Podcasts about johns hopkins university school

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Best podcasts about johns hopkins university school

Latest podcast episodes about johns hopkins university school

DKBmed Radio
10/9/2021 - Update on COVID-19 Treatment

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 52:14


Drs. Paul Long and Paul Auwaerter discuss the latest news on COVID-19 treatments for patients in and out of the hospital. Topics: *How variants (such as the Delta variant) impact treatment decisions *Test your knowledge with patient cases *The latest treatment guidelines and recommendations *Q&A Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/hospitalists/10-9-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/hospitalists Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA, Past President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Paul Long, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, General Internal Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Faculty Factory
Interdisciplinary Science Habits and Hacks with Sarah Amend, PhD

Faculty Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 39:05


As you will hear on today's podcast episode, “interdisciplinary” is far more than just another buzzword. We are delighted to welcome, Sarah Amend, PhD, to the Faculty Factory Podcast this week for another enlightening “Habits and Hacks from Hopkins” episode. Today's interview focuses on how to foster healthy and productive collaborations between diverse-minded experts. Dr. Amend serves as Assistant Professor of Urology and Assistant Professor of Oncology with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. “My lab focuses on understanding, and ultimately, trying to design strategies to treat lethal prostate cancer,” she told us. Learn more: https://facultyfactory.org/ 

Rodger That
EP 101:: Do Culture or Ethnicity Play a Part in Dementia's Effects? :: Dr. Chiadi Onyike

Rodger That

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 36:09


Dr. Chiadi Onyike is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His practice focuses on conditions that develop in midlife or earlier, including frontotemporal dementias, young-onset Alzheimer diseases, prion diseases, leukodystrophy, and other atypical conditions that cause cognitive and behavioral impairments and dementia.   Don't forget to follow, download, and review to share your thoughts about the show!   To find out more about Bobbi and Mike or the inspiration behind this podcast, Rodger That, head over to rodgerthat.show.   ***************************************** Rodger That is produced by Missing Link—a podcast media company that is dedicated to connecting people to intelligent, engaging and informative content.   Also in the Missing Link line-up of podcasts is The Designated Drinker Show —a high-spirited show featuring craft cocktails and lively banter with the people who create (and quaff) them. Now, if you are looking for a whole new way to enjoy the theatre, check out Between Acts—an immersive audio theatre podcast experience. Each episode takes you on a spellbinding journey through the works of newfound playwrights—from dramas to comedies and everything in between.

Hopkins Biotech Podcast
My PhD- Gian Molina-Castro

Hopkins Biotech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 19:19


Gian is a fourth-year PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience. His thesis under the supervision of Dr. Dwight Bergles focuses on studying the dynamics and functional significance of cortical remyelination in diverse mouse models of multiple sclerosis. Gian is a Senior Fellow at PHutures, a career and professional development hub for doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows. In July 2021, he received the 2021 Diversity Recognition Award from the Diversity Leadership Council of Johns Hopkins University. Hosted by Joe Varriale and Gustavo Carrizo. We are looking for PhD students from Hopkins, as well as other Institutions in and outside the US! If you are interested  in being interviewed for My PhD please complete the following form and we will contact you:                                                          MyPhD podcast application form

The Round Table: A Next Generation Politics Podcast

At this week's Round Table, Inica, Jack, Kenisha, and Madeline spoke with Carolyn Sufrin, MD/PhD and an assistant professor of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Director of the Advocacy and Research on Reproductive Wellness in Incarcerated People program; and who serves on the board of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. Dr Sufrin worked as an OB GYN in a jail for 6 years. Fun fact: imprisoned folks are the only population who legally have guaranteed healthcare stemming from a Supreme Court case in 1976 in which not providing healthcare was deemed cruel and unusual punishment and a violation of the 8th amendment. Sadly, this guaranteed provision does NOT translate into quality--there is LOTS of neglect and getting screenings, getting ADEQUATE care, getting abortions, and getting appropriate medications are hard to come by in prison. Unfortunately, getting unnecessary surgeries isn't--Carolyn told us about myriad women in CA who have been unnecessarily sterilized. Carolyn was influenced by reproductive rights activism she did in high school, and seeing the potential of medicine to activate social justice. She was further influenced by the field of reproductive justice, which centers black women whose experiences have been devalued and diminished, and contextualizes these violations within a broader human rights framework. As a first year Resident in Medical School, she was called to support the delivery of a baby by a woman who was SHACKLED TO THE BED--and her career path advocating for health care for incarcerated women was set. Through her work today, Carolyn looks at both statistics AND stories to get behind stereotypes. There are 218,000 women behind bars today, the majority btw 18-45, and 60% of whom are mothers responsible for children. The impact of incarceration is not just on women but families and communities. Further, as we know, there are profound racial disparities in incarceration that don't track w crime rates due to people having suffered from structural and systemic forces that have impacted them and the crimes they've committed, along w racism within the criminal legal system. We were so inspired by Dr. Sufrin and we know you will be too. Thank you for joining us! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message

DKBmed Radio
9/29/2021 - COVID-19 Child Health

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 20:01


Dr. Paul Auwaerter continues his interview with Dr. Maddy Travers as they discuss child health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Topics: *Advice for parents considering vaccinating their children *Explanation for the rise in COVID-19 pediatric cases *Risk of Delta variant for children *Common questions from parents Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/9-29-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA, Past President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Maddy Travers, MPH, PhD, Public Health Consultant and Co-founder and Lead Sleep Trainer at Littlest Learners See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

DKBmed Radio
9/22/2021 - COVID-19 Maternal Health

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 16:44


Dr. Paul Auwaerter interviews Dr. Maddy Travers about maternal health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Topics: *Is it safe to get the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy? *Elevated risk of COVID-19 for pregnant mothers *Clarifying whether or not the COVID-19 vaccines impact fertility *Passing on immunization to newborn children Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/9-22-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA, Past President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Maddy Travers, MPH, PhD, Public Health Consultant and Co-founder and Lead Sleep Trainer at Littlest Learners See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

DKBmed Radio
9/15/2021 - COVID-19 Variants Explained

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 23:36


Dr. Paul Auwaerter explains what we currently know about COVID-19 viral variants. Topics: *The most concerning variants *Delta Plus and Mu variants explained *Vaccine efficacy against disease caused by variants *New recommendation for concurrent flu and COVID-19 vaccination Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/9-15-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA, Past President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Good Athlete Podcast
Episode 132 – Dr. Robert Higgins: The Heart of Leadership

The Good Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 42:38


GoodAthleteProject.com For today's episode, Jim is joined by Dr. Robert Higgins, Director of the Department of Surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Higgins is the leading authority in heart and lung transplantation, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and mechanical circulatory support. His scientific interests include the mechanisms of cell injury in failing hearts, health economics and policy, racial disparities in post-transplant outcomes, access to care and improving outcomes among heart failure and cardiac surgery patients. Before his role at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Higgins served at The Ohio State University, where he was professor and chairman of the Department of Surgery, as well as surgeon-in-chief and director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center at Wexner Medical Center. Dr. Higgins obtained his bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College and went on to earn his medical degree from the Yale School of Medicine, followed by a master's degree in health services administration at Virginia Commonwealth University. He completed a residency in general surgery and served as chief resident at the University Hospitals of Pittsburgh. He was a Winchester Scholar and fellow in cardiothoracic surgery at the Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Higgins served as a senior registrar in transplantation at the renowned Papworth Hospital, the U.K.'s largest cardiothoracic surgical program and its main heart-lung transplant center. He also served as a Major in the United States Army Reserve Medical Corps. The Good Athlete Project on Instagram: @GoodAthleteProject and Twitter: @Coach4Kindness Visit us at our website: GoodAthleteProject.com

MIB Agents OsteoBites
Osteosarcoma Update from Dr. Huang - 2019 OutSmarting Osteosarcoma recipient

