Podcasts about roughly

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,231PODCASTS
  • 1,684EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 7, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about roughly

Latest podcast episodes about roughly

The Top Left Corner
Top Left Corner #164: No Justice for Miguel

The Top Left Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 65:32


On the evening of March 25, 2022, friends of Pittsfield, Mass. resident Miguel Estrella called 911 to request assistance for the 22-year-old, who was in the midst of a mental health crisis. Roughly two minutes after officers arrived at the scene, Estrella was dead. The post Top Left Corner #164: No Justice for Miguel appeared first on The Greylock Glass.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John challenges you to not expect anything for an entire day, and why it's important not to put weight on expectations. Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John talks about the importance of connecting to yourself.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Today in PA | A PennLive daily news briefing with Julia Hatmaker

Roughly 8,000 patients have been affected by a data breach at Allegheny Health Network. First Hospital in Kingston will close its doors this fall due to staffing shortages. People are abandoning dogs in a wooded area in Philadelphia. And two bear cubs will soon call a Washington County sanctuary their home.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John talks about how to stop dreading the things you don't want to do.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sarasota Memorial HealthCasts
Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer | HealthCasts Season 4, Ep. 6

Sarasota Memorial HealthCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 25:13


Roughly 240,000 people will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States this year. Robert Carey, MD, specializes in the treatment of prostate cancer and explains the screening process, treatment options, and why not every diagnosis requires treatment. Check out other interviews with SMH experts at smh.com/podcast, and subscribe on your favorite streaming app so you never miss an episode.You can also watch the video recording on our YouTube channel here.For more health tips & news you can use from experts you trust, sign up for Sarasota Memorial's monthly digital newsletter, Healthe-Matters.YouTubeCheck out our other interviews with SMH experts at smh.com/podcast.

Roughly a Podcast
Most Motivated

Roughly a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 60:57


Phil and Brandon discuss the Julio wrist injury saga, the horrendous Astros series, Juan Soto scuttlebutt, and the conclusion to the international draft issue in baseball. Notes:Elm Coffee Roasters - Use promo code ROUGHLY at checkout for 25% offDaniel Kramer on Robbie Ray's struggles against Houston"Most Motivated"The Wheelhouse PodcastThe Mariners Podcast 

Lean Blog Interviews
Alan Robinson on Continuous Improvement for All and Practical Innovation in Government

Lean Blog Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 74:44


Episode page: https://leanblog.org/451 My guest for Episode #451 of the Lean Blog Interviews Podcast is Dr. Alan G. Robinson. He specializes in managing ideas, building high-performance organizations, creativity, innovation, quality, and lean production. He is the co-author of 13 books, many of which have been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Dr. Robinson is on the faculty of the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts. He received his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, and a B.A. and M.A. in mathematics from the University of Cambridge. He has served on the Board of Examiners of the United States' Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and on the Board of Examiners for the Shingo Prizes for Excellence in Manufacturing. He's a returning guest (Episode 217) – talked about one of his previous books (co-authored with Dean Schroeder) — The Idea-Driven Organization. His bestselling book, Ideas Are Free, co-authored with Schroeder, was based on a global study of more than 150 organizations in 17 countries. It describes how the best companies go about getting large numbers of ideas from their front-line employees, and the competitive advantages they gain from this. His new book, available now, also co-authored with Schroeder is Practical Innovation in Government: How Front-Line Leaders Are Transforming Public-Sector Organizations. Today, we discuss topics and questions including: As we've learned from you previously… “Roughly 80 percent of any organization's improvement potential lies in front-line ideas.” — Potential? Continuous Improvement vs Innovation? Used to draw a distinction The Tesla factory doesn't have the continuous improvement culture of NUMMI? How much progress have you seen in terms of executives understanding the power of engaging everybody in bring forward and implementing ideas? Alan's first book was with Shingo — “mass creativity” UMass Memorial Health — 100,000 ideas and your role helping them? Tell us about the new book — what prompted you and Dean to write this for this audience? What prompted the research? Educating / influencing elected leaders vs. career government employees The role of front-line leaders vs. senior leaders vs. elected officials? Non-partisan – almost 50/50 from their research party wise The phrase “practical innovation”? Does adopting these practices mean we are “running government like a business”??  Adoption at local (including schools), state, or federal levels? Does “practical innovation” get past pointing simply to budgets as a barrier? Demanding cost savings or ROI is a kiss of death for improvement? 1841 — Original article that invented cost/benefit analysis… “only useful for the simplest…” “Why cost/benefit analysis is stupid“ Would we expect government in Japan to be a leader in Kaizen?

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John talks about the two shitty jobs he's had, and what to do if you have a shitty job.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Moonlight Graham Show

This week's Moonlighter goes way back with Moonlight Tim. Eric Stein was a sophomore leader for the Iowa Central Tritons when Tim joined the team as a freshman. Even as a 19-year-old, Eric Stein's baseball IQ made it clear that his future was in coaching if he wanted it. Roughly 18 years after that first meeting, Tim sits down with Eric to talk about Stein's progression from player to head coach for those same Tritons.   Eric Stein grew up on a farm outside Portsmouth, Iowa, and attended Harlan Community High School. After a successful high school baseball career, Stein moved to the big city of Fort Dodge to play for Iowa Central during the 2004 and 2005 seasons. After considerable success as an infielder, including recognition for his defensive skills, Stein played for Grand View University. When his playing days were over, he took a call from Rick Pedersen to come back as an assistant coach. Stein took over as a head coach in the 2018-2019 season and has had consistent success over the last few years, racking up 75 wins so far.   Tim and Eric both have a passion for Iowa Central and junior college baseball. This interview focuses on the world of JUCO baseball from the players' and coaches' perspectives. They cover everything from recruiting kids to a 2-year school to the impact of Eric Sim.    Tim takes Eric through his eight beliefs about success in junior college baseball. These nuggets of wisdom are explained from both the veteran player angle and the current skipper. Tim's list ranges from staying out of trouble to ensuring your attitude and work ethic keep you on the path to success. Stein has to recruit young men to Fort Dodge to help his program take the next step by moving on to 4-year schools when their time in JUCO is done. His success so far shows that he knows what it takes to win at the junior college level, but maybe Tim's list could be the Moonlight bump to help Stein and the Tritons bring home that world series ring.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John does a deep dive on break-ups and shares his thoughts on what moving on really looks like and explains why you're not getting over anyone.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Interview Under Fire Podcast
S.13 E.09 – Andreas Reinhard of The Oklahoma Kid

Interview Under Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 49:41


Noya. Doicha. Harta. Roughly translated into “New German Hardness.” The perfect description for our current guest. When you combine elements of industrial metal with metallic post-hardcore and alternative – it can be quite the mix when executed to perfection. Enter Berlin-based metalcore outfit The Oklahoma Kid, now fresh off their vicious sophomore effort “Tangerine Tragic,” guitarist Andreas Reinhard joins Sonny on the IUF podcast to talk about the production processes behind one of metalcore's greatest kept secrets. The band may be 8 years into existence, and Andreas may also be the newest member to join in on the fun, but the maturity in the band's sound and chemistry with a growing fanbase serves as the perfect starting point for this talented quintet. Andreas could not have asked for a better situation to be in, and he's here to stay for it all as he has found his groove with TOK. They have toured with the likes of Stick To Your Guns, Carnifex, and Hatebreed – and as their resume grows, so do their humble attitudes. Andreas is ready to take the next step with The Oklahoma Kid, and it's an entrance into the metalcore scene that will have many heads turned in their direction. And lastly, it's not every day you get to interview The Oklahoma Kid while...IN OKLAHOMA. Listen in and you'll get the kick. “Tangerine Tragic” is full of all the heaviness and melody that promises to be a strong effort as one of the top records of the year. A fun conversation in store here, so be sure to buy and stream the new album “Tangerine Tragic,” out now worldwide via Arising Empire.Stay connected with The Oklahoma Kid, visit: https://arising-empire.com/artists/the-oklahoma-kid, https://www.facebook.com/theoklahomakidofficial and https://www.instagram.com/theoklahomakidband/Stay connected with IUF, visit: https://interviewunderfire.com/

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John talks about the belief that anything is possible no matter where you're at in life.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Health Now
The Truth About Sunscreen

Health Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 32:02 Very Popular


Roughly 90% of all skin cancers are a direct result of ultraviolet light exposure. So, what are the best sun protection methods? And does SPF matter? Board-certified dermatologist Laurel Naversen Geraghty, MD, talks to us about what UVA, UVB, and broad spectrum means, the ideal SPF number, and breaks down the difference between mineral and chemical sunscreen. Listen in to find out the best ways to protect your skin. Related Links:  Dr. Geraghty's posts on WebMD's Healthy Skin blog American Academy of Dermatology Skin Cancer Foundation

Land Academy Show
Jack Thursday – Land Academy Member Avatar (LA 1811)

Land Academy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 10:15


Jack Thursday - Land Academy Member Avatar (LA 1811) Transcript: Steven Jack Butala: Steve and Jill here. Jill DeWit: Cheers. Steven Jack Butala: Welcome to The Land Academy Show, entertaining land investment talk. I'm Steven Jack Butala. Jill DeWit: And I'm Jill DeWit, broadcasting from sunny Southern California. Steven Jack Butala: Today's Jack Thursday and I'm going to talk about the Land Academy member avatar. Who's the typical person who joins this group? Where do they come from? What's their background? This topic came from a recent conversation that I had with somebody, who with very serious authority, believed that they knew who my customer was to which I really laughed pretty hard in their face. I'll explain the whole thing. Jill DeWit: Okay. Steven Jack Butala: Before we get into it, let's take a question posted by one of our members on the landinvestors.com online community. It's free. Jill DeWit: Do you want my water? You just a little tickle in your throat. Steven Jack Butala: No, I'm good. Jill DeWit: Okay. Steven Jack Butala: And please, don't forget to subscribe on the Land Academy YouTube channel and comment on the shows you like. Jill DeWit: I was just being nice. Derek wrote, "Hello, everyone. I'm very new here and not really computer savvy, but willing to learn to make this my career. I have reviewed Land Academy 3.0 and 1.0, and when trying to pull the zip code data from Redfin or Realtor, I'm not getting all the data I need for the red, yellow, green test. Does anyone have an alternative to those two to pull the data? For better clarity, when I'm on Realtor, I was only able to find one zip code that I needed. And when I was on Redfin, I found all three zip codes, but not much data attached." Steven Jack Butala: This is a very good question, as a new person, and I'm sure you're going to do great. And it's a very logical question. Here's the thing, not all counties are equal. And so every county and parish, I think there's 1,344 in the entire country, or is it 3,144? Jill DeWit: 3,144. Roughly. Yeah. Steven Jack Butala: Have a way of doing things. And they're not all the same. They all have an assessor. They all have an assessor who collects data. Jill DeWit: Who's a real person. Steven Jack Butala: Who's a person who collects data on each one of the properties. This is a finite number of properties in their county. And they report that data to companies like data aggregators, like data tree. And that's it. So there's a finite amount of data. You have access to it. It's probably 99.8% of the counties contribute to data trees. So there's a ton of data in there. The universe of it is about 150 million records. There's 150 million properties in the entire country. It's not this big huge number. It's not a universe or an infinity. It's a finite number. And so when doing the red, green, yellow test, what you're looking for is properties that have been sold recently or properties that are for sale, or however you choose to see that. We choose to look at both. And very often a county that you may be interested in selling property and buying and selling land in just doesn't have any data. It's so rural that there's no sales comparison values and nothing's for sale. Jill DeWit: [inaudible 00:03:08]. Steven Jack Butala: Or there's three or four. And so, as you can imagine, people who collect data for a living in real estate and aggregate it are really, really interested in reselling that data for profit and the more urban the area, the more people are interested in buying the data or using the data for all kinds of reasons, contracting reasons, you name it. How we use it, oil and gas, all of that. So the rural counties, which are places we love to buy land, at times get overlooked. So you have a couple choices here, Derek, and boy, I'll tell you, there's about 50 people in discord that answered you. Jill DeWit: Oh, good. That's so good. Steven Jack Butala: And so you already have the answer,

