awarded PACE, GAINS, and Upskills grants from the NJ Department of Labor. In partnership with The Thrive Network, they have trained and certified over 1000 workers in NJ in Mental Health First Aid.Lorenzo McFadden is also a member of the Human Services Advisory Council for Cape May county and a Board of Trustee member of the Community Planning and Advocacy Council.Learn more and connect with Lorenzo McFadden:Website: https://thethrivenetwork.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wherekidsthrive/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wherekidsthrive/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/where-kids-thrive-inc/Find out more about GAIN THE PASSION Coachinghttps://www.gainthepassion.comAccess past episodes and more of the GAIN THE PASSION Podcasthttps://www.gainthepassionpodcast.com

Oxfordshire Teacher Training
Episode 35 Mental Health First Aid with Matt Barnard and Donna Brunstrom

Oxfordshire Teacher Training

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 15:54


In this episode of the Oxfordshire Teacher Training podcast, Matthew Coatsworth explores Mental Health First Aid with Matt Barnard and Donna Brunstrom. Listeners will hear why it is such an important strand of continuing professional development for teachers at the moment, as well as gaining an overview of what will be covered in Mental Health First Aid training.For current Oxfordshire Teacher Training Associate Teachers:Youth Mental Health First Aid Thursday 2 March 5-7pm onlineYoung person case studies/stigma and language/stress container/frame of referenceFriday 3 March 5-7pm onlineDepression and anxiety/active listeningMonday 13 March 5-7pm onlineSuicide and psychosis/boundarying and signpostingTuesday 14 March 5-7pm onlineSelf-harm and disordered eating/MHFA action plan/recovery tree framework* * * UPDATE * * *  THIS COURSE NOW FULLY BOOKED: please  add name on the waiting list for further courses in the Spring and Summer 2023 by emailing wellbeing@ott-scitt.org.ukFor current Oxfordshire Teacher Training Mentors:Adult Mental Health First AidWednesday 19 April 5-7pm onlineMHFAider role/learner wellbeing/ALGEE/helpful or unhelpful language/frame of reference/stress container/film discussionThursday 20 April 5-7pm onlineFactors influencing mental health/mental health continuum/applying ALGEE to case studies/anxiety/traumatic events/active listening with empathy/disordered eating/self-harm/substance use/MHFA conversation practice/quizMonday 24 April 5-7pm onlineApplying ALGEE to case studies/depression/suicide/psychosis/film discussion/MHFA conversation practice/quizTuesday 25 April 5-7pm onlineRecovery and lived experience/boundaries in the MHFAider role/conversation practice/MHFA role action plan/returning to self-careFREE PLACES ARE AVAILABLE by emailing wellbeing@ott-scitt.org.uk For listeners not working with Oxfordshire Teacher Training:Visit www.mhfaengland.org for more details including courses nationwidewww.oxfordshireteachertraining.co.uk

From Survivor to Thriver
Understanding How To Manage OCD and Intrusive Thoughts with Zach Westerbeck, Part 2

From Survivor to Thriver

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 40:55


Do you struggle with OCD? According to the World Health Organization, it is one of the top ten most debilitating disorders, but it is one of the most misdiagnosed. This means that many people with this disorder aren't getting the help they need. In this episode of From Survivor to Thriver, we have a special two-part episode with Zach Westerbeck, where we talk about the things that people don't know or understand about OCD, what it actually is, the truth about intrusive thoughts, and so much more. Zach Westerbeck is a Mental Health advocate, National speaker, College Success Coach, and author of “You're Not Alone”, who was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder in 2016. During that time period he experienced severe anxiety, deep depression, and thoughts of suicide. After hitting his rock bottom moment, he sought help and started to recover. Through his recovery process, he became Mental Health First Aid certified and now travels the country educating thousands of students on the fundamentals of mental health. Through his personal experiences and extensive research, he is able to relate and clearly articulate why now, more than ever, it is critical to understand how to manage your mental health. Zach has spoken at higher learning institutions such as Penn State, Georgia Tech, Purdue University, University of Arizona, to name a few.In today's episode we cover: Your amygdala and limbic system when it comes to OCDCBT and intrusive thoughtsWhy people need a “why” The deep, innate desire for certainty and safetyChanges to your prefrontal cortex during traumaMental health issues among different generationsOverstimulation from technologyNegativity biasOur capacity to change and adaptWe hope you enjoyed part one of our conversation with Zach. If you want to hear more from Zach, make sure to check out his book and tune in to his podcast. Thanks again for tuning in. We are so grateful to each and every one of you. Please remember to leave a rating and review of our show. It helps us grow and reach those who need it. Also, make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode! Links: Visit Zach's website Listen to his podcast Follow him on Instagram Follow him on Facebook Check out his bookFollow us on FacebookFollow us on InstagramFollow us on TikTokGet in touch: amgits.reverse@gmail.com“This is the next wave. We're going to have people healing from trauma, anxiety, OCD, and depression at scale.” -Zach“OCD really is consuming.” -Marc“For those of us with OCD, the scary part is we can actually change the narrative in our own minds.” -Erik

Exceeding Expectations
Paula Allen - Wellbeing in your workday

Exceeding Expectations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 41:01


Habits & Health episode 94 with Paula Allen who is  a Senior Vice- President at LifeWorks, trusted mental health & wellbeing partner to over 15,000 organizations around the world. She is the creator of the LifeWorks' Mental Health Index. We discuss mental health in the workplace and many other issues around mental wellbeing. She is the Global Leader, Research and Total Wellbeing and a Senior Vice- President at LifeWorks, now a part of Telus Health and is the creator of the LifeWorks' Mental Health Index. Paula manages the research agenda for LifeWorks, which includes primary research conducted by LifeWorks, exploratory data science, research collaborations and meta-analyses. Given her focus on industry-leading research, Paula also leads LifeWorks thought leadership and is co-chair of the organization's product and innovation strategy. Timestamps for topics discussed in this episode: 01:54 Who are LifeWorks? 04:06 Is awareness around mental health improving? 05:16 Stigma around mental health 07:16 How the pandemic effected mental health issues 09:42 Mental Health First Aid 10:04 Mental health in the workplace training 11:48 Does Lifeworks only work with large organisations? 12:50 The many benefits a company receives by caring for their employees mental health 14:06 Employee retention 14:30 Confidentiality 15:48 The Mental Health Index 19:42 How different nations approach this topic 20:39 Examples of orgainsations that tackle this well 21:51 Training managers 22:54 Not forcing employees to speak about issues 24:07 How Paula got into this line of work 26:01 How things might change in the near future 28:10 Social media and mental health 29:32 General good habits for reducing mental health issues 31:10 Japanese teenagers not going outside 33:12 Social judgement 35:13 Paula's favourite books 35:46 The Stockdale Paradox 37:16 The importance of purpose 37:43 Details on how to contact Paula and Lifeworks 39:05 Favourite quote 39:57 Next week-episode 95 Dr Joe Mather Full shownotes including a transcription available at: https://tonywinyard.com/paula-allen/ Habits & Health links: Website - tonywinyard.com Facebook Page - facebook.com/TonyWinyard.HabitsAndHealth Facebook Group - facebook.com/groups/habitshealth Twitter - @TonyWinyard Instagram - @tony.winyard LinkedIn - uk.linkedin.com/in/tonywinyard YouTube How to leave a podcast review - tonywinyard.com/how-to-leave-a-podcast-review/ Details of online workshops to create habits for health - tonywinyard.com/training/ Are you in control of your habits or are they in control of you? Take my quiz to find out - tonywinyard.com/quiz

From Survivor to Thriver
Understanding How To Manage OCD and Intrusive Thoughts with Zach Westerbeck, Part 1

From Survivor to Thriver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 49:32


Do you struggle with OCD? According to the World Health Organization, it is one of the top ten most debilitating disorders, but it is one of the most misdiagnosed. This means that many people with this disorder aren't getting the help they need. In this episode of From Survivor to Thriver, we have a special two-part episode with Zach Westerbeck, where we talk about the things that people don't know or understand about OCD, what it actually is, the truth about intrusive thoughts, and so much more. Zach Westerbeck is a Mental Health advocate, National speaker, College Success Coach, and author of “You're Not Alone”, who was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder in 2016. During that time period he experienced severe anxiety, deep depression, and thoughts of suicide. After hitting his rock bottom moment, he sought help and started to recover. Through his recovery process, he became Mental Health First Aid certified and now travels the country educating thousands of students on the fundamentals of mental health. Through his personal experiences and extensive research, he is able to relate and clearly articulate why now, more than ever, it is critical to understand how to manage your mental health. Zach has spoken at higher learning institutions such as Penn State, Georgia Tech, Purdue University, University of Arizona, to name a few.In today's episode we cover: What OCD really isWhen disorders like this manifestThe impact of intrusive thoughtsThe relationships that you have with your thoughtsBreaking compulsive patternsSigns of OCD in childrenExposure and response preventionWhy ERP therapy is so effectiveWe hope you enjoyed part one of our conversation with Zach. Make sure to tune in Thursday to hear part 2 as we dive even deeper into this conversation. If you want to hear more from Zach, make sure to check out his book and tune in to his podcast. Thanks again for tuning in. We are so grateful to each and every one of you. Please remember to leave a rating and review of our show. It helps us grow and reach those who need it. Also, make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode! Links: Visit Zach's website Listen to his podcast Follow him on Instagram Follow him on Facebook Check out his bookFollow us on FacebookFollow us on InstagramFollow us on TikTokGet in touch: amgits.reverse@gmail.com“OCD isn't just perfectionism. It's not just organization, it's not just cleanliness. It transcends way beyond that.” -Zach“OCD really is consuming.” -Marc“For those of us with OCD, the scary part is we can actually change the narrative in our own minds.” -Erik

Going North Podcast
Ep. 590 – “You're Not Alone” with Zach Westerbeck (@Zachwesterbeck)

Going North Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 49:22


“You cannot fix what you don't measure.” - Zach WesterbeckToday's featured bookcaster is husband, Mental Health Professional Speaker, college success coach, and certified Mental Health First Aid professional, Zach Westerbeck. Zach and I have a chat about his book, “You're Not Alone: The Only Book You'll Ever Need to Overcome Anxiety and Depression”, some tools to help you take care of your mind, and more!! Key Things You'll Learn:How he became a mental health advocateWhy he believes that anxiety and depression is not a choiceWhat is a “brain health-centric life” and how to create it for yourself Zach's Site: https://zachwesterbeck.com/Zach's Book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0578754207Zach's Podcast, “You're Not Alone”: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1637167404?itsct=podcast_box_link&itscg=30200&ls=1&at=1010l38Ld&ct=listennotes The opening track is titled "Strike Strong" by Asis Galvin. To listen and purchase the full track, click the following link. https://asisgalvin.bandcamp.com/track/strike-strong You May Also Like… 14 - "Reach Your Mountaintop" Jeff Davis (@JeffDavis027): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/14-reach-your-mountaintop-jeff-davis-jeffdavis027/ Ep. 329 – “You Were Not Born to Suffer” with Blake Bauer (@BlakeBauer): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-329-you-were-not-born-to-suffer-with-blake-bauer-blakebauer/ #Bonus Host2Host Ep.– “Unleashing the Power of Respect” with Dr. Joseph Shrand (@Drjoeshrand): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/bonus-host2host-ep-unleashing-the-power-of-respect-with-dr-joseph-shrand-drjoeshrand/ Ep. 455.5 – “From Triggered to Tranquil” with Dr. Susan Campbell (@drsusan99): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-4555-from-triggered-to-tranquil-with-dr-susan-campbell-drsusan99/ Ep. 367 – “What Happens in Tomorrow World?” with Jordan Gross: https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-367-what-happens-in-tomorrow-world-with-jordan-gross/ Ep. 431 – “The Dangerous Truth About Today's Marijuana” with Laura Stack (@JohnnyKStack): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-431-the-dangerous-truth-about-todays-marijuana-with-laura-stack-johnnykstack/ Ep. 393 – “Unlocking the Cage” with Mark Tullius (@MarkTullius): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-393-unlocking-the-cage-with/ Ep. 507 – “From Hardened to Healed” with Dr. Debi Silber (@DebiSilber): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-507-from-hardened-to-healed-with-dr-debi-silber-debisilber/ Ep. 304.5 (Holiday Bonus Episode) – “Choose Your Struggle” with Jay Shifman (@JBShifman): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-3045-holiday-bonus-episode-choose-your-struggle-with-jay-shifman-jbshifman/ 284 – “Choose You” with Meagan Fettes (@MeaganFettes): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/284-choose-you-with-meagan-fettes-meaganfettes/ 253.5 (Host 2 Host Special) – “The University of Adversity” with Lance Essihos (@EssihosLance): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/2535-host-2-host-special-the-university-of-adversity-with-lance-essihos-essihoslance/ Ep. 474 – “How Social Media Impacts The Way We Think, Feel and Behave” with Tyler Hendon (@tylerhendon7): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-474-how-social-media-impacts-the-way-we-think-feel-and-behave-with-tyler-hendon-tylerhendon7/ Ep. 468 – “The Power Of Mindset” with Hayk Tadevosyan (@hayktadevosyan): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-468-the-power-of-mindset-with-hayk-tadevosyan-hayktadevosyan/ Ep. 477 – “P.S. You're a Genius” with Kelly Trach (@kellytrach): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-477-ps-youre-a-genius-with-kelly-trach-kellytrach/ Ep. 444 – “Achieve with Grace” with Theresa Lambert: https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-444-achieve-with-grace-with-theresa-lambert/ Ep. 424 – “Thoughtfully Fit” with Darcy Luoma (@DarcyLuoma): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-424-thoughtfully-fit-with-darcy-luoma-darcyluoma/

CBC Newfoundland Morning
Taking mental health first aid offshore. We'll meet a Hibernia worker who saw a need and has spent nearly a decade trying to help himself and others

CBC Newfoundland Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 7:15


This month, the province's oil and gas industry is marking 25 years since first oil at Hibernia. Steve Tizzard has been working on the platform since the beginning, but it hasn't always been easy. After the crash of Cougar Helicopters Flight 491 back in 2009, he and many of his colleagues had a very tough time coping with their fear, stress and anxiety. He saw a need for better mental health care for offshore workers, so he decided to take it on himself. Steve Tizzard spoke with CBC's Leigh Anne Power.

