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NATO-led security mission in Afghanistan, 2001–14

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International Security Assistance Force

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Best podcasts about International Security Assistance Force

Latest podcast episodes about International Security Assistance Force

Let's Get After it with Chris Cuomo
A Conversation with General Stan McChrystal about Risk

Let's Get After it with Chris Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:43


In this special Bonus episode, Chris has an extended dialogue with General Stan McChrystal, US Army (Retired) about his new book: Risk: A User's Guide,  co-authored with Anna Butrico. They talk through assessing risk in our own lives: amid the pandemic and persistent uncertainty at work and at home, with real world examples of how to systematically detect and respond to it.  This is a conversation not to miss.  General Stanley McChrystal retired in July 2010 as a four-star general in the U.S. Army. His last assignment was as the commander of the International Security Assistance Force and as the commander of the U.S. forces in Afghanistan. He had previously served as the director of the Joint Staff and as the commander of the Joint Special Operations Command. The author of My Share of the Task, Team of Teams, and Leaders, he is currently a senior fellow at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and the cofounder of the McChrystal Group.

Dose of Leadership with Richard Rierson | Authentic & Courageous Leadership Development
General Stanley McChrystal on Building & Maintaining our Risk Immune System

Dose of Leadership with Richard Rierson | Authentic & Courageous Leadership Development

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:03


General Stanley McChrystal retired in July 2010 as a four-star general in the U.S. Army. His last assignment was as the commander of the International Security Assistance Force and as the commander of the U.S. forces in Afghanistan. He had previously served as the director of the Joint Staff and as the commander of the Joint Special Operations Command. The author of My Share of the Task, Team of Teams, and Leaders, he is currently a senior fellow at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and the cofounder of theMcChrystal Group, a leadership consulting firm.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
439: General Stanley McChrystal - A New Way To Understand Risk & Master The Unknown

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 59:21


Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more... Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 General Stanley McChrystal retired in July 2010 as a four-star general in the U.S. Army. His last assignment was as the commander of the International Security Assistance Force and as the commander of the U.S. forces in Afghanistan. He had previously served as the director of the Joint Staff and as the commander of the Joint Special Operations Command. The author of My Share of the Task, Team of Teams, and Leaders, he is currently a senior fellow at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and the co-founder of the McChrystal Group, a leadership consulting firm. Notes: Stan's mentor for his military career and still to this day: an Army officer with a thick southern accent, Major John Vines. His advice: “If there are 3 people responsible for feeding the dog, the dog is going to starve.” Stan graduated from West Point 31 years after his father did. Major General George Smith Patton (General George Patton's son) handed him his diploma. Stan wondered at that moment, what kind of leader you wanted to be. And he came up with, “a good one.” Now the more fundamental question is “What do good leaders do?” Instead of just being a good leader, Stan desires to be an effective leader. Effective leaders: Tactically competent Are morally good Respected They create an environment where others want to follow They shape how people think and behave People that others want to follow Have high standards Risk: in reality, risk is neither mathematical nor finite. Its impact depends to a great extent on how we perceive, process, and respond. A healthy risk immune system successfully executes 4 imperatives: Detect, Assess, Respond, and Learn "Risk comes at you from out of the blue, from every angle, when least convenient. There is a cost in becoming overly focused on risk and another at ignoring them. And the sweet spot between the two extremes moves with the circumstances around you.” “I chose a soldier's life for many reasons, one of which was the desire to perceive myself as a courageous risk taker. I liked the idea of taking risks that others would not.” Threat x Vulnerability = Risk Risk is an eternal challenge. But trying to anticipate or predict every possible risk is a fool's errand. The key is to understand how we need to think about risk, and to then respond appropriately. Rather than living in dread of things we often can't anticipate, duck, or dodge – we must remember these five key insights. Look Inward: The greatest risk to us is us. It's Up to Us: We have a risk immune system Be holistic: It's the system. Make it work Balance: The muscles you exercise will be strong: those you ignore will be vulnerabilities Risk is always with us, and it's our responsibility to make our teams ready for it When taking command of the 2nd Ranger Battalion, Stan, along with the leaders of the unit, established The foundational skills - They called them the big 4: Physical conditioning Marksmanship Medical Skills Small Unit Drills But even before mastering basic skills, grounding both individuals and organizations with answers to the most basic questions that relate to the narrative is essential: What are our values? What exactly do we do? And why do we do it? What is expected of each of us? What went wrong with our response to COVID-19? 50 states operated separately instead of a united response "We weren't unified" "Our leaders did not communicate effectively." "You have to act before the population sees the requirement for it." Have a front-line obsession - Stan was known for going on the front lines with his soldiers. As leaders, we should do the same with our teams. Be on the front lines to: See how it's done with your own eyes, not just reports They need to see you go. They'll appreciate it It helps create your self-identity The new hybrid model of in-office and at-home working... Be intentional Use technology Understand what you're not doing Don't get lazy How to deal with imposter syndrome? Ask, "What do I know?" "What's my responsibility?" "You have to fight that crisis of confidence." Excellence = Be less flexible on your basic values Be flexible with how a problem gets solved

