Podcasts about Manuka

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Best podcasts about Manuka

Latest podcast episodes about Manuka

Winning at Work
Manuka Honey and the Plight of the Bees with Corey Blick, SVP, GM Comvita USA with Matt Kovacs, President Blaze PR E150

Winning at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 38:49


Manuka honey is a premium, functional honey from New Zealand, and not the ordinary honey in a plastic bear!  Did you know bees are nearly extinct in 8 US states? Crazy but true. Learn about the world's most unique honey and how it is sold and marketed as a "challenger" brand.  Connect with Corey Blick on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/corey-blick-781a9b4/ Connect with Matt Kovacs: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattjkovacs/ https://www.comvita.com/ http://www.blazepr.com/ Comvita Origin story - Beekeeping since 1974 What is Manuka Honey? What are the benefits? Industry trends Lab Certified How does one market ultra-premium food?  Line extensions? 3 tough questions  The plight of the bees Bee Resources: Maine, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont, Idaho, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Oregon each have zero or close to zero American bumblebees left, according to a petition by the Center for Biological Diversity and Bombus Pollinators Association of Law Students.  Over the last two decades, the American bumblebee population has decreased by 89% across the U.S. New York had a decline of 99% and they disappeared from the northern part of Illinois that has seen a 74% decrease in population since 2004, the petition said. Source: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/10/14/american-bumble-bees-disappeared-8-states-face-extinction/8448637002/ There are 4,000 bee species in North America: https://www.usgs.gov/faqs/how-many-species-native-bees-are-united-states Beekeepers across the United States lost 45.5% of their managed honey bee colonies from April 2020 to April 2021, according to preliminary results of the 15th annual nationwide survey conducted by the nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership, or BIP. These losses mark the second-highest loss rate the survey has recorded since it began in 2006 (6.1 percentage points higher than the average annual loss rate of 39.4%). The survey results highlight the continuing high rates of honey bee colony turnover. The high loss rate was driven by both elevated summer and winter losses this year, with no clear progression toward improvement for beekeepers and their colonies. Source: https://ocm.auburn.edu/newsroom/news_articles/2021/06/241121-honey-bee-annual-loss-survey-results.php https://pollinator.org/learning-center/bee-issues?gclid=CjwKCAiA9qKbBhAzEiwAS4yeDWCNdxzMM5I3vjGIB08aTe6f-Jug6JyhVwm_FOeQwZL1ESuNV2R_-BoCnT8QAvD_BwE https://www.greenpeace.org/usa/sustainable-agriculture/save-the-bees/ https://www.earthday.org/fact-sheet-bees/ About your Host Tony Moore and the Winning at Work podcast: Connect with me on LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/differentbetterspecialbrands/ Are you looking for a fun and light-hearted podcast to stay current on the trends shaping the $1.6 trillion food and beverage industry? My totally awesome brands featured here take us deep into the world of sustainability, plant-based, food tech, CBD, and good for you. Want to learn how to grow a brand? Scale a brand? I've got you covered.  Join me on my mission to discover what makes these companies different, better, and special. Episode 150 is sponsored by: Timpl Search - National Food and Beverage headhunters for sales, marketing, innovation, and operations. https://www.timplsearch.com/ Contact: Tony Moore. 404-904-9235. Follow me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/differentbetterspecialbrands/ Music from Uppbeat: https://uppbeat.io/t/soundroll/get-the-funk-in License code: SF3WUKBUJQULFHXE

Beyond Recovery
Bee Magic

Beyond Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 58:33


"As a cancer survivor, I passed through a lot. After it was surgically removed in 2005 my life has turned upside-down. I changed my business from employment agency to natural supplements distributor and functional foods importer. Later, I became a brand owner and brought several natural remedies to the USA from around the globe under my own brand names: "Bee Magic" and "Health Republic". I do believe such remedies directly or indirectly prevent human mutated cells to convert into cancerous. I've learned a lot about Manuka Honey (I visited New Zealand and became a US distributor in 2014), and now I know how to identify real Manuka honey from fake. (my YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIo7IYRuFhkGiOUxvNz4kfw tells you a little what I mean).I can tell the audience about common tricks nowadays mass Manuka honey manufacturers use to keep their brand “competitive” in the US market and why FDA does not control the "Manuka honey"."This is an AMAZINGLY informative episode that covers a lot of the health benefits of Manuka Honey, as well as some overview conversations about holistic health in general!✅ www.beemagicusa.com✅ @Manuka Honey Guru (YouTube)

Holistic Health Matters
Are you ready for cold and flu season? w/Joyce Dales

Holistic Health Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 32:20


Joyce Dales is the founder of Coldbeegone an all-natural homeopathic remedy that can strengthen your immune system to fight cold and flu viruses. 4:36 Catching a virus through the air is rare 6:54 Don't destroy your nasal biome 9:20 Make your body a hostile environment for microbes 13:57 We are living in human zoos 15:15 Should kids get sick all the time? 19:52 Manuka honey will help destroy bacteria 23:37 Eat food as close to its God-given natural form as possible 26:17 Low-hanging fruit Joyce's website David's book The Christian's Guide to Holistic Health

Wabi Sabi - The Perfectly Imperfect Podcast with Candice Kumai
EP-95 How to Better Self-Soothe Your Anxiety and Depression

Wabi Sabi - The Perfectly Imperfect Podcast with Candice Kumai

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 41:07


It's clear that so many of us are currently suffering from mental health and anxiety disorders - I'm here to keep the conversation normalized, useful and here to give you free tips on how we can better self-soothe and heal ourselves. Here's to a better week and focusing on our love and health for one another. xx Candice PS use code: CANDICE25 for 25% off Comvita.com Manuka honey xx deee-lish Candice

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin
Mike Van De Elzen: Smoked fish gratin recipe

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 4:48


 Mike's website – goodfromscratch.co.nz  With daylight savings starting today, it not only brings with it each ray of extra sun shine. It is also the time for us to plant our potatoes. This will ensure you have a good crop come Xmas and the whole summer. Homegrown spuds are just amazing, the flavour profile is better and they are easy to maintain. Agria are our favourite as they are so universal but we also plant a couple smaller more coloured varieties to give our dishes a bit more visual impact.   And what's summer without a potato salad or a smoked fish pie!  Smoked fish gratin (serves 4)  Prep time: 20 mins  Cooking time: 40 mins  8 small Agria potatoes  1 cup cream  4 tbsp finely grated parmesan  1 egg  pinch white pepper  100g butter  100g flour  500ml milk  2 tbsp wholegrain mustard  1 tsp salt  1 cup sliced leek, white only  1 cup chopped celery, with leaves  1 cup peas  flesh of 1 small smoked snapper or similar white fish  ¼ cup finely grated parmesan  Preheat oven to 180*C. Peel potatoes and slice into thin discs. Whisk together cream, first measure of parmesan, egg and pepper in a bowl. Add potato to cream mix, coat well and leave to soak.  Melt butter in a large saucepan, add flour and whisk together. Gradually add milk while whisking until thick. Add mustard, salt, leek, celery and peas. Cook over a low heat for 10 minutes then flake in smoked fish. Transfer to a 30cm greased pie dish. Fan out creamy potato slices over pie filling. Sprinkle over second measure of parmesan and bake in oven for 40 minutes.  To smoke a fish . . .  Prep time: 35 mins  Smoking time: 20 mins  2 cups Manuka wood chips  ½ cup water  1 small whole snapper or similar white fleshed fish, gutted (approx. 1-1.25kg)  2 tbsp salt  2 tbsp brown sugar  Scatter wood chips over the base of an old roasting dish with lid. Drizzle water over wood chips. Place an old wire rack over the chips and open the fish out flat onto the rack, skin side down. Sprinkle salt and sugar over flesh, cover and leave for 30 minutes to cure. Place roasting dish over open flame (stovetop or BBQ) on high heat until it begins to smoke. Turn heat down to a low flame and leave for 20 minutes. (Cooking time will depend on fish size.) Remove fish from smoker and set aside until ready to use.   LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

One Radio Network
09.21.22 Atom One

One Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 71:34


ORN Atom Bergstrom show notes 9/21/22 What will people do for a living after the Great Reset? Taxing your solar panels, metering your wells, and constraining your rain water usage. Keeping you from consuming “too much". If you're not an elite, you'll be one of the obsoletes. We need to take a wrecking ball to all hospitals and medical establishments. The only way out is a revolution. Food additives being touted as a health supplement at a greatly increased price. JovialFoods.com olive oil is dated when olives are picked. Look for “estate grown and packed” on olive oil labels. Soy first manipulated in 1888 by radiation. DDT also used for food manipulation. Can now use CRISPR to make anything they want. Vitamins don't cause acid or alkaline reactions until you overdose on them. Any beneficial effect is from shocking the body. If taking big niacin doses, need Vitamin C with it to prevent toxicity. Homeopathy – a thief to catch a thief. Allopathic medicine - a cop to catch a thief. The allure of foods from far away and mysterious places. Caviar (which is an egg) is an excellent food for making babies, especially if eaten at sex-circulation time. ADAPTNOW sale. 20% off Surthrival Chaga and Reishi. “Toilet to tap” water, aka poop-water, coming in California. Purifying sewage water until it becomes clean enough to drink. Slowing digestion down with cold water. Venison and wild game digests faster than pastured meat. Mushrooms are a reflex to the penis. Frigidity implosion. 6.8 earthquake in Taiwan, 7.5 in central Pacific coast of Mexico. Texas is sinking, it's not the ocean rising. Taking the oil out is causing subsistence. US napalmed AWOL US soldiers in the jungle. Story buried after news organization bought off. Does the energy of meat that people eat harm them? Yes, if the animal suffered before death. Want wild-caught fish. Be wary of food labels. Spirulina company exposed for using blackboard chalk. The life force of the animal, its vitalism, needs to be considered in choosing food. Don't want confinement animals as food. How about shrimp as food? Atom's story of “rocks in eyes” going away after eating all the shrimp he could eat. What does urine character tell about a person's state of health? See Dr. Revici's book, free search via The Crazy Pharmacist. Also https://www.biri.org/resources/revici-book/. Patrick not peeing as much on his carnivore diet and is doing well on it. Atom says that diet would kill him. Temple Grandin – instrumental in the movement for humane treatment of livestock. 32 year professor at Colorado State University in animal science. Great movie about her called Temple Grandin. Royal jelly – honey bee secretion used in nutrition of larvae and adult queens. Nutritious for people. What is it about bacon that is so appealing? George Biggers the famous Bee Man. Manuka honey is a medication. Has some toxins. Use the lower rating ones if using ongoing. They have made drones smaller than the size of mosquitoes. Can make a nano version of any element. The sun radiates us with energy 24 hours a day. At night, infrared energy reflects off the moon. Sunlight is reflected. Infrared light goes in directly via the para-adrenal system.. What causes heavy dandruff and small waxy buildup contributing to hair loss, also ear wax? Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids. Take a good dose of cholesterol, olive oil or oleic acid. Correct the diet. Video about donkeys as guard animals. Donkey milk is closest to human milk. Was a major source of milk for the pioneers. Limes are different from lemons. Controversy over whether lemon or lime is better. Lemon in water won't hurt. Can bring toxins out of water to be scrapped off. Atom doesn't see value in adding lemon to water. He thinks drinks other than water have more nutrition.

The Explorers Podcast with Barry FitzGerald
Manuka Resources' recent acquisition has come with an extremely valuable biproduct - vanadium

The Explorers Podcast with Barry FitzGerald

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 22:13


In this episode Barry chats to Alan Eggers, executive director at Manuka Resources (ASX:MKR).

Microbe Talk
Episode 135: Manuka honey could help treat a deadly drug-resistant lung infection

Microbe Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 15:06


In this episode of Microbe Talk, Charlie talks to Dr Jonathan Cox about his team's newly published research on a surprising use for Manuka honey. Music: Leatherbound by Blue Dot Sessions (www.sessions.blue)

Biohacking with Brittany
112. Poop Transplants and Nasal Microbiome with Joyce Dales of Buzzagogo

Biohacking with Brittany

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 47:56


Have you heard of the nasal biome? Find out what it is and why it's important in this episode. Today we have Joyce Dales and we talk about poop transplants, the nasal biome and why it's important, Manuka honey, and more. Joyce Dales is the inventor of Cold Bee Gone Nasal Swab Remedy. Cold Bee Gone is an all-natural, homeopathic remedy that you swab inside your nose to help your body fight cold and flu exactly where germs replicate while protecting the Nasal Biome.   We talk about:  08:10 - Poop transplants 16:00 - Lactobacillus reuteri and its benefits 20:00 - Preventative medicine and why its important 23:30 - Getting your DNA tested and it not being the end all be all 28:30 - Why Joyce Dales started Buzzagogo 31:30 - Your nose has a microbiome 34:00 - Manuka honey and its benefits 39:30 - How to know if your nasal biome is healthy or not 40:40 - How to support your nasal biome 42:00 - When should you use Manuka honey 44:20 - New products in the pipeline for Joyce   Resources: You can email Joyce at Joyce@buzzagogo.com Buzzagogo   Let's Connect: Instagram Facebook My Amazon Storefront Subscribe to my newsletter Shop my favorite health products Listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Play   Sponsors:  Get 20% off InsideTracker plans, including testing your biological age, with my code BIOHACKINGBRITTANY. Use my discount code BIOHACKINGBRITTANY at Sensate for $25 off today.

Dad Time Out Show
S1 Ep62: Simple Stress Relief Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Parents and Kids

Dad Time Out Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 70:06


So many of us are dealing with stress in many different forms. In this show of the Dad's switch the batting order around and take a stress quiz early in the line up and then have some discussion and even try out a few ways to de-stress or  decompress after or during a long family day or week while discussing an article from Fatherly that gives us stress relief activities. Then plenty of off-topic funny parenting tweets of the week and on to onto finish line as we'll take on a couple questions from our popular new “Would you rather” segment and finally they wrap up with things that make them smile. Speaking of things that make us smile... Manuka honey, fresh socks, Heardle, food store worship, superpowers, tattoos and much more in this packed episode!