MIB Agents OsteoBites

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 88:21


Osteosarcoma Update from Dr. Huang - 2019 OutSmarting Osteosarcoma recipient Dr. Huang is back on OSTEOBites to give us an update on his research funded by OutSmarting Osteosarcoma 2019. Don't miss this exciting new episode, plus who doesn't love Dr. Huang? ABOUT Alex Huang, MD, PhD: Dr. Huang received a B.S. in chemistry and an M.S. in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Chicago. He then entered the medical scientist training program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he completed his Ph.D. thesis in the laboratory of Drew M. Pardoll, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Huang's Ph.D. thesis included studying the process of in vivo tumor-antigen cross-presentation by bone marrow derived professional antigen presenting cells and identified the dominant MHC class-I restricted tumor rejection antigen, AH-1, in a murine colon tumor model. Hosted by: Executive Director of MIB Agents - Ann Graham OsteoWarrior and MIB Junior Board Member - Shannon McCormack MIB Super Volunteer Amy Woodchecke PA-C. LINKS: VIDEO of this Podcast: https://youtu.be/eRTS2S8li-I BOWS: https://www.mibagents.org/bows ANGEL WALL: In memory of OsteoAngels: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6Cbe-1m72s&t=558s Note: Note: Dr. Huang's cousin, Wenwei is at 9:18 HUANG LAB: http://www.huanglab.com Dr. Huang's Email: alex.y.huang@case.edu Clinical Trial Search: www.mibagents.org/physicians-researchers/clinical-trials … What We Do at MIB Agents: PROGRAMS: ✨ End-of-Life MISSIONS ✨ Gamer Agents ✨ Agent Writers ✨ Prayer Agents ✨ Healing Hearts Bereaved Parent Support ✨ Ambassador Agents - Peer Support EDUCATION for physicians, researchers and families: ✨ OsteoBites, weekly webinar & podcast with thought leaders and innovators in Osteosarcoma ✨ MIB Book: Osteosarcoma: From our Families to Yours RESEARCH: ✨ Annual MIB FACTOR Research Conference ✨ Funding $100,000 annually for OS research ✨ MIB Testing & Research Directory ✨ The Osteosarcoma Project partner with Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard ... Kids are still dying with 40+ year old treatments. Help us MakeItBetter.

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys
2021 Prostate Cancer Awareness with Joy Keys

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 29:00


September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month ***Ingrid J. Hall, PhD, MPH, is an epidemiologist in the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control's Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch. Dr. Hall's current research focus is in the area of minority health, particularly finding culturally relevant ways to publicize the need for participation in cancer screening and early detection by minority populations. Dr. Hall has a long history of published work in the area of prostate cancer decision making and spearheaded the organization and coordination of the State of the Science Conference on Active Surveillance in the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer convened in 2010. She currently oversees studies developing an interactive online educational tool for prostate cancer treatment choices as well as support materials for newly diagnosed men who choose active surveillance. ***Otis Brawley is professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and 39th Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Brawley leads a broad interdisciplinary research effort of cancer health disparities at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, working to close racial, economic and social disparities in the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer in the United States and worldwide. He also directs community outreach programs for underserved populations throughout Maryland as the Kimmel Cancer Center's associate director for community outreach and engagement.  

The FOX News Rundown
From Washington: Remembering 9/11 - 20 Years Later

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 22:11


Today marks the 20th anniversary of September 11th. Americans today will gather to reflect and honor the nearly three thousand victims who died on that date 20 years ago after nineteen members of the terror group al-Qaeda hijacked four planes and carried out suicide missions in New York, Washington D.C. and Shanksville, PA. Former CIA Station Chief and FOX News Contributor Daniel Hoffman weighs in on the 20th anniversary and where he was on that day. President Biden on Thursday announced sweeping new federal vaccine requirements for as many as 100 million Americans. Companies with more than 100 employees will now have to require coronavirus vaccinations from their workers or submit to weekly testing. This includes the private sector, federal workers including contractors and health care workers. All in an effort to try and put an end to surging COVID-19 cases throughout the country. Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Fox News Medical Contributor, Dr. Marty Makary weighs in on the President's mandates.

Faculty Factory
Habits and Hacks with Michelle C. Johansen, MD, PhD | Faculty Factory Podcast | Episode 137

Faculty Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 37:16


Another great episode of the Faculty Factory Podcast has arrived! This week we are joined by Michelle C. Johansen, MD, PhD, for another inspiring and informative edition of the Habits and Hacks from Hopkins (H3) series. Dr. Johansen discusses burnout, brokenness, and the all important "attitude of gratitude" on today's show.  Dr. Johansen serves as Assistant Professor of Neurology in the Cerebrovascular Division with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. 

Connecting ALS
"Identifying an Earlier Domino in Cellular Breakdown Connected to ALS…"

Connecting ALS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 21:43


This week, Jessica and Jeremy are joined by Dr. Jeffrey Rothstein, professor of neurology and neuroscience and the founding director of the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Dr. Alyssa Coyne, a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins. Drs. Rothstein and Coyne discuss their recent publication of research identifying a cellular defect common in ALS and what it means for research into the disease going forward.To read more about the role CHMP7 accumulation plays in cell degradation go to https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/researchers-identify-cellular-defect-common-familial-sporadic-forms-alsLearn more Dr. Coyne's research at https://www.als.org/blog/meet-alyssa-coyne-2018-milton-safenowitz-postdoctoral-fellowLearn more about The ALS Association's Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at https://www.als.org/research/research-we-fund/fellowships/milton-safenowitz-postdoc-fellowship-programDive deeper into the impact of the Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at https://www.connectingals.org/episodes/recruiting-new-researchers-to-the-search-for-treatments

Tradeoffs
Catching America's Top Cancer Killer

Tradeoffs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 26:56


New national guidelines say millions more Americans should get screened for lung cancer. The test can save lives, but it's inaccessible to many and harmful to some. How should we balance the promise and perils of lung cancer screening?Guests:Otis Brawley, MD, Professor of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineLisa Carter-Harris, PhD, APRN, Behavioral Scientist and Adult Nurse Practitioner, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterCherie Erkmen, MD, Professor of Thoracic Surgery and Director, Lung Cancer Screening Program, Temple UniversityElla Kazerooni, MD, Professor of Radiology, University of MichiganIda Pittman, lung cancer patient, Temple University Hospital Helena Price, Ida's cousin and health care advocateGerard Silvestri, MD, Professor of Pulmonology, Medical University of South CarolinaDig deeper into the research and tradeoffs of lung cancer screening on our website: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/05/27/catching-americas-top-cancer-killer/Read a transcript of this episode: https://tradeoffs.org/2021/05/27/catching-americas-top-cancer-killer-transcript/Sign up for our weekly newsletter to see what research health policy experts are reading right now, plus recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/tradeoffsnewsletterSupport this type of journalism today, with a gift: https://tradeoffs.org/donateFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tradeoffspod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FoundMyFitness
#066 Dr. Mark Mattson on the Benefits of Stress, Metabolic Switching, Fasting, and Hormesis

FoundMyFitness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 140:08


Dr. Mark Mattson Dr. Mark Mattson is a professor of neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the former chief of the Neuroscience Research Laboratory at the National Institute on Aging. He's one of the most cited neuroscientists in the world, with more than 180,000 citations noted in the scientific literature. Dr. Mattson's work has advanced scientific understanding of brain aging and identified fundamental aspects of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. His most notable work has focused on how the brain responds to mild stressors, such as those associated with exercise and intermittent fasting. In this episode, Dr. Mattson and I discuss... How hormetic stressors drive adaptation and prevent physiological complacency. How intermittent fasting improves health by promoting metabolic switching. How daily time-restricted eating and 5:2 weekly fasting compare. How a ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting differ in terms of brain effects. How exercising while intermittent fasting exerts additive effects. How plant-based bioactive compounds induce hormetic stress. How severe caloric restriction may harm the body and compromise muscle mass. The differing contexts of intermittent fasting: young vs. old and in men vs. in women. How the effects of cortisol differ during a fast versus chronic uncontrollable stress. How the effects of fasting-mimetics like resveratrol and spermidine compare with actual fasting, and; How ketone supplementation may improve brain health Show notes coming soon! Join over 300,000 people and get the latest distilled information on circadian insights straight to your inbox weekly: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/newsletter Become a FoundMyFitness premium member to get access to exclusive episodes, emails, live Q+A's with Rhonda and more: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/crowdsponsor

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates
Agree to Disagree: Leaving Afghanistan

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 53:16


The Taliban have won. Twenty years after the 2001 invasion, the U.S.-backed government in Kabul has fallen. The Afghan president has fled. Taliban leadership, which ran the country in the late 1990s, is now firmly in place within the presidential palace. But after two decades of war, tens of billions spent, hundreds of thousands of lives lost – including more than 2,300 U.S. military personnel – bigger questions have emerged: Is the cost of leaving greater than the cost of staying? And was pulling out the right decision? Intelligence Squared and its host John Donvan examine these competing perspectives in this special timely edition of Agree-to-Disagree: Leaving Afghanistan.   First, a conversation with Ahmed Rashid, a Pakistani journalist and best-selling author, who is one of the world's leading experts on the social and political situations in Pakistan and Afghanistan. His first book, Taliban: Militant Islam, Oil and Fundamentalism in Central Asia, explores the shadowy world of the Taliban and quickly became a #1 New York Times bestseller.  Rashid has been called “Pakistan's best and bravest reporter” (Christopher Hitchens).  Then, a competition of ideas: Arguing in favor of leaving is Daniel Markey, Senior Research Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. Arguing against leaving is Kori Schake is a senior fellow and the director of foreign and defense policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). Emmy award-winning journalist John Donvan is the moderator.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
#154 Kenneth Kovan & David Berd on Haptenized Vaccines

