Podcasts about Babson College

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Best podcasts about Babson College

Latest podcast episodes about Babson College

Bloomberg Businessweek
Using Artificial Intelligence for a Competitive Advantage

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 16:53


Tom Davenport, Professor of Information Technology and Management at Babson College, discusses his book All in on AI: How Smart Companies Win Big with Artificial Intelligence. Hosts: Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec. Producer: Paul Brennan. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

DisrupTV
DisrupTV 307, Whitney Johnson, Tina Opie, Beth A. Livingston, Jacob Harold

DisrupTV

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 64:50


This week on DisrupTV, we interviewed Whitney Johnson, Founder and CEO at Disruption Advisors, Tina Opie, PhD, Associate Professor of Management at Babson College and award-winning teacher, researcher, consultant, and speaker, Beth A. Livingston, PhD, Associate Professor in Management and Entrepreneurship at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business and Jacob Harold, former GuideStar CEO/Candid co-founder, social impact strategist and author of The Toolbox. DisrupTV is a weekly Web series with hosts R “Ray” Wang and Vala Afshar. The show airs live at 11:00 a.m. PT/ 2:00 p.m. ET every Friday. Brought to you by Constellation Executive Network: constellationr.com/CEN.

Revolutionize Your Retirement Radio
Senior Entrepreneurs Are Driving More Social Innovation Worldwide with Dorian Mintzer and Elizabeth Isele

Revolutionize Your Retirement Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 59:00


Social innovation is much more than having an idea. Real innovation is recognizing the value of that idea and operationalizing it through social enterprise. Research demonstrates that, contrary to the media image of an entrepreneur as a tech-savvy youth, senior entrepreneurs (aged 50+) are creating more businesses worldwide than any other age group, and an overwhelming number are creating social enterprises, including green businesses. That being said, we should bear in mind that while experience fuels innovation, experience is also regenerative, so the opportunity is at hand to intentionally facilitate knowledge transfer across generations and foster dynamic, innovative decision-making. Catalyzing multigenerational experience generates new insights, perspectives, and multiple paths to solutions. In this episode, you will discover: how senior entrepreneurs activate and scale social innovation; how older adults can be more innovative than their younger counterparts; how shared intergenerational knowledge is a unique social and economic opportunity to drive innovation, boost workplace engagement, productivity, and profitability, and successful new business startups that can result in healthier societies, a more sustainable environment, and robust economies - and provide specific examples.About Elizabeth Isele: Recognized globally as a pioneering senior and intergenerational entrepreneurship expert, Elizabeth Isele is leading a movement to transform the culture of aging and retirement. Her passion to ignite a Silver Economy by unleashing the experience and the potential of 50+ year-olds to drive economic markets and generate social and environmental impact is grounded in data and metrics. Elizabeth embodies the Silver Economy. As a septuagenarian, after a distinguished career as an award-winning editor and author, she founded The Global Institute for Experienced Entrepreneurship, a comprehensive, cross-sector (business, government, education, and research) ecosystem to catalyze and support intergenerational experience in the Future of Work, Entrepreneurship, and Artificial Intelligence.She is also a Senior Fellow in Social Innovation and Entrepreneur in Residence at Babson College in Wellesley, MA, and an Associate Fellow in Finance and Global Economics at The Royal Institute of International Affairs: Chatham House in London, UK.In the fall of 2021, she was interviewed by Globant for their Be One of a Kind series to share the one-of-a-kind VALUE of workers aged 50+. She has also published numerous reports, articles, and op-ed pieces on 50+ entrepreneurship and is continually quoted and profiled in the media and publications such as the NY Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Bloomberg, etc. Elizabeth was named a Journalism in Aging Fellow by the MetLife Foundation and the Gerontological Society of America, a Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Foundation Fellow, and an Influencer in Aging by PBS NextAvenue.org.Get in touch with Elizabeth Isele:Visit Elizabeth's website: https://experieneurship.com/What to do next: Click to grab our free guide, 10 Key Issues to Consider as You Explore Your Retirement Transition Please leave a review at Apple Podcasts. Join our Revolutionize Your Retirement group on Facebook.

MLM Nation
Understanding the 4 Types of Network Marketing Careers by Chelsea Lauren

MLM Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 28:16


Chelsea Lauren teaches recruiting and duplication tips based on the 4 types of network marketing careers that people chooseWho is Chelsea LaurenChelsea Lauren was raised around the network marketing profession but decided to attend Babson College and learn more about entrepreneurship.At school, she quickly realized the advantages that MLM had compared to other business such as lifestyle and leverage so she joined her network marketing company right after she graduated.Once she got started, Chelsea became one of the top 10 income earners under the age of 25 and spent her 20s traveling around the world building her business. Today she is a 6 figure earner with a customer base of over 150,000 people.Favorite QuoteAre you a cheerleader or are you a leader?Recommended Books by Dalibor StropRich Dad Poor Dad by Robert KiyosakiLeaders Eat Last by Simon SinekSecrets to the Millionaire Mind by T. Harv Eker Recommended Online AppCompany Commissions appRecommended Prospecting ToolPersonal VideoContact InfoChelsea Lauren on Instagram

Cuentos Corporativos
EP #155 - T4. PIXZA. Pixzas con Impacto Social- Conoce a Alejandro Souza.

Cuentos Corporativos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 64:14


Alejandro Souza es un joven nacido en México, que desde muy pequeño se dio cuenta de que solo apoyando a los demás lograría cambiar al mundo. Estudio Administración de Empresas en Babson College, además de un Máster de Administración Pública y prácticas de desarrollo social por Columbia University.Inicia su mundo en el emprendimiento social fundando una empresa para darle tecnología apropiada a cooperativas de mujeres cacahuateras en Uganda, posteriormente, funda el primer instituto de inglés y capacitación empresarial para dirigentes de empresas y del gobierno en Ruanda, construye una medida base de bienestar multidimensional en la juventud en Bután, lideró un proyecto piloto financiado por el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo que buscaba la práctica de deportes como avenida de desarrollo social en tres favelas en Brasil.Alejandro Souza es hoy considerado uno de los cinco “empresarios sociales más cool de México” según Red Bull y desde el 2015 fundó Pixza, la revolucionaria pizzería de maíz azul que emplea y empodera a jóvenes en situación de calle y ahora es co-fundador de Wemerang, una app para que héroes cotidianos que les gusta ayudar al planeta, las personas y los animales puedan movilizar y monetizar. Alejandro es un emprendedor social, consultor de desarrollo social, autor, maestro y conferencista internacional.Recuerda que ahora puedes escuchar Cuentos Corporativos en vivo. Estamos en RADIOMEX los martes y jueves a las 8 pm de la CDMXSíguenos en:www.cuentoscorporativos.com Newsletter. Escribe una Reseña Encuesta Audiencia Nuestras redes sociales:Facebook Instagram. Linkedin. Twitter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Observatory | Discovery of Consciousness & Awareness
Female Entrepreneurship with Shakenna Williams | The Family Principles That Shaped Her

The Observatory | Discovery of Consciousness & Awareness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 60:37


In this episode we have a dear friend, Dr. Shakenna Williams, who is the Director of the Center for Women's Entrepreneurship at Babson College in Massachusetts. She's a delightful friend and entrepreneur, one who draws heavily on her wisdom. You'll hear her talk about her new book, “Hook: Entrepreneurial Lessons While Fishing with My Dad” where she learned a lot of life lessons with her father while fishing, and she'll talk about the entrepreneurial path and journey that she has taken to become a mentor and leaders, especially women as they embark on finding themselves and building businesses. We also hear about her foster parenting experience, as well as how big of a help and an influence her own mother has been on her in her path of life and development as a businesswoman and becoming a well rounded individual. About Shakenna and what keeps her busy these days 2:13Barriers that Shakenna's dad faced after Vietnam 5:52Being a foster parent to multiple children 10:49What happened with foster parenting during Covid 16:05Her mom and their great relationship 18:29Her book 21:08Hiring people and trying to remain positive and open about what you want 34:11Situations when Shakenna had to dig deeper to get out 35:16Her dad's influence on her 42:00What's on the the horizon 51:25“Just using her wisdom, I think that has definitely helped me as a rising young woman entrepreneur, also as a director, how I manage my team. She's definitely put things in my mind to be mindful of and I'm just so grateful. I have that cool auntie mother that everybody wants to have and I'm extremely blessed.” 19:51

Entrepreneur's Enigma
Jason Craparo From Burger Flipping To Entrepreneur & Founder

Entrepreneur's Enigma

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 22:23


Jason Craparo is the founder & CEO of Hovr. Prior to Hovr, Jason was on the executive management team of Juma Ventures, a national social enterprise operating in six US cities. Prior to Juma Ventures, Jason owned and operated restaurants for the national chain, Sonic Drive-in. Jason holds an MBA from Babson College, the #1 ranked entrepreneurship school in the world for 22 consecutive years, where he won the school's top honor, the Roger W. Babson award and the top academic award, the Sorenson Scholar. Jason has won numerous leadership awards, most notably the ABC 10News Community Leadership award. He serves on various boards and commissions, most notably he was appointed by the Mayor of San Diego to the Equal Opportunity Commission. Jason has been a certified private pilot since 2008 and has done advanced aerobatics. He enjoys running and competing in triathlons. Find Jason Online https://gethovr.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasoncraparo/ If you're enjoying Entrepreneur's Enigma, please give us a review on the podcast directory of your choice. We're on all of them and these reviews really help others find the show. Also, if you're getting value from the show and want to buy me a coffee, go to the show notes to get the link to get me a coffee to keep me awake, while I work on bringing you more great episodes to your ears. →  https://gmwd.us/buy-me-a-coffee Follow Seth Online: Seth | Digital Marketer (@s3th.me) • Instagram: Instagram.com/s3th.me Seth Goldstein | LinkedIn: LinkedIn.com/in/goldsteinmedia Seth on Mastodon: https://masto.ai/@phillycodehound Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Medicine Redefined
86. Infusing Ayurvedic Wisdom into Modern Life | Shivani Gupta, PhD

Medicine Redefined

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 56:21


In this episode, Darsh and Altamash dive deep into Curcumin and Ayurvedic Medicine with their guest Shivani Gupta. Dr. Gupta is the CEO of Fusionary Formulas. She is also a researcher, author, and advocate for Ayurvedic medicine. She obtained her bachelor's of business administration from Babson College. Subsequently, she completed her master's and Ph.D. in Ayurvedic sciences. She is an expert in blending the science of Ayurvedic Wisdom into Modern Life. In this episode we discuss the following: Shivani's introduction to Ayurvedic medicine Her inspiration for advanced education in Tumeric and the genesis of her company Curcumin, Ashwagandha, and other mainstream herbal supplements The future of supplements and the integration of Ayurvedic medicine into Western Medicine. Follow Shivani Instagram @dr.shivanigupta Shivani's Website Fusionary Formulas

New England Weekend
2023: A Fresh Start for Your Finances, and the Truth About New Year's Resolutions

New England Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 37:52


Happy New Year! As we kick off 2023, many of us are taking the first few weeks of the year to take a closer look at our personal finances. Ryan Davies, Chair of the Finance Department at Babson College, joins Nichole on this week's show to offer some insight and advice on budgeting, savings, and much more as we all try to navigate this volatile economy. PLUS: Making a New Year's resolution is one thing. Keeping it is another. Usually, the latter doesn't happen. Deborah Carr, Professor of Sociology at Boston University, explains why we tend to fall off the wagon when it comes to our resolutions, and shares some tips to help keep us on track.

Fueling Deals
Episode 212: An M&A Matchmaking Firm with Brian Scanlon & Joe Zanca

