Podcasts about cincinatti

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City in Ohio

  • 204PODCASTS
  • 244EPISODES
  • 52mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 11, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about cincinatti

Latest podcast episodes about cincinatti

Memories With A Beat
Get Better with Ed Cunard

Memories With A Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 25:07


Who loves karaoke??  Ed Cunard sure does...before the pandemic he had a 13-year streak of going to karaoke once a week!!!  Ed loves karaoke so much that he created a podcast and Facebook group for his podcast about karaoke!   Ed is a fan of lots of music but for this interview, he went with grunge folk-punk to discuss..."Get Better."  Oddly enough this is not a karaoke song so he only gets to perform it in the shower, his car, or one of his playlists that he creates to perform.  He just loves how the song points out that there's still time to do better because we aren't dead.  Ed dreams of being 70 years old and still performing karaoke! Full Show Notes

Can Crushers Wrestling Podcast
Fully Engulfed!!

Can Crushers Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 141:30


A short and sweet description this week, because the show is long and in-depth. Jenks and Mark start off  heated with the world off the WWE being turned upside down once again! They continue the heat with Full Gear 2021 predictions and a bet that could break the bank for one of them! Collar X Elbow - The Wrestling Brand Use promo code CanCrushers to save 10% off your order!Can Crusher Merch Check out our Can Crushers store to buy some merch!!!Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (http://paypal.me/cancrushers)

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Man and Fiancé Murdered in Their Sleep

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 41:33


It's been fifteen years since Judy Conley said good night to her son, then woke up to the news that he'd been murdered in his bed. Curtis Francis was gunned down along side his fiancé, Jennifer Burgette. No suspect has been named in the case, but there's lots of speculation in this rural Ohio community. The discovery of a well at the home where Francis was last seen, uncovered two weapons. Those weapons where lost when the fire department, working with police to recover the guns, blew out the bottom of the well. Investigative Reporter Jody Barr found a statement in another murder case, where the suspect offered information in exchange for a deal in his case. That information has not come into play in solving the Hopper Road murders.Joining Nancy Grace Today:Judy Conley - Curtis Francis' MotherAngela Montgomery - Cousin of Curtis Francis, justiceforcurtandjenny@yahoo.com, Facebook: "Justice For Curtis Francis and Jennifer Burgette"Troy Slaten - Los Angeles Criminal Defense Attorney, Slaten Lawyers, APC, Twitter @TroySlatenDr. Jorey Krawczyn - Police Psychologist, Adjunct Faculty with Saint Leo University; Research Consultant with Blue Wall Institute, Author: Operation S.O.S. - Practical Recommendations to Help “Stop Officer Suicide,” bw-institute.comJoe Scott Morgan - Professor of Forensics Jacksonville State University, Author, "Blood Beneath My Feet", Featured on "The Piketon Massacre: Return to Pike County" on iHeartRadioJody Barr - Chief Investigator, FOX 46 Charlotte, NC, former investigative reporter FOX 19 Cincinatti, OH, Facebook: "Jody Barr KXAN", Twitter: @JodyBarrSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Battle Red Blog: for Houston Texans fans
Houston Texans Podcast: 2021 Week Nine NFL Preview

Battle Red Blog: for Houston Texans fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 91:45


Beans are one of my favorite foods. I get a pound of black beans, lime juice, jalepeno, and onion, toss it in the Instapot, then wait a hour. I get a pound of pinto beans, bacon, barbecue sauce, jalapeno, onion, and toss it in the Instapot, then wait a hour. I'll add them to ground beef, or quinoa, or eggs, or eat them plain. High in fiber and protein, low calorie, it's the perfect food. So when the first cold front finally comes in, and there are logs in the fire, and the air conditioning finally off. I make a pound of kidney beans, get out the big silver pot, and make chili. I love beans. I love chili. I put the beans in my chili, and the beans are my favorite part. Simple as. Deal with it. On this episode of Battle Red Radio, Matt Weston and his good friend Taylor preview week nine of the NFL season. Topics include: hating the Antichrist who took Derrick Henry and Jamies Winston from us, the current playoff picture, WOOO SUPER BOWL WOOO TYROD TAYLOR, the numerous issues plaguing the Miami Dolphins, doing the disgusting and appreciating the Dallas Cowboys, Teddy Bridgewater is a top ten quarterback this year, Odell being done with Baker, Cincinatti exhaustion, if Jordan Love is a real quarterback, and the Chiefs being as obnoxious as Jackson Mahomes. Let's start the show. While you're at it, give it a five star review and subscribe below: You can subscribe/listen on iTunes here. You can subscribe/listen on Spotify here. You can subscribe/listen on Stitcher here. You can subscribe/listen on Google here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Recruiting Great Talent with Ryan Clo and Virtual Tour of Dubwerx [AW 077]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 24:46


https://youtu.be/JLR-erM0fis Guest host Ryan Clo, Dubwerx, Cincinnati OH and see this shop in Cincinatti, OH We're going to talk about recruiting after covid. Recruiting is a topic I'm passionate about in general since our people are everything but also the landscape is changing post-covid  I think a few critical pieces of the recruiting puzzle. I mean, first and foremost is the shop itself, you know, does your shop present well? Is it clean? Are the staff there? Good? Is the reputation good? If I was going to consider working for your shop, I would probably Google it. I might drive by, especially if this person has a family and you're going to support that family. The ad that you place, the particular words that you use. It's marketing and sales. Uh, are those going to attract, you know, the people, when you have applicants?  I think money's important and we always have to get to that. They might say something like, I just need to take care of my family, or I really want to work with good people. I love cars. I want a place that I can advance. That's a really good point because some shops have room for advance and sometimes that's a challenge, but I really want to get an idea of all of those things. And is this position, cause you might want them, you might really want them and they might be qualified if they're not going to be happy at your. Former employers are really countering hard. And they had given this guy 30 days, even after he left there, like 30 days, you change your mind, you won't lose. And the whole time he's there, you know, not making me be quite as many hours as he did. He didn't want to stick it out. And he went back to what was safe. Connect with the show: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partner: Dorman gives people greater freedom to fix vehicles by constantly developing new repair solutions that put owners and technicians first. By always innovating, Dorman has led the way in growing the aftermarket. Here you will see a few examples of a Dorman OE Fix. An OE FIX is a Dorman repair solution you can't get from the original equipment manufacturer. It means they found a situation where they believe the OEM wasn't giving repair professionals what they wanted, so we fixed it. Everything Dorman does is centered around providing customer value, both in the quality of products, and the creativity of solutions. Our engineers and designers go out of their way to save repair technicians time and save vehicle owners money. Want to really go under the hood? Take the Dorman Virtual Tour athttp://www.dormanproducts.com/Tour ( www.DormanProducts.com/Tour)

Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris
Can the Gators upset the Bulldogs? Plus week 9 college football and NFL preview

Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 40:02


In episode 203 of Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris, Rob and Kristie start the episode discussing the Sixers situation. Then they preview this weekends college football games discussing several of the top 25 teams matchups. They predict who will win the Gators versus Dawgs matchu, UCF versus Temple, plus many more. They also breakdown some of Urban Meyer's recent comments from his press conference. The discuss Mike Tomlin's recent comments about USC rumors and debagte whether James Franklin will be the next Trojans head coach. Kriatie also shares her concerns with the AP topp 25 this week and Rob asks will Cincinatti be in our out of the top 4 in the initial College Football Playoof rankings? Then they preview the Jags, Dolphins, and Bucs games this weekend. Be sure to listen so you know who will be this weekends winners and who will be losers. As always Rob and Kristie end the episode with trivia and a would you rather. If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe, rate, and tell your friends or anyone you think would enjoy our podcast. Text or leave voice messages for us at (407)494-6420 and we may read or play them on the next episode.

The Jimmy Smith Show
Is Tom Brady Due For Another Huge Performance In The NFL? Gerard Condon From Reading The Play Gives Jimmy His Tips! 27/10/21

The Jimmy Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 9:01


The Reese Waters Show
Reese Talks College Football With Bill Bender

The Reese Waters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 24:43


How long will Cincinatti be in the mix? How good are name brand teams with one loss? There is much to discuss with the great Bill Bender of Sporting News.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris
Ed Orgeron is out at LSU. Plus Love It or Flush it football edition

Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:43


In episode 200 of Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris, Rob and Kristie start the episode reacting to Josh's wicked awesome rant. Josh rants about the Jags versus Dolphins game and of course the Patriots and Cowboys game. Next, Rob and Kristie play love it or flush it. They cover several topics including the LSU versus Florida Gators game, Ed Orgeron not coming back to LSU next year, the UCF versus Cincinatti game, who will be the next LSU coach and of course the Jacksonville Jaguars versus the Miami Dolphins, plus more. Finally, as always Rob and Kristie end the episode with trivia and a would you rather. If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe, rate, and tell your friends or anyone you think would enjoy our podcast. Text or leave voice messages for us at (407)494-6420 and we may read or play them on the next episode.