Lighten Up and unstuck your what the f**k
Alleviating Stress with Sara Nakamura

Lighten Up and unstuck your what the f**k

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 29:20 Transcription Available


Stress affects our thoughts, feelings and actions and often shows up in our body. How do you alleviate stress?In this episode I talk to Sara Nakamura, well-being consultant, board-certified therapeutic massage and bodywork therapist - and StressXpert!!With years of experience as a massage therapist, Sara realized a need for 2-minute techniques to help her clients with stress. While frequent massage therapy appointments are dreamy, she recognized that people are busy and want to feel better between their massages. They don't necessarily have time to lay down for a massage once a week to feel better! Her two-minute techniques offer quick help with relief of stress - and they last and WORK! Sara's goal is to help you feel less exhausted, overwhelmed and burned out!Sara walks you through finding your Zen Zone in the podcast and you can do this technique anywhere!Sara will be releasing her latest book, Stressed Out and Don't Know What To Do? on December 7th, a day of significance to her family and it's history, Pearl Harbour Day. Be sure to purchase your digital version December 7th on Amazon. Stressed Out and Don't Know What To Do? will be a special price for that one day only - 99 cents! Mark your calendar and be sure to get this amazing gift for yourself and friend!Keep your eyes peeled on our social medias! Sara and I will be doing a book signing together in Vegas in December, too!About the Guest: Sara is a well-being consultant, author, board-certified therapeutic massage & bodywork therapist and a StressXpert who creates stress solutions made simple. As the co-founder of Inspired Mind 360, their mission is to inspire you to stress-less and achieve more success!As the author of “Stressed Out & Don't know what to do? 2-minute techniques to Stress-Less When You're Exhausted, Overwhelmed and Burnt out,” her passion is helping other move through stress so they can get on with the goodness of life! This native Hawaiian is certified in Mental Health First Aid and has achieved a master's level certification in Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Hypnotherapy, as well as studies many other cognitive behavioral therapies. She also has a degree in Hospitality management from the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she resides.Sara is an elite in the hospitality and wellness field, having two decades of experience in hospitality, management, sales, food & beverage, spa, casino marketing, and consulting. As a StressXpert, she helps you shift the debilitating stress causing the strain in your career, relationships, health, and wealth by helping you break the stress cycle before stress breaks you! Elevating you to create an even more Inspired Life!For more on Sara Nakamura and to stress less:StressXpert.comFacebook: @SaraNakaInstagram: _massagemymind_About the Host: Tanya is the Founder and creator of the Trifecta of Joy Philosophy. With over 30 years of research and work in various helping fields, she is your real-talk friend, teacher, social worker, and embodied transformation life coach! Her mission is to help people connect with their truth and love the life they intentionally choose to live! Using her philosophy of the Trifecta of Joy, her mission is to empower people through their struggles with the elements of awareness, befriending your inner critic and raising your vibe. This podcast is about sharing stories of imperfection moving through life to shift toward possibilities, purpose, and power in your life!Having had...

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E52 - Smokey on Mental First Aid

