Podcasts about Mosul

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Latest podcast episodes about Mosul

Postcards From Nowhere
149. The strange, colliding worlds of Tagore and Yeats

Postcards From Nowhere

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 13:29


On 4th May 1799, the British forces defeated the famed king of Mysore in a battle, largely owing to the king's chief minister betraying him. About 8500 kms away, the battle finds a reference in a 200 ft talk Obleisk in Phoenix Park, in Dublin Ireland. But is that the only legacy India has left in Ireland, of a war an Indian ruler lost to the British? This week, in the twelfth episode of the series Ireland Untravelled, we discover the legacy of India, in the form of one of its most outstanding polymaths. Tune in, and discover the strange colliding worlds of two national poets, the unlikely connection between them and what it means to be a nationalist today.Till then Check out the other episodes of "Ireland Untravelled"Lost Treasures, Dynamite and the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3okwxm5Gaelic and the stunning decline of the Irish Language : https://ivm.today/3zmhE9iTrinity Long Room and the Soul of the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3PnZkSEU2, Body Snatching and the Irish Way of Death : https://ivm.today/3IQ6fl3Bombay, Paris and the improbable victory for LGBTQ+ rights in Ireland : https://ivm.today/3AJLa9BIrish roads that go nowhere, Houses no one lives in : https://ivm.today/3PGG95XTitanic, Mosul and the Global shame of Western Museums : https://ivm.today/3R9uBceThree Irish Women, Emigration and India's National Anthem : https://ivm.today/3KfZdqzYou can check previous episodes of 'Podcasts from Nowhere' on IVM Podcasts websitehttps://ivm.today/3xuayw9You can reach out to our host Utsav on Instagram: @whywetravel42(https://www.instagram.com/whywetravel42)You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Inspiring Leadership with Jonathan Bowman-Perks MBE
#227: Lt Gen Sir Simon Mayall – ME Advisor

Inspiring Leadership with Jonathan Bowman-Perks MBE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 66:55


Lieutenant General (Retired) Sir Simon Mayall KBE, CB Much of General Mayall's 40 year military career has been marked by a focus on the Middle East, and his experience and understanding of the region is long-standing and deep. In 1985, having learned colloquial Arabic, he was seconded to the Sultan's Armed Forces, commanding an Omani tank squadron. He was the Operations Officer for the 1st (UK) Armoured Division in Operation DESERT STORM, the liberation of Kuwait. Before commanding his Regiment, 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards, he went to Balliol College, and then St Antony's College, Oxford, where he wrote a book on Turkish security policy. He subsequently completed an MA at King's College, where his thesis was on Jihad philosophy and the ‘Civil War' within Islam. He is also an avid student of Crusading history.As Commander of 1st Mechanised Brigade, he was deployed to Kosovo in 2002, and in 2006-2007 he was Deputy Commanding General of the Multi-National Corps (Iraq), based in Baghdad, during the period of the fight against AQ-I, the Sunni ‘Awakening' and the ‘Surge'. The following year he was appointed Assistant Chief of the General Staff and then, in 2009, Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff (Commitments) with policy responsibility for global operations, particularly in Afghanistan. With the election of the Coalition Government of 2010, he was appointed as the first Defence Senior Adviser Middle East (DSAME), responsible for re-energising the UK's security relationships with partners in the Gulf, the Near East and North Africa. This period coincided with the complexities of the ‘Arab Spring', the overthrow of Gaddafi in Libya, the Syrian ‘civil war' and the rise of ‘Islamic State'. In 2014, after the fall of Mosul to ISIS, he became the Prime Minister's Security Envoy to Iraq and the Kurdish Regional Government. He was instrumental in establishing the new Royal Navy base in Bahrain.General Mayall retired from the Army in July 2015, and was appointed Lieutenant of the Tower of London. He is a Senior Adviser with Greenhill, Coutts Bank, and Viaro Energy, and the Director of Sandcrest Consulting. He is a regular contributor on Middle East and Defence and Security issues on television, radio and in the press, and he lectures on related subjects to many academic and business fora. His book, ‘Soldier in the Sand – a Personal History of the Modern Middle East', was published in late 2020. He was knighted in 2014, and has also received the US Legion of Merit for services in Iraq. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Postcards From Nowhere
Amelia Earhart, Microscopes and the Mental Health Crises of Northern Ireland

Postcards From Nowhere

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 9:45


On 20th May 1932, a 34-year-old woman set off from Newfoundland, the easternmost province of Canada. She flew for almost 15 hours, and created aviation history. She was supposed to land in Paris, but ended up in Derry, Northern Ireland. Almost 60 years later, just below the hill she landed, lived a young 8 year old girl who was given a microscope as a gift. But what connects a pioneering American aviator to a young girl? This week, in the eleventh episode of the series Ireland Untravelled, we follow the story of the 8 year old girl, who was just like many other children who grew up during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Tune in, and discover the hidden mental health crisis of Northern Ireland, and the ability of nature to heal us.Listen to Petardu by Delorentos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2te0QzNidr4Till then Check out the other episodes of "Ireland Untravelled"Lost Treasures, Dynamite and the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3okwxm5Gaelic and the stunning decline of the Irish Language : https://ivm.today/3zmhE9iTrinity Long Room and the Soul of the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3PnZkSEU2, Body Snatching and the Irish Way of Death : https://ivm.today/3IQ6fl3Bombay, Paris and the improbable victory for LGBTQ+ rights in Ireland : https://ivm.today/3AJLa9BIrish roads that go nowhere, Houses no one lives in : https://ivm.today/3PGG95XTitanic, Mosul and the Global shame of Western Museums : https://ivm.today/3R9uBceThree Irish Women, Emigration and India's National Anthem : https://ivm.today/3KfZdqzYou can check previous episodes of 'Podcasts from Nowhere' on IVM Podcasts websitehttps://ivm.today/3xuayw9You can reach out to our host Utsav on Instagram: @whywetravel42(https://www.instagram.com/whywetravel42)You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

TNT Radio
Phillip D. Blackmon on The Hrvoje Morić Show - 02 September 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 55:35


GUEST OVERVIEW: Phillip D. Blackmon enlisted into the US Army June 6, 2002, due to the attack on our country September 11, 2001, as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Specialist. He attended basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina and EOD school at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama and Naval School Explosive Ordnance Disposal (NAVSCOLEOD) Eglin, Air Force Base, Florida. After a year of training to be an EOD specialist, he was assigned to the 760th Ordnance Company (EOD) at Ft. Dix New Jersey where he deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom only 10 days after his graduation date. SSG Blackmon's mission, while in Baghdad, Al Asad Air Base, and Al Ramadi, Iraq was to disarm the roadside bombs that were responsible for taking so many lives of US servicemembers and innocent civilians; he also was responsible for large-scale demolitions operations of captured enemy munitions. SSG Blackmon destroyed over 150 million tons of explosives and ordnance during his first tour. After returning from his overseas deployment, his mission continued supporting the United States Secret Service providing protection for President George W. Bush, the First Family, Condoleezza Rice, Dick Cheyney, John Kerry, Colon Powell, members of Congress, members of the State Department, and foreign dignitaries and high-profile diplomats across the United States and the world. Afterwards, he volunteered to be transferred to the 706th Ordnance Company (EOD) at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii where he had the privilege and honor to conduct missions for the then-named Joint POW-MIA Accountability Command (JPAC) throughout the countries of Vietnam and Laos disarming old booby-trap devices and ordnance while searching for the remains of the fallen who never made it home from their tour. SSG Blackmon deployed for a second time to Mosul, Iraq as a Team Leader where he was injured while conducting route clearance missions.

Postcards From Nowhere
Magdalene Laundries, Alternative Rock and the Shame Industrial Complex

Postcards From Nowhere

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 10:36


In the summer of 2009, as the world was still reeling from the impact of The Great Recession, a young man, by the name of Kieran McGuinness, was trying to perfect a song. It was inspired by some grafitti he had seen in Spain. But the song had a purpose, for he was trying to find someone. And like Kieran, there were thousands of people who were trying to find someone all across Ireland. This week, in the tenth episode of the series, Ireland Untravelled, we uncover the story of the Magdalene Laundries, that of an alternative rock band, and the search of a boy for his long lost mother. Tune in, and discover the life lessons we learn from 200 years of the shame industrial complex. Listen to Petardu by Delorentos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2te0QzNidr4Till then Check out the other episodes of "Ireland Untravelled"Lost Treasures, Dynamite and the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3okwxm5Gaelic and the stunning decline of the Irish Language : https://ivm.today/3zmhE9iTrinity Long Room and the Soul of the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3PnZkSEU2, Body Snatching and the Irish Way of Death : https://ivm.today/3IQ6fl3Bombay, Paris and the improbable victory for LGBTQ+ rights in Ireland : https://ivm.today/3AJLa9BIrish roads that go nowhere, Houses no one lives in : https://ivm.today/3PGG95XTitanic, Mosul and the Global shame of Western Museums : https://ivm.today/3R9uBceThree Irish Women, Emigration and India's National Anthem : https://ivm.today/3KfZdqzYou can check previous episodes of 'Podcasts from Nowhere' on IVM Podcasts websitehttps://ivm.today/3xuayw9You can reach out to our host Utsav on Instagram: @whywetravel42(https://www.instagram.com/whywetravel42)You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

The Black Site Show
Navy SEAL Battles Evil in the City of Mosul

The Black Site Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 107:22


City of Death tells the unforgettable story of an American warrior turned humanitarian forced to fight his way into and out of a Hell on Earth created by ISIS.City of Death is the true story of Ephraim Mattos and what he witnessed while volunteering as a frontline combat medic during the historic battle to retake Mosul from ISIS - the deadliest urban combat the world has seen since WWII.

