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Best podcasts about unm

Latest podcast episodes about unm

Die Maus - Musik
Was macht ein Flatulenzkünstler?

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 30:52


Die Maus zum Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit den Unmöglichen, vielen Pupsen, mit André und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von Andre Gatzke.

Die Maus - Musik
Regenlieder und Regentänze

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 30:27


Die Maus zum Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit Maus-Plattenkiste, Angeberwissen, den Unmöglichen, mit Nina und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefante Von Nina Heuser.

The Stiff Truth
Episode 110 - Spooky Stiff

The Stiff Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 55:26


There is a Fondler on the loose at UNM! Ye cancels himself. A woman is swallowed whole by a 22' Python! Also, didn't we tell everyone to wash back there already. Join us for a Corpse Reviver 2 and a good conversation!

Running New Mexico Podcast
Episode 126 - Kurt Thomas; Hobbs Graduate, Head Track and Field Coach at University of Alabama at Birmingham

Running New Mexico Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 71:30


This week I was able to talk with Kurt Thomas. He is a Hobbs High School graduate and the current Women's Track and Field Head Coach at UAB, University of Alabama at Birmingham. It was such a pleasure to talk to him and learn about his journey. He talks about running at Hobbs High School, under Coach Jackson, and then walking onto the UNM track team after graduation. Kurt talks about just walking into the coaches office and talking to him, which he says wouldn't happen today. He gives some insight about what it looks like today with kids looking to join his program or walk on. I liked his honesty and how he said he tries to be honest with the kids and let them know if it's a reality. We continue to talk about his coaching journey and how he ended up at the University of Tennessee, where he graduated and worked as a student assistant, before moving on to Mississippi State. Kurt talks about the coaches he was able to study under during those times and how it helped influence his own coaching. We finish up talking about getting the job at UAB and what this season is looking like for them, as we are getting closer to the indoor season. So, tune in and enjoy the conversation. New Mexico cross country is wrapping up with the state meet coming next week, November 5th and the first Red vs Green Championship race the next Saturday. I hope you have had an opportunity to support your local teams and can get out to one of these fantastic races coming up. Good luck to anyone with a race coming up. Those mornings are cool, but the afternoons are so nice. Make sure you layer, wear reflective clothing in the dark, and keep running, New Mexico.

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #93: Raising Voices, Spirits, and Data through the SingWell Project: In conversation with Dr. Arla Good and Dr. Jessica Richardson