Fueling Deals

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 46:58


DealQuest Community, this week I bring you another triple discussion. This week I have Brian Scanlon and Joe Zanca, Managing Partners of Dealgen Partners. DealGen Partners is a Deal Orientation company sourcing deals for Private Equity Funds, and Strategic Acquirers. Currently, Dealgen Partners manages $2.7B in buy-side mandates. THE “PARTNERS” IN DEALGEN PARTNERS Neither Brian nor Joe had any idea in their younger years that they'd end up in the M&A Space. As with many young boys, they both dreamt of being sports stars. Brian recently found a “What Do You Want to Be When You Grow Up?” paper from his 6th grade year of school, and there was no doubt his eye was on a specific prize: Shortstop for the New York Yankees. Joe also dreamt of being a baseball player. Growing up with his father as a firefighter, Joe said to himself that if baseball didn't work out – which it didn't – he would become a firefighter like his father. His brother is now a firefighter, working alongside their father, and Joe has found himself in the business universe, having started his own storage company business in college with teammates from his baseball team. The business model was literally in the basement, specifically the basement of a teammate's parents' home, however storing other students' belongings in a home basement proved to be a great business idea for 20-year-old Joe. This company continued for 8 years before Joe finally sold it to move along his career. Brian's start into business was a coincidence – his aunt had a PR firm based in New York. In 2007, one of her clients showed great interest in the up-and-coming social media site, Facebook. His aunt didn't understand Facebook, so she offered him $500 a month to curate and upkeep the client's company Facebook page. As time went on, and the interest in Facebook took off, his aunt continued to send her clients to Brian for social media, and even started gaining his own clients. Brian began his investment career after selling his marketing firm, Social Mediators in 2014, and joining the Sell Side M&A Advisory space through O'Hare Management. Brian established a strong network in the Investment Banking space during his time at O'Hare. In 2016, Brian founded DealGen Partners with the goal of providing quality deals to companies in the acquisition process. Brian and Joe met at Babson College and remained friends for several years, until one day after they both had sold their businesses, it sort of clicked for both of them that they should partner up and build something great. A VIEW FROM THE SELL SIDE Brian's background has allowed him an insider's view of the sell side of a deal, a literal crash course in how deals can fall apart. Seeing these deals, in his words, “crumble” over the years, he saw that there was a lot of opportunity to be had with the private equity groups. The sell side of the industry also moves at a much slower pace. On the buy side, a firm can be working on several hundred to thousands of deals in a year, whereas on the sell side, those numbers will rarely go over the double digits. Brian notes that at one point, he was only working on 3 deals, whereas a buyer he was working with had some 3000 deals they were evaluating. After seeing this stark contrast in a number of deals, Brian began to wonder if there was a way to service both sides, without as much reliance on a single deal closing. It wasn't that he saw the grass is greener on the other side, so to speak, he was merely reaching a place of burnout, and wanted to move forward onto different things in his career. Thus, Dealgen Partners work on an estimated 70 – 80 deals at a time. LESSONS LEARNED IN THE NUANCE OF DUE DILIGENCE Through Brian's perspective on the sell side of seeing many deals fall apart, especially at the 11th hour (after LOI, etc.), there were lessons in due diligence that Brian learned. He recollects two deals that fell through: One because a spouse wasn't really on-board with the business being sold A second because the deal taking so long to complete, the seller's numbers began to drop, and the buyer backed out because the seller's business wasn't performing as well. Through seeing these reasons, and a myriad of others , causing deals to fall apart at stages at which it was essentially considered a done deal, Brian learned a valuable lesson about due diligence: Cover all your bases and leave no rock unturned. He could've checked in with the temperature of the spouse wherein the family business is being sold He could make sure buyers and sellers were better fits for each other He could make sure buyers and sellers got to know each other a bit better before entering a deal; not getting blinded by the purchase price He could have pushed the seller a bit harder to ensure a quicker deal timeline, or educate the seller's lawyer that the numbers weren't looking great at that moment, and it was important to get the deal signed While it's easy to chalk up something to being out of one's control, in the deal-making process, a lot of times, this isn't always the case. It's important to keep your finger on the pulse of every deal to completion and ensure you're doing all you can to complete the deal successfully; there is always more you can do. This is a good lesson in not only being proactive during due diligence, but also how nuanced and meticulous one's due diligence must be to ensure the deal, lest it fall apart. THE ENTREPRENEURIAL STEP For Joe's experience with running his college business, he learned about the many reasons for selling a business. Some of those reasons include: A joint owner buying out another owner An owner wanting to step back or totally away from the company New opportunities Industry changes Partner disagreements In Joe's case with the storage company, his partners wanted to take the company in one direction, and he wanted to take it in another. In the end, his partners bought out his equity, and Joe continued his path forward – still very much in positive friendship with these former partners, and the company still exists today. DEALGEN PARTNERS By the time Joe was exiting his storage business, Brian already had his motions in gear for what his next step was. They then decided to bring Joe in as a partner, as they both felt they knew each other well enough and had seen each other in business to know they would work well together. Dealgen works primarily with PE (Private Equity) Funds. Per a tagline on the Dealgen Partners website (www.dealgenpartners.com): “We find the deal you wish you knew about. You close them.” An eloquent way to sum up the services Dealgen Partners offer. They have grown a vast network of trusted partners, utilizing that network with proprietary outreach strategy in order to bring PE firms the ideal targets for their deal criteria – a facilitator of deal courtships, in a way. A CRAFTED OFFER Even the most desired deals take time to unfold and build. Dealgen Partners has built a formula for their company to offer to their clients the best opportunity to be successful within the dealmaking relationship. Dealgen does the business development for the clients The clients will be able to save themselves significant time – as finding a business looking to sell takes a lot of resources and time Dealgen takes on the burden of finding those companies wanting to sell Apply their marketing skills as being business owners and entrepreneurs themselves This is a great setup, right? So how does Dealgen Partners structure their offer for their clients? Dealgen charges a working capital deposit at the beginning of the relationship with a PE firm or strategic buyer. That deposit buys: One year's worth of Dealgen's service Exclusivity to a vertical. For example: If you're looking to buy specifically cybersecurity companies, when a cybersecurity company comes across Dealgen's radar for sale, this exclusivity allows you to be the first to be given the chance to purchase. If one of their clients does not acquire a business within 12 months, the retainer is refundable. By taking on this risk, they found a way to really set themselves apart from the marketing agencies. WHO DEALGEN WORKS WITH Dealgen Partners are retained and paid strictly by the buy side, whether it's a Private Equity Fund or a Strategic Acquirer. This places Dealgen in an interesting position wherein they can approach a number of sellers with an expansive network of serious buyers. They can, with certainty, approach the sellers and present they are going to be bought for the most amount of money possible. In an industry where there tends to be more buyers than sellers, this confidence and guarantee becomes extremely attractive to sellers. Their paradigm also allows them to operate in a way that an Investment Banker doesn't necessarily have. By operating as a matchmaker or liaison of sorts, this veil of you're working for one side and one side only tends to not exist, allowing for comfortable familiarity and trust to be built in all directions. Now of course, they're extremely loyal to their clients – the buyers. They certainly aren't playing both sides of the field, however, they've crafted their business to allow them to remain loyal to their clients, while simultaneously forming positive relationships with sellers, which is a very unique position. Dealgen Partners is confident in their skills, experience, and network. They are more than willing to go that extra distance in all avenues of an M&A deal. By giving the guarantee to their clients, forming positive relationships with sellers, and building their offer for the clients in the way they have, it takes a lot of the risk pressure off the clients and ensures everyone finds the utmost satisfaction. • • • FOR MORE ON BRIAN SCANLON:https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianscanlondeals/ FOR MORE ON JOE ZANCA:https://www.linkedin.com/in/joe-zanca-8b154559/ FOR MORE ON DEALGEN PARTNERS:Dealgen Partners are currently available to any Investment Bankers, M&A Advisors, Founders or Fund Managers who are looking to sell their business.https://dealgenpartners.com/ Corey Kupfer is an expert strategist, negotiator, and dealmaker. He has more than 35 years of professional deal-making and negotiating experience. Corey is a successful entrepreneur, attorney, consultant, author, and professional speaker. He is deeply passionate about deal-driven growth. He is also the creator and host of the DealQuest Podcast. If you want to find out how deal-ready you are, take the Deal-Ready Assessment today!

Experiencing Data with Brian O'Neill
107 - Tom Davenport on Data Product Management and the Impact of a Product Orientation on Enterprise Data Science and ML Initiatives

Experiencing Data with Brian O'Neill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 42:52


Today I'm chatting with returning guest Tom Davenport, who is a Distinguished Professor at Babson College, a Visiting Professor at Oxford, a Research Fellow at MIT, and a Senior Advisor to Deloitte's AI practice. He is also the author of three new books (!) on AI and in this episode, we're discussing the role of product orientation in enterprise data science teams, the skills required, what he's seeing in the wild in terms of teams adopting this approach, and the value it can create. Back in episode 26, Tom was a guest on my show and he gave the data science/analytics industry an approximate “2 out of 10” rating in terms of its ability to generate value with data. So, naturally, I asked him for an update on that rating, and he kindly obliged. How are you all doing? Listen in to find out! Highlights / Skip to: Tom provides an updated rating (between 1-10) as to how well he thinks data science and analytics teams are doing these days at creating economic value (00:44) Why Tom believes that “motivation is not enough for data science work” (03:06) Tom provides his definition of what data products are and some opinions on other industry definitions (04:22) How Tom views the rise of taking a product approach to data roles and why data products must be tied to value (07:55) Tom explains why he feels top down executive support is needed to drive a product orientation (11:51) Brian and Tom discuss how they feel companies should prioritize true data products versus more informal AI efforts (16:26) The trends Tom sees in the companies and teams that are implementing a data product orientation (19:18) Brian and Tom discuss the models they typically see for data teams and their key components (23:18) Tom explains the value and necessity of data product management (34:49) Tom describes his three new books (39:00) Quotes from Today's Episode “Data science in general, I think has been focused heavily on motivation to fit lines and curves to data points, and that particular motivation certainly isn't enough in that even if you create a good model that fits the data, it doesn't mean at all that is going to produce any economic value.” – Tom Davenport  (03:05) “If data scientists don't worry about deployment, then they're not going to be in their jobs for terribly long because they're not providing any value to their organizations.” – Tom Davenport (13:25) “Product also means you got to market this thing if it's going to be successful. You just can't assume because it's a brilliant algorithm with capturing a lot of area under the curve that it's somehow going to be great for your company.” – Tom Davenport (19:04)   “[PM is] a hard thing, even for people in non-technical roles, because product management has always been a sort of ‘minister without portfolio' sort of job, and you know, influence without formal authority, where you are responsible for a lot of things happening, but the people don't report to you, generally.” – Tom Davenport (22:03)   “This collaboration between a human being making a decision and an AI system that might in some cases come up with a different decision but can't explain itself, that's a really tough thing to do [well].” – Tom Davenport (28:04) “This idea that we're going to use externally-sourced systems for ML is not likely to succeed in many cases because, you know, those vendors didn't work closely with everybody in your organization” – Tom Davenport (30:21)   “I think it's unlikely that [organizational gaps] are going to be successfully addressed by merging everybody together in one organization. I think that's what product managers do is they try to address those gaps in the organization and develop a process that makes coordination at least possible, if not true, all the time.” – Tom Davenport (36:49) Links Tom's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davenporttom/ Tom's Twitter: https://twitter.com/tdav All-in On AI by Thomas Davenport & Nitin Mittal, 2023 Working With AI by Thomas Davenport & Stephen Miller, 2022 Advanced Introduction to AI in Healthcare by Thomas Davenport, John Glaser, & Elizabeth Gardner, 2022 Competing On Analytics by Thomas Davenport & Jeanne G. Harris, 2007

Afrique Économie
Pierrette Kouakou, l'Ivoirienne qui forme les entrepreneuses africaines de demain

Afrique Économie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 2:14


Former les entrepreneuses de demain, c'est l'objectif de l'Ivoirienne Pierrette Kouakou qui dirige depuis un an FIN'elle, un programme de formation lancé par le groupe ivoirien COFINA, spécialisé dans la microfinance. Pour cette ancienne banquière, la formation des femmes entrepreneuses est un enjeu de développement.  Pendant quatorze ans, Pierrette Kouakou a travaillé dans la banque, et plus précisément chez UBA, le groupe fondé par le milliardaire et philanthrope nigérian Tony Elumelu. Elle a pu mesurer les difficultés que rencontrent les femmes entrepreneuses, notamment dans le secteur informel, pour accéder au crédit. « Le banquier se demandera : Est-ce que cette femme est mariée ? Est-ce qu'elle a une garantie ? Est-ce qu'elle a des enfants ? Est-ce qu'elle est en âge d'en avoir ? Et si c'est le cas, quel impact sa grossesse future aura sur son activité ? Il y a des aspects liés à la femme qui sont très différents de l'homme » affirme l'entrepreneuse.  En décembre 2021, Pierrette Kouakou rejoint le groupe de microfinance ivoirien COFINA pour diriger FIN'Elle, autrement dit « la finance pour elles », un programme de formation destiné aux femmes qui créent leur activité. « La plupart des femmes qui ont suivi cette formation nous ont dit unanimement que désormais, elles étaient capables de lire leurs états financiers, de comprendre leurs états financiers et de pouvoir s'adresser à une banque pour obtenir un financement, rapporte-t-elle. Elles ont pu, à travers cette formation, repenser les opportunités qu'elles ont eues, et les mettre à niveau par rapport aux marchés auxquels elles s'adressent. » ► À lire aussi : Reportage : femmes et micro-entreprises au Togo L'Afrique détient le record mondial d'entrepreneuriat féminin FIN'elle vient de s'associer avec l'un des leaders américains de l'éducation professionnelle, le groupe Babson College, pour former des formatrices et les envoyer dans toute l'Afrique de l'Ouest. L'idée est de cibler les femmes du secteur informel, mais aussi les dirigeantes de PME. Affronter le monde très masculin des affaires fait aussi partie des axes d'enseignement, estime Pierrette Kouakou.  Aujourd'hui en Afrique et partout dans le monde, nous avons des exemples de femmes qui ont réussi à briser le plafond de verre. Et pour notre génération, je pense que nous devons continuer à nous battre pour apporter notre contribution à nos économies de manière équitable.  Née dans une sororie de cinq filles, l'Ivoirienne, qui a grandi dans un milieu où l'éducation était privilégiée, cible en particulier celles qui n'ont pas eu cette chance. « Il y a encore beaucoup de travail à faire, surtout pour les femmes en zones rurales où l'accès à certaines opportunités n'est toujours pas d'actualité, constate-t-elle. Et le système n'est pas fait pour les personnes analphabètes. » L'entrepreneuriat féminin atteint 27% en Afrique, le record mondial. Un chiffre que Pierrette Kouakou espère contribuer à faire progresser.  ► À lire aussi : Djamilla Toure, amplifier les voix des femmes de la diaspora africaine

Critical Mass Radio Show
Critical Mass Business Talk Show: Ric Franzi Interviews Mark Beran, Fractional Chief Commercial Officer (Episode 1409)

Critical Mass Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 22:57


Mark Beran is innately curious. He is one that has never stopped asking the question why? Consequently, Mark has driven teams to come up with innovative solutions that have resulted in significant intellectual property in the healthcare and medical device market. Mark is an Orange County native and started his career at a startup called Respiratory Support Products that was successfully sold to Smiths Medical (now ICU Medical). At Smiths, Mark was Global VP of Sales & Marketing for Level 1 a company that marketed unique products for patient temperature management in the critical care setting and operating room. From Smiths, Mark took a full P&L role as VP & General Manager of Cincinnati Sub-Zero. He successfully led a team that pivoted the business to the emerging market of therapeutic hypothermia for patients post cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury. This move took the company to immediate profitability with a significant IP roadmap to drive profitable growth. Mark was SVP of Sales & Marketing for Posey company where he developed a strategy that led to doubling revenue for Posey and a future exit to a private equity sponsor. From Posey, Mark was VP & General Manager of Gaymar industries and head up the Pressure Management business (high end therapeutic surfaces and devices to reduce pressure injury risk). This private equity owned business was successfully sold to Stryker. From Gaymar, Mark took a role as Chief Commercial Officer for TIDI products where He led a team that executed on both an organic and inorganic growth strategy that led to two successful transactions with successful outcomes for the private equity sponsors and management team. From TIDI, Mark moved to Chief Marketing Officer for Encompass Group a manufacturer of healthcare textiles for the acute care and senior living markets. He led a team to develop novel technology in the patient warming (OR) and specialty support surface space. Both products had significant intellectual property and competitive advantage over the market leaders. Mark is now fractional Chief Commercial Officer for a PPE nurse's shoe start-up called Gales (www.weargales.com) and is advising a start-up in the vascular access space called MightyWell (www.mightywell.com). Mark is advising MightyWell on the sale of their business. Mark was born and raised in Southern California and grew up in Orange County. He went to Servite High School in Anaheim and graduated from Chapman University with a degree in Marketing. Mark gained his MBA from Babson College in Massachusetts. He lives in Santa Ana with his son Joseph and father Tony (a serial entrepreneur). -- Critical Mass Business Talk Show is Orange County, CA's longest-running business talk show, focused on offering value and insight to middle-market business leaders in the OC and beyond. Hosted by Ric Franzi, business partner at Renaissance Executive Forums Orange County. Learn more about Ric at www.ricfranzi.com. Catch up on past Critical Mass Business Talk Show interviews... YouTube: https://lnkd.in/gHKT2gmF LinkedIn: https://lnkd.in/g2PzRhjQ Podbean: https://lnkd.in/eWpNVRi Apple Podcasts: https://lnkd.in/gRd_863w Spotify: https://lnkd.in/gruexU6m #orangecountyca #mastermind #ceopeergroups #peergroups #peerlearning