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021


You did it! DNA Today has been nominated for the Best 2021 Science and Medicine Podcast Award. If you nominated us, check your inbox to see if you were one of the people randomly selected to vote for the show! I was this year and received the email on August 9th. So pause the show now and check to see if you got the email. If you did please go ahead and vote for DNA Today, we need all the votes we can get to defend our title as the best Science and Medicine podcast! This week our host, Kira Dineen, is joined by Kenneth Kovan and Dr. David Berd of BioVaxys, a clinical-stage biopharma company developing antiviral and anticancer vaccine platforms using haptenized viral protein technology.Kenneth Kovan is the Founder, President, and COO of BioVaxys. He has over 30 years of experience in biopharmaceuticals commercial development. Mr. Kovan's professional background includes several years in technology transfer with Thomas Jefferson University, Strategic Marketing with GlaxoSmithKline, and Global New Product Development with Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals. His therapeutic experience includes infectious disease, antivirals, oncology, vaccines, cell/gene therapy, and gene editing. Mr. Kovan has a broad international business background, having launched pharma brands in Latin American and Asia/Pacific markets, and has worked in Europe for several years.David Berd, MD is the Founder and Chief Medical Officer of BioVaxys. He is a medical oncologist with a lifelong record of clinical research in medical oncology and cancer immunotherapy. As National Director for Immunotherapy at Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Dr. Berd investigated the application of the AC vaccine to ovarian cancer. Previously, Dr. Berd was Professor of Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University, where for 20 years he conducted clinical research on melanoma immunotherapy. He also spent nine years as a research physician at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Over the course of his career, Dr. Berd has published more than 85 original papers in numerous medical journals alongside dozens of editorials, reviews and abstracts. He has ten issued patents dealing with cancer vaccines. Have you been vaccinated for COVID-19? Wouldn't it be handy to have a digitized version of your vaccine record? States in the US are starting to do just this, with California leading the way. However privacy concerns have been raised about the personal information being kept in a central database. Genobank.io offers digitized vaccine records, without these privacy concerns. Genobank.io ultizes blockchain networks to keep track of your vaccine record without exposing your personal data!On This Episode We Discuss:How the immune system fights cancer Haptenized vaccines and how they workSafety of haptenized vaccines COVID-19 vaccines Anticancer and antiviral vaccines Vaccinations for COVID-19 variantsTo learn more about BioVaxys, visit their website or check them out on Twitter and LinkedIn. Are you interested in the rapidly growing field of genetics and want to learn more about clinical genetics, molecular genetics, and laboratory science? Then you should check out the Genetic Assistant Online Training Program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine! By taking part in the program, you will be joining both national and international learners with the same passion for genetics. Interact directly with your Johns Hopkins instructors and fellow students throughout the program. Applications are now being reviewed for the Fall 2021 cohort, and a limited number of spots are still available. Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today on September 3, 2021, where I'll be joined by Dena Goldberg to share advice for starting graduate school for genetic counseling! New episodes are released on the first and third Friday of the month. In the meantime, you can binge over 150 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. All episodes in 2021 are also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel. See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNApodcast.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNApodcast.com. Do you want to influence change in the genomics market? Lucky for you a new position just opened at Agilent where you can have an impact as a Genomic Software Field Applications Scientist. In this west coast remote-based role you will provide technical consultation, training, and education to enable customers to perform data analysis in clinical laboratory environments. You will partner with sales to serve as the scientific/technical specialist to help drive sales and provide support for customers in diverse clinical settings. Learn more about the position here. Join our host, Kira Dineen, next week on Clubhouse. Dena Goldberg (aka Dena DNA) will be interviewing her about how to prepare and what to expect in grad school for genetic counseling. This is on Thursday August 26th at 4pmPT (7pmET). Dena and Kira will be answering your questions about grad school live! You can tune in by searching for the “Genetic Counseling & The Future of Healthcare” club in the clubhouse app.

Faculty Factory
Habits, Hacks, and Editorial Services with Rachel Box, MS, ELS

Faculty Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 15:01


Rachel Box, MS, ELS, joins the Faculty Factory Podcast today to discuss the benefits of utilizing specialized, technical editors in scholarly publishing. She is a board certified editor in the life sciences.  Rachel Box is the Director of Editorial Services and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore.  Learn more about today's episode: https://facultyfactory.org/rachel-box

SHINING MIND PODCAST
Episode #67: Learn about the new brain health economy. William Hynes, Head of New Approaches to Economic Challenges at OECD.

SHINING MIND PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 24:15


William Hynes is a Senior Advisor to the Secretary General and the Head of the New Approaches to Economic Challenges (NAEC) Unit which provides a space to question traditional economic ideas and offer new economic narratives, new tools, methods and policy approaches.He previously worked as a Senior Economist at NAEC, Advisor in the Sherpa and Global Governance Unit, a policy analyst in the Development Co-operation Directorate and an Economic Affairs Officer at the World Trade Organisation.William is an Associate Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, has a doctorate from Oxford University and was a Marie Curie Fellow at the London School of Economics.https://www.linkedin.com/in/william-hynes-b794527/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/selenab)

The Leslie Marshall Show
Expert Analysis on COVID-19 Delta Variant and U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan

The Leslie Marshall Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 41:59


The guest host for today's show is Brad Bannon. Brad runs Bannon Communications Research, a polling, message development and media firm which helps labor unions, progressive issue groups and Democratic candidates win public affairs and political campaigns. His show, 'Deadline D.C. with Brad Bannon,' airs every Monday from 3-4pm ET. Brad is first joined Dr. Bob Bollinger, the Raj and Kamla Gupta Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The two discuss the COVID-19 Delta variant, the struggle to safely re-open schools for in-person learning when Governors of states like Florida and Texas have outlawed mask mandates, and more.   Dr. Bollinger is Founding Director of the Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE).  Their website is main.ccghe.net and their Facebook page is Facebook.com/CCGHE. Brad is then joined by Colonel Cedric Leighton, Founder and President of Cedric Leighton Associates, a strategic risk and leadership consultancy serving global companies and organizations. He founded the company in 2010, after serving in the US Air Force for 26 years as an Intelligence Officer and attaining the rank of Colonel. Brad and Colonel Leighton analyze the withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Afghanistan, and what can be learned from how long the U.S. has spent fighting there (21 years). Colonel Leighton's website is CedricLeighton.com and his Twitter handle is @CedricLeighton. Brad writes a political column every Sunday for 'The Hill.' He's on the National Journal's panel of political insiders and is a national political analyst for WGN TV and Radio in Chicago and KNX Radio in Los Angeles. You can read Brad's columns at www.MuckRack.com/Brad-Bannon. His Twitter handle is @BradBannon. Watch a video broadcast of this episode here on Twitter/Periscope: https://www.pscp.tv/w/1vAGRwvBwbqJl Or here on Facebook Live: https://www.facebook.com/DeadlineDCWithBradBannon/videos/983558642430277

Progressive Voices
Leslie Marshall Show -8/16/21- Expert Analysis on COVID-19 Delta Variant and Afghanistan Withdrawal

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 41:59


The guest host for today's show is Brad Bannon. Brad runs Bannon Communications Research, a polling, message development and media firm which helps labor unions, progressive issue groups and Democratic candidates win public affairs and political campaigns. His show, 'Deadline D.C. with Brad Bannon,' airs every Monday from 3-4pm ET. Brad is first joined Dr. Bob Bollinger, the Raj and Kamla Gupta Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The two discuss the COVID-19 Delta variant, the struggle to safely re-open schools for in-person learning when Governors of states like Florida and Texas have outlawed mask mandates, and more. Dr. Bollinger is Founding Director of the Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE). Their website is main.ccghe.net and their Facebook page is Facebook.com/CCGHE. Brad is then joined by Colonel Cedric Leighton, Founder and President of Cedric Leighton Associates, a strategic risk and leadership consultancy serving global companies and organizations. He founded the company in 2010, after serving in the US Air Force for 26 years as an Intelligence Officer and attaining the rank of Colonel. Brad and Colonel Leighton analyze the withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Afghanistan, and what can be learned from how long the U.S. has spent fighting there (21 years). Colonel Leighton's website is CedricLeighton.com and his Twitter handle is @CedricLeighton. Brad writes a political column every Sunday for 'The Hill.' He's on the National Journal's panel of political insiders and is a national political analyst for WGN TV and Radio in Chicago and KNX Radio in Los Angeles. You can read Brad's columns at www.MuckRack.com/Brad-Bannon. His Twitter handle is @BradBannon. Watch a video broadcast of this episode here on Twitter/Periscope: https://www.pscp.tv/w/1vAGRwvBwbqJl Or here on Facebook Live: https://www.facebook.com/DeadlineDCWithBradBannon/videos/983558642430277