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John answers a listener's question he gets asked often: what are your thoughts on open relationships?Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. AOspfhJ5gZgQ2yifBKSw See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hawaii News Now
HNN News Brief (July 20, 2022)

Hawaii News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 3:19


The Jan. 6 committee will hold another hearing Thursday primetime. Roughly 120 million Americans are facing excessive heat warnings and advisories. Japanese visitors are slowly returning to the state. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Congressional Dish
CD255: Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs)

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 86:04 Very Popular


The recently signed gun law, S. 2938: Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, contained a surprise dingleberry postponing a regulation designed to save seniors money on their pharmaceutical drugs by prohibiting kickbacks to an industry few have heard of: Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs). This little-known but extremely powerful industry deserves much of the blame for ever rising prescription drugs costs in the United States. In this episode, Jen gives you the scoop on PBMs and how they make their money at the expense of Americans who are most dependent on medications. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! View the shownotes on our website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd255-pharmacy-benefit-managers-pbms We're Not Wrong Berlin Meetup Contact Justin at WereNotWrongPod@gmail.com Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD134: The EpiPen Hearing US Healthcare Landscape Jessi Jezewska Stevens. Apr 23, 2020. “A Brief History of the Great American Healthcare Scam.” Bookforum. Tanza Loudenback. Mar 7, 2019. “The average cost of healthcare in 21 different countries.” Insider. Chuck Grassley and Ron Wyden. 2019. “Insulin: Examining the Factors Driving the Rising Cost of a Century Old Drug [Staff Report].” U.S. Senate Finance Committee. “Health Insurance Coverage of the Total Population.” Kaiser Family Foundation. Sara R. Collins and David C. Radley. Dec 7, 2018. “The Cost of Employer Insurance Is a Growing Burden for Middle-Income Families.” The Commonwealth Fund. PBMs What are PBMs? JC Scott. Jun 30, 2022. “Drug manufacturers are root cause of high drug costs; PBMs drive costs down.” The Hill. Zach Freed. Jun 22, 2022. “The Pharmacy Benefit Mafia: The Secret Health Care Monopolies Jacking Up Drug Prices and Abusing Patients and Pharmacists.” American Economic Liberties Project. Adam J. Fein. Jun 22, 2021. “The Top Pharmacy Benefit Managers of 2020: Vertical Integration Drives Consolidation (rerun).” Drug Channels. “Flash finding: How drug money from sick people really works.” Nov 11, 2021. 46brooklyn. Adam J. Fein. Feb 3, 2019. “Don't Blame Drug Prices on ‘Big Pharma.'” The Wall Street Journal. How PBMs Make Money “DIR Fees.” National Association of Chain Drug Stores. “How PBMs Make Money: PBM Practices & Profits.” RxSafe. True North Political Solutions. Oct 25, 2017. “White Paper: DIR Fees Simply Explained.” Pharmacy Times. ACA “Vertical Integration” Loophole Peter High. Jul 8, 2019. “A View From Inside Cigna's $67 Billion Acquisition Of Express Scripts.” Forbes. Angelica LaVito. Nov 28, 2018. “CVS creates new health-care giant as $69 billion merger with Aetna officially closes.” CNBC. David Dayen. Oct 12, 2018. “Why the Aetna and CVS Merger Is So Dangerous.” The American Prospect. Jeff Byers. April 12, 2018. “Optum a step ahead in vertical integration frenzy.” Healthcare Dive. Graph: Optum opens up wider market for UnitedHealth Group Graph: Optum's pharmacy business contributes the majority of its revenue Susan Morse. May 10, 2017. “Secret weapon: UnitedHealth's Optum business is laying waste to old notions about how payers make money.” Healthcare Finance. Lobbying “Client Profile: Pharmaceutical Care Management Assn.” Open Secrets. The Demise of Independent Pharmacies Christine Blank. Oct 17, 2019. “Independents Prepare to Close Up Shop.” Drug Topics. Paulina Firozi. Aug 23, 2018. “The Health 202: Here's why rural independent pharmacies are closing their doors.” The Washington Post. What Is a Formulary? Ana Gascon Ivey. May 19, 2020. “A Guide to Medication Formularies.” GoodRx. Previous Delays in Rebate Regulation Paige Minemyer. Jan 29, 2021. “In a win for PBMs, Biden administration delays rebate rule.” Fierce Healthcare. Paige Minemyer. Jan 12, 2021. “PCMA sues Trump administration over rebate rule.” Fierce Healthcare. “Incorporating the Effects of the Proposed Rule on Safe Harbors for Pharmaceutical Rebates in CBO's Budget Projections—Supplemental Material for Updated Budget Projections: 2019 to 2029.” May 2019. Congressional Budget Office. The Gun Law Passage Process Office of the Clerk. May 18, 2022. “Roll Call 212 | Bill Number: S. 2938.” U.S. House of Representatives. Tampa Bay Times Editorial Board. May 12, 2022. “Republican lawmakers should be ashamed for failing to honor Justice Joseph Hatchett.” Miami Herald. Annie Karni. Apr 12, 2022. “House G.O.P., Banding Together, Kills Bid to Honor Pioneering Black Judge.” The New York Times. Background on Most Important Provisions Mary Katherine Wildeman. May 26, 2022. “Data show most school shootings carried out by young adults, teens.” CT Insider. Jeffrey Pierre. May 26, 2022. “Experts say we can prevent school shootings. Here's what the research says.” NPR. The Dingleberry Erik Sherman. Jun 30, 2022. “Gun Safety Bill Extends Drug Middlemen Protection From Anti-Kickback Measure.” Forbes. Molly Rutherford. Jun 28, 2022. “Gun legislation provision puts drug supply chain profits over patients.” The Hill. Marty Schladen. Jun 22, 2022. “Deep inside the gun bill: a break for prescription drug middlemen.” Iowa Capital Dispatch. Poland Train Station Taylor Popielarz, Maureen McManus and Justin Tasolides. Mar 25, 2022. “‘The help given is remarkable': Inside the Poland train station that's become a hub for Ukrainian refugees.” Spectrum News NY1. The Law and the Regulation S. 2938: Bipartisan Safer Communities Act Senate Vote: 65-33 (All Nos GOP) House Vote: 234-193 (All Nos GOP) Jen's Highlighted PDF of S. 2938: Bipartisan Safer Communities Act Fraud and Abuse; Removal of Safe Harbor Protection for Rebates Involving Prescription Pharmaceuticals and Creation of New Safe Harbor Protection for Certain Point-of-Sale Reductions in Price on Prescription Pharmaceuticals and Certain Pharmacy Benefit Manager Service Fees U.S. Health and Human Services Department November 30, 2020 Audio Sources The State of Competition in the Pharmacy Benefits Manager and Pharmacy Marketplaces November 17, 2015 House Committee on the Judiciary Witnesses: Bradley J. Arthur, R.Ph., Owner, Black Rock Pharmacy David Balto, Law Offices of David A. Balto PLLC Amy Bricker, R.Ph. Vice President of Retail Contracting & Strategy, Express Scripts Natalie A. Pons, Senior Vice President and Assistant General Counsel, CVS Health Clips 53:48 Bradley Arthur: The Big Three PBMs control almost 80% of the entire market and these PBMs have the upper hand both in negotiating the contract with the payer, as well as strongly influencing the actual plan design itself. The PBM industry typically states that they can use their economic power to harness enhanced market efficiencies, but for whom? However, the staggering annual revenues that continue to grow each year of the big three suggests that these efficiencies are going directly to their corporations' bottom lines. Small community pharmacies like mine are faced on a daily basis with the impact of the PBMs' disproportionate market power. Community pharmacies routinely must agree to take-it-or-leave-it contracts from the PBMs just to continue to serve our long-standing patients. As if that weren't enough, the PBMs also directly set the reimbursement rates for pharmacies, the very same pharmacies that stand in direct competition of some of these PBM-owned mail-order and specialty pharmacies. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that the PBMs present employer and government payers with carefully tailored suggested plans designs that steer beneficiaries to these PBM-owned entities. Drug Pricing in America: A Prescription for Change, Part I January 29, 2019 Senate Committee on Finance Witnesses: Kathy Sego, Mother of a Child with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Douglas Holtz-Eakin, Ph.D., President, American Action Forum Mark E. Miller, Ph.D., Vice President of Health Care, Laura and John Arnold Foundation Peter B. Bach, MD, MAPP, Director, Memorial Sloan Kettering Center for Health Policy and Outcomes Clips 1:57:30 Sen. John Cornyn (R - TX): Can anybody on the panel explain to me why we have a general prohibition against kickbacks — they call them rebates — under the Social Security Act, but we nevertheless allow it for prescription drug pricing? What's the sound public policy reason for excluding prescription drug pricing from the anti-kickback rule under federal law? Douglas Holtz-Eakin: I can't explain that and won't pretend to. [laughter] Sen. Cornyn: I thought I was the only one who didn't understand the wisdom of that. Well, it's not a transparent arrangement and it does produce upward pressure on drug prices. And obviously, the negotiations between the PBM and the pharma in terms of what the net cost is, is not transparent, nor is it delivered to the consumer. Is it Dr. Miller? Dr. Bach? Peter Bach: It's delivered to the consumer indirectly through the reduction of the total cost of the benefit, but it is not delivered to the actual consumer using the drug, and that is a disassociation, that is a problem. Because it essentially reverses the structure of insurance. Lowering the total costs are people who use it the least, and raising the costs are people who use it the most, relative to if you allowed the rebate to be used at the point of sale, including all discounts. 1:59:49 Douglas Holtz-Eakin: If we had the negotiation be about the upfront price, so instead of a high list price and a rebate, you just negotiate a lower price, that would be the price that Ms. Sego would pay and insurance companies would look at that and say, okay, she's not paying as much as she used to, we're going to have to make up that money somewhere else and they might raise premiums. That means that people who don't have extreme insulin drug costs would pay a little bit more in a premium every month, and people who have extremely devastating medical conditions and high health care costs would get less costs. That's exactly what insurance is supposed to do. And so the rebate system is more than giving strange incentives on pricing. It's undercutting the purpose of insurance in general. Drug Pricing in America: A Prescription for Change, Part II February 26, 2019 Senate Committee on Finance Witnesses: Richard A. Gonzalez, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, AbbVie Inc. Pascal Soriot, Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, AstraZeneca Giovanni Caforio, M.D., Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. Jennifer Taubert, Executive Vice President, Worldwide Chairman, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson Kenneth C. Frazier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co., Inc. Albert Bourla, DVM, Ph.D., Chief Executive Office, Pfizer Olivier Brandicourt, M.D., Former Chief Executive Officer, Sanofi Clips 1:22:03 Albert Bourla: Adverse incentives that favor higher cost biologics are keeping biosimilars from reaching patients. In many cases, insurance companies declined to include lower cost biosimilars in their formularies because they would risk losing the rebates from covering higher cost medicines. I can't think of a more concerning example of a broken system and we need to do something about it. 1:33:35 Sen. Chuck Grassley (R - IA): So many of you have voiced support for the recent rebate rule proposed by the administration. Should the administration finalized this rule, will you commit to lowering your drug prices? Richard Gonzalez [CEO, AbbVie]: Mr. Chairman, we are supportive of the rule. We'd like to see it in its final form, obviously, to make a final decision, but we are supportive of taking the discount to the patient at the point of sale. Sen Grassley: Okay. AstraZeneca? **Pascal Soriot [CEO, AstraZeneca]**The same for us Senator, I would go one step further: if the rebates were removed from the commercial sector as well, we will definitely reduce our list prices. Sen Grassley: Okay. And Bristol? Giovanni Caforio [CEO, Bristol-Myers Squibb]: We have the same positions. Sen Grassley: Okay. Johnson and Johnson? Jennifer Taubert [EVP, J&J]: Yes, we're supportive, and that definitely would be my goal. We would just need to see the final legislation, provided that there aren't additional fees that are added into the system to compensate for the rebates. Sen Grassley: Merck? **Kenneth C. Frazier: I would expect that our prices would go down if we change the system. Again, on the commercial side as well as the Medicare side. Sen Grassley: Okay, Pfizer? Albert Bourla [CEO, Pfizer]: It is a very clear intention that we will not keep a single dollar from these rebates. We will try to move every single penny to the patients and we think if this goes also to the commercial plants that will be even better for more patients. Sen Grassley: Okay. Sanofi? Olivier Brandicourt [Former CEO, Sanofi]: Lowering list price has to be linked to better access and affordability at the counter for the patients. 1:35:20 Sen. Ron Wyden (D - OR): Is it correct that your company, and nobody else, sets the starting price for all drugs sold by Pfizer? Yes or no? Albert Bourla: It is a negotiation with PBMs and they are very powerful. Sen. Wyden: But you still get to set the list price? Albert Bourla: Yes, but we set this price and the rebate limit(?). 