SBS Polish - SBS po polsku
Australian bees and Manuka honey - Australijskie pszczoły i miód Manuka

SBS Polish - SBS po polsku

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 14:09


Marian Winczura, a beekeeper from Victoria, talks about his passion for beekeeping and the properties of Manuka honey ... - Marian Winczura, pszczelarz z Victorii opowiada o swojej pasji do pszczelarstwa i właściwościach miodu Manuka...

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How Muscle Promotes Energy, Regulates Our Metabolism, And Prevents Disease

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 56:31


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, ButcherBox, and Comvita.As you lose muscle, you lose mitochondria and your metabolism slows down. Then there is the fact that the natural loss of muscle mass and strength as we age is associated with all-cause mortality and linked to the incidence of many chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease and stroke, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. This is why muscle mass is not only essential for maintaining a healthy weight, but it's also a key factor in reducing the risk of chronic disease and improving your healthspan and longevity. In this episode, I speak with Drs. Stuart Phillips and Chris Rinch, Dr. Gabrielle Lyon, and Mark Sisson about the importance of supporting our body's largest organ, muscle.Dr. Chris Rinsch is co-founder and CEO at Amazentis where he oversees the company's operations in Switzerland. For more than two decades, he has been an innovator in the life sciences arena. Dr. Stuart Phillips is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and a member of the School of Medicine at McMaster University. He is Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Skeletal Muscle Health. He is also the Director of the McMaster University Physical Activity Centre of Excellence. Dr. Gabrielle Lyon is an integrative physician who completed her fellowship in Nutritional Sciences and Geriatrics at Washington University, St. Louis. She is board-certified in Family Medicine and completed her undergraduate work in Human Nutrition Vitamin and Mineral Metabolism. Mark Sisson is the founder of the popular daily health blog, Mark's Daily Apple, godfather to the Primal food and lifestyle movement, and the New York Times bestselling author of The Keto Reset Diet. His latest book is Keto for Life, where he discusses how he combines the keto diet with a Primal lifestyle for optimal health and longevity. Mark is the author of numerous other books as well, including The Primal Blueprint.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, ButcherBox, and Comvita.Rupa Health is a place where Functional Medicine practitioners can access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, and Great Plains. You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. If you sign up today, ButcherBox will give you two ribeye steaks for free in your first box. Just go to butcherbox.com/farmacy to claim this deal. Learn more about Comvita at comvita.com, and enter code Hyman25 for 25% off all Manuka honey and bee products. (This offer does not apply to bundles or sale items.)Full-length episodes of these interviews can be found here:Dr. Stuart Phillips and Dr. Chris RinschDr. Gabrielle LyonMark Sisson Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Radio One 91FM Dunedin
Interview - Matt Hunter on new label, Manuka Recordings - Paul Whiley - Radio One 91FM

Radio One 91FM Dunedin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022


Tune into the Radio One 91FM Drive show weekdays, 4pm - 7pm NZDT or head to https://www.r1.co.nz

Myers Detox
A Deep Dive into the Booger Biome with Joyce Dales

Myers Detox

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 41:37


Joyce Dales joins the show to talk about the amazing health benefits of Manuka honey and the “booger biome”. That's right, our nasal passage has a biome of it's own where viruses and bacteria can build up causing sickness. In order to replenish our booger biome and prevent infections, Joyce developed an amazing nasal swab using the antimicrobial properties of Manuka honey. We cover lots of interesting topics about Manuka honey and our booger biome, so make sure to tune in!   On today's podcast, you will learn: What is our “booger biome”? Why Joyce developed her Cold Bee Gone product. How Cold Bee Gone works to fight viruses and infections. Should you swab with colloidal silver? All the amazing properties of Manuka honey. The type of Manuka honey Joyce sources for her products.   Joyce Dales' Bio: Joyce Dales is the CEO of Buzzagogo and the inventor of Cold Bee Gone, a homeopathic, Manuka Honey based remedy that you swab in your nose to fight cold, flu, allergies and to protect the nasal biome.  Joyce, who used to be a high school teacher, is married to Jeffrey, who is an attorney and software engineer. In 2009 and 2011 they welcomed two beautiful girls as they grew their family through the gift of international adoption. Together they run their company, while homeschooling, as they travel the country in their 1972 Airstream. Cold Bee Gone is now sold nationwide and is a proud official sponsor of the Boston Red Sox. You can learn more about Joyce and her amazing Cold Bee Gone at  

Zahlen im Griff-Podcast für Selbstständige und Unternehmer
Was Honig mit dem richtigen Umgang mit Geld zu tun hat (unbedingt hören!)

Zahlen im Griff-Podcast für Selbstständige und Unternehmer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 39:49


Die Gewinnabsicht steht bei vielen Unternehmen im Vordergrund. Es gibt allerdings noch mehr Werte, die einen wesentlichen Einfluss auf die Arbeitsweise haben.

 Von meinem heutigen Gast Mario Tenspolde erfährst du
 - wie man auch mit Herz ein Unternehmen führen kann
 - was er sich aus seiner Kickbox-Karriere mitnehmen konnte für sein Business
 - was er von einem 6-jährigen Kind lernen durfte und was daraus entstanden ist Wenn du Anregungen hast oder Wünsche, dann melde dich bei mir via Mail email@joerg-roos.com Impressum: https://joerg-roos.com/impressum

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Special Episode: Get To Know Dr. Mark Hyman

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 49:23


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, Thrive Market, and Comvita.Today, as part of my Masterclass series, I'm answering personal questions my team put together from the “Let's Get Closer” card deck. I am joined by my good friend and podcast host, Dhru Purohit, to give you a peek into my personal life as I answer questions about my greatest struggles, what I'm addicted to, the best advice I've received, and much more. Dhru Purohit is a podcast host, serial entrepreneur, and investor in the health and wellness industry. His podcast, The Dhru Purohit Podcast, is a top 50 global health podcast with over 30 million unique downloads. His interviews focus on the inner workings of the brain and the body and feature the brightest minds in wellness, medicine, and mindset.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, Thrive Market, and Comvita. Rupa Health is a place where Functional Medicine practitioners can access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs. You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. Thrive Market is an online membership-based grocery store that makes eating well convenient and more affordable. Join today at thrivemarket.com/hyman to receive an extra $80 worth of free groceries with your first order. Comvita offers the most premium, pure, well-researched, and sustainably sourced Manuka products available on the market today. You can learn more at comvita.com, and enter code Hyman25 for 25% off all Manuka honey and bee products. (This offer does not apply to bundles or sale items.) In this episode, we discuss (audio version / Apple Subscriber version):The last time I asked for help (5:20 / 2:12)A time when I felt the most alive (7:04 / 4:45) The way I like to be comforted when I'm sad or upset (12:00 / 9:38) What I am addicted to (14:08 / 11:47) What I miss about being a kid (21:42 / 18:03)Characteristics I most admire in others (25:06 / 21:26) The greatest struggles I've overcome (25:50 / 22:10) The best advice I've received (27:57 / 24:18) My biggest fear (30:34 / 26:54)My definition of success (33:14 / 29:37) The most miraculous thing I've experienced (34:55 / 31:17)Something I can't explain (40:55 / 37:15) How I'd like to be remembered (46:28 / 42:50) Mentioned in this episode:Let's Get Closer by Intelligent ChangeInner.UHow to Conquer Your Mind to Live Your Best Life with Colin O'BradyThe Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire by Deepak Chopra Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Saturday Morning with Jack Tame
Ruud Kleinpaste: Do you have a wet garden?

Saturday Morning with Jack Tame

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 4:44


It is quite extraordinary, how often I come across gardeners that are complaining about having a very wet garden. In many cases they are dealing with a residual “wetland”!!! In our history, land owners and farmers simply hated these wet lands and they went to extreme efforts to drain the living daylights out of them… As luck would have it, I have just read a brand-new book about New Zealand's WETLANDS: Life in the Shallows, by Karen Denyer and Monica Peters. This book does not just describe the many facets of wetland research and the people that do the hard mahi, out there in those shallow waters, it also covers the history of wetland habitats in Aotearoa. The coolest thing is the Mātauranga associated with wetlands. My goodness these habitats were important to Maori for soooo many years. Wetlands have always been recognised as the nurseries for Kai Moana and the sources of food in both fresh water and sea water and everything in between. The most awful statistic in the book is that we have just 10% of all our wetlands left. The rest has been “tidied up” by land owners who have always considered wetlands to be a pain in the proverbial and a messy, wet, unproductive form of land. Homo sapiens have always wanted a clean, regular, tidy and orderly piece of land; Have you noticed how Nature is always “messy”? So if you have a piece of land, or a garden that has nice wet patches, what can you do to turn that into a classy habitat for native wetland organisms; my immediate thoughts are “plant some wetland plants” I contacted Karen Denyer to find out if there are some common sense plants that would make a good cover for wetlands; I mentioned the usual features: flax, Ti Kouka, Kahikatea, red tussock and Carex species, with mahoe, Manuka, swamp coprosma etc on the somewhat drier patches… Without hesitation I got a severe telling off from Karen (which I expected): “If you put this sort of thing on the radio, we'll end up with McDonalds wetlands all over the place”; Oh how I loved that description!!! Every wetland is different: North differs from South and East from West Soil types are other important factors that determine how a wetland looks and operates River/Stream origin or salt/Brackish water. Acid or alkaline. Lowlands or alpine wetlands Wet and deep (Aquatic), Lake edge (Emergent), Swamp or Fen (Saturated), Marsh or swamp edge, occasionally flooding (Moist), rarely flooding (Dry). Each of these conditions has its own suite of suitable plants Information on which plant to use in which region: Your regional Council, Local City Councils, DOC offices, and the local Botanical Society are all good sources of local information. And then there's another fabulous wetland book: Wetland restoration: a Handbook for New Zealand Freshwater Systems Wetlands are extremely important for our Planet… and certainly for Aotearoa. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How To Conquer Your Mind To Live Your Best Life with Colin O'Brady

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 72:07


This episode is brought to you by InsideTracker, BiOptimizers, and Comvita.Several months ago, I took thirty days to be by myself in a secluded Vermont cabin. I had no phone, no podcasts, no music, no TV, no work, and no company—it was just me and my thoughts. And I can't tell you how refreshed, recharged, and centered I felt after that trip. It can be incredibly hard spending time alone with your inner self, but it's always rewarding. That's what today's conversation with my good friend Colin O'Brady is all about. Colin is a ten-time world record breaking explorer, New York Times bestselling author, entrepreneur, speaker, and expert on mindset.He is focused on sharing his hard-won wisdom to encourage others to step outside of their comfort zone and unlock their best lives. Colin's highly publicized expeditions have been seen by millions and his work has been featured by The New York Times, The Tonight Show, BBC, Forbes, and Today. His world-renowned feats include the world's first solo, unsupported, and fully human-powered crossing of Antarctica, speed records for the Explorers Grand Slam and the Seven Summits, as well as the first human-powered row across Drake Passage. He is a regular speaker at Fortune 100 companies like Nike, Google, and Amazon and top Universities including UPenn, Georgetown, and Johns Hopkins. This episode is brought to you by InsideTracker, BiOptimizers, and Comvita.Right now InsideTracker is offering my community 20% off at insidetracker.com/drhyman.Go to magbreakthrough.com/hyman and use code hyman10 at checkout for 10% off your next order of BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough.Learn more about Comvita at comvita.com, and enter code Hyman25 for 25% off all Manuka honey and bee products. Note: Does not apply to bundles or sale items.Here are more details from our interview (audio version / Apple Subscriber version):Colin's solo crossing of Antarctica (7:44 / 3:27) The personalized nutrition food bars Colin ate on his expedition (9:37 / 6:55) The advice Colin's wife gave him on the first day of his Antarctica crossing (18:51 / 15:51) How Colin broke out of a period of anxiety and depression (27:24 / 23:53) Conquering your own mind (31:18 / 27:14)The experience that led me to become a doctor (41:34 / 37:18)Facing the feeling of not having enough time (43:50 / 39:31) What Colin fears more than dying (47:35 / 43:22) Becoming unstuck from the zone of comfortable complacency (49:10 / 46:54)The severe burn injury that served as a major turning point in Colin's life (54:59 / 52:00) Learn more about Colin at colinobrady.com and get a copy of his new book, The 12-Hour Walk: Invest One Day, Conquer Your Mind, and Unlock Your Best Life, here. Get a copy of Colin's book, The Impossible First: From Fire to Ice―Crossing Antarctica Alone, here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Cabral Concept
2360: BPA-Free Blender, Chest Pressure, Ghee & Trans-Fat, IHP Practice, Breakfast Ideas, Intestinal Pain & Supplements (HouseCall)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 22:16