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with Jack Sharry, Chief Growth Officer at LifeYield

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 23:08


Jack Sharry is the Chief Growth Officer at LifeYield, co-chair of the Money Management Institute Digital Advice Community, a member of the Next Chapter Executive Leadership Advisory Board, and co-chair of Next Chapter Leadership in Action. He also hosts the WealthTech on Deck podcast, teaches at Babson College, is the author of the book Authentic and Ethical Persuasion, and contributes regularly to many industry publications.Learn more: https://www.lifeyield.com/Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-jack-sharry-chief-growth-officer-at-lifeyield

Business Innovators Radio
Interview with Jack Sharry, Chief Growth Officer at LifeYield

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 23:08


Jack Sharry is the Chief Growth Officer at LifeYield, co-chair of the Money Management Institute Digital Advice Community, a member of the Next Chapter Executive Leadership Advisory Board, and co-chair of Next Chapter Leadership in Action. He also hosts the WealthTech on Deck podcast, teaches at Babson College, is the author of the book Authentic and Ethical Persuasion, and contributes regularly to many industry publications.Learn more: https://www.lifeyield.com/Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-jack-sharry-chief-growth-officer-at-lifeyield

Manufacturing Hub
Ep. 88 - [John Harrington] Retrieving, Contextualizing, Processing and Managing Industrial Data

Manufacturing Hub

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 83:32


Guest BioI am passionate about delivering technology that improves productivity and safety in manufacturing and industrial environments. I have over 25 years of experience implementing technology solutions, working on both the technology supplier and factory operations sides. I held numerous roles, including business strategy, product management, sales, and consulting for industrial software companies.  I also held design, supply chain, and production responsibilities while managing operations for an industrial equipment manufacturer. I lead from the front, building passionate, execution-focused teams.  I have participated in and built global teams of all disciplines and sizes.  I am very comfortable spanning strategic business concepts to product execution plans. I have a Master's in Business Administration from Babson College and a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute.John Harrington, Co-Founder of HighByte helps us continue our conversation beyond SCADA.We've built out a SCADA system; we are collecting system and sensor data...Now what?We need to contextualize that data and make real-time decisions.Listen as John helps walk us through his career and the recommendations he gives.Manufacturing Hub Episode 88. Recommended Materials 4.0 Solutions Podcast Momenta Podcast How I Built This Podcast Modern War Institute Podcast Connect with Us John Harrington Vlad Romanov Dave Griffith Manufacturing Hub Let Us Know What You ThinkIf you enjoyed the show, it would mean the world to us if you could leave us a review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/manufacturing-hub/id1546805573#manufacturing #automation #digitaltransformation #data

The Morning Beat With AJ and Mikalah
12/12 Phone Calls On a Plane?

The Morning Beat With AJ and Mikalah

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 70:30


Happy Monday! AJ and Mikalah are out, but we have a treat - Pop culture pundit Shar Jossell and Political analyst Ryan Basham guest host.  Europe will allowed phone calls on a plane, but do we really want that? For Money Monday's, online returns might just be a thing from the past! Plus, this trans man is asking "I'm a trans man who doesn't want to transition medically or socially. Am I betraying my community?" Shar and Ryan have thoughts and so much more!  Special Guest: Lauren Beitelspacher - Chair of the Marketing Division at Babson College

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1579 - Innovator and Author Shares About Resiliency to Community Leaders and Healthcare Advocates

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 16:58


Howard Brown is a Silicon Valley entrepreneur, two-time stage IV cancer patient / survivor, international bridge-builder and mentor. He shares the keys to leading a resilient life that drives successful business innovators, community leaders and healthcare advocates. Howard shares the values of survivorship for cancer and life, mentorship as leadership and entrepreneurship of all kinds (trademark Babson College). Website: www.shiningbrightly.com Amazon Authors Page: howardbrown-shiningbrightly Amazon Book Page: BuyShiningBrightly LinkedIn: howardsbrown Facebook: howard.brown.36

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.
Gautam Gupta from TCV (Velocity) on the trend of large funds going early, the art of pro-rata investing, and what he is seeing in this market cycle

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 43:20


Follow me @samirkaji for my thoughts on the venture market, with a focus on the continued evolution of the VC landscape.This week we are joined by Gautam Gupta, who is the co-lead of TCV's new expansion stage strategy called TCV Velocity. TCV was founded over 25 years ago with over $15B invested in over 350 companies. Prior to launching TCV Velocity, Gautam spent time as an investor at General Catalyst and M13, and in between those shops he was Founder and CEO of Naturebox. Gautam brought such an interesting point of view to our conversation, and we covered a lot of ground spanning from early to late-stage investing. Hope you enjoy this episode!Aumni is an investment analytics company dedicated to improving private capital markets. Aumni's technology digitizes hard to track unstructured data from private transaction agreements and organizes it in a structured database through an intuitive dashboard. For investors across the board, the insights provided by this data improve the managers ability to build strategy and make better decisions. Today, Aumni tracks data from over 250 thousand private market transactions to provide anonymous, aggregated market benchmarks.As someone that works deeply in the private fund space, I'm incredibly excited that Aumni's solution helps fund managers provide more insightful accurate reporting to their investors.  Check them out at Aumni.fund.Subscribers of Venture Unlocked can sign up for 20% off when you mention Venture UnlockedAbout Gautam Gupta:Gautam is General Partner at TCV where he focuses on investments in the consumer technology space including commerce, consumer-facing healthcare, education, software, and financial services businesses. Before TCV, Gautam was a Partner at M13 Ventures, an early-stage venture capital firm focused on consumer technology, where he led investments in marketplace, consumer subscription, and B2B2C models.Gautam started his career at General Catalyst in 2004. He was initially an intern while in college and later became a member of the investment team. He left to launch NatureBox and, as CEO, helped build the company into a nationally recognized brand with millions of customers. He did his undergrad at Babson College.In this episode we discuss:02:13 Gautam's career journey as an investor and founder04:52 How being a founder has shaped him as an investor07:50 Identifying whether a company truly is a venture backable company10:27 Why TCV setup the Velocity Fund to do earlier stage and smaller investments11:33 What is an expansion phase investment?14:35 Pros and Cons of traditionally later stage firms investing earlier17:19 Creating a unique brand in a larger firm19:24 How today's market is compared to past down markets in 2008 and the dotcom bust23:07 Changes in deals and the market in the last year26:11 Competing in today's market as an investor29:01 How Power Law is skewing the markets31:05 Looking back on deal memos of the past to see how short-sighted they were33:48 Why TCV Velocity is sticking with their investment thesis36:17 Why investors get pro-rata decisions wrong so often38:48 Advice he would give himself in 200741:08 Common traits of successful foundersI'd love to know what you took away from this conversation with Gautam. Follow me @SamirKaji and give me your insights and questions with the hashtag #ventureunlocked. If you'd like to be considered as a guest or have someone you'd like to hear from (GP or LP), drop me a direct message on Twitter.Podcast Production support provided by Agent Bee Agency This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit ventureunlocked.substack.com

Dirt to Dinner: Digging In
Digging In: Mark McCall, iSelectFund

Dirt to Dinner: Digging In

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 49:08


iSelect was created to help solve a complex web of interrelated challenges with food and human health. By connecting investors with the innovative companies fixing these industries, iSelect provides the network to create investment opportunities that are making a real impact on the future of our world. Mark has over 25 years of experience in investing, executive leadership and business development while growing six early-stage funds/companies. He has extensive experience in impact investing, as an investor, developer, and operator. Most recently he was EVP Business Development for Cadenza Innovation, a leading energy storage technology company. Previously, he was CEO of HPA Sonics, an early stage specialty materials company developing a clean process for the production of a key LED raw material. Prior to that, he was CEO of Greenleaf Biofuels (now American Greenfuels). At Greenleaf, he and his partners built the largest waste-to-biofuel plant in the Northeast U.S. Formerly, Mark was an investment banker at Progress Partners where he led the clean energy practice, and a Managing Director of two long/short equity hedge funds that he helped grow to $500M in combined assets. Mark has B.S. in Finance from Babson College.

The Money Moves Podcast
Partner Conversation: Babson Financial Literacy Project | Robin Kahn

The Money Moves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 29:11


Stephen and Matthew, founders of Gen-Z for Financial Literacy, sit down with Robin Kahn, program director of the Babson Financial Literacy Project (BFPL). Together, the three of them discuss the BFPL's work, the importance of teaching adults personal finance, and how to improve financial literacy education outside of the traditional classroom setting. The BFPL is an initiative from Babson College in Wellesley, Massachusetts. It is a not-for-profit initiative designed to help young adults acquire the necessary financial knowledge and skills for long-term independence and prosperity. The BFLP has led 186 workshops with over 7,000 participants in the last four years. We're proud to call The Babson Financial Literacy Project one of our partners! This episode is part of our Partner Conversations series. To learn more about Robin Kahn and The Babson Financial Literacy Project, visit https://www.babson.edu/the-babson-financial-literacy-project/, https://www.linkedin.com/in/robinskahn, https://www.instagram.com/babsonfinancialliteracyproject/. To learn more about Gen-Z for Financial Literacy, visit genzforfinlit.org. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/genzforfinlit/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genzforfinlit/support

A Dose of Black Joy and Caffeine
[2-Part Season 4 Finale: EP 62] Aaron Walton (Walton Issacson) CEO/Founder (Part 1) & Renetta Mccann (Publicis Groupe) Chief Inclusion Experience Officer (Part 2)

A Dose of Black Joy and Caffeine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 80:34


About Aaron: Recognized as a trailblazer and thought leader, Aaron Walton's focus on innovation and cultural engagement has transformed traditional marketing and advertising strategies. As the CEO / co-founder of Walton Isaacson (WI), a full-service advertising agency, with offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas and New York, Aaron's focus is squarely on identifying unseen opportunities rooted in cultural insights and connections, transforming the definition of the agency model by prioritizing diversity of thinking and encouraging strategic solutions that defy tradition. Founded in partnership with famed NBA superstar and entrepreneurial legend, Earvin “Magic” Johnson, WI has built inventive and dynamic business relationships with brands and organizations such as Lexus, McDonald's, Bristol Myers Squibb, JP Morgan Chase, and Spalding. His leadership in the advertising community has led to several industry Board positions including a 2022 appointment to the National Board of the American Association of Advertising Agencies (4A's). During 2020, Walton was elected to Co-President of ThinkLA after serving on the Board of Directors of this prestigious nonprofit advertising trade association for three years. He is also a member of the Ad Age Diversity Council and the AIMM/ANA Catalyst Committee. A recipient of Babson College's Martin Luther King Jr. Leadership Award, Aaron also was recognized by the American Association of Advertising Agencies (4A's) as one of the 100 People Who Make Advertising Great and is member of the Ebony Magazine Power 100 list. About Renetta: Renetta McCann has been recognized as one of the leading innovators and most influential executives in the advertising, marketing and media industries, with a global reputation for not only building brands, but also the organizations and leadership to sustain them. As Chief Inclusion Experience Officer for Publicis Groupe, she works to drive inclusion at all levels of the organization, with an emphasis on ensuring that the company's clients are benefiting from the many strategic advantages that diverse teams deliver. Renetta is no stranger to the Publicis family. She began her career at Leo Burnett, and, after a long tenure, she became the CEO of Starcom MediaVest Group Worldwide. Under her leadership, client billings exceeded $26 billion and the global workforce rose to over 6,000 people. Most recently, she served as the Chief Talent Officer for Leo Burnett USA as well as Publicis Communications North America. She is a frequent name in the press. In 2002, she was named "Corporate Executive of the Year" by Black Enterprise magazine and was selected Ad Woman of the Year by the Chicago Advertising Federation. Essence named her one of "50 Women Who are Changing the World” and she received a Matrix Award in 2006 from New York Women in Communications. She has appeared on the pages of Advertising Age, Business Week and Chicago magazine. In 2014 the American Advertising Federation honored her with a Diversity Achievement Award for her contributions as an Industry Influential and she received The Pantheon Award from the 4A's MAIP program. Recently, she was featured on Adweek's list of “11 Inspiring Women Who Have Broken Down Advertising's Most Persistent Barriers.” On September 10, 2020, Renetta was honored with an ADCOLOR lifetime Achievement Award and the Sheldon J. Levy Leadership Award. In October 2020, Renetta will receive the Chicago Advertising Federation's Silver Medal Award.

Jacobs: If/When
Data Products: Accelerating Insights and Profitability

Jacobs: If/When

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 41:41


Tom Davenport is a Distinguished Professor of Information Technology and Management at Babson College, Visiting Professor at Oxford Business School, Fellow of the MIT Digital Economy Initiative, and Senior Advisor to Deloitte's AI practice. He has published 23 books and over 300 articles for Harvard Business Review and many other publications. He has been named one of the world's Top 25 Consultants, one of the top 3 business/technology analysts, one of the 100 most influential people in the IT industry, and one of the top fifty business school professors in the world. He's worked with many of the world's leading companies on data, analytics, and AI strategies, organizational structures, and deployment processes.