1:35:40 Sen. Ron Wyden (D - OR): Is it correct, when a hypothetical patient, let's call her Mrs. Jones, goes to pay for her drug at the pharmacy counter, her coinsurance is based on the price of the drug you set? Albert Bourla: It is correct in many cases. Sen. Wyden: Okay. I just want you all to know that the number one reason consumers are getting hammered, is because these list prices, which you have the last word with respect to where they are, are unaffordable. And the high prices are tied to what the consumer pays at the pharmacy counter. And all this other stuff you talk about, the rebates and the discounts and the coupons, all this other stuff is window dressing, all of that. And the fact is on Part D, 40% of the drugs don't even have a rebate. So I want it understood, particularly because I've asked you, Mr. Borla, I think you and others in the industry are stonewalling on the key issue, which is actually lowering list prices. And reducing those list prices are the easiest way for American consumers to pay less at the pharmacy counter. 2:12:45 Sen. Thomas Carper (D-DE): First is eliminating rebates to PBMs. That's the first one, eliminating rebates to PBMs. The second is value based arrangements. And the third is increasing transparency industry-wide on how you set your prices. 2:13:20 Richard Gonzalez: We clearly support providing the discount at the patient level, eliminating rebates essentially. 2:14:10 Pascal Soriot: If the rebates, as I said earlier, were to be removed from Part D and the commercial sector, we would actually reduce our list prices. 2:15:10 Giovanni Caforio: I would say that not only do we support all three elements that you mentioned, but I do believe those three elements together with the continued effort to develop a generic and biosimilar market would mean significant change, and would clearly alleviate the concerns that patients have today. 2:14:44 Jennifer Taubert: We are very supportive of all three elements that you outlined 2:15:52 Kenneth Frazier: We too support all three. 2:15:55 Albert Bourla: All three elements are transformational for our industry, will disrupt it. However, we do agree that these are the three things that need to be done and also I believe that will have significant meaningful results if we do. 2:16:10 Olivier Brandicourt: We support the three Senator, but we want to keep in mind at the end of the chain the patient has to benefit, so if rebates are removed it has to be to the benefit of patients. Sen. Thomas Carper (D-DE): Good, thanks. 2:18:10 Albert Bourla: 50% of the American people are in commercial plans and these rebate rules apply to Medicare. If the rules apply to all, definitely the list price will go down. 2:18:30 Albert Bourla: The list price is not irrelevant, it's very relevant for a lot of people because they have to pay list price during the deductible period. However if the rebate rule is applied, then they become irrelevant because the patients will not be paying the list price at the purchase point. 2:19:10 Sen. John Thune (R-SD): How would manufacturers respond if the rebate rule were finalized for government programs? I mean, what does that what does that mean for the commercial market? Albert Bourla: Senator, as I said before, all these proposals that they're discussing, [undistinguishable], eliminating the rebate rule, are transformational and will disrupt the way we do business. I don't know exactly how the system will evolve, and I really don't favor a bifurcated system. I would like to have a transparent single system across both parts. So we need to see how the whole thing will evolve. 2:25:26 Johnny Isakson (R-GA): Who sets the discount and who sets the rebate? 2:26:20 Richard Gonzalez: We negotiate with payers, so managed care and PBMs— Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA): You're a supplier though, so you have to go negotiate with the PBMs and those people, is that right? Richard Gonzalez: Correct, and they negotiate aggressively. Sen. Isakson: Is that pretty much true with everybody, that they're the major component between the end retail consumer price and the origin of the product? Richard Gonzalez: Yes, Senator. Sen. Isakson: Well, that seems like that's someplace we ought to focus, because that's where the distorted numbers come in. Johnson & Johnson, Janssen, in your testimony, you talked about your average list price of 8.1%, up, but an average net price change of only 4.6%. So while your gross went up 8.6, your net went down 4.6 In the same pricing period. How does that happen? If you're setting the price, how does it not go up on the bottom? Jennifer Taubert: Yeah, and in fact, in 2018, our net price actually declined 8.6%, so even more than that. The intermediaries in the system are very, very effective negotiators— Sen. Isakson: Tell me who the intermediaries are. Jennifer Taubert: Those would be the PBMs and the insurers. Sen. Isakson: …and the insurance companies? Jennifer Taubert: Right, and they set the formularies for patients. Sen. Isakson: And they're not the same. They're two different people? Jennifer Taubert: Yes, correct. 2:40:45 James Lankford (R-OK): All of you have mentioned the rebate issue has been a problem and that insurance companies and PBMs are very effective negotiators. Part of the challenge of this is, health insurance companies pay their PBM based on the quality of their negotiation skills, cutting a price off the list price. And so if a list price is higher and a rebate is higher, that also gives preference to them. So the difficulty is, as you raise list price, and the rebate gets larger, the insurance company gives that preference, making it harder for biosimilars. Am I tracking this correctly? 2:43:00 Albert Bourla: Here in the US, the penetration of biosimilars is much lower than in other places, but it is disproportional to different parts of the US healthcare system. For example, in open systems, systems where the decision maker it is a PBM, the one biosimilar we have has a market share of 5% in the US. In closed systems, in systems like Kaiser, for example, integrated healthcare systems where the one who decides has the whole cost of the healthcare system in its interest, we have 73%. 5% and 73% for the same product. I agree with what Mr. Fraser said that we need to create incentives, but I would add also that we need to break this rebate trap that creates significant disincentives for providers, and the healthcare system, and insurance companies. 3:19:25 Kenneth Frazier: If you went back a few years ago, when we negotiated to get our drugs on formulary, our goal was to have the lowest copay by patients. Today the goal is to pay into the supply chain the biggest rebate, and so that actually puts the patient at a disadvantage since they're the only ones that are paying a portion of the list price. The list price is actually working against the patient. 3:19:50 Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT): Why do we have a system today? Where you all are setting, I'll just say very, very high list prices, which is the starting point for negotiation. Why? Olivier Brandicourt: Senator, we're trying to get formulary position. With those list prices. High list price, high rebates. It's a preferred position. Unfortunately the preferred position doesn't automatically ensure affordability at the end. Kenneth C. Frazier: Senator, If you bring a product to the market with a low list price in this system, you get punished financially and you get no uptake because everyone in the supply chain makes money as a result of a higher list price. Drug Pricing in America: A Prescription for Change, Part III April 9, 2019 Senate Committee on Finance Witnesses: Steve Miller, MD, Former Executive Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer, Cigna Corporation Derica Rice, Former Executive Vice President and President, CVS Health and CVS Caremark William Fleming, Pharm.D., Segment President, Healthcare Services, Humana Inc. John Prince, Chief Executive Officer, OptumRx Mike Kolar, JD, Interim President & CEO, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Prime Therapeutics LLC Clips Sen. Ron Wyden (D - OR): Pharmaceutical Benefit Managers first showed up decades ago, back when prescription drugs were being utilized more extensively. The PBMs told the insurance companies, “we're the ones who know drug pricing, we will handle the negotiations for you.” But there is little evidence that the pharmaceutical benefit managers have actually held down the prices in a meaningful way. In fact, most of the evidence shows just the opposite. Pharmaceutical Benefit Managers actually make more money when they pick a higher price drug over a lower price drug. Colleagues, let's remember that all the way through this discussion, benefit managers make more money when they pick a higher price drug over a lower price drug. The logic on this isn't exactly complicated, graduate-level economics. PBM profits are based on taking their slice of the prescription-drug pie. More expensive drugs means there's a bigger pie. When there's a bigger pie, [there are] bigger slices for the pharmaceutical benefit managers. 50:24 Mike Kolar: Rebates and the role they play have been key areas of focus in the drug cost debate. In our view, rebates are a powerful tool to offset high prices, which are set by pharmaceutical companies, and pharmaceutical companies alone. The fact that rebates are not offered on many of the highest cost drugs, and that studies show no correlation between prices and rebates underscore that rebates are a key to mitigating rather than causing high drug prices. We pass rebates through fully to our plans, and we believe our plans should be able to choose how to apply these rebates in ways that best serve their members and market needs by balancing premiums and cost sharing. 56:05 Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA): I'd like to talk about consolidation, including the recent integration of PBMs with insurance companies. Last year I wrote to the Justice Department on the issues, it reported that the three largest PBMs who are before us today now covers 71% of Medicaid, Medicare Part D enrollees and 86% of standalone Drug Plan enrollees. 57:45 Derica Rice: This is a highly competitive space. In addition to the three that you've pointed out here, CMS has noted there are over 60 PBMs across the US. Therefore, the competition, there's many options for the employers that are out there, government entities, as well as unions to choose from given their specific needs. 1:10:35 Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI): So when we look at Express Scripts has 100 million Americans covered, CVS 90 million, OptumRx 65 million, Prime Therapeutics 27 million, Humana 21 million, and yet Americans still pay the highest prices in the world. Even though you are negotiating for millions of people. The VA has its own pharmacy benefit manager service, they negotiate for 9 million veterans, and they pay, on average, 40% less for the same drugs that the rest of the healthcare system pays for. Despite greater volume, you are unable to secure these kinds of low prices. With all due respect, you guys are pretty bad negotiators. Given the fact that the VA can get 40% less. And so I'd like to know from each of you why that's the case. Dr. Miller? Steve Miller [Former EVP and Chief Clinical Officer, Cigna Corporation]: Yes. Part of the equation is giving patients choice. At the VA, they actually limit their formulary more than any of us at this table do. So oftentimes, they'll have one beta blocker, one ace inhibitor. And so if it's going to get to that level of choice, then we could get better prices also. Sen. Stabenow: Let me jump in, in the interest of time. I know you create nationwide drug formularies, you have pre-authorization, you give preferred status to certain medications. So you don't use any of those tools that the VA is using? Because you do. Steve Miller: We definitely use those tools, but we also give people choice. It's crucial for both physicians and patients to have the choice of the products they want to be able to access. Many of our plans want us to have broad formularies and when you have more products, it means you move less market share. Sen. Stabenow: So basically you're saying a 40% premium gives them more choice. 1:24:30 Sherrod Brown (D-OH): If the administration's rebate rule were finalized as proposed, would you in some way be required to change the way you do business? Mike Kolar: Yes, Senator we would. John Prince: Yes. William Fleming: Yes. Derica Rice: Yes. Steve Miller: Yes. Sen. Brown: Thank you. 1:25:05 Sherrod Brown (D-OH): What percentage of prescriptions that you fill across Part D actually receive a rebate? Roughly what percentage? Mike Kolar: So Senator, approximately 8% of the prescriptions that we cover in Part D are associated with a rebate. Sen. Brown: Okay, Mr. Prince? John Prince: Senator, I don't know the exact number, I know our overall business is about 7%. Sen. Brown: Okay, thank you. William Fleming: About 7-8%. Derica Rice: Senator, I do not know the exact number but we pass through 100% of all rebates and discounts. Sen. Brown: [Grunt] Steve Miller: 90% of the prescriptions will be generic. Of the 10% that are branded, about two-thirds have rebates. So it's about seven-- Sen. Brown: 7-8% like the others. Okay. To recap, PBMs do not set drug prices. Forcing you to change the way you do business -- as the administration's rule would — will not change that fact. And while the rule might impact a small percentage of drugs and Part D that receive a rebate, it does nothing to lower costs, as your answer suggests, for the other 90% of prescriptions you fill. Most importantly, absolutely nothing in the proposed rule would require Secretary Azar's former employer or any other pharma company to lower the price of insulin or any other drug. It's important to establish that, so thank you for that. 1:41:40 Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV): Let me ask you, Dr. Fleming, in your testimony, you say Humana's analysis of the rebate rule -- and we're talking about the administration's rebate rule now — found that approximately 17% of beneficiaries will see savings at the pharmacy counter as a result of this rule. Can you tell me a little bit more about who these people are? And what kind of conditions do they have? William Fleming: Senator, there will be a number of members who are taking brand drugs for which we get rebates and so it could vary all the way from the common chronic conditions, things like diabetes or hypertension or high cholesterol, all the way over to occasionally, not usually, but occasionally on the specialty drug side. When you think of some medications like treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, places where there's competition. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

