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Michigan's AutoTalk Podcast
Episode 85: "The great snow tire debate and other winter driving myths."

Michigan's AutoTalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 16:11


Episode 85: "The great snow tire debate and other winter driving myths."In this episode, producer Phil Tower, along with hosts Al Schwinkendorf and John Puhek, discuss the pros and cons of snow tires and the best tips for safe winter driving overall. The decades-old wisdom that snow tires were essential in West Michigan is really not true and in this episode, Al and John talk about why snow tires are not as necessary as they used to be commonly used years ago and why snow tire owners should make one significant investment before they purchase any set of snow tires. And while we're at it let's get rid of the term "snow tires." Any tire dealer today will tell you the correct term for these types of tires is "winter tires." Those who insist on them and there are quite a few, argue they work better in Michigan winters when our roads are blanketed with typically oft and slushy snow. Still, according to to Al and John, most drivers don't need them.More on winter tires:https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/local/2022/06/03/should-you-be-changing-your-tires-we-put-seasonal-tires-through-the-local-4-trust-index/And, what are the best values in winter/snow tires:https://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/g35005560/top-cheap-snow-tires/Like us on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/MichigansAutoTalkPodcastMichigan's AutoTalk podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Google Podcasts, Amazon Audio, Spreaker.com, Deezer, and Podcatcher.Thank you for listening, and please share this episode with a friend!

Mission: Employable
Episode 149 – How Bridgestone Firestone is Recruiting New Talent

Mission: Employable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 15:10


Bridgestone Firestone is looking to grow their workforce with more than 100 openings ranging from production line workers to salaried employees at their Des Moines location. HR Specialist Trevor Brothers discusses how the company is getting the word out about job opportunities, and how recruitment has changed for them over the years.  

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 102: Lean Manufacturing with Michel Baudin

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 49:02


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Lean Manufacturing. Our guest is Michel Baudin (https://www.linkedin.com/in/michelbaudin/), author, and owner of Takt Times Group. In this conversation, we talk about how industrial engineering equals the engineering of human work and why manufacturing and industrial engineering education needs to change because it has drifted away from industrial work and a future where manufacturing is not going away. If you like this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you like this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean with Professor Torbjørn Netland from ETH Zürich (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/84). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Lean manufacturing might mean many things, but industrial work has largely been a consistent practice over several hundred years, which is not necessarily a bad thing. Having said that, if we want to go about improving it, we might want to stay pretty close to the workforce and not sit in statistics labs far removed from it. Efficiency is tied to work practices, and they cannot be optimized beyond what the workforce can handle or want to deal with. As we attempt to be lean, whatever we mean by that, we need to remember that work is a thoroughly human endeavor. Transcript TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Lean Manufacturing. Our guest is Michel Baudin, author, and owner of Takt Times Group. In this conversation, we talk about how industrial engineering equals the engineering of human work and why manufacturing and industrial engineering education needs to change because it has drifted away from industrial work and a future where manufacturing is not going away. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Michel, welcome. How are you? MICHEL: Fine, thank you. How about yourself? TROND: Things are good. Things are looking up. I'm excited to talk about lean manufacturing with you, having had such a rich, professional background. Michel, you're French. You originally, I think, were thinking of becoming a probability researcher, or you were actually, and then you went to Japan and studied Toyota. You have had this career in English, German, Japanese sort of consulting all the way back from 1987 onwards on exciting topics, lean manufacturing, and especially implementing it, right? The real deal. You've authored at least four technical books that I know about. And I think you listed probably a while back, having written 900 blog posts. You've been very busy. You are the owner of the Takt Times Group, which is a consulting firm on lean manufacturing. And you love math, but you have this very interesting attitude, which we'll talk about, which is math is great, but it's not always the best communication tool. Tell me a little about that to start off. You're a probability researcher that doesn't use math; I think that's fascinating. MICHEL: I use it, but I don't brag about it with people that it turns off. So I have to be in the closet for this because people who work in manufacturing usually focus on concrete things, things that they can see and touch, and abstraction is not something that they respond well to. So whenever you explain a principle, my approach is to state this principle and then dig into some very specific examples right away; otherwise, I'm losing the people I'm talking to. But anyway, that's what I've had to do. TROND: So, did I capture your background okay? I mean, you've had a very international life so far. I hope it's been enjoyable and not just professional because you've spent your time in Germany, and Japan, and in the U.S., So you're really enjoying the different kinds of manufacturing environments. Or is it that you just want to be close to where it's all happening? MICHEL: I've enjoyed living in many different countries. And so you mentioned I'm French. I was born and raised in France, but I'm an American citizen, and I spent most of my life in the U.S. I think of myself as being part French, part American, part German, part Japanese. Because when I'm in a country, I tend to immerse myself in the culture; I don't stay aloof from it. TROND: Well, I'm curious about that because in the abstract... so if we are in the world of math, then you could maybe say that efficiency techniques are global; that was the idea. Some people have that idea, let's say, that efficiency is a global thing, and there's one thing called efficiency, and everybody should just learn it because then it's all better. It seems to me that because you spent a lot of time in three different places, it shows up differently. MICHEL: I don't use the word efficiency so much because it's limited. There are techniques to improve manufacturing performance in every aspect of it, efficiency only being one of them, and these techniques are pretty universal. Now, when you're trying to help people in different countries, it's a postulate. You have to postulate what works in one place will work in another. So far, I haven't found any reason to believe otherwise. I have encountered many people who are saying things like, "This is country X, and these techniques don't work because our people are from country X." It's one of the most common techniques to refuse to implement anything new. The fact is the Toyota Production System wasn't supposed to be applicable to American workers until Toyota applied it with American workers in its joint venture with GM in the early 1980s at NUMMI specifically. It became a showcase. Later, Toyota opened its own factory in the U.S. in Georgetown, Kentucky, and applied the system there. And then, a few years later, it opened its own factory in France, and it worked with French workers. So it's really the idea that this only works in certain cultures or this only works in Japan. It's just the reality is different. It works pretty much everywhere. TROND: Well, that's fascinating, though, because, like you said, you have immersed yourself in these different factory and industrial cultures, if you may, and you are implementing lean in all of them or advising on lean methods. Why don't we start with that, then, perhaps? Tell me a little bit, what is lean to you? MICHEL: Lean to me...and I use the term less and less because I think over the past 30 years, it's lost a lot of its meaning. When it first came out, it was the latest in a number of labels that have been applied to the same thing. In the early 1980s, you talked about just-in-time then there was world-class manufacturing. A number of different terms were used and never really caught on. This one caught on. And the way I took it, I took it to mean generic versions of the Toyota Production System. There are very good reasons why you can't call what you're proposing to a company that makes frozen foods a Toyota Production System. There are also very strong reasons why you can't even go to a car company and do this. It's very awkward for a car company to openly admit to be using a competitor's system. So you have to have a label that refers to the content but doesn't refer to where it's coming from. TROND: So for you, at the basic level, if you strip away everything, it still is essentially the Toyota Production System, and lean is just to you, I'm just paraphrasing, it's a convenient wrapping for a way to explain it in a way that's non-threatening. But it is essentially the lessons from the Toyota Production System from a while back. MICHEL: That's the way I took it. That's why I adopted this label in the early 1990s, but a lot of time has elapsed since then. Because it became popular, very many people started using that label. And the content they were putting under it was pretty much...they were attaching this label to whatever they were doing. It has lost a great deal of its meaning which is why at this point, I rarely refer to it. TROND: So you're saying a lot of people are attaching lean to whatever they're doing, I mean, understandably so, Michel, right? Because it's become a very successful term. It sells books. It sells consulting. It does refer back to something that you think is real. So can you understand why people would do this if you are in consulting, or even in teaching, or you work in an industry, and you're managing something, why people would resort to this label? MICHEL: First of all, consultants have to have a brand name for what they're selling. It was useful. As a brand name, you have to call what you're offering by a given name, and clients look for this. It's a keyword they look for, and that's how they find you. So it's really necessary. I'm not criticizing consultants for using that. TROND: No, no, I understand it. And, I mean, you're also a little bit in a glass box in the sense that you are within the general tent of lean yourself. So I understand that. I fully understand it. MICHEL: What happens when it's successful is that more and more people jump on this bandwagon and say, okay, I'm going to offer a lean. When you look at what they're saying, it does not reflect the original content. By about 2000s, it had evolved into...what most consultants were offering was drawing value stream maps and organizing Kaizen events. Those two keywords are absent from the Toyota Production System. TROND: Can you explain...so this is interesting. Because I was going to ask you exactly this, what are the types of elements that you react to the most that you feel is really...because one thing is to say it diverged from the original content, but if it is kind of a valuable extension of something...but you're saying value streams and the Kaizens, the Kaizen practices they have very little to do with the Toyota Production System in your reading. MICHEL: That's right. The value stream mapping is a new name for a technique that they call; I mean the translation of the original name is, Materials and Information Flow Analysis (MIFA), Mono to Joho no Nagare in Japanese, flow of materials and information. So that's one idea. And there is a particular graphic convention that has actually evolved from Toyota that became the value stream mapping graphic convention, but it never was in the Toyota context. Mike Rother's own admission (He wrote Learning to See, which promoted this technique.) said it was not an important topic at Toyota. It has some uses, but if you go on factory tours in Japan, you don't see a lot of value stream maps. And so it's been taken...it was a specific tool for a specific purpose like figuring out how to work with a particular supplier. And then it was made into this supposedly all-powerful analytical tool that is the first thing that you have to do when you go into a factory is map its value streams, so that's taking a very small part of what Toyota does and make it into this big thing. As for Kaizen Events, it's actually an American invention. It's something that came out of...in the early 1990s; there were a number of executives who were frustrated with the slow pace of lean implementation with other methods. So they came up with this format they called the Kaizen Blitz, that became the Kaizen events. It's also traced back to some Japanese consulting firms, which found this particular format as a convenient way to make good use of a trip from Japan to the U.S. They would organize one-week events at their clients because it was a good way to justify essentially the cost and the trouble of flying over. TROND: I'm going to go with your story here. So let's say these two are kind of examples for you of things diverting from the original content. Why don't we speak about what the original content then is for a minute? What is the core of the Toyota production method or of lean in its original form for you? MICHEL: Well, the Toyota Production System is something I'm very interested in and still studying. And it's not a static thing. It's something that, for example, the first publication about it was from the early 1970s, an internal document from Toyota with its suppliers. And then there have been many, many other publications about it through the decades. And it's changed in nature, and the concepts of manufacturing have evolved. By definition, the Toyota Production System is what Toyota does. They're very good at making cars. And so it's always important to try to keep up with what it is they're doing, knowing that there is a 5 to 10-year gap between the time they come up with new concepts and the time that the rest of the world gets to know about them. And so, in the early 1990s, there were essentially concepts of how to organize production lines, how to lay out production lines, how to design operator workstations. And there were concepts on how to regulate and manage the flow of materials and the flow of information between stations and lines and between suppliers and customers. And there was also an approach to the management of people and the whole human resource management aspect of hiring people for careers, having career plans for everybody, including shop floor operators, managing to improve the operations based on this infrastructure. So it's a very rich concept, and it encompasses every aspect of manufacturing, logistics, and production control, all the way to accountability. So it's compared with other things like the Theory of Constraints or TPM that are much more limited in scope. There is an approach to quality that Toyota has. The quality improvement is not all of the Toyota Production System. It's a complete system for making a product covering all the bases. TROND: Let me just pick up on one thing, so you're saying it's a complete system. So one thing you pointed out was the HR aspect, and hiring people for careers is one thing, but you also said the career plans for shop floor operators. So I took two things from that, and I was going to ask about this because this has been used as one example of why you cannot implement the Toyota Production System in the same way in different countries, namely because that is one aspect of society that a company doesn't fully control because it is regulated. So, for example, in Europe and in France, which you know, really well, and Germany, you know, employment is regulated in a different way. If a company was going to have the same HR policy in three different factories in three different countries, they would have to have, first of all, obviously, follow the national regulation. But then they would have to add things on top of that that would, you know, specific employee protections that are perhaps not part, for example, of U.S. work culture. So that's one thing I wanted to kind of point to. But the other thing is interesting. So you said career plans for shop floor operators meaning Toyota has a plan for even the basic level worker meaning the operators, the people who are on the floor. And that seems to me a little bit distinct. Because in the modern workplace, it is at least commonly thought that you spend more time both training and caring about people who are making career progression. And you don't always start at the bottom. You sort of hope that the smart people or whatever, the people who are doing the best job, are starting to advance, and then you invest in those people. But you're saying...is there something here in the Toyota Production System that cares about everybody? MICHEL: Yes. But let me be clear about something. The way Toyota manages HR is not something that there are a lot of publications about. There's probably a good reason for this is because they probably consider it to be their crown jewel, and they're not that keen to everybody knowing about it. A lot of the publications about it are quite old. But there's nothing in the regulations and labor laws of any country that prevent you from doing more for your employees than you're required to. TROND: That's a great point. That's a great point. MICHEL: So there are laws that forbid you from doing less than certain things, but they're not laws that prevent you from doing more. There is no rule that you have to offer career plans for production operators because there's nothing preventing you from doing it. In a completely different situation, a large company making personal products ranging from soap to frozen foods...I won't name what the company is, but they have a policy of not being committed to their workers. Essentially, if business is good, you hire people. If there's a downturn, you lay people off. They wanted to migrate from the situation where you have a lot of low-skilled employees that are essentially temps to a situation where they have higher level of qualification and fewer people. So the question is, how do you manage the transition? The way this company eventually did it in this particular plant was to define a new category of employee like, say, technical operator. And a technical operator will be recruited at higher a level of education than the general population of operators. They will be given more training in both hard skills and soft skills and the specific processes they're going to be running, and some additional training on how to manage the quality of these processes, that sort of thing. But at the level of a production operator, they will be put in charge of these processes. And this small group would be separate job categories than the others. And gradually, this evolves to a situation where you only hire into this group. You don't hire any more of the traditional operators. And then, you provide a transition path for the other operators to become members of that group so that over a period of time, gradually, the general population of less skilled, less stable operator shrinks. And you end up over a number of years with a situation where all of the operators that you have are these highly trained operators who are there for the duration. So that's one kind of pattern on how you can manage this kind of transition. TROND: Super interesting. Can I ask you a basic question? So you've been in this consulting part of this venture, you know, of this world for a long time. Where do you typically start? When do you get called, or when do you sign up to help a company, at what stage? What sort of challenge do they have? Do you visit them and tell them they do have a challenge? What is the typical problem a company might have that you can help with or that you choose to help with? MICHEL: There are a lot of different situations. One particular case was a company in defense electronics in the U.S. had a facility in Indiana, and they were migrating all this work to a new facility in Florida. What they told me...they called me in, and they told me that they wanted to take the opportunity of this move to change the way they were doing production. Generally, my answer to that would be, well, it's really difficult to combine a geographical change of facility with an improvement in the way you do the work. Normally, you improve first where you are. You don't try to combine transformation and migration. TROND: It's a funny thing, I would say. It seems like the opposite of what you should be doing to try to make one change at a time. MICHEL: But there were several circumstances that made it work. You can have general principles, and when you're in a real situation, it doesn't always apply. One is the circumstances under which they were doing this migration was such that the people in the old plant were in an environment where there was a labor shortage, so none of them had any problem finding jobs elsewhere if they didn't want to move to Florida. If they wanted to move to Florida, they could, if they didn't want to move to Florida, they had to leave the company, but there were plenty of other companies hiring around. And so there was not this kind of tension due to people losing their jobs and not having an alternative. And then, the transition was announced way ahead of time, so they had something like a 15-month period to plan for their transfer. And to my great surprise, the operators in the old plan were perfectly...were very helpful in figuring out the design for the new lines and contributed ideas. And there was no resentment of that situation. TROND: In this particular example and in other examples, to what extent is production, you know, process redesign a technology challenge, and to what extent is it a human workforce challenge? Or do you not separate the two? MICHEL: I try not to separate the two because you really have to consider them jointly. A technical solution that nobody wants to apply is not going to be helpful. And something everybody wants to apply but that doesn't work, is not going to be helpful either. So you have to consider both. And in this transition, by the way, between these two plants, most of the labor difficulties were in the new plant, not in the old one, because this plant became a section of the new plant. And none of the other lines in that new plant did anything similar, so it stood out as being very different from what all the other lines did. What all the other lines did is you had a structure that is common in electronics assembly where you have rows of benches at which people sat and did one operation, and then the parts were moved in batches between these rows of benches. And instead of that, we put cells where the parts moved one at a time between different operations. And it was also organized so that it could be expanded from the current volume of work to higher volume of work. And so a lot more went into the design. I was a consultant there, but I don't claim credit for the final design. It was the design of the people from the company. They actually got a prize within the company for having done something that was exceptionally good. And when I spoke with them a few years later, they had gone from having something like 20% of the space used for production in the new facility to having it completely full because they were able to expand this concept. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com, and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: Michel, I know that you have a consulting life and a consulting hat, but you also have a teaching hat and a teaching passion. Why did you write this recent textbook which is coming out on Routledge this fall, I believe, with Torbjø Netland from ETH? It's an Introduction to Manufacturing but with a very specific kind of industrial engineering perspective. You told me when we talked earlier that there's a really specific reason why you wrote this textbook, and you have some very, I guess, strong views or worries about how manufacturing education, but perhaps the way it's taught really needs to change. And you feel like some schools are drifting away from the core. What's happening there? MICHEL: Well, industrial engineering as a discipline is about 100 years old, take or leave a decade or two. It started out as...the way I describe it is the engineering of human work in the manufacturing environment. And it expanded to fields other than manufacturing, even at the time of pioneers like Frank and Lillian Gilbreth. For example, we know the way operating rooms in hospitals work with the surgeon being assisted by nurses who hand all the tools to the surgeon; that particular form of organization is due to Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, industrial engineers who looked at the way operating rooms worked and figured that you really don't want to leave a patient with his belly open on the table while the surgeon goes to fetch the tool. You got to have some people giving the tools to the surgeon so that the surgeon can keep operating on the patient. It sounds obvious now, but it wasn't obvious in 1910. And so they were immediately some applications outside of manufacturing, but the bulk of the work was on manufacturing. And the way it's evolved, especially in the past few decades, is that it's gotten away from that focus on human work. And when you look at the research interests of the academics in this field, you find that it's completely dominated by operations research and math. TROND: So we're back to the math. [chuckles] So I find it fascinating that...well, you obviously have a deep insight into it, so you are sensitized to the challenges of overfocusing on one technical discipline as kind of the mantra and the fodder, I guess, the research data for all kinds of processes. I mean, why is math such a big problem, and what do you mean by human work in industrial manufacturing? Because to many people, the advanced work right now is about digitization, digitalization, and it has to do with machines and computers, and one would assume with big data or at least with data. Are you arguing against that trend? MICHEL: No. I mean, if you ask the question of what is human work? The classical answer that I would give is what happens when the guy picks up the wrench. That's one answer. But what happens when the operator sees an alarm message on the control screen of a machine, that's a different answer, a more modern answer. So you had people with the torque wrench applying the right torque to a bolt manually, and then the torque wrench would tell him when the torque was achieved. That's one form of human work. But monitoring and looking after multiple machines that are connected and have a central control system is also human work. You also have people doing it. And they have to feed these machines. They have to make sure that the machines have the right kinds of tools and dyes available to them. They have to maintain these machines. They have to program these machines, and they have to monitor them during production. And one particular problem with automatic systems is micro stoppages. Are you familiar with that term? TROND: Well, explain it to all of us, micro stoppages. I mean stoppages, obviously, anything that stops the production line, whether it's a minor, major, I mean, that would be what I think you are saying. MICHEL: Well, if it's a big problem, the operator doesn't solve it. The operator calls maintenance, and maintenance sends somebody to solve it. Micro stoppage is a problem that's small enough for the operator to deal with. And so, in daily life or in any office life, one very common micro stoppage problem is the copier, right? You tell the copier to print 20 collated copies of a document, and you walk away expecting to find these 20 copies ready when you come back. It doesn't happen because there are some paper jams and so you have to clear the paper jam and restart. You have a lot of things like that in production where parts jam and shoots and stop coming down in automatic system. You have all sorts of issues like this which cause production lines to stop in a way that the operator can resolve in half a minute or a minute and restart. What these things cause is that you have to have an operator there. And so if you really want to have an automatic system that are fire and forget...when you press a button, you move away to do something else while the machine goes through an automatic cycle. When that automatic cycle is finished, you come back. Micro stoppages prevent you from doing that. And they're very difficult to avoid, but they're a major problem, even today. TROND: Michel, I wanted to keep talking about the educational part. But before that, I just wanted to benefit from your experience here and ask you a much more basic question which is so you're writing this textbook about the future or introducing prospective students to industrial engineering and manufacturing. My question is, historically, factories were a very, very big part of manufacturing. Nowadays, meaning in the last few years after the pandemic and other things, a lot of us start to spend a lot more time on an issue, which I'm assuming you have spent a lifetime working on as well, which is supply chain which goes far beyond the factory because it's not located in any one factory, if anything, it's a system of many factories, and it's obviously the supplies of material flows into the factory. And the reason I'm asking you about this is in thinking about the future, which I'll ask you about in a second, a lot of people are sort of factory of the future, this and that. And there are visions about how this is going to change. But it strikes me that manufacturing is and has always been so much more than the factory. What are the components that you really worry about? So, humans, you worry about humans. And you worry about materials. And then you obviously have to worry about the physical infrastructures that are regulating these things. What else goes into it on the macro level? What is this book about, I guess? MICHEL: We're talking about supply chains as well because, as you mentioned, they're a very important part of manufacturing. And when you design a manufacturing system to make a product, you have to make decisions about your products, about components of your product, and what you make in-house, and what you buy from the outside. And there's a major difference between supply chain issues relating to customers, on one hand, the suppliers on the other. It's not just suppliers; it's both sides, incoming supply chain and the outgoing as well. One major difference with what happens in the factory is that you don't control what other people decide, what other organizations decide. So when you manage a supply chain, you have to manage a network of organizations that are independent businesses. How do you get this network of independent businesses to work with you, to cooperate with you, to make your manufacturing successful? That is a big challenge in supply chain management. Inside a factory, that's an environment you control. It's your organization. What management says is supposed to go; it doesn't always, but it's supposed to go. And you have a lot more control over what happens inside than over what happens in the supply chain. And how much control you have over what happens in the supply chain depends greatly on your size. For example, if you're a small customer of a special kind of alloy that only has one manufacturer in the world, you're a very small customer to a very large manufacturer, a metals company. You're not in a position of strength to get that supplier to work with you. If you're a car company making 10 million cars a year and you're dealing with a company that is making forgings for engine parts, you have a lot of control. You have a lot of influence. You represent a large part of their business. They can't afford to lose you. You can't afford to lose them. You can replace them if they don't perform. They can't afford to lose you. They might go out of business if they did. So it's a very different kind of position to be in. And so when you deal with that sort of thing, you have to think through, what is my position with respect to suppliers and customers? Where is it? Where's the driving influence? And it's not always...power in a supply chain is not always resident with the company that does the final assembly of consumer products. In electronics, for example, semiconductor manufacturers are much more key than people who assemble computers. TROND: I wanted to ask you a little bit about the trends and how these things are evolving in the next decade and beyond that. And one example you gave me earlier when we talked was pilots and jetliners because manufacturing in...well, the aviation industry is an example of an industry that, yes, it has an enormous amount of high tech. It's a very advanced science-based development that has produced air travel. But yet these pilots...and I experienced it this summer, a pilot strike stops everything. So the role of people changes as we move into more advanced manufacturing. But people don't always disappear. What do you see as the biggest challenge of manufacturing and the role of manufacturing in the emerging society? What is going to happen here? MICHEL: What I think is going to happen is that in many countries, the manufacturing sector will remain a large part of the economy, but as economies advance, it will have a shrinking share of the labor market. So it's a distant future, maybe like that of agriculture, where 2% of the population does the work necessary to feed everybody else. And manufacturing is now about 10% of GDP in the U.S., 20% in Germany and Japan, about 10% in England, France, Italy. In China, we don't really know because they don't separate manufacturing from industry. And industry is a broader category that includes mining, and it includes road construction, et cetera. They don't separate out manufacturing, but really, it's a big sector of the economy. And so it can remain a big sector, that's not a problem. But you have to think through a transition where the number of people that you employ doing this kind of work goes down, their level of qualifications go up, and the nature of the work they do evolves towards telling machines what to do and maintaining machines. So telling machines what to do can be programming machines when you develop processes, or it can be scheduling what work the machines do. TROND: Is that incidentally why you have gone into teaching in a kind of an academic setting or at least influencing curriculum in an academic setting so much that you see a role here in the future? Beyond what's happening in factories today, you're quite concerned about what might happen in factories ten years from now, 20 years from now when these students become, I guess, managers, right? Because that's what happens if you get education in management at a good school, reading your hopefully great textbook. It takes a little time because you trickle down and become a manager and a leader in industry. So I guess my question then is, what is it that you want these people to know ten years from now when they become leaders? What sort of manufacturing processes should they foster? It is something where humans still matter for sure, and machines will have a bigger part of it. But there's things we need to do differently, you think? MICHEL: The airline pilot metaphor, you know, you have this $300 million piece of equipment. And how much money you make from operating it depends on these two people who are in the pilot's cabin. You have to pay attention to the work of people. And in most factories, the work of people today is an afterthought. So you put in machines. You put in production lines without thinking how will people get from the entrance of the building to where they actually work? TROND: I was going to say it's a fascinating example you had with the airline industry in the sense that, I mean, honestly, even in the old industrial revolution, these machines were expensive, but I guess even more so. I don't know if you've done any research on this, but the amount of dollars invested per worker presumably has to go up in this future you are talking about here where we're increasingly monitoring machines, even these perhaps in the past viewed as low-skilled jobs or operator jobs. I mean, you are operating, maybe not airplanes, but you're operating industrial 3D printers that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars with presuming error rates that could be catastrophic, either for you, for the production line, or for the product you're making. MICHEL: Or photolithography machines that cost millions. TROND: Right. But then that begs the question for me, Michel, how on earth is it possible? If you are right about this that education has been somewhat neglected and skills has been neglected, how's that even explainable? If you are a responsible factory manager or executive of a large manufacturing firm, how could it have gotten...and I'm obviously paraphrasing here. I don't know if you think it's that bad. But how could it get this bad that you actually had to come out and say it's a massive problem? MICHEL: What happens is that you hear a lot about systems thinking, which, to me, it's pretty obvious there's more to a factory or more to a manufacturing system, to supply chain than the collection of its components; it's pretty obvious. And when you change the way a supplier delivers parts, it has an impact over what happens at the assembly workstations where these components are being used, for example. You have to think of the whole as a system. And you have to think about whenever you make any changes to it; you have to think through how these changes affect the whole. What's happening is that there has been a great deal of specialization of skills; I'm not talking about factory workers here. I'm talking about engineers and managers that have been put into silos where they run production control. They become production control manager in the factory. Their next career move is to become production control manager in the factory of a different company. TROND: So here's my open-ended question to you; you're sort of saying that industrial engineering, in one sense, needs to go back to its roots where it was. But the other side of the coin here is you're also talking about a world that's changing drastically. So my question is, the industrial engineer of the future, what kind of a person is this ideally, and what sort of skill sets and what sort of awareness does this person have? MICHEL: The skill sets that this person should have are both technical and managerial. It's management and technology considered together. So they may not be able to write code, or they may not be able to design how to cut a piece of metal, or how to tweak the electrical properties of a circuit, but they know the importance of these things. They've been exposed to them through their education and career. And they have an appreciation for what they are. So, for example, one particular task that has to be done in every manufacturing organization is technical data management. You have to manage the problem definition, the process definitions, which machines you use to do what, down to the process program that these machines run. All of this is data, technical data that has to be managed, put under revision control. And you'd expect someone with training in industrial engineering to understand the importance of revision control on this. If you change something to the cutting program of a milling machine, you may affect what happens elsewhere. You may affect the mechanical properties of the product and make it difficult to do a subsequent operation later. And that's why before you implement this change in production, you have to have a vetting process that results in revision management. So I would expect an industrial engineer to understand that. TROND: Well, you would expect an industrial engineer to understand that, but, I mean, some of the challenges that come from these observations that you're making here they impact all operators, not just engineers. And they certainly impact managers because they are about this whole system that you are explaining. So it sounds to me that you're mounting a pretty significant challenge to the future manufacturers, not just in skills development but in evolving the entire industrial system. Because if we're going to make this wonderful spacecraft, and solve the environmental crisis, and build these new, wonderful machines that everybody expects that are going to come churning out every decade, we certainly need an upskilled workforce, but we need a whole system that works differently, don't we? MICHEL: Yes. Can I give you a couple of examples? TROND: Yeah. MICHEL: One company outsourced the production of a particular component to a supplier then there were technical problems with actually producing this component with the supplier. So the customer company sent a couple of engineers to the supplier, and they found some problems with the drawing that had been provided to the supplier. And they made manual corrections to the drawings, the copies of the drawing in possession of the supplier. And it worked. It solved the immediate problem. But then, at the customer company, they didn't have the exact drawing. The only place with the exact drawings was at the suppliers. And a few years later, they wanted to terminate this supplier. TROND: Aha. MICHEL: You can see the situation. You want people to be able to understand that you just don't do that sort of thing. TROND: Right. So there are so many kinds of multiple dependencies that start to develop in a manufacturing production line, yeah. MICHEL: And then you find a company that's a subcontractor to the aircraft industry. And you find out they route parts through a process that has about 15 different operations. And the way they route these parts is they print a traveler that is 50 pages long, and it's on paper. And the measurements they make on the parts that they're required to make by their customer they actually record by hand on this paper. What's wrong with this picture? TROND: So yeah, multiple challenges here. MICHEL: Yes. TROND: Are you sensing that these things are fixable? Are you optimistic in terms of this awareness of all aspects of the systems changing both among managers and next-generation industrial engineers, and perhaps even among the operators themselves to realize they're getting a more and more central role in the production system? MICHEL: I won't try to prophesy what will happen to industry as a whole but what I'm confident about is that the companies that know how to address these problems will be dominant. Those are the sort of basic mistakes that really hurt you and hurt your competitive position. So there will be a selection over time that will eliminate people who do these kinds of mistakes. TROND: Michel, I don't want to put you on the spot here. And you have spent your career researching and tracking Toyota as an excellent, excellent manufacturer that has graciously taught other manufacturers a lot. And also, people have copied and tried to teach them Toyota methods, even if Toyota wasn't trying to teach everyone. Are there any other either individual companies or things that you would point to for the eager learner who is trying to stay on top of these things? I mean, so lean, obviously, and the Toyota Production System is still a reference point. But are there any other sources that in your career or as you're looking at the future where there is something to learn here? MICHEL: Oh yes. Toyota is a great source of information, but it's by far...it's not the only one. One of the key parts of Toyota's management system is Hoshin Planning. Hoshin Planning didn't come from Toyota; it came from Bridgestone tires. And so that's one case where a different company came up with a particular method. Honda is a remarkable company as well, so there are things to learn from Honda. HP was, under the leadership of its founders, a remarkable company. And they had their own way of doing things which they called The HP Way. Companies have recruited a lot of people...electronic companies have recruited a lot of people out of HP. And you feel when you meet the old timers who have experienced The HP Way, they feel nostalgia for it. And there were a lot of good things in The HP Way. They're worth learning about. So I also believe that it's worth learning about historical examples because history is still with us in a lot of ways. The Ford Model T plant of 100 years ago was a model for a lot of things at the time. It also had some pretty serious flaws, namely, its flexibility. And you still see people putting up the modern-day equivalent of a Model T plant with new products and new technology but without thinking about the need. That particular plant may have to be converted in the not-too-distant future into making a different product. So it's always worth looking at examples from 100 years ago, even today, not for the sake of history but because, in a lot of ways, history is still with us. TROND: Well, on that note, history is still with us; I thank you for this, Michel. And I shall remember to forget the right things, right? So history is still with us, but [laughs] you got to know what to remember and what to forget. Thank you so much. MICHEL: Culture is what remains once you've forgotten everything. TROND: [laughs] On that note, Michel, thank you so much for your time here and for sharing from your remarkable journey. Thank you. MICHEL: You're welcome. TROND: You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Lean Manufacturing. Our guest was Michel Baudin, author, and owner of The Takt Times Group. In this conversation, we talked about how industrial engineering equals the engineering of human work and why manufacturing and industrial engineering education needs to change because it has drifted away from industrial work. And indeed, we are looking at a future where manufacturing is not going away. My takeaway is that lean manufacturing might mean many things, but industrial work has largely been a consistent practice over several hundred years, which is not necessarily a bad thing. Having said that, if we want to go about improving it, we might want to stay pretty close to the workforce and not sit in statistics labs far removed from it. Efficiency is tied to work practices, and they cannot be optimized beyond what the workforce can handle or want to deal with. As we attempt to be lean, whatever we mean by that, we need to remember that work is a thoroughly human endeavor. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean with Professor Torbjørn Netland from ETH Zürich. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes, and if so, do let us know by messaging us because we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform connecting people, machines, devices, and systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Michel Baudin.