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 48:43


Welcome to the Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations Podcast. I'm Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, Program Specialist at the Aphasia Treatment Program at Cal State East Bay in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, and a member of the Aphasia Access Podcast Working Group. Aphasia Access strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources. I'm today's hosts for an episode featuring Dr. Arla Good and Dr. Jessica Richardson.        We will discuss the SingWell Project and the role of aphasia choirs from a bio-psychosocial model. Today's shows features the following gap areas from the Aphasia Access State of Aphasia Report authored by Nina Simmons-Mackie:  Gap area #3: insufficient availability of communication intervention for people with aphasia, or the need for services.  Gap area #8: insufficient attention to depression and low mood across the continuum of care.  Gap area #5: insufficient attention to life participation across the continuum of care. Guest Bios: Dr. Arla Good is the Co-director and Chief Researcher of the SingWell Project, an initiative uniting over 20 choirs for communication challenges around the world. Dr. Good is a member of the Science of Music, Auditory Research and Technology or SMART lab at Toronto Metropolitan University, formerly Ryerson University. Much of her work over the last decade has sought to identify and optimize music based interventions that can contribute to psychological and social well-being in a variety of different populations.  Dr. Jessica Richardson is an associate professor and speech-language pathologist at the University of New Mexico in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, and the Center for Brain Recovery and Repair. She is director of the UN M brain scouts lab and the stable and progressive aphasia center or space. Her research interest is recovering from acquired brain injury with a specific focus on aphasia, recovery, and management of primary progressive aphasia. She focuses on innovations in assessment and treatment with a focus on outcome measures that predict real world communication abilities, and life participation. Listener Take-aways In today's episode you will: Learn about the SingWell Project model of supporting choirs and research around the world Learn which five clinical populations are the initial targets of the SingWell Project Discover how the SingWell Project is challenging the stigma about disability and singing Learn about some of the biopsychosocial measures being used to capture choir outcomes Transcript edited for conciseness Show notes Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  02:58 I'm going to admit that aphasia choirs have long been one of my clinical passions. I'm really excited and honored to host this episode today. I'd like to just start with a question or two that will help our listeners get to know you both a little better. So Arla, is it okay, if I start with you? Would you share what motivated you to focus your research on music-based interventions? Do you have a personal connection to music?   Arla Good  03:29 I feel like I could do a whole podcast on how I ended up in this field.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  03:33 That'd be fun.   Arla Good  03:34 There's just so many anecdotes on how music can be a powerful tool. I've experienced it in my own life, and I've witnessed it in other lives. I'll share one example. My grandfather had aphasia and at my convocation when I was graduating in the Department of Psychology with a BA, despite not being able to communicate and express himself, he sang the Canadian National Anthem, perfect pitch-- all of the words. It's just an accumulation of anecdotes like that, that brought me to study music psychology. And over the course of my graduate studies, I came to see how it can be super beneficial for specific populations like aphasia.    So, I do have a quote from one of our choir participants that really sparked the whole idea of SingWell. It was a Parkinson's choir that we were working with. And she says, “At this point, I don't feel like my Parkinson's defines me as much as it used to. Now that I've been singing with the group for a while, I feel that I'm also a singer who is part of a vibrant community.” And that really just encapsulates what it is and why I'm excited to be doing what I'm doing--  to be bringing more positivity and the identity and strength into these different communities.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  04:49 Yes, the development of positive self-identity in the face of facing adversity is such an important contribution to what we do and thank you for sharing that personal journey. That was really beautiful.  Jessica, I'm hoping to get to hear a little bit about why what your personal connection is to aphasia choirs and music.   Jessica Richardson  05:12 Again, so many things. I grew up in a musical household. Everyone in my family sings and harmonizes and it's just beautiful. But a lot of my motivation for music and groups came from first just seeing groups. So some early experience with groups at the VA. Seeing Dr. Audrey Holland in action, of course, at the University of Arizona-that's where I did my training. Dr. Elman, you, of course, so many great examples that led to the development of lots of groups. We do virtual online groups for different treatments, different therapies. We have space exploration. We have space teams, which is communication partner instruction that's virtual. So we do lots of groups. And of course, we have a neuro choir here in New Mexico. Now, I'm just so excited that there's so much research that's coming out to support it.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  06:03 Jessica, can I just give you a little shout out? Because you were visionary. You actually created these amazing YouTube videos of your choir singing virtually, even before COVID. And you came out with the first virtual aphasia choir. I remember just sitting there and just watching it and being amazed. And little did we know. I guess you knew! Do you want to just take a moment because I want to put those links in our show notes and encourage every listener to watch these beautiful virtual choir songs that you've done. You've done two right?   Jessica Richardson  06:44 Yes. And I could not have done it, I need to make sure I give a shout out to my choir director, Nicole Larson, who's now Nicole Larson Vegas. She was an amazing person to work with on those things. She also now has opened a branch neuro choir, just one town over. We're in Albuquerque and she's in Corrales and our members can go to either one. We coordinate our songs.    I'd really like to start coordinating worldwide, Ellen. We can share resources and do virtual choirs worldwide and with Aphasia Choirs Go Global. But I definitely want to give her a shout out. And then of course our members. I mean, they were really brave to do that. Because there was nothing I could point them to online already to say, “Hey, people are doing this. You do it.” So they were really courageous to be some of the first.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  07:36 Do you want to mention the two songs so people know what to look for? And just throw in the name of your choir.   Jessica Richardson  07:42 We're just the UNM neuro choir as part of the UNM Brain Scouts. The first song was The Rose. The second song was This is Me from the Greatest Showman. And the song journal that you could wait for in the future is going to be Don't Give Up On Me by Andy Grammer.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  08:01 Beautiful! I can hardly wait. And there are some endeavors and efforts being made to create these international groups. Thank you for doing a shout out to Aphasia Choirs Go Global, which is a Facebook group to support people who are involved in neuro and aphasia choirs. I'll give a shout out to Bron Jones who helped start it and Alli Talmage from New Zealand who has worked really hard to build a community there. It's been really wonderful to have a place where we can throw out questions to each other and ask for opinions and actually dig into some interesting questions like, “What measures are you using to capture X, Y, or Z?” I think we'll get to talk about some of that today, actually. So thank you.    I encourage our listeners to listen to those two YouTube videos we'll put in the show notes. But Jessica, I'm going to give you a twofer here. I've been following your amazing work for many years, but the first time I got to meet you in person was at an Aphasia Access Leadership Summit. I wanted to ask you as an Aphasia Access member, if you have any particular Aphasia Access memories that you could share with our listeners?   Jessica Richardson  09:09 Well, it was actually that memory. So, I would say my all-time favorite collection of Aphasia Access moments, really was working with my amazing colleague, Dr. Katerina Haley. She's at UNC Chapel Hil. We were co-program chairs for the Aphasia Access 2017 summit in Florida. The whole summit, I still think back on it and just smile so wide. And you know, we went to the museum, we were at the Aphasia House, just so many wonderful things. All of the round tables and the presentations, they just rocked my world. And it's just something I'm super proud to have been a part of behind the scenes making it happen. And I also remember that you wrote me the nicest note afterwards.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  09:54 It was just because it impacted me, too. Personally, I felt like it just cracked open such a world of being able to have engaging discussions with colleagues. Tom Sather, really named it the other day (at IARC) when he quoted Emile Durkheim's work on collective effervescence, the sense of being together with a community. I'm seeing Arla, nodding her head too.   Arla Good Yeah, I like that.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Yeah, there was a lot of effervescing at these Leadership Summits, and we have one coming up in 2023. I'm really excited about it and hope to get more information out to our listeners about that. So I'll just say stay tuned. And you'll be hearing more, definitely.   I just want to do one more shout out. And that is, you mentioned international collaboration. I'd like to do a quick shout out to Dr. Gillian Velmer who has been doing the International Aphasia Choirs. I'll gather a couple of links to a couple of songs that she's helped produce with people around the world with aphasia singing together. So there's just some great efforts being done.    That's why I'm excited about launching into these questions. I want to start with an introduction of SingWell. Arla, would you like to get the ball rolling on that one?   Arla Good  11:09 For sure. SingWell began with my co-director, Frank Russo, and myself being inspired by that quote I shared at the beginning about singing doing something really special for these communities. We applied for a Government of Canada grant and we received what's called a Partnership grant. It really expanded well beyond just me and Frank, and it became a network of over 50 researchers, practitioners, national provincial support organizations, and it continues growing.    It's really about creating a flow of information from academia to the community, and then back to academia. So understanding what research questions are coming up in these communities of interests. And what information can we, as researchers, share with these communities? That's SingWell, I'll get into the research questions.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:03 Let's dive in a little bit deeper. What is SingWell's primary aim?  That's something you describe really well in an article we'll talk about a little later.   Arla Good  12:15 So our aim is to document, to understand, group singing as a strategy, as a way to address the psychosocial well-being and communication for people who are living with communication challenges. SingWell, we're defining a communication challenge as a condition that affects an individual's ability to produce, perceive or understand speech. We're working with populations like aphasia, but also people living with hearing loss, lung disease, stuttering. I hope, I don't forget anybody. There are five populations. Parkinson's, of course.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  12:53 Perfect. So that's your primary aim. Do you want to speak to any secondary or additional goals for your project?   Arla Good  13:03 The second major pillar of this grant is to advocate and share the information with these communities. So, how can we facilitate the transfer of this knowledge? We've started a TikTok channel, so you can watch videos. We have a newsletter and a website that's continuously being updated with all the new information. We want to develop best practice guides to share with these communities about what we've learned and how these types of choirs can be run. And really, just mobilize the network of partners so that we're ensuring the information is getting to the right community.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  13:35 Wow. Well, I mentioned a moment ago that there's a 2020 article that you wrote with your colleagues, Kreutz, Choma, Fiocco, and Russo that describes the SingWell project protocol. It  lays out your long term goals. Do you want to add anything else to what you've said about where this project is headed?   Arla Good  13:54 Sure, the big picture of this project is that we have a network of choirs that are able to address the needs of these different populations. I want the network to be dense and thriving. The home of the grant is Canada. But of course, we have partners in the states, like Jessica, and in Europe and in New Zealand. So to have this global network of choirs that people can have access to, and to advocate for a social prescription model in healthcare. Have doctors prescribing these choirs, and this network is available for doctors to see, okay, here's the closest choir to you. So, in some ways, this is a third goal of the project is to be building this case for the social prescription of singing.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  14:41 Before we go too much further, I want to acknowledge that you picked a wonderful aphasia lead, Dr. Jessica Richardson. That's your role, right? We haven't given you a chance to explain your role with SingWell. Do you want to say anything about that Jessica?   Jessica Richardson  14:58 Yeah, sure. I'm still learning about my role. Overall, I know theme leaders, in general, were charged with overseeing research directions for their theme. Aphasias, the theme that I'm leader of, and then monitoring progress of research projects and the direction of that. So far, it's mostly involved some advising of team members and reviewing and giving feedback of grant applications. I'm supposed to be doing more on the social and networking end and I hope to be able to make more that more of a priority next year, but I do think this podcast counts. So thank you for that.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  15:33 Well, you did a wonderful presentation. I should be transparent, I was invited to be on the Advisory Committee of SingWell, and I got to hear your first presentation at the first project meeting where each team leader explained their focus and endeavor. I was so excited to hear the way you presented the information on aphasia, because again, we know that for some people, aphasia is not a well-known name or word. And even though this is a very educated group, and I think everybody, all the leaders know about aphasia, but it was nice to see you present and put on the table some of the challenges and importance of doing this research.    One of the things that really attracted me when reading about that 2020 article is that you talk about SingWell having an ability versus disability focus early, Arla, could you elaborate on that?   Arla Good  16:22 Our groups are open to anybody, regardless of their musical, vocal or hearing abilities. And we compare it often to the typical talk-based support groups that focuses on challenges and deficits. Of course, there's a time and place, these can provide a lot of benefit for people living in these communities. So, this isn't a replacement for these types of support groups,  But, singing is a strength-based activity. They're working together to create a beautiful sound and there's often a performance at the end that they're very proud of. We're challenging stigma, especially in a population like aphasia, where it would seem like, oh, you have aphasia, you can't sing? But, of course they can. We're challenging that stigma of who can sing and who can't sing. We find that it's just so enjoyable for these people to be coming and doing something strength- based and feeling good. Going back to that, quote I said at the beginning, right? To feel like there's more to their identity than a diagnosis. This is what keeps them coming back.