Investing in Impact
Andrée Simon // President and CEO of FINCA Impact Finance

Investing in Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 41:32


In episode 31 of the Investing in Impact podcast, I speak with Andrée Simon, President and CEO of FINCA Impact Finance, on empowering low income women and men to take control of their financial future through an innovative global network of microfinance banks.Andrée Simon is the President and Chief Executive Officer of FINCA Impact Finance (FIF), a global network of microfinance banks and institutions. FIF's network of 20 community-based banks offer responsible and affordable loan and saving products to more than two million people across the world, empowering low income women and men to take control of their financial future.Previously, Andrée served as VP and COO, returning to FINCA after serving for several years as President and COO of Women for Women International, a humanitarian organization dedicated to financial, educational, and interpersonal support of women survivors of war, poverty and injustice.Prior to this, she was Deputy to the President & CEO of FINCA for more than seven years, where she was pivotal in redesigning the organization's business model from donor-based non-profit to a for-profit operating structure. Andrée has significant experience in corporate strategy and she has held various business and advisory roles in other organizations, including the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Andrée has been a board member of Women Advancing Microfinance International and is currently a member of the Board of Directors for the FINCA Microfinance Holding Company.As the head a financial institution with more than 9,000 employees in 20 countries –including Tanzania, Uganda, Pakistan, Haiti, Afghanistan and more– Andrée spends half the year in these remote locations, learning from her customers on how they could best access financial products, whether it is as simple as a loan, and savings account or a mobile money application.Andrée has been named one of the Top 100 Fintech for SDG Influencers by LATTICE80 and has written extensively on responsible financial services in numerous publications including International Banker, Euromoney and The Financial Times.She is fluent in French and Spanish. She earned an undergraduate degree in international relations from the University of Virginia, an M.A. from The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, and an M.B.A. in finance from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.Listen to more Causeartist podcasts here.Check out the Impact Investor platform here - Discover Impact Investors from around the world.We are powered by:Podcast Made with TransistorPodcast cover design Made with CanvaBuild amazing web platforms with Webflow

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys
Learn about Schizophrenia with Joy Keys

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 33:00


Special guest:Russell Margolis, M.D. is the clinical director of the Johns Hopkins Schizophrenia Center and a professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Margolis specializes inschizophrenia, affective disorders, and neuropsychiatry, among other conditions, and his research revolves around the interface of psychiatry, neurology, and genetics.

From Washington – FOX News Radio
As The Taliban Advances, Afghanistan Crumbles

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 51:13


This Week: The Senate passed a bipartisan $1-trillion infrastructure plan this week, passing with help of 19 Republicans. Though House Progressives have already said they will not support the bipartisan infrastructure package until the Senate passes a larger $3.5-trillion "human" infrastructure proposal. FOX News Washington Correspondent Rachel Sutherland and FOX News Congressional Correspondent Chad Pergram discuss the uphill battle that the infrastructure bill faces in the House. U.S. troops are heading back to Afghanistan to help get personnel out of the U.S. Embassy in Kabul. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell called on President Biden to reverse course, drawing comparisons to the Fall of Saigon in 1975. The U.S. has reportedly been negotiating with the Taliban to spare troops and personnel as they leave. FOX News Pentagon Producer Lucas Tomlinson discusses the future of the relationship between America and Afghanistan as troops continue to be withdrawn. As more Americans get their COVID-19 vaccinations, new research suggests that mRNA shots may not offer as much protection against the Delta variant. The data collected shows the Pfizer vaccine was 42% effective in combating the new strand, while the Moderna vaccine showed 76% effectiveness. Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine & Fox News Contributor Dr. Marty Makary urges citizens to be wary of the Delta variant, but to also pay attention to natural immunity. It's been a busy week at the White House. President Biden has faced mounting criticism over what's happening in Afghanistan as the Taliban advances in the region, along with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announcing his resignation moments after the Senate passed its bipartisan infrastructure package. Other legislative initiatives hitting the president's desk include voting rights and police reform. FOX News White House Correspondent Jacqui Heinrich breaks down this week at the White House.

DKBmed Radio
8/11/2021 - Latest News on COVID-19 Treatments

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 53:07


Drs. Paul Long and Paul Auwaerter discuss the latest news on treating COVID-19 patients in and out of the hospital. Topics: *Test your knowledge with patient cases *Efficacy and safety of treatment options *The latest treatment guidelines and recommendations Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/hospitalists/8-11-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA, Past President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Paul Long, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, General Internal Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SmartHERNews
Asked & Answered: SmartHER with Dr. Marty Makary

SmartHERNews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 49:00


What's really the truth about natural immunity and COVID-19? What should those with a previous infection consider when weighing a COVID-19 vaccine? What about mask wearing and children? And what do many of those severely ill from COVID have in common that no one seems to want to focus on? Dr. Marty Makary, professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has never avoided tough questions or breaking from the pack of group-think. We ask him about some of his recent work and why he thinks it's worth igniting a firestorm of debate over some of the most talked about issues of our time.

Life as a Nephrologist Series
COVID-19 Vaccine in Transplant Recipients with Dr. Dorry Segev

Life as a Nephrologist Series

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 24:34


Dr. Dorry Segev has recently concluded multiple studies that looked at the immune response to COVID-19 vaccination in kidney transplant recipients. In this episode, Sam Kant (our new Life as a Nephrologist co-host) and Dorry Segev discuss these pivotal studies including the process, results, and directions going forward. Lastly, they discuss breakthrough infections.   List of study's discussed: Immunogenicity of a Single Dose of SARS-CoV-2 Messenger RNA Vaccine in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Antibody Response to 2-Dose SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine Series in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Safety and Immunogenicity of a Third Dose of SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: A Case Series Risk of Breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 Infections in Adult Transplant Recipients   Dorry Segev, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Surgery and Epidemiology and Associate Vice Chair of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University. He has published over 650 peer-reviewed research articles, and is ranked #1 worldwide in organ transplantation expertise and influence by ExpertScape. Reflecting his contributions to health care, he was recently elected into the National Academy of Medicine. Reflecting the creativity and broad reach of his contributions, he received a prestigious Global Thinker Award from Foreign Policy Magazine and was named an Innovators of the Year by TIME Magazine. His work has directly influenced policy, including two Congressional bills (the Norwood Act for kidney exchange and the HOPE Act for HIV-to-HIV transplants), and is regularly featured in widely read media including several front-page features in the New York Times. In the context of the pandemic, Dr. Segev has shifted his research to better understanding coronavirus and its implications in solid organ transplantation.   We are bringing on a new co-host for this episode, please help us welcome Sam Kant, MD! He is a transplant nephrology fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He has completed nephrology fellowship at Johns Hopkins, internal medicine residency and chief residency at University of Maryland. His research interests include ANCA vasculitis, transplantation and has been a recipient of multiple awards in the realm of education. He is also the chair of the American College of Physicians Young Physician Council, co-editor of the Renal Fellow Network and editorial board member of American Society of Nephrology Kidney News. Additionally, he is a member of the planning committee for the 2022 NKF Spring Clinical Meetings.   