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 67:41


Episode Notes Episode Summary Margaret and Smokey talk about ways to go about mental first aid, how to alter responses to trauma for you self and as a community, different paths to resiliency, and why friendship and community are truly the best medicine. Host Info Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Next Episode Hopefully will come out Friday, December, 2nd and will probably be This Month In the Apocalypse. Transcript LLWD:Smokey on Mental First Aid Margaret 00:15 Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast are what feels like the end times. I'm your host, Margaret killjoy. And, this week or month...or let's just go with 'episode'. This episode is going to be all about mental health and mental health first aid and ways to take care of your mental health and ways to help your community and your friends take care of their mental health, and I think you'll like it. But first, this podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show on the network. Margaret 01:52 Okay, with me today is Smokey. Smokey, could you introduce yourself with your your name, your pronouns, and I guess a little bit about your background about mental health stuff? Smokey 02:04 Sure, I'm Smokey. I live and work in New York City. My pronouns are 'he' and 'him.' For 23 years, I've been working with people managing serious mental illness in an intentional community, I have a degree in psychology, I have taught psychology at the University level, I have been doing social work for a long time, but I've been an anarchist longer. Margaret 02:43 So so the reason I want to have you on is I want to talk about mental health first aid, or I don't know if that's the way it normally gets expressed, but that's the way I see it in my head. Like how are...I guess it's a big question, but I'm interested in exploring ways that we can, as bad things happen that we experience, like some of the best practices we can do in order to not have that cause lasting mental harm to us. Which is a big question. But maybe that's my first question anyway. Smokey 03:12 I mean, the, the truth is bad things will happen to us. It's part of living in the world, and if you are a person that is heavily engaged in the world, meaning, you know, you're involved in politics, or activism, or even just curious about the world, you will probably be exposed on a more regular basis to things that are bad, that can traumatize us. But even if you're not involved in any of those things, you're going to go through life and have really difficult things happen to you. Now, the good news is, that's always been the case for people. We've always done this. And the good news is, we actually know a lot about what goes into resilience. So, how do you bounce back quickly and hopefully thrive after these experiences? I think that is an area that's only now being really examined in depth. But, we have lots of stories and some research to show that actually when bad things happen to us, there is an approach that actually can help catalyst really impressive strength and move...change our life in a really positive direction. We also know that for most people, they have enough reserve of resiliency that....and they can draw upon other resiliency that they're not chronically affected by it, however, and I would argue how our society is kind of structured, we're seeing more and more people that are suffering from very serious chronic effects of, what you said, bad things happening, or what is often traumatic things but it's not just traumatic things that cause chronic problems for us. But, that is the most kind of common understanding so, so while most people with most events will not have a chronic problem, and you can actually really use those problems, those I'm sorry, those events, let's call them traumatic events, those traumatic events they'll really actually improve your thriving, improve your life and your relationship to others in the world. The fact is, currently, it's an ever growing number of people that are having chronic problems. And that's because of the system. Margaret 06:19 Yeah, there's this like, there was an essay a while ago about it, I don't remember it very well, but it's called "We Are Also Very Anxious," and it it was claiming that anxiety is one of the general affects of society today, because of kind of what you're talking about, about systems that set us up to be anxious all the time and handle things in... Smokey 06:42 I think what most people don't understand is, it is consciously, in the sense that it's not that necessarily it's the desire to have the end goal of people being anxious, and people being traumatized, but it is conscious in that we know this will be the collateral outcome of how we set up the systems. That I think is fairly unique and and really kind of pernicious. Margaret 07:17 What are some of the systems that are setting us up to be anxious or traumatized? Smokey 07:23 Well, I'm gonna reverse it a little bit, Margaret. I'm going to talk about what are the things we need to bounce back or have what has been called 'resilience,' and then you and I can explore how our different systems actually make us being able to access that much more difficult. Margaret 07:47 Okay. Oh, that makes sense. Smokey 07:49 The hallmark of resiliency, ironically, is that it's not individual. Margaret 07:57 Okay. Smokey 07:57 In fact, if you look at the research, there are very few, there's going to be a couple, there's gonna be three of them, but very few qualities of an individual psychology or makeup that is a high predictor of resiliency. Margaret 08:20 Okay. Smokey 08:21 And these three are kind of, kind of vague in the sense they're not, they're not terribly dramatic, in a sense. One is, people that tend to score higher on appreciation of humor, tends to be a moderate predictor of resiliency. Margaret 08:46 I like that one. Smokey 08:47 You don't have to be funny yourself. But you can appreciate humor. Seems to be a....and this is tends to be a cross cultural thing. It's pretty low. There are plenty of people that that score very low on that, that also have resiliency. That's the other thing, I'll say that these three personality traits are actually low predictors of resiliency. Margaret 09:13 Compared to the immunity ones that you're gonna talk about? Smokey 09:16 So one is appreciation of humor seems to be one. So, these are intrinsic things that, you know, maybe we got from our family, but but we hold them in ourselves, right? The second one is usually kind of put down as 'education.' And there tends to be a reverse bell curve. If you've had very, very low education, you tend to be more resilient. If you've had extreme professionalization, you know, being a doctor, being a lawyer, well, not even being a lawyer, because that's the only...but many, many years of schooling, PhD things like that, it's not what you study. There's something about... Smokey 10:10 Yeah, or that you didn't. They're almost equal predictors of who gets traumatized. And then the the last one is kind of a 'sense of self' in that it's not an ego strength as we kind of understand it, but it is an understanding of yourself. The people that take the surveys, that they score fairly high....So I give you a survey and say, "What do you think about Smokey on these different attributes?" You give me a survey and say, "Smokey, how would you rate yourself on these different attributes?" Margaret 10:11 It's that you studied. Margaret 10:32 Okay. Smokey 10:59 So, it's suggesting that I have some self-reflexivity about what my strengths and weaknesses are. I can only know that because they're married by these also. Margaret 11:11 Okay. So it's, it's not about you rating yourself high that makes you resilient, it's you rating yourself accurately tohow other people see you. Smokey 11:18 And again, I want to stress that these are fairly low predictors. Now, you'll read a million books, kind of pop like, or the, these other ones. But when you actually look at the research, it's not, you know, it's not that great. So those..however, the ones that are big are things like 'robustness of the social network.' So how many relations and then even more, if you go into depth, 'what are those relationships' and quantity does actually create a certain level of quality, interestingly, especially around things called 'micro-social interactions,' which are these interactions that we don't even think of as relationships, maybe with storepersons, how many of these we have, and then certain in depth, having that combined with a ring of kind of meaningful relationships. And meaningful meaning not necessarily who is most important to me, but how I share and, and share my emotions and my thoughts and things like that. So, there's a lot on that. That is probably the strongest predictor of resilience. Another big predictor of resilience is access to diversity in our social networks. So, having diverse individuals tend to give us more resiliency, and having 'time,' processing time, also gives us more...are high predictors of resiliency, the largest is a 'sense of belonging.' Margaret 13:14 Okay. Smokey 13:15 So that trauma...events that affect our sense of belonging, and this is why children who have very limited opportunities to feel a sense of belonging, which are almost always completely limited, especially for very young children to the family, if that is cut off due to the trauma, or it's already dysfunctional and has nothing to do with the trauma, that sense of belonging, that lack of sense of belonging makes it very difficult to maintain resilience. So. So those are the things that, in a nutshell, we're going to be talking about later about 'How do we improve these?' and 'How do we maximize?' And 'How do we leverage these for Mental Health First Aid?' We can see how things like the internet, social media, capitalism, you know, kind of nation state building, especially as we understand it today, all these kinds of things errode a lot of those things that we would want to see in building resilient people. Margaret 14:28 Right. Smokey 14:28 And, you know, making it more difficult to access those things that we would need. Margaret 14:34 No, that's...this...Okay, yeah, that makes it obvious that the answer to my question of "What are the systems that deny us resiliency?" are just all of this. Yeah, because we're like....most people don't have...there's that really depressing statistic or the series of statistics about the number of friends that adults have in our society, and how it keeps going down every couple of decades. Like, adults just have fewer and fewer friends. And that... Smokey 15:00 The number, the number is the same for children, though too. Margaret 15:05 Is also going down, is what you're saying? Smokey 15:07 Yes. They have more than adults. But compared to earlier times, they have less. So, the trend is not as steep as a trendline. But, but it is still going down. And more importantly, there was a big change with children at one point, and I'm not sure when it historically happened. But, the number of people they interacted with, was much more diverse around age. Margaret 15:39 Oh, interesting. Smokey 15:40 So they had access to more diversity. Margaret 15:43 Yeah, yeah. When you talk about access to diversity, I assume that's diversity in like a lot of different axis, right? I assume that's diversity around like people's like cultural backgrounds, ethnic backgrounds, age. Like, but even like... Smokey 15:56 Modes of thought. Margaret 15:58 Yeah, well, that's is my guess, is that if you're around more people, you have more of an understanding that like, reality is complicated, and like different people see things in different ways. And so therefore, you have a maybe a less rigid idea of what should happen. So, then if something happens outside of that, you're more able to cope, or is this...does... like, because I look at each of these things and I can say why I assume they affect resiliency, but obviously, that's not what you're presenting, you're not presenting how they affect resiliency, merely that they seem to? Smokey 16:34 Yeah, and I don't know, if we know exactly how they affect, and we don't know how they...the effect of them together, you know, social sciences, still pretty primitive. So they, they need to look at single variables, often. But you know, we know with chemistry and biology and ecology, which I think are a little more sophisticated...and physics, which is more sophisticated. The real interesting stuff is in the combinations. Margaret 17:09 Yeah. Okay. Smokey 17:10 So what happens when you have, you know, diversity, but also this diverse and robust social network? Is that really an addition? Or is that a multiplication moment? For resiliency. Margaret 17:23 Right. And then how does that affect like, if that comes at the expense of...well, it probably wouldn't, but if it came at the expense of processing time or something. Smokey 17:33 Exactly. Margaret 17:35 Or, like, you know, okay, I could see how it would balance with education in that, like, I think for a lot of people the access to diversity that they encounter first is like going off to college, right, like meeting people from like, different parts of the world, or whatever. Smokey 17:49 I forgot to mention one other one, but it is, 'meaning.' Meaning is very important. People that score high, or report, meaning deep, kind of core meaning also tend to have higher resiliency. That being said, they...and don't, don't ever confuse resiliency with like, happiness or contentment. It just means that the dysfunction or how far you're knocked off track due to trauma, and we're, we're using trauma in the larger sense of the word, you know, how long it takes you to get back on track, or whether you can even get back on track to where you were prior to the event is what we're talking about. So it's not, this is not a guide to happiness or living a fulfilled life. It's just a guide to avoid the damage. Margaret 19:01 But if we made one that was a specifically a 'How to have a happy life,' I feel like we could sell it and then have a lot of money.Have you considered that? [lauging] Smokey 19:11 Well one could argue whether that's even desirable to have a happy life. That's a whole philosophical thing. That's well beyond my paygrade Margaret 19:22 Yeah, every now and then I have this moment, where I realized I'm in this very melancholy mood, and I'm getting kind of kind of happy about it. And I'm like, "Oh, I'm pretty comfortable with this. This is a nice spot for me." I mean, I also like happiness, too, but you know. Okay, so, this certainly implies that the, the way forward for anyone who's attempting to build resiliency, the sort of holistic solution is building community. Like in terms of as bad stuff happens. Is that... Smokey 19:58 Community that's...and community not being just groups. Okay, so you can, I think, you know, the Internet has become an expert at creating groups. There lots of groups. But community, or communitas or the sense of belonging is more than just a shared interest and a shared knowledge that there's other like-minded people. You'll hear the internet was great for like minded people to get together. But, the early internet was really about people that were sharing and creating meaning together. And I think that was very powerful. That, you know, that seems harder to access on today's Internet, and certainly the large social media platforms are consciously designed to achieve certain modes of experience, which do not lend themselves to that. Margaret 21:06 Right, because it's like the...I don't know the word for this. Smokey 21:10 It's Capitalism. Like, yeah, we're hiding the ball. The ball is Capitalism. Margaret 21:14 Yeah. Smokey 21:14 And how they decided to go with an advertising model as opposed to any other model, and that requires attention. Margaret 21:21 Yeah. Because it seems like when you talk about a robust social network, I mean, you know, theoretically, social network, like social networks, you know, Twitter calls itself a social network, right? And is there anything in the micro social interactions that one has online? Is there value in that? Or do you think that the overall...I mean, okay, because even like looking at... Smokey 21:46 I think there has to be value, I think, yeah, they did. I was reading just today, actually, about research, it was in England, with...this one hospital decided to send postcards to people who had been hospitalized for suicidal attempts. Margaret 22:09 Okay. Smokey 22:10 Most of them ended up in the mental health thing, some of them didn't, because they they left beyond, you know, against medical advice, or whatever. But, anyone that came in presenting with that a month, and then three months later, they sent another postcard just saying, "You know, we're all thinking about you, we're hoping you're all you're doing, alright. We have faith in you," that kind of thing like that, right. Nice postcard, purposely chosen to have a nice scene, sent it out. And they followed up, and they found a significant reduction in further attempts, rehospitalizations of these people, so that's a very, you know, there's no, it's a one way communication, it's not person-to-person, and it had some impact on I would guess one could argue the resiliency of those people from giving into suicidal ideation. Right. Margaret 23:13 Yeah. Smokey 23:14 So I think this is to say that, you know, we'd be...unplugging the internet, you know, that kind of Luddite approach doesn't make sense. There is a value to answer your question to the the internet's micro social interactions. It's just we...it's complicated, because you can't just have micro-social interactions unfortunately, but you need them. Margaret 23:44 Yeah. No, that that's really interesting to me, because yeah, so there's, there is a lot of value that is coming from these things, but then the overall effect is this like, like, for example, even like access to diversity, right? In a lot of ways, theoretically, the Internet gives you access to like everything. But then, instead, it's really designed to create echo chambers in the way that the algorithms and stuff feed people information. And echo chambers of thought is the opposite of diversity, even if the echo chamber of thought is like about diversity. Smokey 24:16 Yeah, I mean, it's set up again, almost as if it were to kind of naturally organically grow, we would probably have just as chaotic and and people would still just be as angry at the Internet, but it probably would develop more resilience in people. Because it wouldn't be stunted by this need to attract attention. The easiest way to do that is through outrage. Easiest way to do that is quickly and fast, so it takes care of your processing time. And relative anonymity is the coin of these kinds of things, you know, that's why bots and things like that, you know, they're not even humans, right? You know, they're just...so all these kinds of things stunt and deform, what could potentially be useful, not a silver bullet, and certainly not necessary to develop resiliency, strong resiliency. You don't need the internet to do that. And there are certain...using the internet, you know, there's going to be certain serious limitations because of the design, how it's designed. Margaret 25:42 Okay, well, so hear me out. If the internet really started coming in latter half of the 20th century, that kind of lines up to when cloaks went out of style.... Smokey 25:54 Absolutely, that's our big problem. And they haven't done any research on cloak and resiliency. Margaret 26:00 I feel that everyone who wears a cloak either has a sense of belonging, or a distinct lack of a sense of belonging. Probably start off with a lack of sense of belonging, but you end up with a sense of belonging So, okay, okay. Smokey 26:15 So I want to say that there's two things that people confuse and a very important. One, is how to prevent chronic effects from traumatic experiences. And then one is how to take care of, if you already have or you you develop a chronic effect of traumatic experiences. Nothing in the psychology literature, sociology literature, anthropology literature, obviously, keeps you from having traumatic experiences. Margaret 26:52 Right. Smokey 26:54 So one is how to prevent it from becoming chronic, and one is how to deal with chronic and they're not the same, they're quite, quite different. So you know, if you already have a chronic traumatic response of some sort, post traumatic stress syndrome, or any of the other related phenomena, you will approach that quite differently than building resilience, which doesn't protect you from having trauma, a traumatic experience. It just allows you to frame it, understand it, maybe if you're lucky, thrive and grow from it. But at worst, get you back on track in not having any chronic problems. Margaret 27:48 Okay, so it seems like there's three things, there's the holistic, building a stronger base of having a community, being more resilient in general. And then there's the like direct first aid to crisis and trauma, and then there's the long term care for the impacts of trauma. Okay, so if so, we've talked a bit about the holistic part of it, you want to talk about the the crisis, the thing to do in the immediate sense as it's happening or whatever? Smokey 28:15 For yourself or for somebody else? Margaret 28:18 Let's start with self. Smokey 28:20 So, self is go out and connect to your social network as much as you can, which is the opposite of what your mind and body is telling you. And that's why I think so much of the quote unquote, "self-care" movement is so wrong. You kind of retreat from your social network, things are too intense, I'm going to retreat from your social network. The research suggests that's the opposite of what you should be doing, you should connect. Now, if you find yourself in an unenviable situation where you don't have a social network, then you need to connect to professionals, because they, they can kind of fill in for that social Network. Therapists, social workers, peer groups, support groups, things like that they can kind of fill in for that. The problem is you don't have that sense of belonging. Well, with support groups, you might. You see this often in AA groups or other support groups. You don't really get that in therapy or or group therapy so much. But that is the first thing and so connect to your group. Obviously on the other side, if you're trying to help your community, your group, you need to actively engage that person who has been traumatized. Margaret 29:33 Yeah, okay. Smokey 29:35 And it's going to be hard. And you need to keep engaging them and engaging them in what? Not distractions: Let's go to a movie, get some ice cream, let's have a good time. And not going into the details of the traumatic experience so much as reconnecting them to the belonging, our friendship, if that. Our political movement, if that. Our religious movement, if that. Whatever that...whatever brought you two together. And that could be you being the community in this person, or could be you as Margaret in this person connecting on that, doubling down on that, and often I see people do things like, "Okay, let's do some self care, or let's, let's do the opposite of whatever the traumatic experience was," if it came from, say oppression, either vicarious or direct through political involvement let's, let's really connect on a non-political kind of way. Margaret 31:19 Ah I see! Smokey 31:21 And I'm saying, "No, you should double down on the politics," reminding them of right what you're doing. Not the trauma necessarily not like, "Oh, remember when you got beaten up, or your, your significant other got arrested or got killed by the police," but it's connecting to meaning, and bringing the community together. Showing the resiliency of the community will vicariously and contagiously affect the individual. And again, doesn't have to be political could be anything. Margaret 32:01 Yeah. Is that? How does that that feels a little bit like the sort of 'get right back on the horse kind of thing.' But then like, in terms of like, socially, rather than, because we 'get back on the horse,' might mean might imply, "Oh, you got beat up at a riot. So go out to the next riot." And that's what you're saying instead is so "Involve you in the fundraising drive for the people who are dealing with this including you," or like... Smokey 32:28 And allowing an expectation that the individual who's been traumatized, might be having a crisis of meaning. And allowing that conversation, to flow and helping that person reconnect to what they found meaningful to start with. So getting right back on the horse again, it's reminding them why they love horses. Margaret 33:02 Yeah. Okay, that makes sense. Okay, I have another question about the the crisis first aid thing, because there's something that, you know, something that you talked to me about a long time ago, when I was working on a lot of like reframing. I was working on coping with trauma. And so maybe this actually relates instead to long term care for trauma. And I, I thought of this as a crisis first aid kind of thing, is I'll use a like, low key example. When I was building my cabin, I'm slightly afraid of heights, not terribly, but slightly. And so I'm on a ladder in the middle of nowhere with no one around and I'm like climbing up the ladder, and I'm nailing in boards. And I found myself saying, "Oh, well, I only have three more boards. And then I'm done. I can get off the ladder. "And then I was like, "No, what I need to do is say, it's actually fine, I am fine. And I can do this," rather than like counting down until I can get off the ladder. And so this is like a way that I've been working on trying to build resiliency, you can apply this to lots of things like if I'm on an airplane, and I'm afraid of flying or something I can, instead of being like, "Five more hours and then we're there. Four more hours and then we're there," instead of being like, "It's actually totally chill that I'm on an airplane. This is fine." And basically like telling myself that to reframe that. Is this....Am I off base with this? Is this tie into this, there's just a different framework? Smokey 34:27 That is what the individual should be trying to do is connect the three different things, keeping it simple. One, is to the community which gives them nourishment. On a plane or on your roof, that's not going to happen. Margaret 34:44 Yeah. Smokey 34:45 Though, actually, to be honest. If you're nervous and you have...go back to your roof example, which I think is a pretty good one. Let's say that you had more than three boards. Let's say it was gonna take you a couple hours to do that. But it's something you're nervous about, connecting to somebody in your social network, whether you, you have your earphones on, and you're just talking to them before or during...after doesn't help. That does one way. Or the other is connecting to what you were doing, which is connecting to kind of reframing or your own internal resilience. I've done something similar like this before. This is not something that is going to need to throw me, it is what's called pocketing the anxiety. Margaret 35:45 Okay. Smokey 35:45 Where you're other-izing it, being like, it's coming from you too, right? being like, "Hey, you could fall. This plane could go down," right? That that's still you, you're generating that. You're not hearing that over to, and you're saying, "Okay, but I'm going to try, you know, give primacy to this other voice in my head. That is saying, "You've got this, it's all right, you've done things like this before."" So that's the second thing. And that's what you were doing. So you could connect to your community, you could connect to kind of a reserve of resiliency. And to do that is allow that one to be pocketed. But be like, "Hey, I want to hear from what this core thing has to say. I want to hear from what the positive person on the front row has to say." You're not arguing with that one. You're just listening. You're changing your, your, what you're attuned to. And then the third one is, if you can, you connect to the meaning. What is the meaning of building the house for you? Where are you going on your flight? And why is it important? Margaret 37:03 Yeah. Okay, Smokey 37:05 And that anxiety and the fact that you're doing it, you want to give again, the primacy to the importance, that "Yeah, I'm really nervous, I'm really freaked out about this, but this thing is so important, or so good for me, or so healthy for me to do this. This must mean it's going to be really important. And I'm connecting to why it's important and focusing on that. So those are the three things that the individual can do. The helping person or community is engagement. The second one is the same, reconnecting to the meaning. Why did you love horses in the first place? Okay, don't have to get back on the horse. But let's not forget horses are awesome. Margaret 37:58 Yeah. Smokey 37:58 And Horseback riding is awesome. Margaret 38:01 Yeah. Smokey 38:01 And you were really good at it before you got thrown. But you know, you don't have to do it now, but let's, let's just let's just share our love of horses for a moment and see how that makes you feel. And then the third one is that kind of drawing upon, instead of drawing upon the individual resilience, which you were doing, like, "Hey, I got this," or the plane, you know, you were, you're hearing from other people, you're drawing upon their individual resilience. "Smokey, tell me about the time you did this thing that was hard." And I tell ya, you're like, "Well, Smokey can fucking do that I can do it. You don't even think...it doesn't even work necessarily consciously. Margaret 38:50 Right. Smokey 38:51 So you could see that what you're doing individually, the helper or the community is doing complementary. Margaret 38:59 Yeah. Smokey 39:00 And now you can see why a lot of self care narrative, a lot of taking a break a lot of burnout narrative, all these things, at best aren't going to help you and at worst, in my opinion, are kind of counterproductive. Margaret 39:17 Well, and that's the, to go to the, you know, working on my roof thing I think about...because I've had some success with this. I've had some success where I....there's certain fears that I have, like, suppressed or something like I've stopped being as afraid of...the fear is no longer a deciding factor in my decision making, because of this kind of reframing this kind of like, yeah, pocketing like...And it's probably always useful to have the like, I don't want to reframe so completely that I just walk around on a roof all the time, without paying attention to what I'm doing, right?Because people do that and then they fall and the reason that there's a reason that roofing is one of the most dangerous jobs in America. So a, I don't know I yeah, I, I appreciate that, that you can do that. And then if it's a thing you're going to keep doing anyway, it becomes easier if you start handling it like, carefully, you know? Smokey 40:17 Well, you don't want to give it too much. So why do we? Why is it natural for us to take anxiety or fear and focus on it? It's somewhat evolutionary, right? It's a threat, right? It's supposed to draw your attention, right? It's supposed to draw your attention. And if you're not careful, it will draw your attention away from other things that are quieter that like that resiliency in the front row you need to call on, because they're not as flashy, right? So I don't think you have to worry about threat....You're right. You don't want to get to the point where you and that's why I say 'pocket it,' as opposed to 'deny it, suppress it, argue with it. demolish it.' I think it's good to have that little, "Beep, beep, beep there's a threat," and then being like, "Okay, but I want to continue to do this. Let's hear from resiliency in the front row. What? What do you have to tell me too?" You have to not...what happens is we go into the weeds of the threat. Oh, so what? "Oh, I fall off and I compound fracture, and I'm way out here in the woods, and no one's going to get me. My phone isn't charged." That's not what the original beep was. Original beep like, "You're high up on a ladder, seems unstable. This seems sketchy," right? Okay. Got that. And then resilience is, "Yeah, you've done lots of sketchy stuff. You've written in the back of a pickup truck. That's sketchy, so seatbelt there, nothing, you know, let me remind you that that you can overcome." And, but by going into the anxiety, going into the fear, you're forcing yourself to justify the thing. And then it becomes more and more elaborate, and it gets crazier and crazier very quickly. You know, all of sudden, you're bleeding out and you're cutting your leg off with a pen knife. It's like, "Wow, how did all this happen?" Margaret 42:38 Yeah, well, and that's actually something that comes up a lot in terms of people interacting with the show and about like preparedness in general. Because in my mind, the point of paying attention to how to deal with forest fire while I live in the woods, is not to then spend all of my time fantasizing and worrying about forest fire. But instead, to compare it to this ladder, if I get this "Beep, beep, the ladder is unstable." I climb down, I stabilize the ladder as best as I can. And then I climb back up and I do the thing. And then when I think about like, with fire, I'm like, "Okay, I have done the work to minimize the risk of fire. And so now I can stop thinking about it." Like, I can listen to the little beep, beep noise and do the thing. And now I can ignore the beep beep because just like literally, when you're backing up a truck and it goes beep, beep, you're like, yeah, no, I know, I'm backing up. Thanks. You know, like, Smokey 43:35 Yeah, it's good to know, it's good to know, you're not going forward. Margaret 43:39 Yeah, no. No, okay. That's interesting. And then the other thing that's really interesting about this, the thing that you're presenting, is it means that in some ways, work that we present as very individual in our society, even in radical society, is actually community based on this idea, like so conquering phobias is something that we help one another do, it seems like, Smokey 44:02 Absolutely. I mean, the best stuff on all this stuff is that people reverse engineering it to make people do dangerous, bad things. The military. Margaret 44:18 Yeah, they're probably pretty good at getting people to conquer phobias. Yep. Smokey 44:21 They have a great sense of belonging. They have a great sense of pulling in internal resilient, group resilient, connecting to meaning even when it's absolutely meaningless what you're doing. It's all the dark side of what we're talking about, but it's quite effective and it literally wins wars. Margaret 44:47 Yeah, that makes sense. Because you have this whole... Smokey 44:50 Literally it changes history. And so, the good news is, we can kind of reclaim that for what I think it was originally purposed to do, which is to protect us from the traumas that we had to go through in our evolutionary existence. So we couldn't afford to have a whole bunch of us chronically disabled. Meaning unable to function, you know, they've just taken it and, and bent it a little bit, and learned very deeply about it, how to how to use it for the things that really cause, you know, physical death and injury. And, and, you know, obviously, they're not perfect, you have a lot of trauma, but not, not as much as you would expect for what they do. And every year they get better and better. Margaret 45:51 Hooray. Smokey 45:53 We have to get on top of our game. Margaret 45:56 Yeah. Smokey 45:57 And get people not to do what they do. I'm not suggesting reading...well maybe reading military, but not...you can't use those tools to make people truly free and resilient. Margaret 46:17 Yeah. Smokey 46:18 In the healthy kind of way. Yeah. Margaret 46:22 Okay, so in our three things, there's the holistic, prepared resiliency thing, then there's the immediate, the bad thing is happening first aid. Should we talk about what to do when the thing has, when you have the like, the injury, the mental injury of the trauma? Smokey 46:42 Like with most injuries, it's rehab, right? Margaret 46:45 Yeah. No, no, you just keep doing the thing, and then hope it fixes itself. [laughs] Smokey 46:53 My approach to most medical oddities that happen as I get older, it's like, "It'll fix itself, this tooth will grow back, right? The pain will go away, right?" Yeah, just like physical rehab, it does require two important aspects for all physical, what we think of when someone says I have to go to rehab, physical rehab, not not alcohol rehab, or psych rehab, is that there's two things that are happening. One, is a understanding, a deep understanding of the injury, often not by the person, but by the physical therapist. Right? That if they know, okay, this is torn meniscus, or this is this and I, okay, so I understand the anatomy, I understand the surgery that happened. Okay. And then the second is, short term, not lifelong therapy, not lifelong this or that. Short term techniques to usually strengthen muscles and other joints and things around the injury. Okay. And that's what, what I would call good recovery after you already have the injury. It's not after you've had the traumatic experience, because traumatic experience doesn't necessarily cause a chronic injury, and we're trying to reduce the number of chronic injuries, but chronic injuries are going to happen. chronic injuries already exist today. A lot of the people we know are walking around with chronic injuries that are impacting their ability to do what they want to do and what in my opinion, we need them to do, because there's so much change that needs to happen. We need everybody as much as possible to be working at their ability. So wherever we can fix injury, we should. So so one is where do I get an understanding of how this injury impacts my life? And I think different cognitive psychology, I think CBT, DBT, these things are very, very good in general. Margaret 49:22 I know what those are, but can you explain. Smokey 49:22 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. These all come out of cognitive psychology from the 50s. Our techniques, but most therapists use versions of this anyway. So just going to therapy, what it is doing initially, is trying to, like the physical therapist, tell you, "This is the injury you have. This is why it's causing you to limp, or why you have weakness in your arm and wrist. And what we're going to do is we're going to give you some techniques to build up, usually the muscles, or whatever else needs to be built up around it so that you will be able to get more use out of your hand." And that is what we need to do with people that have this chronic injury. So, one, is you need to find out how the injury is impacting. So, I'm drinking more, I'm getting angry more, or I'm having trouble making relationships, or I'm having, and there's a series of, you know, 50 year old techniques to really kind of get down and see, okay, this injury is causing these things, that's how it's impacting me, and I don't want to drink more, or I want to be able to sleep better, or I want to be able to focus, or I want to be able to have meaningful relationship with my partner or my children or whatever, whatever that is, right? And then there are techniques, and they're developing new techniques, all the time, there's like EMDR, which is an eye thing that I don't fully understand. There DBT, dialectical behavioral therapy, has a lot of techniques that you kind of practice in groups. As you know, we have mutual aid cell therapy, MAST, which is also a group where you're sharing techniques to build up these different things and resilience. So, community, and meaning, and all those...reframing all those kinds of things. So, but they shouldn't, despite the length of the injury, how long you've been injured, how long you've been limping, and how much it's affected other parts of your psychic body in a way. These are things that still should be able to be remediated relatively quickly. Smokey 49:31 That's exciting. Yeah. Smokey 50:10 But this is not a lifelong thing. Now, that doesn't mean, if you're traumatized as a child for example, it's sort of like if you've completely shattered your wrist bone, and they've put in pins and things like that, that wrist, may never have the flexibility, it did, the actual wrist bone, you know, the bones in the wrist. But by building muscles, and other things around it, you could then theoretically have full flexibility that you had before, right? But it's not the actual wrist bone, but that that injury is still there. You've built up...Sometimes it's called strength-based approach or model where you're building up other strengths, you have to relieve the impact that that injury, so like, a common thing with with trauma is trust. My trust is very damaged. My ability to trust others, or trust certain environments, or maybe trust myself, right, is completely damaged. So if, if my...and that may never fully heal, that's like my shattered wrist bone. So then, by building up, let's say, I don't trust myself, I did something, really fucked up myself, you know, psychologically, traumatically, but by building up trust in others, and then in the environment, or other things, that can mediate that damage or vice versa. Margaret 53:53 You mean vice versa, like if you? Smokey 53:59 Like, if my problem is a trust of others, or trust with strangers, or trust with friends, you know, I've been betrayed in a really traumatic way by my mother, or my father or uncle or something like that then, you know, building up my friendships to a really strong degree will reduce and eventually eliminate, hopefully erase the impact of that injury on the rest of my life. I'm not doomed to have dysfunctional relationships, lack of sleep, alcoholism or whatever are the symptoms of that traumatic event, that chronic traumatic event. Margaret 54:54 Okay, so my next question is, and it's sort of a leading question, you mentioned MAST earlier and I kind of want to ask, like, do we need specialists for all of this? Do we have people who both generalize and specialize in this kind of thing? Are there ways that, you know, we as a community can, like, get better at most of this stuff while then some of it like, you know, obviously people specialize in and this remains useful? Like... Smokey 55:22 You need. I wouldn't say...You need, you do need specialists, not for their knowledge, per se so much as they're there for people that the injury has gone on so long that the resiliency, all those other things, they don't have a social network, they haven't had time, because the damage happened so early to build up those reserves, that that person in the front row, the front row, the seats are empty. That is, it's really great we live...Now, in other cultures, the specialists were probably shamans, religious people, mentors, things like that, that said, "Okay, my role is to," all therapy is self therapy. That was Carl Rogers, he was quite correct about that. The specialist you're talking about are the kind of stand in for people who don't have people to do that. I would argue all real therapy is probably community therapy. It's relational. So if you have friends, if you have community, if you have a place, or places you find belonging, then theoretically, no, I don't think you need....I think those groups, and I think most specialists would agree to actually, those groups, if they're doing this can actually do a much better job for that individual. They know that individual and there's a natural affinity. And there there are other non specifically therapeutic benefits for engaging in re engaging in these things that have nothing to do with the injury that are just healthy, and good to you. So sort of like taking Ensure, Ensure will keep you alive when you're you've had some surgery, you've had some really bad injury, or if you need saline solution, right? But we're not suggesting people walk around with saline bags. There are better ways to get that, more natural ways to get that. I'm not talking alternative, psychiatric or, you know, take herbs instead of psychiatric medication. But there are better ways to do that. And I think, but I'm glad we have saline. Margaret 58:08 Yeah, Smokey 58:08 I think it saves a lot of people's lives. But, we would never give up the other ways to get nutrients because of other benefits to it. You know, sharing a meal with people is also a really good thing. Margaret 58:21 And then even like from a, you know, the advantages of community, etc. I'm guessing it's not something that's like magically imbued in community. It's like can be something that communities need to actually learn these skills and develop like, I mean, there's a reason that well, you know, I guess I'm reasonably open about this. I used to have like fairly paralyzing panic attacks, and then it started generalizing. And then, you know, a very good cognitive behavioral therapist gave me the tools with which to start addressing that. And that wasn't something I was getting from....I didn't get it from my community in the end, but I got it from a specific person in the community, rather than like, everyone already knows this or something. Smokey 59:03 Well, I think what we're doing right here is, is....I mean, people don't know. So they read....People were trying to help you from your community. Undoubtedly, with the right. intentions, and the right motives, but without the information on what actually works. Margaret 59:27 Yep. Smokey 59:28 And that's all that was happening there. Margaret 59:30 Yeah, totally. Smokey 59:31 So, it's really, you know, as cliche as it sound. It's really about just giving people some basic tools that we already had at one time. Margaret 59:44 Yeah. Smokey 59:45 Forgot, became specialized. So you know, I'm throwing around CBT, DBT, EMDR. None of that people can keep in their head. They will....The audience listening today are not going to remember all those things. And nor do they have to. But they have to know that, you know, reconnecting to the horse, but not telling people to get back on the horse, that kind of tough love kind of thing isn't going to work, but neither is the self care, take a bubble bath... Margaret 1:00:19 Never see a horse again, run from a horse. Smokey 1:00:21 Never see a horse, again, we're not even going to talk about horses, let's go do something else, isn't going to work either. And I think once we...you know, it's not brain science...Though it is. [laughs] It is pretty, you know, these are, and you look at how religions do this, you know, you look at how the military does this, you look at how like, fascists do this, you know, all sorts of groups, communities can do this fairly effectively. And it doesn't cost money. It's not expensive. You don't have to be highly educated or read all the science to be able to do that. And people naturally try, but I think a lot of the self help kind of gets in the way. And some people think they know. "Okay, well, this is what needs to happen, because I saw on Oprah." That kind of thing. " Margaret 1:01:26 Yeah, Well, I mean, actually, that's one of the main takeaways that's coming from me is I've been, I've been thinking a lot about my own mental health first aid on a fairly individual basis, right? You know, even though it was community, that helped me find the means by which to pull myself out of a very bad mental space in that I was in for a lot of years. But I still, in the end was kind of viewing it as, like, "Ah, someone else gave me the tools. And now it's on me." It's like this individual responsibility to take care of myself. And, and so that's like, one of the things that I'm taking as a takeaway from this is learning to be inter-reliant. Smokey 1:02:06 There isn't enough research on it, again, because of our individualistic nature, and probably because of variables. But there's certainly tons of anecdotal evidence, and having done this for a long time talking to people and how the place I work is particularly set up, helping others is a really great way to help yourself. Margaret 1:02:30 Yeah. Smokey 1:02:31 it really works. It's very, I mean, obviously, in the Greeks, you know, you have the 'wounded healer,' kind of concept. Many indigenous traditions have said this much better than the Western. And I believe they have...and they needed to, but they had a much better kind of understanding of these things that we're we're talking about. You know, it. So, where people can...and I've heard this podcast, your podcast too, talking about this ability to be, you know, have self efficacy. But it's more than self efficacy. It's really helping others. Margaret 1:03:22 Yeah. Smokey 1:03:23 And that, that is really powerful. And there's not enough research on that. And I think that's why support groups, I think that's why, you know, AA, despite all its problems, has spread all over the world and has been around for, you know, 75 years, and is not going to go away anytime soon. Despite some obvious problems, is there's that there's that... they hit upon that they they re discovered something that we always kind of knew. Margaret 1:03:59 Yeah. Okay, well, we're coming out of time. We're running out of time. Are there any last thoughts, things that I should have asked you? I mean, there's a ton we can talk about this, and I'll probably try and have you on to talk about more specifics in the near future. But, is there anything anything I'm missing? Smokey 1:04:15 No, I think I think just re emphasizing the end piece that you know, for people that have resources, communities, meaning, social network, you know, that is worth investing your time and your energy into because that's going to build your...if you want to get psychologically strong, that is the easiest and the best investment, Put down the self help book. Call your friend. You know, don't search Google for the symptoms of this, that, or the other thing. Connect to what's important to you. And then lastly, try to help others or help the world in some way. And those are going to be profound and effective ways to build long lasting resilience as an individual. As a community, we should design our communities around that. Margaret 1:05:35 Yeah. All right. Well, that seems like a good thing to end on. Do you have anything that you want to plug like, I don't know books about mutual aid self therapy or anything like that? Smokey 1:05:46 I want to plug community. That's all I want to plug. Margaret 1:05:50 Cool. All right. Well, it's nice talking to you, and I'll talk to you soon. Smokey 1:05:54 Yep. Margaret 1:06:00 Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, please tell people about it. Actually, I mean, honestly, if you enjoyed this episode, in particular, like think about it, and think about reaching out to people, and who needs to be reached out to and who you need to reach out to, and how to build stronger communities. But if you want to support this podcast, you can tell people about it. And you can tell the internet about it. And you can tell the algorithms about it. But, you can also tell people about it in person. And you can also support it by supporting the, by supporting Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, which is the people who produce this podcast. It's an anarchist publishing collective that I'm part of, and you can support it on Patreon at patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. And if you support at pretty much any level, you get access to some stuff, and if you support a $10 you'll get a zine in the mail. And if you support at $20, you'll get your name read at the end of episodes. Like for example, Hoss the dog, and Micahiah, and Chris, and Sam, and Kirk, Eleanor, Jennifer, Staro, Cat J, Chelsea, Dana, David, Nicole, Mikki, Paige, SJ, Shawn, Hunter, Theo, Boise Mutual Aid, Milica, and paparouna. And that's all, and we will talk to you soon, and I don't know, I hope you all are doing as well as you can. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning at SUU
Inside & Outside of the Classroom Bryan Koenig and Jayci Hacker

Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning at SUU

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 30:19


Dr. Bryan Koenig is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and chair of SUU's Institutional Review Board. He holds degrees from St. John's University, College of William and Mary and New Mexico State University and has taught at SUU for the past five years. Dr. Koenig's teaching philosophy is centered on the belief that every student is unique, and structures his courses to provide students with opportunities to tailor their work to their interests. He actively engages his students by using a flipped teaching approach, including having class members replicate classic experiments. He continually looks to improve and excels at fostering solid relationships with his students. His wife, Crystal Koenig, is also an SUU faculty member, and their two children are their “tiny T-Birds.”Dr. Jayci Hacker has served as the Executive Director of Student Care & Advocacy and an Assistant Dean of Students at Southern Utah University since the summer of 2021. In this role, Jayci oversees the campus Care Team, Non-Clinical Case Management, the Office of Connection and Completion, and Graduate Assistants in the Psy.D. Program. Jayci provides QPR and Mental Health First Aid training for the campus. Prior to this role, Jayci served as the Honors Program Director and has been an SUU employee since January of 2012. Dr. Hacker recently completed her doctoral program at Arizona State University in Education and Leadership in December 2021. In the Spring of 2022, Jayci received the Gerald R. Sherratt Distinguished Service. 

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट
What comes under Mental Health First Aid training? - "मेन्टल हेल्थ फर्स्ट एड ट्रेनिङ"मा के-के सिकाइन्छ?