Stiff Upper Lip
Season 3: Episode 8; How‘s the wives, Taysom? And 100 other jokes your Mormon friends will love - Week 5 Recap

Stiff Upper Lip

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 112:15


Ed, Tom, Max, and for the first time this season - Emma, are back to recap week 5's matchups and run down exactly what the hell was going on in London, Cincinatti, Las Vegas, and Jacksonville

VSiN Best Bets
The Lookahead | October 08, 2021 | Hour 2

VSiN Best Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 53:03


In the second hour of the Lookahead, host Scott Seidenberg welcomes VSIN host of the Greenzone Dave Ross to breakdown Fury vs Wilder III. Scott also dives into the marquee matchup in college football this weekend and discusses a possible let-down spot for Cincinatti after a big win vs Notre Dame last week. Scott also talks about his best bets for college football, and talks about penalties possibly being the difference in trusting teams to cover the spread. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

3rd and 20
College Football Week 5 + NFL Week 4 Reactions | 3rd and 20 Podcast Episode 68

3rd and 20

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 99:20


On this episode of the 3rd and 20 Podcast Frank Entwistle and Ryan Steed talk about the following topics: College Football Week 5 Reactions + Takeaways: Michigan vs Wisconsin: 0:18 Texas vs TCU: 5:51 Arkansas vs Georgia: 11:13 Wake Forest vs Louisville: 14:35 Pittsburgh vs Georgia Tech: 16:06 Notre Dame vs Cincinatti: 19:26 Florida vs Kentucky: 23:19 Stanford vs Oregon: 28:49 Alabama vs Ole Miss: 31:47 Baylor vs Oklahoma State: 33:19 Texas A&M vs Mississippi State: 35:53 Clemson vs Boston College: 37:19 Auburn vs LSU: 40:34 Arizona State vs UCLA: 45:02 Fresno State vs Hawaii: 47:20 NFL Week 4 Reactions + Takeaways: Giants vs Saints: 48:36 Chiefs vs Eagles: 54:27 Bills vs Texans: 58:50 Panthers vs Cowboys: 59:53 Browns vs Vikings: 1:02:52 Titans vs Jets: 1:06:26 Colts vs Dolphins: 1:12:43 Bears vs Lions: 1:08:18 Football Team vs Falcons: 1:14:44 Seahawks vs 49ers: 1:20:45 Cardinals vs Rams: 1:17:36 Ravens vs Broncos: 1:26:28 Buccaneers vs Patriots: 1:28:38 Raiders vs Chargers: 1:34:26 Watch the Episode on Youtube: https://youtu.be/ThxTQ17L4I8 Follow Us On: Twitter: https://twitter.com/3rdand20_/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/3rdand20podcast/ Check Out Our Website For More Content: https://3rdand20.com/

The Free Kick
Episode 134 - The Synergy Between The Union & Cincinnati Continues To Grow (feat. Brad Weigel)

The Free Kick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 50:22


With The Philadelphia Union taking on FC Cincinnati on Saturday, (10/9) Todd previews the upcoming game with one of the co-host/founders of Cincy Soccer Talk, Brad Weigel! Todd and Brad talk about the hiring of Chris Albright as the new GM of FC Cincinnati, and who are the coaches Cincinnati should look to bring in under Albright? They also talk about how Cincinnati's season could've gone differently if some of their draws would've been wins, and how do you find positives in a season that sees Cincy in last place for the third straight year?    A new era in Cincinnati: Cincinnati Hires Chris Albright: [4:41-15:22] Finding the next manager: [15:23-26:18] Players Cincinnati should target: [26:19-30:29] Cincinatti v Philadelphia: Cincinatti's form: [30:30-31:47] Positives in 2021: [31:48-34:57] Union's potential formation: [34:58-45:25]   Social Media: Twitter: @FreeKickPod Instagram: @FreeKickPod Facebook: @FreeKickPod http://thefreekickpodcast.com/   Brad's Social Media: Twitter: @bradleysweigel Twitter: @cincysoccertalk https://cincinnatisoccertalk.com/  

Daily Reflection Podcast
#204 Acceptance (Sept. 19th) - Heather B. (Cincinatti, OH)

Daily Reflection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 38:23


Join us as Heather B., from Cincinatti, OH, shares her story and experience around today's Daily Reflection entitled, Acceptance.ACCEPTANCEWe admitted we couldn't lick alcohol with our own remaining resources, and so we accepted the further fact that dependence upon a Higher Power (if only our A.A. group) could do this hitherto impossible job. The moment we were able to accept these facts fully, our release from the alcohol compulsion had begun.— AS BILL SEES IT, p. 109Freedom came to me only with my acceptance that I could turn my will and my life over to the care of my Higher Power, whom I call God. Serenity seeped into the chaos of my life when I accepted that what I was going through was life, and that God would help me through my difficulties – and much more, as well. Since then He has helped me through all of my difficulties! When I accept situations as they are, not as I wish them to be, then I can begin to grow and have serenity and peace of mind.From the book Daily ReflectionsCopyright © 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.Need the Daily Reflection Book?Visit our web siteRead about Recovery on our BlogVisit our Facebook GroupFollow us on TwitterSupport the Podcast:- On Patreon: https://patreon.com/dailyreflection- On PayPal: https://paypal.me/dailyreflectionIf you're struggling with alcohol or addiction, or wondering how to stop drinking it's helpful to know that there's a solution that has worked for millions of people. The Daily Reflection Podcast provides hope, and inspiration through the shared experiences of people that have found a way out. 

Minnesota Rundown
ARIF HASAN of The Athletic | Vikings Embarrassment, Cardinals Concerns, Gophers Week 2 + Big Test in CO | 9-15-21

Minnesota Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 67:40


On this episode of the Minnesota Rundown, we bring on Arif Hasan, Minnesota Vikings writer for the Athletic to discuss the embarrassment that was the Vikings in week 1, preview the concerns for the upcoming game against the Cardinals, the Gophers scary close-loss against Miami of Ohio, we look into the upcoming test against Colorado, talk why the Wild haven't locked up Kaprizov and more!Follow 10,000 Takes on Twitter: @10kTakes_Instagram: @10ktakesFacebook: 10,000 TakesTikTok: @10ktakesCheck out our website:www.10ktakesmn.com

Majompercek
Majompercek #28 - NFL Week 2 (közr. Kovács Bálint)

Majompercek

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 71:37


Túl vagyunk az első heti meccseken, ráadásul mindjárt meg is kezdődik a második forduló, úgyhogy itt a ropogós Majompercek podcast is!

Wrestling-infos.de Podcast
W-I.de Elite Hour – AEW Podcast: Dynamite vom 08.09. und Rampage vom 10.09.

Wrestling-infos.de Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 98:21


Nach dem Pay-Per-View ist vor dem Pay-Per-View. All Elite Wrestling ist sowohl für Dynamite als auch für Rampage zu Gast in Cincinatti, Ohio. Julian und Thorsten blicken auf die beiden Shows aus der Heimatstadt von Jon Moxley und Brian Pillman Jr. zurück.

Saúde
Saúde em dia - Covid-19: vacina para menores de 5 a 11 anos deve ser avaliada pela FDA em setembro

Saúde

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 5:05


A luta contra a Covid-19 deve ganhar novos aliados com a aprovação do uso emergencial da vacina Cominarty, produzida pela Pfizer/BioNTech, para menores de 5 a 11 anos de idade. Os dados devem estar disponíveis no final de setembro para análise da FDA, a agência de alimentos e medicamentos dos EUA. Os resultados para a utilização nas faixas etárias entre 6 meses e 5 anos devem ser divulgados na sequência, como indicou a empresa em um comunicado. Taíssa Stivanin, da RFI Segundo o laboratório americano, mais de 4.500 crianças com idades de 6 a 11 anos participam dos testes clínicos nos Estados Unidos, Finlândia, Polônia e Espanha. A empresa também pretende avaliar a aplicação da vacina em bebês de menos de seis meses. A farmacêutica lembra que os menores de 15 anos de idade representam 26% da população global. O pediatra americano Willie Ng, que tem mais de 40 anos de experiência e atua em uma clínica de Cincinatti, em Ohio, conversou com a RFI Brasil sobre a expectativa da chegada do imunizante que utiliza o RNA mensageiro ao país. Segundo o especialista em cardiologia infantil, nos Estados Unidos muitos pais aguardam com ansiedade a possibilidade de proteger seus filhos do SARS-CoV-2. Parte dos testes clínicos com a vacina são realizados em Cincinatti e alguns de seus jovens pacientes estão participando dos estudos, que visam avaliar, principalmente, a dose necessária para imunizar as crianças. A Covid-19 gera poucos casos graves em crianças abaixo de 11 anos de idade, afirma, mas vaciná-las será fundamental para o controle da epidemia. Isso fará com que o vírus circule menos e evitará o aparecimento de variantes que podem ser mais perigosas, inclusive para as próprias crianças. Em sua opinião, imunizar todas as faixas etárias também será a única maneira de continuar protegendo idosos e pessoas mais frágeis. Hoje, ressalta, são os não vacinados que contribuem para a circulação ativa do vírus. “Sou a favor da vacina para todas as crianças, até as mais jovens. Há muitos pais que acham que como os casos são leves na maioria, é melhor adquirir a imunidade natural. Acho que sempre há o risco de se ter um caso mais severo, ou desenvolver a Covid longa. Nunca se sabe, sempre é melhor prevenir”, afirma. Com o avanço da variante delta nos Estados Unidos, o número de infecções entre menores quintuplicou, mas sem provocar, proporcionalmente, mais casos graves. As complicações são dez vezes mais frequentes em adolescentes não vacinados, explica o pediatra americano. “Até agora, por sorte, a maioria dos casos são leves”, diz. “Mas se você permite que o vírus continue se replicando, vão aparecer outras variantes, que podem ser piores. É melhor tentar parar essa epidemia agora”, frisa. “A próxima criança pode pegar um vírus que vai mutar e gerar casos mais sérios”, alerta. As mutações são normais, lembra, e a chegada de uma nova cepa é questão de tempo. Por isso, reitera, todo mundo deve ser vacinado. "Minha recomendação é essa.” “Não existe vacina perfeita” O risco de eventuais efeitos colaterais graves provocados pela vacina, em uma população que geralmente registra infecções banais, tem gerado debate nos Estados Unidos. Foram relatados casos raros de miocardite, uma inflamação que atinge o músculo cardíaco, e de pericardite, que inflama o pericárdio, uma membrana que envolve o órgão. Segundo o jornal americano The New York Times, por conta disso, a Pfizer e a Moderna, que também realizam testes clínicos para o imunizante na faixa etária entre 5 a 11 anos, tiveram que incluir mais 3 mil crianças na pesquisa, a pedido da FDA. Essa precaução, reitera Willie Ng, não deve servir de argumento para impedir a imunização nessa faixa etária. “Não existe vacina perfeita. Temos que medir os prós e contras entre a vacina e a doença. Ainda acho que a possibilidade de ter uma complicação com a vacina é muito menor do que as chances de sofrer de uma forma grave da doença”, defendeu a pediatra, em entrevista à RFI Brasil. Na França, por exemplo, de acordo com os últimos divulgados em agosto pela Agência Nacional de Segurança dos Medicamentos, foram registradas 44.587 reações à Cominarty, nome comercial da vacina da Pfizer, em um total de 66.445.000 injeções. A maior parte delas sem gravidade. A presidente da Sociedade Francesa de Pediatria, Christèle Gras-Le Ghen, questiona a necessidade de vacinar as crianças menores. “O SARS-CoV-2, se circula entre as crianças e é benigno, não é motivo de preocupação. A preocupação de verdade é entre os adultos, que podem desenvolver uma forma grave. A solução é clara: vacinar os adultos que podem ir parar na UTI”, diz. Sobre a vacinação, a pediatra francesa diz que é preciso aguardar os dados definitivos sobre a eficácia da vacina e de seus efeitos colaterais em menores de 11 anos de idade, que ainda não foram publicados. “Do meu ponto de vista, a vacinação de crianças só faz sentido após a imunização de todos os adultos”, declara. “Os médicos que trabalham nas UTIs relatam que, em seus setores, recebem principalmente não vacinados”, conclui. 