Welcome back to our weekend Cabral HouseCall shows! This is where we answer our community's wellness, weight loss, and anti-aging questions to help people get back on track! Check out today's questions:    Richard: Hi Dr. Cabral, I have recently been looking for a new blender and it seems like much to my surprise, all the descent premium or high end blenders have a plastic jar. After some time of doing research I had decided on purchasing the ninja but then found out that the jar of this particular blender is plastic. This is really concerning to me because it's something that I use everyday and I don't want to be ingesting chemicals from the plastic. I know a lot of these blenders claim that the plastic is BPA free but from what I understand, when BPA is not used they use other chemicals that are just as bad if not worse than BPAs. I also mix in hot water for my morning smoothies to warm them up a bit since I use a lot of frozen fruits so that would make things more problematic. I also use hot water to clean the blender since sometimes there are stains I need to remove. Is this a legitimate concern or am I missing something here? I would love to hear your thoughts on this and some potential alternatives. Thank you for all your help, it is much appreciated!   Kristen: Hello! I've learned and been helped so much through you! After a “virus” my chest feels so much pressure, I went to a cardio dr and all checks out. I do have MTHFR I read that “ Homozygous variants, and some heterozygotes, may see a decrease in the metabolic pathway that converts folate and folic acid (vitamin Bs) into active forms. There can be a build up of homocysteine (amino acid) which has been linked to cardiovascular issues. ” I'm trying to turn over every leaf to get to the bottom of the random pressure when I lay down. Is It possible they are related or is there a connection with either one of these issues. I've done 5 protocols in over a year with significant improvement! To which I'm soo grateful to you and your staff!   Darren: Good day Dr Cabral. I see un ayurveda, they extol the benefits of ghee. I use it but recently started looking at the nutrition facts label and all the grass fed New Zealand based ghee brands I have seen say they contain some trans fat. Is pure grass-fed ghee of transfat concern? ? If ghee has trans-fat, why is ghee called healthy? Or is it a misperception given New Zealand is often touted as favoured by nature when making milk, with a climate, soils, and plentiful water that generate an ideal environment for growing healthy grass and New Zealand livestock access open pasture year-round, meaning space to roam and follow their natural affinity outdoors. Care to make us understand? Thank you   Lori: Hi, I am considering enrolling in your certification program. I am wondering, however, how to utilize it to practice legally in IL and many other states where it seems only an RD or CNS are allowed to make nutritional recommendations to clients. Thank you! ~Lori   Hazel: Im at a loss for breakfast I have high oxalates, a latex alergy and spontaneous uticaria/ dermatographia. I am following your mediteranean diet Many thanks. I listen to all your podcasts   Cody: Hi Dr. Cabral - I get acid reflux, mild diarrhea, and intestinal pain on my left side when I eat mildly spicy or citrus foods. I was curious if I had H Pylori, and I did a stool test and upper endoscopy which both came back negative. I also did an organic acid test which showed high levels of yeast. Before I start the CBO protocol, I decided to try some supplements targeted towards H Pylori just in case due to my symptoms. I've been taking Manuka honey, 1/2 cup cabbage juice, and L. Reuteri. I was fine for 2 weeks, but I'm now starting to get intestinal pain on my left side. I was planning to add mastic gum, but I've put that on hold now. Would you recommend stopping the H Pylori supplements and starting the CBO protocol? Compared to the CBO protocol, I've taken much less potent antimicrobials/antifungals in the past which started out fine but then gradually gave me intestinal pain. This is what led me to trying a treatment targeted towards H Pylori, which testing says I don't have, in the hope that it would allow me to tolerate the CBO protocol better, but I'm already having pain which I suspect is from the strength of the Manuka honey. In addition, zinc supplements give me intestinal pain, but I also take DGL licorice which is fine. Thank you for your time and advice.   Thank you for tuning into today's Cabral HouseCall and be sure to check back tomorrow where we answer more of our community's questions!    - - - Show Notes and Resources: StephenCabral.com/2360 - - - Get a FREE Copy of Dr. Cabral's Book: The Rain Barrel Effect - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: CabralSupportGroup.com - - - Dr. Cabral's Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Complete Minerals & Metals Test (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Complete Candida, Metabolic & Vitamins Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Mood & Metabolism Test (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Complete Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Complete Omega-3 & Inflammation Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels) - - - Get Your Question Answered On An Upcoming HouseCall: StephenCabral.com/askcabral - - - Would You Take 30 Seconds To Rate & Review The Cabral Concept? The best way to help me spread our mission of true natural health is to pass on the good word, and I read and appreciate every review!

Do you die in hell or stay alive?
LGBTQIA NYPD POLICE INVESTIGATION : 'Our most expensive thing on our rider now is Manuka honey which used to be Laurent-Perrier Rosé

Do you die in hell or stay alive?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 0:53


Music Fun Facts
Shawn Mendes Manuka

Music Fun Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 0:31


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

Keep Your Plants On Podcast
Healing Cystic Acne with Herbal Medicine and Plants with Carolyn Yachanin

Keep Your Plants On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 44:53


Today's episode is all about SKIN with Carolyn Yachanin, founder and CEO of Copina Co, a plant based collagen company born out of her experience healing her cystic acne and gut health issues through holistic medicine.We journey through Carolyn's story with cystic acne, gut health, and getting on prescriptions for her skin from a VERY young age! We journey through the pressure of having constantly perfect skin or health in this industry, and the fulfilling pursuit of imperfection.Habits that were essential in Carolyn's skin journey:1. Shifting coffee to matcha.2. Waking up and doing morning pages.3. Using your fridge as skincare:Here's a sneak peak of Carolyn's favorite face mask recipe:SpirulinaMatchaManuka honeyYogurtWHY: Chlorophyll helps to cleanse the skin, Manuka honey balances the bacteria on your face, and the Lactic Acid from whole milk yogurt works as a natural exfoliant.4. Lymphatic drainage massages, running, yoga, jumping, cold to hot showers.5. Shifting to more balanced, fat, fiber, and protein dense way of eating. Instead of eating as little as possible, healing her body meant nourishing it.You can find and follow Carolyn on instagram @carolynyachanin and @copinaco and explore her incredible products here:www.copinaco.com Use code: KEEPYOURPLANTSON for 15% off your first order!If you are looking for support in your health journey, you can find the transformational KYPO 12 week Functional Nutrition and Health Course and deeper personalization, coaching, and support at www.howtokeepyourplantson.com/programand follow along on instagram @keepyourplantson !

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO
ALGUIEN TIENE QUE DECIRLO (02JULIO2022)

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 49:05


Revive el segundo programa de esta serie, con dis interesantes invitados: Natalia Ubilla, Jefa de Comunicaciones y Sostenibilidad de Manuka, quien nos cuenta del trabajo de vinculación con la comunidad de una de las principales empresas lecheras de la región; y el sociólogo y exDiputado Pepe Auth, con quien conversamos sobre el panorama político y las encuestas que auguran un triunfo del rechazo a la nueva Constitución Conduce: Juan Rafael Maldonado --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/entrevistas-radio-sago/message

Veganish and All Things Healthy
Episode 208 - Interview with Joyce Dales, CEO of Cold Bee Gone

Veganish and All Things Healthy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 55:29


Joyce shares about her invention of Cold Bee Gone & Allergy Bee Gone as homeopathic, Manuka honey formulas to fight cold, flu and seasonal allergies to protect the nasal biome.

Esenciální oleje
Litsea a Manuka

Esenciální oleje

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 5:00


Zatímco Litseu známe jako součást mnoha směsí esenciálních olejů (Air-X a další), Manuka ve verzi touch byla loni v omezené nabídce. Informace o Aromatouch: https://adoterra.cz/aromatouch Vyzkoušejte si esenciální oleje s námi! https://adoterra.cz/nazkousku Napište mi: https://esencialni-oleje.eu/#kontakt Naše webináře o esenciálních olejích: https://esencialni-oleje.eu/#kalendarakci Další zdroje: https://linktr.ee/esencialni.oleje

The GroomPod
Episode 337: GroomPod 337 Grooming on auto pilot and Manuka honey

The GroomPod

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 54:39


We start out talking about grooming on auto pilot but we quickly head out on a tangent and discuss all kinds of grooming stuff.  Then we return to the outline and discuss Manuka honey and Show Season's Honey shampoo and conditioner.

Reformhaus: Mit Ernährung heilen - Fasten, Abnehmen, Schlaflosigkeit, konzentriert bleiben, Säure-Basen-Haushalt ... eine g
Manuka-Honig - flüssiges Gold für die Haut! Was den Honig aus Neuseeland gerade in der Hautpflege so wertvoll macht

Reformhaus: Mit Ernährung heilen - Fasten, Abnehmen, Schlaflosigkeit, konzentriert bleiben, Säure-Basen-Haushalt ... eine g

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 25:16


Die legendäre Schönheit Kleopatras hat vielleicht auch mit ihren Pflegeritualen zu tun: Sie nahm regelmäßig Bäder in Eselsmilch, die mit Honig angereichert waren. Die Ägypter priesen Honig als „Speise der Götter“ - was sich auch in seinem Preis wiederspiegelte: Im Jahr 3000 v. Chr. war ein Topf Honig noch genauso viel wert wie ein Esel. Bis heute wird Honig nicht nur als gesundes Süßungsmittel geschätzt, sondern ist fester Bestandteil der Hausapotheke. Die berühmte warme Milch mit Honig lässt uns tatsächlich besser einschlafen und auch in der kalten Jahreszeit hat sich Honig vielfältig bewährt. Auch in der Wundpflege wird Honig aufgrund seiner entzündungshemmenden Eigenschaften eingesetzt. Da liegt es auf der Hand, dass Honig häufig auch in Hautpflegeprodukten enthalten ist, weil er die Haut besonders zart macht und gut bei kleinen Hautunreinheiten wirkt. Wir sprechen in dieser Ausgabe über eine Hautpflege, die einen ganz besonders wertvollen Honig enthält: Manuka-Honig. Mit Diana Ludwigs, einer sehr erfahrenen und langjährigen Reformhaus®-Inhaberin mit großer Expertise auf dem Gebiet der Naturkosmetik, sprechen wir über die besonderen Benefits des Manuka-Honigs in der Hautpflege. Dieser Podcast ist in Zusammenarbeit mit Manuka Health entstanden.

Accumulate Health
Healthy Sweetener For Coffee

Accumulate Health

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 9:08


In today's episode, we are talking about the benefits of using honey as a sweetener in your coffee instead of Coffee Mate or other artificially enhanced sweeteners. Manuka or raw honey enhances coffee's nutritional benefits and honey tastes delicious. And if you are concerned about the caloric content of honey, there are only 21 calories per teaspoon. Commercial honeys did not demonstrate the ability to withstand heat or the digestive process and are negligible sources of beneficial antioxidants. ___ Want 12 of my favorite, simple and delicious recipes? Download the Healthy Meals Made Easy PDF ⬇️⬇️⬇️ http://go.drwholeness.com/healthymealsmadeeasy Ask your lifestyle health questions on social media, tag @drwholeness and use #accumulatehealth. -- Connect with Dr. Matt online:

Beyond The Bump
Are our kids safe online? - with Sarah from Secure Foundations

Beyond The Bump

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 56:37


In our 126th episode of Beyond the Bump, we chat with Sara Bolitho from Secure Foundations. We've had Sarah on the poddy before where we spoke about body autonomy and speaking to our kids about consent (EP106 is you haven't already listened!) However, this episode focuses purely on our kids' online safety. Now we have to admit, this is episode quite a hectic one, and you may not step away feeling ‘lighter than you did before', but it's still an important conversation to be had. We know that there is some dark shit out there on the internet - that's no surprise to anyone. Our aim for this episode is to give people permission to use this information as they will; we definitely do NOT want to make anyone feel guilty if their kids have screen-time as we know how difficult parenting is and sometimes that is your only break for the day. Trigger warning!! There are discussions about child abuse, online child abuse material and suicide, so if you're already feeling like you're in a very vulnerable position of parenting we give you complete permission to not listen to this episode - we will not be offended. Is there an age that we should we be giving our kids a phone? What about Kids YouTube? Is that secure or not? Is it best to have an honest conversation with our kids about the potential dangers they could come across online? Or is it best to just keep them innocent? What kinds of things should we be telling our kids when it comes to talking to them about their online safety? Why doesn't Sarah have her kids on the internet or social media? And questions Sarah want's our audience to consider when it comes to posting our kids online. Does Sarah see a positive outcome for our children and the internet? When should we talk to our kids about pornography, internet safety and sexting? And some examples of how to have this conversation. What can we do as parents to keep our kids safe online and on social media? What about Facebook Kids? What warning signs should we be looking out for? When should we be alarmed? If our kids are using devices, do those restricted access type things work? And at what age do you stop controlling and monitoring their devices? How can you help a child after a traumatic event?   Goodies mentioned @securefoundations   Beyond the Bump is a podcast brought to you by Jayde Couldwell and Sophie Pearce! A podcast targeted at mums, just like you! A place to have real conversations with honest and authentic people.  Follow us on Instagram at @beyondthebump.podcast to stay up to date with behind the scenes and future episodes.    This episode of Beyond the Bump is brought to you by Ecooriginals: Do you know what makes nappy changes slightly more bearable?  I cannot think of one thing? Someone else doing it for you!?  Nooooo, when you use products that you know actually work and more importantly are doing their bit for the earth.  Alright yes, right you are!  And that's where Ecoriginals come in.  Yep, Ecoriginals' nappies have industry leading absorbency, but more importantly are the worlds first plastic neutral nappy. That means they are the leading nappy made of plant based materials unlike all those plastic supermarket brands. Even better they have talking babies on their website to explain the difference. So cuuute! And don't even get me started on their incredible wipes. They are 100% plant based and completely biodegradable and come in three different natural options of New Zealand purified water, Manuka honey or goats milk!  Lucky bottoms! We recommend you get started with a bundle pack which has their ultra-absorbent and soft nappies plus 6 packs of biodegradable wipes!  Yep, whether you're after nappies or nappy pants or whether your little one is a newborn or running around, Ecoriginals has got you sorted!!!  It's the perfect time to give their nappies and wipes bundle a… well.. go, because they're offering our listeners $50 off this month with the code BTB50!! Ecoriginals such an amazing company - making amazing products, giving back, doing their bit for the earth and… sponsoring us! haha. For some fun check out their talking babies! Super cute videos explaining why their nappies are the best! Head to ecoriginals.com.au and don't forget to use the code BTB50 for your huge $50 discount!  

KRISTEN & NIGE FOR BREAKFAST
FULL SHOW - Accidental Pocket Dials!

KRISTEN & NIGE FOR BREAKFAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 16:21


Canberra decides on the cake for Alex and Val's wedding! Is this baby shower overboard?? Who did you accidentally pocket dial? How do you pronounce Manuka? or is it Manooka?