united states american director community president donald trump health house mother secret guide law change americans new york times child deep joe biden ms executive director data board vice president owner guns price cost healthcare north forbes competition md va republicans washington post effects wall street journal flash npr abuse poland drug senators ukrainian pfizer senior vice president insider donations chief executive officer cnbc national association jd medicare bach astrazeneca fraser medicaid brief history humana removal cvs fleming incorporating big pharma cms demise pharmacists forcing general counsel justice department colleagues lowering johnson johnson roughly health policy janssen clerk miami herald law offices house committees cbo roll call dvm aetna sanofi senate committee hwy pharm congressional budget office chief clinical officer cvs health open secrets certain point part d american prospect mapp kaiser family foundation pbm chuck grassley health care services senate finance committee optum goodrx ron wyden pbms medicare part d drug pricing unitedhealth assistant general counsel david dayen proposed rule commonwealth fund express scripts bookforum congressional dish music alley social security act pharmacy benefit managers pcma isakson sego chief executive office janssen pharmaceuticals crestview formulary jeff byers former executive vice president borla health insurance coverage healthcare finance pharmacy times annie karni optumrx abbvie inc cover art design david ippolito marty schladen
Anticipating The Unintended
#177 We See What We Want to See

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 22:49


Global Policy Watch #1: How the Sri Lankan Economy UnraveledInsights on policy issues making news around the world— RSJWhat people do when they storm palaces is broadly instructive about what comes next.In 1792, the French insurgents determined to end whatever remained of the ancien regime stormed the palace of Tuileries and confronted the Swiss Guards who were defending the palace on the orders of Louis XVI. Blood, gore and massacre followed, at the end of which about eleven hundred combatants were killed. These included, as J.M. Thomson wrote in his history of the French Revolution:..common citizens from every branch of the trading and working classes of Paris, including hair-dressers, harness-makers, carpenters, joiners, house-painters, tailors, hatters, boot-makers, locksmiths, laundry-men, and domestic servants.The Bolsheviks were not to be outdone on the night of October 25, 1917, when they assaulted the Winter Palace at St. Petersburg on the orders of Lenin. The insurrectionists barely met with any resistance from the yunkers, the Cossacks and the women’s battalion guarding the palace. To quote John Reed from Ten Days That Shook The World (1935):On both sides of the main gateway the doors stood wide open, light streamed out and from the huge pile came not the slightest sound. Carried along by the eager wave of men, we were swept into the right hand entrance, opening into a great bare vaulted room, the cellar of the East wing, from which issued a maze of corridors and stair-cases. ...One man went strutting around with a bronze clock perched on his shoulder; another found a plume of ostrich feathers, which he stuck in his hat. The looting was just beginning when somebody cried, ‘Comrades! Don't touch anything! Don't take anything! This is the property of the People!’ Immediately twenty voices were crying, ‘Stop! Put everything back! Don't take anything! Property of the People!’ Many hands dragged the spoilers down. Damask and tapestry were snatched from the arms of those who had them; two men took away the bronze clock. Roughly and hastily the things were crammed back in their cases, and self-appointed sentinels stood guard. It was all utterly spontaneous. Through corridors and up stair-cases the cry could be heard growing fainter and fainter in the distance, ‘Revolutionary discipline! Property of the People.’The Filipinos did things a bit differently on Feb 24, 1986. As this news report suggests:It started with a rock fight, then the gate was opened for a few photographers and the crowd pushed through into the palace the Marcos family occupied for 20 years, shouting and grabbing anything they could carry. They snatched clothes, shoes, perfume, monogrammed towels. Some wolfed food from the table at which Ferdinand E. Marcos and his family had dined before leaving in American helicopters for Clark Air Base and flight from the country.Thousands of people were outside Malacanang Palace when the photographers arrived Tuesday night. Supporters of Corazon Aquino, who became president when Marcos fled, and Marcos loyalists started throwing rocks at each other.They rushed through the gate, turning left to the administration building or right to the living quarters. Marcos loyalists followed them. The fights and looting started. Cheering, the rioters climbed on top of three tanks. One grabbed an ammunition belt. Others took guns.Cut to present-day Sri Lanka. It has a foreign debt of over US$ 50 billion. Its foreign exchange reserves are about US$ 50 million. Inflation is running at over 50 per cent. The Sri Lankan Rupee has fallen by 80 per cent since the start of the year. What’s worse is that no one knows who is keeping score.Former President Gotabaya Rajapaksa fled the country this week. Right now, he is in Singapore negotiating his asylum with friendly countries in the middle-east (why not China?). His brothers couldn’t get out of Sri Lanka in time. Gotabaya’s military plane didn’t possibly have space for two more passengers. Blood is thinner than aviation fuel. The other forty-odd members of the clan who hold various constitutional and government posts have gone into hiding. The time was ripe for an attack on the Presidential palace. And it happened, as they say, duly. But this is how the Lankans did the storming (Photos: Arun Sankar/AFP)​To misquote Tolstoy: happy citizens are all alike. Unhappy citizens are unhappy in different ways.Though unhappy, Sri Lankans look suspiciously upbeat here. So, one thing can be said for sure. There won’t be a revolution in Sri Lanka. The Lankans are a resilient, patient and easygoing lot. They have endured tough times in the past four decades. Now that the Rajapaksas are out of the frame, a national government is likely to be formed; a deal might get worked out with the multilateral agencies involving restructuring of debt, fresh borrowings from friendly countries, and prolonged pain of austerity for the rest of the decade. They will probably muddle through as they have done for much of their independent history. That apart, it is useful to appreciate how Sri Lanka ended up here. There are public policy lessons there.  There are two lenses to apply. The first is the structural weakness in the Sri Lankan economy that has persisted for a long time. Then there is the proximate cause of the recent past that led to sovereign debt default and bankruptcy. We will examine both here.The Achilles' HeelIn 1948, the British left Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) with an economy that was quite similar to the many similar resource rich nations of the time. Manufacturing was non-existent, banking services were limited to a couple of cities and the mainstay of the economy was the exports of tea and rubber which were vulnerable to commodity cycles. However, it started with a good base of foreign reserve surplus that could cover imports for over a year. With this starting point, the obvious policy measures should have came into play. One, develop a manufacturing sector (public and private) that stimulates growth in the economy and reduces the dependency on imports of intermediates and finished products. Two, to develop the banking sector and create development finance institutions that could provide credit for this transition in the economy. Neither happened. In fact, the focus on the plantation economy deepened in the decade after independence. The foreign reserve surplus soon turned to a deficit as Sri Lanka continued to import higher-value goods, and the government found it difficult to raise revenues to support its spends as its population increased. By the mid-60s, Sri Lanka was contending with both a fiscal deficit and a current account deficit. The classic twin deficit pincer that low-income economies get caught in. Over the last six decades, it has struggled to come out of it. The reasons could be many - lack of domestic savings, absence of development finance institutions, inability to attract other sources of foreign capital like direct investment instead of debt and political instability and a long civil war that didn’t help the economy. Things didn’t go badly for Sri Lanka only in the last few years. Its economy was always fragile, as the seventeen different IMF bailout packages that started in 1965 indicate. See the table below for the history of IMF bailouts (SDR = Special Drawing Rights).The comparison with India during the same period is useful. India chose the more inefficient state-led industrialisation and capital creation model and overdid it by the 70s with the nationalisation of the banks. But it led to the creation of a manufacturing sector and the availability of credit. India also created relatively strong institutions for a developing economy during that time. That meant we avoided a sovereign debt default scenario till 1991. The Indian state, after having generated the initial impetus, should have gotten out of most of these areas by the mid to late 70s. But that’s another story. Sri Lanka never built that core capacity, nor did it follow the model of the ‘tiger’ economies of creating national champions in select sectors. In the early 80s it ‘opened’ its economy on the behest of the IMF that made these conditions collateral for further bailouts. The dismantling of duties and exchange controls made Sri Lanka even more dependent on imports as its nascent industries couldn’t compete with the foreign goods flooding in. The twin deficit continued to worsen and further de-industrialisation set in. There are things Sri Lanka is commended for during this time. It has the best HDI metrics in the region, with good quality healthcare and education available to its citizens. These should lead to better economic outcomes, provided the structural issues are addressed. That these metrics themselves were built on foreign debt makes their sustainability suspect. Over-indexing on one measure while avoiding a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis and the unintended consequences is an old public policy error.  