Doug Griffin Podcast
Scott Hamilton

Doug Griffin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 26:08


Scott Hamilton stops by to talk about Sunday's Bridgestone show and so much more. 0:28 - Scott shares about his event - This Sunday at 5pm benefitting Cancer Research  Scott Cares also sharing about his journey and his mom's cancer journey and the website for cancer info www.chemocare.com 6:53 - More about this Sunday's event and stories of past events 12:52 - This show is meant to bring hope 14:09 - Scott shares exciting news about cancer treatment 17:51 - Scott shares about his wife's support through all this 22:41 - "The Only Disability in life is a bad attitude" Scott Hamilton website    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Commercial Real Estate Development & Investing with Tyler Cauble | EP127

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 41:08


Tyler Cauble is an Investor and Real Estate Developer in Nashville, Tennessee. He is the Founding Principal and President of the Cauble Group In this episode we talked about: Tyler's Background in Real Estate Using Brokerage to break into Commercial Real Estate First Deals - Raising Capital Asset Classes  Interest Rates Nashville it terms of Investment Investing in Office Buildings Future of Hybrid Working Next 12-24 Months Real Estate Opportunities  Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: https://www.youtube.com/c/TylerCauble?app=desktop Tyler Cauble Youtube channel  Book “WALKABLE CITY: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time” By Jeff Speck https://www.instagram.com/commercial_in_nashville/?hl=en Instagram Transcription: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the Working Capital Real Estate Podcast. My name's Jessica Galley and on this show we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Ladies and gentlemen, my name is Jesse Fraga and you're listening to Working Capital, The Real Estate podcast. Special guest on the show today is Tyler Cowell.   Tyler Cobble is an investor and real estate developer out of Nashville, Tennessee. He's the founding principal and president of the Cobble Group. And we had the pleasure of sharing a stage at Bigger Pockets, what was it, three weeks ago, Tyler?   Tyler (45s): Yeah, man, it feels like it was so much longer than that.   Jesse (48s): I know really well, first of all, thanks for coming on. It's, it's great to have you on the podcast. How you doing today?   Tyler (54s): Yeah, Jessie. Doing well, man. Thanks for having me on this show. I'm excited to dive in further into those topics that we kind of discussed at bigger pockets, you know, cause we only had, what, an hour or so to, to kind of talk about them a little bit. So it'd be good to go a little bit deeper. But yeah, man, excited to do this with you.   Jesse (1m 10s): Yeah, absolutely. Well, like all the guests that come on that, you know, on their first appearance, I always like to get a little bit of the flavor of your journey in real estate, how you got into real estate. I know we're somewhat similar in that at at one point I believe you're a commercial broker and we chat a little bit about that on stage. But yeah, for listeners, why don't you give us a little bit of a background in for yourself in real estate?   Tyler (1m 34s): Absolutely. Yeah, very similar background. So I started in commercial real estate back in the summer of 2013 as the in-house leasing agent for a local boutique development firm here in Nashville. And really just started off on, on shopping center and office leasing cuz the, the firm that I worked with had about 550,000 square feet of retail. We had about 60,000 square feet of office space and a couple hundred thousand square feet of industrial. But it was really a, a residential firm focused on, on that side of development.   And so got to sit in on all the development meetings every week and after a couple years, kind of learned how to put a deal together and went out and put my first development project together, which was a 42 unit town home development. And then shortly thereafter wrote a book on leasing commercial real estate called Open for Business. Kind of targeted towards small business owners cuz one thing that I saw over and over again was that they just got themselves into trouble left and right cuz they didn't know what they were doing. They weren't represented by a broker and it caused a lot of problems.   But after that development, after that book left and started my own firm started the Cobble group, which is just a commercial real estate brokerage focused on mostly investments today in, in, in the Tennessee area. But we do triple net leasing across the country. I've got Parasol, which is a commercial property management company. We currently manage a little over 2.1 million square feet of assets. And then I've got Hamilton development, which is where I spend probably the majority of my time now focused on mostly neighborhood development.   But we've done everything from a six bay car wash that we converted into five micro restaurants and a bar all the way up to a 32 acre site with 330,000 square feet of retail that we're currently master planning to tear down and develop about one and a half million square feet on it.   Jesse (3m 23s): That's awesome. So the, the initial kind of foray into real estate as a broker, was the, was the plan always to pivot to investing in real estate or was it something that kind of happened naturally? What did that process look like?   Tyler (3m 36s): Yeah, it was really something that kind of happened naturally. I didn't really even think I wanted to get into commercial real estate. I was, I did really well in sales the summer that I graduated high school and decided to drop outta college because of that. And I figured, hey, if I can make 30 grand in a summer as a 19 year old, I could go make, you know, a hundred thousand plus a year working sales full time. So I'm gonna go do that. And then ended up working as a project manager for my grandfather's construction company for about three months before I got the job as the in-house leasing agent and a development firm.   So it kind of just came naturally after having fallen into the business and seeing how that's how things works.   Jesse (4m 19s): Yeah, that's great. So we talked on the, on the panel that we were on about breaking into commercial real estate as opposed from residential real estate. The first couple deals that you did outside of the company that you were working with, so the, the first ones you did on your own or, or privately I guess you should say, because you know, none of these deals are 100% on our own. What did that deal look like? Was it, was that in the commercial space or did you, did you start in resi and then kind of move over?   Tyler (4m 46s): Yeah, it was, well so the, the first development project I did that was resi, it was 42 town homes. That one's very different from, you know, kind of what we've done ever since. But my first real project that I did, you know, relatively on my own without the development firm was an office building. It was a little two tenant office building that was completely vacant when we bought it. It had been mostly renovated and I, I fell into it, this was probably about five years into the business. I had been thinking I wanted to buy commercial real estate for quite some time, but could just never get over the, you know, the scary thoughts that we all have getting into our first deal.   Right. And it fell into my lap in the best way possible. We were helping a client buy it on the brokerage side. They couldn't get their financing. We, we assigned the contract to another client who also couldn't get their financing for different reasons. It wasn't because there was anything wrong with the, the deal. And then so after that we were like, well you know what, just assign it to me and I'll figure this out cuz you know, we've been working on the property for probably four months at this point. I'd really figured it out. I liked the project and so I called a couple of guys that had known me for five years at that point and just said, Hey, it's funny, like I always talk about this deal with my underwriting now cuz I was literally on the back of a napkin.   It was like, I think we can rent it for $12 a square foot and it'll take us, you know, 18 months to stabilize this property. And you know, they just said, Yeah, we'll give you 50 grand each and threw money into it, You know, now comparing that to 17 spreadsheets of underwriting on all the deals that we do, it's, it's hilarious to think back on, but it was a good deal. It was a good first deal. And later that year I ended up buying three more buildings. So once I, once I got over that fear of acquiring the first property, I just realized like, oh yeah, it's not that big of a deal, let's go for it.   Jesse (6m 35s): So the financial model didn't seem like the most difficult part of that deal in terms of, you know, the first couple deals. What do you, what did you find at the beginning if, if anything was the biggest challenge that you had? Whether that, you know, came from the capital raising side, from the operations side? What did that look like?   Tyler (6m 52s): Yeah, so the, the, the problem that we have on our projects today is the same, you know, problems that we had kind of early on in the projects. It's just the raising capital side of things. You know, my skills lie in the acquisition side of things. Finding deals off market and putting the idea on the project together and then executing on that and operating it. So we, we actually have worked very well with the just capital partners, right? Where they come in, they give us the cash, they don't want to do anything else and we just execute the deal.   The, the first deal we ever did was it, it gave me a false sense of how easy it is to raise money. Cuz I literally made two phone calls and they both said yes. And the, the next capital raise we did really put me back in my place. It was went from $50,000 raise, or I'm sorry, 125,000 raise to a $400,000 raise. And that was when I realized like, oh yeah, okay. You know, raising money is not always easy when you have to bring in multiple investors, there's a good chance somebody's gonna back out for any number of reasons, right?   They could love the deal and, you know, they're, they could crash their car and need to buy a new car, right? So there's, there's so many different reasons why somebody could back out, but that's why we work, you know, like I was saying so well with Capital Partners because they come in and fund it and we come in and just execute the deal.   Jesse (8m 13s): Yeah, I think even we, when we chatted about ways to break into real estate or commercial real estate in general, like there's these, all these aspects. There's the ops person, there's the person that's great with financials. There's a guy that's or gal that's great at finding deals and then there's the capital raise where that might be an individual where they are just, you know, all they do is raise capital or have the kind of the, the gift of, of raising capital or finding sources for capital for deals. And I think we underestimate that. You know, it's so hard to be good at any one of those verticals, let alone try to do everything on your own.   Tyler (8m 46s): That's right. Yeah. I mean I, I think you really should have partners that bring their own strengths to the table, right? I mean, you wanna flesh those out and make sure the partnerships work. But you'll get VC firms, venture capital firms, they will almost exclusively will not invest in single partner businesses cuz there's just too much risk, right? What if that guy gets hit by a bus tomorrow, who's gonna run this company? You'll get Shark Tank, right? They almost always love to invest in partnerships over a single person because it just reduces their risk.   And, and there's no way that one person can be good at everything, right? Because if you're, if you're trying to be a jack of all trades, you're probably not, you're probably gonna miss some stuff on everything, right? Yeah. And they would rather you be the outstanding development partner and this guy's the the finance guy, right? Or girl, either way that you want to do it or however you need to divide those responsibilities up. I think it's a a pretty savvy way of, of building your business and getting that security for your potential capital partners.   Jesse (9m 44s): Yeah. We always say in our brokerage it's finders, miners and binders, right? People that find the deal, people that can maintain relationships. And then the ones that, that are closers, I'm sure there's, you know, there's other ones, but those rhymes. So those, those must be right.   Tyler (9m 56s): That's right. Yeah. That's actually, I'm gonna have to keep that finders, minors and binders. I like that a lot. I mean, and yeah, you think about it like your, your personality will also kind of help determine which one of those you're gonna be really good at, right? Like, I've got a beard, I'm covered in tattoos. I'm not gonna be the guy that's golfing at a country club every Thursday, Friday, Saturday. Right. But I've got partners that they absolutely love doing that stuff and it's been incredibly effective for them on the capital raising side.   Jesse (10m 21s): Yeah. And it's just, it's funny how some, some areas that you think that somebody will have the strength in and it turns out they're, they might be great in something completely different. Like you're doing a, a value add and you find it, one of your partners is just really good at communicating with the traits people and, and it's, and it seems like a good fit. They respect him or her and, you know, some of that, some of this stuff doesn't, you know, you don't plan everything out. Some of this stuff happens by osmosis and by a certain deal that you're working on,   Tyler (10m 50s): Right? Yeah. It just falls together naturally. And, and what I've found too, you know, I think a lot of people that are just getting into commercial real estate think that they need to have that figured out all on the front end. And yes. Does it help to have the capital partner, does it help to have the general contractor and the attorneys and the brokers and the property managers? Absolutely. Right. But the chances of you having the right team on board day one are pretty close to zero, right? I mean, the people that we were working with when I first started my development company night and day, compared to who we're working with now.   And that's because as you grow your needs change, right? I can't be working with the same engineer on, on a, you know, $575,000 office building as I am on a hundred million dollar multifamily deal. It just doesn't make any sense.   Jesse (11m 38s): Yeah. So speaking of kind of things changing in terms of when you first started the type of assets that you were buying back then, how has the asset class or the, you know, the investment philosophy changed from then if it has at all to now and, and the deals that you're looking at now?   Tyler (11m 55s): Yeah, so since I started kind of in the, the office and retail world mostly, I've never been afraid of office and retail and, and it's been interesting to see how people have reacted to those two asset classes over the last three to four years. You know, when everybody's freaking out saying the building's on fire and running away, to me, I'm like, man, that's an opportunity. Like right now, I'm sure we'll get into this here in a minute, but interest rates, interest rates going up, buyers developers are pulling back massive opportunity. And if you're building an apartment complex right now, or you start in the next few months, you'll be one of the few apartment complexes delivering, right?   Which means you'll probably have a very aggress lease up. So to me there's, there's, there's always an opportunity in situations like that.   Jesse (12m 36s): So let's talk about interest rates in, in terms of, you know, let's kind of frame it from the perspective of you have people that, like you said, are looking for deals now. So they're going to negotiate with, with interest rates in mind for sure. And, and be hypersensitive to what they can get, whether they should do floating or fixed. And then you have the bucket of people that are, you know, had interest rates locked in at a, at a low rate already that are, you know, working their deals. And then there's kind of that in the middle where you have people that are doing short term debt and it's in a floating kind of environment and they're probably saying, you know, shit, we didn't expect, we didn't put this in the proforma for interest rates to double.   So I, I imagine that with, with those three different type of user groups, there's opportunities like you're saying to come in now with, you know, with the reality of where interest rates are today with a little bit more information. Is that kind of kind of the way you're looking at things right now?   Tyler (13m 32s): Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I think, I think the people with the, the shorter term debt, they're the ones that are gonna be in trouble, right? I, I would rather, I mean, we're working on a multifamily deal right now. That'll be, you know, somewhere between 250 to 350 units depending on how we decide to lay out the site and go, if we go with garage wrap or podium and we have the option to lock in a six and a half percent interest rate or do a floating arm, right? And we can see how well, you know, in, in two years interest rates will probably come down.   So locking it in now might not benefit us in the future, whereas that arm is gonna be high right now, but it could come down pretty significantly in two years. But I'm looking at it and going, I'd rather just lock in at six and a half percent today and just have the surety of, you know, hey, you know what, if we end up overpaying in the future, we, we overpaid so that we could have a little bit of peace of mind so that we know that, you know, I mean, look, if, if World War Three breaks out interest rates are gonna skyrocket and the last thing that anybody needs is for their interest rate to go to 10 or 12%, right?   Cause then you're talking about a massive amount of defaults and you just can't make that deal work. And so, you know, that six and a half percent walk in I think is good. I, I I think, like I said, I think developers, buyers are pulling back and that's gonna create a massive amount of opportunity for people that are cash buyers, right? We've got a client that just sold a vineyard outta California for 120 million cash and we're doing almost, so we're helping them kind of build this portfolio. This is on the brokerage side and they are, we're starting off in the triple net investment side.   And since we're coming in as all cash buyers in an environment where interest rates are too high to make the spread work on preexisting cap rates, we're negotiating these cap rates way up. And we know in two, three years we'll be able to throw 30, 50% debt on these properties just to keep it very safe for them. Keep their, you know, debt service low and pull that cash out at much cheaper rates than we have today. Thereby increasing that spread that they're able to get on some of the most secure assets you can buy even more.   So yeah, definitely opportunity all around.   Jesse (15m 42s): And for those listening, you know, I know not everybody's kind of in the commercial world, on the triple net side, you're just simply mean, You're simply saying that the additional rent, you're, you're downloading to the tenant. So the taxes, maintenance, insurance, you're, you're basically having the tenant pay for those?   Tyler (15m 57s): That's right. Yeah. So all of the, so the tenant pays the rent and then they pay for any of the additional costs of owning that property. So typically, like at a multifamily property, right? You may or may not have the utilities passed on, but you as the property owner will pay for the property taxes, the building insurance, landscaping, you know, anything to do with the property. Whereas in a triple net, you know, take a Starbucks or a Walgreens for example, they will pay for those expenses on their own or reimburse the landlord for it, especially on the commonary maintenance side because let's face it, Starbucks has an image to ahold and that actually directly impacts their business if that's not getting done.   And there are landlords out there that might try and, you know, cut the budget a little bit and and skip by and save some money. So they prefer to have those expenses on their books.   Jesse (16m 44s): Yeah. And it's interesting how things have changed over the last, even the last year or two where kind of caps, I'm not sure in your market, every market seems to be a little bit different, but putting caps on those controllable operating expenses, I think at, at the very least, whether landlords are allowing it or not, but at the very least we're seeing a, you know, a different percentage cap because we're not in a 1% inflation environment anymore. We're, you know, closer to 10 probably in the states. More than that, I don't have been.   Tyler (17m 11s): Yeah, I mean we used to kind of cap everything at around 5% annual increases on the controllable expenses. Yep. And then we more commonly got into 10% per year. And I wouldn't be surprised if people are now capping it at 15% and just saying, Look, we don't know. We don't know what we're gonna get charged. We can't control it. I mean, they're technically your controllable expenses, but you know, if labor costs go up and your landscaping doubles Yeah. And that's just market now. You really can't control that.   Jesse (17m 39s): So given the environment that we're in right now, I'm not sure for your local market in Nashville, well first of all is, is Nashville Nashville kind of where your playground is? Where, where you like to invest or you, are you in other markets or even outta state?   Tyler (17m 53s): Yeah, so we've got, most of our assets are in Nashville. We do have one in Chattanooga and one just across the border in Georgia from Chattanooga, which a lot of people don't know this, but Chattanooga MSA actually crosses into Georgia. So technically Chattanooga. But we, we have helped, like I've got clients that are buying property all over the United States. I was just in San Antonio for a client that was doing a 10 31 exchange. I was up in Milwaukee. But as far as our investments go and, and just my investment philosophy, I prefer to, to be able to have, you know, hands on protection of the asset.   Cuz again, that's, that's our skill set. But we'll, we'll probably expand outta that footprint at some point once I've got a bigger team.   Jesse (18m 37s): So given Nashville right now, it's, it's been a while since I've looked at the numbers, but I remember it was kind of the darling of the apartment industry for a while where there's just deals and deals and, you know, even maybe a year ago, seeing the numbers, the, the unit price of prices have gone up or went up substantially. Is that still the case? Is it, is it a, an expensive market or is that the reason, you know, you're looking into these, you know, potentially secondary markets?   Tyler (19m 4s): Yeah, I mean we try and play in whatever sandboxes nobody else is really paying attention to. Cuz I've been able to find a lot of value that way. So, you know, within Nashville we look at the emerging corridors. So we try not to, you know, so Nashville's kind of bisected by the river, right? So there's, there's downtown and South Nashville, which is on the south side of the river and there's East Nashville, which is technically on the north east side of the river. And that river kind of cut off all of the old money, which is south of town from really developing on this, this side of town.   And so there was a huge opportunity there to be so close to downtown and have, you know, all these cool musicians, your artists in Nashville kind of live on that side of town. So it was very easy for us to jump over here and start doing cooler projects. You know, if you're, if you're trying to buy multi, you know, build multifamily right now closer to the urban core of Nashville, it's tough because land prices have gotten so high, construction's so high, then you have to turn around and get the rents. Even though we're 53,000 residential units short of a comfortable market in Nashville, it's, it's, it can be tough to make those deals work, but we're finding deals on those emerging corridors where, you know, maybe you've gotta put up with a, a, a car lot across the street or a van at bank or you know, whatever that is.   But we're still five minutes from downtown and I don't think that people moving here from New York, Chicago, LA have any issues with that. And they've actually proven that over the last 10 years. And so that's kind of where our, we're finding our opportunities. Chattanooga was, was 100% a yield move, right? I bought a 41,000 square foot nine story tower out there for 1.8 million. Hmm. I mean, just the price per square foot, you know, in Nashville it'd be at least 10 times that in the same location.   So, you know, the, the opportunity there to just make more on your cash for relatively smaller projects was, was too tempting.   Jesse (21m 1s): So when you're looking at, let, let's move to some of the, the office discussion. When you're looking at these assets to purchase, you know, for those that don't know, it's, it's very similar to the kind of the apartment side in a sense, in the sense that, you know, you look at your tenant profile, you're looking at lease expirations, you're looking at the quality of the tenants because you know, the, those are the building blocks of the valuation of your property. Are you doing anything different with how you proforma office buildings than, than say you were two years ago?   Or is kind of the fundamentals pretty much stayed the same?   Tyler (21m 38s): Yeah, so for me the fundamentals have stayed the same only because the type of office that we were investing in just happened to be the type of office that did find during covid. So we're more of the class B and class C office assets on what I call the urban core adjacent. So not your immediate downtown, just in the neighborhoods surrounding it. And those are a lot of small business owners that lived in the neighborhood and they wanted to get out of the house, right? You'll get a lot of these class A assets that are in downtown cores and those are really the ones that are taking probably 90% of the hit because a lot of these people don't wanna drive downtown and work in a 300,000 square foot office building with, you know, a lot of other people they don't know.   Now that's starting to change, right? I mean, there's a ton of companies that are moving back and I, I don't think that that's gonna be a permanent move forever, right? I mean, having office space in the downtown cores is far too convenient for way too many big companies. Cuz you know, think about it, their workforce can live all over anywhere in the city and get there. Whereas if you go to the south side of town, maybe there's only one interstate or a couple major thorough bears that'll take you there and it just makes it a little more difficult. So, you know, I I would say the, on the office side of things, it hasn't really changed.   We always do look at, you know, how can we make this more of a mixed use type of asset? How can we bring some other draw to the space that would make an office tenant say, yes, we would take this over, you know, the straight office, straight up office building down the street. You know, can we add a coffee shop? Can we add a food truck? Can we add, you know, something? Can we add a bar, something cool that would just give them an opportunity to have more meetings or, you know, help create more of a company culture within the project.   Jesse (23m 25s): So most people on the brokerage end of things, or even on the investor side are sick of talking about this in the commercial real estate space. But I have to ask, in terms of the future of work, the future of, of of office space hybrid working, what, what's your view on that? What, what do you see unfolding in the, let's call it the kind of short to to mid term? So say like a year to five years out, How do you see work evolving, if at all?   Tyler (23m 55s): Yeah, I mean, I think if you're, you're focused on office space where you're catering to probably 50 or fewer employees, you're probably gonna have no issues, right? A lot of these smaller companies don't wanna spend the money to go fully remote. It's much more difficult for them to manage a workforce remote than it would be for say, you know, Bridgestone who has thousands of employees and they haven't gone back to the office here in Nashville, right? I think that, and, and again, we saw that through covid. I mean, I was, you know, waving at my neighbors from, you know, across the hall when, when I was still working in the office because everybody was still coming in.   I think that there are certain aspects of everyday offices, right? That, that maybe accounting, right? Does accounting really need to be in the office? Probably not maybe once, twice, three times a week just to make sure that they're caught up in having whatever meetings they need to have with other team members, but they don't necessarily need to be permanently in the office, right? And so there can be some accommodations that get made there. Whereas if you're in sales, right, and you're having to go work with a team, or if you're on, you're a tech developer, right?   And you're working with a team, I mean, chances are you're probably gonna have to be in the office more. So it'll be interesting to see, I know we've seen some companies move more toward, you know, they've lessened their office spaces, right? And they have people on shifts, right? Like, you come in Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and then the, the second shift comes in Thursday, Friday, or however they're deciding to do that. I think that that's gonna end up becoming just another trend, kind of like open workspace, right? Like everybody 10 years ago was saying the open floor plan is the way to go.   We can pack everybody in here like sardines. It's so efficient. And then they found out that none of the employees liked it. It made everybody less productive. I think that that's kind of what you'll see for some of these offices. Now, if you've got a bad work culture, your employees will 100% not want to come into the office, right? So it's kinda like, how do you actually make this a great place to work where your people want to be there?   Jesse (25m 60s): Yeah. It, I think it's definitely like the situation's definitely exposed some, some cultures that probably had issues prior to this. In terms of like the workplace, I think it's, it's an open question on that. If, you know, the trend, the aspect of coming in on a hybrid model, in a lot of ways it makes sense. The, you know, it's like the, there's a great book I was talking about recently with some of the brokers in our office, Fanatical Prospecting by Jeb Blo, you know, Sales Gravy's a great podcast. Some of the guys didn't hear about it, but there's Parkinson's law, which, you know, you'll, you'll basically expand time to take, expand time to take the item A the task at hand will kind of fill up that amount of time that you give it.   But then there's the other one, and I can't remember remember what it's called, but it's basically a contraction of time. And it's kind of similar to, you know, when you have a vacation and you gotta do a bunch of things, all of a sudden you, you, you move mountains and you figure out stuff that you could do in one day that would take you a week because you have that, that plan. And what I've found is that the, comparing that to the work week, a lot of what we do, we can do four out of five days a week, especially like we're in sales, it's a little different, you know, we'll ju we'll work regardless. Like we'll take up that amount of time because our function is different.   But certainly I think that companies, you can do things in four days. I think the challenge that we're seeing with companies that we work with is when you start giving the option for hybrid, all of a sudden Mondays and Fridays become the days that if you're gonna give people three days a week, those are obviously the ones that they're gonna choose to have off. And that creates a problem. So we've had to adjust even in, in our organization and we have, you know, 5,000 plus employees.   Tyler (27m 37s): Yeah. I mean how do you, how do you handle that the right way? Right? I mean, if every company in the world starts taking off on Mondays, there's gonna be a lot of customers or deals that just don't happen or, you know, you struggle to get things moved forward. So yeah, I mean I think that, you know, having people work in shifts or whatever, I mean, you know, we were looking at, what is it Iceland, where they actually have a three day weekend, Like every company there, you know, takes a three day weekend. Hmm. And they are just as productive as United States.   And, and I thought that that was really interesting. And so we've been studying that model, trying to figure out how we can make that work in our company as well so that we can, I mean, I'd love to take Friday through Sunday off. I own my own business. That will never happen.   Jesse (28m 20s): Yeah, I was gonna   Tyler (28m 21s): Say work every day. But that, that's a cool thing for the employees, you know?   Jesse (28m 25s): Yeah, absolutely. I think it's, you know, it is one of those things that we'll see evolve. I think what's, what I find kind of fascinating is that people, you know, that talk to us and that are in the commercial space and talking about how this is a new thing and obviously the pandemic was a new thing, but I think, or at least in my, you know, experience, I've seen this trend kind of just get pushed into high gear. I, I saw a trend of hybrid working and, and not just me, a lot of people in our space did see this trend and it was really a matter of technology catching up and, and kind of the will for companies to, to push it and kind of the pandemic I think just heightened all that.   Tyler (29m 4s): Yeah. I think the best way to look at it that I've heard is we just shot ahead 10 years. Yeah. Right? Like that's, that's basically what happened. Everybody figured out, you know, oh, you know, Zoom existed, right? I mean we're recording on it now. Yeah, Zoom existed prior to the pandemic, but wow did their, you know, subscription rates significantly jump. People found it. They realized, oh okay, we can use this for a significant amount of our meetings. Let's just do that. So I I I think that people just adapted technology that was already in use. It'll be interesting to see what comes out of it, right?   I mean you look at 2009, 2010, all the companies that came out of that to serve some issues, right? You had ride share come outta that lift. Uber, Airbnb came outta the downturn. So I'm excited to see what comes outta this one. But yeah, we just kind of shot ahead 10 years.   Jesse (29m 52s): So we ask four final questions to all guests that come on the show. But before we get to that, I just want to talk a little bit about where, or, or ask you what you think the opportunities, we touched on it a little bit are gonna be where the opportunities are gonna be in terms of, you know, the next 12 to 24 months as we're in a very precarious time. I think a lot, a lot of things are changing at once, inflation interest rates. So I'm gonna ask you to crystal ball it and I know that nobody can, but I'd love to get your thoughts.   Tyler (30m 24s): I wish I could, I'd be Warren Buffet by now, but I would say, you know, let's bring it down by sector, I mean multi-family. I think the opportunity is if, if you're willing to go ahead and move forward and pay a little bit more on construction costs and pay a little bit more on interest rates, you'll be one of the few products delivering. And I think there's something to be said for that, for having a very aggressive lease up on the back end to say that it's worth it. I think on the office side it's gonna be a lot of exploring what are the other amenities that you can really add to office space that will keep companies interested in leasing space from you that nobody else is doing.   Right? I mean, come on, having a meeting room and a little cafe downstairs. I mean it's like most office buildings, I'm sure you see this all the time. It's like they haven't changed since the 1980s and you look at multi-family apartment complexes and in the last 15 years, the amenities that have been added to apartment complexes is insane. Yeah. There's one here in Nashville that has the biggest pool I have ever seen with a volleyball court. This is all on above the parking deck by the way. Volleyball court. A yoga studio with a yoga instructor that comes in.   They've got a CrossFit gym, they've got an indoor like Topgolf simulator. They've got like four or five barbecue pets, hammocks every, I mean, you know, like compare that to 20 years ago, they're like, here's a grill outside. Yeah. You know, they've just totally changed the programming. So I think you,   Jesse (31m 48s): You gotta come to the front to get the key.   Tyler (31m 51s): Yeah, exactly. Exactly. So I think, I think looking at office through the lens of multifamily is a really interesting way to help urge that into the future industrial buy anything you can that's sewn for industrial and start building it. I mean you cannot, you can't do enough of that right now.   Jesse (32m 9s): You can find it.   Tyler (32m 11s): Yeah, exactly. I mean cuz it's, it's so cheap to build and, but the problem is a lot of the industrial, especially in the southeast, has been closer to the urban core. Guess what? It's getting torn down because there's a higher and better use such as multifamily on that site now. So not only are developers not building that product cuz they're focused on, you know, million square foot plus logistics and distribution buildings for like Amazon and e-commerce, but the stock is getting taken away. So where are all of the construction companies going?   Where are your local little e-commerce stores going? And then retail, Just look at it differently. There's nothing wrong with retail. I mean, look at, you know, you got these big boxes you have to fill, call church, call a gem, do something unique in that space. Do self storage, right? There are so many things that can take up big box spaces. Don't be afraid of it. You know, retail isn't dying, it's just changing, right? I mean, you gotta think of what is Amazon proof.   So that's, that's kind of my, my, my crystal ball there.   Jesse (33m 16s): Right on. All right, so we got four questions. I'll, they're pretty, pretty short, pretty self-explanatory. I'll hit you with them here.   Tyler (33m 24s): Let's go.   Jesse (33m 25s): All right. For the younger people listening kind of touched on it on our panel, but your view on mentorship or, or you know, what young people can do to break into our industry?   Tyler (33m 36s): Go find somebody that's doing what you want to be doing and just figure out how to be in their life. Right? I mean see if they'll go, go out for coffee with you if so by the, by the damn coffee, right? Like I've had so many people that have re not that I need somebody to pay for my coffee, but it just, it leaves a really good impression of you of like, I'm taking this seriously. I know you're giving me your time just by the, it's five bucks. I think that any way that you can provide value to that person, do it. Because you gotta think like these commercial real estate professionals are incredibly busy, right?   We've got so much going on. It's really tough for for us to take time out of our days just to have a meeting. Not that we don't want to do that. It's just like, I mean, you know, up until we were on this, I was on a call literally one minute before cuz I've been on calls all day and this guy's called me like three times and I haven't had a chance to call back. And so anyway that you can provide value I think. And then, and then as soon as you get a foot in the door, you know, if you gotta go work for free, do it right. Be the guy that just brings coffee to the office in the mornings. Cuz eventually somebody's gonna say, Hey will you go do this?   Will you pull me some comps? Will you, you know, whatever that opportunity is and then jump on it and you'll get into it. I've had buddies that had, I had one guy that had over 50 interviews in the commercial real estate industry and didn't get a job. Wow. It's tough. It's really, really tough. But you know, once you get that foot in the door, the sky's the weapon.   Jesse (35m 2s): It really is. I tell you, I tell you younger people, especially if they want to be first of all in commercial, it really is the hardest part is just getting in. Once you're in you can, you know, navigate and explore the, explore the studio space as they say.   Tyler (35m 16s): That's right.   Jesse (35m 17s): What was something that you wish somebody had told you when you started out? Whether that's in brokerage or investing, just, just something you, that was a hard lesson you had to learn.   Tyler (35m 26s): Ooh. I would say commercial real estate is not linear. You don't take stair steps. You experience hockey stick growth. The first couple of years were really rough for me as a broker cuz like I told you, I made 30 grand that one summer in sales. Yeah. And so when I started looking at a commercial real estate, after I got offered the job, I was like, oh man, I'm gonna come in here and make over a hundred thousand dollars my first year and just we're gonna be off to the races that I can't believe how hilarious that is. Now looking back on it, I made, I busted my tail and I made 40 grand my first year, which most brokers don't.   Yeah. My second year I was looking at my tax return, I literally made like 40,500. I was like, what am I doing? I made $500 more my second year. I need to go get into a different industry. Well the third year after you actually have learned a little bit, you've made some contacts and you, you know more about the process and how things work. You just work more efficiently. Made 120 grand. Yeah. Right. And then it's just gone up ever since there. And so it's all about just getting in understanding that those first few years are not gonna be the easiest, but it will all pay off the more you teach yourself during that time.   Jesse (36m 41s): Yeah, that's funny. It is a, it's a funny industry. You know, you're gonna make 35, $40,000 but you're wearing a thousand dollars suit in your first couple   Tyler (36m 48s): Years. Oh my gosh. Yeah. I spent all of my money un unbuttoned downs and, and nice pants and shoes and it's funny cuz now, now that I am where I am, I wear t-shirts and jeans and don't have to worry about that at all. Yeah. But yeah, it's, yeah, you've gotta spend money to at least look successful.   Jesse (37m 7s): Yeah. And you're absolutely right. It's like it is not linear. It's hockey stick growth and like the big thing is like that hockey blade might be really long for a long time. Yeah,   Tyler (37m 17s): That's exactly right.   Jesse (37m 18s): Awesome. What are a couple resources that you would recommend, whether it's a book you've recently, you know, recently read or a podcast that you've been on lately?   Tyler (37m 31s): Yeah, I mean I think obviously go check out Jessie's YouTube channel. I've got a YouTube channel as well, teaching people a commercial real estate. I think that those are, those are great resources, right? Cuz when you and I were coming up, nobody was doing that. We did not have that opportunity. I mean, I tried to learn from anybody I could and everybody was just like, you know, swatting at me like I was a fly because nobody wants to teach you anything in this industry. I think that, so the book that I almost always recommend to people is Walkable Cities by Jeff Spec. It is one of my favorite books.   It's really on urban design. So not even necessarily commercial real estate specific, but the way that they talked through how a great city is designed and how commercial real estate, residential real estate design actually impacts everybody's daily lives. Hmm. Completely changed how I looked at my projects. So it's kind of like, kind of the things that you can't put a dollar value on, but you need to spend the money on and you know, it'll come back in the end and benefit you. And so a lot of development companies actually ignore that because they can't quantify it.   Yeah. But the value is there. So those are, those are some great resources.   Jesse (38m 37s): That's great. I've never heard of that. It reminds me a little bit of, I think it's Dr. He's a per, he's a PhD. Gly is the last Edward Gly and it's triumph of the city and a lot of it has to do with urban planning and, and design and how we have different, you know, different ways that design happens as a result of people being in a place rather than designing it that way. And taking, taking kind of notes on, on that aspect of it.   Tyler (39m 5s): Yeah, I think you know, it, it talks in the book, it talks about Nashville and it talks about Vancouver, it talks about Portland and, and Nashville and Portland are almost exact opposites. Portland did not want interstates. Nashville went all interstates. And you could see how that impacted. And then Vancouver, what I love about Vancouver is very early on, before the development got big there, they created view sheds and they created all of these development requirements to make sure that the city doesn't hide the beauty that made it right.   And I think that's really, that's why Vancouver is still one of the best cities you could visit to this day. It's just such a great place to be. You still feel like you're in the mountains even though you're in a city. You know, they've just done such a good job of preserving that. Yeah.   Jesse (39m 51s): Yeah. It's been a while since I've done the Western Canadian thing. Gotta gotta get back out there. Yeah. Okay. So listen, I've, I've kind of gone over time here. I want to make sure that we put a couple links on where people can reach out to you. Obviously the YouTube channel, any other place that you know if people want to connect or see content that you're doing where they can go?   Tyler (40m 11s): Yeah, YouTube channel's. Just my name, Tyler Cobble. And then if you wanna connect with me, Instagram is by far the best way. If you DM me, I will answer questions and that's just commercial in Nashville with underscores between it. Or you can just search my name. Tyler Cobble.   Jesse (40m 27s): My guest today has been Tyler Cobble Tyler, thanks for being part of Working Capital.   Tyler (40m 31s): Thanks Jesse   Jesse (40m 46s): You so much for listening to Working Capital, the Real Estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse Fraga. If you like the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media. It really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram. Jesse for galley, F R A G A L E. Have a good one. Take care.  

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
Prepared to Perform: How Bridgestone Ultra High Performance and Motorcycle Tires Serve the Need for Speed

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 31:28


Whether rolling on four wheels or two, enthusiast drivers pour their time, money and passion into automotive pursuits, and they deserve tires that reward these investments. THRIVE host Keith Cawley chats with Ian McKenney, Senior Product Manager for Consumer Tire, and Jared Williams, General Manager of Motorcycle Products in the U.S. and Canada, about how Bridgestone is doubling down on the ultra-high performance (UHP) tires that are necessary for this lifestyle.

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville
Taylor Swift knows the shape of Woody's body.

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 35:50


Zac had a run-in with French police because of course. Lizzo concert at Bridgestone featured vomit and a missed facetime. Woody's grandson is 4 yrs old! Jim got spooked irl by The Watcher.

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville
Irrational Fears revealed: Sloths and floss

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 36:28


Woody's bday present brought him to tears. Instagram is bringing back a feature from MySpace. What stars hung with Post Malone after his Bridgestone show? We had one of the most fun Gender Wars games ever.

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
Going Off the Road: How Bridgestone's Biggest Tires Raise the Bar for Performance, Technology and Service

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 25:27


In our world of tires, what you see carrying cars and trucks in your daily travels is just the beginning. One of Bridgestone's most premium tire portfolios is off the road – literally. The Off the Road (OTR) tire business supports vital industries that operate in the most grueling conditions, including mining and construction. This is where you'll find the biggest tires that Bridgestone makes, as well as some of the company's biggest technology breakthroughs. Keith Cawley talks to Rob Seibert, President of Off the Road, and Grok Gates, Director of Business Development for Off the Road Mobility Solutions, about how their combination of high-performing products, innovative digital solutions, and premier customer service is meeting the incredible demands placed of the OTR industry.

Morning Drive
Robby & Rexrode: It's gameday in Smashville we're live from Bridgestone (10-13-2022)

Morning Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 49:08


Johnny G & Friends
How to Innovate Through Industry Challenges with Doug Miller of St. Lucie Battery & Tire

Johnny G & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 26:50


Behind the 17 locations of St. Lucie Battery & Tire is a family of immigrants who moved to southeast Florida in the 1940s. Initially, the Miller family started a poultry and egg business in Fort Pierce, yet one of the oldest boys, Joey, saw a need for batteries in the area. So, after he delivered eggs and poultry to the locals, he'd pick up old batteries from service stations, clean them up and re-sell them as reconditioned batteries. Later on, he'd sell new batteries and then add Farm Bureau tires. And before he knew it, he had created St. Lucie Battery & Tire. Now a sprawling urban area, Florida's Treasure Coast is dotted with multiple locations of St. Lucie Battery & Tire, which boasts more than 240 employees in five counties today. With Joey's son, Doug Miller, serving as president of the business, Doug has maintained his father's credo of “Home of Honest, Reliable Service,” yet has adapted the business to change with the times and its customers. In this episode of Johnny g & Friends, presented by Firestone, Doug shares his journey in the tire industry and how he has been able to grow the business with his business savvy and forward-thinking mindset to keep employees engaged while providing world-class customer service. EPISODE OVERVIEW- How Doug's family settled in Fort Pierce in the early 1940s and why Doug's father, Joey, created a side hustle in the battery business (1:14)- How the business's culture has been shaped around its slogan, “Home of Honest, Reliable Service” (7:07)- How Doug became involved in management at a young age (12:01)- The ways St. Lucie Battery & Tire has been able to grow and add locations amid the pandemic (14:26)- Why Doug rewards his team with performance-based bonuses (19:03)- Doug's mentors in the tire business (20:33)- What's in store in the five-year plan for St. Lucie Battery & Tire and how Doug is looking at new technologies, like EVs, that are coming down the line (21:45)Subscribe to this podcast on:Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/johnny-g-friends/id1575371575Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/51HCGxJxYmRvUC48iiKXJWGoogle Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvNDk5NTE0Ny9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/johnny-g-friendsMore on Firestone Tires: https://www.firestonetire.com/More from Tire Review: www.tirereview.com

Collecting Real Estate
How Logistics Ties Into Real Estate with Jeff Davis

Collecting Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 36:06


In Collecting Real Estate's hundred and fifth episode, we interviewed Jeff Davis of Bridgestone Capital.Jeff is a global sales executive for a Fortune 200 logistics company since 2005 and has been active in Real Estate since 2015. He is an owner/operator of Bridgestone Holdings, LLC maintaining a portfolio of rental properties as well as fixing and flipping single family houses in Houston and surrounding areas. In 2021, Jeff and Bridgestone moved into a more strategic arena partnering in 2 large apartment syndications for over 500 units. Jeff resides in Spring, TX with his beautiful wife, Cindy and their 5 children.https://www.bridgestoneinvest.com/

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
Be Well: How Bridgestone is Meeting and Supporting Teammates on their Wellness Journey

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 25:25


There is no debating that events of the past few years have altered our professional and personal lives. In response to these shifts, a more open and dynamic conversation is growing around personal well-being, as well as the role employers play in supporting their employees. In this episode, Keith Cawley talks with two well-being experts at Bridgestone: Molly Colli, Director of Benefits Administration and Operations, and Mark Cecil, Director of Health and Well-being Benefits Strategy, about how Bridgestone is working to meet teammates where they are with physical, emotional or financial well-being resources that can help them thrive.

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
In the Dirt 32 - LIstener questions

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 44:45 Very Popular


This week Randall and Craig open up the floor to questions from The Ridership. Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: In the Dirt 32 [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. I'm going to be joined Really By my co-host randall jacobs for another episode of in the dirt [00:00:34] Craig: randall, how you doing today? [00:00:36] Randall: I'm doing well, Craig, good to see you, bud. [00:00:39] Craig: Yeah. Great to see you too. I mean, I've been looking forward this just a, a little bit of reprieve from everything else that's going on in life. It's just nice to connect with you and just purely have a half hour an hour conversation about bikes. [00:00:51] Randall: Yeah. Yeah. I know you've been going had a lot going on with your mom and so on. So, you know, definitely sending a lot of love and good vibes to you and your family going through some challenging times. [00:01:01] Craig: Yeah, I appreciate that. I mean, we it's the conversations we've had on the podcast and certainly within the ridership community, just about the value of this pursuit of gravel cycling and just kinda getting outta your head. I I've always loved it in that, like when you're on a, a gravel trail, particularly a technical gravel trail, like I ride you can't really think about anything else, but what's in front of you. And it's just so, so helpful for me to just sort of think about the bike and performance and riding. Rather than thinking about everything else going on all the time. [00:01:32] Randall: Yeah. Yeah, I can, I can relate. I've been processing some heavy things in my own life these days. And at the same time returning to the bike, I've been doing a lot more walking, hiking trail running lately as well as like canoeing and kayaking the canoes great with the kids. But there's. There's that flow state that you can get into on the bicycle that is, you know, people talk about runners high. I've never really had that. I don't think I can run long enough to get to that head space, but on the bicycle, there's just a place where everything is just in sync and the it's. I just feel very connected to everything, but not overwhelmed by it. If that makes sense. [00:02:13] Craig: yeah. You know, I was up in lake Tahoe last weekend and did a bunch of standup paddle boarding. I got some good recommendations from people on the ridership as to where I should explore to ride. And I had a bike, but honestly I just left it on the patio because I, it was just enjoying the lake so much. And to your point, like with standup paddle boarding, I found, you know, I just have to focus on the balance piece. So I, I, it sort. Took me to that same place. I just got in the rhythm of stroking on either side of the standup paddle board and, and being focused on the physicality of it. And, and the moment that I was experiencing, which, which I also really enjoyed. [00:02:49] Randall: Yeah, standup paddleboards are great. I actually like them. I use them occasionally standing up, but having them as like your own little floating island in the middle of a lake or a pond you know, you can have two adults. I've had, you know, another adult and a, a toddler on one. And so one adult is in the water swimming and the toddler is kind of jumping on and off and, and it's, it's just so much fun. Yeah, [00:03:12] Craig: but you've got, you've got something coming up. That's kind of probably forcing you a little bit to get back on the bike. Right. [00:03:17] Randall: Well, so, well, one I'm wanting to start coordinating more group rides. We've talked about this quite a bit and just life has gotten in the way you know, the logo launch and some things in, in my personal life and so on. So there's that the O positive festival. In Kingston, New York is coming up. That's the seventh through the 9th of October and community member, Joe conk in the ridership. He is the founder of that festival. And once again, we're gonna be coordinating a gravel ride. Together with a road ride and a a mural tour ride, which will be through the, the city of Kingston and is very family friendly. As part of that weekend, I believe it's gonna be on the eighth. So we'll be posting more information about that in the ridership and would love to have people come out and join. [00:04:00] Craig: That's super cool. I remember you talking about the festival last year and some of the riding that you've done with Joe up there. So that sounds awesome. So for anybody on the east coast, that's within range of that, we're able to travel, as Randall said, it'll definitely put some notes out there. Maybe we can talk about it again, more specifically when you lock down the details. [00:04:17] Randall: Yeah, we're, we're finalizing the route right now and we'll create a page for the event. So if you're interested in staying in touch, we'll definitely announce it here on the pod. I might even bring Joe on for a few minutes to share some more details, but the festival itself, it's, it's arts, it's music, it's community, it's great food and just a wonderful vibe right outside the Catskills and the riding out there is great. I've done quite a bit of riding out there with him and others. So if you're in that area, definitely come out and join us. We'd love to see you. The, the event is it'll be, the ride will be you know, we may ask like for a recommended donation, which doesn't have to be provided, and that goes towards the artist community in Kingston. And then, you know, there'll also be an option to get a wristband for the entire festival too. So. So, yeah. And if you wanna be participate in the conversation, definitely join the the Hudson valley channel in the ridership. That's where, where we'll be talking about this [00:05:07] Craig: Cool. I similarly am trying to get my act together. Cause I signed up to support the Marin county bike coalition and the NorCal NACA league for the eventual adventure revival ride. I think it started three, maybe four years ago. They did had one year that was virtual during the pandemic, but I missed last year cause it sold out. So I was sure to get on it this year. And it's a great route starting out of Fairfax, California. So super fun route , very technical it's only 60 miles, but it's got a decent amount of climbing, particularly up the aply named Randall trail. Off of highway one is a, is a grind at the end. And then you're coming across Fairfax BOS Ridge, but it's a lot of fun. And I believe I saw that Rebecca Rush is joining. [00:05:51] Randall: oh, great. [00:05:52] Craig: So that's gonna be cool. She's so nice. Former podcast guest couldn't have been more friendly when I've connected with her and subsequent times when I've ran into her, it's been awesome. So looking forward to seeing her again. [00:06:04] Randall: I got to meet her at a dinner hosted around sea Oder some years back. And yeah, she's, she's a rad woman. And a great rider. Very, very cool. Is it the same route as the original cause I did the original one some years back living in the bay. [00:06:18] Craig: Yeah, I don't, I don't think they've changed anything. I mean, I'll tell you after the 17th, but I I'm pretty sure it's the same route [00:06:24] Randall: Well, if anyone's considering doing this run higher volume tires and have a properly low gear, cuz you will want both and maybe a suspension stem. [00:06:34] Craig: and maybe a suspension for Randall. [00:06:36] Randall: Yeah. And maybe a suspension fork sacrilegious. But yeah. [00:06:39] Craig: No. Yeah, no, it's a great route and, and totally perfect recommendations Randall, cuz it's, it's, it's technical. It'll push your limits. I mean, I loved it. I just thought it was like one of those roots that favored adventure, like the name, the name is perfect, cuz you're just out there on the mountain. They're carving the route through rugged terrain, you know, basic fire roads and just this awesome part of the north side of Marin. [00:07:06] Randall: I mean, it's the location where mountain biking got ITSs start. And frankly, the gravel bikes that we ride are far superior mountain bikes than they were riding back in those days. So [00:07:14] Craig: Yeah, a hundred percent. I think I recently was at the, at the, the museum up in Fairfax, the mountain Mike museum, and looking at a clunker. And I was just [00:07:23] Randall: Mm-hmm [00:07:24] Craig: I can't even imagine with a kickback break, how they even survived going down Mount. [00:07:29] Randall: well, they had to rebuild those hubs pretty much. Every run is my understanding. So. [00:07:34] Craig: he hence the name repack downhill. [00:07:38] Randall: Yeah. I've ridden with a few of the, the OGs of the mountain biking scene and it, it wasn't the good old days. We definitely have it better now speak speaking of which we have a new bike to nerd about. [00:07:49] Craig: Yeah, not may not maybe a bike that I would take on adventure revival per se, but a very interesting bike for people to take a look at it. It's the BMC now, how do we decide that? It would say pronounce it [00:08:02] Randall: CAS say it with confidence. It's gotta be KIS, maybe [00:08:05] Craig: Kay. [00:08:06] Randall: Ks. Yeah. Something like that. [00:08:08] Craig: Super racey bike, actually, what I would've thought that BMC would've introduced to begin with kind of in the vein of the Cervelo ESP Sparrow, this bike looks, I mean, this bike could have been a road bike. When, when you see a picture of it. [00:08:23] Randall: It's stunning. I love they, there's some unique design elements on the top tube that are very BMC. I like how the, you know, the chains, the seat stays are perfectly paralleled with the down tube and it's just a very elegant bike. The, the paint schemes, particularly on that top end model are quite striking and definitely a gravel race bike. And in fact, I would say a dedicated gravel race bike, which is a little bit different than that as Sparrow. [00:08:48] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. I mean it's seven dedicated 700 C. But it still manages a fairly tight change stay and fairly good tire clearance. I mean, 700 by 45 is nothing to sneeze. [00:09:00] Randall: Yeah, especially in such a, a, you know, a tight change stay. And it's, it's optimized for that. It has 80 milli BB drop, which is to say like the bottom bracket drop relative of relative to the axles. And that's quite a bit, so anyone running longer cranks is. Going to have say like a pedal strike issue. If they try to run smaller tires, which is why I say, like, it's not quite like the Aspero, the Aspero is much more of a one bike. Like you could use it as a dedicated road bike as well. And it would be great for that sounds like bikes like that or ours, or you know, the, the open up that I always call out. So this is. The the bottom bracket drop the fact that it's a, a longer top tube, so longer reach relative to the stack, just make it a bike that is very much optimized for bigger 700 seat tires, shorter stems. And all of this works really well. Well, offroad, but kind of takes away from its versatility as a, as a road bike which [00:09:56] Craig: I also, [00:09:57] Randall: for what it's designed for. [00:09:58] Craig: yeah, I mean, it's very intentional, right. I also saw that they speck like a fairly narrow handle bar on there with a wide flare. So like keeping again, keeping that body tight in that race, race position. Yeah. [00:10:12] Randall: Yeah. Which I, I'm not sure how much I like that. I think it makes a ton of sense on the road. But I, I feel like often, well, we'll, we'll see I think there's, I think there's a place for it. I would probably want if I was gonna go so narrow, I'd probably wanna do a compound flare in order to get even more flare in the drops without having the hoods super kicked out. Because that, you know, that that extra leverage in the drops is, is nice to have, and it's kind of, but, you know, interesting to see some some difference of perspective there, [00:10:43] Craig: Yeah, let me be clear. Like I would be terrified to ride. I think it was a 37 millimeter bar hood to hood. I would be terrified to ride that. I mean, that just seems really tight. I have heard of some of the pros kind of going super narrow and maybe on a, a non-technical course, like a S B T gravel, or if you live in a part of the country where it's, you know, you're just basically on dirt roads that might, that might work. But yeah, for me, I think I'd be terrifi. [00:11:10] Randall: I think that there's a, a place for this. And you, you see it on, on the road. You've seen some road pros go towards more narrow up top and it does improve arrow. And there a lot of gravel races are not that technical. And so that arrow benefit is meaningful. I just think that there's a little bit more evolution to happen in terms of one getting even more arrow on those narrower hoods. So maybe like something to support the forearm a little bit. So you can be grabbing the, the top of the, of the hoods, but, and, and have your your forearms perpendicular the ground at parallel the ground in your upper arm perpendicular. So you really get that arrow benefit, but then, you know, again, compound flare to get that, maintain that extra leverage in the drops when you need it. Nonetheless we're we're getting into deep handlebar nuance here. Let's let's back out and look at the rest of this machine. [00:11:56] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I do think it's, it is just sort of interesting as you pointed out, like this is for a very specific rider and it's pretty natural. Companies are gonna continue to evolve around speed and ultra performance for one side of the market, not the side of the market, that's gonna attract me per se, but as more and more dollars going into racing and more and more people are looking for super high performance, like it's natural that bike companies are gonna do this type of thing. [00:12:24] Randall: There's also an element of like, you know, the bike industry likes N plus one. And so this is distinct enough from a, a road bike where you would have your road bike and, and this bike and the type of person who has this bike probably has multiple bikes. I mean, it is a dedicated race bike so that, you know, it makes sense. [00:12:46] Craig: Yeah, yeah. Yeah. You pointed out a few other interesting things about the design as well. [00:12:50] Randall: Yeah, so I like, I like how they did the inter I'm not a huge fan of integrated cabling through handlebars and stems. And I like how it seems that they kept the, the cabling external to the handlebar and then ran it underneath that new rock shop. That new shock stop stem. I think they're calling it some something different. They, they built it in using RedShift's suspension, stem tech. And so it stays external until it drops into the upper headset bear. So that could be a lot worse in terms of serviceability and adjustability and so on. The top end model is a one piece HBAR and stem that has fully internal routing looks stunning, looks really, really beautiful but an absolute nightmare to set up and service. And I wouldn't recommend going that route on any sort of bike period, because even a pro rider needs to be able to get their fit adjusted properly. [00:13:45] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you and I share the same opinion on like, on elements of bike design that make it constrained from modification, easy modification. So yeah, I'm I'm with you on that. It absolutely looks gorgeous, but knowing me, like, I think I'd be frustrated at the limitations of it. [00:14:03] Randall: yeah, yeah. But kudos to them on the keeping the, the cabling outside the bars on the Lower end models, which I say lower end, they start at six grand, which is another thing about this bike, which is on trend. Everything is so expensive. It's remarkable. How expensive bikes are these days? [00:14:19] Craig: Yeah, we gotta, we got a question about that in the, in the ridership, right? Just sort of, why are bikes so expensive and it's yeah, I don't know. You know, when you look at a $10,000 bike or $6,000 bike, it's just that's. I mean, that's a hell of a lot of money. Yeah. [00:14:33] Randall: I mean, there's, I think there's a few things that go into that. So this was we, we put out some, you know, we asked the, the ridership community for some questions in comments. So this was Matthew Kramer chiming in, you know, asking about why bikes have gotten so expensive. I think a, a big part of it. I mean, of course there's inflation, right? And one of the major drivers of inflation in recent years are COVID related supply chain constraints. Right. So it's harder to get, it's hard to get parts and it's hard to get complete bikes, which means there's, you know, Up until recently. And there was a flood of, of like stimulus money for example, into the market. So you had all these dollars chasing less available product. And so by companies focused on the higher end, I mean, we did the same thing. We, we, you know, we actually kind of regret having eliminated the mechanical model cuz but it was because we couldn't get parts and we went with all access, which is really great, but puts it at a, a more premium point. But. [00:15:27] Craig: you're layering. You're layering in increased fuel costs for transportation. There's a lot of things that have gone into it. [00:15:34] Randall: Yeah, that is a factor. But I, I don't think that that's a major driver for this. I think it's more well, honestly, a, a significant part of it is people are paying it. Right. And there's some R and D that goes in here, like the, you know, this, some of these bikes that you see coming out. On the really high end, you know, the volumes are not that great. And so that R and D has to be incorporated somewhere and with bike companies focusing on the higher end, cuz that's where the bigger margins and dollars are and riders having limited options in the more affordable end of the market, because that's not where bike companies are focusing. I mean, I think it's, it's kind of like the automotive industry right now where, you know, I bought, I bought a used Prius for like seven grand and I've put a bunch of miles into it and like, Like scrape the bumper and things like that. And I could probably sell it for 11 [00:16:24] Craig: Right. [00:16:25] Randall: like, you, you just see that in a number of different domains. And I think the B the, the bike space is no different. But you do get bikes are improving in incremental ways. But I, I, it has been a pretty radical shift towards the top of the market. It's is hard to find middle end products that is frankly, just as good in many ways. [00:16:45] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you hope over time. We know historically it does trickle down and there's, I mean, don't get us wrong. I, I think there's a lot of good entry level bikes out there. It's just getting your hands on one and finding one today is a challenge. [00:16:59] Randall: When supply chains go from 30 to 60 day lead times to, you know, at one point you know, there were like, you have very limited options for your levers and, and Dils and so on. Right. We have a duopoly in our industry, you know, and can't be is now, you know, they have a, a good product a competitive product in gravel now with their 13 speed stuff ECAR groups. But you know, that stuff was like one to two years. So when that's the case, you know, if you have a limited buy, where are you gonna focus? You're gonna focus on the higher end and that's that? I think that's part of it too. [00:17:32] Craig: Yeah, that makes sense. And I also remember you mentioning on an earlier podcast, just the amount of commitment level the component manufacturers are expecting from you. So, you know, in order to get a, a seat at the table, maybe you have to buy 50 of something, which as a small builder, you know, that could, that's a, that's a lot of dollars out of pocket. [00:17:50] Randall: Well, and the, the smaller builders generally are like, if you're a domestic builder and you're assembling domestically, it's a different supply. You're paying, you're paying more from say like STR for their domestic distributor versus the, you know, their Taiwan based distributor, just because they're manufacturing a lot of that stuff in Taiwan. But yeah, there were greater constraints. Sometimes you had to put a deposit up front and, you know, you put a deposit on something that is not going to, you're not gonna have for a year and you can't get that deposit back. So the, the risks associated with, you know, well, is something else new gonna come out or what's the market gonna look like in a year? So there's, there's all these you know, it, it really drives home, just re how remarkable it was prior to the pandemic that supply chains worked so well. I mean, truly it is a miracle of a whole lot of very complex decentralized coordination that, you know, any of this works at all. As a supply chain nerd, it's, it's something that, that is, is is not lost on me. And yeah, even the current circumstance, it's still pretty amazing what humans do. [00:18:52] Craig: Yeah. [00:18:53] Randall: All right. So where do we want to go from here? [00:18:55] Craig: Yeah. I mean, one thing I did did I thought was interesting that you pointed out about that BMC is that they do have an integrated suspension stem offering from that they've worked with, it sounds like Redshift on [00:19:05] Randall: Yep. [00:19:06] Craig: yeah. [00:19:07] Randall: I thought that was well executed. One downside I believe is that you can't flip the stem and with that beat bike being relatively long and, and on the lower side, like, you know, it's a race bike you know, it's, again, you have more constrained fitment options. I think the standard shock stop, then you can run in the up upward pointing direction. [00:19:28] Craig: Yeah, you can. I think what's interesting to point out there though. So if this in BMCs designer's mind, this is a flat out thoroughbred race, bike. To have that be an option suggests that designers are coming around to the fact that suspension and suppleness can, can be a performance benefit, like put putting, I mean, you and I have talked about that and obviously I'm sold on it, but it just struck me as like this incredibly arrow stretched out race bike is offering that they must have determined that this is gonna help people win races. [00:20:02] Randall: Yeah. Yeah. Fatigue and control it's material. And they've also done a few things with the frame design, which you see on other bikes like the really the, the seat tube towards the bottom gets really narrow. It gets really thin. So it has a lot more flex built in you saw that with bikes, like, you know, the GT grade is, is kind of an extreme example of that, but compliance is, is a great thing. That's the reason why we have one of the reasons we have such wide rims now, too. And what's so great about, you know, high volume, supple tubus tires, you know, it, it all, it all improves speed as a system. [00:20:35] Craig: Yeah. I mentioned this when I had someone from BMC on talking about the S and the S LT. I have a, I have a hard tail BMC, 20 Niner mountain bike from back in the day, like at least a decade ago. And I remember getting on that bike, I came off of a, a similar Niner. Coming to that bike, the back end definitely had a supplement to it. It had that, that exact drop stay design that you're kind of talking about and it really worked. And I was super impressed. I remember when I got on that bike, it just felt so fast and I could control it so well. [00:21:10] Randall: Yeah, well, I had you know, you probably heard the conversation I had on the pod with Craig Cal talking about suspension on road bikes and whether or not you fully agree with that thesis. I think it's, I think it's fairly compelling. Definitely higher volume tires. Like I don't see, even, even in Marin, I would be running minimum 28 mill tub plus tires. Nice low pressures on wide rims. There's no reason to run narrower than that. And you see a lot of the new arrow wheel options for road being built to a width where you can actually get an arrow benefit with those tires, you know, adhering to the rule of one oh 5%, which we had talked about in the wheel episode. So, so yeah, all of these things are, are good developments. [00:21:53] Craig: Yeah. You know, speaking of good developments, I managed actually to hook up with Matt Harvey from Enduro Barings, they did a ride. Out of Fairfax, California, a few weeks back. And I, I joined probably 50 people up there, Yuri, Oswald and other podcast guests was on there. And I think a couple others, I, I think I counted four old podcast guests on that ride, which was great, but a hell of a lot of fun. You had some conversation, some great conversation with him about Enduro Barings, which I hope people will go back in reference. But I think there was a question or a comment about from the ridership about. [00:22:27] Randall: Yeah. So, you know, one of the things that we covered in that episode, which I had so much fun with Matt he's just has a wealth of knowledge about the bicycle industry. He's an engineer, an engineering mindset clearly cares a lot about what he does. And you know, talking about the merits or lack thereof of a lot of ceramic bearings and long story short, most ceramic bearings. Rubbish, the ones that are of those that are good, the majority of them require a lot more maintenance to stay. And the, and the benefit is pretty trivial. And then there's this XD 15 bearing that Enduro makes. And I'm sure, you know, others probably have some, some equivalent, but I haven't looked into it, but that I find really interesting. And this is an Aeros, you know, a, I think a French aerospace alloy used for steel alloy used for the races. And then they have these high, very high grade ceramic ball. And because of this particular steel, which is very expensive and they have to buy it they don't, they can't buy it in tube form. They have to, you know, buy it in sheets and, and take it from there, I believe. But because of the unique properties of this material You can get you can use ceramic bearings and if it gets any contamination, essentially the contamination gets like pulverized and kicked out as opposed to pitting and, and starting to, to damage the the metal, because in many cases, the ceramic bearings, that metal is a lot less hard than the bearing itself. And thus, as a consequence, it's the thing to give. We go into a lot more detail in that episode, but yeah, Hans, I'm gonna, I might butcher this. So, bear with me here. Lale I'm guessing L E L L E I L I D he, he brought up this article that James Wong, why admire immensely? He's at cycling tips now wrote about an Enduro bottom bracket with this XD 15 bearing set. And what James said was incredibly low friction feel phenomenal toughness. We did everything we could to kill it, but this thing is simply incredible. And like that is coming from someone like James Wong. It makes me really think, okay, this is something that we're gonna still do a little bit more investigation and Matt's gonna be sending us some data, but we'll probably, we're strongly considering this in incorporating these into a, a higher end version of our, the logos wheels in the. [00:24:36] Craig: Got it. Nice. Yeah. I mean, I had enough smart people tell me that that was the way to go and happy that I've got that in my bottom bracket of my, my unicorn. That I've started riding. [00:24:47] Randall: Oh, it's an XD 15. [00:24:49] Craig: Yeah, I believe so. [00:24:49] Randall: Oh, sweet. Yeah. Yeah. Genuine benefits that you don't have to spend a lot of time servicing. In fact, the service, it should essentially be zero service. That's pretty cool. [00:25:00] Craig: that's what I'm looking for. [00:25:02] Randall: Not cheap though. Not cheap. So everyone else, high quality steel bearings. [00:25:07] Craig: Yeah. And I think Hans was also leading the conversation around just kind of, like flared bars, flat pedals, different kinds of like, you know, We're just out there for enjoying the ride kind of features of a bike or ways in which you could set up a bike. [00:25:22] Randall: Yeah. I mean, I think flare borrows are de rigor. I. Would run flared bars on every drop bar bike, including a pure road performance bike, just with a, maybe a different philosophy on my road bike, I'd go super narrow and get the flares to have more control in the drops for aerodynamics. But flare is here to stay. You see levers being designed with a little bit of flare. So with flare in mind and you know, any sort of, you know, is there an arrow cost? I have no idea. I, I don't think so. As long as the lever is aligned with. The bar behind it, it should sit in its wake, but if, even if there was the control benefits more than outweigh it. [00:25:58] Craig: Yeah. I think that co that the arrow part might come into play on the trend towards super wide bars. And as the, as you know, I've played around with that, I mean, I've got, I think I've. A 48 on one of my bikes and my fitter kind of brought me back to a 44. I, I do miss kind of the offroad control the way to rip the bike around that I got out of the wider bars, but I'm, I'm fairly comfortable at 44 as well. So I, I think I just need to play around with the flare on the bar that I'm running right now. And then it will be the right, right mix for. [00:26:37] Randall: Well, we've talked about in the the, in the ridership that we're thinking about developing a bar that has a compound flare. So you can get, say like eight degrees on the hoods and then 16 to 20 in the drop. So you kind of get the best of both worlds in that you still get that. You know, that roady fit up top, but then the extra control the, the first bar to do this, I believe was the three T a GI. And, and I don't even know if I'm pronouncing that right. We've talked about it on the pod [00:27:02] Craig: Yeah. And I think there was the other one that was like the Whis whiskey components has something similar [00:27:07] Randall: also does a compound. Yeah, I think compound flare makes a ton of sense for, for all of these bikes. [00:27:15] Craig: I wish it wasn't so costly. And you, you didn't have to sort of go all in to create a bar, like cuz you can't 3d print, something like this, right? [00:27:23] Randall: no, but it, it would be easy enough for somebody to create, say a, a high quality aluminum version. It's just another bending process plus testing regime to make sure that it, you know, it doesn't, it doesn't break on you. [00:27:38] Craig: yeah. I'm gonna keep exploring that. I'm I'm not sort of locked and loaded on my handlebar and stem right now. Still just wanted to make sure that the bike was fitting me correctly. And I feel like I've got enough inputs to figure out which way I wanna go with any one of the cockpit components. [00:27:55] Randall: Well, depending on your, what your timeframe is, I may have a prototype for you in time, so let's [00:28:00] Craig: All right. Many, many reasons why you're a good friend Randall and that's just one of 'em [00:28:04] Randall: you know, a guy, you know, a guy who can get you stuff. [00:28:07] Craig: yeah. [00:28:09] Randall: Tom SHEEO was asking about suspension seat posts. What's your take here? [00:28:14] Craig: I I'm a yes. So, I mean, I've been running on the thesis. I have a, a, a P N w coast dropper that has both a drop and a suspension, and I found that it's air tuned. So. Very tuneable very predictable. And I came to the conclusion, like anytime it moved, when my first inclination was like, oh crap, I'm losing performance. Anytime it moved, I wasn't in a fluid pedal stroke. Like I had hit something unexpectedly and it was just saving me. Similarly, although I think it's less active rock shock on the wireless. Their wireless dropper post does have what they call active ride. And I'm probably not tuned correctly on it right now. Cause I don't feel a lot of movement. The big difference between the two is on the PWC PMC. What am I saying here? Pacific PM. Yes. That one moves when you're fully extended. So it doesn't matter whether you're dropped or not. Like it it'll move. If the amount of pressure applied to it from your, your backside is, is forcing it to move. Whereas the rock shock post, it has to be lowered a little bit. So if you're in the full position, you're who locked out. It's only active when you're down a little [00:29:30] Randall: I wonder if that's a design constraint, because meaning something inherent in how they architected it as a dropper post, because from a product standpoint, that's exactly the opposite of what I would want. [00:29:41] Craig: I'm kind of with you and, and I, you know, in talking to rock shock, they did say some of their riders will actually set it up a little bit high so that they can basically constantly ride it with it on. [00:29:53] Randall: Yeah. I think that makes sense, especially adjustability. So to, to answer Tom's question, I think we both agree that suspension has its merits. I would definitely get a dropper first though. I like the best suspension you have is your arms and legs. And the, the float between your body and the bike. That's, that's my strong opinion. And from there you have pneumatic suspension from the tires you can do, you know, a slightly cushier saddle, like, you know, you can have some, some compliance in the frame. There's a whole bunch of things you do before you do a suspension seat, post primary amongst those being a dropper. [00:30:28] Craig: A hundred percent dropper. Number one, upgrade for gravel bikes, period. You'll never go. I don't know if I've ever met anybody who went back. Honestly, once they had a dropper. [00:30:37] Randall: Yeah, I mean, I occasionally talk to people, looking at our bikes who are like, oh, well, you know, can I swap in a rigid post? And I was like, well, if that's what you wanna do, get the, you know, the access wireless droppers are really expensive and they're heavy. But you could have a saddle on one of those and, and, you know, a standard post and swap it in, in and out with a single bolt. So that that's an option. [00:30:58] Craig: I've got that set up now. And I will tell, I will tell you, I will tell our friends in the community if I ever swap it. [00:31:05] Randall: Yeah. Yeah, yeah, [00:31:07] Craig: I don't think, I don't think I will, but [00:31:09] Randall: yeah. I can see on a city bike or like a burning man rig not having a dropper. That's that's about it. that's a whole, that's a whole separate conversation though. [00:31:18] Craig: I will argue with you on the city bike, but anyway, you still wanna drop her on the city bike? [00:31:22] Randall: Let's see. Luke Lopez and Larry Rose were commenting about non-competitive gravel setups, you know, alternative handlebars, flat pedals bags, and fun rides, and so on. Inspired by our friends over at pathless pedals who very much do a lot to create content around the non-competitive side of cycling. So what are your [00:31:41] Craig: Yeah. I mean, I think whether or not you set your bike up in a specific way to go out and have this non-competitive experience, or it's just a mindset. I think we're aligned in that gravel, gravel is for everyone. Right. And whatever your jam is going fast, going slow. Just getting out there is important. I mean, for me, I often change my clothing. [00:32:04] Randall: Mm-hmm [00:32:05] Craig: When I'm out there for just a fun ride, like, like I've got some, some, you know, great baggies that I can wear and different things. And it's definitely a different mindset rolling out the door. Not that I'm out there hammering on a general basis, but it's definitely a different mindset when I'm just out there to stop and smell the roses. [00:32:21] Randall: Yeah. Yeah. And I, I appreciate that mindset, but I still vastly prefer Lyra and, and being clipped in and, and, you know, and so on. [00:32:35] Craig: And I've got a, I've got a mountain bike. So like having a flat bar on a gravel bike, like I I've had that set up on an old cross bike. I loved it. Super fun, nimble, but for me, like if I'm gonna go flat bar right now, it's definitely gonna be more on a mountain bike than a, a traditional gravel bike setup. [00:32:52] Randall: But at the same time, you see, I can't recall if it was Luke, but you see folks with like an old Bridgestone mountain bike that they've converted into, you know, a flat bar or a drop bar, gravel bike. And it's, you know, they got a, you know, a handlebar bag on there and it's much more of like a let's go out and get lost and have an adventure, maybe do coffee outside or things like this party pace as you know, as Russ likes to say over. You know, PLP. [00:33:18] Craig: Yeah. If you've got a quiver by all means like, I, I love all bikes and I'm one who appreciates the nuances between them. So, you know, I just don't have a garage big enough for all these things. [00:33:28] Randall: yeah, yeah, no, I, I like I like the, I like being able in the middle of a ride to decide that I feel like throwing down a little bit. Sometimes I get that, that little jolt of energy less. Now that I'm 40, I suppose, but, but still [00:33:41] Craig: I I've seen you have those jolts Randall. I know it's there. [00:33:45] Randall: Let's see, what else? Oh, Matthew Kramer turned me on to something that I thought was really cool in the ridership, which was E 13. Now has a 12 speed, 9 45 cassette that is compatible with standard 12 speed chains. So you don't need that funky flat top chain. That's fair. Still, you know, pretty proprietary to Ram in order to run a tighter cluster. [00:34:07] Craig: So is that, is that 12 speed cassette from shrimp? Something you have to run on their product. [00:34:15] Randall: So the way that SW has set it up, they have migrated all their road. And then now they're dedicated gravel drive trains to this 12 speed flat top chain which is, you know, it, it has a slight benefit in terms of like, You, you get the same cross sectional area of the side plates with a thinner side plate so they can make the chain a little bit thinner. And that helps with the, the already very tight spacing of those cogs and like, but also makes it so that it's something proprietary. And so they've been expanding that I, I suspect that you'll see it on their mountain bike groups soon enough. And, you know, I really like to adopt, you know, proven open standards and non-pro proprietary stuff whenever possible. And the fact is that standard 12 speed works really well and nobody was making a tighter cluster for Eagle, like, you know, or for, for like, you know, a mullet set up where you have. A mountain bike rear derailer, but maybe you want a little bit tighter cluster a little bit tighter cassette for your road or your, your certain gravel applications. [00:35:17] Craig: when you talk about tighter cassette. I remember seeing this pop up and I was like 9 45. Okay. Why do I really care? Talk about the tighter cluster? Cause I think that's an important maybe nuance beyond just like, oh, you got a 45 and a nine. [00:35:30] Randall: Yeah. So the, the biggest knock that people have against one by drive trains is the jumps between cogs. Right. And yeah, I get it. A lot of this can be mitigated by proportional, crank length, and by having a proper bike fit. Because it allows you to spin at a wider range of cadences without, you know, while still maintaining a smooth pedal stroke. And I've, I've been fine with my setups. This 9 45 is it's the same as a, a 10 speed, 1138. Which is, you know, a, a larger road cassette from, from a few years ago. And it just adds a, a taller cog and a bigger cog you know, on that same cassette. And so you get, you know, jumps that I think are probably tight enough for the vast majority of roadies to say like, okay, well, if I had any concerns about jumps, now those are mitigated some. Want it to be like one tooth jumps between cogs and you know, okay. Go ride your road bike. That that's fine. But but yeah, I like, I like to see this. I was actually considering having us develop something if someone else didn't. So I'm glad to see this in the market, I think is a real gap for it. [00:36:35] Craig: Yeah, it's interesting. I wonder why, like SHA doesn't go to a nine cause you think like, I understand why smaller companies kind of pop up and they see an opportunity like this gap, but E thirteen's been doing this kind of thing for a while. [00:36:49] Randall: The nine tooth is so it it's gonna wear all else equal same material and everything it's gonna wear itself and the chain more quickly than a 10 tooth or an 11 tooth. Right. And so the, the entire philosophy of the drivetrain changes with a nine tooth in that. You know, I like to think of the nine tooth as an overdrive gear, plus the jump between the nine and the 11 is significant. Right? So if you're spending a lot of time at the top end of the range, you know, you might not love that, but for me, you pair it with a 42 chain ring and that 42 9. With a, you know, a, a 700 by 28 or 700 by 30 tire is the equivalent of, of a road bike with, you know, 51 11, which is to say, you have plenty of top end. You're not gonna spin out all the time on, on a high speed descent, but it's not all that often that I'm descending at those sorts of speeds. And so that jump from the 11 to the nine is not a problem for me on that end of the cassette. And so in turn, when you have that nine tooth that also informs the chain ring that you pair. Because you, you know, you kind of need to set your chain ring based on how you wanna calibrate that range that the cassette has. So yeah, I'm not surprised that Ram didn't go that didn't go that route. But I do think it makes a ton of sense and I love one by drive trains and I'm all about one bikes as well with one by drive trains. And so the nine two really facilitates that. [00:38:08] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. Super interesting. And Eli Bingham who often chimes in, in the ridership about some real technical stuff and tends to explore a lot of components. He had a kind of note on this didn't. [00:38:18] Randall: Yeah. So, one thing you gotta make sure, because of, and again, this gets into like proprietary standards and so on. So like the free hub, the XD XDR free hub standard that this cassette is compatible with is a proprietary standard that you know, Sam made it. So any. It's really easy for a wheel company to create a wheel with a free hub that, that uses the, you know, XD XDR. But they patented every possible way. They could think of, of attaching a cassette to that so that only they could produce the cassettes. And so E 13 has a came up with a really clever solution, but it requires like a cinch bolt. That clamps around the free hub body. And if that comes loose, it can affect the shifting. So that's kind of like the one issue that these can have. I've never had that issue with E 13 cassettes and I've run them exclusively for several years now. But it's just something to keep in mind. I find that they shift shift really excellent and they're light and they hold up well, cause they're, you know, most of the cogs or steel. [00:39:11] Craig: Right. Yeah, right on. And then I think we should end with, I think, which, which was one of my favorite questions coming out of the ridership from our friend, Silas, pat love is the pursuit of a quiet bike without creeks, an achievable goal or a pipe dream. [00:39:27] Randall: , it depends on what you're starting with. Unfortunately. I think in general I mean, this should AF absolutely be the standard. It, there's no reason why things should be rattling around. And you know, there are ways to get around it. So there, you know, wireless shifting and so on helps. But also like in our case, we run full housing through the frame and then we put it in a, we put it in a foam sleeve and we do that with. Hydraulic hoses too. And every bite company should be doing that because rattles suck bottom bracket Creek, again, like any bottom bracket will Creek if it gets contaminated. But you know, having a bottom bracket set up that aligns and supports the bearings sufficiently. You know, should eliminate the vast majority of those creeks. Yeah, it, this, this should entirely be possible. Unfortunately, there are a lot of bikes that, mm let's just say that this sort of thing was an afterthought. So it may cost, it may cost some money and require some expertise to chase out the, you know, all those creeks. [00:40:25] Craig: I think that's gotta be the worst task as a bike mechanic to be tasked with is when someone comes in and says, my, my bike is creaking. Help me resolve it. [00:40:34] Randall: Yeah. And, and honestly my experience, it it's a special mechanic. Who's who's really good at. I've had bikes that you know, our, our bikes will have a Creek here and there. And we'll say like, you know, bring it to a mechanic, have them take a look and they can't chase it. And I've actually had an instance where I had the bike shipped to me personally, and I chased it, but I chased it in a way that like, you know, it's I'm trying to remember what it was. Oh, it wasn't even a Creek. It was just that. Axis rear derailer the hanger on the was ever so slightly misaligned. And then the axis derailer was harder. When it's miscalibrated it makes a lot of noise on the cassette and that was the noise. So we're like, they were looking at the bottom bracket, they were looking at the seat post. They were looking at the, the headset interface and, and so on. And unless you have that, like the time and that deductive mindset and some experience of like, what things sound like, it's really hard to, to chase. So if you have a mechanic, who's a good chaser. That that's that's someone who really knows their stuff and [00:41:39] Craig: Yeah. A hundred percent. Yeah, my, my go to, I mean, as a non methodical bad mechanic, definitely like I clean my bike when a Creek arrives and that usually, like, it's say 85% of the time solves the problem. And then if, if I need to go further, it's about. You know, greasing things, making sure, just kind of being a little more I inspect of, of what's going on. I I've generally been pretty lucky that I haven't had creeks that I weren't, that I wasn't clear on how to resolve. [00:42:10] Randall: Yeah. Yeah. Well, I'd like to end with a with something that I'm excited about, which is I haven't nailed it down yet, but I had pinged you about coming out west for a bit. And so once those dates are locked down you know, getting a big group ride in the bay area and potentially in a couple other parts of the us. Something I'm super excited about and to meet some of the riders that are in the forum and that are, are regular listeners and so on. So more on that as we approach. But that would probably be Denver, Boulder, maybe San Diego, and then definitely the bay area. [00:42:40] Craig: That's super exciting. I feel like, you know, before the pandemic we had kicked off some really amazing group rides and [00:42:47] Randall: I miss it. [00:42:48] Craig: you. Yeah. And you and I have been longing for, we've had a lot going on to not kind of be putting that out there ourselves personally, but I think it's, it's a great time to do that and hopefully we can get some knocked out by the end of the year and super excited to see you when you're in the bay area. [00:43:04] Randall: Likewise. It's been too long. [00:43:06] Craig: We're good to catch up. My friend, [00:43:08] Randall: Likewise. All right, my friend. [00:43:09] Craig: take, take care. [00:43:10] Randall: See it. [00:43:11] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of in the dirt. From the gravel ride pod cast How's a bit of a postscript. I did attend the adventure revival ride up in Marine county, out of Fairfax this past weekend. Quite a lovely event, benefiting Nika. The course is amazing and difficult as I imagined and remembered from the last time I did it such a great route put together by the Marine county bike coalition. Super challenging on a gravel bike. I remember thinking about halfway through. Wow. I'm about halfway through feeling quite beat up. And I was riding my unicorn with a front suspension fork on it. I certainly saw a number of riders out there on mountain bikes, which would not have been a bad choice. Anyway, phenomenal event, definitely something to have on your radar, down the line. If you're interested in connecting with myself or Randall, please join the ridership. Simply visit www.theridership.com. That's a free online, global cycling community where you can connect and discuss gravel, cycling with athletes from all over the world. If you're interested in supporting the podcast, please visit buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. And remember, ratings and reviews are always hugely appreciated. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt onto your wheels

Two Smart Assets
How the Global Supply Chain & Interest Rates are Impacting Investors with Jeff Davis

Two Smart Assets

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 24:11


Rising interest rates and global supply chain conditions are just two things that could indicate the apparent unstable economic conditions. But how do these things impact investors? Join Daniel Nickles and Jeff Davis in this episode of Two Smart Assets Real Estate Investing Podcast to find out!   Jeff shares the possible situation of the supply chain nine to twelve months from now. He also talks about building various income streams to find the best deal and the deal that makes sense. Tune in and enjoy!  Outline of the episode:  His journey to finding consistency  Building various income streams  Global supply chain and its impact  Investing in what makes sense  Black Swan event  About Jeff Davis:  Jeff is a global sales executive for a Fortune 200 logistics company since 2005 and has been active in Real Estate since 2015. He is an owner/operator of Bridgestone Holdings, LLC maintaining a portfolio of rental properties as well as fixing and flipping single family houses in Houston and surrounding areas. In 2021, Jeff and Bridgestone moved into a more strategic arena partnering in 2 large apartment syndications for over 500 units. Jeff resides in Spring, TX with his beautiful wife, Cindy, and their 5 children.  Connect with Jeff here:  Website    Connect with Two Smart Assets on:  Website: https://twosmartassets.com/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TwoSmartAssets/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/twosmartass  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5b8 

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
BRAVO: Offering Fellowship, Service and Support to Veterans and Allies at Bridgestone

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 28:50


Bridgestone Americas Veterans Organization, or BRAVO for short, is an Employee Resource Group that not only plays a major role in helping the company recruit and retain teammates with military service, but it also invites both veterans and non-veterans to unite in a fellowship of service. In this episode of THRIVE, the group's President and Vice President, Joe Bailey and Marty Morrison, offer listeners an overview of BRAVO's journey, it's objectives, and its ongoing activities at Bridgestone.

The Action Catalyst
CLIP: Employee Innovation and Challenging the Boss

The Action Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 3:51


Gary Garfield, speaker, author, and former CEO of Bridgestone Americas, shares a few times when he empowered his workforce to speak truth to power, drive innovative ideas from within, and speak up for themselves, resulting in one of Bridgestone's most well-received initiatives. Hear Gary's full interview in Episode 395 of The Action Catalyst. Also be sure to check out Gary's first appearance on the podcast, in Episode 243 of the Action Catalyst.

The Hackers Paradise
Bridgestone Goes Off Course

The Hackers Paradise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 53:09


Off Course is back this week with a fantastic show. Hosted by Dan Edwards, each Friday he gives you a deep look into the world of golf and equipment in a way unlike any other podcast has done before. Today Adam Rehberg joins the conversation to talk about everything in the world of Bridgestone Golf. […] The post Bridgestone Goes Off Course appeared first on The Hackers Paradise.

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
Credit Due: How Bridgestone Built its Own Payment Solution to Help Customers

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 31:41


Did you know Bridgestone has its own payment solutions company? CFNA was founded in the late 1970s to provide customers with financing help for auto care. Considering 50% of Americans are ill prepared for surprise costs of $500 or more, CFNA has proven to be a financing lifeline to customers for five decades. Learn more about how CFNA fits into Bridgestone in this episode of THRIVE when host Keith Cawley chats with Brian Zempel, President of CFNA.

The Action Catalyst
Driving Results, with Gary Garfield (Leadership, Automotive, Trust, Innovation)

The Action Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 23:25


https://southwesternspeakers.com/gary-garfield/ (Gary Garfield), speaker, author, and former CEO of Bridgestone Americas, shares the "rules of the road" from his new book, "Driving Results", including why humility is freedom from arrogance, the advice from the best boss that HE ever had, the equation to creating a productive and trusting company culture, the discrepancy between professional auto testing and consumer driving, creating innovation & how one of Bridgestone's best ideas came from an employee submission, and answering the question of "who's REALLY the boss?" Also be sure to check out Gary's first appearance on the podcast, in Episode 243 of the Action Catalyst. Mentioned in this episode: This episode is brought to you by Southwestern Speakers This episode is brought to you by Southwestern Speakers. https://the-action-catalyst.captivate.fm/southwesternspeakers (Southwestern Speakers)

The St. Joseph's Capital Podcast
Episode 29 - Transitioning from Single-family to Multifamily Investing with Jeff Davis

The St. Joseph's Capital Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 23:04


Jeff moved from New Orleans to Houston after Hurricane Katrina and found work as data entry behind the desk at a logistic company. He began working on solving problems for customers and soon found himself regularly in customer-facing meetings helping sales people close deals. Eventually, he became a sales rep for a large Fortune 200 Logistics firm where he continues helping clients to this day. He has been active in Real Estate since 2015. He is an owner/operator of Bridgestone Holdings, LLC maintaining a portfolio of rental properties as well as fixing and flipping single family houses in Houston and surrounding areas. In 2021, Jeff and Bridgestone moved into a more strategic arena partnering in 2 large apartment syndications for over 500 units. Jeff resides in Spring, TX with his beautiful wife, Cindy, and their 5 children. Jeff has seen the benefits of how real estate can help grow net worth and wants to help others do the same. Check out this episode to learn more about: Jeff background in logistics and dispatching before he invests in real estate. Jeff's transitional journeys into real estate. How does it look like investing during the financial crisis of 2008 The benefits and disadvantages of flipping houses and rental business Some advantages of investing in multifamily Balancing W2 job, life, and real estate business with a growing family The challenges of getting the first multifamily deals How does faith play an important role in his life? To connect with Jeff Davis please visit: ➡️Website:

Retire Smarter
Ep 106: Pension Lump Sums - You May Need To Act Now in 2022

Retire Smarter

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 34:13


Pension lump sums will be much LOWER in 2023 than 2022. Listen to Kevin give a brief intro on what is going on and then cut into a replay of episode 62, recorded in December 2020 on the same topic.  Learn timing considerations on how to optimize your pension benefits by understanding the key variables -- interest rates and mortality -- that determine your lump sum. Company pension plans specifically discussed include Akron Children's Hospital, Bridgestone, FirstEnergy, Goodyear, Kaiser, Mercy Health, and Rockwell Automation. Need help with your specific lump sum option?    If you are eligible for a lump sum, don't delay. To give proper advice, your pension decision must be made within the context of your overall financial life plan, and this takes some time to thoughtfully put together. Call 855-TWD-PLAN (855-893-7526) or visit https://www.truewealthdesign.com/contact to get expert help.   Whether you have a pension from your company or not, you'll benefit from this episode. Why? Anyone can invest money with an insurance company and receive a lifetime income in the form of annuity payments. So these considerations are universal in crafting your retirement income plan. Want more information on pension claiming strategies? Listen to Episode 38 here: https://www.truewealthdesign.com/ep-38-pension-lump-sum-or-monthly-payment    Key topics on this episode:  0:38 - Why we're pulling this show from the archives 8:53 - What you need to know about lump sums 14:22 - Why this matters 15:58 - Segment Rates 21:43 - What To Expect In The Future 26:02 - Spreadsheet Story 30:28 - Closing Thoughts

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
What Really Matters: Bridgestone Shifts Brand Voice to Purpose over Performance

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 28:09


In the first episode of THRIVE season 4, Sara Correa, Chief Marketing Officer for Bridgestone Americas, introduces Bridgestone's succinct new brand voice: What Really Matters. The multi-channel behavioral platform is a new approach for the iconic brand, which is shifting its marketing to focus on actions over advertisements and purpose over performance. Learn more about how it will help Bridgestone tell its mobility and sustainability stories, engage it's wide-ranging stakeholders, and deliver on its North Star and the Bridgestone E8 Commitment.

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3384 - Munro Says 4680 Cheaper Than Expected; Experts: ICE Still Dominates In 2030; New Way To Make Lithium Batteries Last Longer

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 8:19 Very Popular


- Audi, Porsche, Kia Mad at U.S. EV Tax Credits - Fisker Looking for More U.S. Assembly Capacity - Experts: ICE Still Dominates In 2030 - New Way to Make Lithium Batteries Last Longer - Auto Industry Loses DSRC - Bridgestone Developing Sustainable Tires - Amazon Does 430,000 Deliveries w/ Rivian Vans - Automated Speed Enforcement in Construction Zones - Munro Says 4680 Cheaper Than Expected

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking
498: How to Defeat Loneliness Through Connection (with Ryan Jenkins & Steven Van Cohen)

Case Interview Preparation & Management Consulting | Strategy | Critical Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 50:12


Welcome to an episode with workplace loneliness experts and thought leaders, Ryan Jenkins and Steven Van Cohen. Get Ryan's book here: https://amzn.to/3SOSwiY In this episode, Ryan and Steven discuss a vital, sensitive, and very interesting topic: loneliness. Oftentimes, loneliness and emotional pain is taken lightly compared to physical pain. But physiologically, the effect is nearly the same. The conversation revolved around answering why do we feel lonely and how we can battle and address this issue. Ryan and Steven talked about the significance of awareness, connection, a sense of safety and belonging, and mental health, which largely contributes to resolving loneliness and is the key to developing a healthy personal and professional environment. Ryan Jenkins CSP® (Certified Speaking Professional™) is an internationally recognized keynote speaker and three-time published author. He speaks all over the world to companies such as State Farm, Salesforce, Wells Fargo, FedEx, Liberty Mutual, and John Deere. For a decade, he has been helping organizations create engaged, inclusive, and high-performing teams by lessening worker loneliness and closing generational gaps. Ryan's top-ranked insights have been featured in Forbes, Fast Company, and The Wall Street Journal. He is also co-founder of LessLonely.com, the world's first resource fully dedicated to reducing worker isolation and strengthening team connections. Ryan lives in Atlanta, GA with his wife, three children, and yellow Labrador. Steven Van Cohen is a global leadership consultant, author, and executive coach. Steven has spent 12 years working with hundreds of leaders from organizations like Salesforce, The Home Depot, Komatsu, and Bridgestone, helping them improve worker well-being, reduce employee isolation, and boost team belonging. Dubbed "The Leadership Whisperer," Steven has inspired thousands through his workshops, keynotes, and virtual events. He is co-founder of LessLonely.com (the world's first resource for addressing loneliness at work) and CEO of SyncLX (a consultancy that works with many Fortune 500 companies.) Steven holds a Master of Science in Organizational Development from Pepperdine University and a BA from The University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana. Steven lives in San Juan Capistrano, CA with his wife and two daughters. Get Ryan & Steven's book here: Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams From Isolated to All In. Ryan Jenkins & Steven Van Cohen: https://amzn.to/3SOSwiY   Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Autoline Daily
AD #3384 - Munro Says 4680 Cheaper Than Expected; Experts: ICE Still Dominates In 2030; New Way To Make Lithium Batteries Last Longer

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 8:19


- Audi, Porsche, Kia Mad at U.S. EV Tax Credits- Fisker Looking for More U.S. Assembly Capacity- Experts: ICE Still Dominates In 2030- New Way to Make Lithium Batteries Last Longer- Auto Industry Loses DSRC- Bridgestone Developing Sustainable Tires- Amazon Does 430,000 Deliveries w/ Rivian Vans- Automated Speed Enforcement in Construction Zones- Munro Says 4680 Cheaper Than Expected

Blaine and Mickey
Blaine and Mickey Hour 1: Live from Bridgestone Tower

Blaine and Mickey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 40:15


Blaine and Mickey broadcast live from the Bridgestone Tower ahead of the Big Machine Music City Grand Prix! Titans defensive lineman Teair Tart joins the show, and Indy Car driver Graham Rahal joins the guys.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business News Leaders
Rubber Hits The Road on Tariff Application

Business News Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 20:30


The issue of tariffs was thrown into stark relief yesterday when the DTIC failed to extend tariffs on chicken imports as food costs rise. And its interesting to note against the backdrop of a recent tariff application by the SA Tyre Manufacturers Conference (SATMC) to ITAC for the imposition of additional duties on tyres imported from China. No doubt this will concern every South African motorist and the taxi, bus and trucking sectors, which could be hard hit if additional duties are imposed on imported tyres. The four large domestic tyre producers – Continental, Bridgestone, Goodyear, and Sumitomo, collectively known as the SA Tyre Manufacturers Conference (SATMC), maintains that its application to investigate the unfair trade caused by dumped imports of passenger, truck and bus tyres imported from China, is part of a sustained effort to rescue the local tyre industry and the livelihoods dependent upon it. SATMC was invited to participate on this panel but declined. Joining Michael Avery for this discussion is Charl de Villiers, Chairperson at Tyre Importers Association of South Africa; Donald MacKay, CEO and founder of XA International Trade Advisors and Theo Malele, Spokesperson of National Taxi Alliance

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW
BRIDGESTONE GOLF - Elliot Mellow, MKTG MGR

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 15:30


Bridgestone has been guided by the philosophy of our founder Shojiro Ishibashi since 1931 to 'Serve Society with Superior Quality.' Over the years, the pursuit of superior quality has resulted in Bridgestone becoming the global market leader in the rubber industry and in polymer science technologies.Today Bridgestone continues to push the performance capabilities for all our products with an unmatched commitment to Research and Development.Bridgestone shares the same passion for the game of golf as our founder did. Mr. Ishibashi converted his golf passion into a commercial success when Bridgestone first produced golf balls in 1935.Technical developments in tire technology lead to breakthroughs in golf ball technology which have allowed Bridgestone to be the number one golf ball producer in Japan.Design and production of golf clubs followed in 1972 with the same passion for excellence propelling Bridgestone to a leadership position in the current marketplace.Learn about our Environmental Commitment.

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories
S6 E3: 1996 Australian GP - Villeneuve's stunning F1 debut

Bring Back V10s - Classic F1 stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 70:00


Jacques Villeneuve came heartbreakingly close to winning on his F1 debut in the 1996 Australian Grand Prix, only losing out when he was told to slow down to save his engine, allowing Williams team-mate Damon Hill through for victory.  Glenn Freeman is joined by Matt Beer and former Jordan F1 designer Gary Anderson to look back at F1's first weekend in Melbourne, including Villeneuve's remarkable debut, and what Gary thought when he saw his yellow Jordan fly through the air and break in half in Martin Brundle's famous first lap crash.  They also discuss the impact of the post-Schumacher upheaval at Benetton, Mika Hakkinen's return to racing after his horrific Adelaide crash in 1995, a wake-up call for David Coulthard with Ron Dennis, rules controversy as two teams took a clever approach to the new-for-'96 cockpit sides, and what the paddock thought of Bridgestone's announcement it was coming to F1 to take on Goodyear - originally for 1998. Plus, we do our best to get to the bottom of the various theories behind Villeneuve's engine problem, and the myths around his dramatic Turn 1 off that is often blamed for causing the oil leak. ASK US ANYTHING: Submit your questions for our series finale using #BringBackV10s on Twitter or email bringbackv10s@the-race.com

Surround Sound Podcast
Episode 26: #SurroundSoundPodcast - #WeekOfJuly26th2022 - THINK BIG

Surround Sound Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 61:48


Wise Guys having a bad year, #NFL madness ensues, #MLB after the break, & #BigStepperTour walks into the #Bridgestone... plus can I get #Beyonce to give Us a #hiphop mixtape and more on the latest... Then My cousin ask Us to stop thinking small! #StayCurrent w/ #SurroundSoundPodcast News for the #HipHop Generation sponsored by #901RestorationKings Download this week's episodes below and from all other streaming services!⬇ https://www.iheart.com/podcast/surround-sound-podcast-29299951/

#StillServing: The VFW Podcast
On Location: The VFW 123rd National Convention in Kansas City

#StillServing: The VFW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 77:11


The 123rd VFW National Convention just concluded at the Kansas City Convention Center in Kansas City Missouri. It was the first time the convention has been back in full swing since 2019. One of the new things was an exhibit sound stage in the exhibit hall where #StillServing Podcast Host Rob Couture had the pleasure of interviewing sponsors, exhibitors, comrades, and special guests. Ryan Gallucci, Director of the VFW's National Veteran Service   Ryan describes all of the available services at the convention including the Claims Clinic and Health Fair provided by the NVS. [2:29]   How the NVS and VFW help veterans understand the full breadth of benefits available to them. [5:33]   The delegates function as the governing body but each VFW member has a voice in how decisions are made. [7:55]   Joe Bailey, President of Bridgestone's BRAVO Employee Research Group Joe shares his military background and his civilian career history. [11:21]   The BRAVO initiative supports veterans with career-based transition services and more. [12:19]   Firestone Direct is a new program that offers on-site mobile services directly from mobile specialists. [15:48] Clayton Smith, Senior Director for Sales at Twisted X     Clayton spoke at the convention in place of Twisted X's President, Prasad Reddy. [20:50]   In 2005, Twisted X morphed from cowboy gear to lifestyle and casual styles. [23:17]   To be more sustainable, Twisted X developed a fabric made from discarded plastic water bottles. [24:54]   Twisted X is a proud sponsor of the voice of democracy scholarship program and the Tough Enough to Wear Pink program. [28:43]   Honorable Denis McDonough, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs   During the convention, Denis discussed the partnership VA has with the VFW organization. [31:35]   Denis shares what VFW can expect for the next year regarding the PACT act. [33:47] Kelly McKeague, Director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA)   Kelly vehemently thanks the VFW for the time and effort they put forth finding, identifying, and recovering POW/MIA military members. [37:28]   Raising the nation's consciousness about National POW/MIA Recognition Day. [40:47]   Kelly describes the various methods that connect families to the remains of their beloved service members. [43:01]   Johnny Webb was awarded a gold medal for his well-established dedication to the DPAA. [44:36] Aaron McCoy, Regional Veteran Executive for Humana   Aaron is a life member of the VFW Post #3345 and served in the Army and National Guard. [48:36]   Humana donated $25,000 to the VFW's Unmet Needs Program and helps educate veterans about their medical benefits. [49:52]   At the convention, Humana sponsors two booths to show their gratitude to the VFW organization. [53:16]   Humana also partners with the service officers of the NVS to enhance their veterans' service offerings. [55:40]   To address food insecurity, Humana joins forces with the VFW for the Uniting to Combat Hunger campaign [57:15]   Chris Ward, Public Affairs Manager for the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES)   Chris describes the changes and new benefits available to veterans as part of the AAFES. [1:00:06]   The AAFES currently has a robust hiring program for veterans and military spouses. [1:02:56]   Teddy Robb, country music recording artist   Teddy describes his experience at the VFW National Convention [1:07:13]   Leaving football behind in Akron, Ohio, Teddy got his recording career started in Nashville, Tennessee. [1:10:15]   In his song, “Heaven on Dirt,” Teddy reached out to the VFW to promote the Unmet Needs program. [1:14:12]   For more information or to continue the conversation, please visit: Veterans of Foreign Wars Website VFW Podcast Page @VFWHQ on Twitter VFW on Facebook @RobCoutureVFW on Facebook VFW Unmet Needs Program Call 1-888-JOIN-VFW Text “NEEDS” to 20222 to donate to the Unmet Needs Program Today's VFW — Share Your #StillServing Story National Veterans Services — Claims Help Firestone Direct Apply My Exchange Website Find out more about the VFW National Convention    

The Voices of Risk Management
People Who Discriminate Against You are Two Steps Behind You with Robert Cartwright Jr.

The Voices of Risk Management

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 41:57


Robert Cartwright Jr. is the Division Manager for Environmental, Health, Safety, and Sustainability and the former President and Board of Directors at RIMS. Robert has seen a lot of growth after being in the industry for over 25 years and shares some of the rapid improvements the insurance industry has undergone since he's been in the field. Everything from being a more welcoming, and diverse, place to work, how he used his work ethic to shine through, and what young professionals can look forward to in the insurance space today.   Key Takeaways: A little bit about Robert and how he got into risk management. Robert has been at Bridgestone for over 25 years and has seen a lot of promotions and changes since then. As a minority, Robert has seen his fair share of challenges and the lack of diversity in the space didn't help. Robert has seen this space completely open up and make diversity a priority. It's blown him away. It's a great time to join! Robert grew rapidly in his career field; what made him so successful early on? Whenever someone asked Robert to do something, he always wanted to know why. When Robert understood the reason, he was able to be an advocate for the new solution and get more people behind the change. What did it mean to be a black professional 25-plus years ago in health and safety? Diversify was always talked about, even back 20 years ago, but it was always just a noun with no action plan. Today it's much different. The people in power are the only ones who can make the change. The next generation wants a diverse workforce. Nobody walks on water, but when you're being second-guessed, you do have to be conscious of the details. Robert was the first black president to serve on the RIMS organization and it was a huge honor and opportunity. Ships are safer in the harbor but that's not what they're built for. What advice would Robert give his younger self?   Mentioned in This Episode: Bridgestone.com Robert on LinkedIn  

The Monty Show
The Monty Show 751!

