Podcasts about Assistant director

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  • 2,268PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Assistant director

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Latest podcast episodes about Assistant director

Simulation
#781 Dr. Jay Sanguinetti — Neurotechnology & Human Flourishing

Simulation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 84:36


Dr. Jay Sanguinetti is a Research Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona and Assistant Director to the Center for Consciousness Studies. His lab focuses on how mindfulness impacts the brain and behavior using neurostimulation to accelerate meditation training. https://semalab.arizona.edu https://jaysanguinetti.com https://consciousness.arizona.edu No Limits Society ► https://bentinhomassaro.com/nls What is I? ► https://bit.ly/WhatisI High Level Perception ► https://highlevelperception.com

Harbor
Episode 4: Skeletons and Secrets- Harbor Season 2

Harbor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 46:10


The happiest Halloween.  harborpodcast.com For mature audiences only, listener discretion advised. Content Warnings: Coarse Language, Drunkness, Gore, Death/Dismemberment of Animals, Concepts of Police Brutality, Insect Attack, Guns, Gun Shots, Baby Cries, Fire. CAST Leah - M. Kate Mculloch, Teeny - Catherine McGuire, Sedum - Marcus Cannello, Narrator - Kiarra Osakue, Samson - Z Reklaw, J - Joseph Rothorn, Al - Faraday Roke, Valen - Samantha Weiler, Roose - Jacque Reiman, Deputy Ryan - AJ Carter, Cop 2 (Burt) - Aud Andrews, Glenda - Gretchen Ho, Becker - Cory Moosman, Crux - John Peacock, Joan - Megan Brown, Harold - Chef Goldblum, Launke - Joseph Rothorn, Person - Breanne Nicole Wilson, Bosswuin - Rock Fowl, Young Man- Avi Mercury, Young Woman - Breanne Nicole Wilson, The Pyre - Carla Brown, Mia - Erin M. Banta. CREW Script Editor, Jacque Reiman. Assistant Director and Script Editor, Joseph Rothorn. Written, Directed, and Edited by Faraday Roke. Harbor is a production of Tartarus Jenny Studios.  Thanks so much for listening to the show. Wanna help us out? Write a review! We also have some spiffy merch at our website, harborpodcast.com, as well as a donation link.  And of course, please tell your friends, family, good-natured weirdos, and local cryptids about us- each new ear is a great gift. Stay kind! Opening Music: Five Tribes by Hunter Quinn. Playout Music: The Bayou by Tigerblood Jewel Thanks to Epidemic Sound.

The Manuscript Academy
Live(-Recorded) Logline Workshop with Producers Eric Mofford and Keith L. Shaw

The Manuscript Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:57


Join us for a free, live book-to-film event with producers Kim Williams, Edwin Stepp, and Jonathan Burkhart on Thursday, December 2, at 8pm ET / 5pm PT (introvert-friendly! We won't be able to see you). Get your FREE ticket here: https://manuscriptacademy.com/book-to-film Want to meet a Hollywood producer, director or showrunner? Consult with them about your logline and pages here: https://manuscriptacademy.com/meet-hollywood-producers We had a wonderful event with producers Eric Mofford and Keith L. Shaw, and wanted to share with you the fun of live pitching. Over the next hour, you'll hear us reading the pitches everyone shared in the text chat—and learn about how a quick loglines summary of your work, along with a great concept, can open doors for you and your book-to-film dreams. OUR PANEL: Eric Mofford is a producer, line producer and budget consultant. He has been involved in over 150 film, television and web productions as well as numerous music videos and commercials. His credits include the Emmy-winning television series 24 and the iconic indie feature, Daughters of the Dust. Recently he served as Head of Production at Lone Wolf Media overseeing documentary projects for NOVA, Nat Geo, Animal Planet, Smithsonian Channel and PBS. Previously, he served as Head of Production at Lady of the Canyon where he produced projects such as the dramatic television pilot, Finding Hope, with Chris Mulkey, James Morrison, Darby Stanchfield and Molly Quinn; and the comedy documentary, We'll Always Have Dingle, shot in Kerry County, Ireland. He also served as Head of Production at Unconventional Media, producing the Emmy-nominated award-winning documentary, Houston We Have A Problem, and the live action portions for the EA video game, Need For Speed: Undercover, with Maggie Q. Mofford, a member of the DGA, has written and directed projects for Disney Interactive, Saban Entertainment, The Discovery Channel, Image America, United Way and TBS. He co-produced Senior Year, a 13-part PBS documentary series on high school. He has sold two feature film screenplays and has various projects in development. His dramatic blues film, Travelin' Trains, won a dozen national and international film festival awards and continues to play in art museum showcases over 25 years later. He has done schedules and budgets for both large studio productions and small indies and has shared that knowledge teaching numerous media workshops, both in the United States and internationally. Keith L Shaw is currently the Director of Operations for Jaigantic Studios. With over 27 years of experience as a Director, Producer and Assistant Director in both the television and the feature world, Keith has worked on projects for HBO, ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, Comedy Central, YouTube Red and Teen Nick, to name just a few. Keith served as Director on Season 3 of the Sport-Docu, 3 Gun Nation and Director/Producer on the highly regarded Indie feature, Suicide Dolls. In 2006, Keith produced the feature film, Privileged for Glass House Productions. After a season on Curb Your Enthusiasm, Keith was accepted to the DGA's Director's Single Camera Program, and shortly after, directed on the PBS series, Madison Heights. Keith has filmed on many other projects across the United States and internationally, including Production Supervisor on ABC's, Oprah Winfrey presents The Big Give, 1st Assistant Director on NBC's, The Kenan Show, 2nd Unit-UPM/1st AD for the soon to be released Amazon Prime series, Jack Reacher and Field Producer for 5 seasons of The Apprentice. Keith also serves as Producer/Director and Co-Partner for Last Man Out Productions. The Company was recently nominated for an Emmy award for the Short Documentary, The Prohibition Chronicles: Echos of Point Place.

Sacramento Bishops Hour
Lauralyn Solano, Pat Holbus

Sacramento Bishops Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 60:00


Lauralyn is the Assistant Director for Lay Formation Pat is talking about the 43rd annual Holiday Show of Hands 

VertiMax Vive
Stuart Roche — Mentoring The Next Generation of Coaches

VertiMax Vive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:48


Stuart Roche is the Assistant Director of sports performance at Marquette University and is in his seventh season there. His primary focus is on the men's and women's lacrosse and tennis teams. Stu takes great pride in being the internship coordinator at Marquette, and his experience there has greatly influenced his latest project, My Momentum, dedicated to mentoring and guiding aspiring performance coaches.   Stu shares more about his journey with strength conditioning from the UK to his current position at Marquette University. He elaborates on the MVP process he uses to guide his athletes, how he creates a positive and thriving culture with his athletes, and how he has kept them moving forward through the pandemic and lockdowns. Stu also talks about his inspiration for setting up My Momentum and the work that he does to give back to his community by uplifting and mentoring the future generation of performance coaches. Tune in to find out more.   Key Takeaways: [0:35] Al introduces his guest for this episode — Stuart Roche. [2:49] What is Stu's background and how did he get into strength conditioning? [8:40] What does Stu's day-to-day look like as the Assistant Director at Marquette University? [12:33] How does Stu envision his weight room, what it means for the athletes he works with, and the culture he creates? [15:08] What are some of the differences Stu has observed between the US and the UK in how coaches program and implement training strategies? [17:57] What is Stu's MVP Process for his athletes and how does it affect them? [20:48] This podcast is being sponsored by VertiMax. [21:32] What impact did COVID have on Stu's athletes' training programs and how did he adapt? [25:11] How did Stu keep his athletes moving forward when things got shut down? [28:13] Stu shares more about how his mentorship program for newer coaches started, and what it is like today. [34:45] What are some new features that Stu has launched recently? [40:05] Stu shares some ideas he is working on moving forward. [42:16] Find out more about Stu and connect with him via his website and Instagram! Mentioned in This Episode: VertiMax VertiMax on Facebook VertiMax on Instagram VertiMax on YouTube VertiMax on LinkedIn Al Marez on LinkedIn Stu Roche — My Momentum Stu Roche on Instagram  My Momentum on Instagram Email Stu Roche My Momentum Connect Championship Teams have an MVP process, not an MVP player. Here's how they do it. By Brian Cain, TeamBuildr Bridge Trello Gather   Tweetables: "The development of athletic qualities from this room should be a byproduct of the culture of the team that moves through here."   "The quietest conversation you have with an athlete that just pushes the right buttons — that could change their trajectory on their four or five-year career."   "People are starting to understand that it takes education and experience to understand how to program well and be agile in your programming depending on the context of the group you have in front of you."   "There's kind of this chasm between the developmental opportunities that you might experience as an undergraduate, but then actually making that next step into the profession."

Talking FACS
Smiles for a Lifetime

Talking FACS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 15:52


Host:  Dr. Jennifer Hunter, Assistant Director for Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, University of Kentucky  Guest: Dr. Pam VanArsdall, Professor and Division Chief, Dental Public Health, UK College of Dentistry KY Smiles Episode 3 Maintaining excellent oral health over the life span is possible.  On this episode of Kentucky Smiles, Dr. Pam VanArsdall discusses changes that occur in the mouth due to aging. She shares tips for overcoming barriers to good oral health for older adults. For more information: Nursing Home Oral Health Dental Information to Provide for Nursing Home Residents Dentistry | UK HealthCare UK Dentistry on Facebook UK Dentistry on Twitter

Walk With TFB
4.9 Bet On Yourself // Wayne Black

Walk With TFB

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 71:29


During this walk, Wayne tells us why it's important to always bet on yourself. An Indianapolis native, Wayne moved to Cincinnati and attended Mount St. Joseph's University as a wrestling college athlete. While at Mt. Saint Joseph's, our guest was a 3-year starter, set multiple school records, and earned his spot as a 2014 NCAA All-American. His leadership as team captain and president of the student-athlete advisory committee (SAAC) prepared him well for his next steps as a MBA candidate and assistant wrestling coach at Mt. Saint Joe's before working as the Assistant Director for Career Services at UC. But his educational career was just beginning. Wayne is currently a PhD candidate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies program at Kansas University. His research centers on college athletics and higher education. A quantitative methodologist, Wayne uses college impact, sociology, and organizational behavior theories to ground his work. Broadly, his current research agenda explores college esports, social justice in college sport, and higher education governance. He's dope af and if you are in a position to hire a tenure track faculty role, Wayne Black is your guy! When he's not reading or writing, you can find him drinking a local craft beer, building the latest lego set, or cheering on his Los Angeles Chargers. Is college sport really a business?! Is college sport research really necessary?! Let's talk about it! Wayne's Twitter: @WayneLBlack1 Podcast IG: @WalkWithTFB Podcast Twitter: @WalkWithTFB --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walkwithtfb/support