Why did things go from bad to worse in the past few years? Two things happened. One, the composition of Sri Lankan debt changed for the worse. Sri Lanka issued international sovereign bonds (ISBs) at attractive coupons that got in global fund houses into the mix with more dollar-denominated debt. China, too, got into the game with large infrastructure projects that have ended up as the proverbial white elephants. The chart below shows how its foreign debt stood in 2021.The market borrowings now contributing to 47 per cent shot up in the last decade. This fresh source of funds further lulled the policymakers. The government continued to spend and feed domestic consumption without a plan to control the fiscal deficit while borrowing to build infrastructure and pay for imports. In 2019, Gotabaya came into power, promising to reverse these policies. But the ‘strong man syndrome’ took over. There were bold initiatives announced with minimal debates and understanding of likely scenarios that could emerge. Corporate taxes and VAT were slashed in the hope of an economic boost. That didn’t come because there wasn’t an industrial base that could take advantage of this. The fall in tax revenues widened the fiscal deficit and increased the government’s borrowing from the central bank. The pandemic hit tourism, a significant contributor to the economy and a source of precious foreign exchange. The widening current account deficit had to be controlled, leading to another bold idea. The government announced an overnight transition to organic farming and banned the import of synthetic fertilisers and pesticides. There was no real conviction to organic farming here. It was just a means to reduce the import burden and bring the current account deficit under control. The consequences were disastrous. Paddy production fell over 20 per cent, and there was an immediate food shortage. Tea production suffered, and exports fell. Then the Ukraine war sent oil beyond US$ 100 a barrel, which was the last straw. The central bank supplied over US$ 2 billion in the past 12 months to import essential items. But eventually, they all ran out of runway. And we got here.Of course, Sri Lanka's historical structural weakness is a factor to blame for its troubles. But you cannot take away the hubris of strong man decision-making that aggravated its situation in the last three years. Policy-making requires debates, scenario planning, anticipating the consequences and above all, strong institutions to take an independent, objective view of decisions. Bypassing them and going by instinct might seem like strong leadership, but the odds are stacked against good outcomes coming from them. Matsyanyaaya: Ignorance Breeds BiasBig fish eating small fish = Foreign Policy in action— Pranay KotasthaneWhen our level of understanding of another country is poor, we resort to cognitive shortcuts to make sense of the news coming from there. We interpret happenings in a way that reaffirms our current fears, hopes, and anxieties.While parsing information about a stronger adversary, we start with a sense of awe. When a weaker adversary makes it to the headlines, we start from a position of derision. Similarly, when we interpret information from a stronger ally, we amplify news that shows us in good light with respect to the ally. As for a weaker ally, our starting point is self-aggrandisement.Excessive reliance on these cognitive blinkers indicates that we don’t know enough about another country. And since we don’t know enough, we cannot differentiate between trash takes and informed opinions, rumours and facts, and between motivated actions and serendipity. It is easy to see these blinkers in action on social media discussions on Indian foreign policy issues.Take, for instance, what happened in the US earlier this week. House Rep Ro Khanna proposed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act 2023. Amongst other things, the amendment had these lines: While India faces immediate needs to maintain its heavily Russian-built weapons systems, a waiver to sanctions under the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act during this transition period is in the best interests of the United States and the United States-India defense partnership to deter aggressors in light of Russia and China’s close partnership.The House passed the amendment. Immediately, Indian media and commentariat pronounced that the US had given India a CAATSA waiver. My first reaction was no different. I realised later that this amendment only urges the Biden administration to provide India with a CAATSA waiver since the authority to take this decision lies with the executive branch. Unsurprisingly, there’s not a single mention of this amendment in the top American newspapers (I checked WSJ, WaPo, and NYT). Still, we had already given ourselves a strategically autonomous pat-on-the-back here in India. There are several other instances as well. In Feb 2018, a 26-member committee of the Pakistani Senate passed a resolution for the promotion of the Chinese language in Pakistan. Within minutes, Indian media was reporting that Pakistan has made Mandarin an official language of Pakistan! Someone just picked up a piece of bad news reporting from a Pakistani YouTube channel and assumed the worst. The sense of ridicule was almost instantaneous, and few stopped to consider how the official language of a State could be decided by a Senate Committee consisting of 20-odd members?Of course, these cognitive shortcuts are the easiest to find in Indian discussions on China. Because we understand so little about its culture, language, and politics, we almost always solely rely on our preconceived notions. So, we are absolutely confident that the Sri Lankan economy faltered only because of China’s debt-trap diplomacy, that China’s already deployed AI for advanced decision-making in military systems, or that China’s social credit system is a real-life incarnation of the Black Mirror episode, Nosedive. The reality is quite different, but these narratives occupy prime positions in our discourse. Can we train ourselves to not succumb to these cognitive shortcuts? Perhaps. Political Scientist Yiqin Fu has a really good solution set in the context of poor understanding of China in the US. She proposes four ways out:Tying more of one’s payoffs to what is happening in the target country as opposed to how news from the target country makes you feel would incentive you to form more accurate beliefs. Participating in online prediction markets or having some exposure to the target country’s financial markets would be a concrete example.The ultimate solution is to expand your knowledge.. as you can so that you are qualified to judge a wider pool of sellers (commentators).. A realistic approach could be talking to friends or following people with different skill profiles. Together you would be capable of evaluating commentary on a broader set of issues.Give more weight to commentary that uses systematic evidence… where applicable, the quality of commentary that cites systematic evidence is generally superior to those that do not.People on the knowledge frontier of any given issue bear special responsibility to amplify analyses they find reasonable, including those that reach conclusions they disagree with. On issues at the intersection of many niche areas, the average consumer has no way of distinguishing between analyses that are “reasonable but different from mine” and those that “rely on complete falsehoods.” So experts ought to share all commentary they find reasonable, regardless of how much they agree with the conclusion. As a footnote, its useful to consider that the “CAATSA has been waived off” cognitive shortcut indicates one of two things:some of us are intuitively assuming that US domestic politics has a better appreciation of India’s worldview. And hence, we are ready to jump to the conclusion that the US has already waived off these sanctions. We are seeing what we want to see. Given the chequered past of the US-India relationship, even this mistaken assumption is a positive sign.However, I think most people are intuitively assuming that India is entitled to a waiver. A lot of Indians are convinced that the US cannot counter China without India on its side. And so, they interpreted the CAATSA amendment news as a reaffirmation of India’s global importance.It is also interesting to consider if these mistaken assumptions will impact the Biden administration’s calculus on the waiver. Since many Indians are already convinced that India has got a CAATSA waiver, can it now afford to impose sanctions? The answer, of course, depends on a whole lot of other factors. Nevertheless, our cognitive shortcuts about another country reveal a lot about ourselves. Course Advertisement: Admissions for the Sept 2022 cohort of Takshashila’s Graduate Certificate in Public Policy programme are now open! Apply by 23rd July for a 10% early bird scholarship. Visit this link to apply.A Framework a Week: Things Governments DoTools for thinking public policy— Pranay Kotasthane(This post was first published in March 2018 on Indian National Interest)A typology of government actions can be extremely helpful. Faced with a policy problem, such a typology can serve as a menu of actions that governments can respond with. Various policy solutions can then be seen in this comparative framework:might action X be the better way to solve this policy problem?why would the government employ action X over other actions?what are the disadvantages of using action X over other actions?Surprisingly, I came across only a few typologies of government actions. One by Michael O’Hare and the other by Eugene Bardach.O’Hare’s 1989 paper A Typology of Government Action says: all legitimate government behaviour can be classified in eight classes.Note how this classification does not include things like laws, rules, and procedures — actions that we associate most commonly with a government. The reason is that these three are methods to implement the chosen government action. As such, a law can be a chosen method for many government actions: to prohibit (example: Prohibition of Child Marriage Act, 2006), to tax (example: Income Tax Act, 1961) and to subsidise (example: the Hajj Committee Act, 1959).Eugene Bardach’s typology in A Practical Guide for Policy Analysis is the second one I came across. It classifies government actions into these categories:1. Taxes (add, abolish, change rates, tax an externality)2. Regulation (entry, exit, output, price, and service levels)3. Subsidies and Grants (add, abolish, change formula)4. Service Provision (add, expand, organise outreach, reduce transaction costs)5. Agency budgets (add, cut, hold to last year’s level)6. Information (require disclosure, govt rating, standardise display)7. Structure of Private Rights (contract rights, liability duties, corporate law)8. Framework of Economic Activity (control/decontrol prices, wages, and profits) 9. Education and Consultation (Change values, upgrade skills, warn of hazards) 10. Financing and Contracting (leasing, redesigning bidding systems, dismantle PSU) 11. Bureaucratic and Political ReformsHomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters[Article] Ajay Shah on improving resilience against extreme surges in demand.[Blog] Noah Smith has an excellent post on the Sri Lankan economic crisis.[Book] Carrots, Sticks and Sermons — another useful classification of policy instruments This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John encourages and talks about how to take your pleasure seriously. Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Police Off The Cuff
Sharks biting people on Long Island