Congressional Dish
CD238: Losing Afghanistan

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 97:18


The war in Afghanistan is over. In this episode, we document how and why the Biden administration finally admitted defeat in our 20 year attempt to create a new government in Afghanistan and we take a hard look at the lessons we need to learn. Afghanistan is a country in a far away land, but there are disturbing similarities between the Afghanistan government that just collapsed and our own. We'd be wise not to ignore them. Executive Producer: Rachel Passer Executive Producer: Anonymous  Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD218: Minerals are the New Oil CD210: The Afghanistan War CD124: The Costs of For-Profit War How We Got Here Craig Whitlock. The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War. Simon and Schuster, 2021. Patrick Tucker. August 18, 2021. “Trump's Pledge to Exit Afghanistan Was a Ruse, His Final SecDef Says.” Defense One. Eugene Kiely and Robert Farley. August 17, 2021. “Timeline of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan.” FactCheck.org. Eric Schmitt and Jennifer Steinhauer. July 30, 2021. “Afghan Visa Applicants Arrive in U.S. After Years of Waiting.” The New York Times. Craig Whitlock, Leslie Shapiro and Armand Emamdjomeh. December 9, 2019. “The Afghanistan Papers: A secret history of the war.” The Washington Post. Mark Landler and James Risen. July 25, 2017. “Trump Finds Reason for the U.S. to Remain in Afghanistan: Minerals.” The New York Times. John F. Harris. October 15, 2001. “Bush Rejects Taliban Offer On Bin Laden ” Washington Post. The Evacuation: Those Left Behind William Mauldin. September 2, 2021. “Afghanistan Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Staff Left Behind.” Wall Street Journal. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Karni. August 29, 2021. “Series of U.S. Actions Left Afghan Allies Frantic, Stranded and Eager to Get Out.” The York Times. Sami Sadat. August 25, 2021. “I Commanded Afghan Troops This Year. We Were Betrayed.” The New York Times. Marjorie Censer. August 18, 2021. “US contractors rush to get former employees out of Afghanistan.” Defense News. Siobhan Hughes. August 18, 2021. “Afghanistan Veterans in Congress Trying to Prevent ‘a Death Warrant' for Helping America.” Wall Street Journal. Alex Sanz and Tammy Webber. August 18, 2021. “US friends try to rescue brother in arms in Afghanistan.” AP News. Seth Moulton. June 04, 2021. "Moulton, Bipartisan Honoring Our Promises Working Group to White House: Evacuate our Afghan Partners.” Contractors in Afghanistan Matt Taibbi. August 18, 2021. “We Failed Afghanistan, Not the Other Way Around.” TK News by Matt Taibbi on Substack. Jack Detsch. August 16, 2021. “Departure of Private Contractors Was a Turning Point in Afghan Military's Collapse.” Foreign Policy. Matt Stoller. July 15, 2021. “‘A Real S*** Show': Soldiers Angrily Speak Out about Being Blocked from Repairing Equipment by Contractors.” BIG by Matt Stoller. Lynzy Billing. May 12, 2021. “The U.S. Is Leaving Afghanistan? Tell That to the Contractors.” New York Magazine. Oren Liebermann. March 29, 2021. “Pentagon could open itself to costly litigation from contractors if US pulls out of Afghanistan this year.” CNN. Lucas Kunce and Elle Ekman. September 15, 2019. “Comment Submitted by Major Lucas Kunce and Captain Elle Ekman.” [Regulations.gov(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulations.gov). Aaron Mehta. Oct 25, 2016. “30 Years: William Perry — Reshaping the Industry.” Defense News. Jared Serbu. August 22, 2016. “DoD now awarding more than half its contract spending without competitive bids.” Federal News Network. 41 U.S. Code § 3307 - Preference for commercial products and commercial services. Money: Lost and Gained David Moore. August 23, 2021. “Lawmakers Benefit From Booming Defense Stocks.” Sludge. Lee Fang. August 20, 2021. “Congressman Seeking to Relaunch Afghan War Made Millions in Defense Contracting.” The Intercept. Anna Massoglia and Julia Forrest. August 20, 2021. “Defense contractors spent big in Afghanistan before the U.S. left and the Taliban took control.” OpenSecrets.org. Stephen Losey. April 16, 2021. “The Bill for the Afghanistan War Is $2.26 Trillion, and Still Rising.” Military.com. Eli Clifton. February 16, 2021. “Weapons Biz Bankrolls Experts Pushing to Keep U.S. Troops in Afghanistan.” Daily Beast. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Lobbying, 2021. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Money to Congress. Laws S.1790 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 Sponsor: Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Status: Became Public Law No: 116-92 on December 20, 2019 H.R. 3237: Emergency Security Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 Sponsor: Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) Status: Signed into law, 2021 May 20 House Vote Breakdown Congressional Budget Office Score Law Outline TITLE IV: BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXTENSION AND MODIFICATION OF THE AFGHAN SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM Sec. 401: Amends the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 to expand eligibility to include Afghans who worked not only for the US Government for more than 1 year but also our allies as an off-base interpreter or if they performed "activities for United States military stationed at International Security Assistance Force (or any successor name for such Force). Increases the number of Special Immigrant Visas (SIV) to Afghan partners by 8,000, for a total of 34,500 allocated since December 19, 2014. Sec. 402: Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security and Secretary of state to jointly waive for 1 year (maximum 2 years with an extension) the requirement that Afghan partners eligible for SIVs get a medical exam before they can receive their visa. The Secretary of Homeland Security has to create a process to make sure Afghan SIV holders get a medical exam within 30 days of entry into the United States. Sec. 403: Allows the surviving spouse or child or employee of the United States Government abroad to be eligible for immigration into the United States if the employee worked for our government for at least 15 years or was killed in the line of duty. It also expands entry permissions for Afghan SIV applicants in addition to those who have already been approved. This is retroactive to June 30, 2021. Policies for Visa Processing: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Policy Manual, Chapter 9: Certain Afghan Nationals U.S Department of State -- Bureau of Consular Affairs. “Special Immigrant Visas for Afghans - Who Were Employed by/on Behalf of the U.S. Government.” Audio Sources Gen. Mark Milley: "There was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days." August 18, 2021 General Mark Milley: The time frame of rapid collapse that was widely estimated and ranged from weeks to months, and even years following our departure, there was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days. Central Command submitted a variety of plans that were briefed and approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and the President. These plans were coordinated, synchronized and rehearsed to deal with these various scenarios. One of those contingencies is what we are executing right now. As I said before, there's plenty of time to do AARs(After Action Reviews) and key lessons learned and to delve into these questions with great detail. But right now is not that time. Right now, we have to focus on this mission, because we have soldiers at risk. And we also have American citizens and Afghans who supported us for 20 years also at risk. This is personal and we're going to get them out. President Biden on Afghanistan Withdrawal Transcript July 8, 2021 Sound Clips 01:30 President Biden: When I announced our drawdown in April, I said we would be out by September, and we're on track to meet that target. Our military mission in Afghanistan will conclude on August 31. The drawdown is proceeding in a secure and orderly way, prioritizing the safety of our troops as they depart 3:40 President Biden: Together with our NATO allies and partners, we have trained and equipped nearly 300,000 current serving members of the military, the Afghan national security force, and many beyond that are no longer serving. Add to that hundreds of thousands more Afghan national defense and security forces trained over the last two decades. 04:04 President Biden: We provided our Afghan partners with all the tools, let me emphasize, all the tools -- training, equipment -- of any modern military. We provided advanced weaponry, and we're going to continue to provide funding and equipment and we'll ensure they have the capacity to maintain their Air Force. 5:54 President Biden: We're also going to continue to make sure that we take on Afghan nationals who worked side by side with US forces, including interpreters and translators. Since we're no longer going to have military there after this, we're not going to need them and they'll have no jobs. We're [sic] also going to be vital to our efforts. they've been very vital, and so their families are not exposed to danger as well. We've already dramatically accelerated the procedure time for Special Immigrant Visas to bring them to the United States. Since I was inaugurated on January 20, we've already approved 2,500 Special Immigrant Visas to come to the United States. Up to now, fewer than half have exercised the right to do that. Half have gotten on aircraft and come commercial flights and come and other half believe they want to stay, at least thus far. We're working closely with Congress to change the authorization legislation so that we can streamline the process of approving those visas. And those who have stood up for the operation to physically relocate 1000s of Afghans and their families before the US military mission concludes so that, if they choose, they can wait safely outside of Afghanistan, while their US visas are being processed. 8:13 President Biden: For those who have argued that we should stay just six more months, or just one more year, I asked them to consider the lessons of recent history. In 2011, the NATO allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. In 2014, some argued one more year. So we kept fighting. We kept taking casualties. In 2015, the same, and on and on. Nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year of fighting in Afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely. It's up to the Afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. Others are more direct. Their argument is that we should stay with the Afghans and Afghanistan indefinitely. In doing so they point to the fact that we we have not taken losses in this last year. So they claim that the cost of just maintaining the status quo is minimal. 9:19 President Biden: But that ignores the reality, and the facts that already presented on the ground in Afghanistan when I took office. The Taliban is at its strongest militarily since 2001. The number of US forces in Afghanistan had been reduced to a bare minimum. And the United States and the last administration made an agreement that they have to with the Taliban remove all our forces by May 1 of this year. That's what I inherited. That agreement was the reason the Taliban had ceased major attacks against US forces. 9:55 President Biden: If in April, I had instead announced that the United States was going to go back on that agreement, made by the last administration, the United States and allied forces will remain in Afghanistan for the foreseeable future, the Taliban would have again begun to target our forces. The status quo was not an option. Staying would have meant US troops taking casualties, American men and women back in the middle of a civil war, and we would run the risk of having to send more troops back in Afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. Once that agreement with the Taliban had been made, staying with a bare minimum force was no longer possible. 10:34 President Biden: So let me ask those who want us to stay: how many more? How many 1000s more Americans' daughters and sons are you willing to risk? How long would you have them stay? Already we have members of our military whose parents fought in Afghanistan 20 years ago. Would you send their children and their grandchildren as well? Would you send your own son or daughter? After 20 years, a trillion dollars spent training and equipping hundreds of 1000s of Afghan National Security and Defence Forces. 2,448 Americans killed, 20,722 more wounded, and untold 1000s coming home with unseen trauma to their mental health. I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome. 11:51 President Biden: Today the terrorist threat has metastasized beyond Afghanistan. So, we are repositioning our resources and adapting our counterterrorism posture to meet the threats where they are now: significantly higher in South Asia, the Middle East and Africa. 12:07 President Biden: But make no mistake, our military and intelligence leaders are confident they have the capabilities to protect the homeland and our interests from any resurgent terrorist challenge emerging or emanating from Afghanistan. We're developing a counterterrorism over-the-horizon capability that will allow us to keep our eyes firmly fixed at any direct threat to the United States in the region and act quickly and decisively if needed. 12:38 President Biden: We also need to focus on shoring up America's core strengths to meet the strategic competition competition with China and other nations that is really going to determine our future. 14:58 Reporter: Is the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan now inevitable? President Biden: No. It is not. Because you have the Afghan troops, 300,000. Well equipped, as well equipped as any army in the world, and an air force against something like 75,000 Taliban. It is not inevitable. 15:45 President Biden: Do I trust the Taliban? No, but I trust the capacity of the Afghan military who is better trained, better equipped, and more competent in terms of conducting war. 18:07 Reporter: Your own intelligence community has assessed that the Afghan government will likely collapse President Biden: That is not true 18:53 President Biden: And I want to make clear what I made clear to Ghani, that we are not going to walk away and not sustain their ability to maintain that force. We are. We're going to also work to make sure we help them in terms of everything from food necessities and other things in the region. But there is not a conclusion that in fact, they cannot defeat the Taliban. I believe the only way there's going to be -- this is now Joe Biden, not the intelligence community -- the only way there's only going to be peace and secure in Afghanistan, is that they work out a modus vivendi with the Taliban, and they make a judgement as to how they can make peace. And the likelihood there's going to be one unified government in Afghanistan, controlling the whole country is highly unlikely. 