This Round Is On Me
The Ori'GIN' of Indian Craft Spirits Ft. Anand Virmani, Co-Founder & CEO, NAO Spirits

This Round Is On Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 85:28


Joining our host Gauri Devidayal on This Round Is On Me, is the CEO of NAO Spirits, Anand Virmani. Anand walks us through the history of Gin in India and the world, his origin story which took him across the world, including studying at Babson College, Massachusetts, USA to helping set up Perch, Delhi's first Wine Bar in Khan Market. Anand shares with us the nuances of the alcohol-beverage industry, from branding to India's regulatory environment. Know more about Anand Virmani-https://www.instagram.com/anandinaglass/ https://in.linkedin.com/in/anandvirmani  Check out all the amazing episodes of 'This Round Is On Me' Podcast: ("This Round Is On Me with Gauri Devidayal") You can follow Gauri on Instagram: @gauridevidayal (https://instagram.com/gauridevidayal) Twitter: @gauridetails(www.twitter.com/@gauridetails)You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: IVM Podcasts - Apps on Google Play or iOS: ‎IVM Podcasts, or any other podcast app.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AI and the Future of Work
Kevin Mulcahy, co-author of the Future Workplace Experience, discusses how technology is improving the employee experience

AI and the Future of Work

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 38:04


Kevin Mulcahy, co-author of the Future Workplace Experience, has been thinking and writing about the future of work since 2016. Six years ago the future of work was dramatically different. Reading Kevin's book makes him seem like a clairvoyant who predicted the future. In addition to being a successful author Kevin is a sought after speaker on all topics related to the future of work and workplace trends. In the past, he also lectured on entrepreneurship at Babson College.Listen and learn:What HR teams need to know about delivering great employee experiencesHow Airbnb created a culture of measuring and improving the employee experienceWhat are progressive employers doing to make the transition back to office work easierThe three "soft leadership" questions every manager should get great at askingHow to measure the quality of employee experiencesHow AI can be used to detect changes in tone in employee engagementWhere to start when using AI to improve the employee experienceHow the metaverse will improve remote workReferences in this episode:Twitter boss Elon Musk fires the entire ethics team as one of his first acts of "leadership"Charlene Li on AI and the Future of WorkGary Bolles on AI and the Future of WorkMark van Rijmenam on AI and the Future of WorkBurn In: A Novel of the Real Robotic Revolution by P.W.  Singer and August Cole

Decidedly
Ep.64 HIGHLIGHT I Rep. Christine Hunschofsky I Deciding Through Tragedy

Decidedly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 11:33


WANT THE FULL EPISODE?Check out yesterday's episode, or download it here: https://api.spreaker.com/v2/episodes/51953789/download.mp3When making decisions in tragedy, it's imperative to recognize your unique purpose.Representative Christine Hunschofsky, Mayor of Parkland, Florida at the time of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting, joins the show to discuss the importance of bringing humanity into your decisions when navigating tragedy and gaining understanding from your community as you recover together.KEY TOPICS- Politics around the Thanksgiving dinner table- Removing emotions from decisions- Deciding when to do something, and when not to- Knowing WHY you're making a decisionCONNECT WITH USDecidedlypodcast.comInstagram: @decidedlypodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/decidedlypodcastShawn's Instagram: @shawn_d_smith Sanger's Instagram: @sangersmith MAKING A FINANCIAL DECISION?At Decidedly Wealth Management, we focus on decision-making as the foundational element of success, in our effort to empower families to purposefully apply their wealth to fulfill their values and build a thriving legacy.LEARN MORE: www.decidedlywealth.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/decidedlywealth/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DecidedlyWealth/Subscribe to our newsletter for weekly decision-making tips: https://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/manage/optin?v=001aeU_pPBHJPNJWJBdVbaci6bjGIuEJurH12xHBWDEVT_NxyCadMd7wLSZjcEZglkSjDjehuIbTHD8nABOIdV69ctfYpSzg24RCIytetBUrlIPPKgaGzjGZ8DkM0Wp1LMjbErcYUur7PbZGjeVo4gyXlz821AoJGZRJoin us every Wednesday for more strategies to DEFEAT bad decision-making - one episode at a time!MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODESix Degrees of Kevin Bacon: https://www.amazon.com/Degrees-Kevin-Bacon-Craig-Fass/dp/0452278449/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=six+degrees+of+kevin+bacon&qid=1668618662&sr=8-3CONNECT WITH REP. CHRISTINE HUNSCHOFSKYInstagram: @christinehunschofskyFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/christine.hunschofskyLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christine-h-30608538/Twitter: https://twitter.com/CHunschofskyWebsite: https://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Representatives/details.aspx?MemberId=4799&LegislativeTermId=90State Representative Christine Hunschofsky earned Bachelor's Degrees in Business Administration and Philosophy from Boston University and an MBA from Babson College. From 2006-2013, she served on Parkland's Education Advisory Board and in 2013 successfully ran for commissioner on the Parkland City Commission. In 2016, Representative Hunschofsky was the second woman in Parkland's history elected Mayor. While Mayor, Representative Hunschofsky led her community through the aftermath of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. She was appointed to co-chair the United States Conference of Mayors Small Cities Forum and testified before the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force of the 116th Congress. In 2019, she joined the American Food Coalition to advocate for flood mitigation and was inducted into the Broward County Women's Hall of Fame. Representative Christine Hunschofsky was elected to the Florida House of Representatives as the State Representative for District 96 in November of 2020. In 2021, Representative Hunschofsky was appointed by Speaker Sprowls to the Commission on Mental Health and Substance Abuse.In 2022 Representative Hunschofsky was re-elected without opposition to the newly redrawn district 95. Where she continues to serve and represent her community.

Decidedly
Ep.64 I Rep. Christine Hunschofsky I Deciding Through Tragedy

Decidedly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 58:45


When making decisions in tragedy, it's imperative to recognize your unique purpose.Representative Christine Hunschofsky, Mayor of Parkland, Florida at the time of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school shooting, joins the show to discuss the importance of bringing humanity into your decisions when navigating tragedy and gaining understanding from your community as you recover together.KEY TOPICS- Politics around the Thanksgiving dinner table- Removing emotions from decisions- Deciding when to do something, and when not to- Knowing WHY you're making a decisionDON'T HAVE TIME FOR THE FULL EPISODE?Check out the highlight episode by going to tomorrow's episode, or download it here: https://api.spreaker.com/v2/episodes/51954124/download.mp3CONNECT WITH USDecidedlypodcast.comInstagram: @decidedlypodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/decidedlypodcastShawn's Instagram: @shawn_d_smith Sanger's Instagram: @sangersmith MAKING A FINANCIAL DECISION?At Decidedly Wealth Management, we focus on decision-making as the foundational element of success, in our effort to empower families to purposefully apply their wealth to fulfill their values and build a thriving legacy.LEARN MORE: www.decidedlywealth.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/decidedlywealth/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DecidedlyWealth/Subscribe to our newsletter for weekly decision-making tips: https://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/manage/optin?v=001aeU_pPBHJPNJWJBdVbaci6bjGIuEJurH12xHBWDEVT_NxyCadMd7wLSZjcEZglkSjDjehuIbTHD8nABOIdV69ctfYpSzg24RCIytetBUrlIPPKgaGzjGZ8DkM0Wp1LMjbErcYUur7PbZGjeVo4gyXlz821AoJGZRJoin us every Wednesday for more strategies to DEFEAT bad decision-making - one episode at a time!MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODESix Degrees of Kevin Bacon: https://www.amazon.com/Degrees-Kevin-Bacon-Craig-Fass/dp/0452278449/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=six+degrees+of+kevin+bacon&qid=1668618662&sr=8-3CONNECT WITH REP. CHRISTINE HUNSCHOFSKYInstagram: @christinehunschofskyFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/christine.hunschofskyLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christine-h-30608538/Twitter: https://twitter.com/CHunschofskyWebsite: https://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Representatives/details.aspx?MemberId=4799&LegislativeTermId=90State Representative Christine Hunschofsky earned Bachelor's Degrees in Business Administration and Philosophy from Boston University and an MBA from Babson College. From 2006-2013, she served on Parkland's Education Advisory Board and in 2013 successfully ran for commissioner on the Parkland City Commission. In 2016, Representative Hunschofsky was the second woman in Parkland's history elected Mayor. While Mayor, Representative Hunschofsky led her community through the aftermath of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. She was appointed to co-chair the United States Conference of Mayors Small Cities Forum and testified before the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force of the 116th Congress. In 2019, she joined the American Food Coalition to advocate for flood mitigation and was inducted into the Broward County Women's Hall of Fame. Representative Christine Hunschofsky was elected to the Florida House of Representatives as the State Representative for District 96 in November of 2020. In 2021, Representative Hunschofsky was appointed by Speaker Sprowls to the Commission on Mental Health and Substance Abuse.In 2022 Representative Hunschofsky was re-elected without opposition to the newly redrawn district 95. Where she continues to serve and represent her community.

BachTalk
Alex Reynolds- Pitching Intern at Cressey Sports Performance

BachTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 51:54


Season 4 Episode 35 is out with Alex Reynolds. He is currently a pitching intern at Cressey Sports Performance located in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. He graduated from Babson College with a M.S. in Business Analytics. While also graduating B.A. in a Business Analytics and Finance. He played 5 years of college baseball at Babson and his main position was a catcher Alex talks about why he picked business analytics as a major and why it's such a good degree for future analytically mindset individuals. During his time at Babson, he underwent Tommy John Surgery. During this time, Alex along with Eric Schoenberg wanted to create a platform for athletes to share their experiences and offer support with their TJ Surgery & rehab process. Alex explains his overall role at Cressey and what the future of CSP Pitching entails. Within Cressey, Alex is able to dive completely into the development side of pitching while using his analytical skills to provide value within overall player progression profiles. Timestamps Intro (1:20) Alex's background includes – M.S. in Business Analytics and Playing Career (2:30) Tommy John Experience and Tommy John Club (4:45) Business Analytics experience within the school including projects & simulations (9:00) Favorite Computer Languages and what he uses at Cressey SP (11:30) Why Business Analytics is one of the best routes for a future career (15:25) Overall role as a pitching intern at Cressey Sports Performance (19:30) Using catching background towards pitching development (22:00) Cressey Pitching Performance Player Reports (28:00) Stuff + metric towards player development (31:00) The biggest learning curve working at Cressey SP (35:30) Favorite sabermetrics towards pitching (39:30) Favorite Player Development technology (43:20) Player Development progression over the next 5 years (47:00) Closing (50:00)

Her Self Expression
35 - CHRISTINE MILLS - Empower Your Financial Future

Her Self Expression

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 23:01 Transcription Available


Christine Mills is a financial advisor and has nearly 20 years' experience in the financial services industry. She enjoys helping clients realize their financial goals whether it's retiring with dignity or saving for college or any goal in between. Christine also works with privately held business owners and their families to effectively create succession plans that maximizes their financial potential while addressing the various needs of concerned parties.Christine hosts the podcast, The Veranda Entrepreneur Podcast, where she interviews creative women entrepreneurs.Christine Mills is a lifelong learner and has a Master of Business Administration from Babson College, Master of Arts in Education from University of Saint Joseph, and a Bachelor of Science in Business Management from Florida A&M University.She holds the following registrations: Investment Advisor Representative (Series 66 the Uniform Combined State Law Examination), Series 7 Securities Representative Exam and the Life Variable Annuity Insurance Agent.She is an active volunteer in her local community and church. Christine lives with husband of nearly 20 years, two active children and their standard schnauzer in Boca Raton, FL. She enjoys traveling, reading, spinning classes and spending quality time with her family and friends.HERE ARE 3 TIPS TO HELP YOU ON YOUR ROAD TO SELF-EMPOWERMENTTalking about money is paramount to your financial successDiscover your money mindset and how it impacts your money decisionsSeek support for your financial freedomCONNECT WITH CHRISTINE MILLSWebsite - https://www.raymondjames.com/christinemillsInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/theverandaentrepreneur/CURIOUS TO FIND OUT WAYS ON HOW YOU CAN TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE AND START YOUR OWN JOURNEY TO RECOVERY?Curious to know how well you know where you are in your empowerment journey? Make sure you visit https://herselfexpression.com/#quiz to take the free quiz to see where your opportunities to thrive in life are.HAVE YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW GONE THROUGH A DIVORCE AND WANT TO RECOVER?Take the free quiz here to find out what's keeping you from the life you deserve: https://herselfexpression.com/divorce-recovery-program-1LISTEN TO ALL EPISODES OF THE HER SELF EXPRESSION PODCAST HERE: https://herselfexpression.com/podcastTO FIND OTHER WOMEN WHO YOU CAN CONNECT WITH, SHARE, AND GROW TOGETHER, JOIN THESE TWO COMMUNITIES ON FACEBOOK AND LINKEDINHer Self Expression Sisterhood on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/herselfexpressionsisterhoodHer Self Expression Network on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/groups/14119012/CONNECT WITH BEVERLY PRICEWebsite - www.herselfexpression.comFacebook -

The Andreá Effect Channel
[ELLA] That's What She Said Series Ft. Laura Paredes Oldaker

The Andreá Effect Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 44:23


Determined and hardworking, Laura (Paredes) Oldaker has built The Oldaker Group, a group of companies comprised of Academy On-demand, La Casa de Becker Assisted Living and The Gift of Caring. These companies work with older adults, their families, and Care professionals to increase the quality of life of the aging population and develop the healthcare workforce. Laura's passions lie in not only excellent care but, also education, workforce development, and family caregiver training, empowering family caregivers who want to give their aging loved ones the highest level of care without sacrificing their own well-being. Laura is a big believer in education and continued training; as she is an avid learner herself. She has participated in many entrepreneurial training programs including the prestigious Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small business program at Babson College in Boston, Massachusetts, and At the Table Women in Leadership and Business by the US Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Laura is also a graduate of the Stanford University Latino Entrepreneur Initiative. Laura received many accolades throughout her entrepreneurial career, including receiving national recognition as the 2013 Latino Business Series' Entrepreneur of the Year by Verizon Wireless and 2017 by the US Hispanic Chamber of Commerce At The Table Hispanic Business Enterprise Award. She was also honored as the 2017 Hispanic Business Woman of the Year by the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, a 40 Under 40 award recipient, and named a Woman of Influence in 2017. Laura is greatly entwined in the Arizona community and lends service to organizations that support older adults, women of color, access to healthcare, and small businesses. Laura has recently completed her tenure as the Chairwoman of the Board for the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and was appointed to the Pima County Workforce Investment Board; she also serves as a board member of the YWCA of Southern Arizona. Laura has a true passion for life and together with Justin, is raising their children, V'Eanna (Andrew), Ethan, Isabelle, and Uli to be the community's next leaders.

The Talent Angle with Scott Engler
SPOTLIGHT: Preventing Collaboration Overload With Rob Cross

The Talent Angle with Scott Engler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 18:43


In this Talent Angle podcast, collaboration expert Rob Cross shares ways employees can become more efficient collaborators and reclaim and reinvest their time. Cross explains how small stressors throughout the work day are  increasing, overwhelming and exhausting employees and lays out practical advice for addressing these issues. Rob Cross has studied the underlying network dynamics of effective organizations and the collaborative practices of high performers for more than 20 years. He is the Edward A. Madden Professor of Global Leadership at Babson College and the co-founder and director of the Connected Commons, a consortium of over 100 leading organizations accelerating network research and practice. Cross is a graduate of the University of Virginia's McIntire School of Commerce, and earned an MBA from UVA's Darden School and completed doctoral work at Boston University. *This episode is an excerpt taken from our 2021 interview.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 73 – Unstoppable Visionary and Two-Time Cancer Survivor with Howard Brown

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 76:06


Yes, Howard Brown is a two-time cancer survivor. As you will discover in our episode, he grew up with an attitude to thrive and move forward. Throughout his life, he has learned about sales and the concepts of being a successful entrepreneur while twice battling severe cancer.   Howard's life story is one of those events worth telling and I hope you find it worth listening to. He even has written a book about all he has done. The book entitles Shining Brightly has just been released, but you get to hear the story directly from Howards' lips.   About the Guest: Howard Brown is an author, speaker, podcaster, Silicon Valley entrepreneur, interfaith peacemaker, two-time stage IV cancer survivor, and healthcare advocate. For more than three decades, Howard's business innovations, leadership principles, mentoring and his resilience in beating cancer against long odds have made him a sought-after speaker and consultant for businesses, nonprofits, congregations, and community groups. In his business career, Howard was a pioneer in helping to launch a series of technology startups before he co-founded two social networks that were the first to connect religious communities around the world. He served his alma mater—Babson College, ranked by US News as the nation's top college for entrepreneurship—as a trustee and president of Babson's worldwide alumni network. His hard-earned wisdom about resilience after beating cancer twice has led him to become a nationally known patient advocate and “cancer whisperer” to many families. Visit Howard at ShiningBrightly.com to learn more about his ongoing work and contact him. Through that website, you also will find resources to help you shine brightly in your own corner of the world. Howard, his wife Lisa, and his daughter Emily currently reside in Michigan. About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi, and welcome to another episode of unstoppable mindset. Today, we get to interview Howard Brown, I'm not going to tell you a lot because I want him to tell his story. He's got a wonderful story to tell an inspiring story. And he's got lots of experiences that I think will be relevant for all of us and that we all get to listen to. So with that, Howard, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Howard Brown  01:44 Thank you, Michael. I'm really pleased to be here. And thanks for having me on your show. And excited to talk to your audience and and share a little bit.   Michael Hingson  01:54 Well, I will say that Howard and I met through Podapolooza, which I've told you about in the past and event that brings podcasters would be podcasters. And people who want to be interviewed by podcasters together, and Howard will tell us which were several of those he is because he really is involved in a lot of ways. But why don't you start maybe by telling us a little bit about your, your kind of earlier life and introduce people to you and who you are. Sure, sure.   Howard Brown  02:23 So I'm from Boston. I can disguise the accent very well. But when I talked to my mother, we're back in Boston, we're packing a car. We're going for hot dogs and beans over to Fenway Park. So gotta get a soda. We're getting a soda, not a pop. So we add the Rs. They call my wife Lisa, not Lisa. But I grew up I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, a town called Framingham. And I'm a twin. And I'm very unusual. But a girl boy twin, my twin sister Cheryl. She goes by CJ is five minutes older. And I hold that I hold that now against her now that we're older and she didn't want to be older, but now she's my older sister, my big sister by five whole minutes.   Michael Hingson  03:09 Well, she's big sister, so she needs to take care of her baby brother   Howard Brown  03:12 says exactly. And she did. And we're gonna get to that because it's a really important point being a twin, which we'll get to in a second. But so Britta she Where does she live now? So she lives 40 minutes away from me here in Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:25 Oh my gosh, you both have moved out of the area.   Howard Brown  03:27 So she she moved to Albany, New York. I moved to Southern then California, LA area and the beaches, and then Silicon Valley. And then the last 17 years we've all lived close. And we raised our families together here in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan.   Michael Hingson  03:40 What got you to all go to Michigan?   Howard Brown  03:43 Well, for me, it was a choice. My wife is from Michigan, and I was in Silicon Valley. And we were Pat had a little girl Emily, who's four. There's a story there too. But we'll we decided we wanted her to grow up with a family and cousins and aunts and uncles and my in laws live here. My wife grew up here. And this made it closer for my parents and Boston suburbs to get here as well. So great place to raise a family very different from Silicon Valley in Palo Alto, California.   Michael Hingson  04:12 Yeah, but don't you miss Steve's ice cream in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:15 I do. I miss the ice cream. I missed the cannolis in the Back Bay. I missed some of the Chinese food. So in the north end, but it just it I do, but I have not lived there. I went to college there at Babson College number one school for entrepreneurship. And then when I got my first job, I moved out to Ohio but then I moved back and well there's a whole story of why I had to move back as well but we'll get   Michael Hingson  04:41 there. So are your parents still living in Boston?   Howard Brown  04:46 They are and so my dad I call myself son of a boot man. My dad for 49 years has sold cowboy boots in New England in the in the in the western you know the states New York Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts. And that's, you know, anyone who stayed somewhere for 49 years got to be applauded. And he's a straight commission boot salesman and he sold women's shoes prior to that. So he he's, he's a renaissance man.   Michael Hingson  05:15 Wow. So does he sell cowboy boots with snow treads as it were for the winter?   Howard Brown  05:21 No snow trends but, you know, like out west when you're working on, you know, on with cattle and working out west and sometimes it's a fashion statement. Not not too many places in New England like that. But he, he made a living, he enjoyed it. And he's, he's just about to retire at the age of 79. This year.   Michael Hingson  05:39 I remember living in Boston and and when I wear shoes with just leather soles, I slid around a lot on the sidewalks and all that so did get rubber rubbers to go over my boots and then later got real boots.   Howard Brown  05:54 Right. So I have the big hiking boots, the Timberlands, but I too have a pair of a you know, in Boston, we call them rabbits, rabbits, robins. And they basically are slip ons that gave you grip. They slipped right over your leather shoes. And you wore them when anyway in the snow and in those sloshing in the mess. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  06:12 And they worked really well. They did. So you went off to college. And I gather kind of almost right from the beginning you got involved in the whole idea of entrepreneurship.   Howard Brown  06:23 Well, I did I transferred to Babson from a liberal arts school called Connecticut College. I just I found out it wasn't for me and Babson College changed the trajectory of my entire life. i i I knew that I wanted to do sales and then later technology. But Babson was the catalyst for that. They just they support entrepreneurship of all kinds, no matter how you define it, and I just drank it in and I loved, I loved my time there. I love my learning there. And I continue to stay involved with Babson very closely as a past president of the Alumni Association, a former trustee, and very actively recruit students to go there and support student businesses. So it was a big impact on me and I continue to give back to it.   Michael Hingson  07:11 That's pretty cool. So how, how did you proceed as far as a career and entrepreneurial involvement as it were in in sales and all that?   Howard Brown  07:22 So I had an internship, I had wanted cellular one when cellular phones came out and I was basically learning the business. This is really early 1984 And five, and then I got another internship at NCR Corporation if you remember national cash register 120 year old company based out of Dayton, Ohio, and now it's in Atlanta, and it's, it's just not the same company. But I took an internship there a lot of Babson folks work there. And I worked as a trainer, sales installation rep. I trained waitresses, waiters, bartenders, hotel clerks, night audits, how to use cash register computer systems. So I was the teacher and a trainer. And I would, you know, talk to waitresses and waiters and bartenders and say you can make more tips by providing better service. But the way that you do that is you type you the order into a computer, it zaps it to the order station or the back to the back of the house to cook to prepare the foods or for the drinks. And you can spend more time servicing your table which should translate into higher tips. Well, about a third of them said nope, not for me, a third of them were need to be convinced and a third of them are like I'm in. I had a lot of fun doing that. And then after the shift, the either the manager or the owner would come over and they'd give you a savior at a Chinese food restaurant. They give you a poopoo platter to go to take home to your dorm room.   Michael Hingson  08:46 So I had a lot of fun, a lot of fun and a lot of good food.   Howard Brown  08:50 Sure sure. So that's what really started me off and hired me   Michael Hingson  08:55 so did that did that concept of tips and all that and advising people ever get you to translate that to Durgin Park?   Howard Brown  09:03 I actually did install the cashiers to computers area ago Daniel hall so the checkerboard you know draped you know cloth on the table and so you know it's there's a lot of good restaurants in Boston, you know the union Oyster House with a toothpick but I did countless restaurants hotels bars, you know it was I was basically at the whim of the Salesforce and there was a couple of us that went to go train and teach people and take the night shift and make sure everything was going smoothly as they installed the new system of course the no name restaurant and other one but well you know for for your listeners that no name was a place to get, you know, really great discounted seafood but you sat on a park bench. Remember that?   Michael Hingson  09:50 Right? Oh yeah, definitely. It wasn't. Well, neither was Durgin park, but I haven't kept up Is it still there?   Howard Brown  10:00 Yes, I believe it's still there.   Michael Hingson  10:01 Oh, good. I heard somewhere that, that it might not be because of COVID. But we enjoy   Howard Brown  10:07 down it shut down for a while during COVID I hope it's back open. I'm gonna have to go now. Yeah, you're gonna make me go check to see if it's open. But you know, many of them are still there. And obviously restaurants turn over. But that's a mainstay that's got a lot of history.   Michael Hingson  10:19 Oh, it does. And we had a lot of fun with the waitresses and so on at their Compac. I know, once we went there, and you know, the whole story, that Durgan is a place where you sit at family tables, unless we actually have four people then they'll let you sit at one of the tables for for around the outside. Well, there were three of us and my guide dog when we went in one time. And the hostess said, we're gonna put you at one of the tables for for just to give more room for the puppy dog. And she sat us down there. Then the waitress came over and as they are supposed to do at Durgan Park, she said, you're not supposed to sit here. There are only three of you. And I said there's a dog under the table. No, there's not. You can't fool me with that. And the waitress isn't supposed to be snotty, right. And she just kept going on and on about it. And I kept saying there is a dog under the table. She went away. And then she came back a little bit later. And she said, You've got to move and I said no. Why don't you just look, there's a dog under the table. You're not gonna make me fall for that. She finally looked. And there are these Golden Retriever puppy eyes staring back at her. She just melted. It was so much fun.   Howard Brown  11:26 Wouldn't be Boston if you didn't get a little attitude. Well, yeah, that's part of what it's all about your right next seating. And they just they sit you in a and they say, meet each other and be married.   Michael Hingson  11:38 Yeah, yeah. And it was a lot of fun. So how long did it take you to get to Silicon Valley?   Howard Brown  11:44 Well, so the story is that I did. I worked for NCR and I got hired by NCR, but I wanted out of the hospitality business. You know, even though he's young work until two, three in the morning, once they shut the restaurant or bar down or the hotel down, and then you do the night audit and you do the records. It was a hard life. So I looked and I did my research. And I said, you know who's who's making all the money here at NCR in the banking division. And it was really the early days of the outsourcing movement, punch cards, and you're outsourcing bank accounts, over 1200 baud modems. And I said, Well, that's interesting. And so I went to NCRs training at Sugar camp to learn how to be a salesperson were they actually in the early days, they filmed you, they taught you negotiation skills, competitive analysis, Industry Skills, it was fantastic. It's like getting an MBA today. But they did it all in six months, with mixing fieldwork in with, you know, training at this education facility in Dayton, Ohio. And I came out as a junior salesperson working for for very expansive experience, guys. And they just, I knew one thing, if I made them more productive, they'd make me money. And I did. And I, they sent me to banks and savings and loans and credit unions all over New England. And I basically learned the business of banking and outsourcing to these banks. And they made a lot of money. So that was how my career started. You can't do better than that. But to answer the question, because it's a little more complex than that. But it took me NCR in 1988. And then I moved out to Los Angeles in 1991, after a big health scare, which we'll talk about, and then I moved up in 2005. So there's the timeline to get me to Silicon Valley.   Michael Hingson  13:29 So you, you definitely moved around. I know that feeling well, having had a number of jobs and been required to live in various parts of the country when going back and forth from one coast to another from time to time. So you know, it's it's there. So you, you did all of that. And you You ended up obviously making some money and continuing to to be in the entrepreneurial world. But how does that translate into kind of more of an entrepreneurial spirit today?   Howard Brown  14:00 So great question, Michael. So what happened was is that I built a foundation. So at that time when you graduated school, and as far as for technology, the big computer shops like IBM Unisys, NCR, Hewlett Packard, what they did is they took you raw out of college, and they put you through their training program. And that training program was their version of the gospel of their of their products and your competitors and all that. And that built a great foundation. Well, I moved to Los Angeles after this big health scare, which I'm sure we're gonna go back and talk about, and I moved into the network products division. So I didn't stay in the banking division. I looked at the future and said voice data and video. I think there's the future there and I was right and AT and T bought NCR and, unfortunately, this is probably 1992. They also bought McCaw cellular they had just bought all of Eddie computer. They were a big company of five 600,000 employees and I have To tell you, the merger wasn't great. You felt like a number. And I knew that was my time. That was my time where I said, I got my foundation built. It's now time to go to a startup. So your time had come. My time had come. So at&t, offered early retirement for anyone 50 and older, and then they didn't get enough takers. So they offered early retirement for anyone that wanted to change. And so the talk around the watercooler was, let's wait they'll make a better offer. And I was like, I'm 26 and a half years old. I what am I waiting for? So they made a tremendously generous offer. I took early retirement, and I moved to my first true startup called avid technology that was in the production space. And we basically were changing film and television production from analog to digital. And I never looked back, I basically have been with startups ever since. And that, but that foundation I felt was really important that I got from NCR, but I prefer smaller companies and build the building them up from scratch and moving them forward.   Michael Hingson  16:07 Yeah, when you can do more to help shape the way they go. Because the the problem with a larger a lot of larger companies is they get very set in their ways. And they tend not to listen as much as maybe they should to people who might come along with ideas that might be beneficial to them, as opposed to startups as you say,   Howard Brown  16:27 Well, it depends. I mean, you know, you want to build a company that is still somewhat innovative. So what these large companies like Google and Facebook do, and Apple is they go acquire, they acquire the startups before they get too big or sometimes like, it's like what Facebook did with Instagram, they acquired six people, Google acquired YouTube, and they acquire the technology of best of breed technology. And then they shape it, and they accelerate it up. So listen, companies like IBM are still innovative, Apple, you know, is so innovative. But you need to maintain that because it can get to be a bureaucracy, and with hundreds of 1000s of employees. And you can't please everybody, but I knew my calling was was technology startups. And I just, I needed to get that, get that foundation built. And then away away I went. And that's what I've done. Since   Michael Hingson  17:16 you're right. It's all about with with companies, if they want to continue to be successful, they have to be innovative, and they have to be able to grow. I remember being in college, when Hewlett Packard came out with the HP 25, which was a very sophisticated calculator. Back in the the late 19th, early 1970s. And then Texas Instruments was working on a calculator, they came out with one that kind of did a lot of the stuff that HP did. But about that same time because HP was doing what they were doing, they came out with the HP 35. And basically it added, among other things, a function key that basically doubled the number of incredible things that you could do on the HP 25.   Howard Brown  17:58 Right, I had a TI calculator and in high school.   Michael Hingson  18:02 Well, and of course yeah, go ahead HPUS pull reverse Polish notation, which was also kind   Howard Brown  18:09 of fun. Right and then with the kids don't understand today is that, you know, we took typing, I get I think we took typing.   Michael Hingson  18:19 Did you type did you learn to type on a typewriter without letters on the keys?   Howard Brown  18:23 No, I think we have letters I think you just couldn't look down or else you get smacked. You know, the big brown fox jumped over the you know, something that's I don't know, but I did learn but I I'm sort of a hybrid. I looked down once in a while when I'd say   Michael Hingson  18:39 I remember taking a typing course in actually it was in summer school. I think it was between seventh and eighth grade. And of course the typewriters were typewriters, typewriters for teaching so they didn't have letters on the keys, which didn't matter to me a whole lot. But by the same token, that's the way they were but I learned to type and yeah, we learned to type and we learned how to be pretty accurate with it's sort of like learning to play the piano and eventually learning to do it without looking at the keys so that you could play and either read music or learn to play by ear.   Howard Brown  19:15 That's true. And And again, in my dorm room, I had Smith Corona, and I ended up having a bottle of or many bottles of white out.   Michael Hingson  19:25 White out and then there was also the what was it the other paper that you could put on the samosa did the same thing but white out really worked?   Howard Brown  19:33 Yeah, you put that little strip of tape and then it would wait it out for you then you can type over it. Right? We've come a long way. It's some of its good and some of its bad.   Michael Hingson  19:43 Yeah, now we have spellchecker Yeah, we do for what it's worth,   Howard Brown  19:49 which we got more and more and more than that on these I mean listen to this has allowed us to, to to do a zoom call here and record and goods and Bad's to all of that.   Michael Hingson  19:58 Yeah, I still I have to tell people learning to edit. Now using a sound editor called Reaper, I can do a lot more clean editing than I was able to do when I worked at a campus radio station, and had to edit by cutting tape and splicing with splicing tape.   Howard Brown  20:14 Exactly. And that's Yeah, yeah, Michael, we change the you know, avid changed the game, because we went from splicing tape or film and Betamax cassettes in the broadcast studios to a hard drive in a mouse, right? changed, we changed the game there because you were now editing on a hard drive. And so I was part of that in 1994. And again, timing has to work out and we had to retrain the unions at the television networks. And it was, for me, it was just timing worked really well. Because my next startup, liquid audio, the timing didn't work out well, because we're, we were going to try to do the same thing in the audio world, which is download music. But when you do that, when you it's a Sony cassette and Sony Walkman days, the world wasn't ready yet. We we still went public, we still did a secondary offering. But we never really brought product to market because it took Steve Jobs 10 years later to actually sell a song for 99 cents and convince the record industry that that was, you know, you could sell slices of pizza instead of the whole pizza, the whole record out   Michael Hingson  21:17 and still make money. I remember avid devices and hearing about them and being in television stations. And of course, for me, none of that was accessible. So it was fun to to be able to pick on the fact that no matter what, as Fred Allen, although he didn't say it quite this way, once said they call television the new medium, because that's as good as it's ever gonna get. But anyway, you know, it has come a long way. But it was so sophisticated to go into some of the studios with some of the even early equipment, like Avid, and see all the things that they were doing with it. It just made life so much better.   Howard Brown  21:52 Yeah, well, I mean, you're not I was selling, you know, $100,000 worth of software on a Macintosh, which first of all the chief engineers didn't even like, but at the post production facilities, they they they drank that stuff up, because you could make a television commercial, you could do retakes, you could add all the special effects, and it could save time. And then you could get more revenue from that. And so it was pretty easy sale, because we tell them how fast they could pay off to the hardware, the software and then train everybody up. And they were making more and more and better commercials for the car dealerships and the local Burger Joint. And they were thrilled that these local television stations, I can tell you that   Michael Hingson  22:29 I sold some of the first PC based CAD systems and the same sort of thing, architects were totally skeptical about it until they actually sat down and we got them in front of a machine and showed them how to use it. Let them design something that they could do with three or four hours, as opposed to spending days with paper and paper and paper and more paper in a drafting table. And they could go on to the next project and still charge as much.   Howard Brown  22:53 It was funny. I take a chief engineer on to lunch, and I tried to gauge their interest and a third, we're just enthusiastic because they wanted to make sure that they were the the way that technology came into the station. They were they were the brainchild they were the they were the domain experts. So a third again, just like training waitresses and waiters and bartenders, a third of them. Oh, they wanted they just wanted to consume it all. A third of them were skeptical and needed convincing. And a third of whom was like, that's never going out on my hair anywhere. Yeah, they were the later and later adopters, of course.   Michael Hingson  23:24 And some of them were successful. And some of them were not.   Howard Brown  23:28 Absolutely. We continue. We no longer. Go ahead. No, no, of course I am the my first sales are the ones that were early adopters. And and then I basically walked over to guys that are later adopters. I said, Well, I said, you know, the ABC, the NBC and the fox station and the PBS station habit, you know, you don't have it, and they're gonna take all your post production business away from you. And that got them highly motivated.   Michael Hingson  23:54 Yeah. And along the way, from a personal standpoint, somebody got really clever. And it started, of course at WGBH in Boston, where they recognize the fact that people who happen to be blind would want to know what's going on on TV when the dialog wasn't saying much to to offer clues. And so they started putting an audio description and editing and all that and somebody created the secondary audio programming in the other things that go into it. And now that's becoming a lot more commonplace, although it's still got a long way to go.   Howard Brown  24:24 Well, I agree. So but you're right. So having that audio or having it for visually impaired or hearing impaired are all that they are now we're making some progress. So it's still a ways to go. I agree with you.   Michael Hingson  24:36 still a ways to go. Well, you along the way in terms of continuing to work with Abbott and other companies in doing the entrepreneurial stuff. You've had a couple of curveballs from life.   Howard Brown  24:47 I have. So going back to my promotion, I was going driving out to Dayton, Ohio, I noticed a little spot on my cheekbone. didn't think anything of it. I was so excited to get promoted and start my new job. up, I just kept powering through. So a few weeks after I'd moved out to Dayton, Ohio, my mom comes out. And she's at the airport and typical Boston and mom, she's like, What's that on your cheek? What's that on your cheek? And I was like, Mom, it's nothing. I kind of started making excuses. I got hit playing basketball, I got it at the gym or something. And she's like, well, we got to get that checked out. I said, No, Mom, it's okay. It's not no big deal. It's a little little market. Maybe it's a cyst or pebble or something I don't know. So she basically said she was worried, but she never told me. So she helped set up my condo, or an apartment. And then she left. And then as long Behold, I actually had to go speak in Boston at the American Bankers Association about disaster recovery, and having a disaster recovery plan. And so this is the maybe August of 1989. And I came back and that spot was still there. And so my mom told my dad, remember, there was payphones? There was no cell phones, no computers, no internet. So she told my dad, she didn't take a picture of it. But now he saw it. And he goes, Let's go play tennis. There's I got there on a Friday. So on a Saturday morning, we'd go do something. And instead of going to play tennis, he took me to a local community hospital. And they took a look at it. And they said off its assist, take some my antibiotic erythromycin or something, you'll be fine. Well, I came back to see them on Monday after my speech. And I said, I'm not feeling that great. Maybe it's the rethrow myosin. And so having to be four o'clock in the afternoon, he took me to the same emergency room. And he's and I haven't had the same doctor on call. He actually said, You know what, let's take a biopsy of it. So he took a biopsy of it. And then he went back to the weight room, he said, I didn't get a big enough slice. Let me take another. So he took another and then my dad drove me to the airport, and I basically left. And my parents called me maybe three weeks later, and they said, You got to come back to Boston. We gotta go see, you know, they got the results. But you know, they didn't tell us they'll only tell you. Because, you know, it's my private data. So I flew back to Boston, with my parents. And this time, I had, like, you know, another doctor there with this emergency room doctor, and he basically checks me out, checks me out, but he doesn't say too much. But he does say that we have an appointment for you at Dana Farber Cancer Institute at 2pm. I think you should go. And I was like, whoa, what are you talking about? Why am I going to Dana Farber Cancer Institute. So it gets, you know, kind of scary there because I show up there. I'm in a suit and tie. My dad's in a suit down. My mom's seems to be dressed up. And we go, and they put me through tests. And I walk in there. And I don't know if you remember this, Michael. But the Boston Red Sox charity is called the Jimmy fund. Right? And the Jimmy fund are for kids with blood cancers, lymphoma leukemias, so I go there. And they checked me in and they told me as a whole host of tests they're going to do, and I'm looking in the waiting room, and I see mostly older people, and I'm 23 years old. So I go down the hallways, and I see little kids. So I go I go hang out with the little kids while I'm waiting. I didn't know what was going on. So they call me and I do my test. And this Dr. George Canalis, who's you know, when I came to learn that the inventor of some chemo therapies for lymphomas very experienced, and this young Harvard fellow named Eric Rubin I get pulled into this office with this big mahogany desk. And they say you have stage four E T cell non Hodgkins lymphoma. It's a very aggressive, aggressive, very aggressive form of cancer. We're going to try to knock this out. I have to tell you, Michael, I don't really remember hardly anything else that was said, I glossed over. I looked up at this young guy, Eric Rubin, and I said, What's he saying? I looked back out of the corner of my eye, my mom's bawling her eyes out. My dad's looks like a statue. And I have to tell you, I was really just a deer in the headlights. I had no idea that how a healthy 23 year old guy gets, you know, stage four T cell lymphoma with a very horrible prognosis. I mean, I mean, they don't they said, We don't know if we can help you at the world, one of the world's foremost cancer research hospitals in the world. So it was that was that was a tough pill to swallow. And I did some more testing. And then they told me to come back in about a week to start chemotherapy. And so, again, I didn't have the internet to search anything. I had encyclopedias. I had some friends, you know, and I was like, I'm a young guy. And, you know, I was talking to older people that potentially, you know, had leukemia or different cancer, but I didn't know much. And so I I basically showed up for chemotherapy, scared out of my mind, in denial, and Dr. RUBIN comes out and he says, we're not doing chemo today. I said, I didn't sleep awake. What are you talking about? He says, we'll try again tomorrow, your liver Our function test is too high. And my liver function test is too high. So I'm starting to learn but I still don't know what's going on. He says I got it was going to field trip. Field Trip. He said, Yeah, you're going down the street to Newton Wellesley hospital, we're going to the cryogenic center, cryo, what? What are you talking about? He goes, it's a sperm bank, and you're gonna go, you know, leave a sample specimen. And it's like, you just told me that, you know, if you can help me out what why I'm not even thinking about kids, right now. He said, Go do it. He says what else you're going to do today, and then you come back tomorrow, and we'll try chemo. So thank God, he said that, because I deposited before I actually started any chemotherapy, which, you know, as basically, you know, rendered me you know, impotent now because of all the chemotherapy and radiation I had. So that was a blessing that I didn't know about until later, which we'll get to. But a roll the story forward a little more quickly as that I was getting all bad news. I was relapsing, I went through about three or four different cycles of different chemotherapy recipes, nothing was working. I was getting sicker, and they tight. My sister, I am the twin CJ, for bone marrow transplant and she was a 25% chance of being a match. She happened to be 100% match. And I had to then gear up for back in 1990 was a bone marrow transplant where they would remove her bone marrow from her hip bones, they would scrub it and cleanse it, and they would put it in me. And they would hope that my body wouldn't immediately rejected and die and shut down or over time, which is called graft versus host these that it wouldn't kill me or potentially that it would work and it would actually reset my immune system. And it would take over the malignant cells and set my set me back straight, which it ended up doing. And so having a twin was another blessing miracle. You know that, you know, that happened to me. And I did some immunotherapy called interleukin two that was like, like the grandfather of immunotherapy that strengthened my system. And then I moved to Florida to get out of the cold weather and then I moved out to California to rebuild my life. I call that Humpty Dumpty building Humpty Dumpty version one. And that's that's how I got to California in Southern California.   Michael Hingson  32:15 So once again, your big sister savedthe day,   Howard Brown  32:19 as usual.   Michael Hingson  32:21 That's a big so we go,   Howard Brown  32:23 as we call ourselves the Wonder Twins. He's more. She's terrific. And thank God she gave part of herself and saved my life. And I am eternally grateful to her for that,   Michael Hingson  32:34 but but she never had any of the same issues or, or diseases. I gather. She's been   Howard Brown  32:41 very healthy, except for like a knee. A partial knee replacement. She's been very healthy her whole life.   Michael Hingson  32:48 Well, did she have to have a knee replacement because she kept kicking you around or what?   Howard Brown  32:52 No, she's little. She's five feet. 510 So she never kicked me. We are best friends. My wife's best friend. I know. She is just just a saint. She's She's such a giving person and you know, we take that from our parents, but she she gave of herself of what she could do. She said she do it again in a heartbeat. I don't think I'm allowed to give anybody my bone marrow but if I could, would give it to her do anything for her. She's She's amazing. So she gave me the gift, the gift of life.   Michael Hingson  33:21 So you went to Florida, then you moved to California and what did you do when you got out here?   Howard Brown  33:24 So I ended up moving up to northern California. So I met this girl from Michigan in Southern California, Lisa, my wife have now 28 years in July. We married Lisa Yeah, we got married under the Jewish wedding company's wedding canopies called the hotpot and we're looking at the Pacific Ocean, we made people come out that we had that Northridge earthquake in 94. But this is in July, so things are more settled. So we had all friends and family come out. And it was beautiful. We got it on a pool deck overlooking the Pacific. It was gorgeous. It was a beautiful Hollywood type wedding. And it was amazing. So we got married in July of 94. And then moved up to Silicon Valley in 97. And then I was working at the startups. My life was really out of balance because I'm working 20 hours, you know, a day and I'm traveling like crazy. And my wife says, You know what, you got to be home for dinner if we're going to think about having a family. And we're a little bit older now. 35 and 40. And so we've got to think about these things. And so I called back to Newton Wellesley hospital, and I got the specimen of sperm shipped out to San Jose, and we went through an in vitro fertilization process. And she grew eight eight eggs and they defrosted the swimmers and they took the best ones and put them back in the four best eggs and our miracle baby our frozen kids sickle. Emily was born in August of 2001. Another blessing another miracle. I was able to have a child and healthy baby girl.   Michael Hingson  34:58 So what's Emily doing today?   Howard Brown  35:00 Well, thank you for asking that. So, she is now in Missoula, Montana at a television station called K Pax eight Mountain News. And she's an intern for the summer. And she's living her great life out there hiking, Glacier National Park. And she ran I think she ran down to the Grand Tetons and, and she's learning about the broadcast business and reporting. She's a writer by trade, by trade and in journalism. And she likes philosophy. So she'll be coming back home to finish her senior year, this at the end of the summer at the University of Michigan. And so she's about to graduate in December. And she's, she's doing just great.   Michael Hingson  35:35 So she writes and doesn't do video editing us yet using Abbott or any of the evolutions from it.   Howard Brown  35:41 No, she does. She actually, when you're in a small market station, that's you. You write the script, she does the recording, she has a tripod, sometimes she's she films with the other reporters, but when she they sent her out as an intern, and she just covered the, this, you know, the pro pro life and pro choice rallies, she she records herself, she edits on Pro Tools, which is super powerful now, and a lot less expensive. And then, when she submits, she submits it refer review to the news director and to her superiors. And she's already got, I think, three video stories and about six different by lines on written stories. So she's learning by doing, it's experiential, it's amazing.   Michael Hingson  36:23 So she must have had some experience in dealing with all the fires and stuff out at Yellowstone and all that.   Howard Brown  36:31 So the flooding at Yellowstone, so I drove her out there in May. And I didn't see any fires. But the flooding we got there before that, she took me on a hike on the North Gate of Yellowstone. And she's she's, you know, environmentally wilderness trained first aid trained. And I'm the dad, and I'm in decent shape. But she took me out an hour out and an hour back in and, you know, saw a moose saw a deer didn't see any mountain lion didn't see any Grizzlies, thank God, but we did see moose carcass where the grizzly had got a hold on one of those and, and everybody else to get it. So I got to go out to nature weather and we took a road trip out there this summer, it was a blast. It's the those are the memories, when you've been through a cancer diagnosis that you just you hold on to very dearly and very tight. It was a blast. So that's what he's doing this summer. She'll be back. She'll be back in August, end of August.   Michael Hingson  37:22 That's really exciting to hear that she's working at it and being successful. And hopefully she'll continue to do that. And do good reporting. And I know that this last week, with all the Supreme Court cases, it's it's, I guess, in one sense, a field day for reporters. But it's also a real challenge, because there's so many polarized views on all of that.   Howard Brown  37:44 Well, everybody's a broadcaster now whether it's Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and all the other ones out there, tick tock. So everybody's sort of a reporter now. And you know, what do you believe, and unfortunately, I just can't believe in something in 140 characters or something in two sentences. Yeah, there's no depth there. So sometimes you miss the point, and all this stuff. And then everything's on 24 hours on CNN, on Fox on MSNBC, so it never stops. So I call that a very noisy world. And it's hard to process. You know, all this. It's coming at you so fast in the blink of an eye. So we're in a different time than when we grew up, Michael, it was a slower pace. Today in this digital world. It's, it's, it's a lot and especially COVID. Now, are we just consuming and consuming and binging and all this stuff, I don't think it's that healthy.   