Police Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 58:21


Sharks biting people Long Island #Sharkattacks #LongIsland #Sharks # DronePatrols #SharkWeekFive shark attacks have been reported in the past two weeks off Long Island, N.Y., including two within hours Wednesday, a dramatic increase in shark encounters that officials there said may represent a “new normal.” Four of the reported attacks took place on Fire Island in Suffolk County, including two at the popular Smith Point Beach and two near the village of Ocean Beach. The fifth was reported on Jones Beach Island in neighboring Nassau County. None of the victims were seriously injured, and the sharks sighted were estimated to be four to five feet in length, officials said. Shark sightings have been increasing off U.S. coasts, which scientists attribute to successful conservation efforts that have restored populations closer to historical levels. Still, the recent spate of attacks was highly unusual — there were only 47 confirmed unprovoked attacks nationwide in 2021, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History's International Shark Attack File. “This is not something that is precedented in any way in our history here in Suffolk County,” Suffolk County Executive Steven Bellone said at a news conference Thursday. “Prior to July 3, we had not had a recorded shark bite at [Smith Point Beach] since it had opened, during beach hours, back in 1959.” Bellone said the county is deploying drones and increased lifeguard patrols to monitor the waters, acknowledging that the uptick may represent the “new normal.” “The idea of more frequent contact with these kind of sharks may be what we will be coming to expect,” Bellone said at a separate news conference Wednesday, ahead of the fifth attack. The first of the recent attacks took place June 30, when a 57-year-old man swimming at Jones Beach suffered a laceration on his right foot that paramedics identified as a “possible shark bite,” according to the Nassau County Police Department. Three days later, Zach Gallo, 33, a lifeguard at Smith Point Beach, was playing the role of a victim in a rescue training exercise when he became one himself, WABC reported. He felt a roughly four-foot shark whip him with its tail and then bite his hand, according to the station. “I felt pressure in my hand, pulled it back and I just started hammering, punching and I connected with the shark three times, and then on the third time it spun away,” Gallo told WABC. “I guess my adrenaline, survival instincts kicked in.” Gallo returned to work Thursday, saying at the news conference with Bellone that he was grateful his injuries were minor and that his fellow lifeguards came to his aid. “If you do go in the ocean, make sure you are going into an area that's protected by lifeguards,” Gallo said. On July 7, first-year lifeguard John Mullins, 17, was bitten on his foot while also playing the role of a victim during a training exercise near Ocean Beach, according to CBS New York. “The teeth were inside my skin and when I pulled my foot out, it kind of just felt like a scrape, like a rake going up my foot,” Mullins told the station. “We never expect to be attacked while we're training, but they handled it well.” Mullins received five stitches and was out of work while his foot healed, CBS New York reported. On Wednesday morning, a surfer was bitten by a roughly four-foot tiger shark, leaving a four-inch gash, according to Bellone. The man was knocked off his board and saw the shark circling back toward him, but a wave carried him into shore, Bellone said. Roughly 11 hours later, police were called to Seaview Beach after a 49-year-old Arizona man standing in “waist deep water” was bitten from behind on his left wrist and buttocks, according to Suffolk County police. He walked out of the water and was taken by helicopter to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening, police said.

Not Your Average Investor
218 | JWB's Property Of The Week - Brand New Construction & Located Roughly 5 Miles From $4.7 Billion In Downtown Jax Development

Not Your Average Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 64:14


JWB Co-Founder, Gregg Cohen will reveal his JWB turnkey property of the week, take questions from the audience, and share insights into the Jacksonville real estate market.This week's featured property...- is brand new construction- will deliver an est. 12% return on investment- is located roughly 5 miles from downtown Jax where there is currently over $4.7 billion in the development pipeline!Be the first to know which property Gregg recommends each week as we reveal it live on the show. This is your chance to pick the brain of an investor with 16 years of experience, that oversees $750M worth of assets, and genuinely wants to help you out.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John breaks down how he starts, tackles, and finishes his day.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ghosts-n-Heauxs
Roughly Spoken Elf Boys

Ghosts-n-Heauxs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 80:05


This week, Danielle covers Scotlands Queen of the Witches, Isobel Gowdie, while Zee shares the bizarre history of how mummies were used in the Victorian era, including Mummy Unwrapping parties. Stalk us here!Twitter - ghostsnheauxsInstagram - ghosts_n_heauxsFacebook - GhostsnHeauxsPodcastAnd don't forget to send your stories to ghostsnheauxs@gmail.com

The Big Run
"I am strong enough and I have everything I need" - Dispatches from the road - Danube Sea to Source with Kieran Alger - The Big Run Episode 101

The Big Run

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 15:28


Hello and welcome to a special edition mid-week dispatch courtesy of Keiran Alger aka Man v Miles as he tackles the Danube from Sea to Source. No mean feat. Roughly 2000 miles. A marathon or more, every day for two months.  Kieran kindly sent in this dispatch from day 14 of his epic adventure. In it he talks about being on high alert for wild dogs, the mantra's he swears by, how the body is holding up, the random kindness of strangers and how valuable moments of the sanctuary have been… Keiran is doing this to help raise money for poverty-impacted children to see the information below about how to donate and maybe even get involved.  1. DONATE TO THE CHARITIES: Kieran is raising money for poverty-impacted children worldwide. Even £1 can help give those children a better chance. All donations gratefully received. https://bit.ly/3xO4Kjo 2. THE ROUTE https://www.komoot.com/collection/1431715/-running-the-danube-sea-to-source 3. RUN WITH KIERAN Fancy joining a leg? Hit us up here in the comments or message Kieran on Instagram or Twitter (http://www.instagram.com/manvmiles  / http:///www.twitter.com/kieranalger). 4. MORE ABOUT THE CHALLENGE HERE: https://youtu.be/fiNNfiOXrl8 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thebigrunpodcast/message

Smart Property Investment Podcast Network
Protecting your portfolio from rate rises: RBA discussion with Finni Mortgages

Smart Property Investment Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 14:03


With the cost of living expenses rising across the country, doesn't it seem counterintuitive to add more pressure to Australians' wallets by increasing their mortgage payments? Paul Glossop, chief executive of finni.com.au, joins host Phil Tarrant to explain the economics behind the RBA's series of rate rises and why stifling consumer spending will benefit the Australian economy and, therefore, its residents, even if it comes with some interim financial pain. Roughly a third of Australians have a mortgage, so rate hikes are a major way of shaping spending behaviour and encouraging consumers to “tap the brakes”. But that doesn't mean that all property owners have to suffer under the current course of tightening. Paul explains that there are steps you can take to ensure your wider financial portfolio is still performing for you. The losers, he warns, will only be those who are lazy with their money. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts and by following Smart Property Investment on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you would like to get in touch with our team, email editor@smartpropertyinvestment.com.au for more insights, or hear your voice on the show by recording a question below.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John talks about the four food groups of life.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Disrupting Japan: Startups and Innovation in Japan
The dangerous defect in most SaaS startups

Disrupting Japan: Startups and Innovation in Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 42:24


You never hear the names of some of the world's best SaaS startups. Why waste money building awareness among consumers when you can quickly and steadily grow your B2B business across Japan then across Asia? Today Yu Taniguchi founder of TableCheck returns to the show and answers that question. TableCheck is rapidly expanding their table-management system business by throwing out a lot of the traditional SaaS playbook, and Yu lays out a model for sustainable, scalable SaaS startups. It's a great conversation, and I think you'll enjoy it. Show Notes How the TMS market has changed in the last five years Why the first mover advantage is not really an advantage Maintaining differentiation in an increasingly competitive market The huge flaw in the current generation of SaaS "best practices" Demand-side vs supply-side startups Why you should only take the VC investment that you actually (desperately) need Why Japanese (and otter) startups need to be thinking about global markets from day 1 Concrete (and sad) examples of what's wrong with Japan's education system Links from the Founder Everything you ever wanted to know about TableCheck TableCheck Twitter @tablecheck LinkedIn Page TableCheck on Facebook Follow Yu on Instagram Friend him on Facebook Connect on LinkedIn Transcript Welcome to Disrupting Japan, straight talk from Japan's most successful entrepreneurs. I'm Tim Romero and thanks for joining me. Some of the most important and successful B2B startups fly under the radar. And that makes sense when you think about it.  When success depends on dominating a specific business niche, who really cares if most consumers have never heard of you? In fact, as we'll see, that can actually put your whole startup at risk. Today, Yu Taniguchi, old friend and founder of TableCheck joins us again on Disrupting Japan.  Now, TableCheck makes a table management solution for restaurants, and Yu and the team have taken a very different approach than most of the competition in this space.  The last time Yu came on the show, we talked about his business model and how to expand globally with very little capital. There's a link to the episode in the show notes, and I strongly recommend you listen to it because it was really a good one and we'll be covering a hundred percent new ground today. Today, as we catch up with Yu, we find his strategy has worked with some refinements, and TableCheck is expanding rapidly across APAC.  This is a great real world case study of how Japanese startups can go global. Yu and I also talk about how the current generation of SaaS business models is broken, how to protect your startup from market downturns, and some really good advice about the two kinds of fundraising plans you need to have to survive.  But you know, Yu tells that story much better than I can, so let's get right to the interview.  Interview  Tim: We're sitting here with Yu Taniguchi of TableCheck, who is making integrated reservations, CRM billing and more for restaurants. Yu, it is so good to have you back again. Thanks for sitting down with us. Yu: Thank you so much for inviting me. I'm very honored and excited to be here. Tim: It's been four and a half years since you were last on the show and so much has changed since then. You were growing fast then, you've continued to, so tell me about your customers today. Who's using TableCheck and how many are there now? Yu: We have roughly 7,000 restaurants using our solution both in Japan and overseas. Back then when we did the interview, I think it was around 2,000 restaurants. Roughly we've more than tripled since then and taking in consideration that out of the four years, two years have been during the COVID. Tim: Let's talk about what's changed in the market. Four and a half years ago, you were saying that your biggest competition was paper and pencil. Most of your customers were using these manual processes,

Rampant Discourse
084 - Wealth Inequality

Rampant Discourse

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 120:22


Roughly a year ago, the Rampant Discourse crew had a spirited email discussion that was sparked by two articles on the topic of wealth inequality. One of the articles was a ProPublica article about how the wealthy lower their tax bills, and the other was a Bloomberg article about how the 90% are borrowing from the 1%. We decided we had enough differences of opinion that it could make for an interesting podcast. The end result was two hours of content, so whether or not it is interesting, at least it's long. Sorry for sitting on this for so long, but we hope you enjoy it. Continue the discourse on our website, Discord, Twitter, and Facebook.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John gives his step by step guide on what to do if you're going through a break-up.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ShadowTalk by Digital Shadows
Weekly: Chinese Data Leaked, Crypto Scam Targets British Army, Bug Bounty Reports Insider Threat

ShadowTalk by Digital Shadows

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 35:38


ShadowTalk host Stefano alongside Dani bring you the latest in threat intelligence. This week they cover: * Roughly 1 billion Chinese citizens' data breached * British Army's Youtube and Twitter accounts hacked and used to promote cryptocurrency scams * HackerOne employee steals bug reports to sell ***Resources from this week's podcast*** What We're Reading This Month: June 2022 https://www.digitalshadows.com/blog-and-research/what-were-reading-this-month-june-2022/ Hacker claims to have stolen 1 bln records of Chinese citizens from police https://www.reuters.com/world/china/hacker-claims-have-stolen-1-bln-records-chinese-citizens-police-2022-07-04/ British Army's YouTube and Twitter accounts were hacked to promote crypto scams https://www.theverge.com/2022/7/3/23193668/british-army-youtube-twitter-accounts-hacked-promote-crypto-scam-fraud Rogue HackerOne employee steals bug reports to sell on the side https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/rogue-hackerone-employee-steals-bug-reports-to-sell-on-the-side/ Subscribe to our threat intelligence email: https://info.digitalshadows.com/SubscribetoEmail-Podcast_Reg.html Also, don't forget to reach out to - shadowtalk@digitalshadows.com - if you have any questions, comments, or suggestions for the next episodes.

St. Louis on the Air
Jason Kander's new book explores journey to 'post-traumatic growth'

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 26:29


Roughly two years after he came close to unseating U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, Jason Kander found himself checking into a Veterans Administration facility to get help for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. A day later, he would go public about leaving electoral politics to tend to his mental health — a journey Kander recounts in vivid and often startling detail in his new book, “Invisible Storm: A Soldier's Memoir of Politics and PTSD.”

Financial Survival Network
Time to Retire the Idea of Retirement? - Randy Sevcik #5549

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 18:08


Summary: If you don't change the way you're doing things, you may have to retire the idea of retirement. Thankfully, Randy Sevcik has great advice about how to better plan/manage your retirement. In order to plan for the future, it's important to consider the psychology behind what has brought us to the current point in the economy. Randy helps clients build timelines by looking at each individual investment, and then creating a strategic plan for balancing income and growth as someone gets closer to retirement. Tune in for more insight. Highlights: -There has been madness in the markets; we knew this was coming, but it still has a large impact on us -You have to look into the psychology of what has brought us to this point -Roughly 10,000 citizens are retiring every day, and it will stay like this for the next 8-9 years -For the first time, half of our population will be at or in retirement -This isn't going to be your typical recessionary or inflation period because the psychology behind it is different -Most of the money in the market comes from people aged 55 and older -Randy builds timelines by looking at every single investment someone is going to do. As you move closer to retirement, you have to become more conservative and be okay with missing out on potential growth -Some people are going to panic and purchase things that they shouldn't -Look at market sectors based on what's going on with the overall economy (i.e. energy) -To get through the emotional part of it, it's important to trust the math and map out your plan quantitatively -It's also crucial to balance income and growth -The people fixing the problem must admit there's a problem Useful Links: Financial Survival Network Elite Group Retirement Services

Marketplace All-in-One
That “inflation relief” money could drive prices higher

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 28:05


Roughly a dozen states are giving out tax rebates to ease the impact of inflation on their residents. Some economists are critical, saying more money to spend could make the problem worse. Plus, how long it’ll take to see oil from drilling on federal lands, how credit score algorithms exacerbate inequality and who ultimately foots the bill for a new Walmart transportation fee.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal
That “inflation relief” money could drive prices higher

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 28:05


Roughly a dozen states are giving out tax rebates to ease the impact of inflation on their residents. Some economists are critical, saying more money to spend could make the problem worse. Plus, how long it’ll take to see oil from drilling on federal lands, how credit score algorithms exacerbate inequality and who ultimately foots the bill for a new Walmart transportation fee.

Hawaii News Now
This is Now (July 6, 2022)

Hawaii News Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 24:30


Lt. Gov. Josh Green continues to enjoy a commanding lead in the Democratic race for governor, while Congressman Kai Kahele and businesswoman Vicky Cayetano are in a distant second and third place, according to Honolulu Civil Beat/Hawaii News Now poll. Some 48% of Hawaii voters say they support Green. Meanwhile, 16% said they'd back Kahale and 15% said they planned to vote for Cayetano. Roughly 1 in 5 of those polled were still unsure who they planned to support. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sky News Daily
The hidden impacts of COVID

Sky News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 19:36


Roughly two million people in the UK are suffering from long COVID, according to estimates by the Office for National Statistics. Could it be behind the rise in ‘economically inactive' workers baffling economists? On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson speaks to Nicki Williams, who says long COVID has left her isolated and unable to work, and to the TUC, who are campaigning for long COVID to be recognised as a disability and for sufferers to be given more support in the office. Editor - Philly Beaumont Podcast producer - Rosie Gillott Interviews producer – Madeleine Drury

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John talks about how being in relationships are similar to being in recovery. Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
Sounds Profitable Publishes The Creators Report + 5 more stories for June 30, 2022

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 10:30


This week on The Download: Sounds Profitable publishes the Creators report. Slate is running provocative billboards for Slow Burn, Spotify turns its radar on podcasts, rising YouTube CPMs make the platform even more attractive for podcasters, and news organizations struggle to keep young folks around. Firstly, if you'll indulge us a bit of self-promotion, the first ever Sounds Profitable report has been delivered! On Tuesday Sounds Profitable hosted a first-of-its-kind presentation of The Creators. Here's how we billed it: “Sounds Profitable, in partnership with Edison Research, has put together the first credible study of the profile of podcast creators in America. This is an incredibly important benchmark in the history of podcasting and the first of many regular reports Sounds Profitable will be publishing to chart the future of the audio business.”  The Creators operates off a data sample of 617 people who fit the profile of having produced a podcast, were over the age of eighteen, and listened to podcasts weekly. The data was collected from Q2 2021 through Q1 of this year.  Some results put into sharp focus many assumed truths of the industry, as well as challenging others. The gender makeup of those polled showed sixty-nine percent of creators were men, twenty percentage points higher than the population of the United States. On that same token, the ethnicity spectrum shows podcasting has more diversity, with more representation of Black and Hispanic/Latino podcasters than the census reports as a national average.  These juicy stats and more are available at SoundsProfitable.com/thecreators, from the presentation's video to a spiffy 35-slide PDF of just the presentation, for you raw data nerds out there.  In an advertising campaign fitting of a flashy documentary, Slate is running a stealth billboard campaign for the current season of Slow Burn. From Ariel Shapiro's reporting on Tuesday's issue of Hot Pod:  “Slate is launching a provocative new campaign to promote its latest season of Slow Burn, which tells the story of Shirley Wheeler, the first woman convicted of manslaughter for getting an abortion. The outlet has placed billboards in states that now have some of the strictest abortion laws in the country urging passersby to “Defend Shirley Wheeler.” The billboards are up in seven states with deeply-entrenched anti-abortion sentiment that had trigger laws waiting for Roe v. Wade's nullification.  The same issue of Hot Pod also spotlighted the efforts of Earbuds Podcast Collective founder Arielle Nissenblatt to organize a massive campaign of podcasts running pre-roll message to advocate for abortion rights. Messages like the one you'll find at the beginning of this very episode. Hundreds of podcasters have signed on to the cause, including The Bechdel Cast, You Are Good, and legacy household name My Favorite Murder.  This Wednesday Spotify announced a podcast version of its RADAR program, originally created to spotlight up-and-coming artists on the music side of the app. RADAR Podcasters aims to get promising young podcasts in front of wider audiences with free exposure in-app. Each quarter Spotify's content editors in participating regions will select three podcasts to spotlight with the RADAR program. Podcast Editorial Lead Brianne O'Brien goes more into the rhetoric used:  “We'll focus on creators with shows that exhibit authenticity and inclusivity, give us a reason to keep listening, and educate and entertain.”  Currently the list of participating countries is fifteen, including thirteen countries in which English is not the default language. This is encouraging news for more big company recognition of podcasting's strengths outside the North American and UK English-speaking bubble. O'Brien seems passionate about the cause, too.   “My team, and Spotifiers more broadly, are podcast enthusiasts. So first and foremost, we really want to underscore the hard work that's being done by creators to take their podcast to the next level, but also to build those long-lasting relationships with their audience.” Little is given in the way of specific details outside of which countries will be involved and how many podcasts are being selected. For example: The paragraph dedicated to addressing how the program will measure success offers no concrete ways by which they'll measure success. The main drive seems to be that the program exists and those involved are excited to execute its ambitious mission.  Currently RADAR Podcaster will only spotlight podcasts hosted on Anchor. Big Green sees the utility in embracing its creators, but for now only creators who are wholly locked into the Spotify system.  Last Thursday Phoebe Bain of Marketing Brew revealed there's a reason most YouTubers are doing baked-in influencer ads these days, and that could be excellent news for podcasts.  “According to a new report that influencer marketing agency The Outloud Group shared exclusively with Marketing Brew, influencer CPMs went up across major verticals on YouTube—from beauty and fashion to education—in 2021.” One example given is from the YouTube mainstay of gaming. The median CPM for influencers who focused on gaming content was $54.68 in 2021. Now in 2022 it has climbed to $66.48. And gaming influencers aren't even in the top five fastest-growing genre CPMs in the Outloud chart. Bain quotes Outloud Group vice president Nycole Kelly on the topic of rising influencer rates in general, the group having come to the conclusion YouTube influencers are raising rates in general beyond CPMs.  Podcasting is trying to figure out the right way to blend YouTube impressions and podcast downloads. For some, podcast CPMs are a better bet, but MarketingBrew's chart shows Youtube ads sold directly by influencers exceed podcasting average CPM by quite a bit. Yet another reason for the video-agnostic producers to consider a video strategy for their podcasts.  Last Thursday Sara Guaglione of Digiday covered a recent panel at a Reuters event in which prominent execs and editors in the news world addressed a big issue: Young people aren't watching the news anymore.  “Roughly four out of 10 people under 35 years old – 42% – “sometimes or often actively avoid the news,” according to the 11th annual “Digital News Report” report conducted by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Albeit, that aversion is only slightly more acute than among those 35 years old and older, 36% of whom sometimes or often steer clear of the news.” Reasons for the drop in attention are numerous. The panel proposed several, including the draining effect of repetitive long-term events like politics or the pandemic. The under-35 demo is also cited as the one with the lowest amount of trust in established news organizations, and the percentage who outright distrust the media is growing rapidly.  Legacy institutions are scrambling to solve for the growing problem. Guaglione points to places like the Los Angeles Times creating a team of people whose sole mission is to repackage LA Times content for Instagram.  We bring this story to The Download because a significant portion of podcasting is news. Just because we're the cool new kids on the content block doesn't mean the issues affecting the rest of the journalism industry haven't taken root here as well, and the proposed solutions to fix the issue for online and print orgs likely contain useful strategies for podcasting.  Now it's time for our semi-recurring segment spotlighting articles worth reading that didn't quite make it into the episode. This week The Download has just one to recommend, but it makes an excellent companion piece to the story Manuela just told you about.  Top 25 US newspaper circulations: Print Sales fall another 12% in 2022 by Willam Turvill. The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Evo Terra edited today's episode. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Download from Sounds Profitable
Sounds Profitable Publishes The Creators Report + 5 more stories for June 30, 2022