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  17:22 Beautifully said, and I can't help but think how that really connects with the life participation approach. There's no one better than Jessica, for me to throw that back out to her, and ask how she sees the connection between that.   Jessica Richardson  17:37 Yes, absolutely. Their focus on ability and fighting loneliness and isolation and on social well-being is right in line with it. Because LPAA is really focusing on reengagement in life, on competence, rather than deficits, on inclusion, and also on raising the status of well-being measures to be just as important as other communication outcomes.    I want to make sure we also bring up something from our Australian and New Zealand colleagues, the living successfully with aphasia framework, because it is also in line with LPAA and SingWell. I can say they have this alternative framework. They also don't want to talk about the deficit or disability. It doesn't try to ignore or even minimize the aphasia, but it emphasizes positive factors, like independence, meaningful relationships, meaningful contributions, like you know that performance. So there's just so much value and so much alignment with what Aphasia Access listeners and members really care about.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  18:44 That's a great transition for what I was thinking about next. I was very excited to see people talking about the 2018 review by Baker, Worrall, Rose and colleagues that identifies aphasia choirs as a level one treatment in the step psychological care model for managing depression in aphasia. So that's really powerful to me, and we're starting to see more research come out looking at the impact of participating in aphasia choirs. I'm really excited to see some of this initial research coming out.    Maybe you can address what some of the gaps in the literature might be when it comes to group singing? And its impact on well-being. Maybe Arla, we can start with that and then Jessica, you can jump in and address specifically communication and aphasia choirs. Arla, do you want to start out?   Arla Good  19:35 This is a very exciting time, like you said, there is research that is starting to come out. People are starting to study choirs as a way of achieving social well-being, psychological well-being and so the field is ripe and ready for some good robust scientific research.    Most of the studies that are coming out have really small sample sizes. It's hard to get groups together, and they often lack comparison groups. So what I think SingWell is going to do is help understand the mechanisms and what is so great about singing and what singing contributes. The other thing I'd like to mention is that with SingWell, our approach is a bit unique compared to what some of the other research researchers are doing, in that we're adopting a very hands-off approach to choir. So we're letting choir directors have the autonomy to organize based on their own philosophies, their expertise, and the context of their choirs. So we call it choir in its natural habitat.   And this is giving us the opportunity to explore group effects. What approach is the choir director taking and what's working, what's not working? And to have this large sample of different types of choirs, we can learn a lot from this number, this type of research project as well.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  20:54 What I really love about that is getting to know some of these wonderful colleagues through Aphasia Choirs Go Global and hearing about what their rehearsals and goals look like. There are some amazing similarities, just like saying, “You're doing that in Hungary? But we're doing that here, too.”  And there are some wonderful differences. I really firmly believe that there are a variety of ways to do this very successfully, just like there are a variety of ways to run successful aphasia groups, but there's going to be some core ingredients that we need to understand better.    Just before I go too far away from this, how about you? Do you want to speak to anything we need to learn in the literature about aphasia choirs?   Jessica Richardson  21:35 Yeah, I mean, I don't think I'm saying too much different than Arla. Arla, may want to follow up. But the main gap is that we just don't have enough evidence. And we don't have enough, like she said, solid methodology, high fidelity, to even support its efficacy to convince stakeholders, third party payers, etc. Anecdotal evidence is great, and YouTube videos that we create are also great, but it's not enough. And even more and more choirs popping up around the world, it's not enough.   We need that strong research base to convince the people that need convincing. SingWell is hoping to add to that through its pilot grants, through its methodology that they share for people to use. And I'm hopeful that other organizations, you know, like Aphasia Choirs Go Global, can link up at some point with saying, “Well, I'm excited about communities like that that are also supportive of researching choirs.” Arla, think I saw you're wanting to follow up.   Arla Good  22:31 I just wanted to add to something that Ellen had said about the power and diversity and having these different perspectives. And another goal of SingWell is to create, and it's up on the website already, it's a work in progress, it's going to continue growing, but a menu of options for choir directors who are looking to start a choir like this. Like if you want this kind of goal, here are some tips. So, if it's a social choir, you might want to configure the room in a circle. But if you have musical goals, maybe you want to separate your sopranos, your altos, tenors, and your bass. It's not one prescribed method. It's a menu of items that we're hoping we can through, this diversity of our network, that we can clarify for people who are trying to start a choir for themselves.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:19 I love that because I can hear in my head right now, Aura Kagan saying over and over again that the life participation approach is not a prescriptive approach. But rather, you're always looking at what is the best fit for your needs. Jessica, your head is nodding, so do you want to add anything?   Jessica Richardson  23:37 It's a way to shift your whole entire perspective and your framework. And that's what I love about it.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  23:44 We'll just go back to that 2020 article for a moment because I really liked that article. You and your authors describe four measures of well-being and there are potential neuroendocrinological, that's really a lot of syllables in here, but I'll try to say it again, neuroendocrinological underpinnings,    Arla Good   The hormones---   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis   Oh, that's better, thank you, the hormones, too. Could you just take a moment and please share what these four measures of well-being and their hormonal underpinnings might be?   Arla Good  24:11 For sure. The first one is connection, the connectedness outcome. So we're asking self-report measures of how connected people feel. But we're also measuring oxytocin, which is a hormone that's typically associated with social bonding.    The second measure is stress. And again, we're asking self-report measures, but we're also looking at cortisol, which is a hormone associated with stress.    The third measure is pain. And this one's a little bit more complex, because we're measuring pain thresholds. Really, it sounds scary, but what we do is apply pressure to the finger and people tell us when it feels uncomfortable. So it's actually well before anyone's experiencing pain. But we're thinking that this might be a proxy for beta endorphin release. So that's the underpinning there.    And then the last outcome is mood. This is also a self-report measure. And one of the types of analyses that we're running is we want to see what's contributing to an improved mood. Is it about the cortisol? Is it about just like deep breathing and feeling relaxed? Is it that or is there something special happening when they feel the rush of oxytocin and social connectedness? The jury's still out. These are super preliminary data at this point, especially with oxytocin, there's so much to learn. But those are some of the hormones, the sociobiological underpinnings that we're exploring.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  25:31 That makes for some really exciting research and the way you frame things, SingWell is supporting grants, maybe you could comment on how its biopsychosocial framework influences the methods and outcome measures that you want to adopt.   Arla Good  25:48 Sure, we do provide guidelines and suggestions for measures. Jessica alluded to this. We have it all up on the website, if anyone else wants to run a study like this. And then we have some that we're requiring of any study that's going to be funded through SingWell. And this is so we can address this small sample size problem in the literature. So the grant runs for six more years. It's a seven year grant. And at the end, we're going to merge all the data together for one mega study. We want to have some consistency across the studies, so we do have some that are required. And then we have this typical SingWell design. We're offering support for our research team, from what a project could look like.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  26:28 Well, this podcast typically has a wonderful diverse demographic, but it includes researchers. and clinical researchers who collaborate. So, let's take a moment and have you describe the grant review process and the dates for the next cycle, just in case people want to learn more.   Arla Good  26:45 Sure, so we are accepting grants from SingWell members. So the first step is to become a SingWell member. There is an application process on the website. We have an executive committee that reviews the applications twice a year, the next one is in scheduled for November. There's some time to get the application together. Once you're in as a member, the application for receiving funding is actually quite simple. It's basically just an explanation of the project and then it will undergo a review process. Jessica is actually one of our reviewers, so she can speak to what it was like to be a reviewer,   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  27:21 That would be great because, Jessica, when you and I chatted about it briefly, I've never heard a reviewer be so excited about being supportive in this process. So please share a little bit more because I thought your perspective was so refreshing and positive.    Jessica Richardson  27:36 I have to say too, I have definitely benefited from having some amazing reviewers in my own lifetime. I definitely have to point out one who was so impactful, Mary Boyle, her review, it was so thorough, and it was so intense, but it elevated one of my first endeavors into discourse analysis to just like a different level. And just the way that she treated it as a way to help shape, she was so invested, in just making sure that we were the best product out there. I learned what the world needed to learn. I definitely learned a lot from that experience and from other reviewers like her that I've benefited from.    As a reviewer, whenever I review anything, I try to keep that same spirit. So when I was doing SingWell reviews, I made sure that I revisited the parent grant. I did a really good, thorough reread. I provided feedback and critiques from the lens of how does this fit with SingWell's aims? And, how can it be shaped to serve those aims if it isn't quite there yet? So it's never like, “Ah, no, this is so far off”, it was just like, “Oh, where can we make a connection to help it fit?” Then trying to provide a review that would be a recipe for success, if not for this submission cycle, then for the next.    And as a submitter, even though I mean, we didn't have a meeting to like all take this approach. But I felt that the feedback that I received was really in that same spirit. And so I love feedback in general. I don't always love the rejection that comes with it. But I do love stepping outside of myself and learning from that different perspective. And I've really just felt that this thing while reviewers were invested, and were really just interested in shaping submissions to success,   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  29:24 That's really worthwhile, right? So you get something, even if you're not going to get funding. You still get to come away with something that's valuable, which is that feedback.    We've been talking about measures and I'm really interested in that as a topic. Jessica, could you take a moment and share a little bit about how SingWell's pre/post measures are being adopted for aphasia?  We all know that's some of the challenges. Sometimes, some of the measures that we use for mood, connectivity, or stress are not always aphasia-friendly. So what does that process look like?   Jessica Richardson  29:59 I will say they did their homework at the top end, even before the proposal was submitted. Really having you on the advisory board, and I was able to give some feedback on some of the measures. Some of the measures they've already selected were specific to aphasia. For Parkinson's disease, there are Parkinson's disease specific measures and for stuttering, specific measures. And for aphasia, they picked ones that are already aphasia-friendly. What I was super excited about too, is that they included discourse without me asking. It was already there. I think we helped build it to be a better discourse sample and we've added our own. So it's already in there as their set of required and preferred measures. But the other thing is that the investigator, or investigators, have a lot of latitude, according to your knowledge of the clinical population that you're working with, to add outcomes that you feel are relevant. That's a pretty exciting aspect of getting these pilot funds.    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  30:58 So there's both some core suggested measures, but there's a lot of latitude for making sure that you're picking measures that will capture and are appropriate to your particular focus of your projects. That's great. Absolutely.   Jessica Richardson  31:09 I definitely feel that if there were any big issue that we needed to bring up, we would just talk to Arla and Frank, and they would be receptive.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  31:20 I've been very intrigued and interested in attempts to measure social connectedness as an outcome measure. You speak about it in your article, about the value of social bonding and the way music seems to be a really good mechanism to efficiently create social bonding. Is there something about choir that makes this factor, this social connectedness, different from being part of other groups? How are you going to even capture this this factor? Who wants to take that one?     Arla Good  31:50 I do, I can talk, we can do another podcast on this one.   Jessica Richardson  31:55 It's my turn, Arla. I'm just kidding (laughter).   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:01 You can both have a turn. You go first, Arla,  And then Jessica, I think you will probably add,   Jessica Richardson  32:04 I'm totally kidding (laughter).   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  32:06 Go ahead, Arla.   Arla Good  32:07 This is what I did my dissertation on. I truly believe in the power of group music making. So singing is just an easy, accessible, scalable way to get people to move together. It's consistent with an evolutionary account that song and dance was used by small groups to promote social bonding and group resiliency. I've seen the term collective effervescence in these types of writings.    When we moved together, it was like a replacement for in our great ape ancestors, they were one on one grooming, picking up the nits in each other's fur. Human groups became too large and too complex to do one on one ways of social bonding. And so we needed to develop a way to bond larger groups rapidly.    