Der Shopify Podcast | Erfolgsgeschichten aus dem E-Commerce und der Welt der Startups
Be(e) healthy | Wie bedrop mit Bienenprodukten fast vergessene Heilkunde zurückbringt und Judith Williams als Investorin gewann

Der Shopify Podcast | Erfolgsgeschichten aus dem E-Commerce und der Welt der Startups

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 59:46


Exklusiv für unsere Podcast Community: Lerne in diesem kostenlosen E-Book, wie du deinen eigenen Onlineshop startest!Hier gibt es weitere Informationen zu bedrop, inkl. Show Notes. Kernthemen der Folge:   Die Produkte: Was macht Manuka, Gelée Royal und Propolis so besonders?Die Gründerstory: Propolis aus der KindheitWelche Hürden gab es bei der Gründung zu meistern?Wie Judith Williams zur Investorin bei bedrop wurde Was hat sich seit der Gründung geändert?Die Work-Life-Balance als Ehepaar 

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO
SENADOR FIDEL ESPINOZA EN HACIENDO CIUDAD: "Me duele ver que juegan con las expectativas y los sueños de los ex hacendados de Rupanco"

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 29:29


En diálogo con el programa Haciendo Ciudad de Radio SAGO, el Senador socialista por la región de Los Lagos Fidel Espinoza se refirió a la situación de la ocupación ilegal de terrenos registrada en los predios de las empresas Cabildo, Manuka y Mininco, en la ex Hacienda Rupanco. "Los que andan empujando estos movimientos tendrán que dar explicaciones a las familias porque tendrán que reconocer estas mentiras", indicó el parlamentario. "Tengo muchas pekeas con Manuka . No soy santo de la devocion de Manuka, los denuncié internacionalmente por el tema de los terneros. Pero eso no significa que me vaya a prestar para una situacion de este tipo que pone en peligro la pacificidad que tnemos que tener en nuestra tregion, donde no queremos que comiencen a ocurrir actos como los que se registran en La Araucanía, donde la gente ya no puede vivir tranquila", agregó. Espinoza además se refirió a la marcha del proceso constituyente, indicando que "si las elecciones fueran el domingo probablemente ganaría el rechazo". --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/entrevistas-radio-sago/message

From Our Home to Yours with Nancy Campbell
Episode 201: THE LAND OF MOTHERHOOD, Part 12

From Our Home to Yours with Nancy Campbell

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 37:34


We talk about how to get sweet honey flowing in our marriages and homes. And also the amazing and miraculous benefits of Manuka honey to heal the body.  My grandson, Arrow Johnson, joins us today to tell his testimony of how Manuka honey saved his face from terrible burn scars.

Saturday Morning with Jack Tame
Malcolm Rands: What is permaculture?

Saturday Morning with Jack Tame

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 10:15


What is permaculture?When we started our eco village in 1987, we also took on the practice of permaculture as the discipline around the use of land here. Permaculture was inventing in the seventies by two Australians David Holmgren and Bill Mollison. When we designed the products for ecostore back in the early nineties, permaculture was the bar we were always trying to meet There are many principles in permaculture but I will share some of my favourites that we all can use in our homes: Nature doesn't have a handy gardener coming along fixing up things that can't look after themselves so when you set up systems always try to have them look after themselves Being a gardener can easily become a ‘make work' situation, so how can we get rid of some of those jobs? A classic example is that nature never tolerates bare dirt. So adding mulch not only keeps out weeds and traps moisture but as it decomposes it adds food to your plants. Another example is the zoning system permaculture uses. Zone 1 is plants you visit every day whilst through to zone 5 maybe visited annually. Thus, the herb beds should be just by the kitchen door, the salad garden also close. But in my case, the forest we have planted for future timber use is zone 5, about 20 minutes' walk away.  Choose plants that really suit your local ecosystem - I like to think of this as discovering useful weeds.  Silverbeet is a great example, wack it in and it almost looks after itself.  The way to find these plants is to talk to your local garden clubs about what plants they have found with these qualities.  When you grow a crop, the plant that is healthiest, don't harvest but let it go to seed and plant these seeds next year. After a few years of using this technique, you will have developed your own variety that loves the local ecosystem where you live. When I arrived at the land where we founded the eco village it was covered in kikuyu grass. Very virulent and a terrible neighbour for vege garden or young trees. Everyone said to use roundup, which I wasn't prepared to do. Now grass is one of the world's only monocultures as it has many ways of driving out competitors including poisoning them and taking away their moisture. In fact, I never use grass in an orchard situation for these reasons and end up with unstressed disease-free trees. But the grasses have an ancient enemy. The pioneer tree which has evolved just to get into grass, grow tall, then shade out the grass so others trees can then come in. In NZ this is the Manuka and Kanuka. The bane of grass farmers. LISTEN ABOVE

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO
Conservación y manejo estratégico de praderas en Manuka.

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 10:04


El jefe del Departamento Agronómico de Manuka, Daniel Medina, conversa del tema en entrevista con Campo al Día de Radio SAGO. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/entrevistas-radio-sago/message

Clean Beauty School
53: How to treat rosacea naturally | board-certified dermatologist Estee Williams, M.D.

Clean Beauty School

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 49:44


“To care for the skin, you need to treat a person's entire spectrum of needs,” says board-certified dermatologist Estee Williams, M.D. And nowhere is that more evident than when treating skin conditions and diseases, like rosacea. In this episode of Clean Beauty School, mindbodygreen beauty director and host Alexandra Engler chats with Williams about the inflammatory skin disease, how to manage symptoms, and all the surprising foods that can cause flare-ups.    Show notes: -Follow Estee Williams, M.D. -National Rosacea Society  -General information on rosacea from the AAD -The new research on rosacea -Rosacea, mites, and the microbiome  -Surveys on rosacea triggers -Rosacea and self esteem  -Read more about topics discussed in this episode: Rosacea vs acne, mental health and skin, skin microbiome, skin barrier function, moisture barrier, sensitive skin, how to reduce redness, niacinamide, retinol, mineral sunscreens, zinc oxide, azelaic acid, hand creams, Manuka honey for skin    -Products mentioned in this episode: La Roche Posay Rosaliac AR Intense For Visible Redness, La Roche Posay Toleraine Double Repair Face Moisturizer, Paula's Choice 10% Azelaic Acid Booster, Aveeno Moisturizing Facial Cleansing Bar, SkinCeuticals Metacell Renewal B3, Vanicream Liquid Face Wash For Dry Sensitive Skin Take 25% off postbiotic body lotion with code BODYLOTIONPOD. Cannot combine with gift cards or other discount codes. Apply code at checkout. Call in: sayhi.chat/cleanbeautyschool Comments: podcast@mindbodygreen.com Sponsorship inquiries: sales@mindbodygreen.com 

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO
Exitoso Dia de Campo en predio de Manuka.

Entrevistas de Radio SAGO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 9:32


Feria de Osorno S.A., Corporación de la Carne y Manuka S.A. desarrollaron con éxito Día de campo, "Programa de Crianza de Machos Lecheros Feria de Osorno: un modelo productivo-comercial para incrementar la productividad y bienestar animal en machos de lechería". --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/entrevistas-radio-sago/message

SuperFeast Podcast
#152 Deconstructing The Beauty Industry with Jessica DeFino

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 74:46


They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but how much of our perception of what we perceive as 'beautiful' is being prescribed, moulded, and manipulated through marketing campaigns and products? What if beauty brands were regulated by a set of ethical standards that didn't allow them to prey on our insecurities to sell their products? Let's be real, beauty brands have a vested interest in you not feeling good about yourself, in you wanting to change something about your appearance or enhance your features; It's how they sell their products.      We're exploring all these topics and more today on the podcast, as Tahnee chats with prolific beauty industry journalist and author of The Unpublishable, Jessica DeFino. You may have read some of Jessica's articles in Vogue, Harper's BAZAAR, Allure, The New York Times, Elle, Cosmopolitan, or Marie Claire. Jessica has earned herself a reputation for debunking marketing myths, exposing the ugly truths behind beauty product ingredient lists, and as the HuffPost once put it, "basically giving the middle finger to the entire beauty industry". We love Jess for this and are so excited to share this podcast with you.   In this episode, Tahnee and Jessica deconstruct the beauty industry as we currently know it. The insidious impact patriarchy, white supremacy, colonialism, and capitalism have on the industry, how things like colourism, sexism, and ageism are enforced constantly through marketing campaigns, the ethical dilemma of dermatologists offering (and often suggesting) aesthetic cosmetic procedures like Botox and fillers, the role of self-care as we age, and so much more. Most importantly, Jessica talks about the power individual behaviours have when it comes to shaping culture and the future of beauty culture for the better. Jessica also breaks down how and why we need to stop participating in this psychologically damaging industry that is the root cause of so many physiological and psychological disorders. There is so much in this episode; Jessica inspires transparency, truth, and the kind of beauty that can only come from within.     "I want the next generation of humans to feel worthy, to raise their voices, be seen, heard, acknowledged, accepted, and embraced by the people around them without worrying if they're pretty enough to ask for that acknowledgment and acceptance. And I mean, that's my whole motivation. I don't think anybody should feel the way myself and billions of people around the world currently feel. I want that to change. And the only way I know how to do it is to change myself and inspire the change in others".  - Jessica DeFino     Host and Guest discuss:   Botox. Topical steroids. Filter vs. Reality. Psychodermatology. The Skin/Brain connection. How meditation benefits the Skin barrier. The ploy of 'community' used in branding. The problem with the clean beauty industry. Jess's natural skincare routine and suggestions. The culture of consumerism and the beauty industry. Performative beauty masquerading as empowerment. Self Care; What It Means and How It Changes As We Age. Racism, colourism, sexism and ageism in the beauty industry. The Kardashian's, and the beauty standards they perpetuate. The most pressing health issue in beauty is the psychological harm of beauty standards.   Who is Jessica Defino? Jessica DeFino is a beauty reporter working to dismantle beauty standards, debunk marketing myths, and explore how beauty culture impacts people — physically, psychologically, and psychospiritually. Her work can be found in the New York Times, Vogue, Allure, and more. She also writes the beauty newsletter The Unpublishable.    CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Jessica's website The Unpublishable Jessica's Instagram    Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher :)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everyone, and welcome to the SuperFeast Podcast. I'm here today with Jessica DeFino, who is one of my favourite follows on socials. She's also the author of The Unpublishable, which is this amazing newsletter you guys should all sign up to. I've heard you describe yourself as pro-skin/anti-beauty product. I love that. So yeah, thanks for joining us here, Jess. I'm really excited to have you.   Jessica DeFino: (00:23) Thank you so much for having me.   Tahnee: (00:25) Yeah, really, really cool. And you're such a prolific writer. You've been in the New York Times, Vogue, Marie Claire, all over the place, plus all of those amazing online platforms we have access to today. But then you're kind of this punk, which I love. You're sort of in the beauty world, but also tearing it apart from the inside. So would that be fair to say?   Jessica DeFino: (00:45) Yeah, I think that is fair to say. It's definitely a balancing act and a tight line to walk.   Tahnee: (00:56) Yeah. I often say to my husband, because I really respect that line you're walking, and I think any of us in any industry, it's really important to be critical of like the work that we do and the kind of culture and everything, and also to love and enjoy what we do. And I do get a sense that there's that sort of dance there for you. You really love what you do, but then there's also this like.   Jessica DeFino: (01:23) Exactly. I mean, the whole reason that I got into the beauty industry is out of love and out of a passion for it. And yeah, I think we do critique the things that we love the most because we want them to be the best possible version of what they can be and sort of serve the highest good. And currently, I don't think the beauty industry serves the highest good, and I think it can, and I would love to be part of that transition.   Tahnee: (01:47) Well, you're doing a good job of getting us there. So thank you. So how did that sort of manifest for you? You are obviously a writer. Did you sort of always want to get into the beauty space or were you drawn into it for a certain reason or?   Jessica DeFino: (02:01) No. I was always interested in writing. In college, I studied songwriting. I went to the Berkeley College of Music in Boston. And I sang, I played guitar and songwriting was my main passion. After school, I decided I wanted to be more in the music industry. So I pivoted. I moved to Los Angeles and I decided to work for a wardrobe stylist in the music industry. So I was assisting her on shoots and helping to cultivate the look for rock stars like Green Day and Linkin Park and Daughtry.   Jessica DeFino: (02:34) And that was really fun. And eventually I missed writing. And because I sort of had this foothold in the celebrity space, I pivoted it into celebrity lifestyle writing for magazines, which eventually led me to a job working for the Kardashians, which eventually led me into the beauty space. So it was a long winding path.   Tahnee: (02:58) Okay. So I have to stop at the Kardashians because I've never watched that show. But no matter how avoiding the Kardashians you are in life, they seem to be everywhere. What were you doing for them? What was that?   Jessica DeFino: (03:10) I was part of the launch team that created content for their official apps. So in 2015, all the Kardashian and Jenner sisters launched their own individual apps. And they had content that was fashion related, beauty related, lifestyle. I mostly did Khloe's app. I wrote her sex column. I wrote her beauty column.   Jessica DeFino: (03:32) So it was really funny. It was really fun. It was definitely a learning experience for me. And I think looking back that's part of what inspired me to get into the beauty industry. Well, for one, it was a high stress environment and my skin kind of freaked out during the time I was working there. So I started independently researching a lot about skincare and beauty.   Jessica DeFino: (03:57) And then working for these women, you sort of see how beauty standards are created, and how they are consumed, and how that is a very strategic thing in order to get clicks and sell products. And so I started deconstructing that in my head and applying it to different aspects of the beauty industry. And eventually I was like, "You know what? This is super messed up. I want to do something about it."   Tahnee: (04:27) Well, that's kind of what made me start with that, that name in particular because I feel like they've really shaped, I guess ... Again, I'm not sort of someone who's super across all the trends with face things. But people have the skin that's really shiny and the implants and all the injections and all of these things these days. And it's like I really see they were part of that first wave of celebrities that were really, I guess, pushing that. And they're such an interesting family because they have sort of darker skin, but they're not black and they're sort of in this weird world. What sort of has come from that for you? You are obviously, I love how you call it dewy, diet culture. It's one of my favourite things. But where have you landed after this sort of journey from the Kardashians to now?   Jessica DeFino: (05:17) From the Kardashians? Well, when I started, I truly did think that they were great examples of empowered business women. I really thought like, "Wow! These people started out with not much talent to work with, and they've created these huge empires. And how amazing is that?" And that was definitely an early part of my own feminist learning and understanding, and journey.   Jessica DeFino: (05:43) And now where I am is recognising that those things aren't necessarily empowerment because that sort of empowerment within a patriarchal culture, what kind of power is that truly. I'm less interested in those forms of power and beauty as capital, and infiltrating the male business world as capital. And I'm more interested in chasing collective liberation, which I think looks very different.   Tahnee: (06:16) So where does beauty even sit in that, because I think that's such an interesting ... My partner and I talk about this as well. We're both white, fairly attractive people who run a Taoist tonic herb company. And I have to think if I was Chinese, I probably wouldn't be as successful as I am just because of the way our culture reflects back that sort of stereotype. And it's something I sit with a lot and I don't have any answers about yet. But I think it's a really interesting time because beauty does give us leverage and it does give us space in the world to take up.   Jessica DeFino: (06:53) I think an interesting path to go down, if you are interested in learn more about that and learning more about beauty and how these standards evolved, is just getting into the history of beauty standards. And when you do dive into the history, I wrote a pretty long article on that for Teen Vogue, if anybody wants to Google it, about the origins of beauty standards. But basically beauty standards all came about through four particular forces in society, patriarchy, white supremacy, colonialism and capitalism. Any beauty standard from the beginning of time can be traced back to one of those things.   Jessica DeFino: (07:35) Beauty standards are how things like racism, colorism, sexism and ageism are enforced. These aren't just fun things, even though we tend to think of them that way now. These standards emerged to support these sort of more nefarious societal forces and to, not to get too conspiracy theorists about it, but convince us to reinforce these social structures. So when we are participating in beauty standards, a lot of the time we are reinforcing the very societal structures that oppress us and we don't even know it.   Tahnee: (08:16) I think that's such an important mic drop moment because we are all co-creating and participating in the ongoing perpetuation of these forms without any awareness around how we're actually contributing to that. And that's what I've loved about your work. You're really trying to bring that to the fore. And for me, it's been a big sort of, I think obviously that's been happening in my life for a while. But then your work has really helped me give words, I guess, to sort of some of the stuff that's been brewing in my thinking, because I did some modelling when I was younger and it was quite toxic for me.   Tahnee: (08:55) I know some people don't have that experience. But I had an eating disorder. I felt like people were constantly looking at me and judging me and just it really turned this kind of cog in me that made me very self aware and very uncomfortable. And I've noticed myself over the last probably 20 years just like I don't by stuff anymore. I barely use anything on my skin. My skin seems to be about the same as when I used all the things. It's really funny. Kind of as I decondition myself, it's like my life becomes a lot simpler.   Jessica DeFino: (09:29) Yeah. What strikes me there is that we often hear in the mainstream media beauty sort of touted as this path to empowerment, and beauty is empowering, and beauty builds confidence. And sometimes those things can be true. But more often what beauty culture does is it disempowers us because studies show that it contributes to things like anxiety, depression, body dysmorphia, eating disorders, self harm, and even suicide.   Jessica DeFino: (10:00) So it's really important to examine when we hear this beauty product is empowering or this thing is self care, because the flip side of that is that this disproportionate focus on our physical bodies actually leads to all of those things that I just mentioned. So we sort of have to weigh that and say, "Okay. Is the confidence that I get from getting this injection of Botox worth the anxiety that I get from now constantly worrying about my wrinkles for the rest of my life?"   Tahnee: (10:39) That's a tricky one. I know people in their twenties now getting Botox and I'm like, "Woo." And I think that's ... I mean, you've lived in LA. There's certain pockets where that pressure is really high for people. And I think it's definitely an interesting time to be a human. And that's something I really appreciate about your critique is you talk about this idea of brands and how they perpetuate this idea of community. And again, my brand is probably contributing to that in some way. But I think that's a really interesting conversation again around well, if someone is just getting money out of you and really selling you a narrative, is that actually a community, and is that actually sort of something you want to be a part of? Can you speak a little bit to that sort of, cause I see that as a theme in your work?   Jessica DeFino: (11:27) Yeah. I mean, I think community has become this sort of catch phrase that brands are using now. And it's an attractive one and it's one that really grabs our attention because I think as humans we crave community. Humans are creatures of community. We crave it on a biological, instinctual level. And because we have been so steeped in this culture of consumerism, we can't really see out of it. We don't really see any different. And it's really easy to latch onto this idea that this brand is my community and the other people that buy from this brand are also my community.   Jessica DeFino: (12:08) But it's not a community. There's inherently a power and balance in that relationship in that a brand's main interest is always going to be their financial interest. Brands don't do things unless they further the brand and make the brand money and further their reach. If something that is good for the customer also comes out of it, that's a bonus. But that is never the initial goal. The initial goal is to make a living. And so that inherently creates this power imbalance with brand and customer. And to call that a community is just, I think it's a little bit a psychological mind fuckery. I don't know if I can say that on you podcast.   Tahnee: (12:49) Of course, you can. Feel free. I think that's a really interesting ... So you probably don't know this, but I used to be a yoga teacher full-time and had a studio. And I found that really interesting when I worked in yoga before having my own business that, this is probably not a great thing to say. I won't name names. But people would talk behind students' backs and kind of be quite critical. But then to their faces, do the whole yoga thing.   Tahnee: (13:21) And similarly, within the teaching community, there was a lot of backstabbing and kind of really awful behaviour, and then this front facing kumbaya, look how spiritual we all are kind of stuff. And I found it really challenging and kind of went off and did my own thing. It was financially successful enough for me, but I really notice that when you focus on that community aspect, so much energy, so much time, so much of yourself and you can see why that's not a commercial proposition for most businesses. It's not a way to go and make you millions. But rewarding for other reasons. But I think it's like that word has become so loaded and so misused that it's really tricky now to even know what people mean when they say community, especially.   Jessica DeFino: (14:10) I mean, it's just, especially with beauty, beauty brands have a vested interest in you not feeling good about yourself. They have a vested interest in you wanting to change something about your appearance or not thinking your current appearance is enough as it is. And whether they frame that as "fixing your flaws" or "enhancing your good features", which sort of means the same thing, the baseline has to be there in order for them to be successful. You have to think your good features aren't enhanced enough. You have to think that your flaws aren't fixed.   Jessica DeFino: (14:50) I always like to use the Dove campaign, that everybody is beautiful campaign from years and years ago. That was kind of their first body positive thing. It was founded on this marketing idea of empowerment, and we're going to make everybody feel beautiful. But again, in order for a campaign like that to succeed long term, depends on most customers not feeling beautiful and needing to buy into this message of confidence and empowerment. So your insecurity has to be there in order for these brands to survive even if their marketing message seems positive.   Tahnee: (15:28) I do know. And I don't see that much difference you in the wellness space, if I'm honest. I know I seem to make those comparisons. And I think that's something that I'm aware of in terms of the world we live in, which I guess like you Americans, that sort of we are a version of Moon Juice or those kinds of companies here, obviously with less of a fashion focus than they have. But I think it's a really interesting thing because it's like the premise can be literally there's something wrong with you. You need to buy X, Y and Z to be healthier, or better, or in this perpetual grind toward optimization and stuff, kind of improvement. So can you speak a little bit to that, how you see that overlap up between wellness and beauty in what's happening?   Jessica DeFino: (16:16) Well, I think what has been happening more so is that the shift in messaging is less about outer beauty and physical appearance as it is health. Health has sort of become the beauty standard. And now of course we associate health with having all of these aesthetic markers that are not necessarily signs of health. For instance, beauty brands will use glowing glass skin, healthy skin, and glass skin. That look is not a marker of health. That's not what healthy skin looks like.   Jessica DeFino: (16:57) And I think wellness brands will do the same thing. They'll use health as this marker, but the things that they're positioning as health are not necessarily health, or maybe they are, but it's not going to be fixed by a supplement or a tincture. A lot of the problems that wellness brands are trying to solve are structural societal problems that require collective action and policy change, and not just a stress relieving tincture. So sure, a stress relieving tincture might help. But it's not actually solving the underlying problem. And I think if brands don't acknowledge that, it's pretty disingenuous.   Tahnee: (17:39) So it's really pointing to root cause, which is one of those foundations of neuropathy. And all of these, in theory, wellness things anyway, rather than going at what's the outside symptom.   Jessica DeFino: (17:51) Exactly. Which is so ironic for a lot of wellness brands because they claim to be treating root cause. A lot of the wellness philosophy comes from root cause medicine and holisticism and or holism and and all of that. And still, they're stopping at individual solutions rather than looking wider to systemic solutions. And again, that's not to say you can't do both. As a brand, you can of course say, "Hey, this blend of ashwagandha and whatever might help you feel less stressed throughout the day. And also-   Tahnee: (18:28) So you can go tackle the patriarchy.   Jessica DeFino: (18:31) Here are the systemic reasons why you're feeling stressed, and here is how we as a brand are going to encourage change in those areas too.   Tahnee: (18:41) Well, I think that's such a, not trying to point the finger at America, but that individual pull yourself up by bootstraps. That's such a cultural ... When I was at uni, we studied cultural colonialism. And it's something that really landed for me is how much we've digested that American like, "You can do it." But then it really takes out that we do need to come together as a community and there's this sort of usefulness in us having these conversations to together and sharing them widely. So I noticed that's changing in America slowly, I think, maybe. Are you saying that?   Jessica DeFino: (19:21) I think so. I think, again, it starts with buzzword. And that's not exactly a bad thing. But like just how we set ed brands are starting to use community. Okay, it feels a little disingenuous. But also, okay, it's getting the idea of community out into the collective consciousness and we can start valuing that more. So I am hearing more community, collectivism, collective care. And that feels really good. And I think what needs to happen is just sort of taking that next step from absorbing it as a marketing term and adopting it as a way of life.   Tahnee: (20:00) Yeah. And actually changing culture and letting that filter through. I wanted to step back to self care because you mentioned that before and it's something. I guess we both using Instagram. It's kind of one of those things that always makes me cringe a little bit when I see someone with their bubble bath and their face mask, whatever. And for me, self care has a pretty different definition, especially being a mom. It's usually like my practise and meditation and sleep. They're my pillars. But I'm interested for you obviously having been in the beauty industry and now sort of holding this space of holding up a mirror literally to this strange industry, how has self-care changed or been redefined for you over the last sort of decade or so?   Jessica DeFino: (20:47) I think for sure, I used to definitely give into the brand focused definition of self care as being like, "I'm going to do a face mask, and I'm going to take a bubble bath, and even I'm going to go for a run, or I'm going to exercise." And I mean, those are all valid things. It took me a really long time to realise, or not to realise, but to embody and incorporate the idea that yourself isn't your skin, and yourself isn't your body. Yourself is your values, your purpose, your passions, your deeper wants and needs, your emotions. And all of those things require care too.   Jessica DeFino: (21:33) So if my self-care stops at a face mask, it's literally stopping at the surface, not actually addressing the self. It's just addressing the fleshy coating that encapsulates my spiritual self. So just having that sort of aha moment was huge for me, which is not to say that I'm necessarily great at self-care. I still work too much and don't take time every day to meditate, and don't particularly feel like I'm in a season of my life where I am actively caring for myself the way that I should. But at least I have an awareness about it now. Is that any better? I don't know.   Tahnee: (22:16) I think so. I think that's a step. I mean, my experience is similar of being this, even though I'm a yoga teacher, been practising since I was 15. At the beginning, if I'm really truly honest, I was practising because I didn't want to get fat and I wanted to have a strong body and a healthy body. But it was quite an external motivation. It wasn't to connect to myself or to feel more calm in my existence or whatever. Now it's literally this thing that reminds me of my spaciousness and my connection to life and nature and all of it, and why I'm a mother, and why I'm ... But that took me, I'm 36. I would say in the last 10 years, that's really landed for me. But that's a long time with one discipline really to get to a place of not using it to beat myself up, I suppose. And I think it's a process.   Jessica DeFino: (23:15) Yeah. And it's also fine because I have said many times before that vanity was my entry point to wellness. So the reason I started meditating was because my skin was so inflamed, and I had been through the ringer with dermatologist. I had been on a prescription steroid treatment. It actually really damaged my skin. I went to topical steroid withdrawal and I couldn't put products on my skin.   Jessica DeFino: (23:40) And so I started looking at stress reducing exercises to sort of minimise the impact of stress on my skin because you get stress breakouts, stress can cause acne and rosacea, all of that. So I was like, "Okay, I'm going to clear my skin." So I started meditating. And it was for purely vein reasons. And then once I got into the practice, it expanded and it became so much more. And it became not about my appearance at all. So I think it's fine to have these sort of vein superficial pursuits be your entry point, as long as you are able to cultivate that awareness and allow yourself to expand further and maybe even use it to let go of the original vanity and the original superficial reason why.   Tahnee: (24:33) I think that's so true because that sort of evolution of self has to be honoured and acknowledged. And I think that's probably what I see as so insidious about the kind of those four pillars you were talking about of patriarch and white supremacy and all these things. It's like it's so insidious and it's designed to really trap us in this cycle. And I actually do think it takes quite a lot of strength and self awareness to step out of that. And then I think what you are doing to sort of help raise collective awareness about these things, it's a big task and it's not ... So I think however people get there, it's great.   Jessica DeFino: (25:14) And it's also not easy. So I know like my work and my writing can come off as very harsh. And people will sort of come at me for it and be like, "I don't want to let of this certain beauty procedure or my Botox appointment or my lipstick. And I don't think you should be telling people to let go of these things. And how dare you? And blah, blah, blah." And that's a valid perspective too. And I think what we all need to realise is that so many of us have formed these beauty habit and these beauty behaviours as a coping mechanism. We are coping in a world where we are judged by our beauty. And it has material effects on the quality of our life. "Pretty people" make more money, get better jobs, have better social standings, have better legal outcomes even. There are material benefits to performing beauty.   Jessica DeFino: (26:11) And so when we develop these habits and these behaviours, those are natural and totally understandable reactions to living within a world that judges us based on our outside appearance. And then I also think we need to acknowledge that as we slowly let go of these behaviours, we are changing the culture that instilled them within us. We have that power collectively to change the way things are. And I personally think that it has to start with us individually and collectively deciding to stop participating if and when that is emotionally available to us.   Jessica DeFino: (27:00) If abandoning a beauty behaviour is giving you extreme anxiety and affecting the quality of your life, don't do that. Work on the anxiety thing first. And then maybe later in your life, you will start to let go of the beauty behaviour that prompted it. But there's a balance there where you have to protect your mental wellbeing, while also divesting from this industry and this culture that tells us our appearance is the most important thing about us.   Tahnee: (27:33) So you're still a fairly young woman like me. I often think, I'm not going to speak about other people. But for myself, I've often been like, "When I'm 60, I'll just kick around with my grey hair and not worry about how I look." But that was definitely more so in my 20s. As I'm getting older, I'm sort of integrating more. But how do you personally dance this dance between performative beauty and, I suppose, I guess wanting to present? I love mascara. I have blonde eyelashes. Mascara makes me happy. Those are things that I don't want to give up. Are there things for you that sort of still draw you into this world or?   Jessica DeFino: (28:14) Yeah. I mean, I think the big thing for me is my eyebrows. So I have, it's a mental disorder called trichotillomania, called hair pulling disorder. So when I get really anxious, I actually pick out my eyebrows. And I can't help it. I can't stop it. There is no approved treatment for it. It's just something that I do, and I've done since I was 16. And seeing my bald eyebrows is really traumatising for me. It makes me even more anxious, and then I pick even more.   Jessica DeFino: (28:51) So for me, eyebrow makeup and microblading is something that I'm currently not emotionally able to let go of because it does affect my quality of life if my eyebrows are completely bald, because it triggers the trichotillomania. It makes me remember of like, "Look what you've done to yourself." It starts it all over again. And so I always use that as an example of like this is not a safe beauty behaviour for me to let go of because it harms me to let go of it at this point. I'm working on that emotionally and maybe be someday I will be able to let go of that. And that would be a beautiful thing.   Jessica DeFino: (29:30) And I think I also still have a lot of anxiety around my acne scars. I have had pretty severe cystic acne since I was 14, 15. I've gone through the ringer for treatments of it. And I've done a lot of work to not have to wear a full face of makeup every day. I mean, in my early 20s, I would put on liquid foundation, concealer powder, lipstick, eye line, all of it to go to CVS for toilet paper. I could not be seen without it.   Jessica DeFino: (30:00) And now I pretty much don't wear makeup. But in social situations where I need like a little bit of cushioning to not feel different or weird or ugly, I have gotten down to just tinted moisturiser, a little concealer, blush and eyebrows. Those are my four. And I would love to be at a place where I felt like I didn't need makeup in those situations. But I still do feel like I need it. And so I'm slowly easing my way out of it and being gentle with myself when I do need that sort of skincare security blanket.   Tahnee: (30:42) I think it's such an important thing to talk about because I have a little girl. She's five, or she'll be five in two days. I'm making a rainbow cake right now. It's highly stressful.   Jessica DeFino: (30:53) Oh, so cute.   Tahnee: (30:56) But I watch her. I'm like you. My makeup kit is literally tinted moisturiser, a blush thing, mascara and an eyebrow grooming tool. But I will put that stuff on before we go out for dinner or do some kind of an event of some kind. And I've just watched her, without any encouragement from me, sort of integrate this idea that she now has to ... She doesn't sort of want to put it on every day or whatever. But if she sees my little makeup kit lying there, she'll grab it and she'll start putting on blush. And she'll ask me if she looks pretty, and this part of me dies. I'm like, "Oh my God! What have I done to her?" And then this other part of me is like, "This is life and we kind of have to navigate these things with our kids."   Tahnee: (31:46) But it's been a really interesting dance because I've sort of, I was raised with a mom who didn't really wear makeup at all. And in many ways, I found her lack of self care and presentation almost a bit confronting. It was like can you at least try? Can you put on some ... So it's this sort of interesting thing. And I haven't got any answers at all. But I think we all have to find a space where we're comfortable with what we're putting out there. And I think the piece that you really have been pointing to and we've been dancing around is it's that conscious awareness and choosing what we engage with and what we don't, as opposed to being unconsciously moulded by an industry that's designed to be very toxic for us.   Jessica DeFino: (32:27) Yeah. I mean, I think the mother daughter pipeline is such a powerful example of how individual behaviours shape culture, and how working on our individual behaviours and changing our individual behaviours can shape the future of beauty culture to be better, to be safer, to not be as stifling and suffocating. I think a lot of times people read my work and they think that I have completely freed myself from the pressure of beauty standards. And that's not true at all. I feel so weighed down by the pressure to be beautiful or to look a certain way or to ... I feel that all the time, that I'm not good enough, I'm not pretty enough, I'm not beautiful enough to use my voice in the particular space. I am not pretty enough to be looked at and to be like a public figure or whatever.   Jessica DeFino: (33:25) And so many people feel that. And that is my main motivation, is like nobody should feel that way. I want the next generation of humans to feel worthy raising of their voice and being seen, and heard, and acknowledged, and accepted, and just embraced by the people around them without worrying about if they're pretty enough to ask for that acknowledgement and acceptance. And I mean, that's my whole motivation. I don't think anybody should feel the way that I know I feel, and it sounds like you have felt and millions and billions of people around the world feel currently. I just want that to change. And the only way I know how to do it is to change myself and inspire it in others.   Tahnee:  (34:15) Yeah. I think that one thing, this is weird. It's sort of a segue, but it's linked. My husband, when I first got with him, I was like, "You don't use anything." Literally, the guy doesn't use shampoo, he doesn't use soap. He doesn't. He literally goes in the shower, kind of maybe every now and then he'll use Dr. Bronner's on his armpits or something. Seriously, his little man bag when we travel is toothbrush, toothpaste, not even a hairbrush, a hair tie. And I'm like, "Hang on a second. This person-   Jessica DeFino: (34:49) And I bet he has fine hair and skin.   Tahnee: (34:52) No, beautiful hair and skin. I'm always like, "What the fuck? How come you have this amazing hair and this amazing skin and you've never used any of the stuff?"   Jessica DeFino: (35:06) That's the secret.   Tahnee: (35:08) I know. So I'm interested in this because my daughter, we've never used shampoo and things on her. We've used some conditioner because she has my hand. It gets really tangled. And she barely uses soap, all of these things. And I guess kind of inspired by my husband. I haven't quite got to his level of self corporation. But I'm really interested in that because I mean, yes, patriarchy. But bodies, they're sort of not these filthy beasts that can't take care of themselves. They have these self cleaning mechanisms. You speak about this a little bit. What's your kind of current deep dive into this world? How is that?   Jessica DeFino: (35:46) Sure. Well, I always like to say human skin survived and thrived for literally millennia before pre-bottled products were invented. So it's fine. It's truly fine to not use almost anything. The skin has built-in mechanisms to self cleanse, self moisturise, self exfoliate, self heal, and self protect. And oftentimes what we do when we apply all of these products, and again, not again, but a reminder, your scalp is skin. So this stuff applies to hair as well. When we add all of these external products, we actually interrupt the skin's inherent functions and we change the signals they get, because sort of the extension of your skin is the environment. It gets a lot of its cues out how much sebum to produce or how many dead skin cells to shed from the environment it's in.   Jessica DeFino: (36:42) So when you sort of cut off the connection to that environment with skincare products, you interrupt these mechanisms and they kind of go haywire. And then you become dependent on the products to keep your skin in that cycle because your skin hasn't needed to interact with its actual environment and figure out how to regulate itself. So oftentimes when you just stop using products, it'll take a week, two weeks, sometimes a month. A skin cycle is 28 days. So that's what I generally recommend. When you stop using these products, you'll find that skin self regulates and you actually don't need many products or sometimes even any products. Of course there are like some modern changes to the environment that we can account for. For instance, pollution levels are a lot higher, sun exposure is a lot more harsh.   Tahnee: (37:37) Air conditioning.   Jessica DeFino: (37:37) Yeah, exactly. So SPF, great. Sometimes your skin will need a little bit more moisture in that case. I love to use Jojoba oil on damp skin. Jojoba oil is like a 97% chemical match to human sebum. So your skin really responds well to it as if it were it's own. And I personally cleanse with Manuka Honey, and really-   Tahnee:  (38:03) I've seen you talk about that.   Jessica DeFino: (38:04) I love Manuka, but-   Tahnee:  (38:05) Well, I love it too. But I mean, I tend to use it on wounds and internally. So what's your take on skincare? I've used as a mask before.   Jessica DeFino: (38:14) Yeah. Well, exactly. It's used in hospitals for wound healing, for burn healing. And that's because it really supports the skin's inherent repair and healing mechanisms. So if your skin is acne prone or eczema prone, or psoriasis, rosacea, any of those big skin issues, Manuka is beautiful. It's so great for it because it supports your skin's inherent healing. It's a prebiotic. So it supports your skin's microbiome. It's food for all of those great beneficial bacteria that live on your skin. It's full of antioxidants. Antioxidants are great for fighting free radicals like pollution particles. There are just so many things. It's also humectant. So it draws moisture into your skin. So your skin is able to stay moisturised on its own. It's just, to me, a perfect product. Of course, if you don't have prevalent skin issues, a normal honey will usually do the trick. It has a lot of the same properties. It's just that Manuka has really special healing properties.   Tahnee: (39:25) Yeah. So you're talking about, they're the ones we use medicinally, they're the ones with the pluses. I can't remember what the compound is right now. I should know.   Jessica DeFino: (39:33) It's called the UMF rating. Unique Manuka Factor. So for skincare, if you're using it topically for its healing properties, you want to look for a UMF plus rating of 15 or higher.   Tahnee: (39:47) Yeah. Because I think it can go quite higher from memory. The New Zealand honey industry is thanking you right now for the plug. Well, I guess on a really practical note, it's very sticky. So how do you get around that?   Jessica DeFino: (40:01) Well, I mean I use it as a cleanser. So I will splash my face with water and then just take like a finger full and massage it onto your face for about a minute, and then wash it off. It's really not sticky at all. If you're doing it as a face mask, yeah, it'll be a little sticky. You're not going to be running around the house in it. But you also can't run around the house in a sheet mask. So take those 15 minutes to just chill. Don't touch your face. You'll be fine.   Tahnee: (40:31) Yeah, great. And I mean, are there other things you've sort of changed in your routine from your little research dives? Or like what else are you looking into?   Jessica DeFino: (40:41) Yeah. I mean, the bulk of my like "skincare routine" is mindfulness practices because one of the most fascinating finds of my skincare research has been the field of psychodermatology, which focuses on the skin brain connection. So the skin, the gut and the brain, it's called the gut brain skin axis, are all connected. They form from the same bit of embryonic tissue in utero, and there they form these pathways and these connections that are there for life. So that's why what you eat can affect your skin. It's the gut skin connection. And even what you think can affect your skin. That's the skin brain connection. And we usually see this in more negative settings. So if you're stressed out, and you get a stress pimple, anxiety acne, or when you're embarrassed and you blush, or when you're scared and the colour drains from your face. These are all everyday examples of the skin brain connection.   Jessica DeFino: (41:39) What I found in my research is that it actually goes the other way. So if you actively cultivate a calmer mindset, it results in calmer skin. So for instance, meditation strengthens the skin barrier. It makes your skin are able to hold in moisture. So it actually does create that, we call it, an inner glow. But it's actually an outer glow. It's actually your skin barrier getting stronger and being better able to hold onto moisture and producing balanced levels of oils. So that has been fascinating to me. So I try to incorporate practices like that in my routine.   Jessica DeFino: (42:15) And then a big thing for me was researching the skin barrier and realising that, it sounds so obvious. But your skin is built from within. Your skin cells come from the deepest layer of your skin, work their way out and then eventually shut off. So you're focusing on putting skincare on your face, you're caring for them at the final stages of their life.   Tahnee: (42:41) It's like palliative care.   Jessica DeFino: (42:45) Exactly. If you focus on consuming the nutrients that your skin needs to create healthy skin cells, you're great and you're actually not irritating your skin barrier with external products. So omega-3s and omega-6s are huge for the skin barrier. They're essential fatty acids. They are integral to skin barrier function and the body can't produce them on its own. It can only get them via diet. So once I started incorporating omega-3s into my diet through a supplement, but also through like salmon, nuts and seeds are huge sources of omegas, my skin saw the results of that very quickly. And that's goes onto your skin.   