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 19:17


A two-day Mental Health First Aid training was organised by Australia Nepal Public Link (ANPL) in Glenroy, Victoria on 12 and 13 November, in co-operation with Mental Health First Aid Australia. Listen to our conversation with ANPL President Nirajan Gauli, trainer Bharat Nepal, and some participants who say the training has been helpful in many ways. - अस्ट्रेलिया नेपाल पब्लिक लिङ्क (एएनपीएल)ले मेन्टल हेल्थ फर्स्ट एड अस्ट्रेलियासँगको सहकार्यमा मेन्टल हेल्थ फर्स्ट एड ट्रेनिङ आयोजना गरेको छ। मानसिक स्वास्थ्य सम्बन्धी उक्त प्रशिक्षणका प्रशिक्षक भरत नेपाल र आयोजक तथा सहभागीहरूको अनुभव सुन्नुहोस्।

The Health Design Podcast
Sarita Edwards, Patient Advocate

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 35:13


Sarita Edwards is CEO & President at the E.WE Foundation, a nonprofit healthcare advocacy organization. She began her efforts of advocacy and public policy after her 5th child was diagnosed in utero with rare disease Edwards Syndrome or Full Trisomy 18. Sarita is recognized as a world's top patient expert and social health ambassador. She is an award winning advocate and host of the Being Rare Podcast, a digital resource hub and community conversations platform popular for its 60 second episodes. Sarita serves on executive boards and advisory councils within her home state and across the country. She is a rare disease legislative advocate, a member of multiple coalitions, and an active participant in DEIA workgroups. Sarita also serves as a Community Congress member providing advice and insight on urgent policy initiatives. Sarita has a Bachelor of Science is Health Science and is a candidate for her Masters in Healthcare Administration. She has professional experience in Healthcare Operations & Patient Access. Sarita has certifications in Seizure Recognition & First Aid from the Epilepsy Foundation and Mental Health First Aid from the National Council for Behavioral Health & Mental Wellbeing. Additionally, Sarita has continuing education studies in effective parenting, understanding childhood behavior, and child abuse & neglect prevention. Sarita lives in North Alabama with her husband and their five children.

Roofing Road Trips with Heidi
Coffee Conversations - Mental Health Safety in the Workplace

Roofing Road Trips with Heidi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 61:12


Join us for this Coffee Conversations, sponsored by Tremco and WTI, as we talk about mental health in construction. Our industry ranks second highest in suicide rates and research shows that up to 90 percent of people who die by suicide have a mental health condition. We welcome Mandy McIntyre of Level Up Consultants, who is certified in Mental Health First Aid, along with Christee Holbrook of Graham Roofing and Tom Truelson of Forest Roofing who will discuss how they approach this topic within their roofing companies. They will also share strategies for creating a culture of support and understanding to help team members who may be struggling with their mental health. Grab a cup of coffee and join us for this life-changing conversation. Learn more at RoofersCoffeeShop.com! Sign up for the Week in Roofing!

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. w/ Dr. Heather Brown: White Serial Killers, Robert Berdella #Necrophilia

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022


The Context of White Supremacy welcomes Dr Heather Brown. The Director and President of Behind The Line, Inc., Dr. Brown holds a Bachelor of Social Work from Salisbury University, her Master of Science from Capella University, and completed her Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology at Walden University. She is certified to teach both Critical Incident Stress Management and Mental Health First Aid, and she helps instruct cadets in the mental health unit at the Eastern Shore Criminal Justice Academy. We'll discuss her 2022 dissertation: The Role of Child and Adult Sexual Fantasies and Criminal Paraphilia Involving Serial Sexual Murderers. Gus found her report after speaking with Bishop Tony Caldwell about the missing black females in Missouri. Bishop Caldwell referenced previous serial murders in the area, including Robert Berdella. Dr. Brown's report features Berdella, Seattle's Gary Ridgeway and a number of other White rapists and serial killers. She makes a point of the fact that most of the serial sexual killers are White Men. We discuss what it is about White Culture that produces this pattern of White Male behavior. We re-visit the concept of necrophilia (including the Joliet, Illinois case from 2013, where White teens had sex on the corpses of two black males.) Dr. Heather Brown also became the second White person to tell C.O.W.S. listeners that White people are more informed about White Supremacy/Racism (with a table spoon of inappropriate laughter). #WhatDoesItMeanToBeWhite #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#

In The Money Players' Podcast
Nick Luck Daily Ep 605 - Advantage Keane as Lee appeal unsuccessful

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 44:30


Tom in for Nick and joined by broadcaster Jane Mangan to initially break the news that Billy Lee has been unsuccessful in his attempt to overturn his ban. That makes today his last day riding for the season and all but hands the title to Colin Keane. We hear from Paul Nicholls whose Stage Star was impressive at Warwick yesterday and Paul also touches on Frodon ho may well take in a small-field Betfair Chase after his run at Wincanton this weekend. We also hear from Hollie Doyle ahead of her three rides at the Breeders' Cup in between her stint with husband Tom Marquand in Japan. Jockey Paul Mulrennan joins us to discuss being crowned top northern jockey at Doncaster on Saturday and we also hear from Simon Jones who is running the New York Marathon for Racing Welfare and Mental Health First Aid after his son took his own life three years ago at the age of seventeen. Jane gives her thoughts on Down Royal this weekend, plus it's Wednesday so we have the latest from Hong Kong with Jim McGrath.

Nick Luck Daily Podcast
EP 605 - Advantage Keane as Lee appeal unsuccessful

Nick Luck Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 44:30


Tom in for Nick and joined by broadcaster Jane Mangan to initially break the news that Billy Lee has been unsuccessful in his attempt to overturn his ban. That makes today his last day riding for the season and all but hands the title to Colin Keane. We hear from Paul Nicholls whose Stage Star was impressive at Warwick yesterday and Paul also touches on Frodon ho may well take in a small-field Betfair Chase after his run at Wincanton this weekend. We also hear from Hollie Doyle ahead of her three rides at the Breeders' Cup in between her stint with husband Tom Marquand in Japan. Jockey Paul Mulrennan joins us to discuss being crowned top northern jockey at Doncaster on Saturday and we also hear from Simon Jones who is running the New York Marathon for Racing Welfare and Mental Health First Aid after his son took his own life three years ago at the age of seventeen. Jane gives her thoughts on Down Royal this weekend, plus it's Wednesday so we have the latest from Hong Kong with Jim McGrath.

How Ya Doing Bay County?
Life Management Center of Northwest FL - Mental Health First Aid

How Ya Doing Bay County?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 35:19


Kristina Williams from the Life Management Center of NWFL joins us to share about the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training program offered by the center.  Listen as Kristina shares about this evidence-based training program and the ALGEE process (Assess, Listen, Encourage Professional Help, Encourage Self-Help).  If you are interested in being trained in MHFA, contact Kristina to join a class.  To contact Kristina, please email kwilliams@lmccares.orgor call (850) 522-4485 ext. 1107If you or someone you know is experiencing a crisis, please call the National Lifeline at 988.988 LifelineLife Management Center of NWFL Mental Health First AidMHFA Course ScheduleMental Health First Aid from the National Council for Mental Wellbeinghow ya doing? | Alignment Bay County

Amidon Planet Podcast
E080: Mental Health First Aid with Stephanie Lusk and Mandy Perryman

Amidon Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 42:04


Learning to teach better with Dr. Stephanie Lusk and Dr. Mandy Perryman, of the Department of Leadership and Counselor Education at the University of Mississippi, as we discuss Mental Health First Aid. Show notes can be found at https://amidonplanet.com/episode80/ (https://amidonplanet.com/episode80/)

It's Not Rocket Science! Five Questions Over Coffee
Five Questions Over Coffee with Mike Lawrence (ep. 65)

It's Not Rocket Science! Five Questions Over Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 28:23