Michael Hingson  38:36 It's not only a noisy world, but it's also a world, it's very disconnected, you can say all you want about how people can send tweets back and forth, text messages back and forth and so on. But you're not connecting, you're not really getting deep into anything, you're not really establishing relationships in the way that as you point out, we used to, and we don't connect anymore, even emails don't give you that much connection, realism, as opposed to having meaningful dialogue and meaningful conversations. So we just don't Converse anymore. And now, with all that's going on, in the very divided opinions, there's there's no room for discussion, because everybody has their own opinion. And that's it, there's no room to dialogue on any of it at all, which is really too bad.   Howard Brown  39:21 Yeah, I agree. It's been divisive. And, you know, it's, it's hard because, you know, an email doesn't have the body language, the intent, the emotion, like we're talking right now. And, you know, we're expressing, you know, you know, I'm telling stories of my story personally, but you can tell when I get excited, I smile, I can get animated. Sometimes with an email, you know, you don't know the intent and it can be misread. And a lot of that communication is that way. So, you know, I totally get where you're coming from.   Michael Hingson  39:55 And that's why I like doing the podcasts that we're doing. We get to really have conversation isn't just asking some questions and getting an answer and then going on to the next thing. That's, frankly, no fun. And I think it's important to be able to have the opportunity to really delve into things and have really good conversations about them. I learned a lot, and I keep seeing as I do these podcasts, and for the past 20 plus years, I've traveled around the world speaking, of course, about September 11, and talking about teamwork, and trust, and so on. And as I always say, if I don't learn more than I'm able to teach or impart, then I'm not doing my job very well.   Howard Brown  40:35 So that's exactly and that's, that's where I'm going after the second health concern. You know, I'm now going to teach, I'm gonna inspire, I'm going to educate. And that's, that's, that's what I do, I want to do with the rest of my time is to be able to, you know, listen, I'm not putting my head in the sand, about school shootings, about an insurrection about floods about all that. You gotta live in the real world. But I choose, as I say, I like to live on positive Street as much as possible, but positive street with action. That's, that's what makes the world a better place at the end of the day. So you sharing that story means that one we'll never forget. And you can educate the generations to come that need to understand, you know, that point in time and how it affected you and how you've dealt with it, and how you've been able to get back out of bed every day. And I want to do the same.   Michael Hingson  41:26 Well, there's nothing wrong with being positive. I think that there is a need to be aware. But we can we can continue to be positive, and try to promote positivity, try to promote connectionism and conversations and so on, and promote the fact that it's okay to have different opinions. But the key is to respect the other opinion, and recognize that it isn't just what you say that's the only thing that ever matters. That's the problem that we face so much today.   Howard Brown  41:58 Right? Respect. I think Aretha Franklin saying that great. She   Michael Hingson  42:01 did. She did. She's from Motown here. There you go. See? When you moved out to California, and you ended up in Silicon Valley, and so on, who are you working for them?   Howard Brown  42:14 So I moved up, and I worked for this company called Liquid audio that doesn't exist anymore. And it was just iTunes 10 years too early on, there was real audio, there was Mark Cuban's company was called Audio net and then broadcast.com used for a lot of money. And so the company went public and made a lot of money. But it didn't work. The world wasn't ready for it yet to be able to live in this cassette world. It was not ready. I Napster hadn't been invented, mp3 and four hadn't been invented. So it just the adoption rate of being too early. But it still went public a lot. The investors made a ton of money, but they call that failing, failing forward. So I stayed there for a year, I made some money. And I went to another startup. And that startup was in the web hosting space, it was called Naevus. site, it's now won by Time Warner. But at that time, building data centers and hosting racks of computers was very good business. And so I got to be, you know, participate in an IPO. You know, I built built up revenue. And you know, the outsourcing craze now called cloud computing, it's dominated by the folks that like Amazon, and the folks at IBM, and a few others, but mostly, you know, dominated there, where you're basically having lots of blinking lights in a data center, and just making sure that those computers stay up to serve up the pages of the web, the videos, even television, programming, and now any form of communication. So I was, I was early on in that and again, got to go through an IPO and get compensated properly unduly, and, but also my life was out of balance. And so before we were called out for the sperm and had a baby, I transitioned out when Silicon Valley just the pendulum swung the other way, I ended up starting to work at my own nonprofit, I founded it with a couple of Silicon Valley guys called Planet Jewish, and it was still very technologically driven. It was the world's first Community Calendar. This is before Google Calendar, this is in 2000. And we built it as a nonprofit to serve the Jewish community to get more people to come to Jewish events. And I architected the code, and we ran that nonprofit for 17 years. And before calendaring really became free, and very proud of that. And after that, I started a very similar startup with different code called circle builder, and it was serving faith and religions. It was more like private facebook or private online communities. And we had the Vatican as a client and about 25,000 Ministries, churches, and nonprofits using the system. And this is all sort of when Facebook was coming out to you know, from being just an edu or just for college students. And so I built that up as a quite a big business. But unfortunately, I was in Michigan when I started circle builder. I ended up having to close both of those businesses down. One that the revenue was telling off of the nonprofit and also circuit builder wasn't monetizing as quickly or as we needed as well. But I ended up going into my 50 year old colonoscopy, Michael. And I woke up thinking everything was going to be fine. My wife Lisa's holding my hand. And the gastroenterologist said, No, I found something. And when I find something, it's bad news. Well, it was bad news. Stage three colon cancer. Within about 10 days or two weeks, I had 13 and a half inches of my colon removed, plus margins plus lymph nodes. One of the lymph nodes was positive, install a chemo port and then I waited because my daughter had soccer tournaments to travel to but on first week of August in 2016, I started 12 rounds of Rockem sockem chemotherapy called folfox and five Fu and it was tough stuff. So I was back on the juice again, doing chemotherapy and but this time, I wasn't a deer in the headlights, I was a dad, I was a husband. I had been through the trenches. So this time, I was much more of a marine on a mission. And I had these digital tools to reach out for research and for advocacy and for support. Very different at that time. And so I unfortunately failed my chemotherapy, I failed my neck surgery, another colon resection, I failed a clinical trial. And things got worse I became metastatic stage four that means that colon cancer had spread to my liver, my stomach linings called the omentum and peritoneum and my bladder. And I had that same conversation with a doctor in downtown Detroit, at a Cancer Institute and he said, We don't know if we can help you. And if you Dr. Google, it said I had 4% of chances of living about 12 to 18 months and things were dark I was I was back at it again looking looking at the Grim Reaper. But what I ended up doing is research and I did respond to the second line chemotherapy with a little regression or shrinkage. And for that you get more chemotherapy. And then I started to dig in deep research on peritoneal carcinoma which is cancer of the of the of the stomach lining, and it's very tricky. And there's a group called colon town.org that I joined and very informative. I there then met at that time was probably over 100 other people that had had the peritoneal carcinoma, toma and are living and they went through a radical surgery called cytoreduction high pack, where they basically debulk you like a de boning a fish, and they take out all this cancer, they can see the dead and live cells, and then they pour hot chemo in you. And then hot chemo is supposed to penetrate the scanning the organs, and it's supposed to, in theory kill micro cell organism and cancer, although it's still not proven just yet. But that surgery was about a 12 and a half hour surgery in March of 2018. And they call that the mother of all surgeries. And I came out looking like a ghost. I had lost about 60 pounds, and I had a long recovery. It's that one would put Humpty Dumpty back together. It's been now six years. But I got a lot of support. And I am now what's called no evidence of disease at this time, I'm still under surveillance. I was quarterly I just in June, I had my scans and my exams. And I'm now going to buy annual surveillance, which means CAT scans and blood tests. That's the step in the right direction. And so again, I mean, if I think about it, my twin sister saved my life, I had a frozen sperm become a daughter. And again, I'm alive from a stage four diagnosis. I am grateful. I am lucky, and I am blessed. So that's that a long story that the book will basically tell you, but that's where I am today.   Michael Hingson  48:50 And we'll definitely get to the book. But another question. So you had two startups that ran collectively for quite a period of time, what got you involved or motivated to do things in the in the faith arena?   Howard Brown  49:06 So I have to give credit to my wife, Lisa. So we met at the Jewish Federation of Los Angeles at this young leadership group. And then they have like a college fair of organizations that are Jewish support organizations. And one of them happened to be Jewish Big Brothers, now Jewish Brothers and Big Sisters of Los Angeles. Suppose you'd be a great big brother. I was like, well, it takes up a lot of time. I don't know. She's like, you should check it out. So I did. And I became I fill out the application. I went through the background checks, and I actually got to be a Jewish big brother to this young man II and at age 10. And so I have to tell you, one of the best experiences in my life was to become a mentor. And I today roll the clock forward. 29 years in is now close to 40 years old or 39 years old. He's married with a son who's one noble and two wife, Sarah, and we are family. We stayed together past age 18 Seen, and we've continued on. And I know not a lot of people do that. But it was probably one of the best experiences I've ever done. I've gotten so much out of it. Everyone's like, Oh, you did so much for in? Well, he did so much for me and my daughter, Emily calls him uncle and my wife and I are we are his family, his dad was in prison and then passed away and his mom passed away where his family now. And so one of the best experiences. So that's how I kind of got into the Jewish community. And also being in sales I was I ended up being a good fundraiser. And so these nonprofits that live their lifeblood is fundraising dollars. I didn't mind calling people asking them for donations or sitting down over coffee, asking them for donations. So I learned how to do that out in Southern California in Northern California. And I've continued to do that. So that gave me a real good taste of faith. I'm not hugely religious, but I do believe in the community values of the Jewish community. And you get to meet people beyond boards and you get to raise money for really good causes. And so that sort of gave me another foundation to build off of and I've enjoyed doing that as a community sermon for a long time.   Michael Hingson  51:10 I'll bite Where does Ian live today?   Howard Brown  51:13 Okay, well, Ian was in LA when we got matched. I had to move to San Francisco, but I I petitioned the board to keep our match alive because it was scholarship dollars in state right. And went to UC Santa Cruz, Florida State for his master's and got his last degree at Hastings and the Jewish community supported him with scholarships. And in was in very recently was in San Francisco, Oakland area, and now he's lives in South Portland, Oregon.   Michael Hingson  51:39 Ah, so you haven't gotten back to Michigan yet? Although he's getting into colder weather. So there's a chance?   Howard Brown  51:45 Well, let me tell you, he did live with us in Michigan. So using my connections through the Jewish community, I asked if he could interview with a judge from the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals a friend of mine, we sat on a on a board of directors for the American Jewish Committee, Detroit. And I said, she's like, well, Howard, I really have to take Michigan kids. I said, You know what? No problem. You decide if he's if he's worthy or not go through your process, but would you take the phone call? So she took the phone call, and I never heard anything. And then Ian called me and he said, I got it. I as a second year loss. Going to be a second year law student. I'm going to be clerking for summer interning and clerking for this judge Leanne white. And again, it just it karma, the payback, it was beautiful. So he lived with us for about four and a half months. And when he came back, and it was beautiful, because Emily was only about four or five years old. And, and he lived with us for that time. And it was beautiful.   Michael Hingson  52:43 But that's really great. That, that you have that relationship that you did the big brother program. And I'm assuming you've been big brother to other people as well.   Howard Brown  52:53 No, no. I have not actually. Because what it did is it trained me to be a dad. So when I had Emily, it was more it was more difficult actually to do that. And so no, Ian has been my one and only match. I mentor a lot of Babson students, and I mentor and get mentored by some cancer patients and, and some big entrepreneurs. Mentorship is a core value of mine. I like to be mentored. And I also like to mentor others. And I think that's, that's what makes the world go round. So when Steve Gates when Bill Gates, his wife, Melinda, just donated 123 million to the overall arching Big Brothers, Big Sisters of America. And that money will filter to all those, I think that that's such a core value. If a young person can have someone that takes interest in them, they can really shape their future and also get a lot out of it. So mentorship is one of my key values. And I hope it's hope it's many of your viewers and yours as well. Michael,   Michael Hingson  53:52 absolutely is I think that we can't do anything if we can't pass on what we've learned and try to help other people grow. I've been a firm believer my entire life of you don't give somebody a fish, you teach them how to fish and however, and wherever that is, it's still the same thing. And we need to teach and impart. And I think that in our own way, every one of us is a teacher and the more we take it seriously, the better it is.   Howard Brown  54:18 Well, I'm now a student not learning podcasting. I learned how to be a book author and I'm learning how to reinvent myself virgin Humpty Dumpty, version two coming out.   Michael Hingson  54:29 So you had been a national cancer survivor advocate and so on. Tell me a little bit about that if you would.   Howard Brown  54:35 So I respect people that want to keep their diagnosis private and their survivorship private. That's not me. I want to be able to help people because if I would have been screened at age 40 or 42, I probably wouldn't have had colon cancer and I was not, but this is a preventable disease and really minorities and indigenous people as they need to get screened more, because that's the highest case of diagnosis for colorectal cancer. But what I think that that's what his needs now it's the second leading killer of cancer right now. And it's an important to get this advocacy out and use your voice. And so I want to use my voice to be able to sound the alarm on getting screening, and also to help people survive. There's I think, 16 million growing to 23 or 4 million by 2030. Cancer survivors out there, cancer diagnosis, it sucks sex all the way around, but it affects more than the patient, it affects your caregiver, it affects your family affects relationships, it affects emotions, physical, and also financial, there is many aspects of survivorship here and more people are learning to live with it and going, but also, quite frankly, I live with in the stage for cancer world, you also live with eminence of death, or desperation to live a little bit longer. You hear people I wish I had one more day. Well, I wish I had time to be able to see my daughter graduate high school, and I did and I cherished it. I'm going to see her graduate college this December and then walk at the Big House here in Michigan, in Ann Arbor in May. And then God willing, I will walk her down the aisle at the appropriate time. And it's good to have those big goals that are important that drive you forward. And so those are the few things that drive me forward.   Michael Hingson  56:28 I know that I can't remember when I had my first colonoscopy. It's been a while. It was just part of what I did. My mother didn't die of colon cancer, but she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She, she went to the doctor's office when she felt something was wrong. And they did diagnose it as colon cancer. She came home my brother was with her. She fell and broke her hip and went into the hospital and passed away a few days later, they did do an operation to deal with repairing her hip. And but I think because of all of that, just the amount that her body went through, she just wasn't able to deal with it. She was 6970. And so it was no I take Yeah, so I was just one of those things that that did happen. She was 71, not 70. But, you know, we've, for a while I got a colonoscopy every five years. And then they say no, you don't need to do it every five years do it every 10 years. The couple of times they found little polyps but they were just little things. There was nothing serious about them. They obviously took them out and autopsy or biopsy them and all that. And no problems. And I don't remember any of it. I slept through it. So it's okay.   Howard Brown  57:46 Great. So the prep is the worst part. Isn't it though? The preps no fun. But the 20 minutes they have you under light anesthesia, they snipped the polyps and away you go and you keep living your life. So that's what I hope for everyone, because I will tell you, Michael, showing through the amount of chemotherapy, the amount of surgeries and the amount of side effects that I have is, is I don't wish that on anyone. I don't wish on anyone. It's not a good existence. It's hard. And quite frankly, it's, I want to prevent about it. And I'm just not talking about colon cancer, get your mammogram for breast cancer, get your check for prostate cancer, you know, self care is vital, because you can't have fun, do your job, work Grow family, if your hell if you're not healthy, and the emotional stuff they call the chemo brain or brain fog and or military personnel refer to it as PTSD. It's real. And you've got to be able to understand that, you know, coming from a cancer diagnosis is a transition. And I'll never forget that my two experiences and I I've got to build and move forward though. Because otherwise it gets dark, it gets lonely, it gets depressing, and then other things start to break down the parts don't work well. So I've chosen to find my happy place on the basketball court be very active in sounding the alarm for as an advocate. And as I never planned on being a book author and now I'm going to be a published author this summer. So there's good things that have come in my life. I've had a very interesting, interesting life. And we're here talking about it now so I appreciate it.   Michael Hingson  59:20 Well tell me about you in basketball seems to be your happy place.   Howard Brown  59:24 So everyone needs to find a happy place. I'll tell you why. The basketball court I've been playing since I was six years old and I was pretty good you know, I'm not gonna go professional. But I happen to like the team sport and I'm a point guard so I'm basically telling people what to do and trash talk and and all that. But I love it a

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WeMentor Mondays with Nancy
What Lisa Fain Learned Growing Up in an Entrepreneurial Home

WeMentor Mondays with Nancy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 28:12


Episode 341: What Lisa Fain Learned Growing Up in an Entrepreneurial Home Lisa Fain, C.E.O. of the Center for Mentoring Excellence, says that growing up in a 1980s entrepreneurial home gave her a sense of purpose, place, and accountability. It reinforced an understanding that Lisa could contribute to the world, shape her work, and be independent. This independent thinking started in her formative years when Lisa and her brother were encouraged to make plans and prepare their meals. When Dr. Lois Zachary founded Leadership Development Services, L.L.C., and its Center for Mentoring Excellence, her daughter, Lisa Fain, was in high school. Women entrepreneurship was on the rise, “according to the 1988 State of Small Business Report, the number of sole proprietorships owned by women increased 62 percent between 1980 and 1986. I found this impressive since women weren't encouraged to start businesses until 1972, with a few exceptions like Mary Kay Ash, who founded Mary Kay Cosmetics in 1963.  In 1972, the floodgates opened for women when Title IX (a federal civil rights act) was passed prohibiting sex-based discrimination in any school or any other education program that receives funding from our federal government. Women's organized sports began their rise alongside business ownership because federal monies started flowing into them. Now, “women account for 41% of the global workforce and control more than $20 trillion in annual spending. Predictions are that this number will go up to $28 trillion in the next few years.”  As Dr. Zachary built her educational consultancy and her husband, Ed Zachary expanded his legal firm in Syracuse, New York; they still managed to be present and engaged parents. Role modeling the benefits of fulfilling work fueled Lisa's entrepreneurial spirit that sprouted in her 30s and 40s. Hear how Lisa took her diverse interests in political science, sociology, and economics with a social justice bend to acquire an interdisciplinary degree from Northwestern University in Chicago. Two required courses taught by a cherished mentor helped Lisa understand ways to repair the world. Eventually, she became a lawyer, mediator, coach, and C.E.O. at the Center for Mentoring Excellence. Other Conversation Highlights Although not a fair way to measure oneself, comparing Lisa's start to someone else's finish was a benefit in determining Lisa's major. The next generation. They are raising Talia and Emily with David in their entrepreneurial home. Lisa's lifework of inclusion, diversity, and equity. Creating a mentoring culture for retention and attraction. Insights into Millennials and Gen Zs. Alternatives to the Peanut Butter approach. My conversation with Lisa sparked my curiosity to research the newest female entrepreneurship statistics. I am excited to report that we're progressing globally on inclusion, diversity, and equity. Check out the statistics below. Key Female Entrepreneurship 2022 Statistics  22.4% of small business owners in the U.S. are women. 17% of black women are in the process of starting or running a new business. The female entrepreneurial activity rate in the U.S. is 13.6%. 14% of women-owned businesses employ between 11 and 50+ workers. Women represent 50% of entrepreneurs in Latin America and the Caribbean. Women made up 36.8% of Canadian business owners in 2021. South Asia has less than 20% of female entrepreneurs. Women-owned and controlled enterprises create direct employment for about 27 million people in India. Women entrepreneurship thrived during the 2020/2021 crisis, according to the world's foremost study of worldwide entrepreneurship, the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (G.E.M.). Amanda Elam, a G.E.M. researcher, Research Fellow at Babson College's Diana International Research Institute, and the lead author of the G.E.M. 2020/2021 Women's Entrepreneurship Report, said there is a “slow shift in the narrative on women's entrepreneurship from encouraging a high number of startups ...

Business of Architecture Podcast
438: Key Financial Metrics for an Architecture Firm with Hugh Glazer

Business of Architecture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 70:01


Participate in the largest-ever survey on what small architecture practices are charging? Visit: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/feesurvey Hello and welcome to the Business of Architecture. This week I am speaking with Hugh Glazer who is a CPA for 30+ years and delivers CFO and Business Operations Services to Private Companies and Not for Profit Organizations. As a consultant, part time CFO and hands on advisor he strategically manages projects to offer merger-acquisition-integration, budgeting, financial planning and managing new initiatives to deliver dramatic results. Hugh has mentored over 150+ CEOs through the ‘10,000 Small Business Program' at Babson College. His specialties include software development, publishing, architecture, advertising, and not for profit. He is also our specialist financial consultant inside of the SMART PRACTICE Method, our flagship business program for architects to run profitable and impactful businesses.   In this week's episode we will be discussing: 6 Key Financial Metrics including: 1. Profit & Target Multiplier 2. Cash Flow Breakeven 3. Net Fee per staff 4. Utilization Rate 5. Checks & Balances 6. Accounts Receivable   To learn more about Hugh Glazer, visit his: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hjglazer ► Feedback? Email us at podcast@businessofarchitecture.com ► Access your free training at http://SmartPracticeMethod.com/ ► If you want to speak directly to our advisors, book a call at https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/call ► Subscribe to my YouTube Channel for updates: https://www.youtube.com/c/BusinessofArchitecture   *******   For more free tools and resources for running a profitable, impactful, and fulfilling practice, connect with me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/businessofarchitecture Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/enoch.sears/ Website: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BusinessofArch Podcast: http://www.businessofarchitecture.com/podcast iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/business-architecture-podcast/id588987926 Android Podcast Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/BusinessofArchitecture-podcast Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9idXNpbmVzc29mYXJjaGl0ZWN0dXJlLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz   *******   Access the FREE Architecture Firm Profit Map video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Download the FREE Architecture Firm Marketing Process Flowchart video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Come to my next live, in-person event: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/live   Carpe Diem!

The Zest
Dr. Fred Opie on the “Fascinating” African Roots of Florida Foods

The Zest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 25:20


We always love digging into food history, so we're excited to welcome back friend of the pod Dr. Frederick Douglass Opie. He's an author and professor of history and foodways at Babson College outside of Boston. Among the courses he teaches is African History and Foodways. We always learn something from Dr. Opie, and he has the best stories. In this conversation, he explains the African roots of Southern staples like watermelon, beans and rice, and Coca-Cola. He also details how enslaved Africans brought their farming techniques and cooking methods to America, and how Reconstruction-era politics led to racist food stereotypes that persist today.Related episodes:James Weldon Johnson's Foodie LifeZora Neale Hurston's Foodie LifeToni Tipton-Martin Celebrates African-American Chefs in ‘Jubilee'Two USF Professors Offer a Crash Course in American Food History 

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership
182: Breaking Down Barriers as a Nonprofit Leader (Nyeisha Dewitt)

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 45:48


182: Breaking Down Barriers as a Nonprofit Leader (Nyeisha Dewitt)SUMMARYHow do you blend your life experiences with a passion for change and actually do something about it? Dr. Nyeisha Dewitt is eminently qualified to answer this question. In episode #182 of Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership, Nyeisha shares her journey to nonprofit leadership, the lessons she's learned, and the challenges she's faced along the way. As a committed entrepreneur herself, she knows leaders can be mission-driven yet combine that with business acumen informed by experiences. Nyeisha discusses the value of community partnerships with varying missions who work together to break down barriers of those you serve to address their whole need. You'll also hear her process for self-care, recruiting talent, and building an effective board. ABOUT NYEISHADr. Nyeisha DeWitt is an investor, serial entrepreneur and the CEO of Oakland Natives Give Back Fund, Inc., which she founded in 2008 to epitomize an evolved concept of philanthropy and raise awareness around the importance of daily attendance. Personally familiar with the outcomes associated with chronic absenteeism, Dr. Ny is the example of where you start not necessarily dictating where you finish. She dropped out of high school in the 10th grade, but since taking her GED, she has triumphed from graduation stage to graduation stage. She earned her Bachelor's Degree in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley, her Master's Degree in Teaching and Doctoral Degree in Organization and Leadership in Education, both from the University of San Francisco, and recently, she completed her Master degree in Management with a concentration in Advanced Entrepreneurial Leadership from Babson College in Massachusetts. Her experience as an educator and a mother of three children with unique learning abilities has provided immense value to her role as a funder who supports innovative + solutions to combat this national crisis. Since inception, ONGB has invested nearly $7.2M in resources toward that end.EPISODE TOPICS & RESOURCESThe Celestine Prophecy by James RedfieldLearn more about Nyeisha hereTake our Podcast Survey and let us know what you want to hear!Check out Patton's new book Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership: Seven Keys to Advancing Your Career in the Philanthropic Sector