Postcards From Nowhere
The Troubles, Derry Girls and The Cranberries

Postcards From Nowhere

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 12:45


In 1993, a young alternative rock band was touring England. The lead vocalist, passed through a town near Liverpool which had been the site of a brutal bombing. Moved by the death of two people, she penned a stream of conciousness song which went onto become their biggest hit worldwide, and amassed 1 billion views on YouTube as of today. In 2018, Netflix debuts a teenage drama set in the early 1990's which has a healthy dose of dark humor, and the show goes onto acquire a cult following. But what possibly connects the two? This week, in the ninth episode of the series, Ireland Untravelled, we discover the story of the decade long conflict in Northern Ireland, The Troubles, its worldwide cultural impact, and the ability of art to heal us.Listen to Zombie by The Cranberries: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ejga4kJUtsTill then Check out the other episodes of "Ireland Untravelled"Lost Treasures, Dynamite and the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3okwxm5Gaelic and the stunning decline of the Irish Language : https://ivm.today/3zmhE9iTrinity Long Room and the Soul of the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3PnZkSEU2, Body Snatching and the Irish Way of Death : https://ivm.today/3IQ6fl3Bombay, Paris and the improbable victory for LGBTQ+ rights in Ireland : https://ivm.today/3AJLa9BIrish roads that go nowhere, Houses no one lives in : https://ivm.today/3PGG95XTitanic, Mosul and the Global shame of Western Museums : https://ivm.today/3R9uBceThree Irish Women, Emigration and India's National Anthem : https://ivm.today/3KfZdqzYou can check previous episodes of 'Podcasts from Nowhere' on IVM Podcasts websitehttps://ivm.today/3xuayw9You can reach out to our host Utsav on Instagram: @whywetravel42(https://www.instagram.com/whywetravel42)You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

The Lawfare Podcast
Michael Gordon on the U.S. War Against the Islamic State

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 62:52 Very Popular


In 2014, as Islamic State insurgents took control of the Iraqi city of Mosul, President Barack Obama made the decision to send troops back to Iraq. Within five years, through the work of the United States and its partners, the organization was largely dismantled. What was the nature of the U.S. struggle against the Islamic State? Which decisions were instrumental to its success? And how did the U.S. coordinate with partners in the region. To discuss these issues, former Lawfare associate editor Bryce Klehm spoke with Michael Gordon, a national security correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, about his new book, “Degrade and Destroy,” Gordon's fourth book on Iraq. They covered a range of topics, including the status of forces agreement, or SOFA, the Trump administration's counter-Islamic State strategy, and the challenges for journalists embedding with coalition forces. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dental Digest
134. Dr. Taiseer Sulaiman DDS, PhD - Does anyone know zirconia minimum thickness?

Dental Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 29:32


Podcast Website Follow @dental_digest_podcast Instagram Follow @dr.melissa_seibert on Instagram Connect with Melissa on Linkedin Dental Digest Podcast Facebook Dental materials master Dr. Taiseer Sulaiman will be talking about zirconia's properties and what is relevant to you. Education BDS, University of Mosul, 2003 PhD, Biomaterial Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and University of Turku, 2015 Research Interests Education research, caries, prevention, polymerization, polymers, tooth wear, enamel, dentin, lasers, biomechanics, implantology Research Summary Sulaiman's area of research focuses on multidisciplinary translational research, with in-vitro investigation of biomaterials that can have the maximum clinical relevance. He is developing novel biomaterials in addition to testings that can help provide a blue print for further clinical investigations.

Heroes Behind Headlines
Rescuing a CNN Reporter from Behind ISIS Enemy Lines

Heroes Behind Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 67:52 Transcription Available


In November of 2016, Mosul was the epicenter of the intense battle to drive ISIS out of Iraq. CNN reporter Arwa Damon, her cameraman, and an Iraqi security convoy were ambushed and trapped behind ISIS enemy lines. A US Navy SEAL platoon quickly activated to save them. However, as hundreds of ISIS fighters were closing in, the only chance of a rescue was with the assistance of incredibly precise and powerful air strikes. Luckily, embedded with the SEALs that day was our guest: former US Air Force Technical Sergeant Josh Apple.When most people hear about air strikes they think of missiles launched from miles and miles away. However, when Americans are in contact with the enemy, ‘Danger Close' air strikes often turn the tide of the battle. These strikes are not possible without the incredible work of a Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC), also often referred to as Air Combat Controllers, who are on the ground directing lethal air assets in real-time with remarkable precision. Under-appreciated and under-reported, it is impossible to overstate the critical role JTACs play in US military operations worldwide. When Josh Apple and the SEALs received word that a reporter and her cameraman were being closed in on in urban Mosul, they knew the stakes were enormous. The race to save them was a race against fatal consequences, which likely would have played out in the very public fashion which ISIS prefers. Josh Apple is the recipient of the Bronze Star Medal for Combat Action. We are honored that he took the time to tell this amazing story and we thank him and all of our Air Combat Controllers for their vital and truly spectacular work.Thanks for listening and don't forget to download, subscribe, rate, and review Heroes Behind Headlines.The Short Box: A Comic Book Podcast Join four lifelong friends for entertaining discussions about comics and culture.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Blue Canary: For Cops By a CopWho approaches the scene first risking their lives for the safety of others? We do. The...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Dental Digest
134. Dr. Taiseer Sulaiman DDS, PhD - Why is Zirconia so strong?

Dental Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 34:08


Podcast Website Follow @dental_digest_podcast Instagram Follow @dr.melissa_seibert on Instagram Connect with Melissa on Linkedin Dental Digest Podcast Facebook Dental materials master Dr. Taiseer Sulaiman will be talking about zirconia's properties and what is relevant to you. Education BDS, University of Mosul, 2003 PhD, Biomaterial Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and University of Turku, 2015 Research Interests Education research, caries, prevention, polymerization, polymers, tooth wear, enamel, dentin, lasers, biomechanics, implantology Research Summary Sulaiman's area of research focuses on multidisciplinary translational research, with in-vitro investigation of biomaterials that can have the maximum clinical relevance. He is developing novel biomaterials in addition to testings that can help provide a blue print for further clinical investigations.

Mentaltrener Podcasten
Matmangel til vinteren? Hvorfor protesterer bønder i Nederland? Michael Yon

Mentaltrener Podcasten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 76:21


Har du hørt om alle bøndene som nå protesterer i Nederland og andre land i verden? Hvorfor protesterer de? Kommer vi i Norge til å oppleve problemer med mat til vinteren? Selv om dette kan virke som et negativt tema er hensikten å kunne bli bedre mentalt forberedt for hva som kan komme. Er man godt forberedt blir også frykten mindre om en eventuelt krise oppstår! Gjesten i denne episoden er Michael Yon. Han er en amerikansk forfatter og fotograf. Han tjenestegjorde i spesialstyrkene på begynnelsen av 1980-tallet, og han ble forfatter på midten av 1990-tallet. Han fokuserte på militærskriving etter invasjonen av Irak. Yon har vært innlemmet ved flere anledninger med amerikanske og britiske tropper i Irak, mest fremtredende en utplassering med 1. bataljon, 24. infanteriregiment (Deuce Four) av 25. infanteridivisjon i Mosul, Irak som ble avsluttet i september 2005. Yon har hatt vokalfeider med USAs militærhierarki, og arten av rapportene hans er også kontroversiell. Imidlertid nøt Yon en gang "rockestjerne"-status blant individuelle soldater, ifølge Brian Williams fra NBC. Yons alternative medierapportering har blitt nevnt av en rekke mainstream mediebyråer, og han har vunnet utmerkelser fra 2005, 2007,og 2008 Weblog Awards. I 2008 rapporterte The New York Timesat han har brukt mer tid innebygd i kampenheter enn noen annen journalist i Irak.Han flyttet fokus for bloggingen sin fra Irak til Afghanistan i august 2008. Arbeidet hans støttes først og fremst av donasjoner fra lesere.

Stories of our times
Last man standing (Pt 7) - Inside Mosul

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 55:23


Anthony retraces John Cantlie's steps on the streets of Mosul, the Iraqi city where John was last seen alive.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Hosts: Manveen Rana and Anthony Loyd, War Correspondent, The Times.Clips: CNN and BBC. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Reporter - Black Gold
Last man standing (Pt 7) - Inside Mosul

Reporter - Black Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 55:02


Anthony retraces John Cantlie's steps on the streets of Mosul, the Iraqi city where John was last seen alive.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Hosts: Manveen Rana and Anthony Loyd, War Correspondent, The Times.Clips: CNN and BBC. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Last man standing
Inside Mosul (Pt 7)

Last man standing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 55:02


Anthony retraces John Cantlie's steps on the streets of Mosul, the Iraqi city where John was last seen alive.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Hosts: Manveen Rana and Anthony Loyd, War Correspondent, The Times.Clips: CNN and BBC. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Postcards From Nowhere
Titanic, Mosul and the Global shame of Western Museums

Postcards From Nowhere

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 10:42


On 15th April 1912, the RMS Titanic sank into the Atlantic Ocean. 100 years later, the city of Belfast inaugurated the opulent Titanic Museum, built at the cost of a whopping 116 million Euros. The museum also tells another story, that of the rise of Belfast city, making it one of the largest ports in the world. But there is another story, which it does not tell, and it involves India. This week, in the seventh episode of the series, Ireland Untravelled, we travel from Belfast in Northern Ireland, to Mosul in Iraq to Calicut in India, and uncover the global shame of western museums. Tune in, and discover the story of the decimation of a rich Indian cultural tradition.Morse code audio sourced from Meridian Outpost: https://www.meridianoutpost.com/resources/etools/calculators/calculator-morse-code.phpTill then Check out the other episodes of "Ireland Untravelled"Lost Treasures, Dynamite and the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3okwxm5Gaelic and the stunning decline of the Irish Language : https://ivm.today/3zmhE9iTrinity Long Room and the Soul of the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3PnZkSEU2, Body Snatching and the Irish Way of Death : https://ivm.today/3IQ6fl3You can check previous episodes of 'Podcasts from Nowhere' on IVM Podcasts websitehttps://ivm.today/3xuayw9You can reach out to our host Utsav on Instagram: @whywetravel42(https://www.instagram.com/whywetravel42)You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

AJC Passport
The Forgotten Exodus: Iraq

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 21:09 Very Popular


Listen to the premiere episode of a new limited narrative series from American Jewish Committee (AJC): The Forgotten Exodus. Each Monday, for the next six weeks, AJC will release a new episode of The Forgotten Exodus, the first-ever narrative podcast series to focus exclusively on Mizrahi and Sephardic Jews. This week's episode focuses on Jews from Iraq. If you like what you hear, use the link below to subscribe before the next episode drops on August 8. Who are the Jews of Iraq? Why did they leave? And why do so many Iraqi Jews, even those born elsewhere, still consider Iraq their home?  Join us to uncover the answers to these questions through the inspiring story of Mizrahi Jewish cartoonist Carol Isaacs' family. Feeling alienated growing up as the only Jew in school from an Arab-majority country, Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a gripping graphic memoir, The Wolf of Baghdad.  Meanwhile, Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, professor of History and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University, delves into the fascinating, yet the little-known history of Iraqi Jewry, from its roots in the region 2,600 years ago, to the antisemitic riots that led them to seek refuge in Israel, England, and the U.S. ____ Show Notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about The Forgotten Exodus here.  Song credits: Thanks to Carol Isaacs and her band 3yin for permission to use The Wolf of Bagdad soundtrack. Portions of the following tracks can be heard throughout the episode:  01 Dhikrayyat (al Qasabji)  02 Muqaddima Hijaz (trad)  03 Che Mali Wali (pt 1) (trad) 05 Fog el Nakhal (trad)  11 Balini-b Balwa (trad)  12 Al Effendi (al Kuwaiti)  14 Dililol (trad)  15 Che Mail Wali (pt 2) (trad)  Pond5: “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837; “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. ____ Episode Transcript: CAROL ISAACS: A lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: Welcome to the premiere of the first ever podcast series devoted exclusively to an overlooked episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. Some fled antisemitism, mistreatment, and pogroms that sparked a refugee crisis like no other, as persecuted Jewish communities poured from numerous directions.  Others sought opportunities for their families or followed the calling to help create a Jewish state. In Israel, America, Italy, wherever they landed, these Jews forged new lives for themselves and future generations. This series explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. Each week, we will share the history of one Jewish family with roots in the Arab world. Each account is personal and different. Some include painful memories or elegies for what could've been. Others pay homage to the conviction of their ancestors to seek a life where they were wanted. To ground each episode, we rely on a scholar to untangle the complexities. Some of these stories have never been told because they wished to leave the past in the past. For those of you who, like me, before this project began, never read this chapter in Jewish history, we hope you find this series enlightening. And for those who felt ignored for so many decades, we hope these stories honor your families' legacies. Join us as we explore stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience.  I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman, and this is The Forgotten Exodus.   Today's episode: Leaving Iraq.   CAROL: All my life, I've lived in two worlds – one inside the family home, which is a very Jewish world, obviously, but also tinged with Iraqi customs like Iraqi food, a language we spoke—Judeo Arabic. So, I've always known that I'm not just British. I've lived in these two worlds, the one at home, and then the one at school. And then later on at work, which was very English. I went to a terribly English school, for example, there were about a thousand girls. Of those thousand girls, 30 were Jewish, and I was the only Mizrahi, the only non-European Jew. So, there's always been that knowing that I'm not quite fitting into boxes. Do you know what I mean? But I never quite knew which box I fit into. MANYA: Carol Isaacs makes her living illustrating the zeitgeists of our time, poking fun at the irony all around us, reminding us of our common quirks. And she fits it all into a tiny box. You might not know Carol by her given name, but you've probably seen her pen name, scrawled in the corner of her cartoons published by The New Yorker and Spectator magazines: TS McCoy, or The Surreal McCoy.  Carol is homesick for a home she never knew. Born and raised Jewish in London, she grew up hearing stories of her parents' life in Baghdad. How her family members learned to swim in the Tigris River using the bark of palm trees as life preservers, how they shopped in the city sooks for dates to bake b'ab'e b'tamer.  Millions of Jews have called Iraq home for more than 2,600 years, including many of their children and grandchildren who have never been there, but long to go. Like Carol, they were raised with indelible stories of daily life in Mosul, Basra, Baghdad – Jewish life that ceased to exist because it ceased to be safe. CAROL: My mother remembered sitting with her mother and her grandmother and all the family in the cellar, going through every single grain of rice for chometz. Now, if you imagine that there were eight days of Passover, I don't know 10, 12 people in the household, plus guests, they ate rice at least twice a day. You can imagine how much rice you'd have to go through. So little things like that, you know, that would give you a window into another world completely, that they remembered with so much fondness.  And it's been like that all my life. I've had this nostalgia for this, this place that my parents used to . . . now and again they'd talk about it, this place that I've never visited and I've never known. But it would be wonderful to go and just smell the same air that my ancestors smelled, you know, walk around the same streets in the Jewish Quarter. The houses are still there, the old Jewish Quarter. They're a bit run down. Well, very run down. MANYA: Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a graphic memoir and animated film called The Wolf of Baghdad. Think Art Spiegelman's Maus, the graphic novel about the Holocaust, but for Jews in Iraq who on the holiday of Shavuot in 1941 suffered through a brutal pogrom known as the Farhud, followed by decades of persecution, and ultimately, expulsion. Her research for the book involved conversations with family members who had never spoken about the violence and hatred they witnessed. They had left it in the past and now looked toward the future. There's no dialogue in the book either. The story arc simply follows the memories. CAROL: They wanted to look forward. So, it was really gratifying that they did tell me these things. ‘Cause when my parents came, for example, they came to the UK, it was very much ‘Look forward. We are British now.' My father was the quintessential city gent. He'd go to the office every day in the city of London with his pinstriped suit, and a rose plucked from the front garden, you know, a copy of The Guardian newspaper under his arm. He was British. We listened to classical music. We didn't listen to the music of my heritage. It was all Western music in the house. MANYA: But her father's Muslim and Christian business associates in Iraq visited regularly, as long as they could safely travel.    CAROL: On a Sunday, every month, our house would turn into little Baghdad. They would come and my mother would feed them these delicacies that she spent all week making and they'd sit and they'd talk. MANYA: As Carol said, she had heard only fond memories throughout her childhood because for millennia, Jews in Iraq lived in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors.  CAROL: Jews have always lived in Mesopotamia, lived generally quite well. There was always the dimmi status, which is a status given to minorities. For example, they had to pay a certain tax, had to wear certain clothing. Sometimes, they weren't allowed to build houses higher than their neighbor, because they weren't allowed to be above their neighbor. They couldn't ride a horse, for example, Jews. I mean, small little rules, that you were never quite accorded full status. But then when the Brits arrived in 1917, things became a bit easier. MANYA: But 20-some years later, life for Jews took a turn for the worse. That sudden and dramatic turning point in 1941 was called The Farhud. ZVI BEN-DOR BENITE: Jews have been living in Iraq for thousands of years. If we start with the Farhud, we are starting in the middle of the story, in fact, in the middle of the end.” MANYA: That's Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, a professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. The son of Iraqi Jewish parents who migrated to Israel in the early 1950s, he carries in his imagination maps of old Jewish neighborhoods in Mosul and Baghdad, etched by his parents' stories of life in the old country. He shares Carol's longing to walk those same streets one day.  ZVI: Iraqis, even those who were born in Israel, still self-identify as Iraqis and still consider that home to a certain extent – an imaginary home, but home. And you can say the same thing, and even more so, for people who were born there and lived there at the time. So here's the thing: if I go there, I would be considering myself a returnee. But it would be my first time. MANYA: As a Jew, Zvi knows the chances of his returning are slim. To this day, Iraq remains the only Arab country that has never signed a ceasefire with Israel since Arab nations declared war on the Jewish state upon its creation in 1948. Jews are not safe there. Really, no one has been for a while. The dictatorship of Saddam Hussein, ISIS, and general civil unrest have made modern-day Iraq dangerous for decades. The region is simply unstable. The centuries leading up to the Farhud in 1941 were no different. The territory originally known as Mesopotamia flipped from empire to empire, including Babylonian, Mongol, Safavids, Ottoman, British. Just to name a few. But during those centuries, Iraq was historically diverse – home to Muslims, Jews, Assyrian Christians. Yes, Jews were a minority and faced some limitations. But that didn't change the fact that they loved the place they called home.  ZVI: We zoom in on the Farhud because it is a relatively unique event. Jews in Iraq were highly integrated, certainly those who lived in the big cities and certainly those who lived in Baghdad. Few reasons to talk about this integration. First of all, they spoke Arabic. Second of all, they participated in the Iraqi transition to modernity. In many ways, the Jewish community even spearheaded Iraqi society's transition into modernity. Of course, you know, being a minority, it means that not everything is rosy, and I'm not in any way trying to make it as a rosy situation. But if you compare it to the experiences of European Jews, certainly Europeans in the Pale of Settlement or in Eastern Europe, it's a much lovelier situation. Many Jews participate in Iraqi politics in different ways. Many Jews joined the Communist Party, in fact, lead the Communist Party to a certain extent. Others join different parties that highly identify in terms of Iraqi nationalism. MANYA: Very few Iraqi Jews identified with the modern Zionist movement, a Jewish nationalist movement to establish a state on the ancestral homeland of the Jews, then known as Palestine. Still, Iraqi Jews were not immune from Arab hostility toward the notion of Jewish self-determination. Adding to that tension: the Nazi propaganda that poured out of the German embassy in Baghdad.  CAROL: Mein Kampf was translated into Arabic and published in all the newspapers there. There were broadcasts coming from Radio Berlin, in Arabic, politicizing Islam and generally manipulating certain texts from the Quran, to show that Jews were the enemies of Islam. So, there was this constant drip, drip of antisemitism. ZVI: Another factor is, of course, the British. There is an anti-British government in Baghdad at the time, during the period of someone who went down in history as a Nazi collaborator, Rashid Ali. And Rashid Ali's been removed just before the British retake Iraq. We should remember that basically, even though Iraq is a kind of constitutional monarchy, the British run the show behind the scenes for a very, very long time. So, there is a little bit of a hiatus over several months with Rashid Ali, and then when he is removed, you know, people blame the Jews for that. MANYA: On the afternoon of June 1, 1941, Jews in Baghdad prepared to celebrate the traditional Jewish harvest festival of Shavuot. Violent mobs descended on the celebrants. CAROL: In those two days the mobs ran riot and took it all out on the Jews. We don't, to this day, we don't know how many Jews died. Conservative estimates say about 120. We think it was in the thousands. Certainly, a lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt, women raped, mutilated, babies killed. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA: The mobs were a fraction of the Iraqi population. Many Muslim residents protected their Jewish neighbors.  CAROL: One of my relations said that during the Farhud, the pogrom, that her neighbors stood guard over their house, Muslim neighbors, and told the mobs that they wouldn't let them in that these people are our family, our friends. They wouldn't let them in. They looked after each other, they protected each other. MANYA: But the climate in Iraq was no longer one in which Jews could thrive. Now they just hoped to survive. In the mid-to-late 40s, Carol's father, who worked for the British army during World War II, left for the United Kingdom and, as the eldest son, began to bring his family out one by one. Then came 1948. Israel declared independence and five Arab nations declared war.  ZVI: So, Iraq sent soldiers to fight as part of the Arab effort in Palestine, and they began to come back in coffins. I mean, there's a sense of defeat. Three deserters, three Iraqi soldiers that deserted the war, and crossed the desert back to Iraq, and they landed up in Mosul on the Eve of Passover in 1949. And they knocked on the door of one of my uncles. And they said, they were hosted by this Jewish family. And they were telling the Jews, who were their hosts that evening, about the war in Palestine, and about what was going on and so on. This is just an isolated case, but the point is that you know, it raises the tension in the population, and it raises the tensions against Jews tenfold. But there's no massive movement of Iraqi Jews, even though the conditions are worsening. In other words, it becomes uneasy for someone to walk in the street as a Jew. There is a certain sense of fear that is going on. And then comes the legal action. MANYA: That legal action, transacted with the state of Israel and facilitated by Zionist operatives, set the most significant exodus in motion. In 1950, the Iraqi government gave its Jewish citizens a choice. Renounce their Iraqi citizenship, take only what fits in a suitcase, and board a flight to Israel, or stay and face an uncertain future. The offer expired in a year, meaning those who stayed would no longer be allowed to leave. ZVI: If you're a Jew in Iraq in 1950, you are plunged into a very, very cruel dilemma. First of all, you don't know what the future holds. You do know that the present, after 1948, suggests worsening conditions. There is a sense that, you know, all the Jews are sort of a fifth column. All of them are associated with Zionism, even though you know, the Zionist movement is actually very small. There are certain persecutions of Zionists and communists who are Jews as well. And, you know, there have been mass arrests of them, you know, particularly of the young, younger Jewish population, so you don't know. And then the state comes in and says, ‘Look, you get one year to stay or to leave. If you leave, you leave. If you stay, you're gonna get stuck here.' Now, just think about presenting someone with that dilemma after 1935 and the Nuremberg Laws, after what happened in Europe. MANYA: In all, 120,000 Iraqi Jews leave for Israel over nine months – 90% of Iraqi Jewry. For the ten percent who stayed, they became a weak and endangered minority. Many Iraqis, including the family on Carol's mother's side, eventually escaped to America and England.  CAROL: My mother and my father were separated by a generation. My father was much older, 23 years older than my mother. So, he had a different view of life in Baghdad. When he was around, it was generally very peaceful. The Jews were allowed to live quite, in peace with their neighbors. But with my mother's generation and younger, it was already the beginning – the rot had started to set in. So, she had a different view entirely. CAROL: My grandmother, maternal grandmother, was the last one to come out of our family, to come out of Iraq. She left in ‘63. And my dad managed to get her out. MANYA: After Israel defeated another Arab onslaught in 1967, thousands more fled. ZVI: This was a glorious community, a large community, which was part of the fabric of society for centuries, if not millennia. And then, in one dramatic day, in a very, very short period, it just basically evaporated. And what was left is maybe 10 percent, which may be elite, that decided to risk everything by staying. But even they, at the end, had to leave.  MANYA: Remember, Carol said she was one of 30 Jewish girls at her school, but the only Mizrahi Jew. The term Mizrahi, which means “Eastern” in Hebrew, refers to the diaspora of descendants of Jewish communities from Middle Eastern countries such as: Iraq, Iran, and Yemen, and North African countries such as: Egypt, Libya, and Morocco. CAROL: It's been interesting. A lot of people didn't even know that there were Jews living in Arab lands. I mean, for all my life, I've been told, ‘Oh, you're Jewish, you speak Yiddish, you come from Poland. You eat smoked salmon and bagels. You say ‘oy vey,' which is great if you do all those things and you do come from Eastern Europe, but I don't. Almost 1 million Jews of Arab lands, nobody knows about what happened to them, that they were ethnically cleansed, removed from their homes, and dispersed across the world. It's our truth. And it's our history and make of it what you will, just add it to other family histories that we know. MANYA: Carol has discovered that even Iraqis did not know of their country's rich Jewish past, nor the fate of its Jewish citizens. Since the animated version of The Wolf of Baghdad premiered at the Israeli and Iraqi embassies in London, accompanied by Carol's accordion and other musicians playing its Judeo-Arabic soundtrack, Iraqis in the audience have been moved to tears.  CAROL: At one Q&A, after we did a performance, one Iraqi gentleman stood up at the front. He was crying. He said, ‘I'm really sorry for what we did to you. I'm so sorry.' And that was immensely moving for me. It was like, well, you know what? We're talking now. It's wonderful. We can sit down together. We can talk in a shared language. We can talk about our shared culture, and we've got more that ties us together than separates us. We've got more in common, right? So, I'm always looking for that, that kind of positive, and so far it's come back to me, multiplied by a million, which has been brilliant. The truth is coming to light, that people know that the Jews of Iraq contributed so much, not just culturally but also socially, in the government too. So, it's this reaching out from Iraq to its lost Jews saying ‘Well where are you? What happened to you? Tell us your story. We want to see where you are. Come back even,' some of them are saying. MANYA: Carol has continued to give a voice to the Jewish refugees of Iraq. Most recently, she has been adapting The Wolf of Baghdad for younger, middle school-aged readers to better understand the story. And high schools in London and Canada have added The Wolf of Baghdad to their history curriculum.  CAROL: Leaving Iraq was called the silent exodus for a reason. We just left quietly and without fuss, and just went and made our lives elsewhere. I do know that life was difficult for them wherever they went, but they just got on with it, like refugees will do everywhere. MANYA: These Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who, in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Many thanks to Carol Isaacs for sharing her family's story and to her band 3yin for the music. Throughout this episode, you have been listening to pieces of the soundtrack from The Wolf of Baghdad motion comic performed by 3yin, a groundbreaking London based band that plays Jewish melodies from the Middle East and North Africa. The soundtrack is available at thesurrealmccoy.com. Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can subscribe to The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can learn more at AJC.org/forgottenexodus.  The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.

The Forgotten Exodus
Iraq

The Forgotten Exodus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 20:38 Very Popular


Who are the Jews of Iraq? Why did they leave? And why do so many Iraqi Jews, even those born elsewhere, still consider Iraq their home?  The premiere episode of a new limited narrative series from American Jewish Committee (AJC) uncovers the answers to these questions through the inspiring story of Mizrahi Jewish cartoonist Carol Isaacs' family. Feeling alienated growing up as the only Jew in school from an Arab-majority country, Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a gripping graphic memoir, The Wolf of Baghdad.  Meanwhile, Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, professor of History and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University, delves into the fascinating, yet the little-known history of Iraqi Jewry, from its roots in the region 2,600 years ago, to the antisemitic riots that led them to seek refuge in Israel, England, and the U.S. _________ Show notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about the series here. Song credits: Thanks to Carol Isaacs and her band 3yin for permission to use The Wolf of Bagdad soundtrack. Portions of the following tracks can be heard throughout the episode:  01 Dhikrayyat (al Qasabji)  02 Muqaddima Hijaz (trad)  03 Che Mali Wali (pt 1) (trad) 05 Fog el Nakhal (trad)  11 Balini-b Balwa (trad)  12 Al Effendi (al Kuwaiti)  14 Dililol (trad)  15 Che Mail Wali (pt 2) (trad)  Pond5: “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837; “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. ______ Episode Transcript: CAROL ISAACS: A lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: Welcome to the premiere of the first ever podcast series devoted exclusively to an overlooked episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. Some fled antisemitism, mistreatment, and pogroms that sparked a refugee crisis like no other, as persecuted Jewish communities poured from numerous directions.  Others sought opportunities for their families or followed the calling to help create a Jewish state. In Israel, America, Italy, wherever they landed, these Jews forged new lives for themselves and future generations. This series explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. Each week, we will share the history of one Jewish family with roots in the Arab world. Each account is personal and different. Some include painful memories or elegies for what could've been. Others pay homage to the conviction of their ancestors to seek a life where they were wanted. To ground each episode, we rely on a scholar to untangle the complexities. Some of these stories have never been told because they wished to leave the past in the past. For those of you who, like me, before this project began, never read this chapter in Jewish history, we hope you find this series enlightening. And for those who felt ignored for so many decades, we hope these stories honor your families' legacies. Join us as we explore stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience.  I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman, and this is The Forgotten Exodus. Today's episode: Leaving Iraq. CAROL: All my life, I've lived in two worlds – one inside the family home, which is a very Jewish world, obviously, but also tinged with Iraqi customs like Iraqi food, a language we spoke—Judeo Arabic. So, I've always known that I'm not just British. I've lived in these two worlds, the one at home, and then the one at school. And then later on at work, which was very English. I went to a terribly English school, for example, there were about a thousand girls. Of those thousand girls, 30 were Jewish, and I was the only Mizrahi, the only non-European Jew. So, there's always been that knowing that I'm not quite fitting into boxes. Do you know what I mean? But I never quite knew which box I fit into. MANYA: Carol Isaacs makes her living illustrating the zeitgeists of our time, poking fun at the irony all around us, reminding us of our common quirks. And she fits it all into a tiny box. You might not know Carol by her given name, but you've probably seen her pen name, scrawled in the corner of her cartoons published by The New Yorker and Spectator magazines: TS McCoy, or The Surreal McCoy.  Carol is homesick for a home she never knew. Born and raised Jewish in London, she grew up hearing stories of her parents' life in Baghdad. How her family members learned to swim in the Tigris River using the bark of palm trees as life preservers, how they shopped in the city sooks for dates to bake b'ab'e b'tamer.  Millions of Jews have called Iraq home for more than 2,600 years, including many of their children and grandchildren who have never been there, but long to go. Like Carol, they were raised with indelible stories of daily life in Mosul, Basra, Baghdad – Jewish life that ceased to exist because it ceased to be safe. CAROL: My mother remembered sitting with her mother and her grandmother and all the family in the cellar, going through every single grain of rice for chometz. Now, if you imagine that there were eight days of Passover, I don't know 10, 12 people in the household, plus guests, they ate rice at least twice a day. You can imagine how much rice you'd have to go through. So little things like that, you know, that would give you a window into another world completely, that they remembered with so much fondness.  And it's been like that all my life. I've had this nostalgia for this, this place that my parents used to . . . now and again they'd talk about it, this place that I've never visited and I've never known. But it would be wonderful to go and just smell the same air that my ancestors smelled, you know, walk around the same streets in the Jewish Quarter. The houses are still there, the old Jewish Quarter. They're a bit run down. Well, very run down. MANYA: Carol turned her longing for Iraq and the life her family left behind into a graphic memoir and animated film called The Wolf of Baghdad. Think Art Spiegelman's Maus, the graphic novel about the Holocaust, but for Jews in Iraq who on the holiday of Shavuot in 1941 suffered through a brutal pogrom known as the Farhud, followed by decades of persecution, and ultimately, expulsion. Her research for the book involved conversations with family members who had never spoken about the violence and hatred they witnessed. They had left it in the past and now looked toward the future. There's no dialogue in the book either. The story arc simply follows the memories. CAROL: They wanted to look forward. So, it was really gratifying that they did tell me these things. ‘Cause when my parents came, for example, they came to the UK, it was very much ‘Look forward. We are British now.' My father was the quintessential city gent. He'd go to the office every day in the city of London with his pinstriped suit, and a rose plucked from the front garden, you know, a copy of The Guardian newspaper under his arm. He was British. We listened to classical music. We didn't listen to the music of my heritage. It was all Western music in the house. MANYA: But her father's Muslim and Christian business associates in Iraq visited regularly, as long as they could safely travel.    CAROL: On a Sunday, every month, our house would turn into little Baghdad. They would come and my mother would feed them these delicacies that she spent all week making and they'd sit and they'd talk. MANYA: As Carol said, she had heard only fond memories throughout her childhood because for millennia, Jews in Iraq lived in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors.  CAROL: Jews have always lived in Mesopotamia, lived generally quite well. There was always the dimmi status, which is a status given to minorities. For example, they had to pay a certain tax, had to wear certain clothing. Sometimes, they weren't allowed to build houses higher than their neighbor, because they weren't allowed to be above their neighbor. They couldn't ride a horse, for example, Jews. I mean, small little rules, that you were never quite accorded full status. But then when the Brits arrived in 1917, things became a bit easier. MANYA: But 20-some years later, life for Jews took a turn for the worse. That sudden and dramatic turning point in 1941 was called The Farhud. ZVI BEN-DOR BENITE: Jews have been living in Iraq for thousands of years. If we start with the Farhud, we are starting in the middle of the story, in fact, in the middle of the end.” MANYA: That's Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, a professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. The son of Iraqi Jewish parents who migrated to Israel in the early 1950s, he carries in his imagination maps of old Jewish neighborhoods in Mosul and Baghdad, etched by his parents' stories of life in the old country. He shares Carol's longing to walk those same streets one day.  ZVI: Iraqis, even those who were born in Israel, still self-identify as Iraqis and still consider that home to a certain extent – an imaginary home, but home. And you can say the same thing, and even more so, for people who were born there and lived there at the time. So here's the thing: if I go there, I would be considering myself a returnee. But it would be my first time. MANYA: As a Jew, Zvi knows the chances of his returning are slim. To this day, Iraq remains the only Arab country that has never signed a ceasefire with Israel since Arab nations declared war on the Jewish state upon its creation in 1948. Jews are not safe there. Really, no one has been for a while. The dictatorship of Saddam Hussein, ISIS, and general civil unrest have made modern-day Iraq dangerous for decades. The region is simply unstable. The centuries leading up to the Farhud in 1941 were no different. The territory originally known as Mesopotamia flipped from empire to empire, including Babylonian, Mongol, Safavids, Ottoman, British. Just to name a few. But during those centuries, Iraq was historically diverse – home to Muslims, Jews, Assyrian Christians. Yes, Jews were a minority and faced some limitations. But that didn't change the fact that they loved the place they called home.  ZVI: We zoom in on the Farhud because it is a relatively unique event. Jews in Iraq were highly integrated, certainly those who lived in the big cities and certainly those who lived in Baghdad. Few reasons to talk about this integration. First of all, they spoke Arabic. Second of all, they participated in the Iraqi transition to modernity. In many ways, the Jewish community even spearheaded Iraqi society's transition into modernity. Of course, you know, being a minority, it means that not everything is rosy, and I'm not in any way trying to make it as a rosy situation. But if you compare it to the experiences of European Jews, certainly Europeans in the Pale of Settlement or in Eastern Europe, it's a much lovelier situation. Many Jews participate in Iraqi politics in different ways. Many Jews joined the Communist Party, in fact, lead the Communist Party to a certain extent. Others join different parties that highly identify in terms of Iraqi nationalism. MANYA: Very few Iraqi Jews identified with the modern Zionist movement, a Jewish nationalist movement to establish a state on the ancestral homeland of the Jews, then known as Palestine. Still, Iraqi Jews were not immune from Arab hostility toward the notion of Jewish self-determination. Adding to that tension: the Nazi propaganda that poured out of the German embassy in Baghdad.  CAROL: Mein Kampf was translated into Arabic and published in all the newspapers there. There were broadcasts coming from Radio Berlin, in Arabic, politicizing Islam and generally manipulating certain texts from the Quran, to show that Jews were the enemies of Islam. So, there was this constant drip, drip of antisemitism. ZVI: Another factor is, of course, the British. There is an anti-British government in Baghdad at the time, during the period of someone who went down in history as a Nazi collaborator, Rashid Ali. And Rashid Ali's been removed just before the British retake Iraq. We should remember that basically, even though Iraq is a kind of constitutional monarchy, the British run the show behind the scenes for a very, very long time. So, there is a little bit of a hiatus over several months with Rashid Ali, and then when he is removed, you know, people blame the Jews for that. MANYA: On the afternoon of June 1, 1941, Jews in Baghdad prepared to celebrate the traditional Jewish harvest festival of Shavuot. Violent mobs descended on the celebrants. CAROL: In those two days the mobs ran riot and took it all out on the Jews. We don't, to this day, we don't know how many Jews died. Conservative estimates say about 120. We think it was in the thousands. Certainly, a lot of businesses were trashed, houses were burnt, women raped, mutilated, babies killed. It was an awful time. And that was a kind of time when the Jews of Iraq had started to think, ‘Well, maybe this isn't our homeland after all.' MANYA: The mobs were a fraction of the Iraqi population. Many Muslim residents protected their Jewish neighbors.  CAROL: One of my relations said that during the Farhud, the pogrom, that her neighbors stood guard over their house, Muslim neighbors, and told the mobs that they wouldn't let them in that these people are our family, our friends. They wouldn't let them in. They looked after each other, they protected each other. MANYA: But the climate in Iraq was no longer one in which Jews could thrive. Now they just hoped to survive. In the mid-to-late 40s, Carol's father, who worked for the British army during World War II, left for the United Kingdom and, as the eldest son, began to bring his family out one by one. Then came 1948. Israel declared independence and five Arab nations declared war.  ZVI: So, Iraq sent soldiers to fight as part of the Arab effort in Palestine, and they began to come back in coffins. I mean, there's a sense of defeat. Three deserters, three Iraqi soldiers that deserted the war, and crossed the desert back to Iraq, and they landed up in Mosul on the Eve of Passover in 1949. And they knocked on the door of one of my uncles. And they said, they were hosted by this Jewish family. And they were telling the Jews, who were their hosts that evening, about the war in Palestine, and about what was going on and so on. This is just an isolated case, but the point is that you know, it raises the tension in the population, and it raises the tensions against Jews tenfold. But there's no massive movement of Iraqi Jews, even though the conditions are worsening. In other words, it becomes uneasy for someone to walk in the street as a Jew. There is a certain sense of fear that is going on. And then comes the legal action. MANYA: That legal action, transacted with the state of Israel and facilitated by Zionist operatives, set the most significant exodus in motion. In 1950, the Iraqi government gave its Jewish citizens a choice. Renounce their Iraqi citizenship, take only what fits in a suitcase, and board a flight to Israel, or stay and face an uncertain future. The offer expired in a year, meaning those who stayed would no longer be allowed to leave. ZVI: If you're a Jew in Iraq in 1950, you are plunged into a very, very cruel dilemma. First of all, you don't know what the future holds. You do know that the present, after 1948, suggests worsening conditions. There is a sense that, you know, all the Jews are sort of a fifth column. All of them are associated with Zionism, even though you know, the Zionist movement is actually very small. There are certain persecutions of Zionists and communists who are Jews as well. And, you know, there have been mass arrests of them, you know, particularly of the young, younger Jewish population, so you don't know. And then the state comes in and says, ‘Look, you get one year to stay or to leave. If you leave, you leave. If you stay, you're gonna get stuck here.' Now, just think about presenting someone with that dilemma after 1935 and the Nuremberg Laws, after what happened in Europe. MANYA: In all, 120,000 Iraqi Jews leave for Israel over nine months – 90% of Iraqi Jewry. For the ten percent who stayed, they became a weak and endangered minority. Many Iraqis, including the family on Carol's mother's side, eventually escaped to America and England.  CAROL: My mother and my father were separated by a generation. My father was much older, 23 years older than my mother. So, he had a different view of life in Baghdad. When he was around, it was generally very peaceful. The Jews were allowed to live quite, in peace with their neighbors. But with my mother's generation and younger, it was already the beginning – the rot had started to set in. So, she had a different view entirely. CAROL: My grandmother, maternal grandmother, was the last one to come out of our family, to come out of Iraq. She left in ‘63. And my dad managed to get her out. MANYA: After Israel defeated another Arab onslaught in 1967, thousands more fled. ZVI: This was a glorious community, a large community, which was part of the fabric of society for centuries, if not millennia. And then, in one dramatic day, in a very, very short period, it just basically evaporated. And what was left is maybe 10 percent, which may be elite, that decided to risk everything by staying. But even they, at the end, had to leave.  MANYA: Remember, Carol said she was one of 30 Jewish girls at her school, but the only Mizrahi Jew. The term Mizrahi, which means “Eastern” in Hebrew, refers to the diaspora of descendants of Jewish communities from Middle Eastern countries such as: Iraq, Iran, and Yemen, and North African countries such as: Egypt, Libya, and Morocco. CAROL: It's been interesting. A lot of people didn't even know that there were Jews living in Arab lands. I mean, for all my life, I've been told, ‘Oh, you're Jewish, you speak Yiddish, you come from Poland. You eat smoked salmon and bagels. You say ‘oy vey,' which is great if you do all those things and you do come from Eastern Europe, but I don't. Almost 1 million Jews of Arab lands, nobody knows about what happened to them, that they were ethnically cleansed, removed from their homes, and dispersed across the world. It's our truth. And it's our history and make of it what you will, just add it to other family histories that we know. MANYA: Carol has discovered that even Iraqis did not know of their country's rich Jewish past, nor the fate of its Jewish citizens. Since the animated version of The Wolf of Baghdad premiered at the Israeli and Iraqi embassies in London, accompanied by Carol's accordion and other musicians playing its Judeo-Arabic soundtrack, Iraqis in the audience have been moved to tears.  CAROL: At one Q&A, after we did a performance, one Iraqi gentleman stood up at the front. He was crying. He said, ‘I'm really sorry for what we did to you. I'm so sorry.' And that was immensely moving for me. It was like, well, you know what? We're talking now. It's wonderful. We can sit down together. We can talk in a shared language. We can talk about our shared culture, and we've got more that ties us together than separates us. We've got more in common, right? So, I'm always looking for that, that kind of positive, and so far it's come back to me, multiplied by a million, which has been brilliant. The truth is coming to light, that people know that the Jews of Iraq contributed so much, not just culturally but also socially, in the government too. So, it's this reaching out from Iraq to its lost Jews saying ‘Well where are you? What happened to you? Tell us your story. We want to see where you are. Come back even,' some of them are saying. MANYA: Carol has continued to give a voice to the Jewish refugees of Iraq. Most recently, she has been adapting The Wolf of Baghdad for younger, middle school-aged readers to better understand the story. And high schools in London and Canada have added The Wolf of Baghdad to their history curriculum.  CAROL: Leaving Iraq was called the silent exodus for a reason. We just left quietly and without fuss, and just went and made our lives elsewhere. I do know that life was difficult for them wherever they went, but they just got on with it, like refugees will do everywhere. MANYA: These Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who, in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Many thanks to Carol Isaacs for sharing her family's story and to her band 3yin for the music. Throughout this episode, you have been listening to pieces of the soundtrack from The Wolf of Baghdad motion comic performed by 3yin, a groundbreaking London based band that plays Jewish melodies from the Middle East and North Africa. The soundtrack is available at thesurrealmccoy.com. Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can subscribe to The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can learn more at AJC.org/forgottenexodus.  The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.  

UCL Minds
Rebuilding a Library with Dr. Mohammed Jasim, Director of Mosul University Libraries

UCL Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 16:28


The director of Mosul University Libraries, Mr Mohammed Jasim Aal-Hajiahmed, speaks about national and international efforts to rehabilitate the libraries of the University of Mosul. Mr Mohammed Jasim Aal-Hajiahmed is a recipient of a Visiting Iraqi Scholarship from the Nahrein Network and the British Institute for the Study of Iraq (BISI). For more information and to access the transcript: www.ucl.ac.uk/nahrein/media/podcasts Date of episode recording: 2018-07-13 Duration: 16:28 Language of episode: English Presenter: Mehiyar Kathem Guests: Mr Mohammed Jasim Producer: Mehiyar Kathem

UCL Minds
An Interview with the founders of Mosul Book Bridge

UCL Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 15:20


The Nahrein Network interviews Dr Alaa Hamdon of Mosul University (Nahrein Network - British Institute for the Study of Iraq (BISI) scholarship recipient) and archaeologist Dr Caroline Sandes, who founded Mosul Book Bridge to support the rebuilding of Mosul University Library. You can read more about Mosul Book Bridge on www.mosulbookbridge.org Date of episode recording: 2019-03-09 Duration: 15:20 Language of episode: English Presenter:Mehiyar Kathem Guests: Dr. Alaa Hamdon and Dr. Caroline Sandes Status Producer: Mehiyar Kathem

佳音LOVE聯播網-清醒的心
清醒的心 那鴻書 第02章

佳音LOVE聯播網-清醒的心

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 30:19


本章述尼尼微覆亡的慘象。請記得在先知寫作當時,該城還是“勢力充足“的。 1-2:宣布將有強敵來襲尼尼微,因神要復興曾被她毀壞的猶大。此應驗於612BC巴比倫與瑪代聯攻亞述。「使地空虛的」指亞述。3-4敵軍威武善戰。5-7:尼尼微王匆忙抗敵仍被攻陷。 6「河閘開放宮殿沖沒」見1:8。史載柯撒河(Khoser river)的水閘也被巴比倫用於攻城之役(注)。8-9尼尼微被劫掠。 9:亞述長期搶掠別國,城中積蓄財寶極多。10-13尼尼微成廢墟。 12:當日尼尼微像公獅,殘待其征服之民,今卻被毀滅除盡。亞述人素以獅子作徽號,也愛獵獅。  注:尼尼微遺址即今伊拉克北部大城摩蘇爾(Mosul),在2014年8月中旬伊斯蘭國(ISIL)與美軍支持的伊拉克政府軍的爭奪戰中,水壩(Mosul Dam)仍是戰略焦點。

Westminster Institute talks
Blasphemy Murders in Nigeria

Westminster Institute talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 54:59


https://westminster-institute.org/events/blasphemy-murders-in-nigeria/ Douglas Burton is a veteran reporter and news content producer based in Greenbelt, Maryland. In recent years he has put his energies into reporting terrorism in Nigeria, where he mentors a team of grassroots conflict reporters. Burton and some of his team were featured in a Fox Nation documentary on Nigeria produced by war correspondent Lara Logan in 2021. Burton put in decades as an assignment editor with the Washington Times corporation before heading to Iraq to help the occupation effort from 2005 dot 2007 and later reported the campaign to remove Islamic State from its base in Mosul, Iraq. Burton switched to Nigerian terrorism in 2019. Masara Kim, 35, is a widely watched conflict reporter in Jos, the capital of Plateau State, from which he has contributed as a reporter to Fox Nation, The Epoch Times and other news media. Kim overcame a lost limb in his childhood and manages his print and photography output with only one arm. He recently published a groundbreaking investigation of mass rape as a tool of governance by terrorists in so-called ungoverned spaces of Nigeria's Northwestern States.

The Morning Formation Podcast
Discover Army ROTC Opportunities with SDSU Professor of Military Science LTC Michelle Parlette

The Morning Formation Podcast

Play Episode Play 19 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 76:10 Transcription Available


Fall in… Today, we have a special episode for the parents, guardians, and future leaders who wish to take the military into consideration and also complete college at the same time. I'm talking about the prestigious Army ROTC program, which is available in many colleges all across the United States. I have a former coworker and friend, who also was deployed in 2004-2005 in Support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Mosul, Iraq. I was a lowly 2LT in a nearby Transportation Platoon and she was the Executive Officer of her respective Maintenance Company.Today, I am very proud to say that our guest has managed to climb the Army ranks and is now a Lieutenant Colonel and is serving as a Professor of Military Science at San Diego State University, where she mentors, guides, and build our future military leaders. I'd like to welcome LTC Michelle Parlette to The Morning Formation Podcast. Connect with LTC Parlette on LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/michelle-parlette-7322a096/San Diego State University Army ROTC Websitehttps://armyrotc.sdsu.eduSan Diego State University Army ROTC Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/SDArmyROTC/Army ROTC San Diego State University Cadre Contact:https://armyrotc.sdsu.edu/cadreSan Diego State University Army ROTC Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/sdarmyrotc/San Diego State University Army ROTC Recruiter (ROO) Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/sdsu_army_rotc_recruiter/Other Nearby Partnered Programs with San Diego State University are: University of San Diego | University of California San Diego | Point Loma Nazarene University | Army ROTC | Aztecs Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/aztecs_rotc_bulldogs/Find Universities with Army ROTC Programs:https://www.goarmy.com/careers-and-jobs/find-your-path/army-officers/rotc/find-schools.htmlArmy ROTC National Scholarship Information:https://www.goarmy.com/careers-and-jobs/find-your-path/army-officers/rotc/scholarships.htmlArmyGeneral Army ROTC Information:https://www.goarmy.com/careers-and-jobs/find-your-path/army-officers/rotc.htmlNational Guard Schlorships with Army ROTC Programs Information:https://www.nationalguard.com/tools/guard-scholarshipsArmy National Guard Simultaneous Membership (SMP) Program Information:https://www.nationalguard.com/simultaneous-membership-programArmy ROTC Cadet Command Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/ArmyROTCDogs on Deployment (Mentioned at the end of the podcast):https://www.dogsondeployment.org

Professional Military Education
Degrade and Destroy: An Interview with Michael Gordon

Professional Military Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 68:18


Michael Gordon is the author of Degrade and Destroy: The Inside Story of the War Against the Islamic State. He is currently a National Security Correspondent with The Wall Street Journal. He has covered wars and conflicts for over 35 years with The Wall Street Journal and previously with The New York Times.  In this interview, we discus the last decade of conflict against the Islamic State in which the United States applied a “by, with and through” strategy. This strategy supported Iraqi Security Forces and Syrian Democratic Forces with U.S. advisors in the field as well as multiple intelligence and air assets. Topics covered include the following:  The conditions that allowed ISIS to capture territory in Iraq and Syria The capture of Mosul followed by the U.S. developing a strategy to respond The “By, With and Through” strategy that the U.S. employed based on a Special Forces concept to back local forces in the field of combat Where the term “Degrade and Destroy” came from and the strategic implications of how it shaped into “Operation Inherent Resolve” Michael discusses his frontline view of the conflict while embedded with Iraq's Counterterrorism Service (CTS) and Kurdish Peshmerga forces The early struggle to take back Mosul and how it led to Lieutenant General Townsend's “Tactical Directive One”  The difference between the Battle of Mosul and the Battle of Raqqa  How the U.S. and Russia faced off in Syria The current state of “Operation Inherent Resolve” and the current disposition of the Islamic State Lessons learned from “Operation Inherent Resolve” Michael Gordon Bibliography: Degrade and Destroy: The Inside Story of the War Against the Islamic State The Endgame: The Inside Story of the Struggle for Iraq, from George W. Bush to Barack Obama COBRA II: The Inside Story of the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq The Generals' War Article: “How the War Against ISIS Was Won”  Follow and contact Michael Gordon:  Twitter: @mgordonwsj  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelgordonwsj/  E-mail: Michael.gordon@wsj.com and mgwsj@protonmail.com    HELP SPREAD THE WORD! If you like the interview and want to hear others, subscribe in iTunes, Spotify, or Audible. Support the show with written reviews, share on social media, and through word of mouth. To request additional shows or guests, e-mail me: tim@professionalmilitaryeducation.com  Check out the website: www.professionalmilitaryeducation.com  

Newshour
15 dead in Soweto bar shooting

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 47:30


15 people have been shot dead at a bar in the South African township. We report live from Soweto. Also in the programme: as the US urges Sri Lankan leaders to restore economic stability, more than a quarter of the population are at risk of hunger; we hear from the UN World Food Programme And five years after the Iraqi city of Mosul was liberated from Islamic State militants, we report on the efforts to rebuild it (Image: police cordon around the Soweto tavern where 15 people were shot dead / Credit: BBC News / Ed Habershon)

Beyond the Headlines
Five years after ISIS, when will Mosul be rebuilt?

Beyond the Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 21:44


Five years have passed since Iraq liberated Mosul from ISIS in a bloody, street to street battle that left 11,000 civilians dead and much of the northern city in ruins.  Millions fled the brutal three year rule of the terror group and hundreds of thousands more fled the deverstating fighting to recapture the city.  But five years after victory, several neighbourhoods in Mosul still lie in ruins.  On this week's episode, host Robert Tollast asks why is it taking so long to rebuild Mosul.

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com
Hawaii Viet Vet Becomes Gold Star Father

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 16:38


Alan Hoe comes from a tradition of warriors going all the way back to wars between the Chieftains of Hawaii prior to the arrival of the Europeans and Americans.   this was dramatic warfare as early as the 11th Century.Alan got drafted into the US Army at age 19.   He  saw heavy combat in Vietnam as a Medic.  He tells the story of his talented son who was Killed In Action in Mosul and offers advice to others who must face tragedy.  Allen is an American hero.  Lawyer, Judge, Combat Medic! 

UCL Minds
An Interview with Louise Haxthausen

UCL Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 13:07


Director of the UNESCO Office for Iraq, Louise Haxthausen, speaks about the rebuilding of Mosul and national and international efforts to revive its spirit of co-existence, learning and education. Louise Haxthausen also speaks about the importance of a $50m contribution from the Government of the UAE to rebuild the destroyed al Nuri Mosque complex and the Hadba Minerat, and the role of intangible heritage as an essential part of reconstruction. Date of episode recording: 2018-07-09 Duration: 00:13:07 Language of episode: English Presenter: Mehiyar Kathem Guests: Louise Haxthausen Producer: Mehiyar Kathem

SWR2 Essay
Michaela Diers: Malath und die Vögel von Mosul

SWR2 Essay

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 49:09


Wie ist es, Flüchtende in Deutsch zu unterrichten? Was erfahren sie, was erfahren wir über Präsenz, Perfekt, Futur? Eine poetische Meditation über die Heimat, das Ankommen, das Weitermachen.

10 Percent True - Tales from the Cockpit
F-15E Mosul SA-3 Strike: Starbaby Walkthrough

10 Percent True - Tales from the Cockpit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 96:32 Very Popular


F-15E Mosul SA-3 Strike: Starbaby WalkthroughTip Jar: https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=GDJU6CM3GWZTNDiscussion on Discord: https://discord.gg/9vJ3hPYFQh00:00:00 Introduction    00:01:58 Setting the Scene    00:26:42 The Strike    01:06:42 Questions and DiscussionSupport the show

The Archaeology Show
United Tools, Drought Finds, and the Most Important Site in the World - Ep 176

The Archaeology Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 39:59


MEMBERS: CHECK YOUR AD-FREE DOWNLOADS FOR THIS EPISODE'S BONUS SEGMENT! We've got a lot to cover in this news episode. We start with a tale of the Swiss Army Knife of southern Africa. Then we talk about a site in Iraq visible now because of drought and being recording in a rapid way. Then we go to Turkey to talk about the most famous site in the world: Gobekli Tepe. But wait, there's more! For members we have a bonus segment about the world's oldest company. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code TAS. Click this message for more information. Links 65,000 year-old ‘Swiss Army knife' proves ancient humans shared knowledge, research says. Ancient city emerges as Mosul's dam is drained Drought in Iraq Reveals 3,400-Year-Old City Turkish hilltop where civilization began Contact Chris Webster chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
United Tools, Drought Finds, and the Most Important Site in the World - TAS 176

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 39:59


MEMBERS: CHECK YOUR AD-FREE DOWNLOADS FOR THIS EPISODE'S BONUS SEGMENT! We've got a lot to cover in this news episode. We start with a tale of the Swiss Army Knife of southern Africa. Then we talk about a site in Iraq visible now because of drought and being recording in a rapid way. Then we go to Turkey to talk about the most famous site in the world: Gobekli Tepe. But wait, there's more! For members we have a bonus segment about the world's oldest company. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code TAS. Click this message for more information. Links 65,000 year-old ‘Swiss Army knife' proves ancient humans shared knowledge, research says. Ancient city emerges as Mosul's dam is drained Drought in Iraq Reveals 3,400-Year-Old City Turkish hilltop where civilization began Contact Chris Webster chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Europa Europa
Neutralità climatica, in Plenaria trionfa la discordia

Europa Europa

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022


Auto verdi e scambio di quote di emissione. Il Parlamento si divide sulla definizione dei tempi in cui porre fine alla produzione di auto con motori endotermici. Il rapporto sullo scambio di emissioni viene invece congelato. La legislazione dell'UE sul clima era all'ordine del giorno della plenaria di questa settimana, con i deputati che hanno discusso e votato otto proposte per combattere il cambiamento climatico. Ma la sessione di mercoledì è stata piombata nel caos dal rifiuto della bozza di relazione del membro del PPE Peter Liese che proponeva una revisione e un'espansione del sistema di scambio di emissioni, un elemento chiave del cosiddetto pacchetto climatico Fit for 55. Nella seconda parte di EE lasciamo il continente per l'Iraq: Beda Romano è stato testimone di come dopo cinque anni gli effetti della guerra segnino ancora la città di Mosul. Un doloroso promemoria per gli effetti di lungo termine di quanto sta accadendo ormai da più di tre mesi in Europa orientale.

Historiansplaining: A historian tells you why everything you know is wrong
Taking Stock of 5 Years of Historiansplaining, & Teaser: The Library of Ashurbanipal

Historiansplaining: A historian tells you why everything you know is wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 24:06


We take stock of the growth of "Historiansplaining," which has brought together listeners and guests, ranging from scholars and critics to regular working people, from America to Asia and Australia. We consider the different lectures that have proved most popular and attracted the attention of journalists, and we preview possibilities for the future, such as videos and series on music in history, which may be realized with enough patron support. Finally, we hear the names of all current active patrons, and an excerpt from the latest patron-only lecture, examining the largest discovery ever made of texts and documents from the ancient world, the Library of Ashurbanipal, in Mosul, Iraq. Please sign up on Patreon to hear patron-only lectures, including "The LIbrary of Ashurbanipal" -- www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

Heart and Soul
After ISIS: Reviving the Jewish history of Mosul

Heart and Soul

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 26:29


When ISIS swept into Mosul in June 2014, the organisation immediately began a campaign to wipe out the most important part of the northern Iraqi city's unique heritage - its a multi-sectarian culture. Mosul was home to ancient and modern Christian communities, Yazidis, Shia and Sunni Muslims, and at one time, Jews. Throughout the period of ISIS occupation Omar Mohammad, a history lecturer at Mosul University, risked his life daily to get news of the city out to the world via the internet. His Mosul Eye blog became essential reading. Now living in exile in Europe, Omar de Mosul, as he is known, is reconstructing the history ISIS tried and failed to wipe out, including the history of the city's Jewish community. Presenter Michael Goldfarb spends time with Omar as he collects oral histories from the remaining Jews who were born and grew up in the city. Most Jews left the city in the early 1950s in the upheaval following the establishment of Israel. He also speaks with Rabbi Carlos Huerta, retired US army chaplain, who spent the first year after the US overthrew Saddam Hussein in Mosul with the 101st Airborne. He had no idea about the rich Jewish history of the place and spent much of his time investigating it. Presenter: Michael Goldfarb Producer: Julia Hayball (Photo: The dilapidated Sasson Synagogue in Iraq's northern city of Mosul destroyed by Jihadists. Credit: by Zaid aL-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images) A Certain Height production for BBC World Service

Silver Savage
Silver Savage Podcast Ep18 - Daniel Archer

Silver Savage

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 70:41


CW4 Daniel T. Archer entered the Army in October of 2001 as an airframe electrician technician.  Following Basic Training, AIT and Enlisted Green Platoon, he was assigned to the Fco 1st BN 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) .  In October of 2002, CW4 Archer was selected to attend Warrant Officer Candidate School and Army Initial Entry Rotorcraft Training at Fort Rucker Alabama.  CW4 selected Apache Longbows as his airframe of choice out of flight school.After Flight school CW4 Archer was assigned to Renegade Troop, 4/3 ACR.  In early 2005, CW4 deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom and flew AH64Ds primarily over the Baghdad and Mosul areas of operation, culminating in 598 Combat flight hours in the AH64D. In 2006 CW4 Archer PCS'd to South Korea to serve as a company Instructor Pilot in the Longbow.  In 2008 he was assigned to the 204th MI BN as a C-12U pilot.In 2009 CW4 Archer Assessed and was selected for training at 4th BN 1st CIG. During his time in 2nd BN CW4 Archer held many jobs to include Company Standardization Pilot, BN Standardization Pilot and Senior Warrant Officer. CW4 Archer has accumulated over 6800 flight hours, 2500+combat flight hours, 1200+ imminent danger hours and has deployed overseas 27 times, 25 times with 1st CIG over the last 12 years in the organization. CW4 Archer holds 8 different type ratings and is an FAA Pilot Examiner Designee.CW4 Archer deployed in support of SOUTHCOM, CENTCOM, PACOM, EUCOM, and AFRICOM, participated in multiple Operations to include IRAQI FREEDOM, ENDURING FREEDOM, INHERIANT RESOLVE, and numerous classified contingency missions directed by the National Command Authority.Masada Tactical The premier self protection training company, combining Israeli tactics and American disciplines.Combat Iron Apparel

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
2022.05.04 Round Trip Special to Iraq with Dunia Aljawad

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 139:54


As broadcast May 4, 2022 with plenty of poor pronunciation and patient correction for your podcast travel experience.  Tonight we take a trip to Dunia Aljawad's homeland for the full two hours as we explore the sounds of Iraq.  We went all over the timeline and landed in Baghdad, stopping down in Basra and headed up to Mosul as well during the show while also marking some history from the US on this date to start with the spectacles on.  A brilliant selection from our resident advisor Dunia Aljawad, and an even better showcase of some of the less used areas of Danno's pronunciation (in)abilities.  Eid Mubarak as well to all who celebrated this week!Tracklisting:Part I (00:00)DEVO – Jocko HomoHassam Shakash – Oud Al batalMustafa Alabdallah & Ali Jassim & Mahmoud Al Turky - Ta'alKadim Al Saher – Lak WahshaQahtan al Attar - shkol aliekPart II (34:59)Nazem al-Ghazali - Gulli Ya Hilu  قلي ياحلو منين الله جابكSeta Hagopian - Droub el Safar (Zghayroun)Seta Hagopian – Mandal DallouniYas Khidr – TaybenAseel Hameem – Eii EntaAseel Hameem - Shkad HelwPart III (69:22)Rahma Riad - Waed MenniNarcy – Sun Ilham al-Madfai - Sharabtak El MaayRida El Abdallah - Melh Wa Al Zad   الملح والزادKadim Al Saher - Fi Madrasat Al HobPart IV (109:53)Salima Murad – Ya Nab'at AlrayhanHameed Mansour – SalamatTarah Salah Moneka – 7alti 7alaGary & Jung-in – YOUR SCENT (사람 냄새)Busker Busker – Yeosu Night Sea

TheEgyptianHulk
EP 15 - Ido Levy: Soldiers of End-Times: Assessing the Military Effectiveness of the Islamic State

TheEgyptianHulk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 53:00


Ido Levy is an associate fellow with The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, specializing in military and counterterrorism operations, particularly relating to jihadist groups. Formerly editor-in-chief of the Georgetown Public Policy Review, he has written for publications including Studies in Conflict & Terrorism and Middle East Policy. He holds a master's degree from Georgetown University. His first book and most recent publication, "Soldiers of End-Times: Assessing the Military Effectiveness of the Islamic State," looks at jihadist warfare from the 1970s to the present, building on primary sources, and interviews with military officers, experts, and journalists. In doing so, Levy explains how the Islamic State (IS) used conventional military capabilities to defeat larger, better-equipped state armies and conquer land in Syria, Iraq, Libya, the Philippines, and Nigeria. Anchored by four case studies—Ramadi, Kobane, Mosul, and Baghuz—the volume illuminates potential strategies to prevent a resurgence by IS or similar groups. Levy's book [FREE]: https://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/soldiers-end-times-assessing-military-effectiveness-islamic-state Episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Ghpmg9HcedM Reach out! TahrirPodcast@gmail.com Streaming everywhere! https://linktr.ee/TahrirPodcast Consider leaving a one-time PayPal donation! https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/siko2001?country.x=EG&locale.x=en_US Support us on Patreon for as low as $2 per-month! https://www.patreon.com/TahrirPodcast

SpyCast
"ISIS Leader al-Mawla: Caliph. Scholar. Canary. Snitch." – with Daniel Milton, West Point CTC Director (Part 2 of 2)

SpyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 39:34 Very Popular


Summary Daniel Milton (Website; Twitter) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss the former Caliph of the Islamic State. Al Mawla was killed in a U.S. raid in February 2022.  What You'll Learn Intelligence The origin of the term “Canary Caliph” The mythology of Islamic State and the reality Battlefield intelligence and understanding an enemy The Combating Terrorism Center being on the radar of terrorists Reflections The presentation of “self” The relationship between organizational priorities and organizational hierarchies And much, much more… Episode Notes Daniel Milton joins us again to discuss a series of interrogation reports of Al Mawla, at the time leader of Islamic law in Mosul for the Islamic State in Iraq (ISI). ISI was the successor to Al Qaeda in that country and the predecessor of Islamic State (Islamic State is a larger umbrella category, while ISIS, ISKP, etc. come with geographical designations, e.g., Islamic State of Iraq and Syria). Al Mawla gave up the names of over 50 people within his own organization: and that was only in the first 3 of 56 interviews.  One interesting insight you can glean from the documents is that Islamic State while very different from many organizations in many respects, is just like them in others: empire building, clashing personalities, struggles over process, paperwork, committees, territorialism, jealousy, prejudice, insecurity – like The Office, but with much more malevolent intent. And… If you want to read a document that captures (a) an important inflection point in the transition from Al Qaeda to Islamic State and (b) was one of the West Point CTC publications captured during the Bin Laden raid, read “Al Qaeda Secedes from Iraq.” Quote of the Week "I think we get a sense of it as an organization that exists and has similar struggles as any other organization does. Having said that, clearly, it's a clandestine organization, and so one of the overriding imperatives is security. Individuals are trying to stay alive and not get arrested or killed. And that affects a little bit of the way that you carry out business. I do think that you also see some element of the things that you described. There is competition. There are people who don't like each other." – Daniel Milton Resources *Headline Resources* Al Mawla Interrogation Reports “Islamic State,” Mapping Militants, CISAC Stanford Books Enemies Near & Far, D. Gartenstein-Ross (CUP, 2022) The ISIS Reader, Ingram et al. (Hurst, 2020) The Rise of Global Jihad, T. Hegghammer (CUP, 2020) Foreign Fighters in the Armies of Jihad, D. Byman (OUP, 2019) Anatomy of Terror, A. Soufan (W.W. Norton, 2017) The Far Enemy, F. Gerges (CUP, 2005) Best Books on the Middle East (Five Books) Articles ISIS Leader Quraishi Kills Himself, Al-Khalidi & Bose, Reuters (2022) ISIS'S Leadership Crisis, H. Ingram and C. Whiteside, Foreign Affairs (2022) The Islamic State in Afghanistan, A. Jadoon et al., CTC (2022) The Cloud Caliphate, Ayad et al., CTC (2021) Lessons from the Islamic State's “Milestone” Texts and Speeches, Ingram et al., CTC (2020) Timeline: The Rise, Spread & Fall of the Islamic State, C. Glenn et al., Wilson Center (2019) Documentary Iraq & Syria: After Islamic State, BBC (2018) Confronting ISIS, PBS Frontline (2016) Reports Islamic State's Method of Insurgency, H. Ingram, GW (2021) Web Operation Inherent Resolve Primary Sources President Biden on a Successful Counterterrorism Operation (2022) Cyber Command's Internet War Against ISIL (2018) Islamic State Memo for Dealing with New Recruits (2017) Message to the Mujahidin and the Muslim Ummah, Caliph Al Baghdadi (2014) The Management of Savagery (2006)  The Sykes-Picot Agreement (1916) *Wildcard Resource* “Camp Bucca Newsletter #1” A U.S. forces newsletter from the time-period when Al Mawla was interrogated at Camp Bucca, in the vicinity of Umm Qasr, Iraq.