21:30 Reporter: Mr. President, how serious was the corruption among the Afghanistan government to this mission failing there? President Biden: First of all, the mission hasn't failed yet. 22:00 President Biden: There were going to be negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan national security forces, and the Afghan government that didn't come to fruition. So the question now is where do they go from here? The jury is still out, but the likelihood there's going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely. 23:20 Reporter: Mr. President, "speed is safety," as you just said in your remarks. Are you satisfied with the timeline of relocating Afghan nationals? Is it happening quickly enough to your satisfaction if it may not happen until next month at the end? President Biden: It has already happened, there have already been people, about 1000 people have gotten on aircraft and come to the United States already on commercial aircraft. So as I said, there's over 2500 people, that as from January to now, have have gotten those visas and only half decided that they wanted to leave. The point is that I think the whole process has to be speeded up -- period -- in terms of being able to get these visas. Reporter: Why can't the US evacuate these Afghan translators to the United States to await their visa processing as some immigrants of the southern border have been allowed to? President Biden: Because the law doesn't allow that to happen. And that's why we're asking the Congress to consider changing the law. President Biden Remarks on Afghanistan Strategy Transcript April 14, 2021 Sound Clips 00:38 President Biden: I'm speaking to you today from the Roosevelt -- the Treaty room in the White House -- the same spot where in October of 2001, President George W. Bush informed our nation that the United States military had begun strikes on terrorist training camps in Afghanistan. It was just weeks, just weeks after the terrorist attack on our nation that killed 2,977 innocent souls, that turned Lower Manhattan into a disaster area, destroyed parts of the Pentagon and made hallowed ground in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and sparked an American promise that we would never forget. We went to Afghanistan in 2001, to root out al Qaeda to prevent future terrorist attacks against the United States planned from Afghanistan. Our objective was clear, the cause was just, our NATO allies and partners rallied beside us. And I supported that military action along with the overwhelming majority of the members of Congress. More than seven years later, in 2008 weeks before we swore the oath of office -- President Obama and I were about to swear -- President Obama asked me to travel to Afghanistan and report back on the state of the war in Afghanistan. I flew to Afghanistan to the Kunar Valley, a rugged, mountainous region on the border of Pakistan. What I saw on that trip reinforced my conviction that only the Afghans have the right and responsibility to lead their country. And that more and endless American military force could not create or sustain a durable Afghan Government. I believed that our presence in Afghanistan should be focused on the reason we went in the first place: to ensure Afghanistan would not be used as a base from which to attack our homeland again. We did that, we accomplished that objective. I said, along with others, we would follow Osama bin Laden to the gates of hell if need be. That's exactly what we did. And we got him. It took us close to 10 years to put President Obama's commitment into form. And that's exactly what happened Osama bin Laden was gone. That was 10 years ago. Think about that. We delivered justice to Bin Laden a decade ago. And we've stayed in Afghanistan for a decade since. Since then, our reasons for remaining in Afghanistan have become increasingly unclear, even as the terrorist threat that we went to fight evolved. Over the past 20 years, the threat has become more dispersed, metastasizing around the globe. Al Shabaab in Somalia, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, on Al Nusra in Syria, ISIS attempting to create a caliphate in Syria and Iraq and establishing affiliates in multiple countries in Africa and Asia. With the terror threat now in many places, keeping 1000s of troops grounded and concentrated in just one country at a cost of billions each year makes little sense to me and our leaders. We cannot continue the cycle of extending or expanding our military presence in Afghanistan, hoping to create ideal conditions for the withdraw and expecting a different result. I'm now the fourth United States President to preside over American troop presence in Afghanistan: two Republicans, two Democrats. I will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth. After consulting closely with our allies and partners, with our military leaders and intelligence personnel, with our diplomats and our development experts, with the Congress and the Vice President, as well as with Mr. Ghani and many others around the world. I concluded that it's time to end America's longest war. It's time for American troops to come home. 5:01 President Biden: When I came to office, I inherited a diplomatic agreement, duly negotiated between the government of the United States and the Taliban, that all US forces would be out of Afghanistan by May 1 2021, just three months after my inauguration. That's what we inherited. That commitment is perhaps not what I would have negotiated myself, but it was an agreement made by the United States government. And that means something. So in keeping with that agreement, and with our national interest, the United States will begin our final withdrawal beginning on May 1 of this year. 8:11 President Biden: You all know that less than 1% of Americans serve in our Armed Forces. The remaining 99%, we owe them. We owe them. They've never backed down from a single mission that we've asked of them. I've witnessed their bravery firsthand during my visits to Afghanistan. They've never wavered in their resolve. They paid a tremendous price on our behalf and they have the thanks of a grateful nation. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) High-Risk List Center for Strategic and International Studies Transcript March 10, 2021 Speaker: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Sound Clips 7:40 John Sopko: But right now, that state is under threat. In the wake of the February 2020 withdrawal agreement, all is not well. Compromise appears in short supply on either side. Taliban attacks have actually increased since the agreement was signed. Assassination of prominent officials, activists, journalists, aid workers and others have also increased, including an unsuccessful attack on one of the female members of the peace negotiating team. And the Taliban offensive on Kandahar city last October, as peace negotiations were ongoing, may well have succeeded, were it not for U.S. air support. Peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban have achieved little for Afghanistan so far, and only time will tell as to whether the new Biden administration initiative will bear fruit. And the Afghan people's fears for its own government survival are exacerbated by the knowledge of how dependent their country is on foreign military and financial support. 12:56 John Sopko: Another equally serious threat to Afghanistan's stability has also largely been ignored as we focus on the boots on the ground in Afghanistan. And that is the provision of last year's U.S.-Taliban agreement that stipulates that in addition to the departure of U.S. and coalition troops, or non-diplomatic civilian personnel: private security contractors, trainers, advisors, and supporting service personnel also must leave the country by May 1. Should this come to passSIGAR and many others believe this may be more devastating to the effectiveness of the Afghan security forces than the withdrawal of our remaining troops. Why is that? Because the Afghan government relies heavily on these foreign contractors and trainers to function. In the first quarter of fiscal year 2021 there are over 18,000 Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan, including 6000 Americans, and 7,000 3rd country nationals, 40% of whom are responsible for logistics, maintenance, or training tasks. Now, it is well known that the Afghan security forces need these contractors to maintain their equipment, manage supply chains, and train their military and police to operate the advanced equipment that we have purchased for them. For example, as of December, the Afghan National Army was completing just under 20% of its own maintenance work orders, well below the goal of 80% that was set and the 51% that they did in 2018. So that's actually going down. The Afghan National Police were just as bad if not worse, undertaking only 12% of their own maintenance work against a target of 35% and less than the 16% that we reported in our 2019 high risk list. Additionally, and more troubling. The Department of Defense does train, advise and assist command air, or commonly called TAC air recently reported that since late 2019, they have reduced their personnel in Afghanistan by 94%, and that the military drawdown now requires near total use of contract support to maintain the Afghan Air fleet. They assess that quote “further drawdown in the associated closure basis will effectively end all in country aviation training contracts in Afghanistan.” Again, why is this significant? Why do we view this as a high risk? Namely because contractors currently provide 100% of the maintenance for the Afghan Air Force, UAE 60 helicopters and CE 130 cargo aircraft and a significant portion of Afghans Light Combat Support aircraft. TAC air this January gave a bleak assessment, namely, that no Afghan airframe can be sustained as combat effective for more than a few months in the absence of contractor support. 17:51 John Sopko: Continued funding for U.S. reconstruction programs aimed at promoting economic development, rule of law, respect for human rights, good governance and security for the Afghan people may be more significant, because it may be the primary lever left for the US and other donors to influence that country. It appears that even the Taliban understand Afghanistan's dire need for foreign assistance. Because, as one of the few commitments that the US had to make last year was, “to seek economic cooperation for reconstruction, with the new post settlement, Afghan Islamic government.” Now how much the donor community wishes to stay involved will of course depend on what that government looks like and how it behaves. Numerous officials, including then Secretary of State Pompeo and Ambassador Halley, have stated that the US will be able to advance its human rights goals, including the rights of women and girls with the Taliban by leveraging or conditioning this much needed financial assistance. But unfortunately, as SIGAR has long reported, even when conditionality involved only dealing with the Afghan government, donors do not have a stellar record of successfully utilizing that conditionality to influence Afghan behavior. 27:19 John Sopko: Today our report suggests the donor community should realize the Afghan government is focused on a single goal, its survival. Afghanistan is more dependent on international support than ever before. It may not be an overstatement that if foreign assistance is withdrawn and peace negotiations fail, Taliban forces could be at the gates of Kabul in short order. Hearing: A PATHWAY FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN: EXAMINING THE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE AFGHANISTAN STUDY GROUP House Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on National Security February 19, 2021 Testimony was heard from the following Afghanistan Study Group officials: Kelly A. Ayotte, Co-Chair; News Corp Board of Directors since April 2017 BAE Systems Board of Directors since June 2017 Blackstone Board of Directors Boston Properties Board of Directors Caterpillar Board of Directors Board of Advisors at Cirtronics General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (Retired), Co-Chair Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the Obama and Trump presidencies. Lockheed Martin Board of Directors since February 2020 Nancy Lindborg, Co-Chair President and CEO of the David Lucile Packard Foundation Former President and CEO of the US Institute for Peace Former Assistant Administrator for the bureau for democracy conflict and humanitarian assistance at USAID During the mid-Obama years. Sound Clips 3:13 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I'd also like to take a moment to thank the nonpartisan US Institute of Peace for the support and expertise they provided to the study group during the course of its work. 3:23 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In the fiscal year 2020 omnibus bill Congress led by Senator Graham Senator Patrick Leahy and the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee of state foreign ops and related programs. They tasked the independent and bipartisan Afghanistan study group to quote, consider the implications of a peace settlement or the failure to reach a settlement on US policy, resources and commitments in Afghanistan. After nearly nine months of review and consultation with current and former US and Afghan government officials, allies and partners and other key stakeholders, the Afghanistan study group issued its final report earlier this month. 15:12 Kelly Ayotte: We recommend that US troops remain beyond may 1. We believe a precipitous withdrawal of US and international troops in May, would be catastrophic for Afghanistan, leading to civil war, and allow the reconstitution of terror groups which threaten the United States within an 18 to 36 month period. 15:41 Kelly Ayotte: Let me be clear, although we recommend that our troops remain beyond may 1, we propose a new approach toward Afghanistan, which aligns our policies, practices and messaging across the United States government to support the Afghan peace process, rather than prosecute a war. Our troops would remain not to fight a forever war, but to guarantee the conditions for a successful peace process and to protect our national security interests to ensure that Afghanistan does not become a haven again, for terrorists who threaten the United States of America. 37:15 General Joseph F. Dunford: Do we need to increase forces if the Taliban don't accept an extension past the first of May, and if they then would re initiate attacks against US forces? and Chairman, we heard exactly what you heard. In the fall. What we were told by commanders on the ground in the department of fence was that 4500 US forces, in addition to the NATO forces that are there was the minimum level to address both the mission as well as protection of our forces in the context of the conditions that existed in the fall in as you've highlighted, those conditions have only gotten worse since the fall so in in our judgment 2500 would not be adequate. Should the Taliban re initiate attacks against the United States Hearing: Examining the Trump Administration's Afghanistan Strategy House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on National Security January 28, 2020 Witness: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) Sound Clips 48:54 John Sopko: We've almost created a system that forces people in the government to give happy talk success stories because they're over there on very short rotations. They want to show success. The whole system is almost geared to give you, and it goes up the chain of command, all the way to the President sometimes. He gets bad information from people out in the field because somebody on a nine month rotation, he has to show success, and that goes up. 54:24 John Sopko: Maybe incentivize honesty. And one of the proposals I gave at that time,be cause I was asked by the staff to come up with proposals, is put the same requirement on the government that we impose on publicly traded corporations. Publicly traded corporations have to tell the truth. Otherwise the SEC will indict the people involved. They have to report when there's a significant event. So put that onus, call it The Truth in Government Act if you want, that you in the administration are duty bound by statute to alert Congress to significant events that could directly negatively impact a program or process. So incentivize honesty. 1:10:25 John Sopko: Over 70% of the Afghan budget comes from the United States and the donors. If that money ended, I have said before and I will stand by it, then the Afghan government will probably collapse. Wartime Contracting Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs September 21, 2011 Witnesses: Charles Tiefer: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Clark Kent Ervin: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Sound Clips 1:11:30 Charles Tiefer: Our private security in Afghanistan appears to be a major source of payoffs to the Taliban. Our report has the first official statement that it's the second-largest source of money for the Taliban. Sen. Carl Levin: After drugs. Charles Tiefer: After drugs, that's right. 1:25:18 Clark Kent Ervin: It's critical that the government have a choice, and that means that there needs to be at least a small and expandable, organic capacity on the part of these three agencies to perform missions themselves, so the next time there's a contingency, the government has a choice between going with contractors and going in-house and the determination can be made whether it's more effective to do it either way, whether it's cheaper to do it either way. As we said at the inception, right now the government doesn't have an option. Contractors are the default option because they're the only option. President George W. Bush announces U.S. Military Strikes on Afghanistan October 7, 2001 President George W. Bush: Good afternoon. On my orders, the United States military has begun strikes against Al-Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. These carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of Afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations and to attack the military capability of the Taliban regime. More than two weeks ago, I gave Taliban leaders a series of clear and specific demands: close terrorist training camps, hand over leaders of the Al-Qaeda network, and return all foreign nationals including American citizens unjustly detained in your country. None of these demands were met and now the Taliban will pay a price by destroying camps and disrupting communications. We will make it more difficult for the terror network to train new recruits and coordinate their evil plans. ** International Campaign Against Terrorism Senate Foreign Relations Committee October 25, 2001 Witness: Colin Powell: Secretary of State Sound Clip 27:00 Colin Powell: Our work in Afghanistan though, is not just of a military nature. We recognize that when the Al Qaeda organization has been destroyed in Afghanistan, and as we continue to try to destroy it in all the nations in which it exists around the world, and when the Taliban regime has gone to its final reward, we need to put in place a new government in Afghanistan, one that represents all the people of Afghanistan and one that is not dominated by any single powerful neighbor, but instead is dominated by the will of the people of Afghanistan. Executive Producer Recommendations Elect Stephanie Gallardo 2022 Krystal Kyle and Friends. August 21, 2021. “Episode 35 Audio with Matthew Hoh.” Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