Tahnee: (43:29) And that's going to be overall. Yeah. I was going to say feel better.   Jessica DeFino: (43:30) Exactly. I mean, it's great for brain function, for hormones, for heart health. They're so important. And also yeah, it makes you glow. So why not?   Tahnee: : (43:40) Win-win.   Jessica DeFino: (43:42) Exactly.   Tahnee: (43:44) And topically, you're sort of just sticking to really simple stuff like you.   Jessica DeFino: (43:47) Yeah. Topically, I don't do much. Honestly, the best thing you can do for your skin is leave it alone. It does so much for you, and it doesn't really want to be bothered. So I really don't wash my face in the mornings. Sometimes I'll spritz it with water if I need to, and I'll put on a little bit of jojoba oil if it's feeling dry. On damp skin and if I'm going outside, mineral SPF. And then at night, I'll wash off the SPF or any makeup that I have on with jojoba oil as an oil cleanser, Manuka honey as a cleanser. And then that's it. I love to leave my skin bare overnight because overnight is when a lot of the skin's repair and renewal processes take place. And again, it needs to interact with your environment in order to do those to the best of its ability. So I just love a skincare free evening.   Tahnee: (44:43) Well, it's so interesting you say all of that because I've landed at a similar place. I basically use jojoba, if I do wear mascara, to get that off and then I wipe my face with a cloth at night, and then I wipe my face with water in the morning. And that's pretty much it. If it's dry, I'll use oil.   Jessica DeFino: (45:02) I love that.   Tahnee: (45:05) Like you said, it took a little while for my skin to sort of, I think probably like a month, just to feel like it was ... It was a bit patchy, I think, or something. I just remember it not being amazing for a little bit. And then it was totally fine.   Jessica DeFino: (45:19) Yeah. And part of that process is also like letting go of these arbitrary aesthetic expectations that we have placed on our skin. Your skin's not going to glow like a piece of freshly polished glass from doing nothing to it. But that's also because your skin is not supposed to glow like a freshly polished piece of glass. Things-   Tahnee: (45:41) Does that basically mean you've taken off, because it sort of seems to me you're taking off that protective ... My understanding is the skin's more mechanical. But it's a protective area and it's meant to be there, and you shouldn't probably be exactly deleting it.   Jessica DeFino: (45:53) Yeah, exactly. Everything that's happening on your skin is happening for a reason. It's meant to have a barrier for a reason. Dead skin cells are there for a reason. They're actually really important to skin functioning. And actually, your dead skin cells are the only skin cells that are equipped to hold external moisture. So when you absorb moisture from the environment rather than drinking it, your dead skin cells are the only cells that can actually do that. So if you're exfoliating them away every day, your skin is going to be dry.   Tahnee: (46:24) Then you need more moisturising things, and vicious cycle.   Jessica DeFino: (46:29) Yeah, it's important. Yes. It's important to just keep everything in place. And the reason that we have, part of the reason that we have come to repeatedly damage our skin through skincare and think that it looks good is because we're actually creating these micro injuries on the surface of our skin every time we do that. So for instance, intense exfoliation will often make you look very smooth and shiny. And we like that. And so we keep chasing that. What that is is your skin's repair process kicking in. When it's injured, your skin, your body, sends all of these healing nutrients and molecules to the surface, collagen, hyaluronic acid, which are supposed to be in the deeper layers of your skin, all of these other things. They flood the injured area with nutrients to sort of heal and repair. And we think that looks good because suddenly we're getting this rush of blood to the surface and all of these good molecules. And what it is is it's a response to injury. And we shouldn't have that happening all the time. [crosstalk 00:47:37].   Tahnee: (47:37) It sounds like a drain on our resources as well.   Jessica DeFino: (47:39) Exactly. Your skin doesn't want to be in repair mode constantly. So I think with glass skin and things like that, we've sort of normalised the look of injury, which again, traces back to capitalism because if you're constantly injuring your skin, you constantly have to repair your skin. And it's just a process that requires product after product, after product with no end in sight. And if you sort of chill and let your skin re-regulate, you can honestly wean yourself off of most of those products.   Tahnee: (48:10) It feels like it's gotten worse since Instagram. I don't know if I'm sort of ... Like I said, I don't really, my one kind of delve into this world, which my husband finds really funny is every now and then I read Into The Gloss Top Shelf, just because I find it incredibly amusing how much shit people have.   Jessica DeFino: (48:27) It is fascinating.   Tahnee: (48:29) Yeah. And I get down into this like, "Wow! This person uses 93 creams in the morning or whatever. And how do they have time? And they must be so rich." And anyway, it's just this funny little reality TV show world of mine. But that, sort of I've noticed. I remember when I first started reading, which would've probably been five or six years ago maybe, there was a lot more sort of, it was quite simple, I feel like, whereas now it feels like people are using a lot of different things. And you see these skin care routines that are 9,000 steps. And I wonder is that because, do you think that's in part because of this filter culture? And I mean, you call everyone dewy dust bunnies, which I love. But there does seem to be, and actually another thing you wrote, which I really loved was like is this fear of dead skin cells related to our fear of death?   Jessica DeFino: (49:21) Oh, yeah.   Tahnee: (49:24) I think it's a really interesting thing because it's like we've suddenly kind of got this platform where people are sharing these kind of quite synthetic versions of themselves. And then we're trying to match our 3D reality to this thing. And it's a bit of a concern.   Jessica DeFino: (49:38) It's so much. I think there are a lot of factors at play there. I think one of them is just that's the nature of consumerism. It's this constant need for more and more and more and more and more. And we've seen that grow in real time through Instagram. I think too, this skincare boom that sort of started with Glossier, beauty has always been messaged as this ethical, moral imperative. It's always been this ethical idea. Beauty historically has been associated with goodness. And so we sort of feel this moral obligation to be as beautiful as possible.   Jessica DeFino: (50:14) Recently, I think through the start of COVID, science has sort of been messaged as this ethical ideal as well, western science. And health has always been an ethical ideal. Of course, these things are not moral, but they have been messaged as such. And so with skincare, you get a lot. You get this sort of moral validation of, "Oh! This is something I'm doing for my health." Even though it's mostly just aesthetic, it's messaged as a healthcare thing and a self care thing. And so that feels really good. And so people are emboldened to share more of it and do more of it.   Jessica DeFino: (50:56) And then there's also this scientific intellectual aspect of skincare where people are just over the top about knowing everything about this particular active ingredient, and whether this ingredient mixes with this ingredient, and what this other ingredient does to your skin. So skincare offers a lot of ways to sort of show off and feel good about yourself. There's the science intellectual aspect, there's the health aspect and there's the beauty aspect. So I think all of those combined into this huge, just overwhelming mass of just skincare bullshit.   Jessica DeFino: (51:29) And then also, as you said, the filter thing is for sure part of it. We're seeing people through filters, and we're seeing less of people in person, especially again through COVID. So we're getting all of our information about what human skin looks like we're seeing through a screen, and we're actually not getting any validation of what real human skin looks like in person, because we're really not seeing people. Most of our interactions are through a screen, through a filter, through lighting, through all of these things that warp our perception of what our skin is supposed to look like.   Jessica DeFino: (52:07) So we're seeing everybody else out there looking "perfect" and we're seeing our actual skin, in an actual mirror, with no filter and we're saying, "Oh my God, what's wrong with me?" And so we start buying and applying all these products to try and match our real life skin to this sort of virtual ideal that doesn't exist in real life. And all of it is just this huge recipe you for, one, consumerism, and two, just skin stress.   Tahnee: (52:34) Insecurity. I think that filter, I'm thinking about the metaverse right now, whatever Facebook. I'm like, "Oh God, this is going to get more interesting." I mean, you've spoken a bit about, I guess we've sort of touched more on what I would say the conventional beauty industry. But clean beauty has become this thing in the last again maybe decade. I'm not really sure on the timelines. And it's sort of the same thing, right? Are you seeing any distinction in this clean beauty space or what's your rate on this trend?   Jessica DeFino: (53:11) I think the ethos behind clean beauty is admirable and necessary. There are a lot of unnecessary ingredients in our beauty products. There are a lot of potentially harmful ingredients in our beauty products and the science bears this out.   Tahnee:  (53:27) Well you also made a note of a dinner you went to where the person was sharing.   Jessica DeFino: (53:31) Oh, my gosh!   Tahnee: (53:31) I was like I wonder if you'd had a few wines when you wrote that?   Jessica DeFino: (53:37) Oh my God. I'm privy to some beauty industry insider information. And it's not good. There are-   Tahnee: (53:47) This particular comment was like, "Yeah, this is not good for people." And they're putting it in this mass produced product.   Jessica DeFino: (53:51) I was talking to a product engineer who was telling me that the ingredient that this cosmetic corporation was using as its star ingredient in a lot of new products was not safe. And they were trying to tell the company, "Hey, we can't use this." And the company was saying, "We're going to use it." So just know behind the scenes there's a lot of stuff going on. There are ingredients that just don't belong in beauty products that are in beauty products. They're not going to kill you, most of the time. They're just ...   Jessica DeFino: (54:22) And I say that talking about extreme examples of a couple of years ago, there was a moisturiser that was contaminated with mercury. That was a counterfeit product. And it actually did put a woman in a coma. Is that going to happen every day with the products you buy at CVS and Target? No. But there are these outlier cases. So I'm not trying to fear longer there. I'm just trying to say like, "Hey, stuff happens." So I do think that the ethos of clean beauty is a necessary one. But it has become this marketing monster and it has gotten so out of control. And a lot of the statistics that clean beauty brands and clean beauty influencers are using are actually scientifically incorrect. And so it undermines the more admirable overall mission of clean beauty.   Jessica DeFino: (55:16) And so I do have a lot of problems with that. I also think that the solution to most of our problems is not cleaner beauty, but just less beauty. We just need to be using less of everything. I see clean beauty products that have 52 natural ingredients in it. And it's like the skin doesn't want 52 ingredients on it. That's going to cause irritation. That's not a better product in any sense of the word.   Jessica DeFino: (55:41) And then finally, I think that in non-toxic beauty, we are focusing on the wrong toxicity. Sure, some of these ingredients can be harmful. But the most toxic thing in the beauty industry are beauty standards. And these products promote unrealistic beauty standards. And these beauty standards that these products are pushing, even clean products, are leading to physical and psychological health issues in humans all around the world, from anxiety, to depression, to eating disorders, to dysmorphia, to self harm and even suicide.   Jessica DeFino: (56:20) And that is what's toxic in the beauty industry more than anything. So I wish that the industry overall could adopt this attitude of clean beauty and apply it to the ideology of the industry and clean up the standards that we're selling people because if you're concerned is a health issue, the most pressing health issue in beauty is the psychological harm of beauty standards.   Tahnee: (56:48) And I mean, I'm just thinking about dermatology, because I know you've mentioned that before, and you've had your own experience with that. And the topical steroid piece you wrote was really interesting because I've not had any experience with it. But I've heard from a lot of people that come through our doors how damaging, and I guess my understanding is it's quite a commonly recommended first step is like, "Use this quite strong product. And I think what I've heard you point to a few times in this podcast is how much that psychological factor is influencing what's showing up on us.   Tahnee: (57:23) And I have a similar, I don't know if your stress was work related mine. I left a partner of 10 years. And it was a big life change for me, and came off the pill at the same time. So it was a combination. Or I'd come off the pill for years earlier. But it was a combination of things going on. But I can really trace my kind of emotional instability at that time to what was reflecting on my face.   Tahnee: (57:49) And I've studied all these practises, Taoist healing and things. And we speak about how these organs and these parts of body, like the emotion, if the body can't hold it, it comes out through these elimination channels. And I think that's a really interesting of an untouched topic. And I don't see dermatology really addressing that. I think what I tend to see as people getting trapped in these loops with prescriptions and kind of appointments. And is that sort of your experience? I mean, I don't know heaps about the dermatology world. But is that your experience?   Jessica DeFino: (58:20) Yeah. I mean, I will say that there are great dermatologists out there, and I do think dermatology is of course necessary for your annual skin cancer screening and anything relating to actual physical health issues that are manifesting specifically on the skin. That being said, in my experience in interviewing thousands of people or over the years and in researching the field of dermatology, the main goal for dermatologists day in day out with their patients is to eliminate the physical symptoms. That doesn't mean treating the root cause, and that doesn't even mean promoting skin health. So a lot of the very powerful drugs that dermatologists are describing will eliminate the physical skin symptoms for a time. And they often do this at the expense of overall skin health and skin functioning.   Jessica DeFino: (59:19) So for example, antibiotics are the number one prescription in skin care. Antibiotics actively kill the bacteria of your gut microbiome and your skin microbiome, which are huge factor in healthy skin long term. And that can lead to more skin issues down the road. Something like Accutane, while it can be very helpful for a lot of people psychologically because it can wipe out acne very quickly, it does this by destroying and damaging your sebaceous glands. And that's a direct quote from a dermatologist. A dermatologist told me in an interview that we damage and destroy sebaceous glands.   Jessica DeFino: (59:58) I was on Accutane in my early twenties before I knew much about it. And my skin still struggles to moisturise itself. I have not regained the sebaceous function at all. So again, this is an example of a prescription that sort of damages the skin long term. Steroids, for sure. I mean, there's a lot of scientific literature on how steroids damage the skin's inherent functions. So dermatology is still very much steeped in this world of aesthetics where it's just trying to create this certain aesthetic as quickly as possible, and that doesn't necessarily serve you or your skin in the long term.   Tahnee:  (01:00:36) So that's sort of making the problem go away without really addressing why it's cropped up in the first place.   Jessica DeFino: (01:00:41) Exactly. I also think there's a huge ethical dilemma to the fact that a lot of aesthetic cosmetic procedures are offered by dermatologists like Botox and fillers. These things are not markers of health. And I do think it's a huge conflict of interest that healthcare providers are not only offering these services, but suggesting them. Offering them is one thing. If people are going to get them, they need to get them in a safe way. But I have heard from dozens and dozens of people who will go into their dermatologist for an annual screening and their dermatologist will say, "Hey. So you recently turned 28. Have you thought about Botox?" And this is your healthcare provider who is now planting this.   Tahnee:  (01:01:25) That's so unethical.   Jessica DeFino: (01:01:26) It's so unethical. And planting the seed of doubt in your brain like, "Oh no, I look old. I need to do something about it. And my healthcare provider is telling me that this is an option. So it must be safe and it must be healthy." And it's equating aesthetic with health again. And it's creating this really, I think, toxic cycle of obsession with our appearance outside of health.   Tahnee: (01:01:56) Is there a long term effect to Botox? Because I've heard about people having preventative Botox, which I'm not ... So my husband's mom is disabled and she has Botox in her leg because it actually is a medical treatment, which was sort of new to me. I knew it had been developed for that, but I sort of figured it had become a beauty thing. But I've sort of been seeing it around that people use it preventatively. Does it actually? It doesn't work long term though, right? It stops after a few months.   Jessica DeFino: (01:02:24) No, it doesn't work long term. It wears off after a while. So you have to keep getting these injections. And just applying common sense, there's no way to know that Botox is preventing anything. You say you're using it preventatively, but what are you preventing? Everybody ages in different ways. Some people get really deep lines and some people get no lines at all. And I mean, there is just no scientific way to prove that you're preventing something. So that is just a, that's marketing. That's nothing more than marketing.   Tahnee: (01:03:01) And kind of we haven't spoken a lot about race. But I'm obviously conscious of time with you. But with things like gua sha, and even I've been seeing face yoga on Instagram recently and these things. I'm interested in, again, from my understanding of yoga, maybe I'm wrong, and of Taoist practices, gua sha, yes, there's the aesthetic, but also it moves Chi, it helps move fluid. It's this really powerful ... I use it on my body because it's this really powerful way of clearing chafe from the meridians and stagnation, these kinds of things. But I'm seeing it a lot now as this really popular trend to get rid of wrinkles and do this and do that. So it's like we've sort of taken, I guess it's the same thing with this whole conversation. It's like we take the real root essence of something and turn it into just an aesthetic kind of.   Jessica DeFino: (01:03:51) Yeah. I mean, to me, that is like the real tragedy of gua sha getting so huge and facial massage getting so huge is that there's been this focus place on it as this is a way to get rid of wrinkles, or it's a way to look younger, when actually these practices offer so many overall health benefits to not only you and your skin, but also your mind. Massage in any form is this huge form of stress relief. It sends a physiological chemical cascade through your whole body that lowers cortisol and promotes skin health and also promotes overall health. And there are just so many benefits to these practices beyond aesthetic.   Jessica DeFino: (01:04:31) And I think we do them a real disservice by focusing on the aesthetic benefits rather than the fact that facial massage supports your skin's inherent cleansing mechanisms, it supports your skin's inherent moisturization and exfoliation mechanisms. It boosts blood circulation. It brings nutrients to your skin cells so that they are healthier and more efficient and better equipped to protect you and to heal you. These are all wonderful reasons to engage in these practices. And I think that should be the focus rather than you're going to look younger.   Tahnee: (01:05:06) Yes, it's funny. I mean, it crossed my mind when my daughter was born. She's got that porcelain baby skin. It's like, "Oh! It's a shame we don't get to keep that." But it's also very vulnerable, right? And so you're always trying to pr

Tatinutritips
Oro Liquido

Tatinutritips

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 11:09


La miel de manuka proviene del néctar del arbusto del mismo nombre (Leptospermum Scoparium), que crece en estado salvaje en ciertas zonas de Nueva Zelandia y Australia. Aprende sus beneficios y Que la hace tan especial

The Explorers Podcast with Barry FitzGerald
Manuka has hit the sweet spot in the Cobar region thanks to new OceanaGold deal

The Explorers Podcast with Barry FitzGerald

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 21:11


In this episode Barry chats to Dennis Karp, Executive Chairman of Manuka Resources (ASX:MKR)

The Catholic Man Show
The Hell There Is

The Catholic Man Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 72:50


How do people go to hell? How do some of the saints describe hell? What types of punishment are there in hell? We talk about this and more in this week's episode. http://www.patreon.com/thecatholicmanshow (Become a Patron! Over 40 interviews, a course with Karlo Broussard, a 10 part series on the domestic church, a course on fitness and virtue by Pat Flynn, and free thank you gifts for supporting the show!) https://selectinternationaltours.com/catholicmanshow/ () WE ARE PLANNING A TRIP TO IRELAND FOR 2022! WANT TO GO WITH US? WE ARE FINALIZING THE DETAILS. TO STAY UP-TO-DATE,  https://selectinternationaltours.com/catholicmanshow/ (Click here) About our drink: https://www.laphroaig.com/en/10-year-old-sherry-oak-finish (Laphroaig 10 Sherry Oak Finish) This unique expression from Laphroaig combines the unforgettable flavour of our 10-year-old whisky with the sweet, aromatic flavours from the Oloroso sherry casks. This marriage of casks creates a rich, full-bodied flavour with notes of Manuka honey, bacon and maple syrup alongside the classic smoke, seaweed and hint of salt that Laphroaig is known & loved for. The European oak sherry casks are carefully selected to complement the unique and much-loved taste of Laphroaig. The additional sweetness and character of the Oloroso casks add complexity and balance to create a unique and exciting expression, but one that stays true to the character of Laphroaig. About our gear: The Paint Stick The https://www.lowes.com/pd/Wagner-Wagner-PaintStick-EZ-Roller-Inner-Fed-Paint-Roller/5002909541?cm_mmc=shp-_-c-_-prd-_-pnt-_-ggl-_-LIA_PNT_222_Applicators-Tape-Tools-Sprayers-_-5002909541-_-local-_-0-_-0&ds_rl=1286981&gclid=Cj0KCQiAmKiQBhClARIsAKtSj-m5sAR9zWbpV1wuo7p6j_MkjdxOTFnwk8MowSjxGwVO7juKr5onNw8aAgrREALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds (Wagner PaintStick EZ Roller) is great for painting walls and ceilings 2X faster than a manual roller and with less mess. The paint roller eliminates the need for messy roller trays by holding up to 22 oz. of paint directly in the handle. You can paint a 7' X 10' area in a single fill, allowing you to quickly transform an entire kitchen, living room, bedroom and more without having to stop and reload the roller. For even, consistent coverage, simply squeeze the trigger to feed paint directly to the paint roller. The roller also reduces the need for a ladder or step stool by providing long reach for tall walls and ceilings. The Wagner PaintStick EZ Roller is a great upgrade to traditional paint rollers and will be an ideal painting tool to have for your next room makeover! About the Topic: How do people go to hell?  The death of a person with the state of mortal sin, that is without any sanctifying grace. What is mortal sin?  CCC 1855: “Mortal sin destroys charity in the heart of ma by a grave violation of God's law; it turns man away from God, who is his ultimate end and his beatitude, by preferring an inferior good to Him.  3 conditions for mortal sin: 1. Grave matter 2. Full knowledge 3. Deliberate consent This episode is sponsored by: https://christcenteredcapital.com/ (CHRIST CENTERED CAPITAL) We point out what companies, organizations and charities are aligned with Christian Values, and which are not, so you can make morally informed decisions on what to do with your capital. https://christcenteredcapital.com/ (Use promo code TCMS2022 for a 1 month free subscription. ) https://christcenteredcapital.com/ ()   [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EblauCIWoug] http://exodus90.com/?utm_source=catholicmanshow&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=exodus90-2022&utm_content=catholicmanshow-email-1 (Exodus90) has started but Exodus Lent is just around the corner! March 2nd is Ash Wednesday, and over a billion people will start living different in some way. Maybe giving up chocolate or alcohol, or whatever. For a lot of Catholics, Lent is a time...

RNZ: Our Changing World
Honey fingerprints and plant powers

RNZ: Our Changing World

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 30:14


Claire learns about honey fingerprinting while Katy Gosset meets a scientist studying the anti-microbial properties of some native plants.

Acne Stories
#88 Parlons Produits ! avec Louis Brauer, fondateur de Cosmoz

Acne Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 35:20


J'ai le plaisir d'inviter aujourd'hui Louis Brauer, fondateur de la marque Cosmoz. Connaissez-vous les bienfaits du miel et en particulier celui de Manuka ? Ce dernier a d'incroyables vertues cicatrisantes et anti-inflammatoires et donc idéal pour les peaux à tendance acnéique.  C'est dans une conversation passionnante que Louis nous raconte la genèse de Cosmoz: son voyage en Nouvelle-Zélande, sa découverte du miel de Manuka puis sa décision de créer ses propres formulations avec cet actif. Louis nous évoque son parcours en chimie, son choix de se tourner vers de la cosmétique biologique et nous explique le développement des produits et des autres ingrédients qu'il associe avec le miel de Manuka.  Aujourd'hui, Cosmoz est devenue une marque de cosmétiques située à Lyon, proposant toute une gamme répondant aux besoins des peaux acnéiques.  Apprenez-en davantage sur un ingrédient cosmétique exceptionnel mais également naturel et bio... bonne écoute!  Je vous invite à explorer le site de Cosmoz www.cosmoz.bio et de suivre l'actualité de la marque sur la page Instagram @cosmoz.bio  Vous pouvez également poser toutes vos questions à l'équipe! A l'occasion de cet épisode, un jeu concours est organisé sur nos deux pages Instagram, tentez votre chance !  Acne Stories est un podcast qui brise les tabous et met en lumière un sujet qui compte. Le but de ce podcast est de se sentir davantage en confiance avec soi-même, d'accepter notre peau telle qu'elle est, de l'aborder différemment et de peut-être découvrir des solutions auxquelles vous n'aviez pas pensé. La série Parlons Produits ! a pour but de vous aider à mieux comprendre les besoins de votre peau afin de choisir des soins plus adaptés. Si vous souhaitez me faire part de votre histoire ou bien d'un simple commentaire, je vous invite à m'écrire sur acnestoriespodcast@gmail.com N'hésitez pas à partager cet épisode sur les réseaux sociaux et à lui donner une note - idéalement 5 étoiles - sur Apple Podcasts. Acne Stories est disponible sur Spotify, Deezer, Soundcloud, Ausha, Google Podcasts et de nombreuses autres plateformes (Stitcher, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Pocket Casts, PodcastAddict, Castro, Castbox & Overcast) Pour plus d'informations, rendez-vous sur la page Instagram @acnestoriespodcast A mercredi prochain pour un nouvel épisode !   

Youngblood Monday Lunch
Manuka by Jeesun Choi

Youngblood Monday Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 34:22


Sungho flunks out of college and his business-savvy mother is worried. But his business-savvier father turns up out of nowhere with the greatest idea he's ever had. This could be the answer to all of their prayers.    Written by Youngblood's Jeesun Choi, directed by Sarah Shin, featuring Mahira Kakkar, Jinn S. Kim, Jiehae Park, & Eugene Young with sound designer Erica Huang, & sound engineer Caroline Eng.  Help us bring more plays to the table at ESTnyc.org/lunchmoney.

Forge Side Chat
EP11. Christropher Frostad of Frosty Forge, Cochrane, Alberta

Forge Side Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 139:54


The hosers talk about Chris' blacksmith experience, including the making of non-knife damascus objects.  WARNING! DISCOUNT CODES CONTAINED IN SHOW! This week we sat down with Christopher Frostad. Chris is a full time smith at Manuka forge and also operates a side business as a Smith working from that same location. Chris has worked with a multitude of different blacksmithing aspects and drops some really interesting stories with some really good knowledge. Of course the hosers act like goods an have a few laughs. Hope you enjoy! Please let us know if you do by shooting us an dm or an email at forgesidechat@gmail.com We are super pumped to announce we have some new support for the show from our good friends @maritimeknifesupply and @mcknifeworks And as always our favourite place to get your abrasive belts, quentchant, and powdered steel is @pritchellandhardy Makers make the future. Be a maker! #steelnerd #handmade #metalfabrication #handforged #forging #forged #forge #metalart #blacksmith #blacksmithing #blacksmithshop #blacksmithtools #weld #welding #welder #metalart #forgedinfire #makersgonnamake #canada

ARO Wellness Wednesday
Manuka Honey: A Worthy Addition to Your Diet?

ARO Wellness Wednesday

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 9:27


Manuka honey is a unique type of honey from New Zealand and comes from the Manuka tree. Manuka honey has long been used for its healing properties both internally and externally. There is an array of conclusive evidence to show that Manuka Honey can be very beneficial for healing wounds. All honey is acidic and that can be really useful in healing but Manuka honey contains a compound called methylglyoxal that other honey does not contain. This compound is one of the reasons Manuka honey has such useful antibacterial properties.

Call Me Crazy Podcast
Unapologetically Me Ft. Chay

Call Me Crazy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2021 56:20


Welcome back my crazy friends! This week we are joined by Chay one of my Manuka honey sisters. we discuss the journey and what it truly means to be authentically yourself. Chay IG: @chayfantastic Chay Hair Page: @STYLEDFANTASTIC Our IG: @callmecrazypod Bas: @beeforeal

The Engaging Voice
Episode 039 | Tara B | Keeping Our Voice Healthy Through Wholistic Practices

The Engaging Voice

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2020 23:34


We've talked often on this show about the health of our voice and the technique behind it. Today, Tara dives into the other parts of our life that can affect our vocal health and what to do about it. This includes foods to eat, those to avoid and other practices that we can add to our lives to keep our voices going strong. Building our immune system through: Exercise Good sleep A relaxed mindset Supplements Finding foods that don't cause extra or thick mucus to our voices.     Mucus can be heathy for our vocal tract and cords if it is clear and thin. What are foods that cause extra mucus? Dairy Eggs Bread, Pasta, Cereal Bananas Cabbage, Potatoes, Corn and corn products Soy products Anything with refined sugar—so any sweet desserts Drinks with caffeine—soda, coffee, tea Alcoholic drinks Fried foods   The foods that can strip healthy mucus are oranges and orange juice.    Foods that keep phlegm away: Spices like ginger, garlic, cayenne pepper, chamomile, turmeric Meat like salmon, tuna, sardines, flounder, chicken Fruits you can have—lemons, limes, pineapple, grapefruit, watermelon, apples Beverages—decaf tea, herbal tea, chicken broth Pumpkin, seeds, watercress, celery, pickles, cucumbers, onions Raw honey, especially Manuka honey   More helps for your voice: Cool mist humidifier Neti Poti for sinus cleansing Gargle with warm salt water Room temp water Vocaleze products Eucalyptus Oil Watch how you are talking—pay attention to not straining and take enough breaths. No vocal fry either.   You can get VOCALEZE products right here! Get your 15% off through my link:  http://vocaleze.refr.cc/tarabrueske   For more info about this episode and to hear other episodes, go to: www.theengagingvoice.com    You can find this and other episodes at Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Spotify, iHeart radio, and Apple Podcasts.   Please go to Apple Podcast and click on RATINGS AND REVIEWS to rate this podcast. I would be so grateful! Thank you! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-engaging-voice/id1448497465

The Holistic Navigator
The Incredible Healing Power of Manuka Honey with Mike Everly

The Holistic Navigator

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2019 36:15


On this week's episode we speak with Mike Everly, founder of Bees & Trees Manuka Honey. Manuka honey is an incredible substance produced only in New Zealand and is garnering a lot of attention for it's help in wound care and immune support. Mike walks us through how manuka works, many of it's different uses, and what to look for when purchasing your own.