Who is Mike?Mike attained his DMS PGDip at London Metropolitan. He represented the university at the 4th International Conference on Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Management in Germany where he received an award for his workshop entitled ‘How to alleviate stress: the importance for organisations to implement a more holistic view of the employee to alleviate stress' (presented in collaboration with Robert M Gordon, American Psychological Association, USA and Paolo Scapellato, European University of Rome, Italy). Whilst there he also collected a number of coaching awards; one of which, as a Football Association referee. He has worked with businesses such as Computer Sense, the Public Carriage Office, Transport for London, Specialist Make-up Services Limited, the Nouveau Beauty Group, Dixons Store Group and Priority Data, as well as practices in Harley Street. He has coached thousands of employees, boosting their motivation, emotional resilience and mental health, and instilling the foundations of good stress management. Described by his clients as a hugely transformative, well-respected practitioner, Mike continued to impact the field of customer service, instilling direction and leadership in large teams. Mike's passion is to help others become the best version of themselves on every level. The results his clients enjoy are consistently outstanding, and they also have a beneficial effect on an individual's colleagues, their environment and family, and the community that surrounds them.Key Takeaways1. We don't seem to be doing & saying much about how people need to look after themselves in these challenging times.2. We're not talking about that ability to communicate, we're not taught nearly enough how to listen to each other. And unfortunately, when we've learned it, we have ingrained behaviours, which we have to undo in order to be able to learn it properly.Valuable Free Resource or ActionA mental health resource : https://www.mikelawrence.co.uk/rediscover-your-confidence-the-antidote-to-good-mental-health/A video version of this podcast is available on YouTube : _________________________________________________________________________________________________Subscribe to our newsletter and get details of when we are doing these interviews live at https://TCA.fyi/newsletterFind out more about being a guest at : link.thecompleteapproach.co.uk/beaguestSubscribe to the podcast at https://link.thecompleteapproach.co.uk/podcastHelp us get this podcast in front of as many people as possible. Leave a nice five-star review at  apple podcasts : https://link.thecompleteapproach.co.uk/apple-podcasts and on YouTube : https://link.thecompleteapproach.co.uk/Itsnotrocketscienceatyt!Here's how you can bring your business to THE next level:1. Download my free resource on everything you need to grow your business on a single page : https://link.thecompleteapproach.co.uk/1pageIt's a detailed breakdown of how you can grow your business to 7-figures in a smart and sustainable way2. Join The Complete Approach Facebook Group :  https://TCA.fyi/fb Connect with like-minded individuals who are all about growth and increasing revenue. It's a Facebook community where we make regular posts aimed at inspiring conversations in a supportive environment. It's completely free and purposely aimed at expanding and building networks.3. Join our Success to Soar Program and get TIME and FREEDOM. : https://link.thecompleteapproach.co.uk/Success-to-SoarIf you're doing 10-50k a month right now: I'm working with a few business owners like you to change that, without working nights and weekends. If you'd like to get back that Time and still Scale, check the link above.4. Work with me privatelyIf you'd like to work directly with me and my team to take you from 5 figure to 6 and multi 6 figure months, whilst reducing reliance on you. Click on https://link.thecompleteapproach.co.uk/DiscoveryCall  tell me about your business and what you'd like to work on together, and I'll get you all the details.————————————————————————————————————————————-TranscriptNote, this was transcribed using a transcription software and may not reflect the exact words used in the podcast)SUMMARY KEYWORDSpeople, work, programme, listen, mike, organisations, mental health, sheffield, emails, question, called, lots, activates, learn, notifications, clients, problems, johann hari, brain, helpedSPEAKERSMike Lawrence, Stuart WebbStuart Webb  00:25Hi and welcome back to it's not rocket science five questions over coffee. I am delighted and I have I have got my coffee here with me today. So it's here ready to go. I'm delighted today to be joined by Mike Lorenz Mike is a really interesting, transformational coach. He started his his career in leisure and hospitality and I'm sure he might get into that, where he was a Butlins Butler. It's red coat, helping holidaymakers through positive engagement and mindfulness. He's now a mentoring and coach for a number of large organisations, he reduces absenteeism. He improves employee morale, and he approves company internal culture. And Mike is in great demand in the corporate world. And he has got some clients who have described him as truly transformational. So I think we're gonna have a really fascinating discussion today. Welcome to the podcast, Mike.Mike Lawrence  01:30Yeah, could skim the day's view, it's great to be here last has been a whileStuart Webb  01:36it has been a take, it's taken us a while to get this set up. And thanks for taking the time to do this. Because I'm really looking forward to the conversation. Mike, can you just start by giving us a sort of an insight into the sort of person that you help the sort of the sort of internal and external behaviours, etc, that you might be seeing in your clients that they're that they wish to change and, and bring about a better well being attitude?Mike Lawrence  02:00Yes, I'd be happy to do so Stuart. Obviously, it's changed because I think prior to sort of COVID, and the lockdown, a lot of the clients, the people that we're seeing on a private basis in my clinic in Sheffield, tended to be women, the thought is like business owners, because you tend to find that the women only speak and how they wellbeing regime. And so they're more looking after their actual well being their mental health, that has changed somewhat. And now this is sort of balanced out. And in a lot of men, which is which is good, we're now starting to come forward and have that conversation talk about the challenges or problems that they face with their sort of well being. And so prior to Tina to COVID, lockdown, it was, you know, the general sort of strange depression sorts of anxiety. Also burnout I sustained on the increase, whereas now it seems to be around financial well being that lack of certainty about the future with the rising cost of living, and so it will try them out. Or we can navigate through these sorts of challenges. Because, you know, in the media and the government's we're talking about a lot of the problems which are going on. And yes, occasionally we have a mental health awareness, but really, we don't seem to be doing saying much about how people need to look after themselves in these challenging times.Stuart Webb  03:33So what are the behaviours, the things that you've seen people with those thoughts try to do to help themselves before you get involved with your, with your, your, your services,Mike Lawrence  03:49the, you know, you've got the negative behaviours, and the positive behaviours and negative behaviours, and some people might think that positive is the coping strategies. So hybrid work and brought in people eating more from element and generally speaking, eating in eating into access as a way of trying to cope because working from home the hybrid working in too far away from your kitchen, and so is this readily available, people are drinking more as well at home because again, it was it was readily available, also working more one way of filling that gap in terms of the challenge of problems that we're facing and felt as though that we needed to, you know, to sort of, you know, work or to fill in those gaps. And so, if I'm in that, working with people who are suffering with burnout or lots of in lots of situations, they're not looking after themselves and and typically the thought of things which I'm here and a lot of the time the things such as, you know, I'm feeling overworked and stressed a lot If I'm feeling depressed, I can't get to see my doctor. Or if, if I do get through to see a doctor, I just feel as though that them not listening, because I've just got a short. I'm just got a short when you call it time with the doctor. And in most of the cases, the prescribing medication, which obviously the right thing to do, but what they're wanting to see is to see somebody that was going to help them with CBT, or counselling, depending on where you live. And in the end, where you are in the control did turn depend upon what term level of support that you might get.Stuart Webb  05:41So, Mike, you've described some really interesting things there. Those are all things which, which I guess, you you provide, D provide them on site in your clinic, do you go to workplaces? How do you how do you offer that services?Mike Lawrence  05:56Yeah, well, was to follow benek in Sheffield, also, people see me remotely as long, which is one of the advantages and benefits, I suppose as the remote working. And so I'm able to offer a range of support services to people throughout the UK, and also our clients, you know, throughout the world as well. And then also get involved with organisations who provide Employee Assistance programmes and, and some people who might be fortunate if you're working for a large organisation, you might be able to get support through EAP, what I find is that lots of people who have got these schemes in the workplace which are free, they're not using them. So if anybody is watching this programme you have got in you're in a company that provides an EAP is really important that you do, you know, do so that said, I go into companies and tend to be smaller organisations, and where they haven't gotten an employee assistance programme. And now we'll come in there. And I will deliver talks and one to ones with members of staff, who may not feel confident speaking to some of their mental health problems to the to somebody within HR. And in some cases, you've got people have been trained as Mental Health First Aiders and a mental Mental Health First Aid instructor. And so I deliver that training on site and also in the workplace. But time and time again, you find that people are Mental Health First Aid trains, again, people within those organisations, there might be some stigma associated to going into the Mental Health First Aid or to talk about, you know, there's some of the problems that they actually face. So I offer a range of workshops, and they range from menopause, which has been on the increase, which had been asked for quite a lot. Mental Health Awareness, stress, depression, anxiety, nutrition and financial well being. Because now that organisations recognise that there have got a duty of care. And as part of that corporate social responsibility, they are doing more and need to be seen to do more for the employers.Stuart Webb  08:10Great. Yeah, thank you, Mike. Mike, I understand you've got a pretty valuable free resource that people even if they're not part of a large organisation, or a small business, even if they work on their own, that they can take in order to be able to do something. And I've just put the link to that scrolling along the bottom the screen now that that your website and the link is rediscover your confidence, the antidote to good mental health? Do you just want to describe to us what that that resource brings to the table?Mike Lawrence  08:41Yes, I can. It's a resource which is available to, you know, to everybody. It's a training programme, which I created and developed online about a year ago. And this is after some research that I did with clients. And also, what some, you know, as you know, a magic one question on LinkedIn, midway through through the pandemic, when I asked, you know, if I could offer you something, if I help you with something in particular, which would move you forward in terms in mental health and well being, what would it be. And so based upon the feedback from existing clients, previous clients, and also friends and family in the poll around on LinkedIn, I created this support programme for people around the UK and also around the world, who are able to step onto this series of webinars and workshops, which are deliver via video and also on a one to one workshop basis, where we'll be tackling and dealing with some of their challenges which they might have faced a long time ago, in terms of their health and well being because a lot of times, the things in which we faced our the problems that we have Sometimes it might be through the loss of somebody, or it could be something that we saw. No, in our in our early years in our childhood. And subconsciously, we've repressed those memories and thoughts. And this then impacts us in later life. I help people who come on to the course to identify or them to identify some of the root causes of their problems, and give them sorts of coping strategies help and support. So they're able to hopefully glean a better quality of life.Stuart Webb  10:36Great, great, great use of LinkedIn. Get that get that feedback on what people actually need from from you? What a great use. Mike, I guess there must be a number of books or courses or programmes that you've taken part in yourself, which have really inspired you that you have you seen as a way to build up your own education is, is there something like that, that you'd like to share with the audience today, in order to give them a flavour of things that you've been learning or things that you've, you've discovered that you'd like to sort of bring into the bring to the audience?Mike Lawrence  11:09Yes, there's, there's a couple that come to mind. And it's always books, I'm always reading books, always learning. A lot of the there's a book sorcerer series by a gentleman called David and Eagleman is also been featured on BBC, you can see he's got some on YouTube, there's some videos that he's gotten also lots of, I think, some BBC iPlayer, as well. And he talks about the brain, and goes very deep into the brain and gets thinking about, you know, what's in there, and how and how it works, the mechanics of it all. And there's lots of aha moments, staying with the brain. Many people may have heard of Darren Brown. And there's some great two podcasts that I've listened to recently one's called boot camp up the mind, which is excellence, and boot camp of your life, which is really good as well. And again, he delves into the brain talks about some of the blind spots that we have, and, and how we think and how certain things that can influence our sorts of beliefs as well. And the final one I'll share with you is one called Lost. What's it called? Is it lost focus? I think it might have things called loss, I think it might be lost, lost focus. And it's written by a gentleman call yo Hannes, Johann Hari, h a r i. And this is for me, it's dynamite. Because when you read this, when you read this book, or I listen, or I did, I listened to it on an audible when I'm going walking. I guess you're thinking about how we use our time and where that time got bears word, where does time go? Because we say all the time. You know, if you love what you do, and I love what I enjoy doing throughout the day, and your end of the day, it's like, wow, you know, where's that time gone. But we can use that time more effectively. And when you break it down, and the amount of time is actually lost? Or as he would say, taken away? Then you calculate that time says, Well, what would I have done with that time? If I control it, you know, a lot better. And typically, you know, everyone's got a mobile phone. And the amount of times and there's lots of studies and research and he talks about this, well, the amount of time and switch is lost on looking at those notifications that keep coming up on a day to day basis. And also emails and you know, you are still at you're nodding your heads, and, and emails, and we're doing this podcast called like, remotely, and I've got notifications switched up, I've got emails, you know, I've got everything's switched off. In actual fact, I've had them switched off for about four years. And the amount of time the amount of control that I have now it is just, it's incredible. And you know, a lot of times when people ask me, you know, I'm being interviewed, and you might ask me, anyone in the future and says, you know, what tip would you give people, you know, in terms of the well being, turn the notifications offStuart Webb  14:28of that mic? And yes, you're right. I'm nodding because I too am a I do not have notifications on my phone, I guess. And you know, there are reasons for it. And, you know, we're going into what you said about Johann Hari, and I believe he was the guy that invented this thing called the Johari Window, which I've heard a lot about, which is, you don't know things about yourself. You've got to look at yourself in a different way in order to see it. But I'm very aware of the fact that notifications are one of those things which activates some very deep, old thinking in our brain I want to call them lizard brain, which is, you know, the crack of a stick in the in the woods used to be assigned for us to sort of get ready to run away nowadays, it's a being on a phone and activates all that same that same system in our body so that our our adrenaline is hyped up and we sort of get, get ready to either run away or fight. And what you don't need when you sitting watching the television and trying to relax on the day and decompress is things from your phone or when you're focused at work, you don't want to bring from your phone or thing popping up in the corner of your screen. So I'm like you, I now have a system where I, I, I have my email set as a calendar invite for myself, and I go and view my emails three times a day. And that's the only time I read email because otherwise, I'm focused on work. And when I want to actually sort of go on to social media, I use a technique you've probably heard of it called the Pomodoro Technique, my work for focus time, and then I give myself permission for a five minute break. And if I want to check Twitter, that's the time I check it. Or if I want to check LinkedIn, that's the time I check it. And I really don't do anything other than that. So I don't have notifications like you. And it has freed up hours of my week, it really has.Mike Lawrence  16:15It works a treat, because you probably well aware that in those those studies, that it highlights that when you if you've got the emails aren't if you're working away, and because you know, we talked about multitasking, and we all say that we are great multitaskers. And it breaks that myth by saying no, the brain doesn't work that way, you can only do one thing at a time. And those people who think they're great multitaskers, they take longer to do those particular tasks. And also, when you've got the if you're writing a document or a report, and that email pings up and it breaks your conscious because it activates that part and your brain was like, Ah, screw it, I need to go to that. So you start to write to that, then you then takes about 20 minutes, then to go back to that document to that that part of your mind, who was accessing to get all those nuggets information for you and your flow. You know, write that piece of work, it takes you 20 minutes to get back to that place again. Just JustStuart Webb  17:18brilliant love it might love it. We could talk about those techniques for about another two and a half hours, but I won't. Because you need to get on to something else, and you need to focus on your work. So let's just get to the final question. Mike, there is probably a question that you're thinking at the moment I wish he had asked me whatever that question is. So Mike, would you please tell us what is the question you would like me to ask you? And then once you've asked the question effectively answer it for us so that you don't leave us hanging with the with it with an interesting question. But no, no real fulfilment of the answerMike Lawrence  17:53is probably you probably mentioned it in the intro about being a red carpet.Stuart Webb  18:00You tell us what did you learn being somebody who helped holidaymakers through their what they hope would be a stress free time? How did you help them?Mike Lawrence  18:13I think it was to, they helped, I helped them in enjoy and have a good time, and have fun. And when you look all those years ago, at a very young age, the ability to be able to work and enjoy what you do and have fun and also and also impact positively and in people's lives in their own sort of health and well being and that was from the young generation all the way through, you know, to the you know, to the older generation, so all those generations and, and it helped me with my my confidence because prior to going there, I was probably an introvert and WhatsApp in an old steel town of Sheffield's and going to college and what have you around that when and just going and being flung into this space of over 5000 people who and who were there and spent a lot of money in those days and they're with their family expecting to entertain and expecting to be taken care of, you know, by these people, you know, these girls and boys in these red coats, and so something that it's live up so and, and the wonderful thing about it is that initially when I came out of working there I worked into I went into working in London in the legend creation industry when for whatever reason, I don't know what I wanted to be a manager in charge of people. And I found it very difficult in the first few years to adapt. Because I'd gone from somewhere where I was enjoying myself, I was having fun. And lots of people were, it was all positive engagement. There was no talk of mental health or wellbeing back then, because everyone was just having a good time, then we're going into the civil service, in local authority in London, it was totally different. And it took me a few years to actually adopt. And also, Stuart's, as I, as I tried to move through my career in management at it, I actually had to take off the fact that as a red coat on my, on my CV, it was fine in that was getting overlooked. And people felt as though that I wasn't saying management, managerial material, and that I didn't take the role seriously. And so I actually took that part out of it and just said that I worked in the leisure industry on the south coast, and left it at that wasn't until many years later that I set up my own consultancy company. And I was being interviewed on radio Sheffield, by a by a link be interviewed on radio Sheffield. And like yourself, he asked me the question, but he asked it in a different way. He actually said to me, what transferable skills did you did you learn as a red coat that you use in your business today. And that was like, ah, and there's lots because yes, I've got a lot you know, qualifications and Mental Health First Aid instructor and gone on lots of courses since then managerial courses and things around and complementary alternative therapies. But those skills that I learned back, then, you're able to communicate to people to talk to people understand people have conversations with people, you know, not on text or email, but communicate, and listen, because that and then to interact with people, and understand how they talk and how they feel and pick up on those things, you don't realise that you what you learn there, which then takes took me all the way through there. And, and it's one of the key attributes that I possess, when I'm working, you know, with, you know, with people now, it is one of the key things, because I was just gonna go on to say And finish in the, in my, you know, in some of the studies that I've done recently, I was surprised in one way that, you know, when we go to school, in the teachers house, it's taught how to read and write. But the amount of time in which actually is is put aside and how to listen, is very little.Stuart Webb  23:05Mike, that's a really interesting thing, too, that I started I interrupted you. I mean, it's interesting that you had to take away an element of your first part of your learning in your career, I similarly had to remove my, my, my, my scientific background, when I first started out as a manager, because people would often ask what somebody like you wanting to do a job like this. So you just take it away, don't you but, but I think that final point about learning to listen was probably the most the most interesting one that I think you you've hit upon, if we could just learn to listen to at a young age, you know, you're right. At school, we are not taught what we need when we get out into the real world, or we were not taught about that teamwork. We're not talking about that ability to communicate, we were largely sort of sat in silence listening to somebody who who feeds facts, we're not taught nearly enough how to listen to each other and, and something we learn far too late in life. And unfortunately, when we've learned it, we have ingrained behaviours, which we have to undo in order to be able to learn it properly.Mike Lawrence  24:13Absolutely, because the you know, we've all got our friend we want to be, you know, the social media is all about, look at me Look at me, like like like, and, and, and in reality, if some, in a lot of cases projects, a false image of actually who we are. But being a but in terms of a mental health and well being. Because, you know, a lot of the times when I meet people or see people, and you might say the same as well, and the first thing that we're saving, you know, English and British, we talk you know as to how are you? I'm fine and well, I'm okay. But oh We biggest a lot of times we we not? And we hope that, you know, we hope that people will respond, I'm fine. I'm okay. And well, you know, am I right? Because we were to say, actually, I'm feeling not very well. That's not what you wanted to hear.Stuart Webb  25:23We must stop, we could talk for hours, I will just say that I think there is some hope. My son who is 21 has a friend who has been to through some difficult medical problems just recently. And when he first reached out this, this young lad to my son, about a year or so ago, I said, Look, I've got a medical problem that I just I just haven't talked to many people. He's now got through that there's been surgery and things which which have helped him to get through this. He's not out of the woods, but he's, he's better. He sent a text to my son last night. And the text basically said, mate, thanks for being there. And just listening when I needed somebody to talk to. And I was just blown away that to 21 year old people, to 21 year old young men were able to actually do that gave hope for the fact that there is going to be a better view upon mental health in the future, because he really did reach out. My son was prepared to stand by and listened and helped him through and just, you know, went through it with him, you know, no matter how difficult it will seem. They just exchanged a series of sort of little text messages saying thank you. There's hope. Yeah, really, there is.Mike Lawrence  26:40And there is and we can't give up. And that's the you know, a great message. That there's always hope and we need to continue to believe that there is hope. And continue to strive to get that support from like minded people are going to listen and and be MBA and hold us accountable on on that journey, wherever we are.Stuart Webb  27:04Mike, let's, let's end on that. That's a brilliant, a brilliant endpoint. Listen, if people are watching, recording, listening to the recording, and the playback, if you want to be available to listen to really interesting conversations and pop in with questions and comments, with with interesting people like Mike go to this this list, which is HTTPS, colon forward slash forward slash TCA dot FYI, forward slash subscribe, that gets you onto our newsletter list. We will send you notifications before the broadcast, so that you can watch and listen and learn together with with really interesting people like Mike. Mike, I want to thank you so much for being here this morning and spending a few minutes with us. I know you're a busy person, and I know you've got a lot of things you've got to get on with. But thank you very much for your time.Mike Lawrence  27:58Thank you, Stuart. Appreciate it.Stuart Webb  28:00No problem. Thank you Get full access to It's Not Rocket Science! at thecompleteapproach.substack.com/subscribe

Inside the Margins
Interview With Mental Health First Aid Trainer Krysta Smith

Inside the Margins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 27:47


On this episode we speak with the Program Coordinator of the Western NY Rual Area Health Ed Center Krysta Smith. She is a Trainer in Mental Health First Aid and explains what it means to be a Mental Health First Aider.

A mí también con Mauricio Martínez
¿Cuáles son las señales de un acoso sexual?