And the idea here is that movement synchrony, so moving together in precise time, was one way of connecting individuals, creating a group bond. Singing is just a fun way of doing that. I've been studying this for about 15 years and trying to understand. We've pared it down, right down to just tapping along with a metronome, and seeing these types of cooperation outcomes and feelings of social bonding, connectedness. I do think there's something special, maybe not singing specifically, but activities that involve movement synchrony. We could talk about drumming, we could talk about dance, I think that there is a special ingredient in these types of activities that promote social bonds.   Jessica Richardson  33:37 There's been some of us even looking at chanting, there's research about that as well.    Arla Good   We should do a SingWell study on chanting!   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  33:43 Jessica, what else do you want to add about what is important about capturing social connectedness? Or, how do we capture social connectedness?     Jessica Richardson  33:53 I think I'll answer the first part, which is, what is special about thinking about it and capturing it. It's something that we've slowly lost over decades and generations, the communal supports. Our communities are weakened, we're more spread out. It's also a way of bringing something back that has been so essential for so long. We've weakened it with technology, with just all the progress that we've made. It's a way to bring something that is very primitive and very essential back. So, that doesn't totally answer your question, though.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  34:31 When we think about the isolation related to aphasia and the loss of friendship, and some of the wonderful research that's coming out about the value and impact of friendship on aphasia, and then, you think about choirs and some of this research--I believe choir is identified as the number one most popular adult hobby/activity. I think more people are involved in choirs as an adult. It's not the only meaningful activity, but it's a very long standing, well developed one,   Jessica Richardson  35:03 We have to figure out how to get the people though who will not touch a choir with a 10 foot pole?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:08 Well, we will continue to do the work on the other groups, right, that suits them very well. You know, be it a book club, or a gardening group, or a pottery class, or many, many, many other choices.   Jessica Richardson  35:21 Or a bell choir?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  35:24 Bell choirs are great, too.    Do either of you want to speak to what type of measures captures social connectedness or what you're using, or suggesting people try to use, for SingWell projects?   Jessica Richardson  35:38 I think Arla already captured some of those with those markers that she was talking about earlier. Hormonal markers. But the self-report questionnaires, and that perspective. There's other biomarkers that can very easily be obtained, just from your spirit. So I think that's going in the right direction, for sure.   Arla Good  35:59 Yeah, we've also looked at behavioral measures in the past like strategic decision making games, economic decision making games, and just seeing if people trust each other, and whether they're willing to share with each other. We've asked people how attractive they think the other people are. Questions like this that are capturing the formation of a group, whether they're willing to share with their in-group.  It's a question of in-group and out-group, and what are some of the effects of the in-group.     Jessica Richardson  36:26 And we're definitely exploring too, because we do a lot of neurophysiological recording in my lab. Is there a place for EEG here? Is there a place for fNIRS, especially with fNIRS, because they can actually be doing these things. They can be participating in choir, we can be measuring things in real time. While they're doing that, with the fNIRS-like sports packs, so sorry, fNIRS is functional near-infrared spectroscopy in case some of the listeners aren't sure.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  36:52 I needed help with that one too. Thank you.    I'm thinking about some of the work done by Tom Sather that talks about the sense of flow and its contribution to eudaimonic well-being, right? I think that's a key piece of what SingWell is looking at as well. It's exciting to look at all these different measures, and all these different pillars that you are presenting today.    And if people want to find out more about SingWell, do you want to say something about your website, what they might find if they were to go there?   Arla Good  37:25 Yes, go to the website, SingWell.org, pretty easy to remember. And on the website, you'll find all the resources to run a research study, to apply to be a member. We have resources for choir directors who are looking to start their own choir, we have opportunities to get involved as research participants if you're someone living with aphasia, or other communication challenges. There's lots of opportunities to get involved on the website. And you can sign up for our newsletter and receive the updates as they come and check out our website.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  37:57 That's great. I certainly have been watching it develop. And I think it has a lot of really helpful resources. I appreciate the work that's been put into that. How do people get involved in the SingWell project? You mentioned earlier about becoming a member. Is there anything else you want to add about becoming engaged with SingWell?    Arla Good  38:18 I think the ways to become involved, either becoming a member or starting a choir using the resources, or like I said, signing up for the newsletter just to stay engaged. And as a participant, of course, doing the surveys or signing up for a choir if you're one of the participants called.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  38:35 Thank you. I'm was wondering if you'd share with the listeners any sample projects that are underway.    Arla Good  38:46 For sure. So we have five funded studies this year. We have one ChantWell, which Jessica spoke about, assessing the benefits of chanting for breathing disorders. That's taking place in Australia. The effects of online group singing program for older adults with breathing disorders on their lung health, functional capacity, cognition, quality of life, communication skills and social inclusion. That is in Quebec, Canada. The third study, the group singing to support well-being and communication members of Treble Tremors. That's a Parkinson's choir taking place in Prince Edward Island, Canada. The fourth is how important is the group in group singing, so more of a theoretical question looking at group singing versus individual singing, an unbiased investigation of group singing benefits for well-being and that's also in Quebec. And then last but not least, I saved it for last, is our very own Jessica Richardson's group singing to improve communication and well-being for persons with aphasia or Parkinson's disease. So I thought I might let Jessica share, if she's open to sharing some of what the research study will entail.   Jessica Richardson  39:53 Oh, yes, thank you. When we first started our neuro choir, I had envisioned it as being an aphasia choir. And we had so much need in the community, from people with other types of brain injury. Our Parkinson's Disease Association, too, has really been reaching out ever since I've moved here. They have a group actually, they're called the Movers and Shakers, which I really love. So, we have a pretty healthy aphasia cohort of people who are interested, who also, you know, taking a break and only doing things virtually if they are interested, you know, since COVID. And then we have our Parkinson's cohort here as well, the Movers and Shakers, were following the suggested study design, it's a 12 week group singing intervention. They have suggestions for different outcome measures at different timescales, we're following that and adding our own outcome measures that we also feel are relevant. So we have those measures for communication and well-being, including the well-being biomarkers through the saliva. As she mentioned, already, we have latitude for the choir director, like who we want to pick and what she or he wants to do. We already have that person picked out. And we already know, and have all of that stuff figured out. There is some guidance, but again, flexibility for our session programming. And we have the choices over the homework programming, as well. We are really looking at this choir in the wild, and looking at those outcomes with their measures. So we're excited about it.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:22 I think you've just thought of a great name for a future aphasia choir, which is a “neuro choir choir in the wild”   Jessica Richardson  41:30 Well, out here, we're a choir in the wild, wild west.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  41:34 There you go. Absolutely. What have been some of the most surprising findings of the benefits of singing so far that have come in through the SingWell project? Either of you want to take that on?   Arla Good  41:46 I don't know if it's the most surprising, but it's definitely the most exciting. I'm excited to continue unpacking what's happening with oxytocin, I think it's a pretty exciting hormone, it's pretty hot right now. It's typically associated with being like a love hormone. They call it associated with sex, and it's associated with mother-infant bonding. If we can find a way that's not mother-infant or pair bonding to release oxytocin, that's very exciting. If group singing is one of those ways to promote this sense of “I don't know where I end and you begin, and we're one” and all those loving feelings. As Jessica mentioned, the missing piece, and how we relate to each other in a society, choir might be an answer to that. I'm really excited about the oxytocin outcome measure. Again, it's still very early, I don't want to say definitively what's happening, but it's a pretty exciting piece.   Jessica Richardson  42:45 I have a future doctoral student that's going to be working on this. That is the part she's most interested in as well..   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  42:52 So there are some really good things that, hopefully, will continue to tell us what some of these benefits are and that it's important to fund and connect people to these types of activities. You said, this is like year one or two of a 6 year project, was that right? Or is it seven year?   Arla Good  43:09 It's seven year.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  43:10 So what is your hope for the future of the SingWell project?   Arla Good  43:15 The secondary goals would be the hope for the future, of actually creating change in the communities and getting people to think outside the box of providing care. Is there a choir that can be prescribed nearby? Is there a way to train these choir directors so that they have the correct training for this specific population? So drawing from the knowledge from speech- language therapy, from choir direction, from music therapy-   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  43:42 Music therapy, right.   Arla Good  43:43 Of course, of course. So creating an accreditation program and training choir directors to lead choirs like this, and having this army of choir directors around the world that are doing this. So, this is a big goal. But that's what I hope to see.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  44:00 That's fantastic. And I think there's some researchers who are really working hard at looking at protocols and asking these questions. And I know, I've been inspired by some of the work that Ali Talmage is doing in New Zealand that's looking at some of these questions. And, Jessica, do you want to add what's your hope is as aphasia lead? Or, what you're thinking about for the SingWell project that you're excited about?   Jessica Richardson  44:21 We have to generate that evidence that we need and mentioning again, those 10 foot pole people, to reach out to let people know that choirs aren't just for people who think that they can sing. We definitely have had some very energetic and enthusiastic choir members who think that they can sing and cannot, and they're still showing up. Maybe you're the one who thinks that choirs aren't for you. If we can generate enough energy, inertia, and evidence to convince those that it might be worth giving a try. I think some of them are going to be surprised that they enjoy it and “oh, I can sing.” So I think that to me is a future hoped for outcome.    And then again, seeing it spread out to other gardening groups, other yoga groups, all these other things that we know are happening within Aphasia Access members and beyond to see, okay, there's this methodology. This is what's used to study something like this, let's apply it also so that its efficacy data for these other approaches that we know and we see can be helpful, but we don't have enough proof to have someone prescribe it and to get those stakeholders involved.   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  45:33 Yes. And we talked about the importance of some of the work that's being done with mental health and aphasia and how some of the information that you're pursuing could really tie in and help us support and get more work in that area as well. So really exciting.    I can't believe we have to wrap up already. I agree with you all, that we could just keep talking on this one. But let's just end on this note, I would like to find out from both of you. If you had to pick just one thing that we need to achieve urgently as a community of providers and professionals, what would that one thing be? What would you like to speak to? At the end of this discussion we've had today and Arla, you get to go first again.   Arla Good  46:15 The one thing we need to achieve urgently is to find a way to address people's needs in a more holistic way. And to see the human as a whole, that it's not just this piece and this piece and this piece, but all of it together? And how can we do that? How can we communicate better as practitioners, as researchers, so that we can address these needs more holistically?   Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  46:36 Thank you. Thank you. And Jessica, what would you like to say?   Jessica Richardson  46:41 I could just say ditto. I totally agree. So the end.    But I think the other part is from a clinician standpoint. What I hear most from colleagues that are out there in the wild, and former students, is that they want the “How to” info which is perfect, because, SingWell has a knowledge mobilization aim, and the exact aim of that is to develop and share best practice guides, which you know, are already mentioned, choir sustainability guides, how to fund it, how to keep it going. Really important. And they're going to update these regularly. It's going to be available in lots of languages. So that's something I'm especially excited for, for our community, because I know so many people who want to start a choir, but it feels too big and intimidating, and maybe they don't feel like they have the musical chops. But this will really help them get over that hump to get started and will address that need. And that desire, that's already there, in a big way.        Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  47:42 Thank you. I'm so appreciative that you both made this happen today. It was complicated schedules. And I just really, really appreciate want to thank you for being our guests for this podcast. It was so much fun. I'm excited to follow the SingWell project over the next seven years and see what continues to grow and develop.    So for more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasiaaccess.org And if you have an idea for a future podcast series topic, just email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org And thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access. Arla, Jessica, thank you so much. Thank you.    References and Resources  UNM Neuro Choir: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQuamJgTVj8&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guU_uRaFbHI&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=6 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4_0Xd7HNoM&list=PLy586K9YzXUzyMXOOQPNz3RkfRZRqtR-L&index=7   www.singwell.org Good, A., Kreutz, G., Choma, B., Fiocco, A., Russo, F., & World Health Organization. (2020). The SingWell project protocol: the road to understanding the benefits of group singing in older adults. Public Health Panorama, 6(1), 141-146. Good, A., & Russo, F. A. (2022). Changes in mood, oxytocin, and cortisol following group and individual singing: A pilot study. Psychology of Music, 50(4), 1340-1347.    