china truth ceo staying american america americans north director war numerous audio friends democrats military losing republicans congress new york times president series donald trump peace stranded syria iraq united states white house cnn trump administration government force pennsylvania africa pakistan afghanistan harris seeking code secretary washington post middle east vice president defense barack obama osama assassination bush roosevelt waiting donations laden lower manhattan new york magazine schuster get out collapse air force tac sen prevent remain south asia commission wall street journal troops joe biden pentagon joint chiefs somalia pledge intercept testimony reform departure citizenship timeline foreign policy afghan retired compromise al qaeda nato kabul sec armed forces taliban hwy daily beast patrick tucker co chair strategic increases music alley treaty uae regulations advisors osama bin laden united states presidents afghans moulton dod contractors us government subcommittee policies publicly sludge dunford homeland security jennifer steinhauer trillion george w bush ruse qaeda behalf arabian peninsula amends preference withdrawal james risen eager al shabaab kandahar united states government fiscal year open secrets oversight turning point john f ap news afghan national police national defense authorization act matt stoller special inspector general defense department congressional dish substack immigration services matt taibbi defense news us institute defense one nancy lindborg death warrant state pompeo ghani afghanistan veterans sivs fact check york times federal news network international security assistance force sound clips lee fang seth moulton cover art design central command authorizes afghan government matthew hoh state bureau david ippolito craig whitlock afghan air force sigar jared serbu defense contracting afghan national army oren liebermann defence forces annie karni mark landler zolan kanno youngs al nusra eli clifton eric schmitt crestview government act s department
The Signal
Can the Taliban run a country?

The Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 14:54


With the US and its allies out of Afghanistan, there's no real contest for power anymore. But the next challenge facing the Taliban is arguably even greater, albeit in a different way: how to run a country. Today on The Signal, major aid donors have frozen their support, and many public officials have fled the country or gone into hiding. So do the Taliban actually have the resources and know-how to run Afghanistan? And if they don't, where does that leave the Afghan people? Featured:  Dr Greg Mills, Director, Brenthurst Foundation, Johannesburg, and former advisor to International Security Assistance Force, Afghanistan

CTV Power Play Podcast
Episode 1124: U.S. Troops Withdraw from Afghanistan & Protests on the Campaign

CTV Power Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 100:26


Glen McGregor, CTV News; Omar Sachedina, CTV News; Kevin Gallagher, CTV News; Terry Duguid, Liberal Party candidate; Dan Albas, Conservative Party Candidate; Lindsay Mathyssen, NDP candidate; Retired General Rick Hillier, former commander of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force; Todd Battis; CTV News; Nik Nanos, Nanos Research; Stephanie Levitz, the Toronto Star; Ian Bailey, the Globe and Mail; Marcella Munro, McMillan Vantage; Tom Mulcair, CTV News Political Analyst; Tasha Kheiriddin; Principal, Navigator Ltd.; Sabreena Delhon, Samara Centre for Democracy; Sarah Bain, Hill+Knowlton Strategies; Jason Lietaer, Enterprise Canada; and Anne McGrath, NDP National Director.

Best of Today
UK foreign secretary: 'We will use every hour and day that we've got left'

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 20:21


Evacuations from Kabul airport in Afghanistan pick up pace, with the total number leaving since the Taliban takeover reaching 70,700. US President Joe Biden says he aims to complete the operation and US troop pull-out by the 31st August deadline. Today's Mishal Husain speaks to the UK foreign secretary, Dominic Raab as well as an interpreter who worked for British forces in Helmand province and is desperate to get out of Afghanistan before the Taliban find him. Today's Justin Webb also speaks to General Lord Richards, former Chief of Defence Staff who commanded the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan between 2006 and 2007. (Image: Boarding of British military plane at Kabul airport, Credit: Press Association)

CTV Power Play Podcast
Episode 1119: Twitter Flags Liberal Tweet & CAF Forces in Kabul

CTV Power Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 98:08


Glen McGregor, CTV News; Kevin Gallagher, CTV News; Annie Bergeron-Oliver, CTV News; Retired General Rick Hillier, former commander of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force; Rob Oliphant, Liberal Party candidate; Michelle Rempel Garner, Conservative Party Candidate; Angella MacEwan, NDP candidate; Nik Nanos, Nanos Research; Stephanie Levitz, the Toronto Star; Ian Bailey, the Globe and Mail; Kate Harrison, Summa Strategies; Don Iveson; Edmonton Mayor; Laura Stone, the Globe and Mail; Sarah Bain, Hill+Knowlton Strategies; Jason Lietaer, Enterprise Canada; and Anne McGrath, NDP National Director.