A mí también con Mauricio Martínez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 32:55


En el episodio de hoy Mauricio entrevista a una persona sobreviviente de abuso sexual que hoy es psicoterapeuta en Mental Health FIRST AID, donde dedica su vida a ayudar a otras personas que han pasado por lo que él pasó.  Información sobre tratamientos psicológicos para sobrevivientes de abuso sexual infantil:Video con explicación de EMDR: https://youtu.be/FjBbvLGTuDEEMDR en México: Inicio | EMDR México Terapia de Reprocesamiento del Trauma (emdrmexico.org)Opiniones o quieres contar tu caso: Mauricio Martinez @martinezmau

Road to Better Teaching
E019 Savannah Armistead: Classroom Management Considering Trauma-Informed Instruction

Road to Better Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 29:04


Traveling the road to better teaching with Savannah Armistead as we discuss her moment of professional growth in creating a classroom management plan, while considering the needs of children that have experienced trauma. The Road to Better Teaching is an Amidon Planet (https://amidonplanet.com/) production. For more on portfolio development at the University of Mississippi School of Education, check out Portfolio School (https://sites.google.com/go.olemiss.edu/soeportfolio/home?authuser=0). Links from the episode. Mental Health First Aid (https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/) For questions on Mental Health First Aid, please email mentalhealth@olemiss.edu (mentalhealth@olemiss.edu). Conscious Discipline by Becky Bailey (https://consciousdiscipline.com/) The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook -- What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us about Loss, Love, and Healing by Bruce Perry and Maia Szalavitz (https://bookshop.org/a/1964/9780465094455) Special Guest: Savannah Armistead.

The Real Tea with Double Dee
Keeping up with Alex Jones

The Real Tea with Double Dee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 62:22


My Name is Sekeithia, I am certified in Mental Health First Aid. I am all about that motivation and having real world conversations. Sharing my thoughts from my own point of view. Let's learn and grow together.

Emotion Well
Rural Response - Helping Rural and Farming Communities Thrive

Emotion Well

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 28:46


The demand for mental health services has never been greater but what does that mean for those living in rural and farming communities? Jason Haglund, a fifth generation farmer and expert in the field of mental health shares how accessibility, availability, and acceptability play a factor in addressing mental health and preventing suicide. Jason also shares how Mental Health First Aid can help move us towards greater acceptance and comfort when mental health concerns arise.ISU Extension - Click for Stress on the Farm infoBank of Iowa - Click to learn more about the survey on Iowa Farmers' mental healthMental Health First Aid - Click to learn moreEFR Mental Health First Aid - Click to explore our offerings

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.
Using Typical Counseling Skills

Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 15:02


Using Typical Counseling SkillsTherapists use basic skills that we generalize in society in many ways. We might call them active listening skills, conflict resolution, communication skills, empathy skills, etc. It's true that all of these skills are things counselors do – but getting good at them does not make you a counselor! It makes you a better human. Today we talk about how the trainings we do are designed help to improve these skills in our educators. We also discuss the value of Mental Health First Aid trainings and how they teach, and allow you to practice, good basic skills that prepare you to intervene in a mental health challenge or crisis. Welcome to season 4 of Arkansas A.W.A.R.E.!Join Betsy Kindall, Nicole Fairchild, and Stacy Moore as they discuss issues related to mental health in education. Their conversations are witty and relate-able, simultaneously shedding light on issues that can sometimes be hard to confront or understand. These episodes are chunked into small bites and packed with information that would be helpful to educators, parents, children.....anyone! We want to help make everyone more A.W.A.R.E.!Project A.W.A.R.E. is a grant program funded by S.A.M.H.S.A. (the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration). The Sandy Hook school shooting happened in December of 2012. In 2013 the White House initiative "NOW IS THE TIME" came out with 2 key goals:1. Make schools safer and more nurturing.2. Increase access to mental health services.The "NOW IS THE TIME" initiative laid the foundation for federal grants like A.W.A.R.E. Arkansas applied for and received the second round of funding for A.W.A.R.E. in October of 2018. Our project is dedicated to Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education.Arkansas A.W.A.R.E. website: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/learning-services/school-health-services/arkansas-awareTranscript:https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Q0S-HsM6mO0O250T8A3zBGzsMrgeetns/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=104750952408493783016&rtpof=true&sd=trueResources:A.W.A.R.E. website:https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/learning-services/school-health-services/arkansas-awareProduced by Donnie LeeMusic: https://www.purple-planet.comMore information: https://dese.ade.arkansas.gov/Offices/communications/dese-podcasts

Illinois Association of Medicaid Health Plans (IAMHP)
Ep. 92 - - Youth Mental Health: First Aid and Addiction Prevention

Illinois Association of Medicaid Health Plans (IAMHP)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 22:33


Riley Cleary, Prevention Program Manager at the Illinois Association of Behavioral Health stops by the podcast to talk about the great work the organization is doing through their Youth Mental Health First Aid and Addiction Prevention programs.

The Book Leads: Impactful Books For Life & Leadership
Episode 38: Jill Siegel & Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connection and the Language of Human Experience

The Book Leads: Impactful Books For Life & Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 76:43


The Book Leads – Episode 38: Jill Siegel & Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connection and the Language of Human Experience It's fitting that Jill selected Atlas as the book she wanted to discuss. The subtitle of the book seems to perfectly describe the journey she's undertaken since having left the corporate world to focus full-time on the desire to do good for others in her community and beyond. In this walk through her career, there are many points where she's reborn, each time gaining insight into her next focus, including how her need for self-care lead to her study of mindfulness. I met Jill during our work with the American Marketing Association – CT Chapter board. Like so many others, she's a great connection I made during the pandemic – a connection I haven't met in person. Some highlights from the episode: · Jill's work ethic is on display, mixing up a career in corporate life and being a stay-at-home mom with volunteering duties in various industries. · She breaks down the experiences that lead her to do what she felt good about, where she felt “This is making a difference in the world.” · The area of her life that she explains by saying, “Sometimes it is nature. Sometimes it is nurture.” · How any emotion can be both healthy and unhealthy. Mentioned or Applicable Books and Stories: · The Parable of the Trapeze by Danaan Parry · The Upside of Stress: Why Stress Is Good for You, and How to Get Good at Itby Kelly McGonigal · Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole by Susan Cain Bio: Jill is a branding strategist and marketing professional with 25+ years of experience in industries including advertising, hospitality, healthcare, media, nonprofit, publishing and law. She has worked in collaboration with key members of leadership teams and executive committees to develop and foster new strategic relationships and revenue streams for both public and private organizations. She has managed and cultivated hundreds of high profile client accounts, projects and events and has been recognized for launching notable strategic programs to optimize ROI, client experience and market engagement. Today, Jill focuses her work in environments where giving back is the driving force. She is Managing Director of the Connecticut Women's Council, a Branding Strategist at J.Lauren Consulting, and a Cause Entrepreneur at One Hope Wine, an award-winning Napa Valley winery that gives back with every bottle. She's is currently enrolled in Copper Beech Institute's Mindfulness Facilitation Certification Cohort, and she will be certified as a Mindfulness Facilitator after she graduates this November. Jill is on the Development Committee for Mental Health Connecticut, she is certified in Mental Health First Aid, and after going through her own mental health crisis in 2016, she is an advocate for helping those dealing with a mental health challenge. Jill believes there is nothing more important than kindness and that we rise by lifting others. She is a mom to two daughters (age 24 and 21) and considers motherhood and her girls her greatest gift and life accomplishment.

Word of Mom Radio
Terry McGuire Giving Voice to Depression on Healthy Habits on WoMRadio

Word of Mom Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 32:00


A former TV news reporter and anchor, Terry McGuire has made a living with her voice for more than four decades. After a recent, long and dark bout of depression, she dedicated her life to shining light into the darkness. Terry founded the non-profit organization Giving Voice to Mental Illness, Inc. and launched the weekly Giving Voice to Depression podcast, which she produces and co-hosts with her sister, Bridget. Terry is a Certified Peer Specialist and has completed training in Mental Health First Aid, When the Conversation Turns to Suicide, QPR and crisis-line volunteer support. She has moderated numerous lived-experience panels and speaks at local and national mental-health conferences and conventions about upstream suicide prevention, and the power of shared stories. Join us for Healthy Habits on September 7th at 1pmET/10amPT and then in podcast. Reach out to Terry at GivingVoicetoDepression.com and on Twitter and Facebook. Thanks to StadiumBags.com. We continue to shine the light on No Such Thing as a Bully and thank Smith Sisters and the Sunday Drivers for our theme song, She is You. Connect with Word of Mom on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and email us at info.wordofmomradio@gmail.com for more info. Word of Mom Radio - sharing the wisdom of women, in business and in life.  

Centering Health Equity
Health Equity and Mental Health: Key Issues to Reduce Inequities

Centering Health Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 40:53


There is a mental health crisis in the US and its been recently discussed as the shadow pandemic that became evident as more individuals had to isolate and physically distance from loved ones to avoid the spread of Covid19. In this episode we speak with Dr. Alexander Salerno, founder of the Urban Healthcare Initiative Program and Director of the Community Health Outreach Program in New Jersey and Chuck Ingoglia, President and CEO of the National Council for Mental Wellbeing. Our conversation looked at the magnitude of the challenges anyone suffering with mental illness can encounter in finding the right care in what can only be described as a fragmented mental health system. We looked at how a unique program of integrated care– a place where physical and mental health needs can be addressed– is building on known best practices to address complex care needs for those experiencing mental illness. We also talked about the importance of sharing knowledge about Mental Health First Aid among informal and formal support systems that individuals may access. As we think about any effort to advance health equity, these conversations about access to mental health services need to take center stage now more than ever.

Successfully Depressed
Episode #7 How To Safely Talk About Your Mental Health At Work With Erin Callinan of Beneath The Brave

Successfully Depressed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 57:59 Transcription Available


In our 7th episode, Kerry interviews Erin Callinan who is the founder of Beneath The Brave, whose mission is to amplify workplaces, careers, and lives through strengthening mental health. In this episode, we learn about what Mental Health First Aid is, Who to safely talk to at work about your mental health, your rights under the Americans With Disabilities Act, and resources to make this difficult task more manageable.About Erin Callinan:Erin Callinan, MSW brings with her 13 years of non-profit leadership experience in the field of mental health, domestic violence and sexual assault. She is the Founder of Beneath The Brave, whose mission is to amplify workplaces, careers, and lives through strengthening mental health.  Erin is a nationally recognized speaker who provides cutting edge training programs, including her Leading From the Top course which gives companies the tools they need to support the mental wellness of their team.  Her passion for rewriting the narrative about mental health began in college as she adapted to “living with” rather than suffering from Bipolar Disorder. In 2013, Erin authored and published her book, “Beautifully Bipolar: An Inspiring Look Into Mental Illness” and began her career in mental health advocacy and motivational speaking.  She is a Nationally Certified Adult Mental Health First Aid Instructor and President of the Board at MIKID, a youth serving organization in Arizona for children and teens living with mental health conditions. Erin proudly received the Emerging Leader of the Year Award while working on her Masters from the National Association of Social Workers Arizona. In 2021, Erin was selected by Mayor Deasy of her hometown of Flagstaff as the recipient of the World Bipolar Day Proclamation, introduced and signed on March 30th.  Erin holds a Master of Social Work from Arizona State University and a BA in Elementary Education from the University of Arizona. She currently serves as an Advisory Committee Member on the Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness Council and was previously the Executive Director of Mental Health America of Arizona. Her proudest moment is being a Mentor to a beautiful teenager through New Pathways for Youth for the last 9 yearsShow NotesLinkedIn InstagramFacebook TwitterPaid Resources Mental Health First Aid Traning Amplify Your Life MasterclassLeading From the Top Workplace trainingBeautifully Bipolar: An Inspiring Look into Mental IllnessFree ResourcesEqual Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)  National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)  Support the show

The Christian Entrepreneurs Podcast
[Ep#377] Renewal of the mind, to believe God for supernatural provision and protection in the last days.

The Christian Entrepreneurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 57:43


Last year, I did a livestream with my friend and colleague Karen Culjak. She was also a speaker on my recent Summit – BEtheDifference on the topic: YOU: A NEW Creation in Christ and what that means.  The information Karen shared last year in November 2021 is still as relevant today as it was then. In fact, very much so, which is why I'm sharing it on this podcast.   Without any further ado, here's a little more about Karen and what we discuss.  Karen Culjak is a devoted Christian who loves Jesus! She's also a qualified life coach, who specialises in mindset coaching, psycho-spiritual therapy, and training people in Mental Health First Aid.   She's passionate about transformational growth and works with change-makers from all walks of life, who are uncompromisingly committed to renewing their minds, to the mind of Christ, so they can live their lives aligned to their true God-given purpose and potential.   On a personal note, she's married with a blended family of 6 adult children and 3 grandchildren; and she enjoys camping, caravanning, and 4wdriving, to explore the great outdoors when time permits. On today's episode Karen and I will be discussing:   The importance of renewing the mind to believe God for supernatural provision and protection in the last days; -  Mindset: your perspective and programming especially when it comes to your identity;   Mind renewal: Psycho-spiritual therapy, examining fruit, and identifying default programs that can limit our potential;   Source of security: System or Saviour, and much more  About Annemarie Cross: Dubbed “The Podcasting Queen,” Annemarie is recognized as an industry pioneer, launching her first co-hosted podcast in 2008 to be the voice of inspiration and hope amongst the deluge of ‘doom and gloom' after the GFC devastated families worldwide. Over a decade on, she's the author of Industry Thought Leader: How To Go from Invisible to Influential (and Profitable) with a Podcast and continues to be the voice of inspiration to a global audience through her award-winning podcasts. Annemarie continues to live out her mission of ‘Changing the World – ONE Message at a Time', with her own podcasts, as well as by supporting Professional Services Businesses (coaches and consultants) who are experts in their field (yet feel like they're the world's best-kept secret) go from Invisible to Influential (and Profitable) with their own Thought Leader Podcast. Click here to access Annemarie's Industry Thought Leader Podcast Series to help you go from Invisible to Influential (and Profitable) with a Podcast. Contact Annemarie: Website: www.ambitiousentrepreneurnetwork.com / www.annemariecross.com Twitter: @TheAmbitiousPod Facebook: @TheAmbitiousEntrepreneurShow The post [Ep#377] Renewal of the mind, to believe God for supernatural provision and protection in the last days appeared first on The Ambitious Entrepreneur Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson
Visit LEGOLAND New York Resort; Video Tutoring with Pearson+ Channels ; Mental Health First Aid; Cotton Incorporated

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 38:15


Matt Besterman is the Public Relations Manager at LEGOLAND® New York Resort. He talks to Michelle about all the things there are to do at the park this fall and throughout the season. LEGOLAND New York Resort is the ultimate LEGO theme park destination for kids age 2-12 and their families, celebrating its first full season in Goshen, NY, just 60 miles from NYC. The park and hotel make for a great two day visit! Johnny Betancourt is co-founder of a company that has helped more than two million students improve their learning outcomes through video tutoring. Now he's teamed up with the leading textbook publisher to bring books and video together in time for Back to School.Dr. Bregman and Linda Corley address Mental Health First Aid with their guest this week. How do you spot someone in a metal health crisis and what to do about it.Director of Corporate Strategy and Insights for Cotton Incorporated, Melissa Bastos talks about how consumers' perspectives on inflation shape their back to school shopping plans. In addition, she shares details on what to do with old, out-grown clothing to keep it out of landfills.

The Richard Piet Show
(Summit Pointe 21) Mental Health First Aid Training

The Richard Piet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 11:55


In this episode of the Summit Pointe series, Meghan and Amy discuss how mental health first aid training helps the community help others. Geared toward the general population, the training gives trainees the tools to recognize potential mental health situations, along with the ability to help guide folks to the right resources. Click to hear the details!Episode ResourcesSummit Pointe Mental Health First Aid TrainingSummit Pointe podcast series episodes

Jaws of Justice Radio
TRAUMA IS NOT A CALLOUS – TRAUMA IS A SOFT SPOT

Jaws of Justice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 59:35


On August 22nd, host David Bell talks to LaKiesha Cotton, Public Health Project Manager and Instructor in Mental Health First Aid, on how she works with healthcare systems to help develop policies that consider the social determinants of health- trauma, racism/discrimination, economic stability, education, physical environment, and access to food. LaKeisha is a Project Manager […] The post TRAUMA IS NOT A CALLOUS – TRAUMA IS A SOFT SPOT appeared first on KKFI.

The Learning Xchange
Addressing and Tackling Trauma in the Workplace

The Learning Xchange

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 17:53


How equipped is your general employee population to navigate and handle trauma in the workplace? Now, that's a question that's getting increasingly impossible to overlook in modern workplaces.The impact of unresolved workplace trauma can lead productivity to take a hit and, ultimately, employee retention. While there's no one-size-fits-all solution, Matthew Brown (Schoox's Chief People & Culture Officer) explores six ways to effectively tackle trauma in the workplace.Tune in to The Learning Xchange to hear more.Listen to this episode to find out:Why it's vital to address trauma in the workplaceImpacts of trauma in the workplaceThe importance of considering mental safety alongside physical safetyHow transparency at work fosters a better environmentHow collaboration and shared experiences make for a better workplaceThe role of education in healing workplace traumaResources:Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: https://www.samhsa.gov/Mental Health First Aid: https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/The National Alliance on Mental Illness: https://nami.org/Workplace Strategies for Mental Health: https://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/If you enjoyed this episode, please share what you love about The Learning Xchange by leaving us a rating and review!

Get Off The Bench Podcast
Kerrie Atherton - Sharing Stories of HOPE

Get Off The Bench Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 62:36


Kerrie Atherton Founder of Stories of HOPE Australia/Worldwide and EMPOWER Life Solutions is a Keynote Speaker, Author, Mental Health First Aid Training Presenter, Event Host, Trauma and Addictions Recovery Counsellor.After planning suicide at 18, Kerrie walked through the doors of a 12 step program and since that day 40 years ago, has remained clean and sober.Over the past 30 years, Kerrie has worked in the business and community sector helping those who are struggling with the issues of life find Hope. Since moving to the Sunshine Coast 17 years ago she has worked in a voluntary capacity in the community as well as private practice as a trauma and addictions coach/counsellor and mentor building connections and supporting people from all walks of life. In addition, she has worked with many young people in crisis at different schools on the Sunshine Coast.Along with her husband she founded a charity called “Streetlight” which ran for six years supporting the homeless and disadvantaged.Four years ago Kerrie founded “Stories of HOPE Australia” a platform which runs monthly events bringing HOPE to the community and is now a published author having just released the second book in her, “Stories of HOPE Australia” series ‘Resilient People, Remarkable Stories'. When the world went into lockdown, Kerrie commenced “Stories of HOPE Worldwide” an online platform sharing stories of HOPE around the world.Kerrie's desire as a “Mental Health First Aid” trainer, is to help people recognise the signs that someone may be experiencing a mental health crisis and to give them vital tools and knowledge to empower and assist them in their time of need.In everything she does, her passion is to help prevent suicide and hopelessness and to bring connection and HOPE to people in times of uncertainty in a rapidly changing world.Socials:Website: https://storiesofhope.com.au/Website: https://empowerlifesolutions.com.au/LinkedIn: Kerrie Atherton FB: Stories of HOPE Australia FB: EMPOWER Life Solutions @empowerlifesolutions Insta: Stories of HOPE Australia @stories_of_hope_aus Mentions:Kevin McMullin Beyond Blue Lifeline headspace Head to Health Enjoy the visual here on Youtube

Mother's Quest Podcast
Throwback Thursday: Living and Loving with Authenticity with Hands Free Mama Rachel Macy Stafford

Mother's Quest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 55:20


This Throwback Thursday episode comes to you while I'm away on vacation at my happy place, UCLA's Bruin Woods in Lake Arrowhead.While here for the week, I've made it an annual tradition to take off all my social media apps from my phone, truly unplug, and be present. The inspiration for this came from this week's guest, Rachel Macy Stafford, whose personal commitment to putting down her phone and becoming a Hands-Free Mama led to a Hands-Free Movement, several powerful books, and most recently to a new audio journey called Soul Shift Sessions through a partnership with Sounds True. You can follow the link to explore this for yourself in the show notes. This episode was originally recorded during a challenging time in our pandemic, March of 2020, while we were sheltering in place and just after the killing of George Floyd. There is no question that we face continued challenges. I hope this episode sparks renewed hope in the power of presence, fulfilling our unique purpose, and authentic connection. You can purchase Rachel's new Soul Shift Sessions audio journey here.    This Week's Challenge:   For this week's challenge, Rachel encourages us to think about any hurtful comments, or criticism, consciously and unconsciously, that we've been carrying around that's holding us back from truly fulfilling our purpose. Reflect on it and slowly turn that pain into purpose. This Episode is Dedicated by Samantha Arsenault   Samantha Arsenault Livingstone is an Olympic gold medalist, high-performance consultant, mental health educator, speaker, and entrepreneur – and she's a mother of four and recovering perfectionist. Samantha holds a master's degree in education and spent six years teaching high school science and coaching swimming. After a near-death experience with her then 12- month old daughter, Samantha knew it was time to pay forward all she's learned about achievement, emotional resilience, rising from failure, and finding happiness.   In 2016, Samantha founded Livingstone High Performance in response to the mental health crisis impacting adolescents across the globe, specifically those in the athletic arena. LHP provides pillars of support to organizations, teams, and individuals to elevate mental health and improve performance, and build a more empowered village. In addition to private and group coaching, Samantha offers online courses and consults with teams and organizations on athlete wellness initiatives, leadership, strategic planning, rising skills, and developing high-performance cultures. She is a certified instructor of Mindful Sport Performance Enhancement and Mental Health First Aid.   Samantha is an engaging public speaker who has more than 19 years of experience, which includes her TEDx Talk: The Weight of Gold: An Olympian's Path to Recovery. She's been featured as a keynote speaker, expert panelist, workshop facilitator, and seminar leader. She's worked with high-school, collegiate, and professional athletes in a group and 1:1 setting; school districts; athletic departments; coaching organizations; women in business groups; wellness entrepreneurs; and national governing bodies, most notably, USA Swimming.   Samantha and her husband, Rob, live in the Berkshires with their four girls. To learn more about her offerings, go over to www.samanthalivingstone.com.   To learn more about her offerings, go over to www.samanthalivingstone.com. You can join Samantha's FREE 5-Day I AM CHALLENGE at www.samanthalivingstone.com/i-am-challenge     • Facebook @slivingstonewellness • Instagram @slivingstn • Linkedin @sarsenaultlivingstone In This Episode We Talk About:   • The way Rachel's mother gave her the gift of “presence” even when she couldn't be physically present.   • Rachel's quest for purpose and the legacy she wants to leave • How reflecting on the question “How do I do it all?” on a run one day became the “spark moment” that pushed Rachel to choose herself • What Rachel means by her connection to her “dreamer girl” • Why facing the truth is really just the beginning • What it means when Rachel says to her children “I want to love you by your book.”  • Hands-Free Mama as a way of being • The pressure and insecurity of online life and how screentime distraction becomes the biggest obstacle to living purpose-filled • The 3 roles that will allow us to walk beside our kids • Finding your place of refuge and helping your kids find theirs • How we can “find our people” by doing the things our heart calls us to do • The tear-filled pledge I made to Rachel, reading from a promise in her book on p.57    Full Episode Show Notes   Check out the full shownotes from the original episode here: Ep 74: Living and Loving with Authenticity with Hands Free Mama Rachel Macy Stafford   Mother's Quest is a podcast for moms who are ready to live a truly E.P.I.C. life. Join in for intimate conversations with a diverse group of inspiring mothers as they share how they are living an E.P.I.C. life, Engaging mindfully with their children (E), Passionately and Purposefully making a difference beyond their family (P), Investing in themselves (I), and Connecting to a strong support network (C). Join our community of mothers to light the way and sustain you on your quest at https://www.facebook.com/groups/mothersquest/

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson
UVCeed for Disinfecting for Travel; Visit Loudoun County, Mental Health First Aid with Dr. B; Goodwill Industries; Melanoma Prevention

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 43:29


The Breakdown with Dr. B
Mental Health First Aid, Part 2

The Breakdown with Dr. B

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 9:39


The mental stresses and strains of the world consistently seem to weigh down everyday living.  For some, the pressures of life can turn into a mental health crisis. How can you be of assistance and help a friend or colleague that may need mental health first aid? Dr. B. breaks down the warning signs of a mental health crisis and offers advice on how and where one can get those who are suffering, necessary care.———Welcome to The Breakdown with Doctor B., a psychologically healing conversation with well-known psychiatrist Arthur Bregman MD.  Every week Dr. B. and host Linda Corley break down issues and problems from a mental health perspective. From the incessant stresses of the pandemic to untangling relationship problems, Dr. B's years of experience help piece together the messiest of life's problems.

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process
159: Fertile Fear with Luan Joy Sherman, artist and educator

Artist Soapbox * Local Artists on Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 35:27 Transcription Available


It's Mara Thomas in conversation with artist and educator Luan Joy Sherman! Mara connected with Luan through the http://schoolofthealternative.com/ (School of the Alternative) (SotA) an immersive, non-hierarchical learning environment that seeks to “create conditions necessary for a present-day community of pioneering artists and critical thinkers.” During this year's SotA session, Luan facilitated a class titled, “Fertile Fear" which Mara and Luan discuss in this episode. The description of Fertile Fear: "A class focused on making friends with fear/avoidance and using these instructive feelings as a door into our true desires. Compassion, vulnerability, emotional safety, and community support are the ideal ingredients for accessing bravery. We'll discuss dimensions of fear, the power of vulnerability, and create guidelines for how we can cultivate bravery together." One of the tools Luan shares in this episode is what he calls his “Daily Practice” – identifying things that he needs to connect with on a daily basis to help him feel emotionally, physically, and creatively healthy. Luan discusses how his Daily Practice came to be, how it was received in creative community, and the tendency that can creep in around using tools like this as a form of self-judgment. BIO: Luan Joy Sherman (he/him) is a white, queer, trans masculine, neurodivergent artist, writer, performer, teacher, and energy worker. He works with School of the Alternative; an experimental art school / world-building project located in Black Mountain, NC as a community facilitator and Board Member. He's taught four classes at SotA: Fertile Fear, Physical Education- The Joy of Having a Body, How to Not Know, and Queering Masculinity.  Luan earned an MFA in Sculpture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in May 2020 and is certified in Compassion Cultivation, Mental Health First Aid, and as a Trauma Support Specialist. https://share.descript.com/view/EPOAUkcEQEX (Transcript) Quote Mentioned in Episode: “Being content is perhaps no less easy than playing the violin well; and requires no less practice.” – Alain de Botton LISTEN TO ASBX AUDIO DRAMAS:https://artistsoapbox.org/masterbuilder/ (Master Builder) https://www.thenewcolossuspodcast.com/ (The New Colossus) https://artistsoapbox.org/declaration-of-love/ (Declaration of Love audio anthology) https://artistsoapbox.org/audio-dramas/asbx-shorts/ (ASBX Shorts) CONNECT AND FOLLOW: Artist Soapbox on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/artist_soapbox (@artist_soapbox) Instagram: @https://www.instagram.com/artistsoapbox/ (artistsoapbox) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/artistsoapboxpodcast/ (https://www.facebook.com/artistsoapboxpodcast/) CONTRIBUTE: Soapboxers are the official patrons of the Artist Soapbox podcast. http://www.patreon.com/artistsoapbox (Get on the Soapbox with us at Patreon )or make a one-time donation via Ko-fi at https://ko-fi.com/artistsoapbox (https://ko-fi.com/artistsoapbox) or via PayPal at https://www.paypal.me/artistsoapbox?ppid=PPC000628&cnac=US&rsta=en_US(en_US)&cust=A55YE26SQPDL8&unptid=bcec7a46-337d-11e8-9bbe-9c8e992da578&t=&cal=cb540804e2cda&calc=cb540804e2cda&calf=cb540804e2cda&unp_tpcid=ppme-social-user-profile-created&page=main:email&pgrp=main:email&e=op&mchn=em&s=ci&mail=sys (PayPal.Me/artistsoapbox.) If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation, please consider our non-profit https://fundraising.fracturedatlas.org/soapbox-audio-collective (Soapbox Audio Collective).

50% Facts
Dr. Mike Battaglino: How to check in with that buddy you're worried about | Mental Health Awareness Month

50% Facts

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 85:19


We always think of him as “70s Big Mike” but Dr . Mike Battaglino is an educator for the Department of the Air Force, Air Force Veteran, Adjunct Professor and competitive Strongman. Throughout these varied endeavors, Mike has become passionate about raising awareness for mental health, particularly for men where help-seeking is often stigmatized. In addition to raising money and awareness for Movember each year, Mike also facilitates the Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training course and Mental Health First Aid.We dive into the question of how to have the difficult discussions about mental health, Resilience Training, and how negative attitudes towards men's emotions have actually undermined mental health. You can find Mike on Instagram @drmikebattaglinoHave a question for us? Hit us up on social media and use the hashtag #onegoodquestion. If your question is picked, you'll get something special from us!Join our Discord for free! Check out our gym (Third Street Barbell) at ThirdStreetBarbell.com and subscribe for updates about our apparel line at 3sb.co! Local memberships and international fresh fits! Get early access to our NEXT DROP!Check out our podcast website: 50percentfacts.comHosted by Mike Farr (@silentmikke) and Jim McDonald (@thejimmcd).Produced by Jim McDonaldProduction assistance by Sam McDonald.Theme by Aaron Moore.Branding by Joseph Manzo (@jmanzo523)

50% Facts
Dr . Mike Battaglino: How to check in with that buddy you're worried about | Mental Health Awareness Month Special

50% Facts