Solomonster Sounds Off
Sound Off Supershow 9/10/21 - WWE SMACKDOWN + AEW RAMPAGE REVIEW!

Solomonster Sounds Off

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 122:00


Solomonster is back with a rare SUPERSHOW and reviews for both WWE Smackdown from Madison Square Garden and AEW Rampage from Cincinatti, OH.  Smackdown featured a tense face off between Brock Lesnar, Roman Reigns and Paul Heyman, as well as a PPV caliber rematch between Edge and Seth Rollins and the return of Finn Balor as THE DEMON.  Over on Rampage, Pac and Andre El Idolo had their match that was bumped off the All Out PPV, and we celebrate 65,000 subscribers on YouTube!

Solomonster Sounds Off
AEW Dynamite 9/8/21 Review - CM PUNK, BRYAN DANIELSON AND ADAM COLE APPEAR!

Solomonster Sounds Off

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 129:55


Solomonster reviews AEW Dynamite from Cincinatti for September 8th, featuring the hometown boy, Jon Moxley, stepping into the ring with MINORU SUZUKI of New Japan Pro Wrestling.  It also marks the start of a new era for AEW with the arrivals of CM Punk, Bryan Danielson and Adam Cole.  Plus, news on the PWI Top 500 and people freaking out over Kenny Omega being ranked #1 over Roman Reigns.

CLAVE DE ROCK
CLAVE DE ROCK T02C099 No te pierdas el final (05/09/2021)

CLAVE DE ROCK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 63:20


Emily Duff rockea toda la noche, entregando canciones conmovedoras que sondean las profundidades de nuestras emociones, incluso emociones tan básicas como las de Elliott Carson, no otras que las del rockandroll primitivo. Escuchamos también a los Heartless Bastards, desde Cincinatti con su sexto disco, música de raíces con la potente voz de Erika Wennerstrom y nos damos un descanso con Chris Daniels y sus colegas Hazel Miller y Dana Marsh, con dos fantásticas versiones del clásico de Albert King (aunque compuesto por William Bell y Booker T. Jones) y del no menos clásico de James Taylor, antes de volver al rockandroll con la sueca Janina Jade, o con el exguitarrista de Joan Jett Ricky Bird y con otra excelente pieza del rocker Willie Nile. Un recuerdo a las hermanas Lovell a ver si sacan disco pronto y un final de fiesta poppie con los The Yum Yums y su más reciente single, energético y juvenil y ¡hasta la semana que viene, peña!Emily Duff, Feelin' alrightEmily Duff, Go Fast, Dont DieElliott Carson & The Preacher Man, I Told Her Not to Do ItElliott Carson & The Preacher Man, Boy from TupeloHeartless Bastards, How LowHeartless Bastards, Parted WaysChris Daniels, Hazel Miller And Dana Marsh, Born Under A Bad SignChris Daniels, Hazel Miller And Dana Marsh, You've Got A FriendJanina Jade, Heart Of Rock N' RollJanina Jade, Before My Time Runs OutRicky Byrd, Ain't Gonna Live Like ThatWillie Nile, SanctuaryLarkin Poe, Keep Diggin'The Yum Yums, Shoog Shoog (Sugar Baby)The Yum Yums A Little Bit of EverythingHeartless Bastards, RevolutionVisita nuestro Facebook y déjanos tus peticiones, comentarios, canciones...O escríbenos un email aquí.

Cougar Sports Saturday
Is the Big 12 targeting the right four teams for expansion?

Cougar Sports Saturday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 12:34


Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte discuss if the Big 12 has targeted the right four teams for expansion. The league expects to add BYU, Cincinatti, UCF and Houston in the coming years. Brett McMurphy reported that the Big 12 also considered Boise State, Memphis, USF, and SMU.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rookie Big Board Fantasy Football Podcast
Special Episode: Previewing the 2021 College Football Season with Phil Steele

Rookie Big Board Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 21:48


Matt is joined by the one and only Phil Steele to preview the 2021 college football season. They discuss North Carolina's bid to knock off Clemson, why Phil believes Washington could win the PAC-12, and how Cincinatti could find themselves as the first Group of 5 team to make it into the College Football playoff. They also discuss players would could rise into the quarterback conversation in the 2022 NFL Draft, including Boston College's Phil Jurkovec, Arizona State's Jayden Daniels, and Ole Miss' Matt Corral. Phil also sheds insight into his favorite freshmen impact players. You can get Phil Steele's 2021 College Football Preview at Barnes n' Noble, Books-a-Millon, or online here: https://philsteele.com/product/2021-college-football-preview/

Dawg Pound BR Podcast
DawgPound BR Podcast 074 – Especial AFC North: Cincinatti Bengals

Dawg Pound BR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 94:47


HERE WE GO BROWNIES, HERE WE GO!  Está no ar mais um episódio do melhor podcast sobre o Cleveland Browns em terras tupiniquins! No episódio #74, Eber Barros recebe Konrad Aleixo e Ricardo Bossi, do WhoDeyBR,  para o primeiro de três episódios especiais que trazem uma análise sobre os rivais de Divisão que o Browns enfrenta na AFC North. Conheça o que podemos esperar, as melhorias, dificuldades e muito mais sobre o Cincinatti Bengals para a temporada de 2021. Edição:Felipe Vasconcelos Siga no Twitter e não perca as novidades do Browns: @DawgPoundBR, @clebrownsbrazil Siga o DawgPound BR no Instagram: @DawgPoundBR

The First Serve
The First Serve SEN, Monday August 23rd, 2021

The First Serve

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 43:47


Brett Phillips is back with another edition of the show, with all the tennis news of the week including reflecting on the success of Ash Barty and Sam Stosur in Cincinatti. Award winning tennis journalist Linda Pearce weighed in on that, plus a look ahead to the US Open as Novak Djokovic attempts the calendar slam. Also on the show, Bill Fourlis, the father of Australian pro Jaimee Fourlis who won her 4th ITF Title over the weekend.

JEFF STERNS CONNECTED THROUGH CARS
Andy Reid - Full Episode

JEFF STERNS CONNECTED THROUGH CARS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 99:01


Andy Reid is a Certified sports car fanatic who travels the world to see what's crossing the auction block and what deals are out there. Andy has been involved in the collector car lifestyle since before he could drive when, at 15, he bought his first collector vehicle, a 1968 Fiat 124 coupe, His second was a 1966 330 GT 2+2 purchased by stealing his college savings at 17. Andy has owned more than 200 cars, “none of them normal or reasonable.” His all time favorite cars is the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona, a model liked so much he has owned twice. Andy is not just an Italian car fan, having owned 24 Porsche 911's, BMWs, Jaguars, MGs, and 2 Mercedes-Benz. Andy also has a special love affair with British cars and has owned a Bentley Brooklands, Aston Martin DBS and DB7,  MGB, Jensen Interceptor 3, and currently owns a Bristol 401 which is his second Bristol car. Andy has written for Grassroots Motorsports, Racer, Vintage Motorsport magazine, Jaguar World, the Hagerty , and was the auction columnist at Classic Motorsports magazine for 12 years. Currently he writes for classiccars.com and the is the auction columnist at Magneto magazine. Andy is also a licensed independent collector car insurance specialist at Haydenwood Insurance, working with Hagerty, American Modern, and AIG. He has worked in Film and Television, Advertising, and founded and launched a number of internet companies. From 1995-2002 he raced professionally in the NASCAR Winston West Series, Featherlight Southwest Tour and Goodys Dash. Andy is  a well-respected Concours judge judges at The Hilton Head Concours,  Radnor Hunt Concours, Cincinatti,  Lime Rock Vintage Festival. In 2020 Andy founded the Isolation island Concours d' Elegance a covid lockdown initiative where owners showed their diecast model cars which were  were judged online on facebook by Pebble Beach and Amelia Island Concours judges. The concours went  9  rounds from April 2020 to April 2021, had more than 1000 entrants

To The Top
Episode 52 Cincinatti Ohio Recap

To The Top

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 91:07


Sonny and Al recap the trip to Cincinnati Ohio where Top Mount Apparel rented a booth at American Grappling Federation Grappling Tournament. They tell some behind the scenes stories and stories of some cool people they met 

Birdiecast | Golf & Life on Tour
43. Leslie's first LPGA event

Birdiecast | Golf & Life on Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 22:51


Leslie got to play her first LPGA event in San Francisco! Listen in to hear all about it. Hosts: @lesliecloots @maschechter Recorded in Cincinatti, OH on July 22nd 2021. Sponsor: Olea Athletics www.oleaathletics.com (promo code BIRDIECAST10) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/birdiecast/support

Beer and Shenanigans
Episode 63: Rhinegeist Brewing

Beer and Shenanigans

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2021 49:13


Medlock has been out of town for 3 weeks and Mike had some family events planned, so the schedules did not match again. But when they finally do, we record, and fun in the process. This week on Beer and Shenanigans, we check out Rhinegeist Brewing from Cincinatti, OH! We have chosen 2 of their seasonal brews. Zango and SunSpun Shandy. Don't forget to Subscribe and leave us a 5 star review! SUBSCRIBE to the YouTube Channel and TURN ON Notifications! tinyurl.com/beerandshenanigansvideo The New Way To See All Our Links! See Below! allmylinks.com/beerandshenanigans --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/beerandshenanigans/message

Rookie Big Board Fantasy Football Podcast
Spencer Rattler, Sam Howell then Who? An early Ranking of the 2022 Quarterback Class

Rookie Big Board Fantasy Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 35:23


In this episode, Matt takes us inside his summer scouting evaluations for nine quarterbacks eligible for the 2022 NFL Draft. He breaks down each prospect in terms of what they do well, what they need to improve on, and how their traits will translate to fantasy football. Spencer Rattler and Sam Howell are the initial class headliners, but Matt argues that Arizona State's Jayden Daniels should not be considered far behind. He also is higher than most on Boston College's Phil Jurkovec and has not given up on Kedon Slovis from USC. Matt also digs into recent hype around Liberty's Malik Willis and his own personal excitement for Carson Strong. He also makes sure to touch on Desmond Riddder from Cincinatti and JT Daniels, the Georgia Bulldog, who he believes have a long way to go to make themselves fantasy football revelent. You can get full access to all of Matt's rookie evaluations for the 2022 & 2021 classes along with his devy and dynasty rankings at patreon.com/theffeducator.

Backstage with Becca B.
Backstage With Becca B. Ep. 89 with DJ Plunkett

Backstage with Becca B.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 74:33


On this episode I talked with DJ about what made him want to be a theatre performer and when he realized he could make a career out of it, what the first show he ever saw was, the regional roles he tackled as a kid which helped him to become a well rounded theatre performer, why he chose to study musical theatre at University of Cincinatti and what the most valuable lesson he learned there was, what makes regional theatre productions worldwide so special, getting to perform as Flounder in The Little Mermaid and why playing Flounder has been one of his favorite roles to play, his audition for the Wicked tour, the casting process, his reaction when he was told he'd be playing Boq on the tour, working on staying healthy and keeping up stamina while on the road, what he thinks makes Wicked such a popular (pun intended) show, his dream roles, and MUCH MORE! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/backstagewithbeccab/support

UBC News World
Solar Company Breaks New Ground in Sustainable Investment By Using Crowdfunding

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 5:22


GoSun, a Cincinatti-based company, has launched an innovative crowdfunding campaign on Starengine.com

PSYCHOTIC BUMP SCHOOL PODCAST
Episode 173: Shout-Out from DJ ROME

PSYCHOTIC BUMP SCHOOL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 1:25


Thank you for listening Join us next time on PSYCHOTIC BUMP SCHOOL Please leave us your comments & feedback Hit up DJ ROME: psybumpschool@gmail.com

Ohio News Network Daily
ONN Daily: Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Ohio News Network Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 6:46


New poll shows 30 percent of frontline healthcare workers have not or will not take coronavirus vaccine; an investigation ongoing in the murder of an inmate at Chillicothe Correctional Institution; two prominent Democrats will face off in Cincinatti mayoral race in Novermber; rioters charged a year after the beating of a disabled man near Ohio Statehouse.

Tobin, Beast & Leroy
4-29-21 Tobin and Leroy Part 1

Tobin, Beast & Leroy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 39:36


It's Draft Day! What will Cincinatti and Atlanta do? Robbie vs Leroy debate on Moving up to 6 part 1. Bam sick dunk last night. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Eins zu Eins. Der Talk
Bill Ramsey, Sänger

Eins zu Eins. Der Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2021 37:37


Bill Ramsey liebt die Bühne und den Jazz und wurde mit Schlagern wie "Die Zuckerpuppe aus der Bauchtanzgruppe", "Pigalle" oder "Ohne Krimi geht die Mimi nie ins Bett" berühmt. 1931 in Cincinatti geboren, entschied er sich 1984 für einen deutschen Pass. Zu seinem 90. Geburtstag am 17. April wiederholen wir ein Gespräch mit ihm von 2014. Moderation: Daniela Arnu

Post 90' Podcast
Dropping Points Early

Post 90' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 16:48


Well, we told you last episode NYCFC should leave their first 2 games with 6 points. Seems like we'd be lucky to leave them with a single point now if we play at all like we did in the second half against DC. The team looked good through the first 30', with the almost-goal FK attempt from Medina, a goal from Taty & a solid press. But, we fell back into our 2020 ways in the second half. Short instances of lazy defending ended in two goals being scored against us. One was a worldie, we'll let that go. The corner goal though? Someone's gotta stop that from getting in the back of the net. Hoping for better times at Yankee Stadium against Cincinatti.

Danish and O'Neill
Episode 294: Gondola Rippers

Danish and O'Neill

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 93:37


O'Neill opens the show with a gondola confession (hence the show's title). Hear what disturbed the poor, unsuspecting gondola worker. Danish tells of his experience in Party City. They sure know how to party! This leads into a conversation about different levels of customer service and when it's too much. Then, there's some brief MMA talk as we discuss the latest with the drama king, Connie Mac McGregor. After that, we read possibly the greatest quote of all time. It's from DMX, and it's about his overall thoughts on Steven Seagal. Then, we move on to a neighborhood dispute over a minature frog statue. It gets heated! Who's right? Who's wrong? Whose frog? Also, we're super proud to announce that we're rising up the ranks of stuffed animal f'ing podcasts! Yup, we got another one of those this week. Look at us soar! Following last week's dyphallia story, we now discuss a woman with two v's! Then, it's the story that's dividing Cincinatti...are there, or are there not monkeys on the loose there? Spoiler alert: it's inconclusive. We wrap it up with some news and notes and random what have you's that are on our minds. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Switched on Pop
Return of the Funk Guitar: Cory Wong Breaks Down Dua Lipa, Jessie Ware and Nile Rodgers

Switched on Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 34:02


Cory Wong is a Minneapolis native and Vulfpeck collaborator known for pushing rhythm guitar from a background instrument to the star of the show. Wong’s a walking encyclopedia of funk guitar, and he takes us through the riffs and styles—from Nile Rodgers to Quincy Jones—that power modern bops such as Dua Lipa’s “Levitating” and Jessie Ware’s “Step Into My Life.”  For Cory, rhythm guitar isn’t just a source of propulsive joy, but a sound that’s intimately connected to different regional scenes: change one note in a riff and you’ve moved from Philadelphia to Cincinatti. Every bubble and chuck speaks to a history of musical innovation - a history Cory mines on his new album-slash-variety show, Cory and the Wongnotes. Mixing comedy sketches, massively funky performances, and interviews, Cory’s project imagines what happens when the bandleader takes over as late night host. Songs Discussed (it’s a long one) VULFPECK - Cory Wong Doja Cat - Say So Mark Ronson - Uptown Funk (Audio) ft. Bruno Mars Dua Lipa - Levitating Chic - Good Times Earth, Wind & Fire - Shining Star Ohio Players - Love Rollercoaster Prince - I Wanna Be Your Lover Maroon 5 - Moves Like Jagger feat. Christina Aguilera Morris Day & The Time - The Bird Bootsy Collins - Stretchin' Out (In a Rubber Band) Gap Band - I Don't Believe You Want To Get Up And Dance (Oops Up Side Your Head) James Payback - The Payback Sly & The Family Stone - Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin) Jessie Ware - Step Into My Life Chic - Le Freak David Bowie “Modern Love”  Duran Duran “Notorious”  Diana Ross - I’m Coming Out The B52’s “Love Shack”  Avicii “Lay Me Down”  Diana Ross - Upside Down Sister Sledge - We Are Family Sister Sledge - Thinking Of You  Sister Sledge - He’s The Greatest Dancer  Steve Winwood “Higher Love” chorus Stevie wonder - Higher Ground Michael Jackson - Billie Jean Michael Jackson - Thriller Daft Punk - Get Lucky (Feat. Pharrell Williams) David Bowie - Let's Dance Madonna - Like a Virgin Eminem - Lose Yourself Miley Cyrus - Party In The U.S.A Stevie wonder - Higher Ground Michael Jackson - Billie Jean Michael Jackson - Thriller Daft Punk - Get Lucky (Feat. Pharrell Williams) David Bowie - Let's Dance Madonna - Like a Virgin Eminem - Lose Yourself Miley Cyrus - Party In The U.S.A Cory Wong - Tiki Hut Strut Cory and The Wongnotes - Episode 4, “Genre (ft Grace Kelly)” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Attendance Bias
Mini Episode #15: Destiny Unbound, 8/18/10, Wantagh, MA

Attendance Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 12:48


Missed opportunities. Everyone’s had at least one. when it comes to Phish, there’s always the one that got away. The show you decided to skip because you had a test the next day. The one that was just too far away to make it back before work. The one you slept on getting tickets for and couldn’t find an extra. Hopefully, it doesn’t happen too often…but unfortunately it does happen And with Phish, it’s the worst feeling in the world when those shows become all-timers. For me, there were two that fit this category: 12/30/97 at MSG–the legendary “Harpua” and the 45-minute encore–and 2/28/03 at the Nassau Coliseum–one of the best “Tweezers” ever played and the long awaited return of the biggest Phish bustout of them all: “Destiny Unbound.”When I was deep into The Phish Compendium and The Pharmer’s Almanac (Vol. 4), the impression was that “Destiny Unbound” was the great white whale of Phish setlists. Played frequently in the early 90s and then shelved, it developed a cult following and old-school fans clamored for its return. When Trey suggested that the band would play it again if all the fans in the front row sang the first line at the same time, leave it to Phish fans to take him up on it at Red Rocks and the Hampton Coliseum in the mid- and late-90s, respectively. Denied, the song stayed on the shelf.As I learned more and more about the Phish mythos, the prospect of “Destiny Unbound” greatly interested me. I found it difficult to track down a recording of the song, and so for many years I had no idea what it actually sounded like. It wasn’t until the February 2003 “return tour” that the concept of actually hearing “Destiny” came back to me.I was a junior in college at the time at SUNY Buffalo. My roommate and I had tickets to see the band in Cincinnati and passed on the opportunity to fly home to see the show a week later at the Nassau Coliseum. In retrospect, it would have been fairly easy to attend. We had plenty of friends going who could find us extras; back when JetBlue was still fairly new on the scene, you could get a round trip flight from BUF to JFK for about $100; plus, it was college–missing a day or two of classes was far from an emergency. But we were so jazzed about the road trip to Cincinatti that we saw the Nassau show as an adventure that we didn’t need to take.Bummer.When I saw the setlist after it was played, my jaw dropped. “Destiny Unbound?” They played it? REALLY? ? And I missed it. At the time, I figured it was my only opportunity. As you can hear in earlier episodes of Attendance Bias with Slade Sohmer of The Recount and Pete Mason of PhanArt, we talked about how setlists in 2.0 were fairly predictable with few exceptions. Two of those exceptions were their show in Burgettstown, PA in the summer of 2003, and this show at the Nassau Coliseum that February. Phish broke their own mold. They played, at that time, what felt like the ultimate bust out. Maybe not in terms of “number of shows since it was last played,” but in terms of community relevance–it felt like I had missed some sort of cosmic event that only occurs once every 500 years; a special eclipse or passing of an obscure comet. The fact that it was played in my hometown venue only added salt to the wound.Pretty dramatic, yes.Luckily the band brought “Destiny” back into the rotation for 3.0. The simple tale of Highway Bill and Highway Jill doesn’t pop up frequently, but at least it’s in the cards. Those of us who absorbed the band’s history and self-referential universe knows that it’s special every time it’s played, simply because there were decades when that wasn’t the case. For me, the sense of closure finally came when the band played it at the 2010 summer tour closer at one of my hometown venues, Jones Beach Amphitheater.

The FriYAY Cast
FriYAY March 5th - "I'm Back": Coffee Is The Devil and The Great Cincinnati Tip Off

The FriYAY Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 16:53


Ladies and Gentleman. We are back. Apologies for the lack of casts, I had been having a bunch of personal stuff going on but we are now back. Today we have a great show: Today in history-- Happy birthday Chicago-- Coffee is no longer the devilRandom:-- How would you utilize sleep if you operated like a batteryFGSOTY:-- The Great Cincinnati Tip OffFollow @TheHATMedia, @TheFriYAYCast, and @_CJCasey on twitter and Instagram.

Ten Junk Miles
Gang Show 146 - Kent Cowgill

Ten Junk Miles

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 182:15


Join Scotty, Holly, Kyle and special guest Kyle Cowgill (from Cincinatti) for ten junk miles in which they discuss: Kent's life in running, marathons, gluten intolerance, bands Holly should know, the World's Longest Turkey Trot, Dentists, other podcasts, The Race4Some1 by Troubled Raccoon Racing, Bad Boy Running Podcast, Health IQ, Holly has a little too much to drink and tells about a ugly confrontation on the street, and much much more!!! Episode brought to you by our friends at Xoskin:  Use the code TJM.  Buy all the stuff.  Watch for new prototype shorts!!: https://www.xoskin.us Sign up for the Race4Some1 by Troubled Raccoon racing here: https://runsignup.com/Race/NY/Ronkonkoma/TheRace4Some1?fbclid=IwAR1qTVxfW6WcrzOHKHBDp-8XwZEg-2ewQVfSL3m5KYTg3PhiYIT-htVVKSw&remMeAttempt= Website: http://www.tenjunkmiles.com/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tenjunkmiles Twitter: https://twitter.com/tenjunkmiles Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/tenjunkmiles/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TenJunkMiles/  

Bengals Brawl
Bengals Nation guest episode!

Bengals Brawl

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 43:03


We break from your Normal Bengals brawl hosts to bring a guest show with two great Bengals nation podcasters, along with Brawl President Marc Lillibridge.

The Twitch and MJ Podcast Podcast
Cocaine Frosted Flakes?

The Twitch and MJ Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 7:33


A shipment of COCAINE frosted corn flakes got stopped by customs in Cincinatti... Tony the Tiger must've fallen on hard times. This made twitch realize that MANY cereal mascots must be on drugs.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Artfully Told
Episode 040 - Darnell Benjamin (Part 1)

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2021 47:31


In today's episode, I welcome Darnell Benjamin! His interview was so good that we ended up spending twice the time talking than my guests and I normally do. We've broken up his interview into two segments. Enjoy his experience as a professional actor, dancer, and artist today and next week. Get in touch with Darnell Benjamin: www.13thandrepublic.com | https://www.facebook.com/darnell.p.benjamin | www.instagram.com/darnell.p.benjaminSupport Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateartArtfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.comGet a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyToldSchedule your interview with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview Episode 040 - Darnell BenjaminLindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art.[00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life.[00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world.[00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough.[00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful.[00:00:31]Lindsey Dinneen: Hi, Artfully Told listeners, it's Lindsey here. Hey, I just want to quickly let you know something before our episode begins and that is that this interview was awesome. I had so much fun talking with my guest today. And I know you are absolutely going to love Darnell as well. And hey, we had so many good things to talk about, and the interview lasted a lot longer than is typical for Artfully Told listeners. So I just wanted to give you a heads up to let you know that I've actually broken this into two parts. So you're going to get part one today and then part two next week. And I just want you to know that ahead of time before we dive in, and I cannot wait to share Darnell with you. And I know you're just going to absolutely love everything has to say as well. Thank you so much.[00:01:26] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey, and I am so very excited to have as my guest today, Darnell Pierre Benjamin. He is a performing artist. Thank you so much for being here.[00:01:43] Darnell Benjamin: Thank you. Thank you. Thanks for having me.[00:01:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Of course. And I know that performing artist barely scratches the surface of all the different things that you do. So I would love if you would just share a little bit about maybe who you are and your background and kind of all the different things you're doing now.[00:02:01] Darnell Benjamin: Sure. And you know, and I'll say all the things I try to do, I'll definitely say I'm originally from a Southern Louisiana small town by the name of St. Martinville. And I started dancing at around 14, mainly because I came from a family that was already very big into music and dancing. And the short version is that it was actually in therapy that I basically got coached by my therapist to explore some movement things. We were just playing with movement. And that's when I learned that for some reason, movement became a, a sort of balancing act for me, a centering place. And so I started out doing some modern dance and that got me into playing with some ballet.[00:02:44] And fast forward to high school, start playing with the speech and debate team, and helping with the plays and then on a whim-- like no joke, it was very much at the last minute-- two weeks before starting college, I decided to change my major from what was going to be aiming towards criminal psychology to theater. And I changed it to theater. And while in the program, I was realizing that I was getting just as many dance credits as I was getting theater credits. So that's when I just realized, "Oh, I'm going to just be a performing arts major," because I was bouncing around between the two of those. And that's when I started getting in love with also Shakespeare and language and words and how they words dance in their own way as well. So, that's when I got into Shakespeare. I ended up going to grad school at University of Houston, got my MFA.[00:03:39] And the program particularly looks at the world through the lens of classical theater, specifically Shakespeare we focused on a lot, and it's a movement-oriented program. So it was perfect for me. And now, I mean, I just kind of right now, I just juggle between acting, dancing, choreographing, directing and teaching. So you know, I, I got a bit of advice many, many years ago from a professor who told me to broaden the brand, whatever you want to do, do it. Who's stopping you? And that really stuck with me. And so now I just like to pretend my way through things.[00:04:14]Lindsey Dinneen: I love it. Yes. Well, and obviously you're not just pretending your way through things. You've been very successful, which is fantastic, but we all have to start somewhere. So there you go.[00:04:26] Darnell Benjamin: Yeah, exactly, and that's what I mean by pretend is that, you know, it's--I remember the first time I started to choreograph. When I really started in the beginning, because as a dancer, you know, have your, you have your awareness of your body and your body and what your body can do, but you don't necessarily think about other people's bodies. You do when you're working with them, but how to create movement for other people's bodies. And that became a whole learning curve for me. And I caught on pretty quickly and I realized that, "Okay." Cause I think I have my strength in choreography is that I think I have a good eye, and I think I'm not afraid to lean into storytelling. I'm very inspired by like, for example, there's that dance group, Polobolus , who is like one of my top, one of my favorite dance companies. I love the type of work that they do because they don't just look at the technical aspect of dancing. They also look at the storytelling. They look at what does this one angle of the body mean versus another. So I'm very inspired by that kind of work.[00:05:28] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. So you started as a dancer and it was in your teens, and so you had mentioned doing modern and ballet. And so did you continue to explore those two or have you also branched into some other dance styles as well?[00:05:45] Darnell Benjamin: Oh, definitely. Yeah. A little bit of both. So I started out in those two and I always struggled with ballet and yeah, no, I was told early on, " Yeah, just don't have the feet." And so it's still that kind of got in my head for a long time, but then I noticed I had a a facility and comfort with modern dance and contemporary world. And that opened the door to me, even playing with some jazz. And that's really where I probably think my personal movement style sits the best. And that opened also to some tap. I'm pretty decent at tap. And then I started playing with some ballroom dance and I did well at that. And when I say--well, keep in mind, I am , I would say that I think I'm a better freestyle dancer than I am like, don't get me wrong--choreo that sits in a world of modern jazz, I am ready to go. Even some hip hop, I'm ready to go---but ballet is it, it's really hard for me. And, and I, I've been trying over the years to figure out what is the wall. And some of that, I think it's a mental block because I have in my head from that one person who told me, "Ya just don't have the feet."[00:06:59]Lindsey Dinneen: Oh man![00:07:02] Darnell Benjamin: Yeah. And so now it's the one that I'm afraid of the most to be perfectly honest is ballet. Terrified.[00:07:07] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, well that is so funny you say that because ballet is my forte. I absolutely love it. I think it's absolutely wonderful, but I'm, I'm the opposite of somebody who's like, "Here's this really abstract, modern piece or, or even worse, here's this hip hop piece." I'll be like, "Mmm, I don't think you want me."[00:07:28] Darnell Benjamin: And that's, you know, I totally like, I guess, you know, on the opposite end I can relate. Because I think what is so amazing, I love watching ballet mainly because I love watching something so technical that's done so freely. When it's done well, you know, when somebody really is just breathing in it. For me, I found that I was having a hard time with allowing myself to breathe. I get very tense with ballet work, and we all know that type of tension is not going to be useful for that type of work. So that was always my issue, but the freedom or what I'm perceiving rather as being freedom in, for example, modern dance , I think what, why I gravitate towards that is because I'm so story-oriented. So, and in contorting my body and moving it in , you know, anything from like, for example, a flexed foot is exciting to me because I'm like, "Oh, what does that mean?" And so I find myself digging into the story of modern dance. And it's not that by the way, please don't--I don't want to make this sound like I'm saying there aren't stories with ballet because there are absolutely some fantastic stories--it's just that I have a hard time allowing my brain to turn off when I'm doing ballet. I really do have a hard time with it.[00:08:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that makes complete sense. I think it's easy in whatever genre that, that doesn't come as naturally or as easily or whatever to you, to have that in your head aspect of, "Oh my goodness. I'm just trying to focus on the technical aspects and remember my choreography." So I think that's like completely normal for any dancer, for sure. And for a lot of artists who are dabbling in, you know, trying to like expand a little bit. If you're out of your element, you don't feel as free just in general, I think.[00:09:22] Darnell Benjamin: Yeah. And also the other side of that is, you know, to be absolutely real, I'm 37 and we all know what the body--like ballet at 37, it's a very different thing, especially if you've been away from it for so long. But I keep saying one of these days, I am definitely going to get back into a class because I would love to just go back to the basics. I don't know about you. I love barre work. I love just being there in the classroom and just doing the work. That's what, I'm not thinking as much. It's when I'm performing it that I get in my head.[00:09:53] Lindsey Dinneen: Fair enough. Yes. I absolutely love barre work as well. It's like, there's something so--just exciting, but also safe or, which is kind of a funny way to put it, but it's just this like, feeling of home. It's like, "Okay, we're going to start back in the barre. Every time we're going to start with our plies." It's like having this, this predictable really well-thought-through formula.[00:10:22] Darnell Benjamin: Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. When you're in that work session, it's really all about you. You just get to focus on your body. I mean, for example, I'm right now teaching at Northern Kentucky University, and I'm teaching a Movement for the Actor class and the students were working on some Tadashi Suzuki technique and it's a very focused technique. It is very--actually I would compare it to ballet in the sense of it's all about being very specific in getting to the shape, what is the shape, the specific shape--but where it's a little different is that one, and it may not be that different really , is that it's all about getting there faster, sooner, better. And it's about being able to train your body to know where that shape is without having to think about it. So that way you can just sit into it. And so working on that with my students right now, it's totally bringing me back to, I feel like I'm in a ballet class.[00:11:16]Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. And so I'm actually curious, you kind of touched on something. Do you feel that being a teacher and learning how to break things down for different students with different learning styles has helped you be a better dancer and mover?[00:11:32] Darnell Benjamin: Oh my goodness. Do you know? I, I firmly believe that the best way to truly test your knowledge of your work and your knowledge of your body and your truth of your creative spirit is by teaching. Because when you have to navigate working with different bodies and different abilities and different levels of understanding, and to try to get them all on the same page, but you have to use different methods for each person there, it's impossible to not be able to reflect that on your own work. Because I know for me, those students teach me something different every single day, every day.[00:12:10]Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I absolutely agree. It's so funny because sometimes professional dancers or pre-professional aspiring dancers will ask me questions like, "What do you think, you know, is something that I should do in this endeavor? And I always say teach, because I think, when I started teaching it, it forced me, I suppose, to astronomically develop my own technique and to go back to basics and realize, "Well, I'm telling you this, I better do this too." You know, it's just so funny. And yeah, that's just a, such a big piece of advice I always give people is teach, learn to teach, and then you'll, you'll become a better dancer yourself or artist or whatever, you know? It's yeah. It's like when you have to break down all the fundamentals, you're like, "Oh yeah. Huh. I should probably do that too."[00:13:01]Darnell Benjamin:  Absolutely. Oh my goodness. And you know what, I also try to be really honest with my students and tell them, "Hey." That whole, you know--I'm sure you've been told this, we've all been told this--when you start off in the arts young and especially I think about like, you know , that fresh out of high school going to college or going to a studio, whatever direction a person goes. And there is the, the emphasis goes a lot on discipline, you know, and I know, I think back to the time when I first taught a class, and specifically first taught a dance class, I found myself on the first day making mistakes I never make. And I remember beating myself up so much. And what I realized afterwards was that I started getting in my head and I started forgetting what I knew.[00:13:49] And I started doubting myself and putting all of, and I was trying to be, I think I was trying to be the instructor, I think I thought I needed to be, as opposed to truly just trust your craft. And I learned a lot about myself that semester teaching and, and, and also being challenged to not only just teach, but consistency. You know what I mean? Being able to fully show up and be honest with the students and tell them, "Hey, well, there is this expectation that we are supposed to always be in the right space, quote unquote, you know what I mean, as artists, and when we go to do our performances, we still have to give those people the same show we gave the ones the night before and the night before and the night before, regardless of what baggage you're bringing into the room." But what I've tried with my students to really open the door to is having a conversation with, "where are you today?" Particularly in class, if you are in a space where you're not maybe -- let's say you didn't sleep well. Let's say you didn't drink enough water. Let's say--the list goes on. "What can you focus on you? Maybe you can't focus on the whole, but can you focus on one thing specifically?" Because you got to remember that, that classroom, whether you were the instructor or the student, it's your time and what are you doing with your time? If you're wasting it, that's on you. I mean, I, I put a lot of accountability on my students to challenge them, to accept the fact that they may not be in the best place on that given day, but you still owe yourself the time and effort to focus on something. You know what I mean?[00:15:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, absolutely. I love the way that you put that. And I think one thing that stood out to me was you mentioned basically the word honesty. And I thought about that too, where it's, I'm sure many teachers can relate to this too, if they're being honest with themselves. But it's so interesting that I had to learn as a teacher to be very, just honest with my students too. And like you said, some days are off days, and even as a teacher and I don't want to bring that into my classroom, but at the same time, there are days I fall out of every single pirouette that I try. Right? And I like to call those high gravity days, but the reality is, you know, some days things work and some don't, but I think that's bringing in the humanity of the arts and the, the reality of the arts is you do your best. You show up every single day, you do your best, but then you just keep trying. And the next day you come back and you do it again. And not every day is going to be the most, you know, ah, success day. But you keep showing up.[00:16:30] Darnell Benjamin: Yeah. Yeah. And I feel like what it does, I found that teaching with that perspective has made my students better by the end of the semester, because they are being accountable for themselves.  Because like, for example, in this, you know, environment where we're teaching virtually, I know that some of my students are not committing a hundred percent to what we're working on. I know they're not truly going there, but it's not all of them. And it's not all the time, the same people. So what I told them is that it's on you, you know. You know when you're there, and you know when you're not. Like, for example, I'm teaching an auditions class, a movement class, and a , a sort of musical theater intensive for high school students. So in those three different worlds, those are three different types of people, you know, very much so, but I told them in all three situations, this is an audition class. This is a movement class, and this is a musical theater intensive. You chose to take this class. So there's something you want to work on.[00:17:35] And all three of those have to do with being prepared at the end of the day. So if you're not going to do the work, I mean, who can you blame? And so what I've noticed is that pushing my students to really take responsibility has made them actually be better at self-evaluations, be better at final products because they know where they sort of, I guess, set back. And it's showing up in their performances and they're able to comment on it in reflection papers. And for me, there's no greater joy than when I can read something a student wrote or even in , you know, verbal format, hearing them be honest about their craft because we all know like, I mean, the business is hard enough. The last thing you want to do is go pointing fingers elsewhere. Right?[00:18:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, definitely. Yeah. I think that's really important. It's a great life skill to help them develop to, of take responsibility for yourself. You're in charge of your life. That's very cool.[00:18:37] Darnell Benjamin: Yeah, and it's fun. It's fun. And there are good days and there are bad days. Cause sometimes these--you know, right now with a pandemic going o,n mental health conversations are happening a lot more. And my students are being very forthright with where they are as individual. Particularly  last semester, I mean, I had a lot of students reach out about some things that are going on and, and I'm like, how much can we, as you know ultimately mentors , give them enough tool sets to be able to truly not only be honest about their work, but also be able to keep track of it, to log it and be aware of if there's something consistent. Are you consistently having an issue with something? Are you consistently not showing up to class, whatever it is, whatever that consistent thing is, if it's not on the positive and what are you doing to change that, you know? And that's, that's where I get excited. Whenever I can see my students grow not only as performers, right? But also as a young adults, you know, that's, that's--what a joy.[00:19:40]Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, I absolutely agree. I've been reflecting on teaching methods and philosophy a lot lately. And I think that there's nothing greater than that. It's, it's so cool to witness those light bulb moments and, and those.... Right? When something finally clicks and it's like, "Ah, yes, you get that!" It's so fun. So yeah. Yeah, it's great. And then the other thing I've been noticing too, is just how special it is when students don't realize how much more they have, and you're able to kind of show them that, and then it's like this, you just watch the transformation on their face, you know, like, "Oh, I, I can turn out that much or I can go that much higher on my releve," or whatever it is. And then they're realizing that. They have all of this and I, I just, that's just such a cool thing too.[00:20:32] Darnell Benjamin: Yes. Yes. I have a friend right now in Seattle who is doing this research project, particularly on movement, actor movement techniques, but specifically from the perspective of risk, the concept of risk . Are you actually taking a risk with your work, whether that's in the classroom or in performance? Are you really throwing yourself into it and falling flat on your face so that you can learn something? But and you know, even relative to the Suzuki method, which is all about push, trusting that your body can go further than you think it can. And that's not, of course, in a way of abusing the body, not at all. It's more a matter of--like, even thinking about the turnout thing--most recently, I made a post on Facebook about how I was asking for advice because I've always had sort of really tight hips and really getting myself to truly let the legs actually turn out and not force it, but also not halfway go there. I got a lot of great tips and let me tell you, I realized something. It's not that I had such a hard time doing it. It was disciplined. I was not. Like going at it every day. I was really not truly committing to it and taking that risk to throw myself in far enough.[00:21:52] And the results have been fantastic because I've been doing it every single day. I've set a time for stretching. I've set a time for breathing exercises and I've set a time for just really challenging and going challenging my body and going there because, you know, I mean, obviously I've been in his body and dancing and movement work in general for a while. So I know what my sort of quote unquote safe limitations are, but I've been really trying to push towards the riskier limitations. How far can I take it? How much can I do within the bounds of reason of course, but I'm, I'm noticing all kinds of great results. And it goes to show that sometimes what it boils down to is discipline, you know?[00:22:38] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Amen to that.[00:22:40] Darnell Benjamin: You're right. And especially as a ballet dancer, I am sure you know what I mean.[00:22:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, yes. It is definitely the whole idea of consistently showing up and yes, so. Yeah. Okay. Awesome. Well, so then, you know, you've also had an acting career kind of alongside, it sounds like. So you said you had done a lot of Shakespeare work. Is that something that you've gravitated towards more? Do you do all sorts of different theater or, or how did that whole come about?[00:23:15] Darnell Benjamin: Oh, yeah. So in , in high school I was in, I was one of those nerdy kids in the AP English class, and we did not do any Shakespeare. And I remember being a little confused by that because I assumed we should have . Fast forward to in college, I had my first experience with Shakespeare and I loved it immediately. I'm a person who is very fascinated with language. I'm very fascinated with alliteration, linguistics in general, anything that is about the exploration of the sounds of words and how those sounds affect meaning. For example, like phonetics , all that stuff, I'm fascinated with that. So Shakespeare was like the motherland when I came across it and that kind of opened the door to me making the decision. That's partly why I went to grad school because I wanted more training in Shakespeare. I wanted to get better at it because I'll share a little story with you.[00:24:10]I went to the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Go Cajuns. And I'll tell you what--I'll share their story. And I don't say this for any, with any hate towards the university, but in the undergraduate program, specifically getting my BFA in performing arts, one of the professors there at the time, he , he taught all of this sort of, you know, the stage craft and lighting, the tech side. And he was also going to be the one directing "Taming of the Shrew." And I was so excited. It was going to be a summer production, which I was like, "Oh my goodness, this is fun." And they opened it up to the general public. So a bunch of people came in, auditioned for this, and we all watched each other audition. That was the worst part about it. Let me tell you, I could not be bothered with that. Watching people go one after another, getting antsy. But I'm watching people go in. I'm like, "Okay, all right. I'm not like the worst one here. We're going to be all right." And not even in a bad--I didn't mean that in a mean way.[00:25:12] Even when I thought that it was just more of a, okay. I maybe could actually get a shot at this. And I went up there and did my thing, felt really good. And noticed the , the callback list went up a couple of days later, my name wasn't on it. And I kind of was like,"Eh, okay. That kind of sucks or whatever, but maybe I might still get cast because you know, there's always the chance just because you're not called back doesn't mean you didn't get it." So fast forward to the cast list is going up and I am looking for my name, looking for my name. All the way at the bottom, "Hey! I'm the Habit Asher." Well, when I saw that and I noticed there were people who, and again, you know, there's so many things that go into this, as taste, who knows. But there were so many people who-- like, I mean, some of them didn't even, were not off book at their audition. Some of them who just did, it's almost like they kind of got teleported into a theater. They had no idea what was going on.[00:26:09] And so I was disappointed that I had gotten this role. So I talked to the stage manager who eventually told me that the instructor ultimately--and the one who was going, and by the way, this is one of my instructors and this was the person who was directing that show-- he said that, "Well, I just don't see black people in Shakespeare unless they're slaves." So that obviously, it was like, "Whoa." I went to talk to the Dean. And I was asked to go back down the ladder and go talk to the head of the department who was new at the time. So he's like, "Hey, you're going to have to go talk to the Dean. I kinda don't have my footing. I don't know any of these people. So, I'm giving you permission to climb up and go talk to the Dean." So I want to talk to the Dean and found out later that there were all of these cases piling up against this person. Everything from sexual harassment to racism to, I mean, it was across the board. And eventually this professor got fired. Yay.[00:27:09] But, but what it ultimately did, it, it lit a fire under me. And I think I wanted to prove him wrong. That's how it started. It started with me having so much passion for it, the language and being told that, and being hit so hard by that. And so I made a decision that I was really gonna dig into this and like, start to understand it because I really started researching and thinking about it and I'm like, "Oh, wow. There really isn't a lot of black and brown representation in Shakespeare that I'm seeing." So, it became a mission of mine because I never wanted another kid to feel like I felt. I mean, and so I ended up going to University of Houston in which--my goodness, I will say this for any listeners--if you are a physically-inclined actor who is strong with language and want to you to get stronger, that is a great program. The work is very physically inclined, but also very see, hear, smell, touch such detail inclined.[00:28:05] But fast forward to I finished there and I graduated in 2009 with my MFA and then I bounced around a little bit, landed in Cincinnati. And I started working with the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company in the 2010-11 season. And I've been working there as a resident actor since then. I've also done some Shakespeare elsewhere , but like that's the company that has been my home base with doing Shakespeare, and so Shakespeare is one of the things I do. I love experimental work. I love, I mean, actually it was an experimental company that moved me to Cincinnati, the Know Theater of Cincinnati moved me there. And they're kind of, they call themselves the alternative playground and they do a lot of fun alternative work.[00:28:48] So, and now, as far as my own personal sort of--what the stuff that I produce and I do on my own--I'm very much what I call, you know, just I'm an arts activist. I love looking at social issues and how we can use art to further the conversation, and deepen it. So a lot of my approach is from a a social issues perspective, and I love, love the movement of expressionism. So that inspires a lot of my work. I mean, come on. Can we please talk about Pina Bausche? Right. Seriously, that kind of work gets me so excited. I love , I love when people can--especially in dance--I love when we can see people turn on its head what we define as dance, because the question becomes, what is dance? And what is the difference between dance and movement?[00:29:41] I love exploring that middle ground and taking pedestrian things and turning them into dance and exploring how they can be seen as dance. So I guess across the board, whether as an actor or a dancer, I'm very much about looking into, I didn't know, I guess I'm, research-driven. I love exploring and understanding and taking those little risks that, you know, may not work always, but more often than not. I love that it creates a conversation, you know?[00:30:14] Lindsey Dinneen: Absolutely. Oh yeah, of course. That's one of the most wonderful things about art, is that it does and can create and spark conversation. And that's pretty special 'cause that's, that's when you really get into all the exciting aspects. And what did the artist intend or what did you gather from it? I mean, because both of those things are important and so, yeah, of course.[00:30:37] Darnell Benjamin: Right? Absolutely. I mean, I even hate whenever I do my work, it's so important to me to make sure that I'm not telling my audience how to feel. I love to challenge the audience, whether that's through theater or dance.  I definitely, when it comes down to dance, I'm very inspired by also Mary Overlie and looking at viewpoints and exploring that to even create. So that way I don't, because, you know, we all have the, you know, we all have our tricks, the things that we're good at and that we can pull out at the drop of a dime. But I love figuring out, "Okay. All right, which of these viewpoints do I suck at?" Let's start playing with that. So that's something I like to try and do at, you know, and, and let's be real. Sometimes it's a pass and sometimes it's a fail.[00:31:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, of course, but you never know until you try.[00:31:30] Darnell Benjamin: Exactly and failure is fun. Failure is how we have an opportunity to learn of course, and, and, and try something different, you know? Yeah. So for me, it's like failure is just an opportunity to learn something.[00:31:44] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, and that's a great perspective. So you had mentioned kind of briefly in passing you, you mentioned kind of the expressionist movement that's something that really compels you, but I wonder if you could just define that a little bit more and talk about what exactly you see that as being just since we might not all be familiar with that.[00:32:05] Darnell Benjamin: Absolutely. Yes, yes, yes. I know a lot of people are familiar with, you know, the scream painting and that is from like an expression as peace. It ultimately, and you know, the best way I could describe it, obviously it's in the way that I understand it and how I perceive expressionist movement being is digging into the feeling, what is the feeling that this art wants to portray. And instead of going from, you know, a linear direction with, here's a story with a beginning, middle, and an end, whether that's a play or for example, with a piece of art, you can just , you know, you can draw, for example, paint the Mona Lisa. But, or what you can do, you can paint what Mona Lisa feels like, what is, what is it that you want that piece of art to evoke? What is that feeling at the core? And that's for me, what expressionism is, it's about really tapping into not focusing on what we know as our realistic world, but instead exploring what is this world, this specific world in this piece of art and letting that tell the story.[00:33:12] Like, for example , contemporary --oh, well, not that contemporary--but Edward Scissorhands, that's a, that's a perfect expressionist film because it created a world that was, yes, we recognize that these are human beings, but the distortion of the character of Edward, even thinking about the those bushes and how he would make these pieces of art with these bushes and that big castle that he lived in, all of that is very expressionism. You have, of course, the iconic film that most people know because It all stems from Germany. There's a lot of stuff out there that explores the exaggeration of things to tell the truth of what that story is.[00:33:53] And as far as in my personal work , I actually got to do my first film. I directed and choreographed a film, which is kind of mind-blowing that that even happened. But , so I was, I was inspired by , so for instance, so I'm in Cincinnati, Ohio, and there were in 2001, there was the murder of a young black man, 19 years old by the name of Timothy. Timothy Thomas. And this was a kid who had a bunch of, you know, minor parking violations, things like that, tickets, stuff like that. And he was followed and he started running and he ran down this alley. Long story short, he , there are a lot of different reports of what possibly happened, but the gist of it is that he was trying to lift up his pants to climb over a fence. And he was shot because they thought he was going to be reaching into his pocket for a gun.[00:34:44] And we all know we are in the midst of another round of this movement of the Black Lives Matter conversation. And, this has happened far too often. We know this happened back in 2001. And prior to that, there was  a man by the name of Roger Owens B. Jr, where this happened in Cincinatti. So for me, I started looking at the repetition of this conversation and how we keep circling back to it. And instead of, and what I found myself leaning towards is we keep talking about it in this sort of sense of understanding of, look, this or here's point A, here's point B. This is what happened. This is the result. And I think it's a lot richer than that. And a lot deeper than that.[00:35:27] I started leaning into the direction of mental health and that's I think at the core of the problem. And so I started thinking about over time, what are the effects of this repeated trauma on the black community and how are the ways that it manifests itself? And that's when I started , you know, putting this piece together and thank goodness , the company, Walter Hoop, which is an amazing company, please check them out: walterhoop.com. They are an arts center organization that plays in all the different mediums. They play in with podcasts. They play with theater. They do live productions, dance recently, with this film that I did. And they, they want it to produce this and we collaborated. The music is insane and the music matched up immediately with this concept I wanted to play with, which was thinking about how can we have this conversation, but look at it through the lens of mental health.[00:36:27] So every single shot for me had to be, it was important that the choreography, the writing, which was, which was done by Tyrone Williams and it's a sort of, it's ultimately poetry. I wanted it all to feel abstract. I wanted it to feel familiar, but not . I wanted it to feel claustrophobic. I wanted it to feel all these things that heightened our emotions. And you know, and also in the midst of all that conversation, I wanted there to be joy despite all of the hurt , the lack of understanding. So at the end of the film, there is a -- it, it sort of, kind of goes through an evolution. Now granted, I didn't go--for anybody who might see this film-- which is called "13 the Republic"--I, if you are familiar with expressionism, please know that I didn't go like hardcore, literal expressionism all in. No, I actually played with a mixture of finding, pulling the things from expressionism that worked for me, which was looking at the feeling, what do I want? The, what is this feeling and how can I create that through movement? How can I create that through text? That's kind of how I lean into it 'cause a lot of expressionism, you're not going to have traditional scenery.[00:37:42]Automize scenery in the film is very much actual streets and actual grass and actual parks, but where I kind of went more towards an expressionist direction in terms of scenery, it was in two scenes where I played with, what is it? What would it look like if we're inside of the main character's head? What does that look like? So there's this, there's a couple of scenes where I leaned into that. But yeah, that's, that's overall how I would describe expressionism in how I utilize it. I hope that makes sense.[00:38:15] Lindsey Dinneen: That was perfect. And first of all, oh my goodnes, congratulations. That is such a huge accomplishment to have gotten to work on that film. And holy cow, that is a huge congratulations and, and, and kudos to you for starting that conversation and addressing things that really need to be talked about. And I so admire what you said, your intentionality behind the way that those scenes were portrayed and everything is just so amazing. I love hearing the background behind it, and why you chose things the way you did. But also, you know, choosing to bring out an element of joy despite everything I think is just huge. So, oh, my gosh. I cannot personally wait to see this film. Where can we watch this film?[00:39:11] Darnell Benjamin: Oh yes, you can go to 13thandrepublic.com. And so that's one, three, and it's spelled out and AND republic.com and that's where you can go check it out. And it's an interactive website. That's the really cool thing is that Walter Hoop wanted to make sure that, because originally this was going to be a live production, but we are in the midst of a pandemic. And that's why we did it as a film. And even the film-- just in case anybody's wondering--we did it in August and it was done absolutely with every bit of social distancing and safety in mind. And I found a way even to incorporate masks in the show, in the film. So I found a way to do that. So we went through a lot of lengths to make sure that because, you know, it will be very ironic if you have these this cast of five black actors and dancers performing and they get COVID. You know what I mean? That was not going to happen.[00:40:07] So it was very important, it was very important to me to make sure that they were safe and not even just them, but also me. And as far as this film, you know, I thank you for even like, 'cause it's, it really is mind blowing to me because it's funny how life has a way of surprising you: here we are in the midst of a pandemic and we were working on, I mean, this film was being worked on prior to the pandemic. We were prepping for filming and then the pandemic hit and we had to push filming back but the rehearsals had to get pushed back for what was going to be a live production because you can't, in my opinion, you know, when you want to talk about social issues and you want to talk about ,  how do we manage this?[00:40:49] And the only way we can manage this is to have the conversation. And part of that conversation is a communal experience. And we couldn't have that because of the pandemic. So I'm really excited to share this information that I applied for a grant through a local organization here called Arts Wave. And they had this grant for what they call it A Truth and Reconciliation Grant. And I got one of those. And so the goal is that we're going to, we connect it with an organization. I can't say who yet, because it's not public just yet, but we connected with an organization where we're going to take the film out of the urban downtown areas and bring it into the suburbs and the rural areas as part of a showcase of the film. And there's going to be a live element involved with it. And also they're can, it's going to be a Q&A where we get to actually interact with the people who are outside of the thick of , you know , city council and the courthouse and all of that world.[00:41:45]So it's really, because for me, the reason why I do what I do is to truly, truly have the conversation. And the only way we can do that is if we step out of our comfort zones and take that risk. And part of the risk for me was getting away from the place that I know, and from the people that already know what I do and going out into these neighborhoods where hopefully we will get welcomed. And obviously there's the chance that we will not, but the way I'm looking at it is that if I don't do this, I'm not doing this film the service it deserves, which is to be seen by the people who are not having these conversations, to be seen by the people who may be disagree with this conversation.[00:42:28] But how nice would it be if we can actually have a dialogue? So that's, that's kinda the next phase of it, which I'm really excited about, but yes, just as a reminder, that's one, three and republic.com and it's an interactive website. So check it out. You get to, there are some interviews that are really cool where we interviewed the cast members to get their perspective and also the , the people on the creative team. So across the board, it's, it's beyond me because in my experience of creating, this is the first time I have ever gotten to do something exactly the way I wanted to do it, and absolutely being truthful to not only my personal mission as an artist, but to who I am as a , as a black queer man. So for me, I've never been prouder of something. Because it's, it's truly every internal experience thought that I've had in a film. It's kind of terrifying because in some ways, it's a little so vulnerable, it feels a little kind of invasive to share it, but it needed to be shared.[00:43:36] And I think that I, I can't wait until we start having the conversation of mental health in, in tandem with conversations on social issues, because they're not separate. It's all connected. And I, I can't wait till we see, to see more artists, more scholars, more across-the-board people finding ways to connect those dots and really dig into the heart of what's going on within each of these social issues.[00:44:06]Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Oh, my word. Well, I, I'm just sitting here smiling. Congratulations. This is so cool everything that you're doing ,and just congratulations on this grant and this new opportunity to expand your reach and to step out of your comfort zone. And, oh my goodness. I commend you. I think it's hard to be that vulnerable and put yourself out there. Oh my word. But that, but telling who you are and your truth and your story, that is so compelling. And that's going to, I just know that's going to have an impact on people's lives. It's going to spark those conversations that will hopefully actually make some change happen. And just think that you are a huge part of that. That is so cool because you had the courage to be vulnerable. So, oh, my word so much respect, kudos to you.[00:44:59] Darnell Benjamin: Thank you. That's very kind.[00:45:00]Lindsey Dinneen: That's all for today. Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this episode, please feel free to share it with your friends. If you'd leave us a review and rating and subscribe to our podcast, you'll get notified when the newest episodes come out. Thank you for sharing art with us, and we hope your day has been Artfully Told.[00:45:19]Hey, Artfully Told listeners, Lindsey here. And I just want to share with you a little bit more about The SpeakEasy Method. Now, if you've had a chance to listen to Gregg Gonzales' interview on Artfully Told, you're already a little familiar with the process that is so unique. That is the SpeakEasy Method is for people who are ready to write their books, but maybe aren't super confident about their own writing ability, or just want a more streamlined way of doing it. Gregg and his team at SpeakEasy are experts at these amazing questions that help your authentic voice to shine through. So what they do is they go through recorded audio interviews with you and these recordings are then transcribed and put into manuscript format, ready to go. So what's cool about that is instead of months and months, or years and years, of you writing a book, they will actually take you from concept to published and it can be as little as nine months. That is one of the most recent success stories that they have accomplished. And it is just a really innovative method that I am personally so excited to help represent and help share the word about because what Gregg and his team are doing is absolutely life-changing for prospective authors. And I highly encourage you to book a discovery call with Gregg or another member of his team to learn more and see if this could be the perfect fit for you. It's a hundred percent complimentary and you can do so easily by going to his website and that's www.joyful-living.com/speakeasy. And again, that spelled out is J O Y dash F U L dash living.com/speakeasy.

Muito Mais Do Que Futebol
Muito Mais do que Futebol #85 Palmeiras campeão, Leila do Vôlei, Navalny e Série A

Muito Mais Do Que Futebol

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2021 77:00


Palmeiras campeão, Leila do Vôlei, Navalny e Série A fazem parte da pauta de hoje, que passa por Cincinatti, Luxa, Rodrigo Pacheco e outros pontos debatidos por Lucio, mauro e Leandro.

Keys Bartender
Episode 372 Drunken Financial Advice

Keys Bartender

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2021 53:24


A patron gives questionable financial advice to millionaire athletes. It involves opening a Bordello. Another customer , Grace, gives motivational advice to the Bartender.What would be the harm of feeling some empathy for others

Washed Up Walkons
WUW 170 | A B1G Load Of Crap, Wisconsin Preview

Washed Up Walkons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 53:39


In this episode Kevin and Tyler dive deep into the College Football Playoff picture. Who deserves to be in the 4 spots for the national title? Clemson, Alabama, and Notre Dame are "win and in" situations but does Ohio St. deserve it at 6-0? Especially after the Big Ten decided to go back on their own rules that were set before the season began just to allow the Buckeyes to make the championship? Then there are teams like Texas AM, Cincinatti, Florida, Iowa State, and even Coastal Carolina who have arguments at the title.. Its a complete mess. We discuss how insane Iowa basketball is after a huge win over North Carolina, and how fun it is to be watching them play. We finish with the Badgers and how Iowa gets over the hump to take home the Bull.. also, who was the toughest Wisconsin player we went up against?

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
Dolphins Dominate Bengals for 8th Win | Wed. Dec 9, 2020

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 23:00


The Miami Dolphins have now won 7 of their last 8 games as they defeated the Cincinnati Bengals 19-7. The matchup proved to be chippy as both sides had players who were ejected. Tua Tagovailoa looked excellent in the second half of the game and the Dolphins took control. In this episode, we go over the victory and talk about the good, bad, and ugly coming from the brawl. Listen and join the Pod!

Catching Foxes
Let's Feel Insecure and Talk for an Additional Hour

Catching Foxes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2020 84:40


Hey! We talked about some stuff. What Gomer will include, who knows. But I need to enter the show notes, so have create the episode. *Consecrated life! * There are a ton of great religious orders in the country that go back generations. Maybe take some time to check a few of them out. The Archdiocese of Cincinatti is hosting a Zoom get together for people interested in consecrated life. Check it out. Or dont. You an adult. You're free to ignore your vocation. Facebook Link (https://www.facebook.com/events/325590775183324/?acontext=%7B%22event_action_history%22%3A[%7B%22mechanism%22%3A%22surface%22%2C%22surface%22%3A%22edit_dialog%22%7D]%7D) Event Site (http://tinyurl.com/CincyVAW) Gratuitous Simpsons Clip (https://youtu.be/7bXjWRXDFV8)