The Download from Sounds Profitable

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 10:30


This week on The Download: Sounds Profitable publishes the Creators report. Slate is running provocative billboards for Slow Burn, Spotify turns its radar on podcasts, rising YouTube CPMs make the platform even more attractive for podcasters, and news organizations struggle to keep young folks around. Firstly, if you'll indulge us a bit of self-promotion, the first ever Sounds Profitable report has been delivered! On Tuesday Sounds Profitable hosted a first-of-its-kind presentation of The Creators. Here's how we billed it: “Sounds Profitable, in partnership with Edison Research, has put together the first credible study of the profile of podcast creators in America. This is an incredibly important benchmark in the history of podcasting and the first of many regular reports Sounds Profitable will be publishing to chart the future of the audio business.”  The Creators operates off a data sample of 617 people who fit the profile of having produced a podcast, were over the age of eighteen, and listened to podcasts weekly. The data was collected from Q2 2021 through Q1 of this year.  Some results put into sharp focus many assumed truths of the industry, as well as challenging others. The gender makeup of those polled showed sixty-nine percent of creators were men, twenty percentage points higher than the population of the United States. On that same token, the ethnicity spectrum shows podcasting has more diversity, with more representation of Black and Hispanic/Latino podcasters than the census reports as a national average.  These juicy stats and more are available at SoundsProfitable.com/thecreators, from the presentation's video to a spiffy 35-slide PDF of just the presentation, for you raw data nerds out there.  In an advertising campaign fitting of a flashy documentary, Slate is running a stealth billboard campaign for the current season of Slow Burn. From Ariel Shapiro's reporting on Tuesday's issue of Hot Pod:  “Slate is launching a provocative new campaign to promote its latest season of Slow Burn, which tells the story of Shirley Wheeler, the first woman convicted of manslaughter for getting an abortion. The outlet has placed billboards in states that now have some of the strictest abortion laws in the country urging passersby to “Defend Shirley Wheeler.” The billboards are up in seven states with deeply-entrenched anti-abortion sentiment that had trigger laws waiting for Roe v. Wade's nullification.  The same issue of Hot Pod also spotlighted the efforts of Earbuds Podcast Collective founder Arielle Nissenblatt to organize a massive campaign of podcasts running pre-roll message to advocate for abortion rights. Messages like the one you'll find at the beginning of this very episode. Hundreds of podcasters have signed on to the cause, including The Bechdel Cast, You Are Good, and legacy household name My Favorite Murder.  This Wednesday Spotify announced a podcast version of its RADAR program, originally created to spotlight up-and-coming artists on the music side of the app. RADAR Podcasters aims to get promising young podcasts in front of wider audiences with free exposure in-app. Each quarter Spotify's content editors in participating regions will select three podcasts to spotlight with the RADAR program. Podcast Editorial Lead Brianne O'Brien goes more into the rhetoric used:  “We'll focus on creators with shows that exhibit authenticity and inclusivity, give us a reason to keep listening, and educate and entertain.”  Currently the list of participating countries is fifteen, including thirteen countries in which English is not the default language. This is encouraging news for more big company recognition of podcasting's strengths outside the North American and UK English-speaking bubble. O'Brien seems passionate about the cause, too.   “My team, and Spotifiers more broadly, are podcast enthusiasts. So first and foremost, we really want to underscore the hard work that's being done by creators to take their podcast to the next level, but also to build those long-lasting relationships with their audience.” Little is given in the way of specific details outside of which countries will be involved and how many podcasts are being selected. For example: The paragraph dedicated to addressing how the program will measure success offers no concrete ways by which they'll measure success. The main drive seems to be that the program exists and those involved are excited to execute its ambitious mission.  Currently RADAR Podcaster will only spotlight podcasts hosted on Anchor. Big Green sees the utility in embracing its creators, but for now only creators who are wholly locked into the Spotify system.  Last Thursday Phoebe Bain of Marketing Brew revealed there's a reason most YouTubers are doing baked-in influencer ads these days, and that could be excellent news for podcasts.  “According to a new report that influencer marketing agency The Outloud Group shared exclusively with Marketing Brew, influencer CPMs went up across major verticals on YouTube—from beauty and fashion to education—in 2021.” One example given is from the YouTube mainstay of gaming. The median CPM for influencers who focused on gaming content was $54.68 in 2021. Now in 2022 it has climbed to $66.48. And gaming influencers aren't even in the top five fastest-growing genre CPMs in the Outloud chart. Bain quotes Outloud Group vice president Nycole Kelly on the topic of rising influencer rates in general, the group having come to the conclusion YouTube influencers are raising rates in general beyond CPMs.  Podcasting is trying to figure out the right way to blend YouTube impressions and podcast downloads. For some, podcast CPMs are a better bet, but MarketingBrew's chart shows Youtube ads sold directly by influencers exceed podcasting average CPM by quite a bit. Yet another reason for the video-agnostic producers to consider a video strategy for their podcasts.  Last Thursday Sara Guaglione of Digiday covered a recent panel at a Reuters event in which prominent execs and editors in the news world addressed a big issue: Young people aren't watching the news anymore.  “Roughly four out of 10 people under 35 years old – 42% – “sometimes or often actively avoid the news,” according to the 11th annual “Digital News Report” report conducted by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. Albeit, that aversion is only slightly more acute than among those 35 years old and older, 36% of whom sometimes or often steer clear of the news.” Reasons for the drop in attention are numerous. The panel proposed several, including the draining effect of repetitive long-term events like politics or the pandemic. The under-35 demo is also cited as the one with the lowest amount of trust in established news organizations, and the percentage who outright distrust the media is growing rapidly.  Legacy institutions are scrambling to solve for the growing problem. Guaglione points to places like the Los Angeles Times creating a team of people whose sole mission is to repackage LA Times content for Instagram.  We bring this story to The Download because a significant portion of podcasting is news. Just because we're the cool new kids on the content block doesn't mean the issues affecting the rest of the journalism industry haven't taken root here as well, and the proposed solutions to fix the issue for online and print orgs likely contain useful strategies for podcasting.  Now it's time for our semi-recurring segment spotlighting articles worth reading that didn't quite make it into the episode. This week The Download has just one to recommend, but it makes an excellent companion piece to the story Manuela just told you about.  Top 25 US newspaper circulations: Print Sales fall another 12% in 2022 by Willam Turvill. The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Evo Terra edited today's episode. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Soundside
Pierce, King counties announce new safe parking lot programs for RVs and other vehicles

Soundside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 25:35


Roughly a third of those experiencing homelessness in the region live in their vehicles. Two new pilot programs will test the viability of supervised safe parking lots for those living in their vehicles, with aims to build a long term solution for homelessness around RVs and other vehicles.

KQED's The California Report
California Voters Get To Decide On Abortion Issue in November

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 17:11


In November, California voters will decide whether to enshrine a right to abortion in the state constitution, after the state Assembly voted on Monday to place the question on the November ballot. Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED While abortion in California will remain legal, and the state says it will champion reproductive freedoms, Arizona is looking to enact some of the most draconian abortion laws in the country. What does this mean for both states? Guest: Howard Fischer, Reporter Capitol Media Services in Arizona Los Angeles County has allocated $50 million to start making purchases for 5,000 affordable housing units to help families reduce two big expenses - housing and transportation. Reporter: Janaya Williams/KCRW  Undocumented immigrants, ages 26 to 49, will get health coverage beginning in 2024. Roughly 700-thousand people are expected to sign up – at a cost of about 2 billion dollars a year. Reporter: Tyche Hendricks, KQED Advocates are hopeful that Gov. Newsom's budget proposal will consider an increase wage replacement for workers who take time off to care for an ill relative, or bond with a new child. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED  

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John explains how to build your relationship with you.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bulwark Podcast
Greg Lukianoff: Democracy Can Handle Free Speech

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 59:34 Very Popular


Roughly 700 professors have been targeted for firing in recent years for something they said - an historic high. Yet, critics still say there's no such thing as cancel culture. Do Americans just have to shut up to keep their jobs? FIRE's Greg Lukianoff joins Charlie Sykes on today's podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John answers a listener's question: is it okay to peep our ex's social media? And is it okay if they peep ours?Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Science Friday
COVID Vaccines For Kids Under 5, IVF Status After Roe V. Wade. June 17, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 47:18 Very Popular


FDA Approves COVID Vaccines For Kids Under Five Parents of young kids may finally breathe a big sigh of relief. On Friday the FDA granted emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccines for kids under the age of five. The agency approved a two-dose regimen from biotech firm Moderna and three-dose regimen from Pfizer. Small children could begin getting vaccinated as early as next week. Umair Irfan, staff writer at Vox, joins Ira to talk about COVID vaccines for little kids, the largest forest fire in New Mexico's history and a Google engineer who claims an AI chatbot is sentient and more.     What Would Happen To IVF If Roe V. Wade Is Overturned? An overturn of Roe v. Wade could have rippling effects far beyond access to abortions. Some state laws designed to ban or severely restrict abortion could also disrupt the process of fertilizing, implanting, and freezing embryos used in in vitro fertilization. That's because some of these laws include language about life beginning at conception, raising questions about in vitro fertilization's (IVF) legality. Roughly 2% of all infants in the United States are born following the use of some form of artificial reproductive technology. While that figure might seem small, it's nearly double what it was just a decade ago. Ira talks with Stephanie Boys, associate professor of social work and adjunct professor of law at Indiana University, about the legal implications of an overturn of Roe v. Wade on IVF treatment. Later, Ira also interviews Dr. Marcelle Cedars, director of the division of reproductive endocrinology at UC San Francisco and president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, about the science behind IVF and what people often get wrong about when and how life begins.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John explains how to calm your nervous system,.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Angry Therapist Podcast: Ten Minutes of Self-Help, Therapy in a Shotglass for fans of Joe Rogan Experience

In this episode, John talks about the Polaroid Syndrome: looking back at old snapshots of your past relationships.Roughly ten minutes of self help in a shot glass. If you're looking for a wine glass, you've come to the wrong place. Marriage family therapist and best selling author, John Kim, shares his life and love revelations as well as insights from his sessions. He pulls the curtain back and documents his journey as a therapist but more importantly, as a human being. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Problematic Women
Betsy DeVos on Why Student Debt Cancellation Is ‘Not Fair'

Problematic Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 25:59


Roughly 45 million Americans owe a combined total of $1.7 trillion in student loan debt. If that were distributed evenly among the borrowers, each would owe close to $38,000. Over the past two years, the federal government has paused collection of student loan payments because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, some Americans contend the government should forgive student loan debt outright.But what would canceling a $1.7 trillion bill mean for the American people? “When we talk about this notion of forgiving student loans, what we're really talking about is benefiting those who don't necessarily need it,” Betsy DeVos, a former secretary of education, says. “And the ones who are going to be ultimately paying for it are those who've never attended college.” DeVos joins the “Problematic Women” podcast to explain how the Biden administration should—and should not—address rising student loan debt. She also addresses increasing concerns over the far left's influence on education. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The New Yorker: Politics and More
Jane Mayer and Evan Osnos on the New January 6th Revelations

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 26:14 Very Popular


For months, the House Select Committee on January 6th has examined Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election and cling to power. Roughly a thousand witnesses have been interviewed—including Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump. Tens of thousands of documents have also been reviewed, such as text messages from the former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. The committee held its first public hearing last night and presented some of what it has learned. Representative Jamie Raskin had promised that the findings would “blow the roof off the House.” The New Yorker's Washington correspondents Jane Mayer and Evan Osnos join guest host Susan Glasser to discuss the revelations.