DKBmed Radio
8/4/2021 - Delta Variant Burning Questions

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 19:04


Dr. Paul Auwaerter answers your burning questions about the COVID-19 Delta variant. Topics: *The impact of the Delta variant on masking and social distancing guidance *Risk of hospitalization and death for unvaccinated vs. vaccinated people *New FDA authorization for monoclonal antibody therapy *How do labs test for the Delta variant? Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/8-4-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSAPast President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.03.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 61:25


When stressed, people are quicker to jump to the worst conclusion University College London, July 29, 2021 When under stress, people reach undesirable conclusions based on weaker evidence than when they are relaxed, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The findings, published today in the Journal of Neuroscience, show that stress can make people more likely to conclude the worst scenario is true. Senior author Professor Tali Sharot (UCL Psychology & Language Sciences and Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research) said: "Many of the most significant choices you will make, from financial decisions to medical and professional ones, will happen while you feel stressed. Often these decisions require you to first gather information and weigh the evidence. For example, you may consult multiple physicians before deciding on a best course of medical treatment. We wanted to find out: does feeling stressed change how you process and use the information you gather? "Our research suggests that under stress, people weight each piece of evidence that supports undesirable conclusions more than when they are relaxed. In contrast, how they weigh evidence that supports desirable conclusions is not affected by stress. As a result, people are more likely to conclude the worst is true when they are stressed." For the study, 91 volunteers played a categorisation game, in which they could gather as much evidence as they wanted to decide whether they were in a desirable environment (which was associated with rewards) or an undesirable environment (which was associated with losses). They were incentivised for accuracy. Prior to playing the game, 40 of the volunteers were told that they had to give a surprise public speech, which would be judged by a panel of experts. This caused them to feel stressed and anxious. The researchers found that under stress, the volunteers needed weaker evidence to reach the conclusion that they were in the undesirable environment. By contrast, stress did not change the strength of the evidence needed to reach the conclusion that they were in the desirable environment. Lead author, PhD student Laura Globig (UCL Psychology & Language Sciences and Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research) said that "we usually think of stressful situations as a hindrance to our decision-making process. But the pattern of learning we have uncovered may counterintuitively be adaptive, because negative beliefs may drive people to be extra cautious when in threatening environments."   Thai Cabinet Approves Use of Fah Talai Jone (green chiretta) to Treat Asymptomatic COVID-19 Cases Bangkok Post, July 22, 2021 Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has instructed authorities to set up a committee to study the use of green chiretta (Andrographis paniculata) extracts to treat Covid-19 patients with mild symptoms. The announcement was made at a cabinet meeting on Tuesday, which was convened to discuss additional measures to help curb the Covid-19 outbreak, the premier said on Wednesday. Deputy Prime Minister and Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul was appointed head of the committee. It will coordinate studies on the safety and efficacy of green chiretta extracts on Covid-19 patients, as well as draft a strategic plan to promote Thai traditional medicine in general. The decision was taken in response to a proposal from Justice Minister Somsak Thepsutin, who urged the government to scale up the use of traditional medicines on Covid-19 patients with mild symptoms. This comes amid a vaccine shortage which has led to criticism for the government. His proposal came with evidence showing the Department of Corrections' success in treating 12,376 inmates who were infected with Covid-19 with green chiretta extracts. Of this number, 5,045 inmates were in Chiang Mai Central Prison, 2,100 in Nonthaburi Provincial Prison and 5,231 in Bang Kwang Central Prison also in Nonthaburi, said Mr Somsak. Before prescribing the herbal medicine to infected inmates, Mr Somsak said he had studied information by the Department of Thai Traditional and Alternative Medicine, which recommended a dosage of 180mg of andrographolides from green chiretta for five consecutive days to patients with mild symptoms. Citing the same research, the minister said each rai of land can yield up to 600kg of green chirettas, which can be turned into roughly 375,000 herbal extract capsules, he said. A total of 3.1 billion such capsules will be needed to cover all Thais, which means 8,400 rai of land will need to be planted with the herb, he said. The Department of Corrections now plans to produce about 50 million capsules of the herbal medicine in the next four months, which it aims to prescribe to about 50% of the prison population, he said. Due to its medical benefits, green chiretta has become a cash crop which is now in high demand in the export sector, he said. Mr Somsak added that the medicinal herb costs about 450 baht per kg    Taking breaks while learning improves memory   Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology (Germany), July 29, 2021 We remember things longer if we take breaks during learning, referred to as the spacing effect. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology gained deeper insight into the neuronal basis for this phenomenon in mice. With longer intervals between learning repetitions, mice reuse more of the same neurons as before—instead of activating different ones. Possibly, this allows the neuronal connections to strengthen with each learning event, such that knowledge is stored for a longer time. Many of us have experienced the following: the day before an exam, we try to cram a huge amount of information into our brain. But just as quickly as we acquired it, the knowledge we have painstakingly gained is gone again. The good news is that we can counteract this forgetting. With expanded time intervals between individual learning events, we retain the knowledge for a longer time. But what happens in the brain during the spacing effect, and why is taking breaks so beneficial for our memory? It is generally thought that during learning, neurons are activated and form new connections. In this way, the learned knowledge is stored and can be retrieved by reactivating the same set of neurons. However, we still know very little about how pauses positively influence this process—even though the spacing effect was described more than a century ago and occurs in almost all animals. Learning in a maze Annet Glas and Pieter Goltstein, neurobiologists in the team of Mark Hübener and Tobias Bonhoeffer, investigated this phenomenon in mice. To do this, the animals had to remember the position of a hidden chocolate piece in a maze. On three consecutive opportunities, they were allowed to explore the maze and find their reward—including pauses of varying lengths. "Mice that were trained with the longer intervals between learning phases were not able to remember the position of the chocolate as quickly," explains Annet Glas. "But on the next day, the longer the pauses, the better was the mice's memory." During the maze test, the researchers additionally measured the activity of neurons in the prefrontal cortex. This brain region is of particular interest for learning processes, as it is known for its role in complex thinking tasks. Accordingly, the scientists showed that inactivation of the prefrontal cortex impaired the mice's performance in the maze. "If three learning phases follow each other very quickly, we intuitively expected the same neurons to be activated," Pieter Goltstein says. "After all, it is the same experiment with the same information. However, after a long break, it would be conceivable that the brain interprets the following learning phase as a new event and processes it with different neurons." However, the researchers found exactly the opposite when they compared the neuronal activity during different learning phases. After short pauses, the activation pattern in the brain fluctuated more than compared to long pauses: In fast successive learning phases, the mice activated mostly different neurons. When taking longer breaks, the same neurons active during the first learning phase were used again later. Memory benefits from longer breaks Reactivating the same neurons could allow the brain to strengthen the connections between these cells in each learning phase—there is no need to start from scratch and establish the contacts first. "That's why we believe that memory benefits from longer breaks," says Pieter Goltstein. Thus, after more than a century, the study provides the first insights into the neuronal processes that explain the positive effect of learning breaks. With spaced learning, we may reach our goal more slowly, but we benefit from our knowledge for much longer. Hopefully, we won't have forgotten this by the time we take our next exam!     The flavonoid epicatechin inhibits progressive tau pathology in Alzheimer's University of Bath (UK), July 23, 2021 According to news reporting originating in Avon, United Kingdom, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, “Aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHFs) and neurofibrillary tangles is a defining characteristic of Alzheimer's Disease. Various plant polyphenols disrupt tau aggregation in vitro but display poor bioavailability and low potency, challenging their therapeutic translation.”  Green tea, cocoa, blackberries and blueberries are high in epicatechin. The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Bath, “We previously reported that oral administration of the flavonoid (-)-epicatechin (EC) reduced Amyloid-beta (A beta) plaque pathology in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Here, we investigated whether EC impacts on tau pathology, independent of actions on A beta, using rTg4510 mice expressing P301L mutant tau. 4 and 6.5 months old rTg4510 mice received EC (similar to 18 mg/day) or vehicle (ethanol) via drinking water for 21 days and the levels of total and phosphorylated tau were assessed. At 4 months, tau appeared as two bands of similar to 55 kDa, phosphorylated at Ser262 and Ser396 and was unaffected by exposure to EC. At 6.5 months an additional higher molecular weight form of tau was detected at similar to 64 kDa which was phosphorylated at Ser262, Ser396 and additionally at the AT8 sites, indicative of the presence of PHFs. EC consumption reduced the levels of the similar to 64 kDa tau species and inhibited phosphorylation at Ser262 and AT8 phosphoepitopes. Regulation of the key tau kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3 beta) by phosphorylation at Ser9 was not altered by exposure to EC in mice or primary neurons. Furthermore, EC did not significantly inhibit GSK3 beta activity at physiologically-relevant concentrations in a cell free assay.” According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “Therefore, a 21-day intervention with EC inhibits or reverses the development of tau pathology in rTg4510 mice independently of direct inhibition of GSK3 beta.”     Fruit compound may have potential to prevent and treat Parkinson's disease   Johns Hopkins University, July 29, 2021 Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the compound farnesol, found naturally in herbs, and berries and other fruits, prevents and reverses brain damage linked to Parkinson's disease in mouse studies. he compound, used in flavorings and perfume-making, can prevent the loss of neurons that produce dopamine in the brains of mice by deactivating PARIS, a key proteininvolved in the disease's progression. Loss of such neurons affects movement and cognition, leading to hallmark symptoms of Parkinson's disease such as tremors, muscle rigidity, confusion and dementia. Farnesol's ability to block PARIS, say the researchers, could guide development of new Parkinson's disease interventions that specifically target this protein. "Our experiments showed that farnesol both significantly prevented the loss of dopamine neurons and reversed behavioral deficits in mice, indicating its promise as a potential drug treatment to prevent Parkinson's disease," says Ted Dawson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering and professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Results of the new study, published July 28, in Science Translational Medicine, detail how the researchers identified farnesol's potential by screening a large library of drugs to find those that inhibited PARIS. In the brains of people with Parkinson's disease, a buildup of PARIS slows down the manufacture of the protective protein PGC-1alpha. The protein shields brain cells from damaging reactive oxygen molecules that accumulate in the brain. Without PGC-1alpha, dopamine neurons die off, leading to the cognitive and physical changes associated with Parkinson's disease. To study whether farnesol could protect brains from the effects of PARIS accumulation, the researchers fed mice either a farnesol-supplemented diet or a regular mouse diet for one week. Then, the researchers administered pre-formed fibrils of the protein alpha-synuclein, which is associated with the effects of Parkinson's disease in the brain. The researchers found that the mice fed the farnesol diet performed better on a strength and coordination test designed to detect advancement of Parkinson's disease symptoms. On average, the mice performed 100% better than mice injected with alpha-synuclein, but fed a regular diet. When the researchers later studied brain tissue of mice in the two groups, they found that the mice fed a farnesol-supplemented diet had twice as many healthy dopamine neurons than mice not fed the farnesol-enriched diet. The farnesol-fed mice also had approximately 55% more of the protective protein PGC-1alpha in their brains than the untreated mice. In chemical experiments, the researchers confirmed that farnesol binds to PARIS, changing the protein's shape so that it can no longer interfere with PGC-1alpha production. While farnesol is naturally produced, synthetic versions are used in commerce, and the amounts people get through diet is unclear. The researchers caution that safe doses of farnesol for humans have not yet been determined, and that only carefully controlled clinical trials can do so. Though more research is needed, Dawson and his team hope farnesol can someday be used to create treatments that prevent or reverse brain damage caused by Parkinson's disease.   Plant compounds reveal anticancer mechanisms Russian Academy of Sciences, July 28 2021.  Research published on June 9, 2021 in Scientific Reportsexplored mechanisms involved in the cancer protective effects of 30 compounds derived from fruits and vegetables. The researchers hope that their findings will contribute to the formulation of new drugs that will have fewer side effects than drugs currently in use.   “To create potent new drugs that will target only the tumor, it was necessary to determine how dietary compounds affect cell proteins in the prevention and treatment of cancer,” explained coauthor Grigory Zyryanov, who is a professor at the Russian Academy of Sciences. “Therefore, by modeling molecular mechanisms, we figured out how substances bind to proteins. This allowed us to determine the pool of therapeutic targets that the drugs will subsequently target. For example, these are anti-apoptotic (prevent apoptosis) and pro-apoptotic (induce apoptosis) proteins, protein kinases, and others. But a key drug target is phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase . . . This enzyme influences mutations in cancer, rearrangement, and amplification of genes.” Compounds investigated in the study included emodin, eugenol, gingerol, sulforaphane, linalool, catechin, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, curcumin, yakuchinone-A, pinusolide, alpha-boswellic acid, oleandrin, sesquiterpene lactone-326, resveratrol, triterpenoid, beta-boswellic acid, anethole, capsaicin, glycolic acid, quercetin, genistein, ellagic acid, flavopiridol, zerumbone, garcinol, guggulsterone, parthenolide, halogenated monoterpenes and silibinin. Of these compounds, silibinin, flavopiridol, oleandrin, ursolic acid, alpha-boswellic acid, beta-boswellic acid, triterpenoid, guggulsterone and oleanolic acid had the greatest binding affinity with phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase alpha (P13K), which is involved in functions that can contribute to cancer. Other targets identified as binding with various compounds included PKC-η, Ras and H-Ras.  “We assumed that the foods we selected for the study had anti-cancer properties, but this needed to be verified,” Dr Zyryanov noted. “As a result, we found out that diseased cells stop development under the influence of certain combinations of food compounds.”     Meta-analysis supports potential of omega-3s for ADHD Kings College London, July 31, 2021 Omega-3s fatty acid supplements may improve symptoms and cognitive performance in children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a meta-analysis of gold standard clinical trials. Data from seven clinical trials involving over 500 children and adolescents indicated that omega-3s were associated with improvements in clinical symptoms of ADHD, while data from three clinical trials involving over 200 children and adolescents indicated a positive impact on cognitive measures associated with attention. “[W]e provide strong evidence supporting a role for n3-PUFAs deficiency in ADHD, and for advocating n-3 PUFAs supplementation as a clinically relevant intervention in this group, especially if guided by a biomarker-based personalization approach,” wrote the authors, led by Jane Pei-Chen Chang from King's College London, in Neuropsychopharmacology . Boosting EPA/DHA intakes Commenting independently on the meta-analysis, Harry Rice, PhD, VP of regulatory & scientific affairs for the Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3s (GOED): “In the past, I've been lukewarm on whether or not increasing EPA/DHA intake benefits children with ADHD. Results from this meta-analysis put me a little closer to believing. “Minimally, given the low side effect profile of omega-3s versus the drugs of choice to treat ADHD, I would highly recommend first increasing intake of EPA/DHA. This is particularly true if a child doesn't eat at least two servings of fatty fish a week or doesn't take an omega-3 supplement on a regular basis.” Meta-analysis details The new meta-analysis was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines and used established scientific literature databases to identify appropriate studies for inclusion. Data from seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 534 young people indicated that that omega-s3 supplementation significantly improved inattention and hyperactivity symptoms, according to parental reports. Additional analysis revealed that the improvements in hyperactivity were only observed when doses of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) of 500 mg/day or more were used. Interesting, the researchers did not find improvements in hyperactivity and inattention when they looked at teacher's reports, unlike what was reported by parents. Omega-3 supplements were associated with improvements in select measures of cognitive performance, said the researchers. “N-3 PUFAs are crucial for optimal neurotransmitter function: for example, incorporating more EPA and DHA in the cell membrane can increase cholesterol efflux, modulate lipid raft clustering and disruption, and affect the function of the dopamine transporter (DAT), which in turn may affect attention and executive function by regulating synaptic dopamine levels,” wrote the researchers. Omega-3 levels Data from case-control studies were also collected to assess if omega-3 levels were also associated with ADHD, with results indicating that children and adolescents with ADHD had lower levels of EPA, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid),and total omega-3s. “In the context of ‘personalised medicine', it is tempting to speculate that a subpopulation of youth with ADHD and with low levels of n-3 PUFAs may respond better to n-3 PUFAs supplementation, but there are no studies to date attempting this stratification approach,” wrote the researchers. “However, we have [previously] shown that individuals at genetic risk of developing depression in the context of the immune challenge, interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), have lower levels of RBCs n3-PUFAs, and that n-3 PUFAs supplementation prevents the onset of IFN-alpha-induced depression, arguably by replenishing the endogenously low anti-inflammatory PUFAs in the ‘at risk' individuals.”