Die Maus - Musik
Warum heißt es Zitteraal?

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 31:50


Die Maus zum Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit einem elektrischen Fisch, den Unmöglichen, mit Marie und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von Marie Güttge.

Peaceful Political Revolution in America
Season 2, Episode 1. Christian Fritz on American Sovereigns

Peaceful Political Revolution in America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 65:18


Welcome back to the second season of the Peaceful Political Revolution in America Podcast, a series of conversations with America's top scholars, writers, journalists, and activists, on the topic of our Constitution. Thank you for tuning in to this podcast, and for your time, support, and continued interest in a subject that I personally find to be the most crucial topic of our time. Season one was an amazing journey for me, and I would sum it up like this: Americans, for the first time in human history, established the inalienable right of the people to not only create their forms of government but to change and to alter them, whenever they deemed necessary. By now, that mantra may sound familiar to everyone, even in today's muddied political climate. But just how is this fundamental, unshakeable right exercised? What precedents from our founding period define our role as sovereign citizens? And what lessons can we take away from those revolutionary Americans who set the United States on its unique and presumably, enlightened and democratic path? Christian Fritz joined the UNM law faculty in 1987 to introduce legal history to first-year students, a new concept to legal education. Even today, few law schools offer such a course. Fritz had just become the first person to complete a program at the University of California in which he earned a Ph.D. in history at Berkeley along with a law degree from Hastings College of Law. At the UNM law school, he teaches a variety of legal history courses along with Property. He has a deep knowledge of legal and constitutional history and an exhaustive research style. In addition to numerous articles, book chapters, and reviews, Fritz has written books on legal history, including Federal Justice in California: The Court of Ogden Hoffman, 1851-1891. In October 2007, Cambridge University Press published his long-term study: American Sovereigns: The People and America's Constitutional Tradition Before the Civil War.This seminal work challenges traditional American constitutional history, theory, and jurisprudence that sees today's constitutionalism as linked by an unbroken chain to the 1787 Federal constitutional convention. It examines the idea that after the American Revolution, a collectivity – the people – would rule as the sovereign. Heated political controversies within the states and at the national level over what it meant for the people to be the sovereign, and how that collective sovereign could express its will were not resolved prior to the Civil War. The idea of the people as the sovereign both unified and divided Americans in thinking about government and the basis of the Union. Today's constitutionalism is not a natural inheritance, but the product of choices Americans made between shifting understandings about themselves as a collective sovereign. Its the perfect topic to begin this season with because until we have a deeper understanding of our relationship to our constitution, it will be difficult for Americans to be engaged in any process of remaking it. So, let's dig in!Chris, welcome to the Peaceful Political Revolution in America Podcast!

The Opening Drive
Up Front

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 43:27


Lobo offensive lineman Isaak Gutierrez joins the show to discuss his work in the community, his road to UNM, the chemistry needed between offensive lineman and the expectations for Saturday.  Lobo/Aggie smack talk.  Can you live without Flex Seal?  Who stays undefeated Sunday night? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tee to Green
Episode 23: Lauren Lehigh

Tee to Green

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 22:02


On this episode of Tee to Green, hosts Jensen and Megan chat with University of New Mexico senior Lauren Lehigh. She took the time to share her experience with the US Women's Am this past summer, the community at UNM and what it means to her, along with what its been like having a sister play college golf! Go give this episode a listen!

Inside the Headset with the AFCA
Jacob Bronowski, ST Coordinator - Miami (Ohio)

Inside the Headset with the AFCA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 22:36


This week on Inside the Headset we are featuring Miami University Ohio's Special Teams Coordinator, Jacob Bronowksi. Coach Bronowski talks about his journey to special teams coordinator, how he adjusts for close games, and how he navigates being a great coach and a great family man. Coach Bronowski is in his first season at Miami (OH) University as the Special Teams coordinator. Coach Bronowski has also had stops at Tennessee, UCF, and Robert Morris. He got his start in coaching in 2017 as a special teams graduate assistant at his alma mater at the University of New Mexico. He played quarterback at UNM (2013) and also spent time as a special teams student assistant with the Lobos in 2014-16 before completing his degree in liberal arts in 2016. 0:29 Start of Interview 0:47 When did you know that you wanted to coach? + Start in coaching  4:37 How did you end up with special teams?  6:36 How did not having previous knowledge of special teams impact your career? 8:41 When did you become responsible for all four phases of the special teams? 12:00 What do you implement to try and win when games are close at the end of the fourth quarter? 16:21 How to be a great coach and a family man  19:41 Conclusion and Social Media Twitter: @coachjbronowski

Die Maus - Musik
Hühnermusik

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 33:25


Die Maus zum Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit den Unmöglichen, Hühnermusik, Charlie Parker, mit André und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von Andreas Blendin.

10 Minuten Jura
Folge 23: Die WGG - ein top-aktuelles Rechtsinstitut!

10 Minuten Jura

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 23:35


In den Zeiten von politischen Krisen steigt die Bedeutung von Wegfall der Geschäftsgrundlage (§ 313 BGB), da Umstände wie Inflation, Corona oder Energiekrise das wirtschaftliche Gleichgewicht von Verträgen berühren. In dieser Folge schauen wir uns die Voraussetzungen der WGG und ihre Abgrenzung vor allem zu den Vorschriften über die Unmöglichkeit (§§ 275, 326 BGB) an. Dazu analysieren wir zwei aktuelle BGH-Entscheidungen zum Einfluss von Corona auf Verträge. In der Folge erwähnte Entscheidungen: BGH Urt. v. 12.1.2022 - XII ZR 8/21, NJW 2022, 1370 (Gewerberaummiete), BGH Urt. v. 4.5.2022 - XII ZR 64/21, NJW 2022, 2024 (Fitnessstudio), BGH Urt. v. 23.1.2013 - VIII ZR 80/12, NJW 2013, 991 (Preisänderungsklausel bei Gasbelieferung) Repetitorium: https://www.repetitorium-hofmann.de Anwalt für Prüfungsrecht: http://www.rechtsanwalt-hofmann.net - für Jurastudierende kostenlose Erstberatung! Intro: Jörg Hofmann, https://www.joerg-hofmann.com https://open.spotify.com/artist/7mGFxzVs5CPMyf3Lalpvlc

Square State Sandlot Podcast
Vogt retires, MLB Playoffs/Predictions, Pokes, Raiders, Steelers, Broncos, NBA Chatter

Square State Sandlot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 45:04


Kyle is out, so Bill discusses: The retirement of Stephen Vogt and what he meant to A's fans. Judge hits #62, is he your HR king? MLB Playoffs kick off and predictions. Wyoming vs UNM matchup. An update on our pick 'em. Raiders vs. Broncos and Chiefs preview. Pickett time in PIT despite the most difficult stretch in the schedule. TNF IND vs DEN... :| Wembanyama sweepstakes Draymond... and more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/squarestatesandlot/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/squarestatesandlot/support

Square State Sandlot Podcast
Vogt retires, MLB Playoffs/Predictions, Pokes, Raiders, Steelers, Broncos, NBA Chatter

Square State Sandlot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 45:04


Kyle is out, so Bill discusses: The retirement of Stephen Vogt and what he meant to A's fans. Judge hits #62, is he your HR king? MLB Playoffs kick off and predictions. Wyoming vs UNM matchup. An update on our pick 'em. Raiders vs. Broncos and Chiefs preview. Pickett time in PIT despite the most difficult stretch in the schedule. TNF IND vs DEN... :| Wembanyama sweepstakes Draymond... and more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/squarestatesandlot/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/squarestatesandlot/support

Die Maus - Musik
Eure Musikwünsche

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 29:14


Die Maus zum Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit vielen Wünschen vom Maus-Anrufbeantworter, den Unmöglichen und einer Befreiung, viel Musik, mit André und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von Andre Gatzke.

Tagesgespräch
Mark Varshavsky, Simone Müller: 2. Flucht dank Yehudi Menuhin

Tagesgespräch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 17:49


Um aus der Sowjetunion auszureisen, braucht es eine Einladung aus Israel. Unmöglich für Mark Varshavsky, diese zu bekommen. Der Geigenvirtuose Yehudi Menuhin hilft. Leiden schwingt immer mit in Varshavskys Musik. Die Autorin Simone Müller hat bei vielen ihrer Porträtierten ähnliches gehört. Heute erzählt Mark Varshavsky anstelle des Tagesgesprächs seine Ausreise aus der Sowjetunion, seine zweite Flucht vor dem Antisemitismus. Ohne den Geigenvirtuose Yehudi Menuhin wäre dies undenkbar gewesen. Nur wenige Tage Zeit erhält Mark Varshavsky, um seinen russischen Pass abzugeben und das Land zu verlassen, Richtung Israel. Er spielt auf den wichtigen Konzertbühnen der Welt, und weiss: Leiden prägt seine Musik. Er würde anders spielen, wäre er nicht aus Charkiv geflüchtet, hätte nicht Jahre in Kasachstan ums Überleben gekämpft. Die Kunst, das ist ihm das Wichtigste seines Lebens. Die Autorin Simone Müller weiss, dass viele ihrer porträtierten Überlebenden des Holocaust etwas hatten, das sie am Leben erhalten hat. Sei es eine eiserne Disziplin oder das Spielen eines Musikinstruments. Mark Varshavsky hat über vieles gesprochen. Zum heutigen Krieg auch in seiner Herkunftsstadt Charkiv kann er nur sagen, dass es ihm unglaublich leidtut.

The Opening Drive
Big Man on Campus

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 40:56


Lobo forward Morris Udeze joins the show to discuss why he chose UNM for his final year of college basketball, the person he is on and off the floor and the expectations he has for this years team.  Colts at Broncos, what will be the difference in the game?  Questions for the MLB postseason. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Opening Drive
Up Front

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 11:30


Lobo forward Morris Udeze joins the show to discuss why he chose UNM for his final year of college basketball, the person he is on and off the floor and the expectations he has for this years team. #GoLobos #MWBB See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TEAM Talk on ESPN Radio 101.7 The TEAM
10/3/22 David Williams breaks down UNM's 31-20 loss at UNLV

TEAM Talk on ESPN Radio 101.7 The TEAM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 17:18


David Williams breaks down UNM's 31-20 loss at UNLV 10/3/22.

Evangelium
Lk 10,17-24 - Gespräch mit Professor Dr. Klaus von Stosch

Evangelium

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 8:38


In jener Zeit kehrten die Zweiundsiebzig zurück und berichteten voll Freude: Herr, sogar die Dämonen gehorchen uns, wenn wir deinen Namen aussprechen. Da sagte er zu ihnen: Ich sah den Satan wie einen Blitz vom Himmel fallen. Seht, ich habe euch die Vollmacht gegeben, auf Schlangen und Skorpione zu treten und die ganze Macht des Feindes zu überwinden. Nichts wird euch schaden können. Doch freut euch nicht darüber, dass euch die Geister gehorchen, sondern freut euch darüber, dass eure Namen im Himmel verzeichnet sind. In dieser Stunde rief Jesus, vom Heiligen Geist erfüllt, voll Freude aus: Ich preise dich, Vater, Herr des Himmels und der Erde, weil du all das den Weisen und Klugen verborgen, den Unmündigen aber offenbart hast. Ja, Vater, so hat es dir gefallen. Mir ist von meinem Vater alles übergeben worden; niemand weiß, wer der Sohn ist, nur der Vater, und niemand weiß, wer der Vater ist, nur der Sohn und der, dem es der Sohn offenbaren will. Jesus wandte sich an die Jünger und sagte zu ihnen allein: Selig sind die, deren Augen sehen, was ihr seht. Ich sage euch: Viele Propheten und Könige wollten sehen, was ihr seht, und haben es nicht gesehen, und wollten hören, was ihr hört, und haben es nicht gehört.  (© Ständige Kommission für die Herausgabe der gemeinsamen liturgischen Bücher im deutschen Sprachgebiet)

Practical for Your Practice
Is There an ECHO in Here? Just-in-time Training and Provider Self-Care in Times of Crisis

Practical for Your Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 35:01


As behavioral health providers, our jobs often are primarily helping patients heal when their worlds are in turmoil. But we don't often talk about doing that work while our own world or even the whole world is in turmoil. What can we learn from efforts to support mental health providers working in the heart of real-time geopolitical aggression? Join us as we discuss the experience of CDP's own Drs. Bill Brim and Andrea Israel partnering with UNM's ECHO project providing just-in-time training in psychological first aid and provider resilience to providers in Ukraine. William Brim, Psy.D., is the director of the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. He joined CDP in 2007, initially as a deployment behavioral health psychologist at Malcolm Grow Medical Center and served as deputy director until 2017. Prior to joining CDP, Dr. Brim served on active duty as a psychologist in the United States Air Force from 1997 to 2007. The focus of Dr. Brim's clinical work, supervision and training is on deployment and redeployment- related mental health issues, specifically assessment and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and insomnia. Additionally, Dr. Brim focuses on health psychology clinical practice, the integration of mental health services in primary care and offers forensic psychology expert consultation and witness services.Andrea Israel, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist serving as a Military Behavioral Health Child Psychologist at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. In this role, she supports a study to assess the feasibility and to identify best practices for enhancing and expanding capabilities to deliver telehealth services to youth (dependents of active duty military) with neurodevelopmental and behavioral health needs across a dispersed geographic area. In addition, she provides Evidence-Based Psychotherapy (EBP) training. Dr. Israel graduated with her doctorate in School Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed her postdoctoral work at Duke University Medical Center. She earned her bachelor's degree in Spanish, with a minor in Psychology, from the University of Virginia.Resources mentioned in this episode: https://deploymentpsych.org/resources-for-providers-in-wartime Calls-to-action: Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

LANZ & PRECHT
AUSGABE SIEBENUNDFÜNFZIG

LANZ & PRECHT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 56:13


Eine Legende als Gast für die Premiere zu dritt: Lanz und Precht in der aktuellen Podcast-Folge im Gespräch mit Reinhold Messner über die Freude des Verzichts, die Angst vor dem Tod und den Willen zu leben. Warum braucht es manchmal weniger als mehr, um erfolgreich und vielleicht auch glücklicher zu leben? Muss Verzicht zwingend Mangel bedeuten oder vielleicht sogar Macht? Der gerade 78 Jahre alt gewordene Reinhold Messner hat sich den härtesten Strapazen gestellt und ist dem Tod dabei zum Greifen nah gekommen. Er hat Menschen am Berg wahnsinnig werden sehen, seinen Bruder sterbend zurücklassen müssen und doch ist seine Angst vor dem eigenen Ende eine ganz andere. Lanz und Precht teilen ihre eigenen Gefühle zu Leben und Sterben ebenso wie Reinhold Messner seine außergewöhnliche Nahtod-Erfahrung, die ihm den entscheidenden Schritt zum Weiterleben ermöglicht hat. Dass er trotz einer „aggressiven Faschistin“ als Wahlsiegerin in seinem Heimatland Italien positiv in die Zukunft blickt und gerade erklärt Unmögliches ihn besonders herausfordert, erzählt Reinhold Messner in dieser außergewöhnlichen Ausgabe SIEBENUNDFÜNFZIG.

Sven Gabor Janszky | Zukunftsmacher Podcast
#124 Abenteuer Zukunft – Im Talk mit Extremsportler Jonas Deichmann

Sven Gabor Janszky | Zukunftsmacher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 49:37


Hallo liebe Zukunftsmacher!Für diese Woche habe ich mir einen Gast eingeladen, der mit viel Biss, Mut, Durchhaltevermögen und einer gewissen Portion Wahnsinn das Unmögliche möglich macht!Die Rede ist von Jonas Deichmann, leidenschaftlicher Abenteuer und Extremsportler. Während seines Studiums im wirtschaftlichen Bereich entschied sich Deichmann erstmals für die wahnwitzige Idee, eine Weltumrundung auf dem Drahtesel zu machen.Nach erfolgreicher Weltreise kam dann in ihm der Wunsch auf, einen Langdistanz-Weltrekord aufzustellen.Seit 2017 ist er hauptberuflicher Abenteurer und hat schon so einige Rekorde gebrochen.Seine EIndrücke hat Deichmann in dem Buch "Cape to Cape" und dem Spiegel-Bestseller "Das Limit bin nur ich" verewigt. Außerdem wurden seine Abenteuer in den Filmen "Cape to Cape", "Miles Ahead" und "Das Limit bin nur ich" festgehalten.Neben seiner Karriere als Abenteuer ist Deichmann Speaker und teilt die gesammelten Erfahrungen und sein Mindset auf zahlreichen Events .Heute möchte ich mit ihm über seine Zukunftsvorstellung sprechen, welche Ziele er sich setzt und wohin ihn das nächste Abenteuer führt.Hört doch also gerne in die neue Folge rein und lasst Euch inspirieren!Bis dahin: Habt eine großartige Zukunft!Hier erfährst Du mehr über Jonas Deichmann.Werde jetzt Teil der Zukunfts-Community und sichere Dir den exklusiven Probemonat in der Future.me Membership. Hier geht's zur AktionHier geht es zu den Janszky Days! Sichere Dir jetzt Tickets: https://janszky.de/digital/zukunfts-ich/Du interessierst Dich für Innovationsreisen? Dann klicke jetzt hier: https://reisen.2bahead.com/

The Opening Drive
Local Flavor

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 43:01


Are you on the over or under for Monday Night Football?  Is it talent, scheme, all the above that is holding the Lobos offense back? What would you do?  La Cueva High School quarterback Aidan Armenta verbally committed to UNM. Adian joins the show to discuss why and his goals on the football field. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mind Matters
Depression and Suicide in the Neurodiversity Community

Mind Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 31:14


On episode 139, as part of Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month, we address depression and suicide among neurodivergent people. We talk about intervention techniques that can help parents, teachers, or anyone who interacts with neurodivergent people to understand and support them through trauma, depression, and suicidal ideation. We are joined by Kelsie Bacon, a licensed clinical counselor and play therapist who works with young neurodivergent people to help them feel connected and supported. Also, if you're an educator, we have a great continuing education course called Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students. Here's the link to pre-order the course for independent study at a 20% discount! If you're an administrator and want to utilize it district-wide, click this link and we'll get in touch and answer your questions. All of the details are at www.Neurodiversity.University. ABOUT THE GUEST - Kelsie Bacon, LCSW-S, RPT, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker serving the Albuquerque, NM area. She graduated from UNM with a B.A. in Psychology and Family Studies and received her master's degree from New Mexico Highlands University in Clinical Social Work. She's currently earning her certification as a Registered Play Therapist. She provides school-based and agency-based therapeutic interventions for children, adolescents and teens. ​She utilizes DIRFloortime techniques with many clients, and finds it particularly rewarding to work with teenagers to help them feel understood and supported.

The Opening Drive
Back Home

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 43:15


New Mexico Lobos defensive end Justin Harris joins the show to discuss his journey from Lutcher, Louisiana to UNM as the Lobos head to LSU.  Who is under the most pressure this weekend in the NFL?  What does culture mean in a locker room?  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Die Maus - Musik
Nachrichtentrommeln

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 30:20


Die Sendung mit der Maus - Lach- und Sachgeschichten zum Hören. Heute: mit Angeberwissen, den Unmöglichen, mit Verena und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von Verena Specks-Ludwig.

TJ Trout
Josh Kastenberg, Eddie Nunez

TJ Trout

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 30:00


Josh "The Professor" Kastenberg comes in briefly to talk about the Civil lawsuit filed against Donald Trump in New York, and University of New Mexico Athletic Director Eddie Nunez comes in to talk about the big game of UNM v LSU with TJ on News Radio KKOBSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tipping Point New Mexico
439 NM Governor's Race, NM 65+ Population, Protest at UNM and more

Tipping Point New Mexico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 49:29


On this week's conversation Paul has had a busy week of travel to Dallas and Atlanta. He fills the listeners in on what he's doing out of State. A new poll gives MLG a healthy lead, but the more interesting thing is how some of the issues and demographics break down (scroll to the bottom of the story). For example, MLG's social media gives the impression that abortion is the ONLY issue on the ballot this fall, yet just 29% of voters claim it is their top motivation to vote. Also, MLG takes credit for her COVID policies, but it is simply not true to claim (as she does) that New Mexico outperformed Texas on COVID.  Gas prices are down, no thanks to Biden who has been especially stingy in leasing federal lands.   A recent article highlights the need for a dramatic expansion of mining needed to fulfill EV goals. New Mexico among the states with the fastest growing 65+ population.  A fascinating article highlights safety issues with Virgin Galactic spacecraft and especially the manufacturer Scaled Composites.  Violent protesters at UNM shut down conservative speaker Tomi Lahren.  Kenneth Starr passed away last week. He spoke at a January 2019 RGF luncheon. He is most well known for investigating then-President Clinton.

The Ari Hoffman Show
Tomi Lahren: Free Speech is Being Shut Down on Campus

The Ari Hoffman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 8:31


The House of Strauss Podcast

UNM protest conservative Tomi Lahren and Joke'-Rodeo on News Radio KKOBSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Opening Drive
A Familiar Sight

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 34:27


Former Lobo linebacker and current broadcast analyst George Carter discusses what he has seen from the UNM defense, where they have to make their mark against UTEP and how close they are overall to taking that next step.  What are Lobo fans expecting?  Brett Farve has shown us who he is. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Opening Drive
EP Lobo

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 43:50


New Mexico sophomore linebacker Alec Marenoc, an El Paso native, joined the show to discuses choosing UNM, the support of his family (who are all Miners) and the progress he has made on the field this season.  A stunning stat that shows how bad the Chargers pick-six was.  A reminder of the difference between the Power Five and Group of Five in recruiting. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TEAM Talk on ESPN Radio 101.7 The TEAM
9/12/22 Weekly Lobos FB recap with David Williams- Boise State too much for UNM in MWC opener

TEAM Talk on ESPN Radio 101.7 The TEAM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 15:31


Weekly Lobos FB recap with David Williams- Boise State too much for UNM in MWC opener 9/12/22.

Bleav in Boise St Football: Kingdom of POD
New Mexico vs Boise St-Now What?

Bleav in Boise St Football: Kingdom of POD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 7:00


A quick look at why my expectations have changed for Boise States performance vs UNM.

The Opening Drive
Porter Climbing Fast

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 10:27


New Mexico senior wide receiver Geordon Porter discusses his journey to UNM, what he learned, how hyped he is for this season, being in a fast family and expectations for Lobo football. #Lobos #MWFB See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ohne Worte
So wirst du neugieriger, innovativer und lösungsorientierter - Spannende Forschungsergebnisse von Dr. Carl Naughton

Ohne Worte

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 51:43


Dr. Carl Naughton ist ein waschechter Umdenk-Pionier. Er hilft Menschen und Unternehmen, den Wandel zu gestalten und Zukunfts-Kompetenzen auszubauen. Eine dieser Kompetenzen ist die Neugier. Dazu forscht er, gibt Trainings und hat ein Buch geschrieben. In unserer gemeinsamen Podcast-Folge sprechen wir über seine erstaunlichen Ergebnisse. Du erfährst: - Wir wir lernen können, neugieriger zu werden - Welche Fragen wir stellen müssen, um Lösungen zu finden und innovativer zu werden - Wie wir durch unser Verhalten unser Denken und Mindset verändern können - Wie der Einsatz der „Never Ever“ Technik das Unmögliche möglich macht Viel Freude mit dieser Folge. Übrigens: Auf YouTube findest du alle Podcast-Folgen im Videoformat. Abonniere gerne meinen Kanal unter: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZD5FJlTj6Y2Nyz4y6UJyqg Informationen über meine Moderations- und Trainingsangebote findest du unter: www.hannah-panidis.de Und hier begegnest du mir meist tagesaktuell ;-) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hannahpanidis LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hannah-panidis-55141a145 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HannahPanidisModeration/ Ich freu mich auf dich! Deine Hannah

Espresso
Trotz Job und Wohnung – Schaffhausen will Flüchtlinge nicht

Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 10:41


Im Kanton Zürich eine bezahlbare Wohnung zu finden, ist schwierig. Für Flüchtlinge ist es quasi ein Ding der Unmöglichkeit. Umso grösser ist die Erleichterung bei einem Paar aus der Ukraine, als es mit tatkräftiger Hilfe seiner Zürcher Gastfamilie im Kanton Schaffhausen Arbeit und eine erschwingliche Wohnung findet. Sie stehen finanziell auf eigenen Beinen. Fälschlicherweise sagt ihnen die verantwortliche Asylkoordination aber nicht, dass ein Kantonswechsel zuerst beim Bund beantragt werden muss. Prompt wird das nachträglich eingereichte Gesuch von den Schaffhauser Behörden abgewiesen. Weitere Themen: - Ich will mehr Lohn! Arbeitgeber und Gewerkschaften im Rededuell

MAZZ AB! - Vollbart nachgefragt
Sänger Elijah Presly kreiert Musik fürs Herz

MAZZ AB! - Vollbart nachgefragt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 61:35


Steven Elijah ist das Paradebeispiel dafür, dass man mit dem Mut, seinen eigenen Weg einzuschlagen und das scheinbar Unmögliche zu versuchen, mehr als nur das Mögliche erreichen kann. Seine Solo-Karriere als Musiker ist geboren. Seither veröffentlichte er u. a. 'Ich bin für dich da' am am Weltkrebstag und arbeitet auf Hochtouren an neuen Songs. Er wirkt cool und sagt selbst, cool ist nur eine Fassade, dahinter stecken oft Geschichten mit großem Päckchen. Seins beinhaltet eine Autoimmunerkrankung, eine Sehbehinderung, Legasthenie sowie Autismus. Als unmusikalisch in der Schule eingestuft, beweist er allen das Gegenteil mit Stolz, Energie und Talent. 10 einzigartige Fragen an den Sänger Elijah Presly.

The Opening Drive
The Lobo

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 12:55


UNM junior safety 'Lobo' Tavian Combs joined the show to discuss his on and off the field growth the last two years, where the defense expects to be this season and what brightens up his day. #MWFB #Lobos See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Start Bragging
It's the Passion

Start Bragging

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 35:16


Eddie Nuñez, Vice President/Director of Athletics at the University of New Mexico, talks about his time in Albuquerque over the last five years and how  he is fully committed to building community. You'll hear his thoughts about how the passion of our people is what truly makes our city unique. Plus, you'll learn about what he texts to the UNM coaches on a regular basis. 

The Opening Drive
Game Week

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 39:02


New Mexico Lobos head football coach Danny Gonzales discusses how the team is game planning for week one, his expectations for Saturday, what he wants out of his starting quarterback and who can emerge as play makers.   What are the expectations for UNM for their first five games?  Are you on board with Tom Brady's response to being out for 11-days? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Die Maus - Musik
Melodie mit drei Tönen

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 32:12


Die Maus zum Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit einem Jazztrompeter, den Unmöglichen, mit André und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von Andre Gatzke.

The Opening Drive
Karlee Maes

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 3:01


UNM women's soccer 5th year senior Karlee Maes discusses her journey, the development of the program, team chemistry and trying to convince her head coach to let the centerback play forward. #UNM #WSOC See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Opening Drive
Jaydn Edwards

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 5:23


Heading into her 5th season as a Lobo the outstanding MF discusses what scoring two overtime goals in one year to send UNM to the NCAA Tournament twice was like, growing to love Albuquerque and a great NIL deal in the 505. #UNM See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Opening Drive
Jaelyn Hendren

The Opening Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 4:06


Raised by two Lobos, Jaelyn Hendren discusses her road to UNM from Colorado, how close this team is, getting her teammates set up with custom cloths/shoes and the expectations for this year's team. #UNM See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cinder Bloc.
The Problem of Prosecuting Fascism w/ Elle Herman

Cinder Bloc.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 74:31


Sean talks with Elle Herman about the varieties and modalities of fascism and the carceral dynamics at stake in the institution of criminal prosecution. Elle recently gave a talk for the Karasu Philosophical Society in Albuquerque titled "The Problem of Prosecuting Fascism." In the talk, she focuses on two recent prosecutions of notorious 2020 American vigilantes: Kyle Rittenhouse's trial for fatally shooting Anthony Huber and Joseph Rosenbaum and non-fatal shooting of Gaige Grosskreutz at the Jacob Blake protests in Kenosha, WI; and the trial of the McMichaels and William Bryan for the pursuit and murder of Ahmaud Arbery around Brunswick, GA.On Monday, the McMichaels were each sentenced to life in prison +, while Bryan received a sentence to serve 35 years. While Sean interviewed Elle last week, the problems she approaches in her talk are all the more significant to consider in light of these sentencings. Listen to our brief interview at the beginning followed by a recording of Elle Herman's talk, "The Problem of Prosecuting Fascism," from earlier this year.Elle Herman is, among other things, a union and labor organizer and doctoral student at UNM. We will release a video of this talk in the next couple of weeks. Special thanks to Idris Robinson and the Karasu Philosophical Society for sending us a recording of this talk.Our stellar theme song, Cosmic Background Radiation, was composed by Occult A/V. Check out more over on bandcamp.

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
New Views of the Universe: UNM's Role & Back to School Priorities for NM Parents

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 36:54


Host Lou DiVizio runs through the top headlines in New Mexico, including the confirmed cause of the deadly McBride Fire. Gene Grant moderates a timely conversation about priorities for parents as they send their kids back to the classroom. Our Line Opinion Panelists talk through new security changes at some NM districts, and touch on some troubling statistics that place New Mexico 50th in education according to new Kids Count data. Then, Gene speaks with Dr. Diana Dragomir, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Dragomir explains what's inside new photos from the most powerful telescope in the world, the James Webb Telescope. Plus, she explains UNM's role in capturing these images, and learning from them. Host: Lou DiVizio Line Host: Gene Grant Line Opinion Panelists: Dan Foley, fmr. NM State Representative Jessica Onsurez, news director, Carlsbad Current-Argus Laura Sanchez, attorney For More Information: 2022 Kids Count Data Report Shows Improvements in New Mexico - KRQE New Mexico School District Recruiting Parents to Patrol Schools – Las Cruces Sun-News First Images from James Webb Space Telescope - NASA --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nmif/message

Die Maus - Musik
Samstagswunschkonzert

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 29:35


Die Maus zum Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit Euren Musikwünschen und den Unmöglichen, mit André und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von Andrè Gatzke.

Jay & Arya - Der eigentlich ganz gute Podcast
Dieses Video endet wenn einer von uns englisch redet..

Jay & Arya - Der eigentlich ganz gute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 5:50


Heute versuchen wir das Unmögliche und scheitern dabei.. enjoy :)