Coffee House Shots
Is the West in retreat?

Coffee House Shots

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 14:42


The south of Afghanistan is now under Taleban control, after the group took the cities of Kandahar and Lashkar Gah this week. Meanwhile, Britain and America are deploying thousands of troops - as many as were there before the withdrawal began earlier this year - to evacuate expats and the majority of embassy staff. After a 20-year war in Afghanistan, the West is running away. Britain and her allies, however, will continue to face challenges like Russian aggression and Chinese expansionism in the coming decade. Will we just sit back and accept our decline? Isabel Hardman speaks to James Forsyth and General Sir Richard Barrons, who helped set up the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2001, and was deputy chief of the defence staff from 2011 to 2013.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Update on Afghanistan

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 6:46


Guest: Dr Greg Mills NATO's Secretary-General says he has spoken to Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani to reassure him that the organisation will continue to support the country. Rapid gains by the Taliban since the withdrawal of American troops a few weeks ago has piled pressure on the country's US-backed government. We speak to Dr Greg Mills, director of the Brenthurst Foundation, who has who served four assignments with the International Security Assistance Force in Kabul and Kandahar, and has recently returned from the country. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Travel Bubble
Episode 18 - Mike Laird: Path Less Trodden

Travel Bubble

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021 68:54


This episode is with adventurer, explorer, travel writer and film maker Mike Laird. Originally from Scotland, he has been to over 100 countries and boasts a varied CV around the world from war photographer to scuba instructor and English teacher. Mike gave up his office job in Surrey, England in the late 90s to appear in the ground-breaking BBC series Castaway - which saw a group of thirty-six people tasked with building and living in a community on the remote Scottish island of Taransay. Since then, Mike has racked up an impressive list of accomplishments from cycling 4000km solo in Australia to being 1 of only 2 people to have ever skied both the North Pole (600km) and the surface of Lake Baikal in Russia (640km). This episode of Travel Bubble touches on some areas of his fascinating life since then, including photographing individuals from Miss World, British Prime Ministers and snipers in Beirut, as well as the extraordinary journey he undertook to obtain Ministry of Defence, International Security Assistance Force, UN and NATO press passes. Did we mention that he’s also a Fellow of Royal Geographical Society and a Trustee of the Scientific Exploration Society? Mike’s Travel Bubble choices includes a country that has so many islands it would take you over 50 years to visit them all if you went to one a day, a country he has battled for nearly six years to get a permit to do an adventure like no other in, and explains the many ways gaffer tape can get you out of a sticky situation. You can find all about joining Mike on his Baikal by visiting - http://www.crossingbaikal.com/ Mike’s personal website is - http://www.jockandthebeanstalk.com/ He can be found on Instagram as: @michaelpaullaird As usual, more information about Mike’s choices are below. . . . . . . Country No.1: Russia Activity: Go to a banya (sauna) in Karelia Food: Khachapuri and reindeer meat with cranberries Anything else/links…. Bering Strait Country No.2: Indonesia Activity: Manggis Garden, Bali Food: Nasi Goreng and tempe Country No. 3: Peru Activity: Sit in the bar carriage on a train journey. Stay with a local on an island off Lake Titicaca Food: Lomo saltado, Ceviche Wildcard: Sudan Top Travel Tip – It’s important what you pack in your bag – take a roll of gaffer tape Best Souvenir: an Oosig – whale penis bone from Alaska Travel Bubble Film Club A Time for Drunken Horses Iran (2000) Available on Mubi, sign up through this link and get a 30-day free Mubi trial. Thanks for listening. Follow us on Travel Bubble Facebook and Instagram @TravelBubblePodcast. Follow and subscribe so you never miss out on an episode. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/travelbubblepodcast/message

Get Down To Business with Shalom Klein
#WeAllServe​ - Episode #36 with Mike Hall

Get Down To Business with Shalom Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 59:30


Command Sergeant Major (CSM), retired, Michael T. Hall brings over 34 years of military service and nine years of commercial sector experience to the Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) board of directors. He currently is an independent executive coach and consultant and devotes his time to several veteran organizations. Most recently, he served as chief of staff of North American Sales at Scotts Miracle Gro Company. Prior to this, he was an independent leadership and organization consultant for several commercial companies and the Department of Defense. He also held different leadership roles at the McChrystal Group and Lockheed Martin Corporation. CSM Hall's military career began when he joined the United States Army in 1976. He served in a variety of positions over the next three decades, leading up to his appointment as the Command Sergeant Major of the United States Army Special Operations Command in 2001. CSM Hall served in multiple deployments including Multi-National Force Observer Mission-Sinai and Operations Just Cause, Desert Storm, Uphold Democracy, Joint Endeavor, Iraqi Freedom, and Enduring Freedom. Following his retirement from active duty in 2008, he was recalled in 2009 to assume the role of Command Sergeant Major for the International Security Assistance Force. He retired again from active duty in 2010. His leadership earned him numerous awards and decorations, including a Distinguished Service Medal, Bronze Star Medal, Combat Infantryman's Badge, Combat Action Badge, and Master Parachutist with Combat Star. CSM Hall is the executive director of the Three Rangers Foundation and serves on the boards of Gallant Few, Inc; Sua Sponte; and the Special Operations Medical Association Board of Advisors. He also currently serves as the Honorary Command Sergeant Major of the 75th Ranger Regiment. As a continuation of his commitment to service, CSM Hall joined the WWP board of directors in 2018.

Mission: Readiness Podcast
Episode 015 (Gen. Stanley McChrystal)

Mission: Readiness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2020 48:16


General Gross speaks to retired four-star Army General Stanley McChrystal, the former Commander of Joint Special Operations Command and the International Security Assistance Force. They discuss leadership lessons they learned from working together in the Army, the importance of quality nutrition, and how to manage teams during a public health crisis.

Across the Margin: The Podcast
Episode 90: On Corruption In America with Sarah Chayes

Across the Margin: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2020 61:13


In this episode of Across The Margin : The Podcast, host Michael Shields interviews prize-winning journalist and internationally recognized expert on corruption in government networks throughout the world, Sarah Chayes. Chayes has served as special assistant on corruption to Mike Mullen, former chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as having advised David McKiernan and Stanley McChrystal (commanders of the International Security Assistance Force). She has been a reporter for National Public Radio from Paris, covering Europe and the Balkans. Chayes is the author of The Punishment of Virtue: Inside Afghanistan After the Taliban and Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security, winner of the 2016 Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She recently penned a book that illustrates the daunting fact that the United States is showing signs similar to some of the most corrupt countries in the world. That book, On Corruption in America: And What Is At Stake, is the focus of this episode, and is one of the most eye-opening and critical books that you will encounter. From the titans of America’s Gilded Age (Carnegie, Rockefeller, J. P. Morgan, et al.) to the collapse of the stock market in 1929, the Great Depression and FDR’s New Deal; from Joe Kennedy’s years of banking, bootlegging, machine politics, and pursuit of infinite wealth, as well as the Kennedy presidency, to the deregulation of the Reagan Revolution, undermining the middle class and the unions; from the Clinton policies of political favors and personal enrichment to Trump’s hydra-headed network of corruption, systematically undoing the Constitution and our laws, in On Corruption in America, Chayes shows how corrupt systems are organized, how they enforce the rules so their crimes are covered legally, how they are overlooked and downplayed by the richer and better educated, and how they become an overt principle determining the shape of our government, affecting all levels of society. On Corruption in America, and this episode, dramatically highlights what we are all up against. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Junior Achievement of South Florida Recipe for Success
Recipe for Success with Guest Rob Ceravolo, Tropic Ocean Airways

Junior Achievement of South Florida Recipe for Success

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2020 36:45


Just as there are no two recipes that contain the exact same ingredients or measurements, there are no two success stories exactly the same. Recipe For Success features entrepreneurs, visionary leaders and innovators of all ages who will share their ingredients that make them successful – personally and professionally. Let's get cooking! Robert Ceravolo is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Tropic Ocean Airways, a regional airlift solution based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Operating amphibious seaplane aircraft in five countries, Tropic Ocean Airways has become the largest amphibious airline in the world with additional planned fleet and service growth around the globe. Former Navy fighter pilot and winner of the prestigious Ernst & Young Regional Entrepreneur of the Year for 2019, Ceravolo founded the airline in 2009. He is responsible for growing the company from one aircraft and one employee to its current size of 15 aircraft and an expanding team of more than 100 employees. Offering passenger and cargo flights with both scheduled and charter routes, Tropic Ocean Airways services domestic and international regions including Florida, the Bahamas, the Caribbean, Cuba, Puerto Rico, New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts. The airline received scheduled Commuter authority from the Department of Transportation (DOT) and has a stellar safety record and reputation with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Utilizing his extensive military aviation expertise, Ceravolo places a strong emphasis on training and development of pilots and personnel. The Tropic Ocean Airways training program is modeled after the procedures and training philosophy of US Navy flight training. Ceravolo believes that proper training and development is the key to growth during the global pilot shortage. In addition to solving regional travel problems utilizing amphibious aircraft, Ceravolo has made it his mission to be a positive influence in the communities that Tropic Ocean Airways services - leading Disaster Response Operations since 2015. Most recently the company led a multi-organization effort, which resulted in 900 evacuations and 200,000 pounds of relief supplies delivered in the first 10 days following Hurricane Dorian's landfall in the Bahamas, in addition to ongoing rebuilding assistance. Ceravolo also sits on the board of Saving The Blue, a non-profit dedicated to marine conservation. Prior to his position at Tropic Ocean Airways, Ceravolo served as an Officer and Aviator in the United States Navy (Active Duty: 2001 - 2011, Reserve: 2011 - Present), where he flew the F-14D, F-18E, and F-5N, deployed in support of OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM and ENDURING FREEDOM, attended TOPGUN (2009), and served as his squadron’s Assistant Operations Officer, Training Officer, Public Affairs Officer, Legal Officer, Administration Officer and Maintenance Officer. Additionally, he served as a Coalition Coordination Officer for United States Central Command, where he served as a Liaison to the Coalition and was responsible for coordinating logistical support for foreign allied countries supporting the International Security Assistance Force. Learn more about Tropic Ocean Airways: https://flytropic.com/ For more information about Junior Achievement of South Florida, visit https://www.jasouthflorida.org. Follow us on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jasouthflorida LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/junior-achievement-of-south-florida/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jasouthflorida Twitter: https://twitter.com/JASouthFlorida For more information about Junior Achievement of South Florida, visit https://www.jasouthflorida.org.

Society, Infected
Episode 5: Leadership in COVID-19 and tips on working remotely

Society, Infected

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2020


This week, retired 4-star U.S. General, and Senior Fellow at Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, Stanley McChrystal reflects on how to lead during a crisis, as well as tips on maintaining a productive working environment when working remotely – something he had to do when leading dispersed military forces across the Middle East. This may be the most generally applicable episode yet – everyone has something to learn from General McChrystal's experience. General (ret.) Stanley McChrystal is a former Commander of the International Security Assistance Force and Commander of United States Forces Afghanistan. His career in the U.S. Army spanned 34 years. Prior to his service in Afghanistan, he served as Director of the Joint Staff (2008-2009), where he assisted the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in managing the direction, operation, and integration of all combat land, naval, and air forces. He also commanded the Joint Special Operations Command (2003-2008), overseeing elite US military forces in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere around the world. He is now the Co-Founder of McChrystal Group LLC and is also chairperson of Service Year Alliance, a nonprofit organization working to make a year of paid, full-time service — a service year — a common expectation and opportunity for all young Americans. Other Resources“Retired Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal assisting Missouri Gov. Parson’s COVID-19 response” Read Here “You Are Not Working From Home” Charlie Warzel, New York Times Read Here

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Snakes and Dragons. Modern conflict's dangerous evolution

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 27:30


In his latest book, 'The Dragons and the Snakes: How the Rest Learned to Fight the West', modern warfare expert, David Kilcullen has put forward a theory of how state threats, (like Russia and China) and non-state threats (like terrorist organisations) now overlap and intersect. What's more, they've learnt from each other, enabling them to out manoeuvre conventional military tactics, with new methods like political manipulation and cyber militias. David Kilcullen, was a senior counterinsurgency adviser to General David Petraeus during 2007 'surge' in Iraq and counterinsurgency adviser to the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. He was previously an infantry officer in the Australian army for 22 years.

Society, Infected
Episode 3: COVID-19 and the Middle East

Society, Infected

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2020


Image Courtesy of Aljazeera News, “Iraq protesters blockade oilfield, rally in southern cities” In this episode, Matt, Tiffany, and guest co-host Matt Trevithick interview Emma Sky, former advisor to the Commanding General of US Forces in Iraq and NATO in Afghanistan, about the implications of COVID-19 for stability and governance in the Middle East. Emma Sky is the Director of the Maurice R. Greenberg World Fellows Program and a Senior Fellow at Yale University’s Jackson Institute, where she teaches Middle East politics. She is the author of the highly acclaimed The Unravelling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq (2015) and In a Time of Monsters: Travelling in a Middle East in Revolt (2019).Sky served as advisor to the Commanding General of US Forces in Iraq from 2007-2010; as advisor to the Commander of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2006; as advisor to the US Security Co-ordinator for the Middle East Peace Process in 2005; and as Governorate Co-ordinator of Kirkuk for the Coalition Provisional Authority, 2003-2004. Other Resources“Coronavirus: Middle East faces uncertainty amid armed conflicts” Hashem Ahelbarra, Aljazeera Read More Here

Story in the Public Square
Telling the Stories of War with Marc Jacobson

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2020 28:03


War stories—whether the stuff of memoir or fictional portrayals of people at war—are mainstays of literature across human history, and today, that extends to film.  Mark Jacobson is both a historian and a veteran who seizes on the power of modern storytelling in film to educate the next generation about the realities of war. Dr. Jacobson is the John J. McCloy ’16 Professor of American Institutions and International Diplomacy at Amherst College and is a non-resident Senior Fellow at Salve Regina University’s Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy. He has over twenty years of experience in the federal government, international organizations, and academia working on some of the most complex and politically sensitive national security issues facing the United States.  Since November 2017, Jacobson has served as a senior policy advisor at Kasowitz Benson Torrres LLC where, as a part of the Government Affairs and Strategic Counsel group, he helps to advise on and resolve complex and politically sensitive issues for clients, as well as representing clients before the U.S. government.  Jacobson was previously appointed as the Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Defense and Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Navy and served in Kabul, Afghanistan as the Deputy NATO Representative and Director of International Affairs at the International Security Assistance Force.

SpyCast
From the Vault: The SpyCast conversation with Gen. David Petraeus

SpyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2020 45:50


SPY Historian Vince Houghton sat down with retired 4-star general David Petraeus, former Commanding General, Multi-National Force – Iraq; Commander, US Central Command; commander of the International Security Assistance Force and Commander, US Forces Afghanistan; and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from September, 2011, until November, 2012.

Intangibles
Leadership - David Petraeus 045

Intangibles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2019 73:17


General David Petraeus has had a long and distinguished career. He served in the Army for 37 years.  Highlights include Commander of the International Security Assistance Force, 10th Commander US Central Command and Commanding General Multinational Force – Iraq (where he successfully directed ‘the surge’ and literally wrote the book on counterinsurgency).  His educational credentials are stellar as well… BS from the US Military Academy (top 5% his class), MPA and Ph.D. from Princeton.  After leaving military service General Petraeus was the director of the CIA. These days he is the Chairman of the KKR Global Institute. He and I discuss leadership.

FPRI Radio
A Conversation with Lt. Gen. Jonathon Riley: Afghanistan, the US-UK Relationship, and Brexit

FPRI Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2019 26:52


In this episode of FPRI Radio Michael Noonan, director of FPRI’s Program on National Security, sits down with retired British Army Lt. General Jonathon Riley to discuss the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the military cultures of the United States and the UK, the state of the Special Relationship, and Brexit and the UK’s defense policy. Lt. Gen. Riley is a former deputy commander of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan and served as the commander of Multi-National Division-Southeast in Iraq among other assignments. He holds a PhD in modern history from Cranfield University and has authored or edited twenty-five books.

FPRI Radio
A Conversation with Lt. Gen. Jonathon Riley: Afghanistan, the US-UK Relationship, and Brexit

FPRI Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2019 26:52


In this episode of FPRI Radio Michael Noonan, director of FPRI’s Program on National Security, sits down with retired British Army Lt. General Jonathon Riley to discuss the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the military cultures of the United States and the UK, the state of the Special Relationship, and Brexit and the UK’s defense policy. Lt. Gen. Riley is a former deputy commander of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan and served as the commander of Multi-National Division-Southeast in Iraq among other assignments. He holds a PhD in modern history from Cranfield University and has authored or edited twenty-five books.

Valuetainment Podcast
Episode 292: General McChrystal - The Myth & Reality of Leadership

Valuetainment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2019 59:00


Stanley Allen McChrystal is a retired United States Army four-star general best known for his command of Joint Special Operations Command in the mid-2000s. His last assignment was as Commander, International Security Assistance Force and Commander, U.S. Forces - Afghanistan.

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
Myth & Reality: General Stanley McChrystal

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2019 76:01


I had the opportunity to speak recently with General Stanley McChrystal, retired four-star general, former Commander of the International Security Assistance Force and Commander, US Forces, Afghanistan. Since 2010, he has taught courses in international relations at Yale University as a Senior Fellow of the University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. General McChrystal is also the the bestselling author of Leaders: Myth and Reality, described by the publisher as follows: “Leadership is not what you think it is… and it never was. Find out why in our new book Leaders: Myth and Reality which explains why leaders are important, but rarely for the reasons we think. Leaders, the follow up to New York Times bestseller Team of Teams and Wall Street Journal bestseller One Mission, profiles 13 historical leaders and reveals essential lessons on leading today.” The Future Authoring program I mentioned, designed to help people develop a vision and a strategy for their life, can be found at: https://www.selfauthoring.com/future-... Service Year Alliance: https://about.serviceyear.org/ Thanks to our sponsors: https://www.butcherbox.com https://www.audible.com https://www.stamps.com

The Leadership Podcast
TLP101: General Stanley McChrystal on What Connects Us

The Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2018 48:06


General, Stanley McChrystal returns to The Leadership Podcast to share his thoughts and insights on leadership and service in the modern era. General McChrystal is the best selling author of “Team of Teams,” and Co-Founder and Managing Partner of The McChrystal group. He talks with Jim and Jan about the importance of a classical education, the sacrifice leaders must make in their lives, and why it’s up to the government and business to create challenging opportunities for the younger generation. He shares his unique perspective on the similarities and differences of leading and teaming in the business and in the military.  He concludes with his thoughts on national service, education, and his recipe for more constructive discourse.     Key Takeaways    [1:28] General McChrystal is a retired four-star general, former Commander of the International Security Assistance Force and Commander of United States Forces Afghanistan. [1:39] General McChrystal is a Senior Fellow at Yale University, where he teaches a course on Leadership in Operation. [3:15] Regarding millennials, the talent is there! What’s different is that our community bonds have grown smaller and are more self-focused, making it difficult to find a clear path of how and where to make a contribution. [4:30] Although we are in a time where much service is needed from young people, only 30% of younger people in the United States are qualified, and eligible, to enlist in the military.  General McChrystal poses the thought of government and business sharing the responsibility to create opportunities for the other 70% of those that still have a desire to contribute. [5:23] The Civilian Conservation Corps of the Depression Era was a program created to give young men the opportunity to make money, earn confidence and get a sense of self-satisfaction. Many of those men went on to serve in World War II. [6:06] General McChrystal feels it is his generation’s responsibility to create opportunity for youth through funding, education and business. At the McChrystal group, they value service and community involvement. If you have completed a year of national service, your resume gets a more detailed review. [7:09] McChrystal discussed how we must create an incentive for businesses to hire employees based on their potential and values -  rather than just look for professionals who already have the skills and need little training. [9:27] In addition to General McChrystal’s famous ascetic lifestyle, he is still learning, growing and studying every day. [9:51] People skills and a strong work ethic as two of the benchmark qualities that make for a good business leader. [11:51] General McChrystal had preconceived notions of the business world, while his colleagues had assumptions about working with someone from the military. They both found out that in each world there are opportunities and challenges not so different. [12:31] His newest book due this fall 2018, Leaders: Myth and Reality is inspired by Plutarch’s life and studies of notable people. They took the findings of this work and crafted it into modern day profiles to compare leaders throughout history from all walks of life, and learn the nuances of different leadership styles. [14:13] In pairing founders and leaders, General McChrystal finds it isn’t a one size fits all approach to success and fulfillment. He did find the common threads to be a commitment to the choice to lead and accept responsibility in an authentic and self assured manner. [18:42] Possessing an absolute commitment and dedication to the cause comes at a cost. [20:56] Classical and liberal arts education that roots us in philosophy provides a common language that connects us both with our values; and to each other. [21:45] James Stockdale, United States Navy vice admiral and prisoner of war for over seven years, was a strong proponent in a classical education as a way to connect us to ourselves and each other. [23:18] As politics pervade our culture, and the absence of civility rises, it is crucial to listen more and welcome different points of view. [25:04] We could benefit from thinking more long term and focus on building sustainable relationships that remain solid in the future. In a business world that means treating your clients in a manner where long term relationship is fostered. [29:44] People think demonstrations of courage are usually reserved for the battlefield, but it is beneficial to recognize it in the workplace as well. [30:48] General McChrystal is a great believer of experiential leadership for individuals and groups.  At The McChrystal Group, they offer adventures for the team to succeed, become familiar and push one another. [33:30] The military uses its advantages of patriotism, and extra time for training to shape them into leaders. On the battlefield, you need to make life or death decisions, where in business there are laws and bureaucracies and it’s harder for people to be decisive. Often times businesses will skimp on or cancel their leadership development programs due to lack of budget or manpower.   [38:01] In an organization with timid leadership, they will see the problem and take a conservative approach while rationalizing to do very little, or not enough. Making strong decisions is like a muscle you must continue to work. [39:34] General McChrystal names the two biggest current security challenges we are facing in today’s climate: Education lagging behind the progress of the rest of the world. Inability to make rational political decisions. [46:02] As General McChrystal has a strong relationship with his grandchildren, he believes in balancing work with getting outside for adventure, continued education, and family.   Website: McChrystal Group   Quotable Quotes We’ve got to create opportunities where people can do the kinds of service that gives them a sense of satisfaction, and a challenge. Begin rewarding service in your home, school and community. When you enter the military, nobody is already a soldier, airman or marine. College doesn’t prepare you for what you are going to do, it prepares you to be prepared for what you are going to do. Everything is simple, but the simplest is difficult. Leadership is this complex weave of factors. Possessing an absolute commitment and dedication to the cause comes at a cost. Classical and liberal arts education that roots us in philosophy provides a common language that connects us both with our values; and to each other. It’s a willingness to sacrifice for the cause when they decide to lead. Strong leaders are themselves. Learn to think long term. There’s got to be some long term consequences for dishonesty. Do everything today to protect what you can do in the future. If you do something challenging with strangers, you rarely end up as strangers. It takes courage to make great decisions. When things get hard, it’s a time to show courage. Don’t promise to do more than you are willing to do. Leaders make decisions that others are reluctant to make.   Bio A  retired  four-star  general, Stanley  McChrystal is the  former commander of  U.S. and International  Security Assistance Force  Afghanistan and Joint Special  Operations Command.    General McChrystal  a Managing Partner of McChrystal Group, LLC, and  a senior fellow at Yale University’s  Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, where  he teaches a course on Leadership in Operation.    He is also the Chairman of the Aspen Institute’s Service  Year Alliance, dedicated to promoting national service initiatives among  American youth. He is the author of two New York Times best-selling books: My  Share  of the  Task: A Memoir  and Team  of Teams:  New Rules of  Engagement for a Complex World. General  McChrystal  resides in Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife  of 39 years, Annie.   My Share of the Task: A Memoir Team of the Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World Authentic Leadership Courage: The Backbone of Leadership

Whiskey Politics
Omar Qudrat - Opening The Door to Republican Muslims

Whiskey Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2018 39:47


Ep: 125 - Omar Qudrat, an American Muslim Republican Congressional Candidate, joins us for this Election Day special interview. Omar is an American-born military veteran, Department of Defense lawyer and may become the GOP’s first Muslim American Congressman. Omar was born in California to Afghani Reagan Republican parents and became a Counter-Terrorism Prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Defense where he prosecuted Guantanamo Bay Detainees, and his office handled capital cases against Khalid Sheikh Mohammad and four co-conspirators of 9-11. Omar served in Afghanistan with the International Security Assistance Force, a political advisor to the NATO Ambassador in Afghanistan. Now Omar is running for San Diego’s 52nd District who tells voters’ “I am an American Muslim and I’ve Dedicated my life to destroying radical Islamic Terrorism”.We cover a lot of issues, including illegal immigration and sanctuary cities, education and fighting the entrenched teacher unions, and national security. Find Omar at https://www.electomar.com/ and Twitter @OmarQudrat1Register for Freedom Fest in Las Vegas this July 11-14 at FreedomFest.com and use code “WHISKEY100” for $100 off your tickets!Follow Whiskey Politics on YouTube, Ricochet, WhiskeyPolitics.net, Facebook and follow Dave on Twitter. Shown on Americas Voice Television Network.Subscribe to your favorite podcast application including TuneIn, Stitcher, GooglePlay, and iTunes where your 5-star rating will be greatly appreciated!In Music: Dirty Weekend, Joel Goodman.Ad Music: Ben Sounds.  

SpyCast
Our Latest Longest War: An Interview with Ben Jones

SpyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2017 67:44


SPY Historian Vince Houghton sat down with Ben Jones, the former Transition Coordinator for the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, where he coordinated the transfer of Afghanistan's security from the coalition to the Afghan National Security Forces. He is also a contributor to the new book, Our Latest Longest War: Losing Hearts and Minds in Afghanistan.

Beyond 50 Radio Show
EPISODE 712 - Afghanistan: On the Bounce

Beyond 50 Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2016


For Beyond 50's "History" talks, listen to an interview with Robert Cunningham. He was a former photographer and war correspondent with the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, from 2011 - 2014. Cunningham will talk about the 65,000 photos taken while accompanying American soldiers on 145 missions. He'll also share stories on the life of service members deployed. Tune in to Beyond 50: America's Variety Talk Radio Show on the natural, holistic, green and sustainable lifestyle. Visit www.Beyond50Radio.com and sign up for our Exclusive Updates.

SpyCast
The Commander: An Interview with Gen. David Petraeus

SpyCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2016 45:50


SPY Historian Vince Houghton sat down with retired 4-star general David Petraeus, former Commanding General, Multi-National Force – Iraq; Commander, US Central Command; commander of the International Security Assistance Force and Commander, US Forces Afghanistan; and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from September, 2011, until November, 2012.

Midrats
Episode 280: Best of NATO in Afghanistan, With Stephen Saideman

Midrats

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2015 60:00


Lost to many whose news sources in the USA consists of the major newspapers and the standard networks, for most of the last dozen+ years, the conflict in Afghanistan has not been a USA-Centric battle; it has been a NATO run operation.When the Commander of the International Security Assistance Force has been an American 4-star, the visuals can be misleading.For most of the last decade, American forces were dominate in only one region of Afghanistan, the east. Other NATO nations from Italy/Spain in the west, Germany in the North, and Commonwealth nations and the Dutch in the south.More important than the actual numbers involved, it was the Rules of Engagement, caveats, and the fickle nature of national politics that drove what effects those forces had on the ground.The good, the bad, and the ugly of modern coalition warfare was all in view for all in Afghanistan, but outside small circles, has yet to be fully discussed.Our guest for the full hour will be Stephen Saideman.Stephen holds the Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.  He has written The Ties That Divide: Ethnic Politics, Foreign Policy and International Conflict and For Kin or Country: Xenophobia, Nationalism and War (with R. William Ayres) and NATO in Afghanistan: Fighting Together, Fighting Alone (with David Auerswald), and other work on nationalism, ethnic conflict, civil war, and civil-military relations.  Prof. Saideman spent 2001-02 on the U.S. Joint Staff working in the Strategic Planning and Policy Directorate as part of a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship.  He writes online at OpenCanada.org, Political Violence at a Glance, Duck of Minerva and his own site (saideman.blogspot.com).  He also tweets too much at @smsaideman.

Journalism in the Digital Age
Conflict Zone: Images from the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

Journalism in the Digital Age

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2015


Bill Putnam’s photography has concentrated on the mental, physical and political cost of war through documentary photography, portraiture and video. In June 2013, he wrapped up a 16-month tour in Afghanistan covering the International Security Assistance Force-led hand over of responsibilities to the Afghan National Security Forces in the county’s volatile Helmand Province. Putnam’s work […] The post Conflict Zone: Images from the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan appeared first on Journalism in the Digital Age.

Pritzker Military Museum & Library Podcasts
General Stanley McChrystal: My Share of the Task

Pritzker Military Museum & Library Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2015 3316:00


My Share of the Task (Portfolio/Penguin), is the revealing memoir of General Stanley McChrystal, former commander of the International Security Assistance Force and commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

Pritzker Military Museum & Library Podcasts
General Stanley McChrystal: My Share of the Task

Pritzker Military Museum & Library Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2015 3316:00


My Share of the Task (Portfolio/Penguin), is the revealing memoir of General Stanley McChrystal, former commander of the International Security Assistance Force and commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

Gail McCabe's A Closer Look
A Closer Look: Moving Forward

Gail McCabe's A Closer Look

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2014


Gen. John Campbell, Commander, International Security Assistance Force, talks to Gail McCabe about the future of Afghanistan with a new leader, President Ashraf Ghani.

Asia: Beyond the Headlines
General John Allen and Martha Raddatz

Asia: Beyond the Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2014 83:26


On the eve of the drawdown of American troops in Afghanistan, U.S. General John Allen, former U.S. commander of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, joins Martha Raddatz of ABC News for a look at questions surrounding Afghanistan's future in general and its security situation in particular. (1 hr., 23 min.)

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography
TCF Ep. 226 - Robert L. Cunningham

The Candid Frame: Conversations on Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2014 53:36


A professional photographer for more than a decade, Robert L. Cunningham has photographed 9 heads of state, 12 prime ministers, 3 governors, multiple astronauts, cosmonauts, CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, renowned actors, musicians, and professional race car drivers, as well as service members from 15 different nations. His work has taken him aboard underway US Navy submarines, into zero-gravity in low earth orbit, and to more than 450 cities in 25 countries. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum features a permanent display of his work. He has documented 132 missions as an embed photographer with the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. He currently resides in Phoenix, Arizona. http://afgotb.com/ http://robertlcunningham.com/ http://www.vanityfair.com/contributors/annie-leibovitz http://ibarionex.net/thecandidframe/ info@thecandidframe.com

Midrats
Episode 212: NATO in Afghanistan with Stephen M. Saideman

Midrats

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2014 61:41


Lost to many whose news sources in the USA consists of the major newspapers and the standard networks, for most of the last dozen+ years, the conflict in Afghanistan has not been a USA-Centric battle; it has been a NATO run operation.When the Commander of the International Security Assistance Force has been an American 4-star, the visuals can be misleading.For most of the last decade, American forces were dominate in only one region of Afghanistan, the east. Other NATO nations from Italy/Spain in the west, Germany in the North, and Commonwealth nations and the Dutch in the south.More important than the actual numbers involved, it was the Rules of Engagement, caveats, and the fickle nature of national politics that drove what effects those forces had on the ground.The good, the bad, and the ugly of modern coalition warfare was all in view for all in Afghanistan, but outside small circles, has yet to be fully discussed.Our guest for the full hour will be Stephen Saideman.Stephen holds the Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.  He has written The Ties That Divide: Ethnic Politics, Foreign Policy and International Conflict and For Kin or Country: Xenophobia, Nationalism and War (with R. William Ayres) and NATO in Afghanistan: Fighting Together, Fighting Alone (with David Auerswald), and other work on nationalism, ethnic conflict, civil war, and civil-military relations.  Prof. Saideman spent 2001-02 on the U.S. Joint Staff working in the Strategic Planning and Policy Directorate as part of a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship.  He writes online at OpenCanada.org, Political Violence at a Glance, Duck of Minerva and his own site (saideman.blogspot.com).  He also tweets too much at @smsaideman.

Crisis Response
Pakistan Relief Service Medal, Long Package

Crisis Response

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2010


Package about U.S. military service members receiving humanitarian service medals, presented by Gen. David Petraeus - commander, International Security Assistance Force - Afghanistan, for their work in Pakistan flood relief missions. Produced by Air Force Staff Sgt. Alana Ingram. Includes soundbites from Gen. Petraeus and Maj. Daniel Rice, award recipient. pakflood10

Crisis Response
Sgt. John McHellon

Crisis Response

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2010


Sgt. John McHellon of the International Security Assistance Force movement control team discusses the uploading of halal meals in support of Pakistan Humanitarian Assistance at Bagram Air Field

Crisis Response
International Security Assistance Force Upload Meals

Crisis Response

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2010


B-roll of U.S. Army Soldiers of the International Security Assistance Force uploading halal meals in support of Pakistan Humanitarian Assistance at Bagram Air Field. Produced by Tech. Sgt. Drew Nystrom. Afghanistan

CHIASMOS: The University of Chicago International and Area Studies Multimedia Outreach Source [video]
“The Consequences of the Escalation of War in Afghanistan” (video)

CHIASMOS: The University of Chicago International and Area Studies Multimedia Outreach Source [video]

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2010 87:36


A talk by political scientist Gilles Dorronsoro, visiting scholar in the Carnegie Endowment's South Asia Program. His research focuses on security and political development in Afghanistan, particularly the role of the International Security Assistance Force, the steps required to achieve a viable government in Kabul, and the conditions necessary for withdrawal scenarios. From the World Beyond the Headlines lecture series. Cosponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the South Asian Language & Area Center, and the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies.

CHIASMOS: The University of Chicago International and Area Studies Multimedia Outreach Source [audio]

A talk by political scientist Gilles Dorronsoro, visiting scholar in the Carnegie Endowment's South Asia Program. His research focuses on security and political development in Afghanistan, particularly the role of the International Security Assistance Force, the steps required to achieve a viable government in Kabul, and the conditions necessary for withdrawal scenarios. From the World Beyond the Headlines lecture series. Cosponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the South Asian Language & Area Center, and the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies.