Podcasts about mckinsey company

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Best podcasts about mckinsey company

Latest podcast episodes about mckinsey company

The Leader's Journey Podcast
Leading Up and Out: Part 2, Leading from the Second Chair

The Leader's Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 37:20


Leading from the Second Chair with Mike Bonem Leadership is not just about being in charge. The best leaders know how to use influence and relationships to lead up, down and sideways in order to shape the things they care about. Subscribe to our newsletter What is a second chair leader? "a person in a subordinate role whose influence with others adds value throughout the organization." Conversation Overview: What is a second chair leader? Joseph as a biblical example of a second chair leader 3 apparent paradoxes of leading from the second chair Leader and subordinate Deep and wide Contentment and dreaming "How do we dream, and yet, not get so wrapped up in making my dream happen tomorrow that we lose contentment today?" Consider some resistance to leading from the second chair Deep change is a process and takes time About Mike Bonem: Mike Bonem is a consultant, coach, author, speaker, husband and father. He offers a unique mix of world-class consulting and executive leadership experience to help churches, ministries, and their leaders turn vision into results. Mike holds an MBA, with distinction, from Harvard Business School. He was a senior manager with McKinsey & Company, one of the world's leading management consulting firms, and held executive leadership roles in two businesses. He subsequently served over 10 years as the executive pastor of a large Baptist church in Houston. Links:  https://mikebonem.com/ The Art of Leading Change by Mike Bonem Leading from the Second Chair Thriving in the Second Chair Leading Congregational Change Genesis 37-50 Jim Collins - https://www.jimcollins.com/ Leading Change, With a New Preface by the Author by John Kotter  

Sell From Love
Episode 77: Profit or Purpose, or Can You Do Both With Tammira Philippe

Sell From Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 46:09


Welcome to episode 77. In today's episode, I have Tammira Philippe joining me.  Tammira is President and CEO of Bridgeway Capital Management. Bridgeway is an investment management firm that stewards over $4 billion in quantitative public equity strategies for clients and the firm donates 50% of its earnings to make a positive impact on the world. Tammira is a member of the firm's Board of Directors, President of Bridgeway Funds, and serves on committees including: Portfolio Innovation and Risk, Responsible Investing , Enterprise Risk, and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Prior to becoming President and CEO, Tammira led strategy and operations projects at Bridgeway from 2005 to 2010 and was Head of Client Service and Marketing from 2010 to 2016. Tammira earned an MBA from Stanford's Graduate School of Business and graduated summa cum laude with a BS in Computer Science from Texas A&M University. Her experience prior to Bridgeway includes strategy consulting with McKinsey & Company and business development and marketing for a global satellite communications startup. Tammira is passionate about promoting education and social justice, two areas that are fulfilled through her professional work and volunteer service. Tammira and I dive into a great conversation about how so many organizations struggle between being a purpose driven organization, but also having the money conversation on being profit generating.   Specifically, here's what you will learn: How do you choose between short term and long-term goals? How do you choose to do the right thing, even when there's a long horizon to reaping any benefits? A great framework for setting strategy for your career and life  What's happened that has eroded our clients trust in financial services  What people can be doing to get better at building clients' trust Why we're off track broadly in financial services, and what we can do about it What Tammira has you learned about herself in the process of getting to where she is today.   Ready to learn more? Tune in!   Mentioned in this episode: https://www.consciouscapitalism.org/video/three-insights-for-balancing-profit-and-purpose-with-tammira-philippe-virtual-gathering-recap   Connect with Tammira Website: www.bridgeway.com  Twitter: @TPhilippeBCM  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tammiraphilippe/   P.S: Let's talk!  Do you want a free coaching call with me?  If you're a coach, consultant, or course creator that: Wants to build a business but doesn't know how to sell yourself or your work. Is struggling to connect with ideal clients or close the sales you need to generate the revenue you want. Wants to stop feeling overwhelmed with busy work and can't find the time to focus on the high value strategic work you need to be doing Struggles to put a price on the value you bring Then you're in the right place! Let's connect to find a way for you to earn more profit, reach more clients and make a bigger impact.  Book a time with me today here: www.sellfromlove.com/discoverycall If you have a specific question or topic, you'd like me to talk about on the podcast I want to hear from you. Email me at finka@finka.ca to share it with me.  And if you enjoyed this episode, please pass it along to a friend or colleague that would also benefit from learning to Sell From Love.  

CEO Perspectives
CEO Excellence: The Best and the Rest

CEO Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 30:10 Very Popular


What differentiates the top CEOs from everyone else? In this episode of CEO Perspectives, Ivan Pollard, Leader of the Marketing & Communications Center at The Conference Board, sits down with Vikram Malhotra, senior partner at McKinsey & Company, to discuss what it takes to excel as a CEO. Tune in to find out: What should CEOs focus on to be most effective? What isn't worth their time? What distinguishes CEOs who are truly excellent? What mindsets are necessary to realize a clear, audacious company vision? How has stakeholder engagement evolved for CEOs, and who should they be engaging with now? What do leading CEOs say they regret the most?

Profiles in Leadership
Jason Wright, First Black President of an NFL team. Transforming an organization one person at a time through diversity, collaboration and focus on people!

Profiles in Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 35:34


As President of the Washington Commanders, Jason Wright is responsible for leading the organization's business divisions, including operations, finance, sales, and marketing. In addition to leading a historic transformation of a sports franchise, he is the first Black team president in the history of the NFL and currently is the youngest team president in the League. He is the fourth former NFL player to become president of a team.Prior to joining the Washington Commanders, Jason was a partner in McKinsey & Company's Washington DC office. His work focused on expanding the value of large, complex organizations through operations and culture transformations. Jason specialized in steering companies through their toughest moments - in crisis and turnaround scenarios. From systemic personnel misconduct to financial distress to COVID-19 response, Jason's tenure at McKinsey supported a range of multi-national, corporation-specific challenges, while also leading the company's global inclusion and anti-racism strategies.His deep passion for intentional change that profoundly expands opportunities for historically marginalized populations resulted in his work co-founding McKinsey's Black Economic Institute. A research entity that analyzes the racial wealth gap, the Institute today serves as a prominent voice in public discussions regarding racial equity in corporate America. This advocacy, combined with his data- and results-oriented approaches, have been sought out by leading organizations, such as The Greater Washington Partnership, where Jason helps lead its Inclusive Growth Strategy Council as co-chair. The Inclusive Growth Strategy Council is a regional collaborative that dissects and identifies a blueprint for the region to address long-standing gaps in income, services, employment, and access to capital for lower-income populations.Jason's commitment to faith, family, and community is marked by his service on the Board of Trustees at Union Theological Seminary, where he is helping the institution better equip a changing student body focused on community organizing and social entrepreneurship.His leadership, passion for community change, and business acumen have been noted nationally and regionally, with Jason being awarded as a "Top 40 under 40" by Black Enterprise magazine, Sports Business Journal's "Best Hire of 2020," and standing as a member of The Economic Club of Washington D.C., where he serves alongside DC-based executives supporting a range of initiatives in the DMV.Jason spent seven years as a running back in the NFL and was team captain and NFLPA player representative for the Arizona Cardinals during the 2011 NFL lockout. He has a B.A. in psychology from Northwestern University, where he was an Academic All-American student athlete, a two-time All-Big Ten football selection, and the president of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. He received his M.B.A. in Operations and Finance with honors, from the University of Chicago-Booth School of Business.

Change is possible
Episode #15 Career Pivot with Rana Nawas: How to manage a full circle from corporate to entrepreneur and back

Change is possible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 35:51


Episode 15 of the “Change is possible podcast” is out! My guest is Rana Nawas. She is a 22-year corporate veteran who built her successful career around problem-solving, driving growth and building relationships. After graduating from Oxford with an Engineering degree, she worked in  McKinsey & Company's London Office, the Dubai Government, and GE Capital in a variety of strategy and sales roles. Then she left the corporate world to found her hugely successful podcast "When women win", and become a keynote speaker, advisor, and board chair. Recently, she made another career change and joined Oliver Wyman in Dubai as a partner focusing on the transportation sector. Apart from all the professional success, Rana is a mother of two boys; she is a quad-lingual global citizen, a retired yogini, a cross-fitter, and a cancer survivor. It was such an interesting discussion about life, work, and change Some of Rana's thoughts that stayed with me: The quality of your life is the quality of your relationships You cannot expect everything in life to come out of only one relationship. Sometimes you have to do a job, and you get meaning and purpose from other things And that is OK There are very few dead ends in life. What you want changes over time and that's OK! You recalibrate and figure out what is next Here are Rana's  three key takeaways to have in mind when you plan a career change: - Make sure you are financially secured - Put a lot of thought into what it is that you want to do - When you start with something new – give it a chance; have a grit Tune in, and I promise you – the discussion was so thought-provoking that you will want to spend some alone time thinking about things!

The FORT with Chris Powers
#240: Wyatt Smith - Founder of Upsmith - On a Mission to Combat America's Growing Skilled Worker Crisis

The FORT with Chris Powers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 76:33


Wyatt is the founder and CEO of UpSmith, a technology company on a mission to combat America's skilled worker crisis.  UpSmith partners with employers to identify high-demand gaps in their labor force, then sources and screens candidates to fill them. Where necessary, UpSmith connects candidates with affordable, fast, high-quality training to qualify them for placement. Prior to UpSmith, Wyatt led business development for Elevate, Uber's aerial ride-sharing business unit. He served as a consultant with McKinsey & Company and as a corps member with Teach for America, receiving the 2013 Sue Lehmann Award as a national teacher of the year. Wyatt holds an MBA with Distinction from Harvard Business School and a BS in Human & Organizational Development and Political Science from Vanderbilt University, where he served as student body president and as a young alumni trustee on the Board of Trust. On this episode, Chris and Wyatt discuss: An in-depth view of the emerging blue-collar labor crisis in America and how we got here. The benefits of blue-collar work and why it is worthwhile work.  Upsmith's plan to employ more blue-collar workers. Why college isn't for everyone. Learn more about Chris Powers and Fort Capital: www.FortCapitalLP.com Follow Fort Capital on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/fort-capital/ Follow Chris on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/FortWorthChris  Follow Chris on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chrispowersjr/  Subscribe to The Fort on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuJ32shRt8Od3MxMY-keTSQ Follow The Fort on Instagram: www.Instagram.com/TheFortPodcast (2:43) - What is the labor crisis we are facing right now? (7:40) - Was there an inflection point where we changed the way we look at the trades? (9:02) - Is this labor crisis attributed equally across all blue-collar work? (10:40) - Are we losing people in the trades due to a lack of training from small businesses? (15:33) - Why is it not obvious that people should look into the trades for a viable career? (18:39) - Does the federal government offer financial aid to attend a trade school? (19:55) - How much of this is a laziness problem? UpSmith (21:25) - Wyatt's launch of UpSmith (24:27) - How are you pitching high school students to have them consider this vs. College? (34:04) - What are the implications for the families of those who choose to enter the trades? (37:30) - Why are you attracted to the words ‘dignity' and ‘purpose'? (39:57) - Renaming Blue Collar as “The Builder Class” (41:10) - What takes place in the initial 8 weeks of a cohort? (44:13) - What problem is a company having that drives them to UpSmith for candidates? (47:40) - What's the line when it comes to blue-collar work and candidates with criminal records? (50:30) - Other than pay, what are some non-obvious benefits of a career in trades? (53:40) - Is the path for people to eventually own their own business or just have a steady income? (57:50) Is anyone on social media making this work sexy? @BuildersOfInsta Mike Rowe's Dirty Jobs The Make It Movement (1:00:48) - Are city crews looking to UpSmith for help with public infrastructure? (1:01:16) - What does our world look like if we fail to fill these blue-collar positions? HBR Future of Work Initiative (1:05:24) - Where have all these workers gone since Covid? The Mom Project (1:08:41) - Is there a certain characteristic that stands out in high-performers in the trades? (1:09:47) - Where do you envision UpSmith in 5 years? (1:11:40) - What are employers in home health care looking for from UpSmith candidates? (1:13:22) - What's one thing you've never predicted since you started this business? (1:14:46) - How can people get in touch or partner with you? Forge NOW The Fort is produced by Johnny Podcasts

Hacks & Wonks
RE-AIR: Transforming Systems of Harm with Sean Goode & Rebecca Thornton of Choose 180

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 35:41


Sean Goode and Rebecca Thornton from Choose 180 stop by to share how to transform systems of harm and injustice - by supporting young people impacted by them as well as their own staff in doing this work. They discuss a better world where neighborhoods are resourced, generative programs are co-created, and the humanity of those accused of causing harm is centered alongside the healing of those who are harmed. Such a world is not as far off as one may think, but does require the transfer of power to those closest to the pain and a long-enough runway to have lasting effects. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii, find Sean at @GraceNotGuilt, and Choose 180 at @ICHOOSE180   Resources Choose 180: https://choose180.org/   “A King County nonprofit raised all staff salaries to $70,000 minimum. Will more organizations follow?” by Naomi Ishisaka from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/labor-shortage-or-living-wage-shortage-one-king-county-nonprofit-is-taking-a-different-approach/   "Disparities in Wealth by Race and Ethnicity in the 2019 Survey of Consumer Finances" by Neil Bhutta, Andrew C. Chang, Lisa J. Dettling, and Joanne W. Hsu for FEDS Notes: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/notes/feds-notes/disparities-in-wealth-by-race-and-ethnicity-in-the-2019-survey-of-consumer-finances-20200928.htm   “Closing the racial wealth gap requires heavy, progressive taxation of wealth” by Vanessa Williamson from The Brookings Institution: https://www.brookings.edu/research/closing-the-racial-wealth-gap-requires-heavy-progressive-taxation-of-wealth/   “The economic impact of closing the racial wealth gap” by Nick Noel, Duwain Pinder, Shelley Stewart, and Jason Wright from McKinsey & Company: https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-and-social-sector/our-insights/the-economic-impact-of-closing-the-racial-wealth-gap   “An Unjust Burden: The Disparate Treatment of Black Americans in the Criminal Justice System” by Elizabeth Hinton, LeShae Henderson, and Cindy Reed for Vera Institute of Justice: https://www.vera.org/downloads/publications/for-the-record-unjust-burden-racial-disparities.pdf   “Prosecutor-funded program helps kids do a 180, avoid charges” by Sami Edge from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/law-justice/prosecutor-funded-community-effort-helps-kids-do-a-180-on-jail-bound-route/   King County Prosecuting Attorney - Choose 180 Youth Program: https://kingcounty.gov/depts/prosecutor/youth-programs/choose-180.aspx   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I'm very excited to have joining us Sean Goode, the Executive Director of Choose 180, and Rebecca Thornton, who's the Office Manager and bookkeeper for Choose 180. Thank you so much for joining us today. [00:00:50] Sean Goode: It's an honor to be here, Crystal. Thanks for the invitation. [00:00:52] Rebecca Thornton: Thank you for having us. [00:00:55] Crystal Fincher: Excellent. So as we get started here, I just want to open up with you talking about what Choose 180 does and what brought you both into this work. And we can start with you, Sean. [00:01:09] Sean Goode: Yeah. Our organization exists to transform systems that cause harm, systems of injustice, and support the young people who've been impacted by those systems. And what that looks like is we partner intentionally with folks like prosecutors to co-create programming that exists outside of the traditional criminal legal system and alleviates the need for them to continue to prosecute young people. So in practicality, it's a young person lives in a neighborhood that's overly policed, their behavior's criminalized, the police send that referral to the prosecutor - but because of our relationship with them, they get community instead of a criminal conviction. And for the young people who engage in our traditional programming, over 90% of the time, they don't return to the criminal legal system within 12 months of participating in our programming. And so that's an example of one of our many models of service, but all of them have a genesis point of partnering with systems to transform the way they administer justice and supporting young people as an outcome to help alleviate the harm that those systems cause. My brother was incarcerated as a 13-year-old boy until he was a 21-year-old man and how he was stigmatized as a problem. And yet how, when he was released, saw me beginning to engage in some of those same problematic behaviors, but saw the possibility that lived within me and was able to call that out from a dark place and show me, by the way of his light, that there was something else that I could become. [00:02:30] Crystal Fincher: And what brought you to this work, Rebecca? [00:02:33] Rebecca Thornton: About six years ago, I was looking for just some way to donate my time, because I just felt I had survived so much and that was just a way I wanted to give back. And I stumbled upon what was the 180 Program at the time. And they were like, "Hey, do you want to come and share your story at one of our workshops?" And I agreed, and I just jumped right in, and I just kept coming back. And about maybe eight months in, Sean ended up coming on and I got to watch that whole process. And then the team started to grow. And then about two years ago now next month, I came on full time as the Office Manager and bookkeeper. And I stayed with Choose 180 because of my lived experience with drugs specifically. I hold this core belief that especially young people should not be criminalized for their behavior because so much of it comes from the things that have happened to them in their lives and the circumstances in which they lived, because that's what happened to me. And I just want to give back in that way so that people don't have to take as long to turn their life around like I did. [00:03:46] Crystal Fincher: You actually made news last year for something that we don't see often, and that was for deciding to make sure everyone at Choose 180 is making at least $70,000, who's there full-time, which is a huge part of a discussion that we're having just around paying people a living wage in the first place and making sure people who are around us that we work with can also afford to live within our communities. But also particularly in the nonprofit space, where, so often, we are used to hearing about thin budgets and even thinner salaries, and there's just not that much money to go around. And this is a pursuit that people get into, not for the money, but for serving the community. How did this conversation start within Choose 180? And how did you arrive at the place where you decided to say, "You know what, everyone deserves to have a fair wage and to have the ability to live where they're working."? [00:04:47] Sean Goode: Yeah. Thanks for that question, Crystal. I think I want to start by saying we're fortunate to serve in a community where there's organizations like Collective Justice, Creative Justice, and Freedom Project, who have all done work around wage equity. And some of them have started the organization out flat, or paying already close to or living wage. And so we're fortunate to be able to have examples like that ahead of us that make the journey that we're traveling easier. And fortunately, we had a couple of our team members speak up who were asking questions about, well, how does it work around here? How do we determine what people make? And how does one get a raise? And do we do things by merit? Do we do things by a degree? And what we didn't want to do is provide any one-off answer and fix one person's situation. We wanted to go about it in a way that addressed it holistically. We convened a committee from our board to assess our compensation philosophy, and they spent time interviewing our team members and listening to their voices. And then they brought their recommendations to me. And their recommendations were many. There were things like, how do we value lived experience? How do we value college degrees? How do we value time served at the organization? But a throughline that was consistent was living wage. And I heard the report, I looked at the report, and I said, "Yeah, that sounds good, but we're at a nonprofit and we're already paying above market rate in many of these positions. So I don't know what more people want from me." And I thought the conversation was done there. I thought, at that point, I was finished and we could move on, but then we had to build a budget out for the next year. And as the story goes, one of our team members was working on their budget and I told them to dream big. And if we need to add to staff, consider what that might look like, which is where I always start budgeting - to think big. And she came back to me and said, "Well, if we're thinking about adding staff, I can't do that and not have our teammates who are currently here making less than a living wage." And then it became a back-and-forth conversation where I still didn't really get what it was I was being asked to do. And at the end of that conversation, she said, "Look, we work to support young people and their families in escaping the material conditions they're living in that are contributing to the harm that they've experienced. Could it be that we're resourcing our team to live in those same material conditions?" And that cut deep. And so - [00:07:18] Crystal Fincher: That cut deep, didn't it? [00:07:20] Sean Goode: Yeah. Yeah. And then I went to Rebecca, because she was in the office that day, and I tugged on her and I said, "Rebecca, do you ever think about buying a home for Maddie?" And Rebecca, you can go ahead and talk about what that was like for you. [00:07:33] Rebecca Thornton: Well, I laughed at him. Maddie is my daughter - she's kind of the office kid, honestly. Everyone is just in love with her - she's eight. But Sean pulled me aside and he asked me if I was able to save money or if I had plans to ever buy a house, and I laughed at him. That was my first instinct because that's never been in my plans [00:07:54] Crystal Fincher: From your end, as you're following this process, Rebecca, a lot of times we hear about this as employers and people who hire people and determine how much people get paid - we frequently hear this conversation from their perspective. But for someone who's working in that condition and you are not dictating what your salary is, but you're living there, and as you said, it was laughable to you that thinking about saving for a house, or anything like that, was a possibility. What was this conversation like as someone working for the organization? [00:08:28] Rebecca Thornton: Well, I know a lot of my coworkers were of the stance of, "Yes, we deserve this. We're going to fight for this." And I was more of Sean's thinking. I'm just so used to making below a living wage that that's kind of all I knew and kind of a core belief of all I thought I deserved. So for this to be on the table, I didn't believe it. I was like, when it's in my bank account, then I might believe it. And it was also odd because here I am, a white person in a Black-led organization. Do I deserve to make that kind of money at the same time? I don't know. There's a lot of - it gets down to all the core beliefs I have in making sure that I know that I deserve that. And it comes - I didn't have a lot of education, and I'm working on my degree and things like that. It's just, it brought up a lot of emotions in me, honestly, more than I thought it would. And I'm glad I had stronger coworkers that could keep the faith in it for me because I don't know - I was a little more pessimistic about it, I feel. [00:09:52] Crystal Fincher: But I think you get to the root of something that a lot of people face - if they're just used to something and you think this is just how it is and there's not really a possibility for it to get any better, you just kind of accept the conditions and go along with the flow. To me, it seems like there's such a synergy between conversations and beliefs that you are bringing into the community, and this conversation that you had within your organization, which is something I feel a lot of organizations need to do. And there is a tension between what they're saying their values are, what they're saying they're working for in the community, and what they're perpetuating through their practices and their budgets. We talk publicly - budgets are moral documents. They're also moral documents within nonprofit organizations and businesses. So what got you to the point, Sean, where you were like, okay, this is something that we can make happen? And how did you work through that? [00:10:50] Sean Goode: Hearing from Rebecca and another one of our co-laborers here - just, it hurt because I care deeply for our team. And then I had this moment of realization, Crystal, where I recognized the only thing getting in the way of this happening is me. And there's also holding attention of this opportunity to build wealth and I know very well, as a multiracial Black man, that the wealth gap between Black Americans and white Americans is 95 cents to the dollar. So for every nickel that Black Americans hold, white Americans hold 95 cents. One of the principal ways to close the wealth gap in our nation is through home ownership. If I am an employer that's largely employing Black and Brown people and not paying them a rate that allows them to build wealth, then I'm perpetuating a historical harm on the very people who I believe are entitled to benefit from the same system that they've suffered from for 400 plus years. [00:11:58] Crystal Fincher: I think that is so important - appreciate you being transparent about the tensions. I think that a critical part of this conversation is acknowledging that those tensions exist, talking through how you work with it. And to your credit and to your team's credit, Rebecca, the willingness to say this is possible and, hey, we believe in better and we're going to stand in this belief while you catch up. And for you, Sean, we talk about empathy and compassion. Those things, to me, are only useful as verbs. And I believe to my core that that enables people to work more effectively, to carry the message more effectively, to intervene effectively, and those in the community to see, okay, you actually mean what you're saying. It's like a bridge to build trust. And so I do want to talk about this work. And so in that context, how do you start conversations with people who start out with that belief - "Hey, someone does the crime, they do the time. And looks like that fixes the problem to me." [00:13:01] Sean Goode: What I'd love to do is this - I'd love to start back and say, hey, let's talk about slave patrols. And then let's talk about abolition, which then led to vagrancy laws, which meant that Black folks could be criminalized for standing on street corners - being unemployed because they weren't employable because the white farmers, who were no longer enslaving them, wouldn't hire them unless they could be servants again - would then be arrested. And then when they are arrested, they would be leased out as convicts, which then put them back on the very same plantations that they were supposedly liberated from. I would love to be able to dive into the prison industrial complex and talk about how for-profit prisons have driven an industry and a practice towards incarcerating people. I would love to highlight the fact that there's more Black people incarcerated today than were ever enslaved at any point of time in our country. I would love to talk about the disproportionate policing and how policing is focused in impoverished areas that are highly under-resourced and undersupported and frequently neglected, where there's not access to quality education, quality healthcare, quality schools. I would love to talk about the many depravities that are present in the places where young people aren't allowed to have behavior listened to before it's criminalized. I would love to bring all those things to the forefront, but what I know to be true is most people who don't understand this reality, are too distant from that place that - for them, that seems like history and not present. And it's difficult for them to draw a throughline. Where I do believe we can start at is a simple conversation around cause and effect. If historically, policing behavior would lead to a decrease in behavior that causes harm, then we should be seeing, year over year, a decrease of the number of people who are incarcerated. We should be seeing a decrease in violent crime. We should be seeing a decrease in property crime. If these systems were preventative measures that were persuading people away from making these types of decisions, then after all these years, it should have had an impact that demonstrates that things are getting better in that regard. Everything we look at would tell us otherwise. Either it doesn't work, or humanity is so inherently evil that no matter how much we police behavior, it'll never change. I don't believe that humanity is so inherently evil. In the work we do, the majority of the folks that we're supporting are people who are committing - whose behavior's being criminalized because they're living in poverty. If someone steals from the Goodwill, it's not because they're some sort of malicious criminal. If somebody's stealing from Target, it's not because they're looking to make some sort of substantial come-up off of what it is that they've taken. So as a result, it's upon us to begin to think outside of our traditional pathways and lean in with the lens of empathy and grace, and understand that we can't police our way out of poverty. [00:16:13] Crystal Fincher: I couldn't agree more with every single thing that you just said. So with that conversation and people going, well, okay, yeah, we see that there were problems with what we've been doing, but I still don't see what the solution is. You're talking about all this compassion stuff, and you're talking about let's treat people better and not put them in prison. What is the answer that you have and the programs that you are working on that are okay, so what is that different thing? [00:16:41] Sean Goode: The work that we do and the work that we do in community with others creates an off-ramp from the criminal legal system and an on-ramp into community where both the young person who is accused of causing harm is invited to be on a healing journey of accountability, and the person who was harmed is also made whole and invited to be on a journey where they're healing. And we've had terrific impact because we center the humanity of those that we're serving - and not a humanity that's absent of being accountable to what you've done, but a humanity that doesn't limit the person to what it is they've done and creates a pathway to what it is they can do, and then provides them with the resources they need to fully lean into that possibility. [00:17:21] Crystal Fincher: Focusing on the stopgaps, what types of programs are there and how do they compare? Because a lot of people are still, I think, having challenges contextualizing - well, yeah, recidivism rates are high, but we see what happens when, okay, someone's arrested, they're sentenced, they go to prison, and then they come out. They see something happening and they're like, "Okay, that is something." It's not as visible to people yet - what the interventions are outside of the criminal legal system that are like, okay, this is the process of healing, this is the process of justice, this is how we work to prevent further harm from happening and also work on healing people who have been harmed - which, to your point, is usually everybody involved in the scenario. What do those look like? And what are those programs? What are those processes? [00:18:21] Sean Goode: Yeah. They look like eviction moratoriums, which keep people housed and not living on the street. They look like the County buying up hotels in places that are inconvenient for some homeowners, but necessary for those who can't afford to live in a home. They look like investing in mental health services at a statewide level, which is something that we failed to do for a very long time in Washington. They look like re-examining our tax code and considering more ways to be able to raise the resources necessary to meet the needs for the collective us, instead of prioritizing the needs for those of us that have already established the foundation of wealth. They look like initiatives like Best Starts for Kids in our region that allow organizations adjacent to ours and like ours to be able to stand up innovative programs that can serve as a stopgap to alleviate some of the hurt and harm that's been caused. They look like many things similar to what it is that I'm sharing. They look like - how do we make sure we get more farmers' markets and healthy foods into neighborhoods that haven't had access to them historically? How do we make sure that people who have access to those healthy foods have the time and space to prepare them because they're not on public transit hours a day going to and from work for a less-than-a-living-wage job and picking up their kids from childcare, and then finally getting home at an odd hour where it's cheaper to buy a Happy Meal than it is to make a meal? Right? These are all contributing factors to the spread of this disease of violence. So it's so multifaceted, but also, if you're wondering and you're listening to this - well, that sounds ambitious. That sounds huge. That sounds like a wonderful utopian society, but how do we deal with what it is we're dealing with today? I'd say, just imagine for a moment, close your eyes and - picture the suburbs - picture places where you can walk to the grocery store, like a gentrified Columbia City, picture places where you have access to green spaces and parks and healthy foods. I know it seems like it's abstract when we put it in the context of underserved neighborhoods, but in neighborhoods where people are paying $1.5 and $1.8 million for houses that were initially purchased for a couple hundred thousand dollars because they were dilapidated in squalor because the areas were underinvested for decades - if we just take a minute and imagine, how do we make sure people have equal access to those type of services, then we wouldn't be having a conversation about violence at all. We'd have a conversation around how do we make sure that there's equitable distribution of services, equitable access to quality healthcare and quality foods and quality education. This is not a profound innovation that we're talking about. It is a profound effort only in the context of the fact that we've historically neglected those that have suffered, hidden them away, and hope that they disappear, and as we all should eventually benefit from a system of capitalism. We are still here. We still persevere, but we could thrive if people saw our humanity and began to make sure we had living wages. I mean, this goes right back into the wage conversation that we began with. If organizations - I was reading a book about the economics in Black community and one of the things that it stood up was that the middle class of Black folks across the country is largely comprised of people who work in social services. So we are the ones who are serving those of us who are impacted, and simultaneously impacted because the majority of our jobs don't provide a living wage that allows us to build wealth to benefit from capitalism, to build up communities that aren't living in the conditions that are causing the harm that's leading to the crime that people are complaining about because they don't want that to be present in their neighborhood. And then where are we supposed to go? [00:22:22] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. And absolutely valid and another - so many of those conversations about - as people explain the difference between Columbia City and an area that has been underinvested and under-resourced for so long - we can talk about Skyway, we can talk about a lot of different areas - it really comes down to the value that people place in those communities. To your point, about most Black people in the middle class being in the - basically serving and helping others, and that our value or people's value being tied up into their labor for others. And if you are laboring, then you have some value - not too much, but some, we'll recognize some. And if you don't, then we don't just value you. These are ultimately investment decisions based on value judgements of who deserves what and who deserves how much. And we repeatedly see and have a lot of empirical evidence about the judgements that our society has made about who is deemed worthy and who is deemed unworthy just for existing. And who has to do all of these shows of worthiness and value and labor to be considered worthy. And who just kind of gets that - because they exist. Now, kind of circling back around to Choose 180 - within Choose 180, you talked about earlier partnering with prosecutors, partnering within the system. Certainly, these are stopgaps and not the entire solution, but what do those partnerships, programs, interventions look like? [00:24:12] Sean Goode: Yeah. It begins with a genuine effort to connect with the people who are generally at the forefront of perpetuating harm, right? So the work with the Prosecuting Attorney's Office in King County goes back to 2011 when Dan Satterberg, now outgoing King County Prosecutor, was engaged with Doug Wheeler, community leader, and said, "Look, we're failing our Black and Brown children. Can you help me?" Right? And because Dan reached out to Doug - together, they created what at that time was called the 180 Program with other community leaders, and stood up an alternative that's continually alleviated the need for juvenile prosecution in our region. It begins with a willingness of those who are holding power to understand that their ability to hold power isn't going to transform the harm. It's their ability to release that power and give it back to those that put them in power, and allow them to co-create solutions that then serve the needs of those who have been impacted the most. And our existence is a manifestation of what is possible there, but it takes a lot of deconstructing of narratives. It takes a lot of trust building. It takes a lot of empathy and understanding, and it takes a lot of grace. Grace selectively applied is favoritism. And so what that means is we have to extend the same grace to prosecutors and law enforcement and court folks that we do to young people and families that we serve, because otherwise, we're just doing the same thing that law enforcement and court system and criminal legal system has done historically, which is prioritize people that they're preferential to while neglecting those that they don't care for. [00:26:00] Crystal Fincher: As the community is looking at programs that are happening through Choose 180 and the diversions that you're doing, as you're working with people to help connect them to resources, to coach them in better ways, provide better examples, and make sure they have the tools and support to sustain a different direction permanently, you talked about your success with recidivism rates. In terms of people sitting back - okay, things are broken, okay, totally not ideal. All right. Great. You have these programs. All right. How are they working in comparison to the traditional system? How do we know what you are talking about is working any better? [00:26:49] Sean Goode: Yeah. Well, Crystal, what I'm asking the community to do is give us the same runway that we've given the systems that have historically caused harm. Give us the same runway that we give the systems that historically cause harm. If we're only - we've been in practice for 10 years and have had great impact. Our systems of oppression have been in place for hundreds of years and have caused a ton of negative impact. How much of a runway do we get to prove that we can be successful? Do we get a year? Do we get two years? Do we get three years? Do we get four years maybe to stand something up for it to be proven wrong? How many iterations do we get to come up with, right? Are we allowed to have as many moments of reform - calls for reform - as law enforcement has in our nation. Historically year over year, do we get that same grace? That's what I'm asking for. If you want to stand up an alternative that's going to help deconstruct years upon years of perpetuated harm, then it's going to take more than 24 to 36 months to do that. It's going to take more than 10 years. It's going to take a generation of commitments to innovative ideas that we don't run away with the first time that they don't have the impact that we're looking for, because candidly, Crystal, if we ran away from the criminal legal system every time someone was released to the community and caused harm again, then we wouldn't be using it today at all. We wouldn't be resourcing it today at all, but we do because we believe that that can be fixed and it can be made better. Well, I'm asking folks to carry that same conviction in the community-based alternatives that are being stood up by the people who are closest to the pain points. Just like when it came to our wage conversation as an organization, the folks who are closest to the pain point understood what they needed to be healthy and whole. In community, the people who are closest to the pain point know what they need to experience safety in their community. Why don't we begin to just stand up what it is that folks are asking for and see what happens, and give it a runway like we've given to these other antiquated systems? [00:28:48] Crystal Fincher: I feel like that is a big thing that we're running into today - that we are sure we haven't had the best results, but we can change, we can fix it. While at the same time, demanding that community-based alternatives - one, present all the data that we need to see that this will fix all of the problems in order for us to consider investing in you at one-tenth of a percent that we invest in the rest of our criminal legal injustice system. Within there - certainly, goodness, you give it a 50- or 60-year runway, the change that you could see, it's hard for me to envision that change. Because if you just look on the short term, better results when it comes to reoffense and recidivism at the 12-month mark and other month marks - immediate results that are, sure, not perfect, but certainly better than the existing traditional systems. What would you say makes you most optimistic about the work that you're doing? And with this, I would just say also, Rebecca, in this question, what makes you most optimistic about the work that you're doing and the changes that you're seeing throughout the programs that you have, and the people who you're working with in the community? [00:30:16] Rebecca Thornton: Well, for me, I'm so excited that it's being talked about because it's something that I've always believed in, and I just never believed it was possible. Coming to Choose 180 and starting working full-time and being totally enmeshed into the programs and the people, I've started to look at things differently and looking at ideas differently. Things are possible if you can come together as a group and work for it and have that belief in it. You can make things happen. I've never seen that before. But I come from corporate America - there's no room for that there as well. It's been so cool to see - and that can be applied out in the community as well. If people can come together and they have the will - and like Sean said, the stamina - they can make stuff happen. But they need the tools to be able to do that as well, because I was out in the community on drugs years ago. I had no idea that change could happen for anyone. And I just think of how differently my life would've been had I had access to the things that could be possible in the 50 years that Sean is talking about. Or the things that my daughter's going to be able to have access to is just so important. My daughter - we have what's like "a broken home." There's statistics and stigma in that, right? So I've worked very hard to make sure that she sees me work hard and surround her with good people and all of that. But at the same time, there's still things in the way there. There's still stigma, right? And I just want to make sure that she knows that anything is possible. And I feel like what we're doing at Choose 180 just shows that, and it's pretty powerful. [00:32:15] Crystal Fincher: And what makes you most optimistic when you look at the work you're doing and the impact that you're having, Sean? [00:32:23] Sean Goode: I think about - brief history lesson here for some folks who might be listening. In the 1700s in Boston, there was a smallpox outbreak and there's an enslaved African American man who had established - there was a tribal cure for smallpox, a practice. And he introduced it to his enslaver, but for five years, the people of Boston refused to listen to this cure for smallpox because it was coming from an enslaved African American, from a tribal custom, because they felt like it couldn't possibly be an answer that would come from an enslaved person. It couldn't possibly be an answer. We need the richness of our white dominant medical science to be able to solve for this. And hundreds of Bostonians died because of their failure to listen to this enslaved African American man. I find hope that as a country, over the past 300 years, that we may have evolved past the point of ignoring those who are bringing solutions from nontraditional spaces, and that we may now be at a position, 300 years later, to lean in and say, "Well, if you think you have the cure, let's go ahead and give it a shot, because quite possibly your way could save lives." [00:33:59] Crystal Fincher: Amen. So I just thank you both for coming on this show, for sharing your experience and your journey and your wisdom, and just encourage people to continue to pay attention to Choose 180, get involved, support. And certainly at a neighborhood and community level, you can do these things where you're at, and that's actually the most powerful place you can activate and get involved. So please make sure that we don't just talk about Choose 180 and other organizations in the abstract, and this is what someone is doing over there, and this is what's possible over there. It is possible everywhere and exactly where you are. And help to be part of what makes that happen. Turn what's possible into what's happening. So with that, I just thank you once again for being here, and hope the listeners have a wonderful day. I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcast - just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. We'll talk to you next time.