The Leslie Marshall Show
Health System CEO for Gun Violence Prevention; COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates

The Leslie Marshall Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 43:20


Leslie is first joined by Michael Dowling, President and CEO of Northwell Health.  Dowling is one of health care's most influential voices, taking a stand on societal issues such as gun violence and immigration that many health system CEOs shy away from.  Leslie and Michael discuss why he and 17 other health system CEOs, along with over 1,300 caregivers, are imploring Congress to support President Biden's gun violence plan. As President and CEO of Northwell Health, Michael Dowling leads a clinical, academic and research enterprise with a workforce of more than 75,000 and annual revenue of $14 billion dollars. Northwell is the largest health care provider and private employer in New York State, caring for more than two million people annually through a vast network of more than 830 outpatient facilities, including 220 primary care practices, 52 urgent care centers, home care, rehabilitation and end-of-life programs, and 23 hospitals. The website for Northwell Health is Northwell.edu and their Twitter handle is @NorthwellHealth. Michael's Twitter handle is @MichaelJDowling. During the second half of the show, Leslie is joined by Dr. Bob Bollinger, the Raj and Kamla Gupta Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Leslie and Dr. Bollinger discuss COVID-19 variants, including the Delta variant.  They also talk about vaccine mandates, and whether they will become necessary within the United States. Dr. Bollinger is Founding Director of the Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE).  Their website is main.ccghe.net and their Facebook page is Facebook.com/CCGHE.