The Monty Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 107:05


Monty & Jake are talking Utah Jazz Basketball! Are the Utah Jazz trading Donovan Mitchell? ESPN and other national outlets are reporting the Utah Jazz are now listening to trade offers for Donovan Mitchell. But is that news? The Utah Jazz said the same thing to the media this week, so has something changed with the Utah Jazz and Donovan Mitchell? LeBron James says he meant no harm in his comments about Brittney Griner not returning to the USA once she is released from prison in Russia. Did LeBron James speak out of turn? Was it a mistake for LeBron James to say Brittney Griner should not return to the USA once she is released from prison? Monty has some passionate takes on what LeBron James said and why he believes it is such a problem. It's Amazon Prime Day and Monty And Jake have the deals for you! Here are our best deals: One Year of GrubHub Free: https://amzn.to/3yXb08X Apple AirPod Pros for $169.99 - Save $79.01!! https://amzn.to/3aCQpxn Apple Watch Series 7 for $279.00 - Save $120! https://amzn.to/3c0Y2hv 3 months of Amazon Music Unlimited for FREE! https://amzn.to/3Ru9pP8 Kindle For Kids $49.99 - Save $60! https://amzn.to/3ILz7ep Blink Outdoor 3 Camera Kit $124.99 - SAVE $159.99!! https://amzn.to/3yxplrh Tiger Woods had plenty to say about the LIV Tour players being involved in The Open Championship, and wonders how there is long term viability in guaranteed pay days as a competitive golfer. In addition to Tiger Woods comments, Bridgestone fired Bryson DeChambeau after he left the PGA Tour for LIV Golf. Is LIV Golf worth it for the players? It is Amazon Prime Day 2 and other retailers are responding, Target is matching the discounts on Amazon in store on a wide variety of items, and most online retailers are offering specials to combat the Amazon effect. Is Amazon good for business, or does Amazon have an unfair advantage? Find us on Twitter and Instagram: @TheMontyShow & @SLCSuperCars

L3 Leadership Podcast
AJ Vaden on Building and Monetizing Your Personal Brand

L3 Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 57:04 Transcription Available


Episode Summary: In this episode of the L3 Leadership Podcast, AJ talks about how she helps people find their own personal brand and why having a personal brand is important for success. About AJ:  AJ Vaden is Co-founder and CEO of Brand Builders Group, an international speaker, million-dollar producer and cohost of The Influential Personal Brand podcast. As a personal brand strategist, she challenges and inspires people to reinvent themselves as part of building and monetizing their personal brand. AJ has personally worked with thousands of individuals to help them focus their expertise, expand their reach, build their reputation and brand the one thing no one else has, their name.Over the last 10 years she has been a part of founding, launching and building a very successful 8- figure coaching business, a multi million-dollar consulting business, and a 7-figure speaking business. Along with her company Brand Builders Group, AJ was featured in a 3-page spread in Success Magazine on the impacts of personal branding as well as recently being named as one of the Top 5 Personal Branding Speakers of 2019. Her client roster includes working with top level executives from organizations such as Bridgestone, Verizon Cellular Sales, Home Franchise Concepts and DIRECTV as well as working with well known speakers, best selling authors, entrepreneurs and online influencers such as mega podcast host Lewis Howes and original “shark”, creator of the infomercial and serial entrepreneur Kevin Harrington.AJ has taken 25 years of setbacks, successes, tragedies and overcoming and distilled them into simple yet powerful lessons that will help anyone become better than ever.4 Key Takeaways:1. AJ gives advice to someone looking to narrow down their personal brand.2. She talks about how her company, Brand Builders Group, works with people looking to build their personal brand.3. AJ talks about how personal brands are a growing trend.4. She highlights how important content creation is for growing your personal brand.Quotes From the Episode:“Just because you can do it, doesn't mean you should.”“I want to be someone who is known for making a difference in this world.”“Personal branding is an extension of who you are and what you want to be known for.”Guest Resources Mentioned:Brand Builders GroupFree Brand CallConnect with AJ:Instagram | Website | Facebook

Cleveland's Morning News with Wills and Snyder
Wills & Snyder: Guardians VS Royals Weekend - Bally's GL Jensen Lewis Previewed The Series - Browns-Guardians Talk From Cleveland.com Terry Pluto - Bridgestone Seniors Rd1 Recap & Rd 2 Preview From Don Padgett III Executive Director Bridgesto

Cleveland's Morning News with Wills and Snyder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 49:18


Bill & Mike Kicked Your Weekend With Guardians VS Royals Weekend - Bally's GL Jensen Lewis Previewed The Series - Browns-Guardians Talk From Cleveland.com Terry Pluto - Bridgestone Seniors Rd1 Recap & Rd 2 Preview From Don Padgett III Executive Director Bridgestone Invitational - James Caan-Actor "Sonny Corleone" From "The Godfather" Dead At 82 - Weekend Movie Preview From Kevin Carr-Fat Guys At The Movies.com & ABC News Entertainment Matt Wolfe - Former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is dead - ASSASSINATED - NBC Radio Rory O'Neil - A new report says that rising food and energy prices have put 71-million people worldwide into poverty since March. Who is being hit hardest and why?-NBC News Radio Nicole Wilson

Talking.Golf
Gary & Rob on Gary's trip to SentryWorld; plus, the Women's State Am, Bridgestone Senior Players, British Open predictions

Talking.Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 55:51


Wisconsin.Golf's Gary D'Amato and Rob Hernandez talk about Gary's trip to the reopened and reimagined SentryWorld in Stevens Point, the host of the 2023 U.S. Senior Open. Plus, they preview next week's Wisconsin Women's State Amateur, Steve Stricker and Jerry Kelly in this weekend's Bridgestone Senior Player's Championship, next week's British Open, and more.

Earn Your Happy
914. Why Personal Branding is the Future of Marketing with AJ Vaden, the CEO and Co-Founder of Brand Builders Group

Earn Your Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 57:27 Very Popular


I'm joined by AJ Vaden, the CEO and Co-Founder of Brand Builders Group, one of the world's leading authorities on personal brand strategy. We dive into what it means to have a personal brand and address some of the common misconceptions that people have around the idea. AJ emphasizes the importance of shifting the focus to who you really are, not just relying on your professional title to tell your whole story. She details some fascinating discoveries that her firm made through the first-ever US study on the state of personal branding, and shares the current trends she and her team are seeing in marketing. Plus, she breaks down the four most important questions that you need to get really clear on before launching your personal brand and gives her top tips about where to start that process.    IN THIS EPISODE, WE TALK ABOUT: Creating a monetization plan for your reputation What motherhood has taught AJ about personal branding  Why your comfort will ultimately hold you back from your calling  AJ's process for being present and consistent with follow-ups  The three questions that Brand Builders Group sought to answer in their national personal branding study  The best way to get started with your personal branding strategy    RESOURCES Schedule your FREE personal brand strategy call with one of the Brand Builders Group experts at freebrandcall.com/loriharder!  Thanks to Indeed for supporting Earn Your Happy. Go to indeed.com/happy to redeem a $75 sponsored job credit.  Thanks a Little Passports for supporting my show. Little Passports is offering new customers 20% off when you go to littlepassports.com/lori. Sign up for The Spritz newsletter at litepink.com! Text PODCAST to 310-496-8363 for updates and a chance to be featured on the show!   CONNECT WITH AJ  Follow AJ: @aj_vaden  Learn more about Brand Builders Group: brandbuildersgroup.com  Listen to The Influential Personal Brand Podcast    CONNECT WITH LORI Follow me: @loriharder Follow Lite Pink: @drinklitepink Follow Earn Your Happy: @earnyourhappy Follow Girlfriends & Business: @girlfriendsandbusiness Listen to Girlfriends & Business   GUEST BIO AJ Vaden is CEO and Co-Founder of Brand Builders Group, one of the world's leading authorities on personal brand strategy.    She's also the co-host of the Influential Personal Brand podcast, named one of Forbes' top 10 podcasts to listen to in 2021. Along with her company she's been featured in Inc, Success Magazine, Fast Company, Entrepreneur, and Good Morning America.  With an entrepreneurial career that spans 15 years, AJ has been part of founding, building, and leading 4 different 7 and 8 figure companies all centered about personal and professional development practices.  Her client roster includes senior executives from Fortune 100 Companies and 9 Figure Entrepreneurs to Hollywood Actors, Award Winning Musicians and Politicians to New York Times Bestselling Authors and world-renowned thought leaders.    She has spoken to hundreds of thousands of people from across the world spanning globally recognized brands such as Bridgestone and DIRECTV to industry leaders including Budget Blinds, Verizon Cellular Sales, and American Pacific Mortgage to nationally recognized organizations like NAWBO and EO on how to become more well known in your space and leverage your reputation to be recognized as your industry's “go-to” expert.

Cleveland's Morning News with Wills and Snyder
Wills & Snyder: Guardians Stun Twins With 4 Run Rally In The 9th To Win 11-10 - Guards PBP Jim Rosenhaus Recapped The Win-Preview Game 3 - US Senior Open Preview From Don Padgett III Executive Director Bridgestone SENIOR PLAYERS - Cleveland Beer-Re

Cleveland's Morning News with Wills and Snyder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 41:42


Bill & Mike Got Your Thursday Jumping With Guardians Stun Twins With 4 Run Rally In The 9th To Win 11-10 - Guards PBP Jim Rosenhaus Recapped The Win-Preview Game 3 - US Senior Open Preview From Don Padgett III Executive Director Bridgestone SENIOR PLAYERS - Cleveland Beer-Restaurant News From Cleveland.com Marc Bona - Faith Furry Friends - Kiwanis Golf Outing-Jackie Horn - A new survey says you need about 2.2 million dollars to be considered “wealthy.”-NBC News Radio Rory O'Neill - A busy week on Capitol Hill as gun control and federal monetary policies are in the forefront-NBC News Radio Scott Kimbler took a look at what Congress is discussing AND a new poll which takes a look at how Americans feel about the events of January 6th

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
SOUTHERN FAIRWAYS GOLF SHOW JUNE 19,2022

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 49:07


Golf and leisure expert Randy Burgan hosts this weekly golf show with the emphasis on area course, tournaments.  David Musial offers some tips for dummies. Elliot Mellow, with Bridgestone and Jay Stubbs with Jimmy Green Tours make guest appearances.

What’s Treading with Tire Review
Creating Consistency & Scaling Up - Lessons from Tires Plus' Jarid Lundeen

What’s Treading with Tire Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 20:17


Even when Jarid Lundeen worked in the restaurant and banking industries, one thing about the customer experience always stood out to him: Consistency. Early on, he learned consistency creates success, which is what he looks to instill in his four Tires Plus locations in Minott, North Dakota. But how do you do that?Jarid tells Johnny g in this latest episode of Johnny g & Friends, presented by Firestone. Jarid not only touts consistency in the tire business but also diversity and scaling up as a means to success as a businessman. As the CEO and president of JETT Management, Jarid has four Tire Plus locations plus four Valvoline Instant Oil Change stores and a barbecue restaurant under his belt and is an example in each of his businesses of how a consistent customer experience can lead to repeat business.Jarid got the hang of the automotive industry as a young boy hanging out with his dad at his father's body shop. Over the years, he strayed away from the industry, yet was called back after his father asked him to partner with him on a Tires Plus location. Since then, he bought his father out and has grown his footprint with much more on the way. Watch the episode above or on YouTube. You can also subscribe to Johnny g & Friends on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts and Spotify.EPISODE OVERVIEW- How Johnny g and Jarid first met (1:40)- What Jarid learned working in the banking and restaurant industries and how he applies that to his businesses today (3:00)- Why Jarid has diversified his portfolio to not only include tire stores and why he feels that will benefit him down the line (4:13)- Jarid describes his early years growing up in his father's body shop and the skills he learned, such as creating conversation, from the experience. (5:47)- Why Jarid was attracted to invest in Valvoline Instant Oil Change stores and his view on how the oil change should work in relation to his tire shop (7:08)- Jarid's goals for his businesses, including his tire business, oil change business and Bones BBQ restaurant and why the need for replication is paramount across processes at all three (8:54)- Mentors Jarid has had in the tire industry (12:40)- Why Jarid thinks it's important to scale up in business and grow (14:49)You can also watch Johnny g & Freinds on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgfm_UrqXz4&list=PLVkqUUE022sfk413J6lVAaPFH4Wc2ORLyMore on Firestone: www.firestonetires.com.

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
Racing to the Future: Bridgestone Advanced Tire Production Center marks a new chapter in the Rubber City

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 33:40


Bridgestone's roots in the Rubber City of Akron, Ohio date back more than 120 years through the Firestone brand, and significant investments over the past few decades have further solidified this region as the home of Bridgestone Americas research and development well into the future. Now in 2022, the company is also ready to add a new chapter to its storied history of race tire manufacturing in the Akron area with the opening of the new Advanced Tire Production Center (ATPC). In this episode, THRIVE goes on the road to speak with Dan Peterman, Senior Manager of Race Tire Manufacturing, and Jerry Morris, Senior Manager of Technology Center Operations, about how the ATPC came to be, what it will produce, and why it means so much to both our company and the local community.

The Business of Intuition
Elena Paweta: Be A Better Presenter By Following Ted-Talk Tips

The Business of Intuition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 35:13


Dr. Elena Paweta is an executive communication coach, speaker, TEDx organizer, and university professor. She conducts courses, trainings, and workshops on effective communication and business presentations internationally. Dr. Elena is a TEDx speaker and has played a big role in organizing TEDx and TEDxWomen conferences in Poland for the last 8 years. She is also a marathon runner and mother of 2 daughters. Her clients are among others: KPMG, PwC, Bosch, Deloitte, Bridgestone, GE Healthcare, Nestle, Santander Bank, Goldman Sachs, and AstraZeneca. In this episode, Dean Newlund and Elena Paweta discuss:Two types of confidence Reducing self-consciousness Creating a balance in your story Being aware of your patterns  Key Takeaways:The outer confidence is much easier to work on, practice good posture, gestures, eye contact, and voice projection. Inner confidence is more about your mindset but building outer confidence can contribute to building your inner confidence. Focus on the value that the audience could get from your message and how it could change their life. Doing this will help you keep the focus out from yourself, it will make you feel less self-conscious. Create a balance of inspiration and information in your speech. Make sure to always include facts in your message, along with your personal story. If you want to improve as a speaker you have to be aware of the patterns you do that hinder you from being the most effective speaker you can be. Ask somebody you trust to point out your blind spots and contemplate on their feedback.  "We need to not only show how confident we are but we also have to feel this confidence." —  Elena Paweta See Dean's TedTalk “Why Business Needs Intuition” here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEq9IYvgV7IConnect with Elena Paweta:  Website: https://elenapaweta.com/Email: info@elenapaweta.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/elenapawetaInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/elena.pawetaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrElenaPawetaYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMsDTwao-1i7xwFwN6RblDg  Connect with Dean:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgqRK8GC8jBIFYPmECUCMkwWebsite: https://www.mfileadership.com/The Mission Statement E-Newsletter: https://www.mfileadership.com/blog/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deannewlund/Twitter: https://twitter.com/deannewlundFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/MissionFacilitators/Email: dean.newlund@mfileadership.comPhone: 1-800-926-7370

Cleveland's Morning News with Wills and Snyder
Wills & Snyder: Guardians Blank Royals 4-0 & Get The Sweep!! - Guards PBP Jim Rosenhaus Recapped The Win - Memorial Golf Tourney Preview From Don Padgett III Executive Director Bridgestone SENIOR PLAYERS - Cleveland Beer-Restaurant Update From

Cleveland's Morning News with Wills and Snyder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 53:42


Bill & Mike Got Your Thursday Rocking With Guardians Blank Royals 4-0 & Get The Sweep!! - Guards PBP Jim Rosenhaus Recapped The Win - Memorial Golf Tourney Preview From Don Padgett III Executive Director Bridgestone SENIOR PLAYERS - Cleveland Beer-Restaurant Update From Cleveland.com Marc Bona - Greater Cleveland Partnership CEO Baiju Shah Talked Downtown Vibrancy - Faith Furry Friends - Cleveland Magazine-Rating The Suburbs - Sports Book At MGM North Field Park - Let The Betting Begin!! - The police version of what happened a week ago in Uvalde, Texas is continuing to change-NBC News Radio Rory O'Neill - A new study says that drinking coffee may actually LOWER your death risk-NBC News Radio Nicole Wilson

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas
Airing it Out: Bridgestone Moving Ahead with Plans for Airfree Tires

THRIVE by Bridgestone Americas

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 28:52


While the structure, technology and performance of tires has evolved significantly over time, the one constant for more than a century has been the air required for it to function. But as Bridgestone considers the future of mobility, the introduction of non-pneumatic tires – or airfree tires – would be a significant breakthrough for safety, efficiency, maintenance, and sustainability. In this episode, THRIVE goes on the road to the Bridgestone Americas Technical Center in Akron, Ohio to chat with Jon Kimpel, Vice President of Extended Mobility Solutions, and Brandon Nelson, Manager of Advanced Extended Mobility Technology, about where Bridgestone is focusing its airfree efforts and where we stand on that tire development journey.

Deliberate Leaders Podcast with Allison Dunn
How to Find an Idea Worth Spreading in Your TED Talk with Elena Pawęta

Deliberate Leaders Podcast with Allison Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 23:08


Dr. Elena Pawęta is a TEDx speaker and has played a big role in organizing TEDx and TEDxWomen conferences in Poland for the last 8 years. She is also a marathon runner and the mother of two daughters. Her clients include KPMG, PwC, Bosch, Deloitte, Bridgestone, GE Healthcare, Nestle, Santander Bank, Goldman Sachs, and Astra Zeneca.During the interview we discuss…how to get invited to speak at TEDxwhat TEDx organizers look forfinding an idea worth spreading on TEDmistakes people make when trying to get on a TED stagewhat happens after you're selected to be a TED speakertips for storytelling in businessConnect after the interview…Ideas+Leaders Podcast: https://elenapaweta.com/podcastWebsite: https://elenapaweta.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elena-paweta/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elena.pawetaEmail: elena.paweta@gmail.comClaim your free gift!We're giving away a one-year membership to the world's #1 business book summary service for leaders! Our gift will help you stay on top of the latest ideas, decide which books to read next, and engage your teams.To get your gift:Leave a rating or review on your favorite listening channel.Take a screenshot of your review.Share the screenshot on LinkedIn, and mention either “Allison Dunn” or “Deliberate Directions” and the “Deliberate Leaders Podcast”.=============Allison DunnExecutive Business CoachDeliberate Directions + Executive Business Coaching + Training Center3003 W Main Street, Suite 110, Boise ID 83702(208) 350-6551Website https://www.deliberatedirections.comLinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/allisondunnPodcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/deliberate-leaders-podcast-with-allison-dunn/id1500464675