The Creative Voyage Podcast
On Courage, Embracing Change and Lifelong Learning with Astrid Stavro (E27)

The Creative Voyage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 87:21


In this episode, I talk to Astrid Stavro, a creative director and graphic designer. We cover topics such as the importance of learning and continually being a student, Astrid's work routines, advice for young designers, her experience as a Pentagram partner, what makes for a good piece of graphic design, how to orient ourselves during times of change, and much more.BiographyAstrid Stavro is an internationally-renowned graphic designer with a reputation for strong concept-driven design that is to the point, emotionally engaging, and emphasising exquisite typography and craft. Her clients span the cultural and commercial worlds, and her work encompasses brand identity, editorial, exhibition design, wayfinding systems, and packaging.She has worked for Camper, Vitra, Phaidon, McKinsey & Company, Tate Publishing, Fedrigoni, Port magazine, Laurence King, The National Portrait Gallery, and Wallpaper*, amongst many others. Also, she led the celebrated redesign of the London-based arts and culture magazine Elephant, where she was Art Director and Contributing Editor from 2013–2017.Stavro directed her own award-winning studio in Barcelona for ten years, and in 2013 she co-founded the renowned brand and design consultancy Atlas with Pablo Martín. In 2018 she was invited to join Pentagram as a Partner, where she directed her team for three years.Her work has been widely published and has received over 150 international awards, including D&AD and the Type Directors Club of New York. In 2010, she was elected a member of Alliance Graphique Internationale, the world's most prestigious design association. Currently, she is the President of ISTD, the International Society of Typographic Designers.Selected Links From the EpisodeAstrid Stavro's InstagramAstrid Stavro's TwitterAtlas, Design ConsultancyPentagramEtienne DelessertInternational Society of Typographic DesignersAdrian ShaughnessySonya DyakovaDerek BirdsallConsolations by David WhyteYuri Suzuki on the Creative Voyage PodcastBLM Floor MuralColors Magazine by Oliviero Toscani and Tibor KalmanPoint It by Dieter M. GräfPhil BainesWhole Earth CatalogSteve Jobs' 2005 Stanford Commencement AddressShow NotesIntroduction [00:00:00]On Art Direction Workshop [00:01:02]Episode Introduction [00:03:05]The Beginning of Astrid's Creative Journey [00:05:23]Career Advice and Tips for Young Designers [00:18:14]Work Routines of an Independent Creative Director [00:26:12]Short Episode Break – Support the Podcast [00:40:57]Managing Finances as a Designer [00:41:40]On Professional and Personal Growth and Development [00:49:36]How to Navigate Life's Changes and Challenges [00:54:06]Becoming a Pentagram Partner [01:08:26]Elements of Good Graphic Design [01:16:53]How to Be a Better Creative Professional [01:24:44]Episode Outro [01:25:50]Full transcript and more at https://creative.voyage/

Leadership Development News
Making the Decision to Invest in Yourself - Luke Owings, Abilitie

Leadership Development News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 55:35


Luke Owings is the Vice President of Product at Abilitie, a leadership development company that offers virtual mini-MBAs and business simulations that help senior executives from companies around the world build leadership skills and improve strategy execution. Since 2015, they have taught 25,000+ executives in over 50+ countries, and their clients include Fortune 500 companies such as PayPal, Marriott, Coca-Cola, GE, and Southwest Airlines. In 2020, Abilitie was recognized as one of the Inc. 5000 fastest-growing private companies and Inc. Best Work-Places In America. Before joining Abilitie, Luke was an Expert Associate Partner at McKinsey & Company, which is a trusted advisor to two-thirds of the Fortune 1000 businesses and governments around the world. He holds a BA in Economics from Princeton University and an MBA from Harvard Business School and was also a Teaching Fellow for Harvard University's undergrad economics class.

Winning Teams
Episode #102- Build Trust with Darryl Stickel

Winning Teams

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 31:31


What does it take to build trust? Do we even really know what trust means? There's a lot that goes into truly understanding the idea of trust and today's guest is an absolute expert on the subject. He studied it, wrote his thesis on it, has written a book about it, and has now dedicated his business and life's work to building trust. Darryl Stickel is the author of Building Trust: Exceptional Leadership in an Uncertain World and the founder of Trust Unlimited. Through Trust Unlimited, Darryl teaches leaders how to find and use their most powerful tool. A tool that is always in a leader's control, how to effectively build trust in their relationships. In this episode with Darryl, we discuss what it takes to build trust, how fragile it can be, and how easy it is to break it. He shares how to be in a place where you can be trusted and can trust others. In a world where we are seeking and hoping we can trust our world leaders, this conversation is very timely. What We Talked About in This Episode: Darryl's Background, Upbringing, and Interest in the Idea of Trust Why Trust is an Important Topic What If There Were No Villains? How Trust Actually Works The Definition of Trust Practical Steps to Take to Build Trust Understanding Trusting Contexts Having a Shared Understanding in a Team Resetting Emotional States Short Term Problems that Can be Resolved with Trust How Trust Differentiates Us Darryl's Book Recommendation and Daily Rituals About Our Guest: Darryl holds a Ph.D. in Business from Duke University and completed his doctoral thesis on building trust in hostile environments. Upon completing his studies Darryl served as a consultant for Mckinsey & Company prior to founding his own consulting firm, Trust Unlimited. As the founder of Trust Unlimited he has advised organizations and individuals on what trust is, how it works, and how to build it. The experience of helping organizations actually solve trust problems has provided a blend of deep theoretical knowledge and practical applied experience. Darryl has worked with a broad range of organizations over the past 15 years with Trust Unlimited. Darryl serves as a coach and advisor for CEO's and other senior executives across a broad range of organizations and industries. He helps senior executives with business related issues but also helps them focus on the people problems that can be among the most challenging they face. Connect with Darryl Stickel: https://www.trustunlimited.com/ Links and Resources: Trust Unlimited Website Building Trust: Exceptional Leadership in an Uncertain World by Darryl Stickel Connect with John Murphy: LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Facebook If you liked this episode, please don't forget to subscribe, tune in, and share this podcast. Thanks for tuning in!

The Business of You with Rachel Gogos
Episode 39 | The Exciting Future of Journalism with Raju Narisetti

The Business of You with Rachel Gogos

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 45:56


Raju Narisetti is optimistic about the future of journalism, and his reasons are compelling.  In this discussion on media literacy and the power of sharing information online, Raju encourages us to keep an open mind and explore who is creating the information we're consuming and how we can share it responsibly. Raju Narisetti's current role as Leader of Global Publishing at McKinsey & Company is the latest in a 32-year global career in media and publishing, during which he has created, reimagined and managed major media organizations in North America, Europe and Asia, as well as being on the frontlines of digital transformation challenges and new ventures in the publishing industry. Raju has worked at The Wall Street Journal, Hindustan Times/Mint, The Washington Post, News Corp, Univision/Gizmodo Media Group and Columbia Journalism School. He was an essential part of the team that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News for 9/11 coverage. How do we use media to open gates and empower others? Raju queries that rather than acting as gatekeepers for information, journalists should act in a role as a gate-opener, helping consumers navigate the sea of overwhelming information in this digital era. He gives suggestions for how publications can improve their click rates while empowering consumers. Why is media literacy important? Media literacy is the ability to interpret and understand written material…and how we discern the intentions of the writer.  Raju talks in detail about how understanding where a piece of content is sourced from should influence how we should share it online. Before you share, ask yourself…who wrote this, and why? Raju discusses his belief that an emphasis on increased media literacy will shape the future of information sharing. Quotes “Our role as journalists should be as gate-openers. People say, ‘this person is helping me navigate the sea of information. I trust them.' That is what brings people back to you!” “I'm one of those people who remains very optimistic about journalism in 2022. People don't realize, it was only in 2018 or 2019 that half of our planet was finally able to get the internet on a daily basis. The demand for what journalism can produce will be continuously growing.” “We have struggled to communicate the fact that something is news or opinion.” “A couple of generations are consuming content without necessarily thinking about where something is coming from, whether it's the Washington Post or Daily Mail. Teaching young people about the value of sourcing is something the journalism industry forgot to do for many years, and now we're figuring out how to regain that.” Links mentioned in this episode: You can see the MicKinsey and Company website at https://www.mckinsey.com/ Connect with Raju Narisetti on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/rajunarisetti You can follow Raju on Twitter at https://twitter.com/raju?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

Hacks & Wonks
RE-AIR: Marc Dones and the Honest Truth about Ending Homelessness

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 38:25


Marc Dones, CEO of the King County Regional Homelessness Authority, and Crystal have an in-depth, honest conversation about addressing homelessness. They talk through the critical need to acknowledge the lack of appropriate housing supply, the harm our system has traditionally perpetuated on those it aims to serve, and the desperate state of a chronically underfunded service infrastructure. Though the scope of the problem is daunting, they discuss how the solutions are mostly straightforward, but hinge on a real commitment to resourcing them. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal on Twitter at @finchfrii, Marc at @marcformarc, and the King County Regional Homelessness Authority at @KC_RHA.   Resources King County Regional Homelessness Authority: https://kcrha.org/   “King County head of homelessness may be an ‘impossible' job, but Marc Dones is optimistic” by Scott Greenstone from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/homeless/king-county-head-of-homelessness-may-be-an-impossible-job-but-marc-dones-is-optimistic/    “Why does prosperous King County have a homelessness crisis?” by Benjamin Maritz and Dilip Wagle for McKinsey & Company: https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-and-social-sector/our-insights/why-does-prosperous-king-county-have-a-homelessness-crisis   “Seattle homelessness nonprofits struggle to hire, complicating plans to expand shelters and housing” by Scott Greenstone from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/homeless/seattle-homelessness-nonprofits-struggle-to-hire-complicating-plans-to-expand-shelters-and-housing/   “A Literature Review of Single-Room Occupancy (SRO) Supportive Housing Structures in the United States: An Assessment to Ascertain the Viability of SROs to Address the Needs of Homeless and Vulnerably Housed Populations in New York City” by Ashwin Parulkar and Daniel C. Farrell for HELP USA: https://www.helpusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/A-Literature-Review-of-Single-Room-Occupancy-SRO-Supportive-Housing-Structures-in-the-United-States.pdf   “Building the Capacity of the Homeless Service Workforce” by Joan Mullen and Walter Leginski for The Open Health Services and Policy Journal: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download;jsessionid=D7337FB9BA53EC10246DDFB46B6B37AE?doi=10.1.1.457.1884&rep=rep1&type=pdf   “Frontline Workers: Urban Solutions for Developing a Sustainable Workforce in the Homeless Services Sector of Los Angeles County” by Vanessa Rios from Antioch University Los Angeles: https://www.antioch.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/RIOS-VANESSA.-URBAN-SOLUTIONS-FOR-DEVELOPING-A-SUSTAINABLE-WORKFORCE.-.pdf   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I'm thrilled to be welcoming this person to the show. Today, we have joining us, the CEO of the King County Regional Homelessness Authority, Marc Dones. Thank you so much for joining us. [00:00:52] Marc Dones: Thanks for having me. [00:00:54] Crystal Fincher: Well, I wanted to have this conversation - we have talked about homelessness, what the unhoused population needs, providing housing, services - throughout several shows here on Hacks & Wonks. But it's a conversation that is so rich and there are so many facets to it, we really can't talk about it enough. I was really excited to see you take the helm of the Homelessness Authority - and just listening to you in various venues, just the vision that you're bringing to it. So, I guess, just to start out for people who may not be familiar with who you are and what this job entails, what brought you here and what is the work that you are charged with doing? [00:01:42] Marc Dones: Well, for folks who aren't familiar with me - one, I'm jealous. You're living a great life and I encourage you to keep living it. You have managed to escape having to know about me or any of the things that I have to worry about, most of which are the worst things that our culture produces. So, kudos to you and teach me your ways. What brings me to the work to some degree is my life - I'm a queer, non-binary Black person, I have some significant mental health issues - I have been psychiatrically hospitalized twice - I did some couch surfing. And when I began my nominal professional career, I was, as most young people are, fascinated most with myself and I wanted to understand - I remember being in my early 20s and trying to understand how it had kind of worked out for me, right? And my work and my research really led to the fact that it was kind of luck - that statistically speaking, this is not likely. And so, I think that part of the reason why I have done this work for as long as I have and what I'm trying to do is - to make a world where luck is not the mediator of a positive outcome for a person who's like me - where we are able to rely on the government and our social structures and our safety net, to produce the kinds of outcomes that we deserve as opposed to having to luck out. So that's why I'm here, and I think that the work of the Authority - in a sentence - is to end homelessness. And homelessness is complicated, it is complex - I've said every which way to Sunday - there is no silver bullet here. There's just actually nuanced work, and it's just the one thing - that's all we got to do - is end homelessness in the county. [00:04:14] Crystal Fincher: Simple phrase, hard work. So, what does it take to end homelessness? [00:04:22] Marc Dones: It takes a couple thing - from my perspective, for our region and just broadly in this country, it takes a couple things. One is, we have to have a very serious conversation about housing. And it's critical we start every conversation with a conversation about housing, because for too long, frankly, we've started the conversation with everything but housing. And so, we've become obsessed with formulating homelessness through the lens of crime, or just of mental health, or all this service infrastructure without ever thinking about the roof. I say all the time that - with reverence and deep respect for the social workers I work with and know - no number of social workers becomes a home. It's not like you get assigned six case managers and they sort of Transformer-Autobot into a house. And so, in this country, we have done a terrible job of producing and maintaining low-income housing stock. And in particular, for wonks, that's the 0-30% AMI - so Area Median Income is the index we use - it's got a lot of flaws and we can talk about those, but it's a good barometer of how much money you need to make in order to live in a region without being cost burdened. For our truly lowest income residents, that 0-30% AMI, we don't produce anything for them. And I think what's really critical there is that 0-30% AMI - folks in their minds often, I think, picture - I don't know what people picture anymore actually. But the point that we should make is that 0-30% AMI is in many instances a barista, it is - a senior on fixed income is 0-30% AMI. And I'm not saying this in an effort to create the other thing we often do, which is the poor people we can empathize with and so, therefore we're worried about helping. I'm saying this just to be really clear that there was a time when getting to 0-30% AMI actually was hard to do because of the level of destitution it required. Now, you can work full-time or be attached to what's supposed to be our nation's greatest benefit structure and still be in that income bracket. The other thing that I think we really need to talk about when we talk about ending homelessness is - the harm the system does when it is attempting to house you. [00:07:18] Crystal Fincher: Yes. [00:07:18] Marc Dones: In all honesty, part of the reason that much has been made about our shot here at really implementing a system that centers the voices of people with lived experience and who are currently experiencing homelessness, is it gives us this opportunity for the first time to be like, These things do more than just not help - they hurt, right? [00:07:42] Crystal Fincher: Yes. [00:07:43] Marc Dones: And so much of our system has been organized through these punitive and paternalistic and carceral lenses that they really create - not just like, "Oh, this was unpleasant." - they create trauma. And that trauma disincentivizes people from engaging in whatever the supportive services they might need. It also creates really significant - I've been playing with this idea for a number of years - this attachment theory, but for housing. That by the time you get to housing, the process has been so traumatic that you attach to it poorly. And so, as a result, are more likely to then experience homelessness again, because of the psychological damage that getting to that housing has caused. And then the last thing would say is just that services are really important. We do need to support people who have experienced different kinds of trauma - whether it's intimate partner violence or war - and for reasons are or for those reasons, I should say, are experiencing housing instability. And our service infrastructure is awful - it is - we don't have it. [00:09:09] Crystal Fincher: Right. [00:09:10] Marc Dones: I think I would be remiss not to be clear that that is also racialized and classed in its construction. The vast majority of folks who do the frontline service work in the homelessness system are women, and in particular, women of color. To me, then it feels like no accident that it has been okay for 30, 35 years to pay them $27,000, while we ask them to manage people who are, in some cases, actively decompensating with psychotic spectrum disorders. Again, I say that not disrespectfully because I have been the person who's been decompensating with a psychotic spectrum disorder. It's hard to manage and we don't compensate those folks the way we compensate white men who do the exact same work, but with a different credentialing, because they had access and yada yada yada. For me, there is a really clear connection between ending homelessness and ending the poverty that we impose on the staff we are asking to do that work. [00:10:28] Crystal Fincher: Such good information with all of that. I want to start off with what you talked about with housing - and such a critical point of the need to start these conversations with housing. I want to ask about the lowest end and I forget - there was an article that I read a while back that was talking about what we used to have but don't have anymore - like one room rentals, day rentals. And that being a way that a lot of people made it back on their feet or actually prevented themselves from winding up on the street - hey, this is suboptimal and I ultimately want a different, larger place to stay, but this is shelter that I can afford. This is my place that I can afford, and in a room, and single-occupancy type thing - but those used to be here. We used to have more of that supply and don't. Do you see that as part of the issue? Is that a more minor missing part of it? Do you think that we also need to increase the amount of really low-income stock that we have? [00:11:37] Marc Dones: I think it's a huge part of it. I mean, let's be clear. America navigated two previous homelessness crises brought on by the two previous World Wars, largely through SRO [single room occupancy] stock. I mean, it was a known thing that vets could come back and get a room at the Y - that was just how we navigated that. And certainly before the passage of the GI Bill, that was it, that was literally it. With the passage of the GI Bill, we see vets having access to other kinds of monetary supports and financial tools to purchase homes in some instances. Although, we should also note that the GI Bill implementation was certainly quite racialized and so, who got access to those financial tools is its own story. Somebody's book, not mine. But I will be really clear that we lost those SRO units and other low-income housing units in the great suburbanization wave that begins at the end of the 40s and then pushes into the 50s and 60s. So, with the creation of the suburbs, we begin to see a corresponding almost unraveling, frankly, of a lot of what had been that standard low-income housing stock. And it then leads to, in particular, with the 60s and some of the work that happens inside the Civil Rights era - we then see a sudden reinvestment in low-income housing. But now, it's taking the form of the Projects and of these other forms of architectural investment that are much more family-oriented than they are for single adults. They're supposed to be stable long-term apartments and then we see the advent of certain kinds of programs like Section 8, et cetera, or voucher programs. But all of these post-suburbs conversations have at their core the same thing they're trying to solve for, which is a lack of the housing for people to access just on their own. In reality, again, if I think about most folks experiencing homelessness that I've known, most people could find their way to a thing and rent it themselves if it existed. They don't need my help to do that - that's demeaning. The only reason our voucher programs exist, the only reason we run the system we run is because that naturally occurring low-income stock is not available to people to find and get to on their own. [00:14:40] Crystal Fincher: I hope we do a better job collectively of prioritizing and addressing that because it's a mess. Also, the service delivery system has a number of challenges and this is an issue. I heard you speaking somewhere before on a panel, and it really struck me just - hey, we can throw millions of dollars at this today. That does not mean that tomorrow we are in a position to spend that millions of dollars and implement stuff based on that. I don't know that a lot of people have visibility into that part of the system. People just hear of services and they think people are operating shelters or some places for people to live. And there are some social workers who maybe connect people to mental health resources. And these things are offered to people every time there's a sweep on the street and they get to opt-in or opt-out. They opt-out and so - hey, we did our best and I guess we got to sweep them now - is where a lot of people are at. What actually happens within this system and what is the current state of our service infrastructure? [00:15:59] Marc Dones: Okay, so what currently happens, if we're being just very candid is - up until the pandemic, we offered you typically at best a mat on a floor with hundreds of other people. You needed to be in for the night, typically no later than 7 or 8 [PM], and out by around 5 or 6 in the morning. There was very little place for the storage of your personal belongings, if there was any place for the storage of your personal belongings. You couldn't - if you have a pet or had a pet, that - tough, no space for that. We oftentimes - well, actually in the vast majority of instances, not oftentimes - also run or ran those shelters, I should say, on the sole basis of gender. And so, if you are trans or non-binary, that can be a real uphill walk. Or if you are a couple and were like "I'm in a heterosexual relationship" - I mean, I am not, but if you were in a heterosexual relationship and wanted to - which no disrespect to heterosexual relationships to be clear, it's just it's not the one I am in. But if you were in a heterosexual relationship and wanted to go to a shelter as a couple, that's not a thing. If you are a family, you need to be a family that we understand - meaning that you have to be, typically, a biological parent with children. Those kids certainly can't be over 18 - they probably can't even be in their teens - because oftentimes if you're trying to access shelter and have teenage children, particularly teenage male children, then they will be sent to the adult male shelter far away from wherever you are. And that kind of goes on, actually. I could keep going through the many, many - frankly, to my mind - cruelties that we have imposed on people experiencing homelessness just to try to be inside for the night for decades. And so, when we say "we offered you shelter" that's what we've been saying. We didn't offer you - even a room - we have offered you kind of a place to be. In this community, in this region, we have worked hard over the last three-ish years to move many of our shelters towards what's called an enhanced shelter status, which means you might have greater service connectivity, or some small expectation of privacy, but that's really it. With the pandemic, suddenly we couldn't do that to people anymore. I just got to be honest - if it takes a world-altering deadly disease to force us to realize that our treatment of other human beings was so inhumane and so beyond the pale unacceptable that we couldn't contain disease spread, that's something. Since then, we have done a lot of work. Now, you see that hotel-motel shelter model - all of a sudden things that were not possible are suddenly possible. Certainly, now that I am in this position - let me just be very clear - we will continue to drive towards a model of shelter that is like SRO. That should be the minimum for what is considered shelter - a door, a key, dignity, the ability to mind your own business, to sleep when you want to sleep, to come and go when you need to come and go. Because the other thing I'll add, sorry, just because I think it's important is, we said to people, "You have a 7 PM curfew, you got to be out by 5 [AM]" and then told everybody to get a job, so heaven forbid they have the night shift. [00:20:57] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. [00:20:58] Marc Dones: What's the plan? There's no plan for that. [00:21:00] Crystal Fincher: There is no plan - right. [00:21:03] Marc Dones: That, I think, is what has been happening and I think it's really important for listeners to have that actual reality in their heads of the humaneness that we have pretended we have been operating with is - it should embarrass us, frankly. [00:21:24] Crystal Fincher: It absolutely should and that bare minimum of humaneness, to your point - if someone had a job, someone doesn't have a traditional family, which many people are kicked out of their homes as teens for a variety of reasons - because their parents didn't agree with their sexuality or lifestyle or whatever it is. And finding people who help them to survive that are a family and trying to stick together and that not being possible. So much of what is actually reality on the ground outside is not acknowledged as an acceptable reality for our services system and for shelter and that leaving so many people out. And so, hearing, "Well, they refused services," has been - I just remember when I realized that, "Oh no, actually - being offered services doesn't actually mean being offered services for that person." It could be services that don't apply, that they are not eligible for, that they can't fit into - and then just too bad. I guess, how do we get from, "Too bad, we can't accommodate you, this doesn't work," to being able to at least accommodate folks in shelter, to get people housed and on the path to becoming stable? [00:22:50] Marc Dones: Well, I think part of it is - the portion of your question around, what is the state of our system from a services perspective and why can't we just spend $20 million because it was given to us? The reality is that - you could give us $20 million - there's no one to spend it. It's like, yes, it is now in an account, cool. But spending it means it has to pay somebody's salary, or pay for the benefits of a person, or pay for a property. It has to do something and the capacity of the system, because it has been chronically underfunded at the staffing level for 30 years, is, I mean, we're worse than at the bone at this point. We are actually - this is a slow crumbling. I have agencies in the system right now that have north of 200 vacancies and no pipeline to fill those vacancies - because we too have been hit by the great wave of resignations as people are like, "I don't want to live like this." No one wants to hear this because it somehow - I don't know why it feels so weird - but we have to pay people more. I'm just going to keep saying it until it gets just really in people's little noggins, I guess. Because if we don't pay people more, then we continue to see these turnovers, we continue to see these vacancies, and more money can come and more money can come and it won't mean anything. There will be no one to do anything with it, full stop. And we have to spend more money. There are at least 45,000 people experiencing homelessness in the county. We don't have the budget - our budget, if I tried to divvy that up across everybody, it essentially turns into about $3,000 a year per person. Or what that translates into is a little over $10 a day, which is just - that's not doing anything. When a permanent supportive housing unit for scale costs about $24,000 per year - that's inclusive of services. Not everyone needs permanent supportive housing, but the difference then between PSH and where we are now is $20,000 per person. We have to put more money in the system, but in order for the system to be able to use that money, we really have to have the people who can do the work. The thing that I want to be really clear about is - this whole system - all of that, we use the word "system" and we use all these words that make it sound, I don't know, make it sound some type of way. I don't know. But at the end of this - this, all of this, is people helping people. That's what's happening - it is people who have chosen - because of their own lives, because of what they see, because of where they feel called in life - to help somebody else. If they can't do it because they can't afford to do it, then there's no help. I'm a big fan of technology, I think technology can do cool stuff - but you ask people how they got into stable recovery, it's not an app. They work with other people who've been on that journey, who can talk with them about it, who can be like, "Yeah. I know it's very hard actually." When we don't provide for that kind of support, when we create through our staffing models such incredibly high turnover, the reality then becomes that you're never able to build a relationship. You can never have that honest conversation. The first time I wanted to have a conversation about like, "I think I might have some very serious mental health problems." - I had to work up to - there was a lot of trust, there was a lot of like, "Oh, maybe I'll flirt with telling someone, maybe I won't." All of these things take time and trust to disclose, to begin to actively work on. We have created these positions that have such high velocity of turnover that no one can build the trust. No one can hold those relationships. And so, so much of what I'm trying to do and what my team is trying to do is - honor the fact that it's the relationships that do the work. And to turn this system into one that is relationship-oriented instead of always focused on these transactions. I guess, the last thing I would say is just that, in that vein, I think it's really critical that we be clear that this is not just some wacky notion I have. The first paper on the impacts of staff turnover on housing the chronically homeless came out in like 2010, I think. And noted that an initiative that the Feds started in 2003 to end chronic homelessness didn't get that done - largely suffered, largely suffered, because the implementation sites couldn't maintain staff. I mean, this is a question of, do we actually want to do this or not? The path is bright and clear. There are no tremendous unknowns. It's just a question of, do we actually care? Or is it just a thing that it makes us feel good to talk about? [00:28:26] Crystal Fincher: Right, or feel good to fund and not actually be concerned about the end result, which is what I feel like we set ourselves up for sometimes by saying, "Okay, we have a great appropriation. Boom, here, let's go. Solve it, Marc." But I also think it's helpful when we talk about service providers - I think some people envision this system of people and, "Hey, let me look up - someone needs shelter, let me dial up the shelter directory and ooh, I can see on my screen, there's a vacancy there. Let me send them here," where there is no cohesive system. We're talking about nonprofit organizations, we're talking about mental health and health organizations, we're talking about a huge hodgepodge of charities, nonprofits, health and mental health service providers who have some joint contracts, some individual contracts, but really it's just this patchwork of things all over the place. And I don't even - I think it was en vogue for a while to talk about - well, we just need a streamlined dashboard to have everybody just on the same page and see. I mean, that's been tried and has failed and several iterations in several places - because there are so many different providers. It just seems these are not people on one standard system, one standard way of doing things. But to that, these organizations have a model that is really not able to handle what is being asked of it. Unless those models change, it seems pretty apparent - unless frontline workers are paid more - we're asking them to de-escalate and mediate more than police officers and firefighters do. They're doing it oftentimes with more trauma behind them if they have lived experience. And being asked to do it while living in poverty - which doing anything and everything while living in poverty is harder. Also, these organizations are understaffed, so you have people making minimum wage who are also doing the job of two and three people and being asked to do as much as they can bear until they burn out. Until we engage with that - and there have been some conversations within some organizations - but it seems like until there's a much wider conversation about that and acknowledgement of that and pressure to address the needs that we have today in our system, that it's not a realistic expectation that if we provide the money or if we - certainly, money can do a lot in a lot of different areas, especially if we just give it to people directly. But for looking at the system of service providers, we really have to ask - if your model is not working today, then what is it serving and who is it serving? How do we reorient that towards the people who actually need the help the most? I really hope we have more of that conversation among here. I guess, looking forward, what do you think it's going to take to help some of those conversations along? Have you seen progress in any areas, or any models that can be followed for looking at how to align our provision of services to the actual needs of the people who need shelter? [00:32:17] Marc Dones: I mean, this is the scary part - is, I think we're actually the farthest down that road in the country. We're the only system - I report to someone who lives in a shelter. One of my board chairs lives in a shelter right now. Half of my staff, myself included, identify as people with lived experience. No other system can say that and so, we are the next great experiment. I think about what it means to not just say we're centering people with lived experience or to say we're centering the voices of people who are actually trying to use the stuff, but to have that be structural and not tokenistic and really, really embedded. I mean, there are so many things that - we should talk for hours. [00:33:05] Crystal Fincher: I know - I'm looking at the time going - man, I could ask you 17 more questions right now - yes. [00:33:05] Marc Dones: I think - there are so many things in which you just said that I want to talk about. The thing that I want to really lean in on is - I do think, and I have seen it personally - I've seen people change over the course of the pandemic and realize how bad some of the congregate shelters were and have to be like, "We can't go back there." People who I've had arguments about it with in the past were like, "Actually, no, this is terrible." I do have hope and when I think about how we move forward and how we as a region can maybe be the proof point for why it is successful to center people - this is hokey, but I think it is about the community conversation. And I want to disaggregate that from the media conversation. I'm on a podcast, but still. [00:34:24] Crystal Fincher: I'm just a political consultant. I am not media. [00:34:27] Marc Dones: There we go, but I think that we got to talk to each other more than be talked at by media. I love my journalist colleagues and I have great respect for what they do and, frankly, the work they do to hold government accountable and all the ways that that must be done. But the way we talk about homelessness in the media is broken. It is bereft of that fundamental humanity and is tied to almost every single misconception that I can name. And so, when people ask me, "How can I make a difference?" I say, "Look, we just had a really great conversation. I feel like you asked me some questions, you got some different information. In some cases, I was informed by one of your perspectives. Invite your neighbor over and have this conversation with them, host a little dinner for your block. If you're part of a Rotary Club..." And I really mean that because unless we, as the community, start to have a different conversation about homelessness, we cannot expect either at the elected official level or the budgeting level - we can't expect those things to change. If this is a democracy, for as long as we can try to hold onto that - [00:35:58] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, that's a whole other show, isn't it? [00:36:02] Marc Dones: - then, it's incumbent on us to be having the conversation we want to see leadership have. I try very hard to take my cue from the community so that I can just be like, "Look." I remember I got into a dust-up about some stuff a couple months ago and I remember calling my board chair who lives in a shelter. I was like, "Am I wrong? Tell me if I have lost my mind and I will stop. This is what I see, and if you tell me or the community tells me that I'm out of line, then we'll end this right now." And that's what I think we need to be doing, is really focusing on building that community conversation, building that community will. I say this all the time and I mean it - I don't say no to anything - I have been to Rotary Clubs, I have done little dinners to talk about homelessness, because I want us to hold the nuance and compassion necessary to build the system that will get this job done. [00:37:08] Crystal Fincher: Well, I certainly appreciate you taking the time to talk about this today and to shed some light on this for us. You are welcome back anytime - there's so much more we could talk about, but we are at time today. I just want to, once again, thank you, Marc Dones, CEO of the King County Regional Homelessness Authority for just helping to enlighten us. We are certainly going to keep an eye on how things unfold. Thanks so much. [00:37:36] Marc Dones: Well, thank you for having me - glad to be here, I'll come back. We'll talk about democracy. [00:37:40] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcast - just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. We'll talk to you next time.

The Kuderna Podcast
Raising Capital with Jay Jung

The Kuderna Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 54:30


Jay Jung is the founder of Embarc Advisors.  His experience in strategic finance includes serving as Investment Banking Vice President at Goldman Sachs, Engagement Manager at McKinsey & Company, and an MBA from Wharton.  He has completed over $50 billion in transactions including marquee transactions such as the sale of Yahoo, the sale of MuleSoft and the sale of SanDisk.  We discuss startups, raising capital, and today's economy. This podcast is for informational purposes only. Guest speakers and their firms are not affiliated with or endorsed by PAS or Guardian. This material contains the current opinions of the speakers but not necessarily those of PAS, Guardian or its subsidiaries and such opinions are subject to change without notice. None of the organizations mentioned in this podcast have any affiliation with Guardian or PAS. Bryan Kuderna is a Registered Representative and Financial Advisor of Park Avenue Securities LLC (PAS). OSJ: 1040 Broad Street, Suite 202 Shrewsbury, NJ 07702 (973)244-4420. Securities products and advisory services offered through PAS, member FINRA, SIPC. Financial Representative of The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America® (Guardian), New York, NY. PAS is a wholly owned subsidiary of Guardian. Kuderna Financial Team is not an affiliate or subsidiary of PAS or Guardian. CA Insurance License #OK04194 #2022-142718 Exp. 8/24  

McKinsey Talks Operations
The hidden value of voice conversations: Part 1 – Trends and technologies

McKinsey Talks Operations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 20:36


High-quality, tailored interactions promote positive consumer experiences. And so in a digital age that can be lacking in emotional connection, human voice engagements can become a point of difference for contact centers.
 In this episode, we discuss the wider trends related to voice interactions in customer care and the technologies that are available. Join the conversation with Paul Humphrey, CEO and founder of Call Journey; Eric Buesing, a partner in McKinsey & Company and a leader in our customer care offering; and host Daphne Luchtenberg, McKinsey's Operations Practice Director of Communications.
 Read more > Listen to the podcast (duration: 20:36) >

McKinsey Talks Operations
The hidden value of voice conversations: Part 2 – Reaping the rewards

McKinsey Talks Operations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 20:54


Following on from our discussion of voice analytics trends and technology and its potential in contact centers in our previous episode, in this episode we learn more about its implementation and how to effectively capture the available value: How can voice data analytics add value throughout your whole organization?
 Join the conversation with Paul Humphrey, CEO and founder of Call Journey; Eric Buesing, a partner in McKinsey & Company and a leader in our customer care offering; and host Daphne Luchtenberg, McKinsey's Operations Practice Director of Communications.

 Read more > Listen to the podcast (duration: 20:54) >

CashFlow Pro
This Is Why You Should Invest In Mobile Home Parks with Daniel Weisfield

CashFlow Pro

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 37:23


In the 110th episode of Cash Flow Pro, we talk with Daniel Weisfield, Co-Founder of Three Pillars Communities. Daniel comes from a family of real estate investors. In fact, he is a third-generation mobile home park investor. His grandfather immigrated to the U.S. and saved money by fixing cars in his backyard until, eventually, he was able to buy a mobile home park. Daniel's goal is to build on this legacy and educate others on how this type of attainable housing could close our country's housing gap and create affordable home-ownership opportunities.    Today, Daniel operates more than 40 manufactured housing communities in 7 states and serves over 10,000 residents. He uses his JD/MBA degree from Yale and experience as a strategy consultant at McKinsey & Company and a U.S. diplomat at the State Department to create awareness.   In this episode, we discuss: Demand for affordable housing and shrinking supply Reasons why trailer parks are more relevant now than ever Texas – the housing crisis and the perfect market The future of mobile homes Age restrictions for manufactured housing communities   Tune in on this episode to find out more!   Find your flow, Casey Brown   Resources mentioned in this podcast: https://threepillarcommunities.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-weisfield-33940613/#experience

Future of Asia
Building a mentally resilient workforce

Future of Asia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 30:53


Employee mental health and resilience is a critical topic for business leaders globally—McKinsey research has shown that as many as one in four employees are reporting signs of burnout. In this episode, we discuss the factors that can influence workplace mental health, and how organizations can effectively build a mentally resilient workforce.
 
 Join the conversation with Samuel Harvey, Professor of Psychiatry from University of New South Wales and Executive Director of the Black Dog Institute, Phil Davis, Managing Director of Amazon Web Services in Asia Pacific and Japan, and Alistair Carmichael, Associate Partner at McKinsey & Company.
 Read more > Listen to the podcast (duration: 30:53) >

The Collaboration Superpowers Podcast
305 - Building Trust: A Blueprint For Leaders

The Collaboration Superpowers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 37:40


Dr. Darryl Stickel has devoted his career to understanding trust, what it is, how it functions, and how to increase it. He holds a PhD in Business from Duke University and wrote his doctoral thesis on building trust in hostile environments. After leaving Mckinsey & Company in 2001, Darryl founded Trust Unlimited. His clients have included financial services, telecoms, tech, families, and the Canadian Military in Afghanistan. He is also a professor at the Luxembourg School of Business teaching in the MBA program and in their executive education program. Building Trust: Exceptional Leadership in an Uncertain World is his first book. Darryl, who is legally blind, lives in Victoria, Canada with his two sons and his “trusty” sidekick, his seeing eye dog, Drake. For more collaboration, visit www.collaborationsuperpowers.com.

il posto delle parole
Giulio Boccaletti "Festival della Mente"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 25:25


Giulio Boccaletti"Festival della Mente"Fermi, mentre l'acqua attorno scorrehttps://www.festivaldellamente.it/it/Festival della Mente, SarzanaSabato 3 settembre 2022, ore 14:45"Fermi, mentre l'acqua scorre"con Giulio BoccalettiPrenota il tuo posto:https://www.vivaticket.com/it/ticket/9-giulio-boccaletti/186312Tutto è cominciato dieci mila anni fa. Per la prima volta, da sedentari, abbiamo affrontato un mondo di acqua che si muove. Le società si sono sviluppate lottando con inondazioni, siccità, temporali, potenti espressioni idriche del sistema climatico. Quella lotta millenaria, guidata dall'illusione di poter controllare il nostro ambiente, ha trasformato il nostro territorio. Ha plasmato istituzioni con radici profonde nel nostro passato—la democrazia, la repubblica, i sistemi legali, anche il monoteismo. La nostra storia è inseparabile da quella dell'acqua. Oggi, il clima è in movimento su scala planetaria, e con esso sta cambiando la distribuzione di acqua sulla Terra. Di fronte a queste sfide enormi, il passato offre ancora lezioni fondamentali per affrontare il nostro futuro.Giulio Boccaletti è saggista, ricercatore onorario alla Smith School di Oxford e Senior Fellow del Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici. Laureato in fisica a Bologna, ha conseguito un dottorato a Princeton. È stato ricercatore all'MIT, socio di McKinsey & Company a New York e Londra, e Chief Strategy Officer di The Nature Conservancy, la più grande organizzazione ambientale al mondo con sede a Washington e operazioni in più di 40 paesi. Si è occupato di sicurezza idrica con governi e istituzioni internazionali. Nel 2014 il World Economic Forum di Davos lo ha nominato Young Global Leader per il suo lavoro sull'acqua, che nel 2020 è stato oggetto del documentario di PBS H2O: The Molecule That Made Us. Il suo libro Acqua. Una biografia (Mondadori, 2022), è stato selezionato come uno dei migliori libri del 2021 da The Economist.IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

Future of Asia
The future of (hybrid) work

Future of Asia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 35:35


In this episode, we discuss the big trends defining the future of work in Asia, why certain companies are reluctant to embrace remote working arrangements, and how organizations can respond to these latest developments. Join the conversation with Ahmed Mazhari, President of Microsoft Asia, Paul Marriott, President of SAP Asia Pacific Japan, and Diaan-Yi Lin, Senior Partner at McKinsey & Company.
 Read more > Listen to the podcast (duration: 35:35) >

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
371. HOW STUDENT RESEARCH IMPACTS COLLEGE ADMISSIONS

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 25:40


In 2022, the University of Pennsylvania reported that a third of their class of incoming freshmen had done research in high school. What makes research so important? Amy and Mike invited researcher Stephen Turban to discuss the trend of high school students doing independent research and how research impacts the admissions process. What are five things you will learn in this episode? Why does research matter in the undergraduate admissions process? How do admission offices evaluate independent research projects? Does research need to be published to be impactful? How can students find research opportunities? What are the pathways? How do students use research papers in the admission process? Do they attach it to their application? Do they get recommendation letters? How do admission officers look at independent projects vs. summer programs vs. projects via curriculum programs like AP Capstone? MEET OUR GUEST Stephen Turban is the co-founder of the Lumiere Research Scholar Program. Before starting Lumiere, Stephen was a PhD student at Harvard Business School, worked at McKinsey & Company, and studied at Harvard College where he graduated Magna Cum Laude in Statistics. Stephen's research has been covered in The Economist, the Harvard Business Review, The Washington Post, Freakonomics Radio, and the BBC. Stephen can be reached at stephen.turban@lumiere.education. LINKS Lumiere Education RELATED EPISODES CREATING A PASSION PROJECT BUILDING AN A+ EXTRACURRICULAR RESUME HOW TO BUILD RELATIONSHIPS WITH COLLEGES ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page. ABOUT YOUR HOSTS Mike Bergin is the president of Chariot Learning and founder of TestBright. Amy Seeley is the president of Seeley Test Pros. If you're interested in working with Mike and/or Amy for test preparation, training, or consulting, feel free to get in touch through our contact page.

LIGHT, DATA, ACTION!
Cloud First vs Cloud Smart

LIGHT, DATA, ACTION!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 42:19


In our newest episode of Light, Data, Action! Terry Barbounis sat down with Bhargs Srivathsan, Partner at McKinsey & Company, leader focusing on cloud and edge, and leader of the "Women Who Cloud” initiative. Together they explore how businesses can benefit from cloud adoption, how cloud migration and its value has changed over time, and the key differences between a cloud smart versus cloud first approach.

#dogoodwork
How to Develop Your Leadership Skills In the Modern Economy with Luke Owings: VP of Product at Abilitie

#dogoodwork

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 28:05


Luke is the Vice President of Product at Abilitie, a leadership development company that offers virtual mini-MBAs and business simulations that help senior executives from companies around the world build leadership skills and improve strategy execution. Since 2015, they have taught 25,000+ executives in over 50+ countries, and their clients include Fortune 500 companies such as PayPal, Marriott, Coca-Cola, GE, and Southwest Airlines. In 2020, Abilitie was recognized as one of the Inc. 5000 fastest-growing private companies and Inc. Best Work-Places In America. Luke is also an Advisory Board Member of Haymakers 4 Hope, a nonprofit that has raised 20M+ for cancer cure research. Before joining Abilitie, Luke was an Expert Associate Partner at McKinsey & Company, a global management consulting firm that is a trusted advisor to two-thirds of the Fortune 1000 businesses and governments around the world. He holds a BA in Economics from Princeton University and an MBA from Harvard Business School and was also a Teaching Fellow for Harvard University's undergrad economics class. Highlights What Abilitie is: How they work Who Luke Owings is How the education now evolved Where's the value that is most intertwined with what the market needs today and tomorrow How Luke makes the remote delightful versus in a room Why do people care about getting an MBA or the next certification versus getting real-world results and trying something new What three things MBAs can give How getting an MBA from established institutions differs from earning it online What key insights to look for Why it is important to leverage education Where to learn more about the programs that Luke develops and facilitate Episode Resources Connect with Raul Hernandez Ochoa https://www.linkedin.com/in/dogoodwork https://dogoodwork.io/work-with-raul https://dogoodwork.io/podcast  Connect with Luke Owings https://www.abilitie.com/ Get a $200 tuition credit if you mention that you came from the Do Good Work Podcast: https://invitedmba.com/modern-mba/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/luke-owings-9889214 

CEO Perspectives
Global Recession? Driving Growth Through Uncertainty

CEO Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 30:12 Very Popular


In this episode of CEO Perspectives, The Conference Board President and CEO Steve Odland sits down with Asutosh Padhi, Managing Partner for McKinsey & Company in North America and John Kelleher, Senior Partner. Odland, Padhi, and Kelleher discuss the current economic environment and the possibility of a recession. Tune in to find out: How an economic downturn will likely play out How business leaders can navigate through this period of economic uncertainty What businesses should be doing to prepare for a recession How companies can find growth, even in a down cycle Click here for more information on McKinsey research.

Conocimiento Experto
292 - El Viaje Más Allá del Miedo - Lecturas Recomendadas Conocimiento Experto

Conocimiento Experto

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 42:01


¿Qué hay para mi dentro del libro de lecturas recomendadas del programa conocimiento experto El Viaje Más Allá del Miedo de John Hagel? Descubre las Tres herramientas para superar El Miedo al Fracaso y dar forma a tu Narrativa Personal.Adquiere el Libro: https://amzn.to/3NBtfF6Accede a nuestro grupo privado en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/conocimientoexpertoMonetiza tus Redes Sociales: https://impactoexperto.com/Participa del Reto 60/100 para ser una Mejor Versión: https://conocimientoexperto.com/reto60100Accede a mi sito oficial y desarrolla tu modelo de negocio:https://www.salvadormingo.com/Accede al Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principiosObtén mi libro: https://amzn.to/2KmHMXaMis programas:* Programa Principios Experto: https://conocimientoexperto.com/principios* Libro Conocimiento: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/unavidaconproposito* Programa Posicionamiento de Expertos en Internet: https://conocimientoexperto.com/programaexperto* Más contenidos gratuitos: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org* Aplicación Móvil Conocimiento Experto: https://www.conocimientoexperto.org/apps/* Programa Conocimiento Experto Elite: https://conocimientoexperto.com/eliteMis redes:* Sígueme En Instagram en: https://www.instagram.com/salvadormingo/* Sígueme en Facebook en: https://www.facebook.com/Conocimientoexperto* Sígueme en Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/SalvadorMingoConocimientoExperto* Sígueme en Twitter en: https://twitter.com/s_mingoSentimos el miedo, y la presión. Como estratega empresarial en Silicon Valley, trabajando con personas de éxito en todos los campos, John Hagel ha visto lo temerosos que somos muchos de nosotros. A menudo nos sentimos abrumados por la competencia y la presión para rendir.El miedo nos frena. Nos impide -tanto a nosotros como a nuestras organizaciones- aprovechar al máximo las oportunidades y alcanzar nuestro potencial. Por lo que si quieres empezar este Viaje Más Allá del Miedo...A lo largo de décadas de experiencia, Hagel ha identificado tres sencillas herramientas que pueden ayudarnos a superar el miedo, transformando nuestras vidas y carreras. Y todo comienza con una historia. Bueno, más o menos...En este análisis aprenderás:- Por qué ciertos tipos de pasión son tan poderosos;- Cómo un simple eslogan puede tener un gran impacto; y- Por qué las empresas deberían inspirarse en World of Warcraft Edicion: Mayo 2021John Hagel III es un empresario y reconocido estratega empresarial. Fue socio de McKinsey & Company, donde ayudó a abrir su oficina de Silicon Valley y lanzó dos nuevas prácticas, incluida la de comercio electrónico de la empresa. En Deloitte, creó y dirigió the Center for the Edge, un centro de investigación global que identifica las oportunidades de negocio emergentes que deberían estar en la agenda de los directores generales. Ha emprendido un viaje más allá del miedo en su propia vida, un viaje que le llevó a Silicon Valley, donde ha vivido los últimos 40 años, aunque su trabajo le lleva a todas las partes del mundo. Se FirmeSalvador MingoConocimiento Experto#NarrativaPersonal#MiedoalaFracaso#JohnHagel

internet nos silicon valley libro miedo fue descubre redes sociales participa el miedo fracaso reto el viaje expertos aplicaci lecturas mckinsey company accede hagel mejor versi adquiere john hagel conocimiento experto programa conocimiento experto elite conocimientoexperto s salvadormingoconocimientoexperto s programa principios experto libro conocimiento programa posicionamiento
The Voice of Retail
Michael Medline, President and CEO and Mohit Grover, Senior Vice President, Innovation, Sustainability and Strategy of Empire, share their bold new three-year Climate Action Plan roadmap.

The Voice of Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 28:34


Welcome to The Voice of Retail. I'm your host Michael LeBlanc. This podcast is brought to you in conjunction with Retail Council of Canada.In this episode, Michael Medline, President and CEO of Empire Company Limited, is back on the podcast, joined by Mohit Grover, Senior Vice President, Innovation, Sustainability and Strategy, to talk about what Empire is doing at all levels around real progress in environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues.Michael and Mohit share their new three-year Climate Action Plan roadmap.  We talk about actual results, fundamental strategies and action plans, the partnerships and complexities involved, and the simple truths that show real progress in environmental, social and governance issues.View the report and watch the podcast video of the interview with Michael and Mohit: : https://corporate.sobeys.com/sustainable-business-report/Thanks for tuning into this special episode of The Voice of Retail.  If you haven't already, be sure and click subscribe on your favourite podcast platform so new episodes will land automatically twice a week, and check out my other retail industry media properties; the Remarkable Retail podcast, the Conversations with CommerceNext podcast, and the Food Professor podcast.  Last but not least, if you are into BBQ, check out my all new YouTube barbecue show, Last Request Barbeque, with new episodes each and every week!I'm your host Michael LeBlanc, President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company & Maven Media, and if you're looking for more content, or want to chat  follow me on LinkedIn, or visit my website meleblanc.co!  Have a safe week everyone! About MichaelMichael Medline is President & Chief Executive Officer of Empire Company Limited (Empire) and its wholly-owned subsidiary Sobeys Inc., a leading Canadian grocery retailer and food distributor. Mr. Medline is a proven leader with a strong track record of success in Canadian retail. He was appointed President & CEO of Empire in January 2017 after more than 15 years in a variety of senior retail leadership positions at Canadian Tire Corporation (CTC), including as that organization's President & Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Medline began his career working with the Ontario Securities Commission in 1989, followed by two years practicing law with McCarthy Tétrault. He was Corporate Counsel for PepsiCo Canada before moving to Abitibi Consolidated Inc. where, between 1994 and 2001, he held a variety of roles including Senior Vice President, Strategy and Corporate Development. Active in the community, Mr. Medline serves as a member of the Board of the SickKids Foundation, and is a past Chair and current board member of the Retail Council of Canada. Mr. Medline has completed the Directors Education Program at the Rotman School of Management; holds an MBA from Raymond A. Mason School of Business, William & Mary; an LL.B. from the University of Toronto, and a BA from Western University.About MohitMohit Grover is Senior Vice President, Innovation, Sustainability & Strategy for Sobeys Inc., a leading Canadian grocery retailer and food distributor. Mr. Grover joined Sobeys from Google Canada where he was Head of Industry for the last five years. He is a recognized leader in building relationships with clients at the forefront of innovation and has successfully tailored Google's solutions to enable innovation at many of Canada's most important retailers. His deep understanding of the retail sector, together with his knowledge of the newest trends and technology in our industry, is invaluable. Prior to his years at Google, Mr. Grover built his passion for retail strategy and innovation at McKinsey & Company where he was a leader in the firm's North American Retail and Merchandising practice. Over his six-year tenure at McKinsey, he led multiple teams of consultants in addressing his clients' strategic, merchandising and operations challenges. Mr. Grover holds an MBA from INSEAD and a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Toronto.About MichaelMichael is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice. He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career. He has delivered keynotes, hosted fire-side discussions with C-level executives and participated on thought leadership panels worldwide.  Michael was recently added to ReThink Retail's prestigious Top 100 Global Retail Influencers for a second year in  2022. Michael is also the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts, including Canada's top retail industry podcast, The Voice of Retail, plus the Remarkable Retail with author Steve Dennis, Global E-Commerce Tech Talks and The Food Professor with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois.  Most recently, Michael launched Conversations with CommerceNext, a podcast focussed on retail eCommerce, digital marketing and retail careers - all available on Apple, Spotify, Amazon Music and all major podcast platforms.   Michael is also the producer and host of the “Last Request Barbeque” channel on YouTube where he cooks meals to die for and influencer riches.

Strong Suit Podcast
Lure Them to the Office with Free Food (Recruit Rockstars 461)

Strong Suit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 21:52


Jeff Grass knows how to get your hesitant employees back to the office.  This serial entrepreneur is Co-Founder & CEO of Hungry Marketplace. Based in Arlington VA, Hungry is tackling the $100 Billion business food & events industry with a food-tech marketplace & logistics platform that provides unparalleled food & engagement solutions for businesses, powered by top local chefs. In short, Hungry partners with local chiefs to bring food to your office. So far, they operate in 9 markets with 250 employees. Clearly, Jeff's onto something big. Hungry doubled revenues last year, despite the pandemic. And he's raised capital from leading VC firms: 10X Capital, Bread and Butter Ventures, Evolution PC Partners, GP Ventures, James Madison Innovations, Marcy Venture Partners, Motley Fool Ventures, Sand Hill Angels, Sands Capital Ventures, The Heritage Fund, The Torch Fund After earning his MBA at The Wharton School and a stint with McKinsey & Company, Jeff was Co-Founder of other successful companies LiveSafe and buySAFE, which enables online businesses to increase trust & confidence with site visitors. In this 20-minute conversation, Jeff reveals how he's put a Rockstar in every seat of Hungry (and how he keeps them)

Interviews: Tech and Business
Digital Transformation: A Practitioner's Guide (with TIAA)

Interviews: Tech and Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 41:11


#digitaltransformation #chiefinformationofficer #cio Digital transformation is no longer an option for most organizations. The question is how to focus resources and transform in areas such as rethinking business models, improving customer experience or client services, driving innovation, and using data analytics more effectively.But how do you measure the results of this transformation? What are the benefits? What about planning for technology investment and culture change? Digital transformation strategy must consider all these points.To gain practical advice, we speak with Sastry Durvasula, the Chief Information & Client Services Officer at TIAA, to learn how a large organization evolves and transforms. With over $1.4 trillion assets under management, TIAA serves about 5 million customers and was founded in 1918 by Andrew Carnegie.Here are the topics we discuss:-- What is TIAA and how large is the company?-- What does digital transformation mean for TIAA?-- Why are both culture and technology important for digital transformation?-- How can organizations avoid risk during digital transformation?-- What is the impact of corporate politics on digital transformation?-- How do organizations break data silos for digital transformation?-- What is the connection between client experience and digital transformation?-- What is the role of ecosystem in digital transformation?-- What is the impact of diversity and demographics on digital transformation?-- Advice to business leaders on being successful with digital transformation?====Join the CXOTalk newsletter and stay informed of LIVE shows: https://www.cxotalk.com/subscribeRead the transcripts from all our episodes: https://www.cxotalk.com/episode/digital-transformation-practitioners-guide-tiaa====Sastry Durvasula joined TIAA in 2022 as the Chief Information & Client Services Officer, responsible for leading the global technology and client services organizations.Sastry comes to TIAA having most recently served as the Global Chief Technology and Digital Officer, and Partner, at McKinsey & Company. In that role, he led the strategy and development of the firm's differentiating digital products and platforms, internal and client-facing technology, data & analytics, AI/ML, cyber and hybrid cloud ecosystem, and served as a senior advisor on client engagements. Prior to joining TIAA, he held Chief Digital Officer, Chief Data & Analytics, CIO and global technology leadership roles at insurance broker and risk management company Marsh and at American Express, where he spent 15 years. He was also a consultant for several Fortune Global 500 companies.Sastry is a passionate advocate for diversity and sustainability. He serves on the Board of Directors for Girls in Tech, the global non-profit dedicated to eliminating the gender gap in tech, and championed industry-wide initiatives focused on women in tech, including #ReWRITE and Half the Board. Sastry holds a Master's degree in Engineering from the Indian Institute of Science, is credited with 30+ patents and plays a leadership role in technology industry/academia consortia.

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast
The Mindsets That Separate the Best Leaders with Vikram Malhotra

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 36:36


Being the top dog isn't easy. In fact, 30% of Fortune 500 CEOs last fewer than three years. What does it take to get to the top and excel? Vikram Malhotra of McKinsey & Company joins Kevin to discuss the research findings on how the top CEOs do their job. Conversations with the best of the best revealed six similar mindsets across the board. Key Points In this episode, Kevin and Vik discuss the process of determining CEO success.  Vik shares the 6 mindsets top CEOs share with a focus on being bold, treating the soft stuff like the hard stuff, and understanding team psychology.  Vik shares examples of how the mindsets worked in practice. Meet Vik Name: Vikram Malhotra  His Story: Vikram Malhotra is the co-author with Carolyn Dewar and Scott Keller of CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest and a senior partner in McKinsey's New York office and is the longest-tenured member of the firm. He served on its Board of Directors for 13 years, its Operating Committee for six, and its Senior Partner Committee for five. He was also Managing Partner for the Americas and currently chairs the firm's Professional Standards Committee. Worth Mentioning: 

Buenos Días América
El 32 % de los latinos envían remesas a sus familiares fuera de Estados Unidos. ¿Usted tiene la posibilidad de mandar apoyos económicos a su familia en el extranjero?

Buenos Días América

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 56:05


Hoy hablamos millones de inmigrantes que mensualmente envían remesas a sus familias a su pais de origen, dejando lo justo para una supervivencia cada vez más difícil por alto costo de vida . El 32 % de los latinos envían remesas a sus familiares fuera de Estados Unidos. Más de dos tercios de ellos envían hasta el 30 % del total de sus ingresos, indica el reporte, publicado por McKinsey & Company. ¿Para ustes cada vez es más difícil enviar dinero a sus familiares o sigue enviando la misma cantidad de dinero sin contratiempos? En Buenos Días América arrancamos contando “Que paso mientras Ud. dormía” nuestro boletín informativo con un resumen de las noticias más importantes del día. El profesor de Ciencias Políticas de la FIU, Eduardo Gamarra, nos acompaña para dar u panorama de lo que será las elecciones primarias en EE. UU. A día de hoy. Juan Carlos Planas, abogado constitucionalista, habla que La Cámara de Representantes aprobó la Ley de Respeto al Matrimonio, pero sus perspectivas son inciertas en el Senado. Paula Valle, Gerente para Latinoamérica de WorldRemit. Nos habla de la Inflación y envío de remesas merman economía de inmigrantes latinos en EEUU Y en Contacto Deportivo, hablamos con Aldo Sánchez dando una ronda por lo acontecido en la MLB y el fútbol femenil de tres confederaciones: CONCACAF, CONMEBOL y UEFA Mañana más, en Buenos Días América, no olvides en conectarte. Si te gusto, recuerda compartir con tus amigos que pueden encontrarnos en la App de UFORIA o en cualquier plataforma de podcast. Envíanos tus comentarios, inquietudes o sugerencias, a nuestras redes sociales en Facebook @buenosdiasam, Instagram buenosdiasamericaam o escríbenos a nfoudradio@UNIVISION.NET estaríamos encantados de recibirlas.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Parkinson's: A Man-Made Disease? - Ray Dorsey, MD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 44:18


Parkinson's: A Man-Made Disease? - Ray Dorsey, MD Dr. Ray Dorsey, M.D.• https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/people/26764214-earl-ray-dorsey • Book – Ending Parkinsons Disease #RayDorsey#ParkinsonsDisease  #parkinsons  0:00 Parkinson's Disease Is Due To Environmental Causes6:15 Parkinson's Disease Will Double In The Coming Generation12:40 Trichloroethylene Increases The Risk Of Parkinson's By 500%24:15 What You Can Do To Help End Parkinson's Disease33:40  Toxins in Foods Increases The Risk Of Parkinson's Disease Dr. Ray Dorsey, M.D. is a medical doctor and author of  Ending Parkinson's Disease: A Prescription for Action In this "must-read" guide Dr Dorsey and three other doctors and advocates offer a bold action plan to prevent, care for, and treat Parkinson's disease-one of the great health challenges of our time. Brain diseases are now the world's leading source of disability. The fastest growing of these is Parkinson's: the number of impacted patients has doubled to more than six million over the last twenty-five years and is projected to double again by 2040. Harmful pesticides that increase the risk of Parkinson's continue to proliferate, many people remain undiagnosed and untreated, research funding stagnates, and the most effective treatment is now a half century old.Dr. Ray Dorsey is David M. Levy Professor of Neurology and Director of the Center for Health + Technology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Dorsey is helping investigate new treatments for movement disorders and improve the way care is delivered for individuals with Parkinson disease and other neurological disorders. Using simple web-based video conferencing, he and his colleagues are seeking to provide care to individuals with Parkinson and neurological diseases anywhere that they live. Professional BackgroundDr. Dorsey previously directed the movement disorders division and neurology telemedicine at Johns Hopkins and worked as a consultant for McKinsey & Company. He completed his undergraduate studies at Stanford University, medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, and business school at the Wharton School.ResearchDr. Dorsey's research has been published in the leading medical, neurology, and economic journals and has been featured on National Public Radio, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. Collaborators include Johns Hopkins University, Pfizer, Teva, IBM, MC10, Apple, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, the West Health Institute, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the National Institutes of Health. To Contact Dr. Ray Dorsey, M.D.https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/people/26764214-earl-ray-dorsey CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

The Platform Journey
7. Nick Houldsworth & Damien Tampling of Xero: Building Your Platform The Right Way

The Platform Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 38:44


Highlights of Avanish, Damien, and Nick's discussion include:Xero's growth story from one person's headache to a global platform supporting over 3 million customersThe genesis of Xero's impressive platform strategyHow the company has created a playground for developers to solve for Xero's customers in new and innovative waysUnderstanding the role the tension between things that the company could do and things that the ecosystem could do plays in overall platform strategyPracticing transparency both internally and with your partner ecosystemDefining your ecosystem platform principles to strike balance between first-party and third-party propositionsAnd much more!Guests: Nick Houldsworth & Damien TamplingDamien Tampling, Chief Strategy and Corporate Development Officer, XeroDamien leads Xero's global strategy, corporate development and partnership teams. Prior to joining Xero, Damien spent nearly 20 years at Deloitte in a number of senior strategy, M&A and other executive roles and was a founding partner of Deloitte's global online and mobile technology practice, Deloitte Digital. He holds a Bachelor of Business from RMIT University, Melbourne and is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.Nick Houldsworth, Executive GM Ecosystem, XeroXero is a global small business platform, with over 1000 connected apps in its ecosystem. In 2021 Nick oversaw the launch of the new Xero App Store, and has held board and advisory roles for a number of startups. He is passionate about building a network of innovation through Xero's ecosystem community to support small businesses worldwide. He is based in Auckland, New Zealand.Host: Avanish SahaiAvanish Sahai is a Tidemark Fellow and has served as a Board Member of Hubspot since April 2018 and of Birdie.ai since April 2022. Previously, Avanish served as the vice president, ISV and Apps partner ecosystem of Google from 2019 until 2021. From 2016 to 2019, he served as the global vice president, ISV and Technology alliances at ServiceNow.  From 2014 to 2015, he was the senior vice president and chief product officer at Demandbase.  Prior to Demandbase, Avanish built and led the Appexchange platform ecosystem team at Salesforce, and was an executive at Oracle and McKinsey & Company, as well as various early-to-mid stage startups in Silicon Valley.About TidemarkTidemark is a venture capital firm, foundation, and community built to serve category-leading technology companies as they scale.  Tidemark was founded in 2021 by David Yuan, who has been investing, advising, and building technology companies for over 20 years.  Learn more at www.tidemarkcap.com.LinksFollow our guests, Nick Houldsworth and Damien TamplingFollow our host, Avanish SahaiLearn more about TidemarkYou can find the full transcript here. 

The Secret Sauce
EE360 พนักงาน Burnout ผู้นำควรแก้ไขอย่างไร

The Secret Sauce

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 28:46


รับชมทาง YouTube ภาวะหมดไฟของพนักงานเกิดจากอะไร? เหล่ามนุษย์เงินเดือนจำนวนไม่น้อยกำลังประสบปัญหาภาวะหมดไฟ และพยายามหาวิธีจัดการกับมันด้วยการปรับเปลี่ยนพฤติกรรมและทัศนคติของตนเอง แต่แท้จริงแล้วนั่นอาจเป็นเพียงการแก้ปัญหาที่ปลายเหตุ เพราะสิ่งที่ต้องปรับเปลี่ยนเพื่อแก้ไขสภาวะนี้มากที่สุดก็คือตัวขององค์กร Executive Espresso เอพิโสดนี้ ชวนคุณมาพูดคุยเกี่ยวกับเรื่อง ‘ภาวะหมดไฟของพนักงาน' จากบทความของ McKinsey & Company เพื่อสืบให้รู้ถึงสาเหตุที่แท้จริง และฉายภาพถึงวิธีการแก้ปัญหาของนายจ้างส่วนใหญ่ที่อาจไม่ตรงจุด รวมถึง 8 คำถามที่ผู้นำต้องตอบ เพื่อนำไปสู่การช่วยพนักงานแก้ปัญหาภาวะหมดไฟได้อย่างตรงจุด

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP
The Future of Women's Wealth: Innovators, Investors, Influencers

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 60:00


The Buzz 1: “85% of the women I interviewed make money in ways that really aren't any different from how women made money in 1980: a third have jobs that pay salaries and bonuses, perhaps with a bit of a twist; about a quarter make money off of direct drive sales (a business model I remember well from selling photocopiers for Xerox in 1986!) and another quarter provide some sort of fee for service. A mere 15% have the “many sources” model for money making.…” (Barbara Stewart, Rich Thinking® global research papers http://barbarastewart.ca) The Buzz 2: “Approximately $30 trillion in wealth is set to change hands in the next decade and women are poised to inherit a sizable share, according to research by McKinsey & Company published in 2020.” (investopedia.com) The Buzz 3: “According to Consultancy group Boston Consulting Group (BCG), women hold nowadays an average of 40% of global wealth, and this could rise at a compound annual growth rate of 7.2% by 2023, outpacing the 5.2% compound annual growth rate projected for men.” (juliusbaer.com) The Buzz 4: “In many ultra-high-net-worth families, the roles of women are still hindered by long-standing conventions and complex intergenerational dynamics. Although these women control a significant percentage of the world's wealth ($10.9+ trillion in assets in the U.S.), serve as CEOs…and play an increasing role in shaping the philosophies and priorities of future generations, their contributions are often overlooked.” (nasdaq.com) We'll ask Barbara Stewart, Eva Grønbjerg Christensen, Iris ten Teije and April Rudin for their take on The Future of Women's Wealth & Technology: Innovators, Investors and Influencers.

On Record PR
Marketing and Personal Business Development Best Practices for Professionals with Deborah Farone

On Record PR

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 37:25


In this episode of On Record PR, Gina Rubel goes on record with Deborah Farone, founder of Farone Advisors, LLC, to discuss best practices for personal business development for lawyers and other professionals. Learn More Deborah Farone has had the unique opportunity to play a role in developing the best practices in professional services marketing by working with the most respected and most demanding lawyers in the world. Deborah is the author of the best-selling legal marketing book, “Best Practices: Marketing and Business Development for Law Firms” (PLI 2019), a work based on more than sixty interviews with successful law firm leaders and marketers, general counsel, and innovators in the profession. Heidi K. Gardner, PhD, Distinguished Fellow, Harvard Law School's Center on the Legal Profession, has called Deborah “the leading expert in law firm marketing. Not only has she studied this complex topic from the peak of the legal profession, her research into what works and what doesn't is priceless for anyone interested in growing their business.”  The book is carried by bookstores of the United States' highest ranked law schools, including Harvard, Yale and Columbia. Over the past two decades, Deborah has carved out a niche by distinguishing herself as the chief marketing officer of two of the world's most prestigious law firms, Cravath Swaine & Moore LLP and Debevoise & Plimpton LLP. Prior to diving into the legal marketing profession, she honed her business development and communications skills by working at the global management consulting firm Towers Perrin, now Willis Towers Watson. In her early days, she worked both in the new business department and as an account executive at Ketchum Communications. Deborah has been involved in the corporate and academic arena. She recently spoke at McKinsey & Company's legal department and, on the academic side, at the University of Pennsylvania's Carey Law School, Cornell Law School and Fordham Law School. She has served as an adjunct Assistant Professor on the faculty of New York University.

The Atlanta Story
Episode 7 | Andrew McConnell

The Atlanta Story

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 42:47


The Atlanta Story podcast features meaningful stories of Atlanta's builders, creators, and entrepreneurs. In this episode Jon Birdsong sits down with Andrew McConnell Co-Founder and CEO of Rented.com and published author of Get Out of My Head: Creating Modern Clarity with Stoic Wisdom. Andrew received two degrees from Harvard and then worked at McKinsey & Company before starting Rented.com. He is also an accomplished swimmer having been a former member on the US National Team in Open Water Swimming.   In today's interview, Andrew shares stories from his entrepreneurial journey, what led him to write a book on stoicism, and what's next in his storied career.   The Atlanta Story is put together by the folks at Atlanta Ventures -- and we can't wait to share some of the personalities behind the brand. Atlanta Ventures invests in entrepreneurs through community, content, and capital -- most notably through our Studio with companies like Greenzie and Intown Golf Club. We believe the best entrepreneurs learn from other great artists in different fields.   Keywords:  Atlanta, Atlantan, ATL, Business Leader, Thought leadership, Atlanta Ventures, Entrepreneurship, startups, stories, leaders, podcast, podcasting, ….   #Atlanta #Atlantan #ATL #BusinessLeader #Thoughtleadership #AtlantaVentures #Entrepreneurship #startups #stories #leaders #podcast #podcasting ... In this episode, we discuss… The steps that Andrew McConnell took before he wrote his book. (1:42) The writing processes Andrew had for his book. (6:10) The simplest way to achieve mental clarity with the exponential growth of information available. (8:20) Andrew's origin story for Rented.com. (10:45) The next steps in andrews journey to grow his company. (12:38) Andrew's process of taking different webs of life, from history to consulting, to create his book. (17:28 Andrews favorite period in history to study and why. (19:05) how COVID affected Andrew's life. (21:50) which came first, Andrews understanding of self-control or knowledge in Stoicism? (25:15) how Andrew brings principles and themes of stoicism into raising his children. (26:25) Andrews balance of expectations for his children. (29:55) The processes Andrew puts into place to manage his time spent on social media. (32:40) How to seek truth nowadays. (35:48) The next chapters for Rented.com. (36:59) Why Atlanta and what Atlanta has done for Andrew. (39:45) Resources discussed in this episode: Rented, Inc Andrew McConnell's Book How you can get involved:  Visit atlantaventures.com/studio if you're interested in learning more about Atlanta Ventures and the Studio.    Where you can find us: Website: www.atlstory.com Twitter: @theatlantastory Instagram: @theatlantastory YouTube: Here Subscribe to the newsletter here.

Looking Forward: Conversations about the Future of Work
S2, E2: Rethinking the future of offices

Looking Forward: Conversations about the Future of Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 36:19


Host Ryan Anderson welcomes Phil Kirschner of global management consulting firm McKinsey & Company. A self-proclaimed “accidental workplace strategist,” Phil fell into managing workplace strategy transformation efforts at Credit Suisse more than a decade ago and never looked back. As a result, his openness to supporting new ways of working fuels this fast-paced exploration of the need for executive-level change management, for widening our perception of what “hybrid” means, for using AI to identify moments that matter in the physical workplace, and more. For a deep dive into MillerKnoll's point of view on the future of work content, visit https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/designing-better-tomorrow-millerknoll/.

MediaVillage's Insider InSites podcast on Media, Marketing and Advertising
Media Metaverse: A Discussion with Hamza Khan of McKinsey & Company on the $5 Trillion Metaverse Opportunity

MediaVillage's Insider InSites podcast on Media, Marketing and Advertising

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 37:44


Global consulting Goliath, McKinsey & Company has a history of being a primary source of intelligence and guidance for some of the top companies and business leaders in the world. They are also a major arbiter of the investment path, and therefore the immediate future which Enterprise, as a whole, takes given their respect and influence. So, when McKinsey & Company issues a report advising its clients that the Metaverse is a $5 trillion opportunity, with a $3 trillion e-Commerce impact, you probably should take a look at that report. Which is exactly what Media Metaverse with Minsky did. Hamza Khan, partner at McKinsey & Company, is one of the architects of that report.  I had the pleasure of speaking with Khan, which I hope is only the first of many opportunities to do so. We spoke about the Metaverse, the hype, the real opportunities, and the impact that our current global macroeconomic situation may (or may not) have on their growth projections.   I highly encourage you to listen and learn as we bust some myths and challenge some preconceived notions about the future of digital.   Click to download the full (free) report: Value Creation in the Metaverse: The Real Business of Virtual World.