Progressive Voices
Leslie Marshall Show -7/27/21- Health System CEO for Gun Violence Prevention; COVID Vaccine Mandates

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 43:19


Leslie is first joined by Michael Dowling, President and CEO of Northwell Health. Dowling is one of health care's most influential voices, taking a stand on societal issues such as gun violence and immigration that many health system CEOs shy away from. Leslie and Michael discuss why he and 17 other health system CEOs, along with over 1,300 caregivers, are imploring Congress to support President Biden's gun violence plan. As President and CEO of Northwell Health, Michael Dowling leads a clinical, academic and research enterprise with a workforce of more than 75,000 and annual revenue of $14 billion dollars. Northwell is the largest health care provider and private employer in New York State, caring for more than two million people annually through a vast network of more than 830 outpatient facilities, including 220 primary care practices, 52 urgent care centers, home care, rehabilitation and end-of-life programs, and 23 hospitals. The website for Northwell Health is Northwell.edu and their Twitter handle is @NorthwellHealth. Michael's Twitter handle is @MichaelJDowling. During the second half of the show, Leslie is joined by Dr. Bob Bollinger, the Raj and Kamla Gupta Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Leslie and Dr. Bollinger discuss COVID-19 variants, including the Delta variant. They also talk about vaccine mandates, and whether they will become necessary within the United States. Dr. Bollinger is Founding Director of the Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE). Their website is main.ccghe.net and their Facebook page is Facebook.com/CCGHE.

Progressive Voices
Leslie Marshall Show -7/27/21- Health System CEO for Gun Violence Prevention; COVID Vaccine Mandates

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 43:19


Leslie is first joined by Michael Dowling, President and CEO of Northwell Health. Dowling is one of health care's most influential voices, taking a stand on societal issues such as gun violence and immigration that many health system CEOs shy away from. Leslie and Michael discuss why he and 17 other health system CEOs, along with over 1,300 caregivers, are imploring Congress to support President Biden's gun violence plan. As President and CEO of Northwell Health, Michael Dowling leads a clinical, academic and research enterprise with a workforce of more than 75,000 and annual revenue of $14 billion dollars. Northwell is the largest health care provider and private employer in New York State, caring for more than two million people annually through a vast network of more than 830 outpatient facilities, including 220 primary care practices, 52 urgent care centers, home care, rehabilitation and end-of-life programs, and 23 hospitals. The website for Northwell Health is Northwell.edu and their Twitter handle is @NorthwellHealth. Michael's Twitter handle is @MichaelJDowling. During the second half of the show, Leslie is joined by Dr. Bob Bollinger, the Raj and Kamla Gupta Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Leslie and Dr. Bollinger discuss COVID-19 variants, including the Delta variant. They also talk about vaccine mandates, and whether they will become necessary within the United States. Dr. Bollinger is Founding Director of the Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE). Their website is main.ccghe.net and their Facebook page is Facebook.com/CCGHE.

DKBmed Radio
7/28/2021 - Delta Variant Part 2

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 13:56


Dr. Paul Auwaerter discusses the COVID-19 Delta variant. Topics: *Where and why the Delta variant is spreading *Do we need vaccine booster doses to protect against variants? *Treatments: oral antiviral molnupiravir and steroids *Data on vaccine effectiveness against the Delta variant Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/7-28-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSAPast President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

DKBmed Radio
7/23/2021 - Q&A

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 14:51


Dr. Paul Auwaerter answers your COVID-19 questions. Topics: *Can you tell if a patient has the Delta variant? *Expectations for the flu this year *Explaining questions of remdesivir efficacy *What if a patient misses a mRNA vaccine dose? Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/7-28-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSAPast President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Broadcast Retirement Network
BRN AM  | An Imaging Test May Predict Patients Most at Risk from COVID Heart Complications

The Broadcast Retirement Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 18:24


BRN AM  | An Imaging Test May Predict Patients Most at Risk from COVID Heart Complications |  Erin Goerlich, M.D., cardiology fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine   | Visit www.broadcastretirementnetwork.com

Once a Scientist
50. [Former] PhD student, Alisa Atkins, on the intersection between art and science

Once a Scientist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 83:02


Episode 50. Alisa Atkins is a technical sales consultant at Miltenyi Biotec. She completed her undergraduate in Molecular Biology at UC Berkeley and her PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health.

The Pulse
New Developments in Cancer Treatment

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 48:45


It seems like every week, we hear about new breakthroughs in cancer treatment — new discoveries, new medications, new hopes for a cure. The war on cancer has been a slow and steady grind, with incremental progress that's been built one study, one breakthrough at a time. Behind each of those small but meaningful victories are years of unseen work — lifetimes spent studying specific cells, protein structures, gene mutations, and more. On this episode, we take a look at some of the latest breakthroughs in cancer treatment, and the personal stories behind them. We hear about the tradeoffs with new lung cancer screenings, find out how immunotherapy is advancing, and talk with a veteran of cancer research about the big wins and grating frustrations. Also heard on this week’s episode: Veteran oncologist and researcher Otis Brawley offers an overview of America's war on cancer. Brawley, a ​​professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, explains where we've made progress — and where we haven't. Screening people who are at high risk for lung cancer can lead to earlier detection, and much better outcomes. Dan Gorenstein from the podcast Tradeoffs looks into why not enough people are getting screened, and what doctors are doing to change that.

Faculty Factory
Habits and Hacks with Barbara Fivush, MD | Faculty Factory Podcast | Episode 130

Faculty Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 51:38


Barbara Fivush, MD, is our guest on today's episode of the Faculty Factory Podcast. She joins us for an engaging chat about the habits and hacks that have led to her success in academic medicine. She also shares with us some of the wisdom she has gained while launching three different leadership programs for women faculty. With the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Dr. Fivush serves as Senior Associate Dean of Women; Director, Office of Women in Science and Medicine; and Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Nephrology.  Learn more about today's episode: https://facultyfactory.org/barbara-fivush

DKBmed Radio
7/7/2021 - Delta Variant

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 14:19


Dr. Paul Auwaerter discusses the COVID-19 Delta variant. Topics: *How dangerous is the Delta variant *Mutations that make the Delta variant concerning *Does mRNA immunization impact fertility? *Is ivermectin an effective COVID-19 treatment? *Monoclonal antibodies that are effective against the Delta variant Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/7-7-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSAPast President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The FOX News Rundown
There's A New Covid Variant. How Concerned Should You Be?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 27:56


President Biden is ramping up his vaccination initiative in hopes of preventing another coronavirus spike across the U.S. from the Delta variant and the more recent Lambda variant. Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Fox News Medical contributor, Dr. Marty Makary joins today to discuss how concerned Americans should be about the threat of the new COVID-19 variants and what protocols we should take as we prepare to return to school or the office. Jesse Watters has saved the world. At least that is what the co-host of FOX News' "The Five" claims in his new book, "How I Saved The World." Watters joins the Rundown to discuss his career at FOX, some of the more contentious confrontations he experienced while reporting for the news network, and why he is not bothered by his critics. Watters also discusses an awkward confrontation with former Vice President Al Gore and looks back at "The Five" as it celebrates its tenth anniversary. Plus, commentary by Guy Benson, host of the Guy Benson Show.

From Washington – FOX News Radio
There's A New Covid Variant. How Concerned Should You Be?

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 27:56


President Biden is ramping up his vaccination initiative in hopes of preventing another coronavirus spike across the U.S. from the Delta variant and the more recent Lambda variant. Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Fox News Medical contributor, Dr. Marty Makary joins today to discuss how concerned Americans should be about the threat of the new COVID-19 variants and what protocols we should take as we prepare to return to school or the office. Jesse Watters has saved the world. At least that is what the co-host of FOX News' "The Five" claims in his new book, "How I Saved The World." Watters joins the Rundown to discuss his career at FOX, some of the more contentious confrontations he experienced while reporting for the news network, and why he is not bothered by his critics. Watters also discusses an awkward confrontation with former Vice President Al Gore and looks back at "The Five" as it celebrates its tenth anniversary. Plus, commentary by Guy Benson, host of the Guy Benson Show.