COLLEGE ADMISSION BRIEF
Admission Insights from a Different Perspective - Tara Miller, Assistant Director of Admissions at St. Mary's University

COLLEGE ADMISSION BRIEF

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 16:57


From her recent career change of college & career counseling to admission, to her fantastic media recommendations (see below), Tara Miller (Assistant Director of Admissions at St. Mary's University) shares valuable insights and lessons learned through the lens of new perspectives.Recommendations Reservation Dogs https://www.fxnetworks.com/shows/reservation-dogsWonder Years: https://abc.com/shows/the-wonder-yearsWhat If… : https://bit.ly/32jVS7PMuhammad Ali: https://www.pbs.org/kenburns/muhammad-ali/The 19th News: https://19thnews.org/

SOFLETE
Performance Podcast - 79 - From the GridIron to the Frontlines with RDN Diana Nyguen

SOFLETE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:35


Dive into a conversation with George and Diana, as they sit and chat about the importance of nutrition from an omni-directional perspective on nutrition. Both George and Diana carry a wealth of experiences that they each shared on the show, only adding and connecting the dots in moving the needle forward in human performance. Furthermore, Diana believes strongly in science, research, and how science is being used to help build a foundation for the tactical professional. Re-educating each tactical professional, not only to support the physical, but most importantly, how nutrition can impact your cognitive function over time. Nutrition can be the smallest worthwhile change, aiding in lowering the chances of illness and disease, over the duration of a tactical professional career, potentially cutting their life span shorter and shorter. Diana Nguyen is a Performance Dietitian for U.S. Army Special Operations to support combat readiness, health, and career longevity for soldiers. Prior to her time in the Special Operations setting, Diana worked in collegiate athletics for 12 years, first as a Graduate Assistant at Virginia Tech, then serving as the Assistant Director for Performance Nutrition at Texas A&M University, and most recently as the Director of Sports Nutrition at NC State University. Diana is also the owner of Nguyen With Nutrition LLC which focuses on performance nutrition education for first responders and tactical professionals as well as competitive athletes. Nguyen earned her bachelor's degree and master's degree from Virginia Tech. She completed her dietetic internship at the University of Virginia Health System in 2008. She is a Registered/Licensed Dietitian (RD/LD), and Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD). She is a member of the practice group Sports and Human Performance Nutrition through SCAN, and she also serves on the Board of Directors for the Collegiate & Professional Sports Dietitians Association (CPSDA) as the Chair of Research and Education. Nguyen's passion for helping athletes and professionals reach peak performance and function through nutrition runs deep. In her free time she enjoys hiking, training and spending time with her family.

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast
Episode 273: The Importance of Speaking with Beauty When Praying and Talking to Others

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:05


In the 11th and final episode of the Year of Saint Joseph Podcast Series, Aaron Zanca, the Assistant Director of the Youth and Young Adult Apostolates at the Basilica of Saint Mary, shares about the importance of speaking with beauty, as we seek to live and die with the intercession of Saint Joseph. 

The Enrollify Podcast
Episode 111: Candid Thoughts on My Career in Higher Education: Janice Cheng-McConnell

The Enrollify Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:05


On this week's episode of The Enrollify Podcast, we feature the first episode in Enrollify's mini series on “My Career in Higher Education.” Janice Cheng-McConnell is the Assistant Director of Graduate Enrollment Communications at Syracuse University. Janice started working in higher ed as a fry cook in the dining hall of her alma mater, Binghamton University. Since then, she has worked at state schools, community colleges, and larger private schools, and as such, has a diverse perspective on how different admissions and marketing teams function.  In this conversation, Janice reflects on the most important advice she received from mentors along her professional journey, what makes a great leader, and what higher ed needs to “figure out” if it wants to reduce employee turnover.Learn more about this episode and about our sponsors in our show notes.

American Shoreline Podcast Network
The Marine Plastic Problem: A brief dive into understanding and resolving society's plastic waste issue | All Swell?

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:53


Eva sits down with two guests this week to discuss ocean plastic, its impacts, and how to tackle this environmental hurdle. Adam Frederick is the Assistant Director for Education at Maryland Sea Grant; he discusses his work in hands-on science curricula that raises awareness of microplastic pollution in classrooms from Baltimore County to European coasts. Demi Fox is the Northeast Regional Coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Marine Debris Program, which tackles plastic issues on a large range of scales, from microplastics to ghost fishing gear debris. Tune in to hear about why plastic pollution is an increasingly salient topic and what you can do in your everyday life to lessen your contribution to it.

The County 10 Podcast
Coffee Time: Brian Young fills us in on everything IMPACT 307

The County 10 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 28:30


(Lander, WY) - 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM's Coffee Time host Vince Tropea recently sat down with Brian Young, who will be serving central Wyoming, specifically Fremont County, as the Assistant Director for IMPACT 307. IMPACT 307 is a "statewide network of innovation-driven business incubators, committed to growing and strengthening Wyoming's entrepreneurial community by providing resources and support for founders to thrive." Brian let us know about his role in the company, the services they provide, what Fremont County entrepreneurs can expect from their services, and the upcoming IMPACT 307 Startup Challenge, which will begin taking applications in January. Check out Brian's Coffee Time interview in full below, which begins around the 5 minute mark. For more information about IMPACT 307 in Fremont County and its services, you can email Brian Young directly at impactfremont@uwyo.edu. Be sure to check out Coffee Time every morning at 9:30 AM on 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM, or stream it live right here.

Mitchell Levy Presents AHA Moments
Marie Zimenoff, Kim Svoboda & Pascale Brady on Thought Leader Life Credibility Specials (MLP 144)

Mitchell Levy Presents AHA Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 23:54


Get to know these successful thought leaders and find out how they present themselves and their crafts as experts in their fields. Marie Zimenoff is a speaker, leader, entrepreneur, trainer, coach, careers industry advocate and counselor, and CEO of Career Thought Leaders Consortium where she provides tools that build credibility and increase effectiveness convening with thought leaders to track global influences on employment, job search, and career management. Marie understands that dedicated professionals in the careers field need and crave first-class support, training, and innovation. She merges vision and best practice training to elevate the career industry worldwide. If you want to be up to speed on trends and best practices in the career services industry, consider reaching out to Marie Zimenoff by visiting her websites https://www.careerthoughtleaders.com/ and https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariezimenoff/. Kim Svoboda is the founder and CEO of Aspiration Catalyst, group leader at ProVisors, contributing writer at Forbes Coaches Council, accredited Vistage keynote speaker at Vistage Worldwide, Inc., and Vice-Chair of the Executive Committee of the Better Business Bureau. Kimberly conducts leadership development coaching programs for leaders. She helps them improve their leadership skills so that they can take their businesses to the next level. Kimberly is passionate about helping her clients to improve their leadership skills so that they are able to achieve better results faster and easier. If you are looking for #LeadershipDevelopment programs to train yourself and your leaders to hit your goals and upscale your business, consider reaching out to Kimberly Svoboda by visiting her website https://www.aspirationcatalyst.com/ and going to https://aha.pub/KimSvoboda. Pascale Brady is the Founder and CEO, The Challenge Coach, Assistant Director of Corporate Programs, Sequence Counselling and Consulting Services, Intercultural Coach Consultant, Net Expat, and Certified Parent Educator, Parent Encouragement Program. Pascale is passionate about guiding executives and managers individually or as part of groups or teams to successfully master their challenges and effectively resolve problems by encouraging courageous growth, respectful communication, and meaningful conversations. If you recognize that you've lost track, and you want to get back on the right direction, seek the support and help you need by reaching out to Pascale Brady by going to her website at https://thechallengecoach.com/ or visiting her profile at https://www.linkedin.com/in/thechallengecoach/. Global Credibility Expert, Mitchell Levy is a TEDx speaker and international bestselling author of over 60 books. As The AHA Guy at AHAthat (https://ahathat.com), he helps to extract the genius from your head in a two-three hour interview so that his team can ghost write your book, publish it, distribute it, and make you an Amazon bestselling author in four months or less. He is an accomplished Entrepreneur who has created twenty businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. He's provided strategic consulting to over one hundred companies, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Mitchell has been happily married for thirty years and regularly spends four weeks in Europe with family and friends. Visit https://mitchelllevy.com/mitchelllevypresents/ for an archive of all the podcast episodes. Connect to Mitchell Levy on: Credibility Nation YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/3kGA1LI Credibility Nation LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/credibilitynation/ Mitchell Levy Present AHA Moments: https://mitchelllevy.com/mitchelllevypresents/ Thought Leader Life: https://thoughtleaderlife.com Twitter: @Credtabulous Instagram: @credibilitynation Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tooth or Dare Podcast
#93 - Karen Daw: The OSHA Lady

Tooth or Dare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 78:04


Today we welcome the fabulous Karen Daw also known as The Osha Lady!  Karen is an award-winning national speaker, author of numerous articles and CE courses on safety in dentistry, and a trainer for practices and healthcare systems across the United States. She earned her BA from the Ohio State University and her MBA with concentrations in Healthcare Administration and Business Management. After graduating, Karen was recruited from the Emergency Department to her roles as Assistant Director of Sterilization Monitoring and Health and Safety Director for the OSU College of Dentistry.  She is a proud member of the Organization for Safety Asepsis and Prevention, where she also served as co-chair for their Annual Conference and Infection Control Boot Camp. This episode is generously sponsored by our peeps at the Hu-Friedy group! As dental professionals, our PPE is necessary for the safety of both our patients and team members throughout the practice.  In regard to the masks we wear though, it's not one size fits all and when we talk about protection and infection control the fit is everything! That is where the Hu-Friedy Secure Fit masks come in! Irene uses these exclusively in her practice! Secure Fit masks feature aluminum nose and chin pinch mechanisms at the top over the nose and also at the bottom under the chin to help reduce gapping. This allows the wearer to customize the mask to their face for optimal fit and protection without sacrificing comfort! And when industry experts are recommending that we change our masks every 20 minutes during procedures with heavy fluid and aerosol exposure to avoid wicking, we could use something with a comfortable fit! Am I right?!  Learn more about Secure Fit masks at the link below as well as the link to the Friends of Hu-Friedy blog! https://www.hufriedygroup.com/securefit   Friends of Hu-Friedy ___________________________________________________ In today's episode, Karen discusses with Irene and Katrina how she got into OSHA and dentistry including how she decided to go out on her own with her business and her approach to get people excited when learning about workplace safety! They talk about what OSHA actually is and how it parallels with Canada's WHMIS, and what trainings are mandatory for US dental practices as well as who in the office should be required to train. She discusses the importance of building a culture of safety within your practice and what she recommends when it comes to having difficult conversations regarding safety practices and compliance. Lastly, she shares a story of one of the worst things she's encountered on the job and how she has pivoted her business during the Covid-19 pandemic! We think you'll love her as much as we do!   Reach out to Karen at: Theoshalady.com Karendaw.com   On Instagram @theoshalady ___________________________________________________   Our hosts encourage you to leave them a review!   Find more episodes at https://www.toothordare.ca/   Follow us on Instagram! Podcast: @toothordare.podcast Irene: @toothlife.irene Katrina: @thedentalwinegenist

Harbor
Episode 3: Dead Seeds Grow- Harbor Season 2

Harbor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:43


Don't remember planting these...  harborpodcast.com For mature audiences only, listener discretion advised. Content Warnings: Burn Scarring, Mentions of Sexual Harassment, Smoking, Coarse Language, PTSD Symptoms, Car Speeding, Mentions of Gore, Unsolicited Touch, Mentions of Forced Drugging, Concepts of Police Brutality. CAST Al - Faraday Roke, Becker - Cory Moosman, Narrator - Kiarra Osakue, Samson - Z Reklaw, J - Joseph Rothorn, Harold - Chef Goldblum, William - Jonathan Hallowell, Crux - John Peacock, Valen - Samantha Weiler, Roose - Jacque Reiman, Mia - Erin M. Banta, Kevin - Brendan Kane, Glenda -Gretchen Ho.  CREW Script Editor, Jacque Reiman. Assistant Director and Script Editor, Joseph Rothorn. Written, Directed, and Edited by Faraday Roke. Harbor is a production of Tartarus Jenny Studios.  Thanks so much for listening to the show. Wanna help us out? Write a review! We also have some spiffy merch at our website, harborpodcast.com, as well as a donation link.  And of course, please tell your friends, family, good-natured weirdos, and local cryptids about us- each new ear is a great gift. Stay kind! Opening Music: Five Tribes by Hunter Quinn. Playout Music: Heads May Roll by Walt Adams Thanks to Epidemic Sound.

Lawfare No Bull
House Intelligence Committee Hearing on Countering Domestic Terrorism

Lawfare No Bull

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 48:17


On Wednesday, November 3, 2021, at 9:30 AM ET, the House Intelligence Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee will hold an open hearing on countering domestic terrorism with The Honorable John Cohen, Senior Official Performing the Duties of the under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. Timothy Langan, Assistant Director, Counterterrorism Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Our Community, Our Mission
Ep #100 - Meet Holton Witman

Our Community, Our Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 28:21


In our 100th episode, we visit with TRM's new Assistant Director of Street Reach, Holton Witman, about his journey leading up to working at TRM and his continued desire to serve the homeless.To learn more about TRM Ministries: Click Here!To support TRM, Click Here!

Donkey of the Day
Donkey Of The Day: Assistant Director On Alec Baldwin's 'Rust' Movie Admits To Gun-Safety Mistakes

Donkey of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 5:33


Assistant Director On Alec Baldwin's 'Rust' Movie Admits To Gun-Safety Mistakes Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg
Flashpoint: Uptick in domestic homicide

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 42:36


This week Flashpoint discusses the domestic violence issue amid the pandemic and highlights the recent uptick in domestic homicide. Marcella Nyachogo, Assistant Director of the Bilingual Domestic Violence Program at Lutheran Settlement House shares the impact of safe housing, but there are many barriers that prevent survivors from obtaining, maintaining safe and affordable housing. Jess Ivey is a domestic violence survivor and consultant advocating awareness of domestic abuse that leads to domestic homicide. The newsmaker of the week is Angela Anderson, a Master's level Therapist with a background in Child psychology who now works in Philadelphia public schools helping students cope with the pressures of school, home, and peers. The Philly Rising Changemaker highlights Bucks County's only domestic violence shelter, A Woman's Place, and the increase in demand for their help during the pandemic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Feinstein's/54 Below Podcast
Episode 30: MYKAL KILGORE

The Feinstein's/54 Below Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 45:29


Grammy Award nominee Mykal Kilgore chats with Assistant Director of Programming Kevin Ferguson about Billy Porter's mentorship, his performance at the Met Gala, and using his platform to serve as a change agent for civil rights and LGBTQ+ issues. For more information about Mykal's upcoming show, visit 54below.com Watch Mykal's music video for his new single "The Man in the Barbershop" out now in streaming platforms: https://youtu.be/wK0uEzKK4OI The Feinstein's/54 Below podcast is hosted by Nella Vera and Kevin Ferguson, and produced by Bailey Everett and Michael Allan Galvez, with support from the Feinstein's/54 Below marketing staff. Original artwork design by Philip Romano. Follow Kevin Ferguson on Instagram at @K.Ferg_ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Baseball Central @ Noon
Jays Wants, Needs & Desires

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 46:48


Jeff Blair and Kevin Barker open this edition of the show by answering your calls and hearing your wants, needs, and desires for the 2022 Blue Jays (00:51). Soon after, Jays' Assistant Director of Player Development Joe Sclafani speaks about Gabriel Moreno's development in the Jays' prospect system, and touches on the impact of the […]

Solve Crimes with Rick & Gavin
S2: Episode 08 - Alec Baldwin Kills Cinematographer - Was Halyna Murdered? - PART THREE

Solve Crimes with Rick & Gavin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 10:36


Was Halyna Hutchins Murdered? If an upset crew member put a live bullet in the prop pistol that Alec Baldwin used when she was shot, that's exactly what happened. Could it be that it was negligence and incompetence on the part of the rookie Armorer and the Assistant Director with a track record of missteps and misfires? Or was it simply a tragic accident that killed cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and wounded director Joel Souza? In this episode, we follow up with new information that has surfaced since Part Two of "Was Halyna Hutchins Murdered?". Alec Baldwin finally speaks on camera! Santa Fe Sheriff Adan Mendoza's press conference where he plainly states the status of the investigation. The 911 tape has been released! Hear excerpts in this video. We learn more about Assistant Director (AD) Dave Halls and we get more insight on Armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed. Hollywood reacts to the tragedy on the set of "Rust". Join us to help figure this mystery out. What do YOU think happened? : : Our Website :: https://solvecrimes.tv : : Our Socials : : https://instagram.com/solvecrimes/ https://facebook.com/solvecrimestv/ https://www.reddit.com/r/solve_crimes/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/solve-crimes/support

The Road Home
GPD Conversion

The Road Home

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 41:37


Tune in this week as we discuss Grant and Per Diem (GPD) Conversion We speak to Leslie Wise, Portfolio Lead, Direct Community Support at Community Solutions, Allyson Randolph, Assistant Director, Real Estate at Community Solutions, and Dr. Audi, President, and CEO of Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries Click here for Insights from this week's episode. *Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. It means a great deal to the show and it will make it easier for potential listeners to find us.* Thanks! Search #NCHV on social media to find us and email us here at info@nchv.org.

Pacey Performance Podcast
Nordic hamstring exercise; can we trust the evidence and should we use it (?) with Rod Whiteley (Physiotherapist at Aspetar)

Pacey Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 61:22


This week's guest on the Pacey Performance Podcast is Rod Whiteley; he is a Specialist Sports Physiotherapist working as the Assistant Director of the Rehabilitation Department at Aspetar Sports Medicine Hospital in Doha, Qatar. He previously worked as a Physiotherapist in elite rugby league, rugby union, and baseball. After gaining his PhD from the University of Sydney in 2009, he has since diversified his research interests to football, handball, and volleyball. Rod gives us an overview on three main subjects; ACL injuries, the changing trends in how physiotherapists are learning new best practice, and the performance benefits and research surrounding Nordics. Rod has noticed how physios are finding their information, research and new techniques from places other than formal training and conferences, and seeks to understand how effective this is and its wider impact. He combines this knowledge with some great advice on ACL injuries and training that will prevent occurrences, plus how to know when an athlete is ready to return to action. He also explains why Nordics are not always a part of every coach's training programme. For all this and more, hit the play button now to hear all this outstanding insight from a physiotherapist with over 30 years' experience in the industry. On the podcast this week: Why ACL injuries are the biggest burden for Aspetar How a sports culture is being created in Qatar Why courses and conferences are no longer the leading method of learning in physiotherapy How physios are learning new best practice Rod's research into different learning methods to audit their effectiveness What research is like around Nordics Performance benefits of Nordics, plus injury risk reduction Why Nordics are not part of training programmes as a matter of course The growing influence of social media ‘gurus' as opposed to conference learning The improvements in sprint mechanics regarding hamstring injuries Decision criteria for returning to play following an ACL injury

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Jessica Rigler, Assistant Director of Public Health with the Arizona Department of Health Services

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 6:27


Mike asked Jessica how they're trying to convince parents the vaccine for 5-11 year-olds is safe.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dreamers & Doers Podcast by Loveworks Leadership
Biz Boot Up Ep 25: To Dream is to Change with Mike Eilts and Sporty Sweets

Dreamers & Doers Podcast by Loveworks Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 18:42


Mike is passionate about saving lives and helping companies manage operations through effective communication of weather risks to businesses and the public. He was a co-founder of Weather Decision Technologies in 2000 and was the President and CEO for the 18 years in operation until the business was sold to DTN in late 2018. Mike then ran the 700-person Weather Business Unit of DTN for 2.5 years, leaving them in March 2021 to form his own consulting business. At present he consults with numerous companies in the weather industry, helping them with strategy and mergers and acquisitions. Before founding WDT, Mike worked at the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) for 16 years, the last 7 as the Assistant Director. He has 3 degrees from the University of Oklahoma: B.S. and M.S. in Meteorology and an MBA. Today he is pursuing his photography passion and being an entrepreneur by launching a new business with his two daughters, Weather and Nature Photography. Brothers Levi and Nathanael Park started Sporty Sweetz as a way to combine two things they love—cookies and sports. They spent several years living abroad in Thailand, where they started their first business, a driveway stand selling snacks, when Levi was just starting kindergarten. Now in the third and fourth grade, they are avid football card collectors and love playing a variety of sports, from baseball to flag football to daily GaGa ball matches at school.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 135: Part 2 - Why Jewelers of the 60s and 70s Were Part of the Counterculture—Even if they Didn't Realize It with Jewelry Experts Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 24:57


What you'll learn in this episode: The characteristics that define contemporary American jewelry What narrative art jewelry is, and why it was so prevalent in the 1960s and 70s What defines American counterculture, and why so many 60s and 70s jewelers were a part of it Who the most notable American jewelry artists are and why we need to capture their stories How Susan and Cindi developed their book, and why they hope other people will build on their research About Susan Cummins Susan Cummins has been involved in numerous ways in the visual arts world over the last 35 years, from working in a pottery studio, doing street fairs, running a retail shop called the Firework in Mill Valley and developing the Susan Cummins Gallery into a nationally recognized venue for regional art and contemporary art jewelry. Now she spends most of her time working with a private family foundation called Rotasa and as a board member of both Art Jewelry Forum and California College of the Arts. About Cindi Strauss Cindi Strauss is the Sara and Bill Morgan Curator of Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design and Assistant Director, Programming at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH). She received her BA with honors in art history from Hamilton College and her MA in the history of decorative arts from the Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons School of Design. At the MFAH, Cindi is responsible for the acquisition, research, publication, and exhibition of post-1900 decorative arts, design, and craft. Jewelry is a mainstay of Cindi's curatorial practice. In addition to regularly curating permanent collection installations that include contemporary jewelry from the museum's collection, she has organized several exhibitions that are either devoted solely to jewelry or include jewelry in them. These include: Beyond Ornament: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2003–2004); Ornament as Art: Avant-Garde Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2007); Liquid Lines: Exploring the Language of Contemporary Metal (2011); and Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection (2014). Cindi has authored or contributed to catalogs and journals on jewelry, craft, and design topics, and has been a frequent lecturer at museums nationwide. She also serves on the editorial advisory committee for Metalsmith magazine. Additional Resources:  Museum of Fine Arts Houston Art Jewelry Forum  Photos: Police State Badge 1969/ 2007 sterling silver, 14k gold 2 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 3 15/16 inches Museum of Arts and Design, New York City, 2012.20 Diane Kuhn, 2012 PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Portrait of William Clark in a bubble_2 1971                        photographer: Unknown Necklace for the American Taxpayer 1971 Brass with silver chain  17 " long (for the chain)  and 6.25 x 1.25 " wide for the hanging brass pendant. Collection unknown Dad's Payday 1968 sterling, photograph, fabric, found object 4 ½ x 4 x ¼ inches Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg Photo: Lynn Thompson Title: "Slow Boat" Pendant (Portrait of Ken Cory) Date: 1976 Medium: Enamel, sterling silver, wood, copper, brass, painted stone, pencil, ballpoint pen spring, waxed lacing, Tiger Balm tin, domino Dimensions: 16 3/4 × 4 1/8 × 1 in. (42.5 × 10.4 × 2.5 cm) Helen Williams Drutt Family Collection, USA Snatch Purse 1975 Copper, Enamel, Leather, Beaver Fur, Ermine Tails, Coin Purse 4 ½ x 4 x 3/8” Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg The Good Guys 1966 Walnut, steel, copper, plastic, sterling silver, found objects 101.6 mm diameter Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 1977.2.102'                        PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Fetish Pendant 1966 wood, brass, copper, glass, steel, paper, silver 3 ½ x 3 ½ x 5/8 inches Detroit Institute of Art, Founders Society Purchase with funds from the Modern Decorative Arts Group, Andrew L. and Gayle Shaw Camden Contemporary and Decorative Arts Fund, Jean Sosin, Dr. and Mrs. Roger S. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Danto, Dorothy and Byron Gerson, and Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller / Bridgeman Images November 22, 1963 12:30 p.m. 1967 copper, silver, brass, gold leaf, newspaper photo, walnut, velvet, glass 6 ¼ x 5 x 7/8 inches Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Rose Mary Wadman, 1991.57.1 Front and back covers Pages from the book Transcript: What makes American jewelry American? As Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss discovered while researching their book, In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture, contemporary American jewelry isn't defined by style or materials, but by an attitude of independence and rebellion. Susan, who founded Art Jewelry Forum, and Cindi, who is Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what it was like to interview some of the most influential American artists; why they hope their book will inspire additional research in this field; and why narrative jewelry artists were part of the counterculture, even if they didn't consider themselves to be. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Definitely, it's a history book, but it's not, because you really do get that flavor for who they are or what they were passionate about or what they were trying to express. I'm just curious; how did you distill all of this into counterculture? Was that something that you decided in a brainstorm? You could have come up with a lot of different things. Cindi: I'm going to let Susan to take that, because—and I admit this freely—I had a very specific idea of what the counterculture was and how people slotted into that. Through Susan and Damian, my understanding of the counterculture was broadened in such an incredible way. They really pushed me to open up my mindset and think about it in many different, layered ways, and I have benefited from that dramatically. So, Susan led that. Susan, I'll turn it over to you. Susan: O.K., and I'll try and answer. We had decided to focus on the 60s and 70s and limit it to that time period. That was the counterculture time period, and as I said before, there are so many in the craft world, which I was participating in during that time, that reflect the sensibilities of the counterculture. As we were interviewing these people, what was really interesting is that many of them didn't necessarily think of themselves of part of the counterculture. They thought of themselves as hardworking jewelers that couldn't be part of the counterculture because that was the dropout, don't do anything, take drugs part of the world. But that wasn't really the counterculture.  The counterculture was especially young people who were opposed to the way that people were living their lives. That got really defined in the 50s, which was a very austere, go to work, make money, buy a refrigerator, get a house and even if it was killing you, do this kind of life. They said, “We don't want that. We want a life that feels meaningful to us, that has real value.” In all kinds of different ways, that was what the counterculture consisted of: thinking in a different way about how life could be for us, something that's meaningful, something that you love doing, something that has some consideration of ecology and equal rights and all of the counterwar attitudes reflected in it. That was really what people wanted to do. The counterculture is big and broad.  A lot of people who thought, for example, that Fred Woell was a Boy Scout. If you asked Fred or you saw his papers or you asked his wife, “What kind of car did Fred drive?” A VW van. What kind of food did he eat? Natural foods. Did he build himself a house? Yes, he did, with solar panels on it. He was a counterculture guy. He just looked like a Boy Scout. A lot of the things you learn in the Boy Scouts were actually part of the counterculture, too, the survival skills and all of that. It's a funny thing to say, but I think in the process of writing this book, we convinced a lot of the jewelers we interviewed that they were part of the counterculture even though they hadn't realized it themselves either. Sharon: That's interesting. Did you enter this process thinking that these people were part of the counterculture, or was that something that came to you as put everything together? Susan: I think it was kind of there from the beginning, but not really. I think we discovered it along the way. In fact, I don't think we were thinking about having the word counterculture in the title. I think for a long time we thought it would be “American Jewelry in the 60s and 70s.” I think it was a provocative idea to put counterculture in the title. It might be that it was a bad idea because, as Cindi said, a lot of people have a narrow point of view as to what the counterculture is, but I hope that if anybody decides to pick up the book, they can find a much broader definition, which I think is the real definition. To limit it is not fair to the expression. Sharon: I think the book does broaden the definition. Before reading the book or looking at the book, I entered into it thinking of Sausalito. I grew up on the West Coast, so to me, the counterculture was Sausalito. My family and I drove through there once when I was a young person, so that was the counterculture, or Berkeley was the counterculture. I Googled the word counterculture, and it's interesting because it goes through all different periods of history that were counterculture. It wasn't just the 60s and 70s. Who did you feel it was wrenching to leave out of the book when you had make some decisions? Cindi: Before I would answer that specifically, to give a little more context, there were a number of jewelry artists who were personally active in all the ways we were highlighting in this book, but their jewelry itself didn't reflect that. We had long debates about how to deal with that. Ultimately, for better or for worse, it came down to the fact that at the end of the day, the book was about the jewelry. It was rooted in the actual works of art. There were artists whose jewelry did not reflect their personal lives. With those artists, we were able to include them in the book in terms of quotes and information that helped set the stage and provide information, whether it was about things from their own lives, if they were professors, what was in their program, but their jewelry wasn't necessarily featured. I'm thinking of someone like Eleanor Moty, who was incredibly helpful in terms of the interview that Susan did and being a sounding board, but her jewelry didn't make it into the book pictorially. There were others who were also like that.  I think I wouldn't necessarily call it gut-wrenching, but it was something we struggled with over a period of time, because these were artists who were very active; they were active in shows; they were teaching; they were going to Summervale; they were going to SNAG, some of them, some of them not. For me, Wayne Coulter is probably the big regret. I did an extensive interview with Wayne and his wife, Jan Brooks, and it was a great interview. He was very involved with Summervale, and a lot of his jewelry would have fit pictorially in the book, but we were never quite able to get the images and the materials we needed to include the jewelry. He's included, as is Jan, in terms of quotes and things like that. For me, that would be one that I regret. Sharon: This is not to say anybody's second tier. I don't mean that. Cindi: Oh no, not at all. Sometimes there are practicalities. This is a time when a lot of the artists don't even know, necessarily, where their jewelry from the late 60s or early 70s resides. Maybe they had slides of it, but those slides may not exist, or they may have been completely discolored. There were practical issues that made certain pieces and/or certain artists—we were unable to go as far as we wanted to. Susan, what do you think? Susan: Yeah, I completely agree with all that. I would say that we interviewed a lot of people that didn't get in the book. There was a lot of jewelry that started up right at the very end of the 70s and went into the 80s. We squeaked in a couple of those people, but what you have to think about is that we're showing you or talking about examples of people in various phases. Some people were very political. Some people weren't so political in their work necessarily, but they lived a counterculture lifestyle and participated in counterculture activities, and it shows up in their jewelry but not as strongly as in others. We tried to give a mix of examples of the things we were talking about, but as Cindi said, there were lots of people we interviewed that never showed up in the book. We must have interviewed Laurie Hall, for example, about three times. Her work isn't in the book, but Damian went on to write about her. That book will be coming out in the fall. We acquired an awful lot of information that didn't ever get in the book and people we interviewed that didn't get in the book. You just have to go with the most obvious choices at a certain point and think of them as examples of other people that you could have included, but you didn't. Maybe some people were upset by that, but you do have to make some decisions. As Cindi said, there are certain practical limitations. Sharon: I think I gave a birthday party when I was 13, and I was so traumatized by having to make decisions about the guest list. I always wonder about it, if you make decisions about who to put in and who to leave out. Do you know the name of the book about Laurie Hall? What's it called? Susan: It's called North by Northwest: The Stories of Laurie Hall. Or maybe The Jewelry of Laurie Hall. Sharon: That leads into my next question. Is there going to be a part two or an addition to the book you just wrote, In Flux? There's so much more material. Susan: Definitely, there's more material. Somebody needs to look at African-American jewelers. We barely got to include some aspects of that. Native American jewelers, too, have a whole history that we didn't really cover at all. These things are whole topics unto themselves, really. We hope someone will take up the mantle and find out more about that. There's a huge amount of continuing research. We don't have any plans to do that, so anybody listening can definitely take it up. Go for it. It's up to you. Sharon: It sounds like a great PhD project. Cindi: Yeah, it can be a PhD thesis. There could be a series of articles. It doesn't have to be a big book about something. You could do all whole symposium based on this topic. You started off with a question about our jewelry journey. I think this is and will be, for all of us, an ongoing journey. Susan and Damian have written this book on Laurie Hall. There will be other threads that, either collectively or individually, we'll want to take up in continuing our own journey off of this book, areas that piqued our interest and we'll go from there. As Susan said, we're hoping people will pick up the mantle. One of the things we learned through this process, and it's probably a lesson that should have been obvious to us beforehand, but the field of American jewelry is a young field. For most of its history, there have been dominant narratives. I'm part of that group of people who have helped with those dominant narratives. As a field evolves, you lay down the baseline, then you focus on individual artists, then you go back and start to layer in additional histories in a way that you can actually understand the full field. A lot of the artists we included in In Flux worked on the outskirts of what was previously the dominant narrative. I think as we proved, that doesn't make their work any less significant, influential, etc. from artists who were part of the dominant narrative. It's a phenomenal way for the field to continue to grow. I hope that as more institutions of all types focus on contemporary jewelry, it will engender additional layers of that story which will continue to propel the field forward. Sharon: Cindi, I noticed that when you look the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston website, you've been involved in a lot of online programming and symposia and things I didn't realize. I'm wondering when you're going to have a symposium on this subject. Cindi: It would be terrific. Up to this point, Susan and I have been invited to give talks. We did one with Craft in America last fall. We did with MAD. We've been invited on your jewelry podcast. I'm also going to be speaking for the Seattle Metals Guild Symposium next month. I would love to do a symposium. For me, in order to do a symposium right, it's not just about getting speakers together, which you can do virtually, but it's really about them coming together and having that in-person experience where you can have breakout sessions; you have the conversations in the hallways, all of those kinds of things. I would absolutely love to do that when it's safe to do it, which is not to say that—there are no current plans. I think our virtual talks have been fantastic, but it would be great to gather the tribe, so to speak, to gather people we interviewed for this book, to gather people who are interested and to share a day or two together to dive into this. I hope that can happen. Certainly, the door is open to it. I just think right now we're still figuring out what we can do in person and what we can't. Susan: I know many of those people are quite elderly at this point in time. Even as we were writing the book, people were dying. Cindi: Yeah, Ed Woell died. Ron Hill died, and now Nancy Gordon has died. Susan: Mary Tompkins passed away. Cindi: Mary Tompkins passed away. Several people had already passed away, but this history will not be quite the same unless people go and interview these older makers soon. This is part of the problem: with them dies a huge amount of information. It's impossible to know anything concrete about a jeweler unless you actually talk to them. Anyway, I hope that if people do want to take up this mantle or if they do a symposium, they do it soon, because they may be all gone by the time we get there. Sharon: People do it on Cartier and Renee Beauvois, and they're not around. Susan: They also kept better records and took better photographs. With those wealthy jewelry companies, it's very different than being a unique maker on your own in your little studio. Many of these people weren't even taking photographs of the work at the time necessarily, or if they were, certainly they were not great ones. They just clicked on a photo link on a slide back. This is not the wealthy, recorded advertising world of Cartier. This is a very different world. Cindi: As someone who has done a Cartier exhibition, I can also tell you that it's about the firm and about styles. You don't learn about who the individual designers were of X, Y and Z pieces, but Susan's right. For artists who are listening to this, it is incumbent upon you to document your work. Today, there are obviously tools that artists from the 60s and 70s could not have availed themselves of, which would have made it much easier. So, document your work, keep track of your work and update the way you document it, so that somebody 30 or 40 years from now who is wanting to do something in depth on you is not having to battle with an old technology that nobody knows how to use anymore, which then can make things invaluable. I'm old school. I'm a big believe in paper. I know that is completely against the way the world works, but I am wary. I have experience with recorded, even digital formats, that we don't have the equipment to use anymore; nobody knows how to use it. If you have a paper printout, you're never going to have that problem. I know that this is environmentally incorrect, that everybody's moving towards digital files. I have them myself, but I still like paper because it's what's going to be preserved for history. Sharon: That's very good advice about documenting. It benefits the artist now and makes life easier for those who follow as historians and people who want to look at it academically. Susan and Cindi, thank you so much for being with us today. It was so interesting. Susan, we look forward to your next part, 1A I guess we'll call it. Thank you so much. Susan: Thanks for having us, Sharon. It's been wonderful. Cindi: Thank you, Sharon. Sharon: Delighted to have you. Cindi: Please do let your audiences know that the book is widely available. My plug on all these things is that we know you can buy books from Amazon. Please buy your book from a local independent bookseller, or even better, come to the MFAH's website. You can buy it off of our website, which goes to support our museum's programs.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

The Premed Years
466: Postbacs 101: What You Need to Know Before Finding a Program

The Premed Years

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 45:31


I'm joined today by Caleb, Assistant Director of Temple University's CST Post Baccalaureate Pre-Health Program, to talk about postbacs!

Entertainment Tonight
Entertainment Tonight for Tuesday, November 2, 2021

Entertainment Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 20:14


Assistant Director, David Hall, break his silence on the fatal shooting as the “Rust” investigation continues.Blanket Jackson speaks out about father, Michael Jackson and his legacy.Ryan Reynolds, Kim Kardashian, Little Nas X. How they made the newest list of innovators.Sting reveals his plans for music fans and where you can see him next.Plus, ET “Will Rock You” with “Queen” night on “Dancing with the stars.”Michael C. Hall drops killer details about the highly anticipated return of “Dexter.”Gwyneth Paltrow unwraps her holiday “GOOP” gift guide.Then, ET “Hawaii Week” continues with a special surprise for co-host and “Alter Ego” star, Nick Lachey.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

PEOPLE Every Day
Why Hailey Bieber chose to 'stick it out' with Justin Bieber, plus Jessica Simpson celebrates four years of sobriety

PEOPLE Every Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 19:38


The ‘Rust' Assistant Director says the film industry should overhaul safety measures on sets, investigators say they think Brian Laundrie committed suicide before search efforts began, and Hailey and Justin Bieber talk mental health and making their marriage work. Plus, Ben Affleck and his Jens go trick-or-treating and Jessica Simpson gets candid about her past addiction and sober journey. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

LOMAH Special Needs Podcast
#155 - Supporting Families in Rural Settings

LOMAH Special Needs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 48:33


Families living in rural and frontier setting may live hours away from the nearest specialist and have a small pool of therapists and providers from which to choose. How can a support system and work force be formed for these families? Links to Mentioned Content: Telehealth and telepractice regulations vary by state. Therapy-focused national associations track these regulations, by state. AOTA State Actions Affecting OT in Response to COVID-19 Virtual School-based Services via Telehealth ASHA Tracking of State Laws and Regulations for Telepractice and Licensure Policy Telepractice Services and Coronavirus/ COVID-19 ----- The National Bureau of Health Workforce  ECHO – Extension for Community Health Outcomes:  Find your state Assistive Technology Program F2Fs  Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs)  LEND programs  About the Guests: Molly Kimmel, OTR-L & Martin Blair, PhD Molly Kimmel is the Program Director of MonTECH, within the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities in Missoula, Montana. MonTECH provides technology, support, and services that focus on improving the quality of life for individuals with disabilities across the state. After graduating from Gonzaga University and an early career in adult education, Molly decided to pursue occupational therapy (OT) as an avenue to help adults and children more fully participate in meaningful, necessary, and valuable activities. She received her master's degree in OT from the University of Washington in 2010 and has practiced at Providence St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula for nearly 11 years. Molly transitioned to the role of Program Director at MonTECH in April of 2020 and has carried the program forward, managing pandemic-related challenges while still meeting the evolving assistive technology needs of Montana families. In addition to her role at MonTECH, Molly is the Montana State Coordinator and OT faculty for URLEND (Utah Regional Leadership and Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities), a collaborative and interdisciplinary training program for students and professionals working with children with special health care needs. In April of 2021, Molly was elected as the President of the Montana Occupational Therapy Association. She is passionate about neurodevelopmental rehabilitation, building connections to provide best practices in care, and helping people achieve greater independence in all aspects of life. Understanding a work/life balance is the cornerstone of any good OT, so Molly also spends plenty of time traveling, floating down Montana rivers, and tending her community garden.  Dr. Martin Blair began his career as a special education teacher. Following that experience, he spent the next two decades at Utah's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), the Center for Persons with Disabilities (CPD), as director of the Utah Assistive Technology Program, Chair of Utah's Interagency Outreach Training Initiative, the policy director of the National Center on Disability and Access to Education, the Associate Director of the Center for Technical Assistance for Excellence in Special Education, and the CPD's Assistant Director for Policy and Development. In these various roles he has built trusting, collaborative relationships with colleagues from a variety of disciplines in university, community, state and national circles. In 2013, Dr. Blair assumed leadership of the University of Montana Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities, Montana's UCEDD. Dr. Blair has presented over 60 papers to national and international audiences and authored dozens of professional articles. He has generated nearly $25 million in grant and contract funds to support his efforts. He currently serves as a Co-Chair of the Public Policy Committee of the Association of University Centers on Disability. Dr. Blair's work is focused on improving the quality of services and supports for individuals with disabilities and their families by working closely with trainees, Center staff, university faculty and administration, state and federal legislators and administration officials, and those who are the primary beneficiaries of the services and supports that he and his colleagues provide.

AP Audio Stories
'Rust' assistant director hopes for film industry changes

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 1:26


Business Matters
COP26 kicks off

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 52:24


The 26th annual Conference of Parties, COP26, begins in Glasgow. World leaders met to rally each other into action against catastrophic climate change, including Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who urged developed economies to financially assist the developing economies to meet their emissions pledges. We speak to Aayushi Awasthy, a PhD scholar in Energy Economics at the University of East Anglia and Rishikesh Ram Bhandary, Assistant Director of the Global Economic Governance Initiative at the Boston University Global Development Policy Centre. Japan has a new prime minister, Fumio Kishida, and he has new ideas for the country – dubbed socialism by some and even mocked as similar to policies of the Chinese Communist Party. In Canada, a tussle for control over a media empire mirrors that of HBO's hit comedy Succession – we hear from Jesse Brown, host of the Canadaland podcast. And Stephanie Hare talks about how best to spend that most precious asset: time. Throughout the programme we're joined by peter Morici, Professor Emeritus of International Business at the R.H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland and in Japan by Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo. Photo: Indian Prime Minister arrives at the COP26 Credit: Getty Images

Where We Live
Describe the pandemic in six words

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 49:00


How would you describe the pandemic in just six words? Today, we talk to Larry Smith, the founder of “six word memoirs” and hear about his new book “A Terrible, Horrible, No Good Year.” It features six word memoirs from students, teachers and parents navigating the pandemic. And later, we hear from Dr. Ulysses Shawdee Wu, Chief Epidemiologist at Hartford Healthcare to answer all your questions about COVID-19 and vaccinating children. Connecticut health officials say the COVID 19 vaccine for children 5-11 could be available starting November 4. Is your child getting the vaccine? GUESTS: Larry Smith - Founder and Editor of Six Word Memoirs Rachel Lloyd - English teacher in English department Suffield Academy Dr. Ulysses Shawdee Wu - Assistant Director of Infectious Diseases, Chief Epidemiologist and Chief Antimicrobial Steward at Hartford Healthcare Maggie Johndrow - Financial Advisor & Partner at Johndrow Wealth Management in Farmington Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 135: Part 1 - Why Jewelers of the 60s and 70s Were Part of the Counterculture—Even if they Didn't Realize It with Jewelry Experts Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 26:30


What you'll learn in this episode: The characteristics that define contemporary American jewelry What narrative art jewelry is, and why it was so prevalent in the 1960s and 70s What defines American counterculture, and why so many 60s and 70s jewelers were a part of it Who the most notable American jewelry artists are and why we need to capture their stories How Susan and Cindi developed their book, and why they hope other people will build on their research About Susan Cummins Susan Cummins has been involved in numerous ways in the visual arts world over the last 35 years, from working in a pottery studio, doing street fairs, running a retail shop called the Firework in Mill Valley and developing the Susan Cummins Gallery into a nationally recognized venue for regional art and contemporary art jewelry. Now she spends most of her time working with a private family foundation called Rotasa and as a board member of both Art Jewelry Forum and California College of the Arts. About Cindi Strauss Cindi Strauss is the Sara and Bill Morgan Curator of Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design and Assistant Director, Programming at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH). She received her BA with honors in art history from Hamilton College and her MA in the history of decorative arts from the Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons School of Design. At the MFAH, Cindi is responsible for the acquisition, research, publication, and exhibition of post-1900 decorative arts, design, and craft. Jewelry is a mainstay of Cindi's curatorial practice. In addition to regularly curating permanent collection installations that include contemporary jewelry from the museum's collection, she has organized several exhibitions that are either devoted solely to jewelry or include jewelry in them. These include: Beyond Ornament: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2003–2004); Ornament as Art: Avant-Garde Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2007); Liquid Lines: Exploring the Language of Contemporary Metal (2011); and Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection (2014). Cindi has authored or contributed to catalogs and journals on jewelry, craft, and design topics, and has been a frequent lecturer at museums nationwide. She also serves on the editorial advisory committee for Metalsmith magazine. Additional Resources:  Museum of Fine Arts Houston Art Jewelry Forum  Photos: Police State Badge 1969/ 2007 sterling silver, 14k gold 2 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 3 15/16 inches Museum of Arts and Design, New York City, 2012.20 Diane Kuhn, 2012 PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Portrait of William Clark in a bubble_2 1971                        photographer: Unknown Necklace for the American Taxpayer 1971 Brass with silver chain  17 " long (for the chain)  and 6.25 x 1.25 " wide for the hanging brass pendant. Collection unknown Dad's Payday 1968 sterling, photograph, fabric, found object 4 ½ x 4 x ¼ inches Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg Photo: Lynn Thompson Title: "Slow Boat" Pendant (Portrait of Ken Cory) Date: 1976 Medium: Enamel, sterling silver, wood, copper, brass, painted stone, pencil, ballpoint pen spring, waxed lacing, Tiger Balm tin, domino Dimensions: 16 3/4 × 4 1/8 × 1 in. (42.5 × 10.4 × 2.5 cm) Helen Williams Drutt Family Collection, USA Snatch Purse 1975 Copper, Enamel, Leather, Beaver Fur, Ermine Tails, Coin Purse 4 ½ x 4 x 3/8” Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg The Good Guys 1966 Walnut, steel, copper, plastic, sterling silver, found objects 101.6 mm diameter Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 1977.2.102'                        PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Fetish Pendant 1966 wood, brass, copper, glass, steel, paper, silver 3 ½ x 3 ½ x 5/8 inches Detroit Institute of Art, Founders Society Purchase with funds from the Modern Decorative Arts Group, Andrew L. and Gayle Shaw Camden Contemporary and Decorative Arts Fund, Jean Sosin, Dr. and Mrs. Roger S. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Danto, Dorothy and Byron Gerson, and Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller / Bridgeman Images November 22, 1963 12:30 p.m. 1967 copper, silver, brass, gold leaf, newspaper photo, walnut, velvet, glass 6 ¼ x 5 x 7/8 inches Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Rose Mary Wadman, 1991.57.1 Front and back covers Pages from the book Transcript: What makes American jewelry American? As Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss discovered while researching their book, In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture, contemporary American jewelry isn't defined by style or materials, but by an attitude of independence and rebellion. Susan, who founded Art Jewelry Forum, and Cindi, who is Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what it was like to interview some of the most influential American artists; why they hope their book will inspire additional research in this field; and why narrative jewelry artists were part of the counterculture, even if they didn't consider themselves to be. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guests are Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss, who, along with Damian Skinner, are the co-authors of In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture. Susan is the founder of Art Jewelry Forum and for several decades drove the organization. Cindi Strauss is the Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. Susan and Cindi, welcome to the program. Susan: Thank you. Cindi: Thank you for having us, Sharon. Sharon: So glad to have you. Can you each give us a brief outline of your jewelry journey? Susan, do you want to start? Susan: Sure. My journey started in the 80s. I had a gallery in Mill Valley, California. I was showing various crafts, ceramics mostly, and a bit of glass, fiber, a whole grouping, and then I decided I should show jewelry. I don't really know why, because I didn't wear jewelry, but it sounded like a good idea. I started showing it, and I was very impressed with how smart and incredibly skilled the artists were. I continued to show that, and the gallery became known for showing jewelry. In 1997, I still had the gallery, and I decided along with numerous other craft groups that we should start an organization that represented the collectors of jewelry. I started Art Jewelry Forum with the help of several other people, of course. That has continued onto today, surprisingly enough, and it now includes not only collectors, curators and gallerists, but also artists and everybody who's interested in contemporary art jewelry. Sharon: It's an international organization. Susan: Yes, it's an international organization. It has a website with a lot of articles. We plan all kinds of things like trips to encourage people to get to know more about the field. I also was part of a funding organization, shall we say, a small private fund called Rotasa, and years ago we funded exhibitions and catalogues. That switched into funding specific things that I was working on instead of accepting things from other people. I've been very interested in publishing and doing research about this field because I feel that will give it more value and legitimacy. It needs to be researched. So, that's one of the reasons why this book came into being as well as Flocks' book. It really talks about the beginnings of American contemporary jewelry in the 60s and 70s. That's my beginning to current interest in jewelry. Sharon: I just wanted to say that people can find a lot more if they visit the Art Jewelry Forum website. We'll have links to everything we talk about on the show. Cindi? Cindi: Sure. My jewelry journey was surprising and happened all at once. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, had no contemporary jewelry in its collection until 2000, when we acquired an Art Smith necklace from 1948. That was my first real knowledge of post-Arts and Crafts jewelry and post-Mid-Century, people like Harry Bertoia. That led me to Toni Greenbaum's Messengers of Modernism catalogue, a fantastic resource for American jewelry from the 30s through the 50s. It opened a whole new field for me, and I started to think about how we should focus on some modern jewelry from that period to expand on the Art Smith necklace, because that Mid-Century design was a specialty of the institution.  Truly, I would say my life changed in respect to jewelry for the better in every way I could explain. When the museum acquired, in 2002, Helen Williams Drutt's private collection of artist-made contemporary jewelry, dating from 1963 to 2002 at the time of the acquisition, in one fell swoop, we acquired 804 pieces of international jewelry as well as sketchbooks and drawings and research materials. We began to build an extensive library. Helen opened her archives and we had recordings of artist interviews. It was just going from zero to sixty in three seconds and it was extraordinary. It was a field I knew really nothing about, so I was on a very steep learning curve. So many people in the field, from the artists to other curators to collectors—this is how I met Susan—were so generous to me in terms of being resources. The story about how the acquisition happened is familiar to probably many of your audience, so I'll keep it brief, which is to say that there was an exhibition of Gijs Bakker's jewelry that Helen organized for the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. Sharon: Cindi, I'm going to interrupt you for a minute because a lot of people listening will not have heard of Gijs Bakker. Cindi: Sure. Gijs Bakker, one of the most prominent Dutch artists, began his career in the 1960s, along with wife, Emmy van Leersum, and was part of the group of Dutch jewelry artists who revolutionized the concept of contemporary jewelry using alter-native materials. They created a lot of photo-based work challenging the value system of jewelry and also challenging wearability. It was his photo-based work that was shown in a small exhibition at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft in March 2002 as part of a citywide festival called Photofest, which is all photography-based work. It was through that exhibition, at the opening weekend—that's how I met Helen. I said to her, “This is something I don't know anything about. I'm interested in exploring it. I'm starting to build a collection for the museum. Could we meet and have coffee and talk?” So we met, and I peppered her with a lot of questions and said, “Could I call on you for advice in terms of building a collection?” Of course, at this time she had the gallery, and she said, “Well, you know, I have a collection,” and I said, “Yes, I know, and I understand it's going to the Philadelphia Museum of Art,” her hometown museum. She said, “Not necessarily. We haven't had any formal talks about that.” So, one thing led to another, and six months later, we signed papers to acquire the collection. That set me off on my initial five-year journey, which resulted in the exhibition and catalogue “Ornament as Art: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection” that opened in Houston and traveled to Washington, D.C., to Charlotte, North Carolina, and to Tacoma, Washington. After that point, I felt that I was really steeped in the field. I have, since that point, been adding works to the collection. It was always going to be a long-term commitment and journey for the museum. We have works installed all over the museum in relationship to other contemporary art, whether it's photography, prints and drawings, sculpture, painting. We also have a robust presentation of jewelry in our departments' galleries. It is an ongoing journey, just like with Susan. It's a journey that never ends, happily. There are always new artists to discover and new ideas. Part of that is our meeting of the mind, if you will, and then with Damian, is what resulted in this book. Sharon: How did you come to write the book? Susan, you started to mention it. The research in this is jaw-dropping. How did you decide to write the book? Why this particular period, the two of you? Susan: We decided to write the book because I was wondering what's American about American jewelry. Europeans have done a lot of research and writing about their beginnings, but I didn't see a document or a book that really talked about the American origins. As Cindi mentioned, Gijs Bakker started in the 60s. So did American contemporary jewelry, but it's a very different story than the European one. We wanted to talk to the people who are still alive now, so we did tons of interviews for the book. We specifically concentrated on the pioneers who were responding to the political and social events of the time. In other words, we were investigating those artists who were considered narrative artists, because that was the defining feature of American art to those out of the country. We wanted to discover who was making this work and what were they saying in their narrative, so really answering “What was American about American jewelry?” We did tons of research through old documents of the American Crafts Library. We went all over the country and interviewed, and it was about a five-year-long process to get this point. The book is incredibly condensed. You can feel that there's a lot there, but it took a lot to condense it down to that.  Really, what we hope is that it's an easy-to-read story about the stories that jewelers were telling at the time, which was the origin of all that's come down to us now. It was the beginning of the development of university programs in the country. They just were in the process of expanding them, and people were learning how to make things. Nobody had a lot of skills in this country, so everybody had to learn how to make things. There were a lot of alternative ways of passing around information. The counterculture, we regarded that not as hippies per se, although hippies were part of it, but also a lot about the political and social issues of the time and how people responded to them. The ethos of the time, the values that people developed really became part of the craft counterculture itself. The craft field is based on a lot of those ways of working in the world, a sort of hope and trying to create a new society that had more values than the 50s had aspired to for each individual. People were trying to find ways to have valuable lives, and doing something like making something yourself and selling it at a craft fair became a wonderful alternative for many people who had the skill to do that. That was a very different way of having a life, shall we say, and that's how American jewelry developed: with those values and skills. I still see remnants of it in the current field. That's my focus. Cindi, do you have some things you want to add to that? Cindi: Yeah, the larger public's ideas and thoughts about American jewelry from that period were rooted in a history and an aesthetic that emerged largely on the East Coast, but certainly spread, as Susan said, with the development of university programs. That was an aesthetic that was largely rooted in the organic modernism of Scandinavian influence, as well as what had come before in America in terms of modernist studio jewelry. There's a history there in the narrative, and that narrative played out in early exhibitions. It played out in the first SNAG exhibition in 1970 in St. Paul, which is considered one of those milestones of the early American studio jewelry movement.  Now, we knew that there were artists like Fred Woell, Don Tompkins, Ken Cory, Merrily Tompkins, who were on the West Coast and working in a different vein, as Susan said, a narrative vein, and who were often working with assemblage techniques and found materials and were making commentary on issues of the day. Within the accepted history of that period, they were a minority, with the exception of Fred Woell and really Ken Cory. Their work was not as widely known, as widely collected, as widely understood. Damian and Susan and I started after we thought, as Susan said, “What is American about American jewelry?”  Fred Woell was an artist who immediately came to mind as embodying a certain type of Americanness. We had an extraordinary trip to visit with Fred's widow, Pat Wheeler, and to the see the studio and go through some of his papers. When we went, we thought we would be doing a monograph on Fred Woell. It was on that trip that we understood that it was a much larger project, and it was one that would encompass many more artists. As part of our research, there were certain artists who were known to us, and our hope was that we would rediscover artists who were working intently during that period who had been lost to history for whatever reason. There were also artists whose work we were able to reframe for the reasons that Susan mentioned: because of their lifestyle, their belief system, the way they addressed or responded to major issues during the day. So, we started developing these list of artists. I think what readers will find in the book is looking at some of the well-known artists, perhaps more in depth and in a new frame of analysis, but also learning about a plethora of other artists. For us, it was five years of intense work. There's a tremendous amount of research that has gone into this book, and from what we've been hearing, it has enlightened people about a period. It's not an alternative history, but it is an additional history. We hope it will inspire people to pick up the mantle and go forth because, of course, one has constraints in terms of word counts for publishing. At a certain point, you have to get down to the business of writing and stop the research, but there are so many threads that we hope other scholars, curators, students, interested parties will pick up and carry forth. In some ways we were able to go in depth, and in other ways we were able to just scratch the surface of what has been a fascinating topic for all of us. Sharon: I have a lot of questions, but first, I just wanted to mention that SNAG is the Society of North American Goldsmiths, in case people don't know. Can you explain, Susan or Cindi, what narrative jewelry is? Cindi: There's no one definition. Everybody would describe it a little bit differently, but I think a basic definition is jewelry that tells a story, that uses pictorial elements to tell a story. Whatever that story is can range from the personal to the public, to, in our case, responding to things like the Vietnam War, politics, etc. Susan, do you want to add to that? Susan: It's a very difficult thing to do when you think about. Narratives usually have a storyline from this point to that point to the next point. Here's a jeweler trying to put a storyline into one object, one piece. It is tricky to bring enough imagery that's accessible to the viewer together into one piece to allow the viewer to make up the story that this is about or the comment it's trying to make. You have to be very skilled and smart to make really good narrative jewelry. Sharon: It sounds like it would be, yes. When you realized what this book was going to entail—it sounds like you didn't start out thinking this was going to be such a deep dive—were you excited, or were you more like, “I think I'd probably rather run in the other direction and say, ‘Forget it; I can't do it'”? Susan: I don't think at any point did we stop and think, “Oh, this is a gigantic project.” We just thought, “Let's see. This person's interesting; O.K., let's talk to this person. Oh, gosh, they said these about this other person. Let's talk to them.” You just go step by step. I don't think, at any point, did any of us realize how vast a project this was until the end, probably. Cindi: Yeah, I would say because it happened incrementally, deep dive led to another and another. We would have regular meetings not only over Skype, but we would get together in person, the three of us, for these intense days in which we would talk about—we each had different areas we were focusing on. We'd bring our research together and that would lead to questions: “Should we explore this avenue?” Then someone would go and explore this avenue and come back, and we would think, “Maybe that wasn't as interesting as we thought it was going to be,” or maybe it was far more interesting than we thought, so it spun out a number of different avenues of research.  At a certain point, we started looking at the most important threads that were coming out and we were able to organize them as umbrellas, and then look at subthemes and think about the artists. It became like a puzzle. We had pockets of deep research, whether it was the in-person artist interviews or whether it was the archival research that was done, whether it was the general research. Damian and I were not alive during this time. Susan was, which was fantastic because I learned a lot about this in history class and school. Damian is a New Zealander, so he was coming at it from an international perspective. There was a lot of reading he did about American history, but Susan was the one gave us all the first-person accounts in addition to the artists. She participated in the American Craft Council Craft Fairs and was able to balance the sometimes emotionless history books with the first-person experiences that made it come alive. I think that's what you see throughout the book. It was important to us that the book would be readable, but it was also important to us that it would have a flavor of the times. When you do oral history interviews, there are many different kinds of questions that can be asked. We set out to talk not only about the jewelry that artists were making, but their lives, what was important to them, how they felt. The richness of experiences and emotions that came out in those interviews really inflected the book with feeling like you were there and a part of what these artists were thinking. This is a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week. 

Harbor
Episode 2: Perdition - Harbor Season 2

Harbor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 47:34


Time to blow off some steam. harborpodcast.com For mature audiences only, listener discretion advised. Content Warnings: Burns, Mentions of Alcohol/Drug Use, Alcoholism, Coarse Language, PTSD Symptoms, Licking Noises, Burn Scarring, Moderately Graphic Sexual Situations and Talk, Violence, Screaming. CAST Samson - Z Reklaw, Al - Faraday Roke, Narrator - Kiarra Osakue, Leah - M. Kate Mculloch, Joan - Megan Brown, Sedum - Marcus Cannello, Cracogus - D.L. Cordero, Phillip - Nathaniel Dolquist, Leopteras - Avi Mercury, Bosswuin - Rock Fowl, Walker - Joseph Rothorn, Apple Butter Participants- Z Reklaw, Roose - Jacque Reiman, Fergum- Joseph Rothorn, Cryptid- Megan Brown, Valen - Samantha Weiler, William - Jonathan Hallowell, Franklin Deco - Paul Greene-Dennis, ???? - Tom Catt, Crux - John Peacock, Glenda -Gretchen Ho, Liwroc - Jenna Melissa Wilcox, Jank - Aud Andrews. CREW Script Editor, Jacque Reiman. Assistant Director and Script Editor, Joseph Rothorn. Written, Directed, and Edited by Faraday Roke. Harbor is a production of Tartarus Jenny Studios.  Thanks so much for listening to the show. Wanna help us out? Write a review! We also have some spiffy merch at our website, harborpodcast.com, as well as a donation link.  And of course, please tell your friends, family, good-natured weirdos, and local cryptids about us- each new ear is a great gift. Stay kind! Opening Music: Five Tribes by Hunter Quinn. Playout Music: High3rFunkLMTD by Andreas Dahlback. Thanks to Epidemic Sound.

In Conversation
Exploring solutions to gun violence

In Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 52:10


When news spread across the city that 16-year-old Tyree Smith was shot and killed in a random shooting while waiting for his school bus, the reality of gun violence shook the city. Almost daily, it feels as if the Louisville community wakes up or goes to sleep hearing about a new violent crime. And we're not alone. Gun violence sweeps through all parts of the country. Hearing so much about violence itself, it's easy to forget that there are activists, community members and organizations actively working to reduce it. This week on “In Conversation,” host Rick Howlett talked to people who take different approaches to curb violence, and address the root causes of it. Our guests included Christopher 2X, Executive Director of the non-profit organization Game Changers, Paul Callanan, Assistant Director at Louisville's Office for Safe and Healthy Neighborhoods, and Jen Pauliukonis, Director of Policy and Programming at the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence.

IJGC Podcast
Racial Inequities in Immunotherapy Trials with Katherine Grette and Nathaniel Jones

IJGC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 30:22


In this episode of the IJGC podcast, Editor-in-Chief Dr. Pedro Ramirez, is joined by Drs. Katherina Grette and Nathaniel Jones to discuss racial inequities in immunotherapy trials and their article, “Not immune to inequity: minority under-representation in immunotherapy trials for breast and gynecologic cancers,” which is the Lead Article in IJGC's November 2021 issue. (https://ijgc.bmj.com/content/early/2021/09/21/ijgc-2021-002557) Dr. Katherine Grette attended medical school at the University of Washington, then completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of South Alabama prior to joining faculty. She currently practices as a generalist and serves as the Assistant Director of Resident Research for the department. Dr. Nate Jones completed residency at Mountain Area Health Education Center in Asheville, NC followed by fellowship in Gynecologic Oncology at New York Presbyterian Hospitals: Columbia and Cornell. He currently serves as Assistant Professor in Gynecologic Oncology at the University of South Alabama Mitchell Cancer Institute. His research interests center on targeted cancer therapies, molecular and genomic characteristics of gynecologic malignancies, and addressing racial disparities in gynecologic cancer care. Highlights •Minority women are poorly represented in immunotherapy clinical trials for breast and gynecologic cancers •Enrollment of black women is especially low, accounting for only 5% of participants •Minority participation in clinical trials must increase to improve equity in health outcomes @natejones333 / @katgrette / @usamci

A Priest And A Rabbi
How do we create SafeSpaces for those in our midst who need support?

A Priest And A Rabbi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 55:26


Join us as we welcome Michelle Tysinger, Assistant Director of Operations and Outreach for SafeSpace here in the Treasure Coast as she will talk about the challenges and successes of SafeSpace and what we can do to create a greater sense of awareness in our communities

Guru Viking Podcast
Ep119: Sex and Enlightenment - Shinzen Young, Chelsey Fasano, Dr Jay Sanguinetti

Guru Viking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 96:10


In this episode we consider the effect of meditation practice and classical enlightenment on sexuality, as we continue the ongoing conversation between:

 - Shinzen Young, meditation teacher and neuroscience research consultant
 - Chelsey Fasano, a Columbia University neuroscience student 
- Dr Jay Sanguinetti, Assistant Director for the Center for Consciousness Studies and Research Professor at the University of New Mexico We recall Leigh Brasington's statements in episode 115 that many of his students experience states of meditative absorption as erotic in nature, and we consider Chelsey's observation that Leigh's brain scans in these absorption states resemble images of the brain during orgasm. I contrast early Buddhist scriptural statements which state that it is impossible for enlightened people to have sexual intercourse with later, highly sexual accounts of enlightened masters such as ‘The Saint of 5000 Women', Drukpa Kunley, and Rinzai saint and erotic poet Ikkyū Sōjun, and pose the question, ‘What does the data say?'. In the face of this apparent disagreement within the wisdom traditions about the effect of realisation on sexuality, what trends have the panel observed in the sexuality of their meditation students, and in their ultra-sound subjects, and what might that tell us about the real world consequences of deep meditation practice and/or brain stimulation aimed at classical enlightenment. … Video version: https://www.guruviking.com/ep119-sex-and-enlightenment-shinzen-young-chelsey-fasano-dr-jay-sanguinetti/

 Also available on Youtube, iTunes, & Spotify – search ‘Guru Viking Podcast'.
 … Topics include: 
 00:00 - Intro 01:29 - Jhana and orgasm 04:31 - Buddha vs Durkpa Kunley 11:07 - Shinzen on the sutras 15:12 - Who was Drukpa Kunley? 17:13 - Ikkyu and Zen 18:52 - Are arhats impotent? 22:37 - Jay on relationship to drives 24:33 - Screwing up on the job 26:43 - Different practices, different results? 31:12 - Being enlightened vs acting enlightened 36:07 - The single most important factor 39:22 - What is integration? 44:47 - Ethical guidelines vs commandments 50:53 - What does the data say? 56:33 - Neuroscience interventions in sexuality 01:01:58 - A logical conundrum 01:03:08 - Shinzen's experience from the field 01:06:23 - Can any human being be free of sin? 01:08:13 - Benchmarks vs complete liberation as an end point 01:10:58 - What does it mean to be a certified a teacher 01:13:36 - Jay analyses the logic 01:16:25 - Chelsey's dimensional analysis 01:18:53 - A job for applied category theory 01:24:00 - Shinzen's advice to mathematicians and category theorists 01:26:30 - Aversion and the system 01:28:39 - Compassion cascading 01:32:57 - Complex systems … Previous episodes in this series: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLlkzlKFgdknxjhwG5wmXRVfrkeGczVPVI 
… To find out more about Shinzen, visit: - https://www.guruviking.com/ep37-shinzen-young-pandemic-edition-guru-viking-podcast/ - www.shinzen.org To find out more about Chelsey, visit: - www.chelseyfasano.com To find our more about Dr Sanguinetti, visit: - https://www.guruviking.com/ep102-dr-jay-sanguinetti-cults-science-the-dalai-lama/ - https://www.jaysanguinetti.com/ For more interviews, videos, and more visit: - www.guruviking.com Music ‘Deva Dasi' by Steve James

Let Me Be Frank | Bishop Frank Caggiano's Podcast | Diocese of Bridgeport, CT

This is a special episode of Let Me Be Frank - guest host Brian Rhude joins the show to talk about his journey of faith! Brian serves as the Assistant Director of Summer Programs and Formation for the Lay Apostolate at The Catholic University of America and Program Director of their summer program, Light the World Catholic U. From food to faith, Brian and Bishop talked about it all!

Talking FACS
The head is closer to the heart than you think

Talking FACS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 10:27


Host:  Dr. Jennifer Hunter, Assistant Director for Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, University of Kentucky  Guest: Dr. Dolph Dawson, Director, Graduate Periodontology, UK College of Dentistry KY Smiles Episode 2 On this episode of Kentucky Smiles, Dr. Dolph Dawson shares the important connection between our oral health and our overall general health.  He explains how infections and inflammation in the mouth affect other parts of the body and contribute to chronic and acute illnesses. For more information: Dentistry | UK HealthCare UK Dentistry on Facebook UK Dentistry on Twitter

Bill Handel on Demand
Handel on the News [EARLY EDITION]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 31:43


Bill Handel is joined by Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee for today's Early Edition of Handel on the News. The three provide updates on news topics that include: SoCal's first major storm of the season has drenched the region, the Assistant Director who handed Alec Baldwin the loaded gun had previously been fired after a separate firearm mishap, and the FDA panel has met to discuss vaccines for kids.

Farm Credit AgVocates Podcast
Celebrating and Elevating Ag Entrepreneurs with Emma Larson

Farm Credit AgVocates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 23:50


On this episode, Katie Ward interviews Emma Larson, Assistant Director of Industry Relations at American Farm Bureau. Emma grew up on her family's farm in California and made her way to Washington, D.C. to begin her career advocating for America's farmers and ranchers.Emma leads the Ag Innovation Challenge, a national business competition that showcases American startups developing innovative solutions that address challenges facing farmers and rural communities. Listen to this episode as we get to know the top 10 Ag Innovation Challenge semi-finalists and talk about how these entrepreneurs are changing the agricultural industry for the better. Episode Notes: https://www.mafc.com/blog/agvocates-podcast-emma-larsonAll Podcast Notes: https://www.mafc.com/podcast

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online
Are You Afraid of the Stacks?

Rhody Radio: RI Library Radio Online

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 25:22


Lauren Walker, Assistant Director at the Coventry Public Library, hosts this spooky episode featuring ghost stories from librarians across Rhode Island. Hear stories from Celeste Dyer, Director of the Cumberland Public Library; Natalie Coolen, Children's Librarian at George Hail Free Library; Mary Anne Quinn, Reference Librarian at Warwick Public Library; and Stefanie Blankenship, Director of the North Providence Union Free Public Library. These librarians share eerie first-hand accounts of paranormal investigations, ghostly figures, and empty elevators moving on their own. Music and sound effects courtesy of Pixabay Music and FreeSound.org, respectively. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rhodyradio/message

AP Audio Stories
Assistant director of Baldwin film fired after 2019 mishap

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 1:37


MEDIA BUZZmeter
Controversial Assistant Director Scrutinized in Alec Baldwin Gun Tragedy

MEDIA BUZZmeter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 31:11


Howie Kurtz on an assistant director facing safety criticisms in tragic onset shooting, mother who works for Amazon exposing the company was shortchanging employees and the continuing fallout from internal Facebook documents being leaked.

Team Deakins
Peter Kohn - Assistant Director

Team Deakins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 78:12


EPISODE 161 - Peter Kohn - First Assistant Director  Team Deakins sits down with first assistant director Peter Kohn (LA LA LAND, BIRDMAN, PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN) for a conversation. In this episode, Peter tells us how his father's career in the industry influenced his aspirations and his taste in films– he loves watching and working on musicals. Peter shares stories from working on the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and Birdman, working with Gordon Willis, and doing smoke on the set of Ridley Scott's The Duellists. Together we talk about what makes a successful assistant director, having a big first day on set, the many factors that dictate the shooting schedule, and even car work. Peter also sneaks in a few questions about 1917!  

The Inspired Painter with Jessica Libor
Episode 57: Navigating Gallery Relationships with Taylor Chauncey of Principle Gallery

The Inspired Painter with Jessica Libor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 46:56


In episode 57 of the Inspired Painter Podcast, artist and podcast host Jessica Libor chats with Assistant Director of Principle Gallery in Alexandria, VA, Taylor Chauncey. Topics covered include how artists can stand out to galleries, how artists can both represent themselves in this digital age and maintain healthy, supportive gallery relationships, and what makes an artwork stand out, systems artists can use in thier own studio practice, and so much more! Visit Principle Gallery in Alexandria, VA or Charleston, SC. Find out more at https://www.principlegallery.com/ LINKS: Check out the New Pre-Raphaelites: Illumination exhibit at Era Contemporary: https://www.eracontemporary.com To book an Artist Guidance Session with Jessica, click here! https://www.thevisionaryartistssalon.com/shop/p/artist-guidance-session Join the waitlist for the Luminary Artist Academy: https://mailchi.mp/a729a90b7ea1/88b0z7g4p4 Browse Jessica Libor's new artwork in WILDLOVE, each time you collect a piece trees are planted in the Amazon rainforest.  Check it out at www.jessicalibor.com! As another gift to you to start out the new year, here is Jessica's free printable calendar for 2021! DOWNLOAD HERE. It highlights twelve of the pieces she made in 2020.   Follow me on IG: @jessicaliborstudio , and @visionaryartistssalon .  The Visionary Artist's Salon courses and coaching for artists: www.thevisionaryartistssalon.com Free guide to selling your art online authentically: CLICK HERE FOR THE FREE GUIDE! Join the Visionary Facebook group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/527920507868455