DKBmed Radio
6/30/2021 - Updates on COVID-19 Treatments

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 56:50


Drs. David Klimpl and Paul Auwaerter discuss the latest recommendations and guidelines for treating COVID-19 patients in and out of the hospital. Topics: *NEW: monoclonal antibody treatment and recommendations for both ambulatory and hospitalized patients *Best practices for managing patients with COVID-19 *Test your knowledge with patient cases! Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/hospitalists/6-30-21-session/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSAPast President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine David Klimpl, MDAssistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver - Anschultz Medical Campus, Denver, CO See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Georgia Governor Brian Kemp: "This Bill Does Not Suppress"

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 51:58


This week, Speaker Nancy Pelosi pressed ahead with a select committee after legislation establishing a bipartisan, independent panel made up of experts outside Congress to further investigate the events that unfolded on January 6th at the Capitol. Fox News Congressional Correspondent, Chad Pergram, explains what to expect from the latest investigation into the insurrection.  The Department of Justice is suing the state of Georgia over its new voting rights law, The Election Integrity Act of 2021 or SB 202. U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland said Georgia's election law was passed, “with the purpose of denying or abridging the right of Black Georgians to vote on account of their race or color.” SB 202 requires voter ID for absentee ballots, expands early in-person voting, limits the use of drop boxes, shortens runoff elections, and prohibits outside groups from giving free food or water to people waiting in line. FOX News Washington Correspondent Rachel Sutherland speaks with Georgia Governor Brian Kemp (R) about the DOJ lawsuit against his state's voting law and why he's defending voter I.D. for absentee ballots. President Joe Biden launched a series of missile strikes against Iranian-backed militia groups in Iraq and Syria last weekend. The Biden administration citing self-defense and that President Biden had the power to order the strikes under constitutional authority. This is the second time this year the President ordered airstrikes without notifying Congress until afterward, leaving Democrats frustrated and pushing to revise the Authorization for Use of Military Force that was put into place after the September 11th attacks. Fox News Washington Correspondent Rachel Sutherland speaks with Fox News State Department Correspondent, Rich Edson about the fallout from the strikes, as well as the current state of US-Iran relations, as the Biden administration attempts to renegotiate the nuclear deal. As the Fourth of July approaches and some Americans travel to celebrate with friends and family, the United States will fall short of President Biden's goal of vaccinating at least 70% of Americans by the holiday. Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine & Fox News Contributor, Dr. Marty Makary helps explain how the vaccination rate doesn't tell the whole story about the COVID-19 risk. 

This Week in Travel
Steven Shalowitz - Traveling to China and Israel

This Week in Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 60:45


Steven is the Host of "The One Way Ticket Show" podcast, where he explores with his acclaimed guests where they would go if given a one-way ticket, no coming back. Their destinations may be in the past, present, future, real, imaginary, or state of mind. He also chats with his guests about their lives and work. Steven is also the Host of the "IsraelCast" podcast. He speaks with experts about their work in Israel in high tech, medicine, agriculture, water management, the culinary & visual arts, and more.   Born and raised in Chicago, Steven worked for Young & Rubicam Advertising in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Ho Chi Minh City, Singapore, and New York City.   While producing and hosting a radio show in Singapore, he conceived the idea for "The One Way Ticket Show," which he launched as a podcast after moving to New York.    An exhibited photographer with a penchant for travel to rogue nations, Steven's adventures have taken him to nearly 70 countries, including North Korea, Libya, Iran, Burundi, Sudan, Syria, Burkina Faso, and Saudi Arabia.   Steven earned his B.A. (Honors) in Chinese Language & Literature from Washington University in St. Louis and his M.A. in International Relations from The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, D.C.  

Midday
Psychedelic Drugs Offer Effective New Psychiatric Treatments

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 49:34


For months, the world's leading science journals have been filled with the news of research trials on new drug treatments for disorders such as post-traumatic stress syndrome, clinical depression, and drug and alcohol addiction. What makes these treatments so remarkable is that they employ two powerful psychedelics, or hallucinogenic, compounds that provide patients with significant - and lasting - relief.The startling results have spring-boarded two once-taboo drugs – psilocybin and MDMA (aka "Ecstasy") – into mainstream medicine. Both psychedelics appear to be moving toward eventual FDA approval for clinical therapeutic use. Some states have already made them legal. Today on Midday: the potential, and perils, of psychedelic psychiatry. Two of the nation's leading researchers in this burgeoning field join Tom for the hour: Dr. Rick Doblinis the founder and executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies. MAPS is a Boston-based non-profit research, education and advocacy organization. Dr. Doblin leads more than a hundred neuroscientists, pharmacologists and regulatory specialists on a mission to bring psychedelic psychiatry into the medical mainstream. Dr. Doblin joins us on our digital line (and Zoom) from New York City… Dr. Roland Griffithsis a psycho-pharmacologist and professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He's also a specialist in mind-altering meditation practices, and the founding director of the two year-old Hopkins Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research. He is the author of a landmark 2006 study showing the beneficial effects of psilocybin. Dr. Griffiths join us on Zoom. Our guests also address listener questions and comments. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pharmacy Podcast Network
A Tale of Two Health Systems, Retail Pharmacy, & the Evolution of the CancelRx | UnScripted by Surescripts

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 42:20


A Tale of Two Health Systems, a Retail Pharmacy, and the Evolution of the CancelRx Standard  Despite implementation of health information technology targeting medication safety, ambulatory adverse drug events (ADEs) prompt over four million people to seek medical care resulting in $8 billion in healthcare expenditures annually. Communication between prescribers and pharmacies is critical to prevent ADE. The National Council for Prescription Drug Programs' (NCPDP) SCRIPT standard supports the functionality to send electronic prescription cancellations from EHRs to pharmacies, known as CancelRx Guests Charlie Oltman, Program Director, NCPDP Foundation Dr. Samantha Pitts, assistant professor, Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Tolu Akinwale, Manager of E-Prescribing, Walgreens Michelle Chui, PharmD, PhD, FAPhA, Hammel-Sanders Professor, Social & Administrative Sciences Division, Director, Health Services Research in Pharmacy PhD Program, Director, Sonderegger Research Center for Improved Medication Outcomes, University of Wisconsin – Madison, School of Pharmacy See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Afropop Worldwide
Hip Deep Angola Part 4: The Cuban Intervention In Angola

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 59:00


The 27 year-long Angolan civil war was also an international crossroads of the Cold War as well as a regional resource war, involving Cuba, the Soviet Union, Zaire, South Africa, and the U.S. When it was over, Namibia was independent, apartheid had fallen, Angola was a nation, and the Soviet Union had ceased to exist. Through music, interviews, and historical radio clips, producer Ned Sublette, author of Cuba and Its Music, tells the story of Cuba's massive commitment in Africa, from the Cuban Revolution in 1959 and the subsequent independence of Congo, to the end of the Soviet Union in 1991. We'll talk to guest scholar Piero Gleijeses, foreign policy specialist at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and author of Conflicting Missions: Havana, Washington, and Africa 1959-1976 and the forthcoming Visions of Freedom, and to Marissa Moorman, author of the forthcoming Tuning in to Nation: Radio, State Power, and the Cold War in Angola, 1933-2002, who will share with us rare archival recordings. We'll talk to Cuban trovador Tony Pinelli, who traveled in a brigada artística playing music for Cuban soldiers and for Angolans, and to Angolan composer, instrument builder, and musicologist Victor Gama, who traveled in remote areas of the interior recording music. And from Cuba, Angola, Zaire, and Portugal, we'll hear some of the music that accompanied the struggle. Produced by Ned Sublette. [APWW #653] [Originally aired 2012]

The Cribsiders
#26: Neonatal HSV

The Cribsiders

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 62:16


Join the Cribsiders team as we unroof a serious diagnosis that you don't want to miss. We discuss perinatal prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of herpes simplex virus and how it can affect the newborn with neonatology expert, Dr. Chris Golden. Christopher Golden. MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a neonatologist whose interests include congenital and neonatal infections, neonatal bilirubin metabolism, care of healthy newborns, and pediatric medical student education. And check out the show notes for his marriage-worthy cheesecake recipe! 

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4E20: The Psychology of the Psychedelics | Roland Griffiths - Jordan B Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 153:27


Dr. Roland Griffiths, Ph.D., is a professor of neuroscience, psychiatry, and behavioral science and director of the Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is the author of over 400 scientific research publications and has trained more than 50 postdoctoral research fellows. He has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health and numerous pharmaceutical companies in the development of new psychotropic drugs. Dr. Roland Griffiths and I discuss the research with John Hopkins University. We spoke about how he got into psychedelics and convinced ethic committees to approve such research, why he chose the scientific path, specifics about his studies with psilocybin, transformations of cancer patients with family members, the impact of psilocybin in existing institutions, the ongoing studies he is performing with long-time meditators and religious leaders, how the integration of psilocybin into society may look and more. Find more information about the center for psychedelic and consciousness research at https://hopkinspsychedelic.org, and read Roland's publications at https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/publications This episode was recorded on March 2nd, 2021 FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CENTER FOR PSYCHEDELIC AND CONSCIOUSNESS RESEARCH: http://hopkinspsychedelic.org ONGOING STUDIES: Depression Study Website https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/depressionstudy Cigarette Smoking-Psilocybin Study Website https://www.quitsmokingbaltimore.org/ Alzheimer's Disease-Psilocybin Study Website https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/alzheimers Anorexia Nervosa-Psilocybin Study Website https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/anorexia Co-occurring Depression and Alcohol Use Disorder https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/depression-alcohol Psychedelic Survey Studies https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/index/#research PUBLISHED STUDIES: All Johns Hopkins Psychedelic Science Publications https://hopkinspsychedelic.org/publications Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices