Podcasts about CSD

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Best podcasts about CSD

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Latest podcast episodes about CSD

taz vorgelesen Podcast
Wie geht die Gesellschaft mit queerfeindlicher Gewalt um?

taz vorgelesen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 19:55


Vor zwei Wochen starb der trans Mann Malte C., nachdem er auf dem CSD in Münster attackiert wurde. Wie geht die Gesellschaft mit Queerfeindlichkeit um? Vorgelesen von taz-Leserin blauschrift. Mehr vorgelesene taz-Texte im Telegram-Kanal: t.me/tazAudio – Mitmachen/Feedback: vorgelesen@taz.de

Dave and Dujanovic
September 15: Full Show

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 112:11


9:05 - Ute Conference suspends players and parents over Herriman Brawl An update has come through regarding referee harrasment from parents, specifically involving the recent “parent brawl” that took place in Herriman over the weekend. Dave and Debbie discuss the update.   9:20 - Sandy City and the Gondola  Today we are broadcasting live from Sandy City! Mayor of Sandy City, Monika Zoltanski joins the show to discuss her priorities for the city and share input on where she stands with the Gondola.    9:35 - Student Loan Forgiveness: Is Utah gearing up for a lawsuit?Governor Spencer Cox along with many others signed a letter requesting the Biden Administration to withdrawl the Student Loan Forgiveness plan immediately. Senator Mike Mckell shares his input on this and what could come from it.  9:50 a.m. Jordan High School Latinos in Action  Jordan High has an incredibly active Latinos in Action program — which has proven to be an effective dropout-prevention program for students who historically have had higher high school dropout rates.  Latinos In Action bridges the graduation and opportunity gap for Latino students, working from within the educational system to create positive change. Jordan High's program operates as a year-long elective course taught by a highly-qualified teacher at the middle school, junior high, and high school level. The end goal of everything LIA does is to empower Latino youth to lead and strengthen their communities through college- and career-readiness. They accomplish this by focusing on four pillars: leveraging personal and cultural assets, excelling in education, serving the community, and developing leadership skills. Jerildeen Fernandez a student at Jordan High School a part of Latinos in Action shares information about Latinos in Action. 10:05 a.m. — Math and Reading scores fall drastically since pandemic  Assessment data show that math and reading scores for American 9-year-old students fell dramatically during the first two years of the pandemic. Nationally, reading scores saw the largest drop in 30 years, while math scores had their first dip in the history of the testing regimen behind the study, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, a branch of the U.S. Education Department. But schools are aggressively targeting the “COVID-19” slide with initiatives to reverse the trend and inspire a trajectory of learning.  Dr. Roderick-Landward will be prepared to talk about what CSD is doing to not only lift up struggling students but also provide opportunities for the many students who are achieving at high levels.   Instructional Supports Assistant Director Jesse Hennefer joins the show to explain more.      10:20- a.m.  — The pandemic's impact on student's  This year's senior class had just started their high school careers when the COVID-19 pandemic upended life. They were freshmen when school was shuttered to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus.  And this is the first year that no COVID-19-related health orders or laws have been in place since 2020.  What has that been like for this year's seniors?  What did they learn from those years?  Do they think they “missed out” — or did they learn things about life that other classes have never had to experience?  What is it like now that students can go to football games, have dances, and attend school without masks?  Jordan High is holding its Homecoming Pep Assembly Thursday morning. Students of Jordan High School share their input on how they've been effected.           10:35 - Behavioral issues caused from the pandemic in elementary school students  One of the reverberations of the pandemic is that kids have not had structure for two years. When they were doing online school at home, the littlest of students didn't learn how to “Do School,” meaning:  Sit at a desk, raise a hand, wait your turn in line, focus for a period of time on a subject, etc. Many small children in their developmental years have only been exposed to close family members and friends for the two COVID-19 years.An evidence-based preschool, like those in Canyons District, can help children become adjusted to both the social and academic parts of school, even before they start kindergarten.  Canyons School District Preschool Coordinator, Terri Mitchell joins the show.  10:50 a.m. —  Special Education Resources in the Canyons School District  While “The Great Resignation” has been a major challenge for schools, it's proven to be especially challenging for special education departments. The dearth of teachers specially trained in special education is a concern for most school districts, including Canyons District. The shortage of para-educators for special education classrooms also is an issue, and CSD this week started a new incentive program for current employees to hopefully fill those positions. Current employees who refer a candidate who accepts a paraeducator job and stays for at least 90 days will receive an extra $500.  Employees who recruit a part-time paraeducator who stays for at least 90 days will receive $250.  Even with the shortage of teachers and staff, special education departments work hard to provide services to the students who need just a little more help to do big things. Special Education Director Nate Edvalson will talk about the need for    teachers, paraeducators, and the great work being done in special education classes and programs, such as speech-language pathology.  Special Education Director Nate Edvalson and Amy Buckley - Speech and language specialist join the show to discuss the resources available to students and need and the staffing issues they are facing in the department. 11:05 - The Putin - Xi meeting China has offered tacit support for Russia's actions in Ukraine – Boyd Matheson, Host of Inside Sources, spoke with an inside source about a meeting between Vladimir Putin and the Chinese leader. Boyd joins the show to explain his discussion.   11:20 a.m. - How Safe UT is being utilized in schools  Nearly every day, Canyons District receives tips through the SafeUT mobile app indicating that a student is contemplating self-harm. As Canyons' Student Services Director, Dr. Brian McGill leads the department that helps respond to such tips.  Dr. McGill can talk about the mental-health services that are offered and how schools and the District work together to support students in crisis and innovate approaches to reach students who may be struggling in silence. In 2018, Dr. McGill received the “Champion of SafeUT Award” for leading Alta High's efforts to prevent suicides, reduce instances of bullying, and maintain a safe learning environment by carefully monitoring and following up on tips sent via the SafeUT mobile app, the state-funded SafeUT mobile app that gives students immediate, all-day-and-all-night access to school staff and counselors at the University of Utah's Neuropsychiatric Institute.  Canyons' Student Services Director, Dr. Brian McGill joins the show to explain more on the Safe UT app and how students in the Canyons District put it to use.    11:35 a.m. - How the Canyon's District has taken a closerlook into school safety  In response to heightened worries about school safety following the May tragedy in Uvalde, Texas, Canyons spent the summer months conducting an internal review of the safety and security measures at CSD campuses and central offices. The review called for an evaluation of each facility's existing security measures, as well as CSD's already-robust Incident Command Manual, which is meant to be CSD's guidepost for emergency responses. Risk Management Coordinator Ryan Jakeman speaks about the review, what was found, and how it has made schools safer.    11:50 - How Student involvement leads to success As we contunie our brodcast from Jordan High School and focus in on KSL in the Classroom, students from different organizations join the show to explain how being highly involved in school has increased their success overall. D2 speaks to a student involved in the peer court and student government as well as a student in the club DECASee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Top-Thema mit Vokabeln | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Wie sicher sind queere Menschen in Deutschland? Immer wieder kommt es zu queerfeindlichen Übergriffen – sowohl im Zusammenhang mit großen Veranstaltungen wie dem Christopher Street Day als auch im Alltag.

Dave and Dujanovic
Math and Reading scores fall drastically since pandemic

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 9:56


Assessment data show that math and reading scores for American 9-year-old students fell dramatically during the first two years of the pandemic. Nationally, reading scores saw the largest drop in 30 years, while math scores had their first dip in the history of the testing regimen behind the study, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, a branch of the U.S. Education Department. But schools are aggressively targeting the “COVID-19” slide with initiatives to reverse the trend and inspire a trajectory of learning.  Dr. Roderick-Landward will be prepared to talk about what CSD is doing to not only lift up struggling students but also provide opportunities for the many students who are achieving at high levels.   Instructional Supports Assistant Director Jesse Hennefer joins the show to explain more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave and Dujanovic
Special Education Resources in the Canyons School District

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 8:46


While “The Great Resignation” has been a major challenge for schools, it's proven to be especially challenging for special education departments. The dearth of teachers specially trained in special education is a concern for most school districts, including Canyons District. The shortage of para-educators for special education classrooms also is an issue, and CSD this week started a new incentive program for current employees to hopefully fill those positions. Current employees who refer a candidate who accepts a paraeducator job and stays for at least 90 days will receive an extra $500.  Employees who recruit a part-time paraeducator who stays for at least 90 days will receive $250.  Even with the shortage of teachers and staff, special education departments work hard to provide services to the students who need just a little more help to do big things. Special Education Director Nate Edvalson will talk about the need for    teachers, paraeducators, and the great work being done in special education classes and programs, such as speech-language pathology.  Special Education Director Nate Edvalson and Amy Buckley - Speech and language specialist join the show to discuss the resources available to students and need and the staffing issues they are facing in the department.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave and Dujanovic
How the Canyon's District has taken a closerlook into school safety

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 9:03


In response to heightened worries about school safety following the May tragedy in Uvalde, Texas, Canyons spent the summer months conducting an internal review of the safety and security measures at CSD campuses and central offices. The review called for an evaluation of each facility's existing security measures, as well as CSD's already-robust Incident Command Manual, which is meant to be CSD's guidepost for emergency responses. Risk Management Coordinator Ryan Jakeman speaks about the review, what was found, and how it has made schools safer. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stadt.Land.Schwul. der Podcast
Warum wir den Ball mal ins Spiel bringen und wir den nicht sofort wegtreten sollten.

Stadt.Land.Schwul. der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 46:04


Unsere Website: https://www.stadtlandschwul.de Instagram: SLS https://www.instagram.com/stadtlandschwul Flo https://www.instagram.com/fkfbrln Pat https://www.instagram.com/paout

StadtRadio Göttingen - Beiträge
Christopher Street Day am 10. September - in Göttingen wird es bunt

StadtRadio Göttingen - Beiträge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 5:06


Morgen findet in Göttingen der diesjährige Christopher Street Day, kurz CSD, statt. Mit einem bunten Programm macht das Aktionsbündnis auf die Rechte der queeren Gemeinschaft aufmerksam. Darunter fallen zum Beispiel Homo-, Bi- und Asexuelle sowie Trans- und Inter- Personen. Um 12:30 Uhr startet der CSD unter dem Motto „Our pride. Our right. Let‘s unite!“ mit einem Demonstrationszug vom Neuen Rathaus durch die Innenstadt bis zum Albaniplatz. Dort findet ab 14:30 Uhr ein Straßenfest ...

Lehrersprechtag
#113 Mit den Jungs!

Lehrersprechtag

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 66:43


Dass eigentlich eigentlich kein Wort ist, merken die Studienräte jetzt, wo sie in der letzten Folge groß angekündigt hatten, eigentlich in diese Folge mit ihrem Sportverein, den Sportniks, auf einem Segelboot unterwegs zu sein. Warum das nicht so ganz geklappt hat, erklären Batzke und Pieler in dieser Folge. Alex weist außerdem auf einen brutalen und tragischen Vorfall auf dem CSD in Münster hin. Er geht im Klopper der Woche der Ursache auf den Grund, warum wohl Kurzgeschichten oft fehlinterpretiert werden, denn auch das geht im Deutschunterricht. Beflügelt vom Wochenende stellt Martin eine wichtige mündliche Prüfung zu Roadtrips zu Wasser, zu Lande und in der Luft und bittet Alex, relevante Getränke, Snacks und das passende Entertainment zu nennen. In der Hausaufgabe wird es nochmal laut und daraufhin weist der Batzke auch noch auf das ebenfalls laute, aber sehr gute Konzert seiner eigenen Band hin: Does Not Float spielen auf dem Gemeindefest in St. Joseph in Bottrop. Weshalb er selbst leider nicht dabei sein kann, erklärt Alex dann auch noch. Er befindet sich nämlich, wenn ihr, liebe SV, diese Folge hört, bereits im Fahrradurlaub. Nähere Einzelheiten dazu in dieser Folge, doch aufgrund dessen wird in den nächsten zwei Wochen keine neue Folge Lehrersprechtag erscheinen. Eine gute Gelegenheit also, alte Folgen nachzuholen! Tschökes und bis die Tage!

0630 by WDR aktuell
So will die Ampel uns entlasten I Totgeprügelt beim CSD - Verdächtiger festgenommen I 50 Jahre nach dem Olympia-Attentat I 0630

0630 by WDR aktuell

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 26:56


Großes Sorry für unseren Technik-Fail in der letzten Woche! Wenn wir in eurer Podcast-App mal nicht zu finden sind, schaut direkt in der ARD Audiothek oder auf www.wdr.de/0630. Lisa und Flo starten mit diesen Themen in die Woche: Wie die Bundesregierung uns bei den hohen Energiekosten entlasten will und wo das Geld für dieses 65 Milliarden Euro teure Entlastungspaket herkommen soll (01:20). Wie in vielen deutschen Städten nach dem brutalen Tod des trans Mannes Malte auf dem CSD in Münster gegen Queerfeindlichkeit demonstriert wird und wodurch ein 20-Jähriger Verdächtiger gefasst werden konnte (09:13). 50 Jahre nach dem Olympia-Attentat in München: Warum die Geiselnahme katastrophal geendet und die Rettungsaktion der Polizei damals gescheitert ist (12:59). Überblick über das Entlastungspaket 3: http://www.wdr.de/k/Entlastungspaket3WDR Mehr Hintergründe zum Olympia-Attentat findet ihr hier: http://www.wdr.de/k/PodcastHimmelfahrtskommando http://www.wdr.de/k/DieOlympiaProtokolle Hier geht's zum funk-Podcast: http://www.wdr.de/k/funkpodcastWasdieWochewichtigwar Ihr habt einen Themenwunsch oder euch ist was aufgefallen? Dann schreibt uns gerne eine Mail an 0630@wdr.de oder schickt uns Audios an die 0151 15071635. Auch über eure Bewertungen bei Spotify und Apple Podcast freuen wir uns. Von 0630.

radio.nrdpl
Doku: Kundgebung gegen queerfeindliche Gewalt, Münster 02.09.2022

radio.nrdpl

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 23:46


Am Freitag, den 02.09.2022 fand auf dem Prinzipalmarkt in Münster eine Gedenkkundgebung für Malte & gegen queerfeindliche Gewalt statt. Örtliche queere Organisationen hatten diese Veranstaltung, die eine Schweigeminute, Musik und Redebeiträge umfasste, schon seit Tagen geplant, nachdem es beim CSD der Stadt am letzten Samstag zu queerfeindlicher Gewalt gekommen war. Am Freitagmorgen war bekannt geworden, […]

Kolakränzchen
106 - Voll mit Gehaltvollem Inhalt und Elke | AndrePlusPlus & Lehzina

Kolakränzchen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 106:16


Jemand von uns hat Corona, aber wir verraten euch ... naja ok, eigentlich erfahrt ihr es direkt... aber is' trotzdem 'ne schöne Folge mit: Dürre, Ärzte, AKW, CSD, China, Gamescom, Tanziverbot, Monte und und und. Viel Spaß!

WDR 5 Morgenecho
Nach dem CSD in Münster: Homophobe Gewalt

WDR 5 Morgenecho

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 7:00


Beim CSD in Münster wurde ein Mann niedergeschlagen, weil er helfen wollte. Er erlag später an seinen Verletzungen. Es wird von einer transfeindlichen Tat ausgegangen. Nehmen Übergriffe wieder zu? Wir fragen René Mertens vom LSVD Bundesverband. Von WDR 5.

Portable Practical Pediatrics
Dr. M's Women and Children First Podcast #28 – Joy Warner – An Educated Life

Portable Practical Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 61:31


Joy Warner - An Educated Life Joy Warner is the founder and director of the Community School of Davidson in Davidson, North Carolina. She is a leader, educator, grower of children and a person with strong compassion. Joy graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before obtaining a masters in education at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her path was a deviation from the traditional model of school leadership leading to a heavy focus on emotional intelligence and growth through the understanding of problems as presented to be solved collectively. We touch on topics such as: Why such a focus on old mentoring young? Why is education more than the book work to you? The students really feel the anti-status quo of grades are everything? Why such a focus on arts? Why such a focus on service work? Why such a focus on leadership? What is the meaning behind the Standing O that is very unique to CSD ? I hope that you enjoy my conversation with Joy Warner, Dr. M

Stand der Dinge
Koalitionsausschuss will Entlastungen beschließen

Stand der Dinge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022


Mit Peter Liebertz: Wann kommt das nächste Entlastungspaket, Saar-Ministerpräsidentin Rehlinger zur Energiekrise, Tod nach Attacke bei CSD in Münster, Saar-Landtag: Wirtschaftsausschuss zu Ford, IAEA-Mission bei AKW in Ukraine.

RUMS-Podcast
Nach Angriff beim CSD: 25-Jähriger ist gestorben | Das Klimaneutralität-Update

RUMS-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 10:32


Ein 25-jähriger Mann, der beim CSD in Münster angegriffen und niedergeschlagen wurde, ist gestorben. Die Polizei hat einen Tatverdächtigen festgenommen. Und: Wir haben uns angeschaut, wie die Stadt mit ihren Vorhaben für die Klimaneutralität vorankommt.

ASHA Voices
Three SLPs Step Off the Beaten Career Path into New Ventures

ASHA Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 17:41


If you've ever looked at someone else and thought, “How do I get that job?”—this episode is for you. ASHA Voices is bringing you three SLPs' accounts of moving from something familiar to something new.These SLPs took a risk or made a move, and their careers haven't been the same since. They tell how they're applying their CSD skills and knowledge to entirely new challenges.

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #89: Aphasia is a Complex Disorder: Mental Health, Language, and More – A Conversation with Dr. Sameer Ashaie

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 37:35


Thanks for listening in today. I'd like to welcome you to this episode of Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I'm Katie Strong, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Strong Story Lab at Central Michigan University and serving as today's episode host. Today I'm talking with Dr. Sameer  Ashaie from the Shirley Ryan Ability Lab. Before we get into our conversation, Let me tell you a bit about our guest.        Dr. Ashaie is a Research Scientist in the Think and Speak Lab at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University.  He earned is PhD in Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at the Graduate Centre, CUNY.  He is recipient of the 2022 Tavistock Trust for Aphasia Distinguished Scholar Award. Dr. Ashaie was also a recipient of NIDILRR's Switzer Merit Fellowship and NIDILIRR's Advanced Rehabilitation Research and Training post-doctoral fellowship. His lab the Shirley Ryan Affective and Emotion Rehabilitation Lab (SAfER) focuses on aphasia rehabilitation, particularly identifying post-stroke depression and related psychosocial disorders. He employs a variety of techniques in his research including eye-tracking and heart-rate variability.   In this episode you will:  Learn about the value of having researchers integrated into clinical care. Be empowered to think about depression on a continuum and why how we measure depression matters. Hear how network models can be a more useful way to examine complex disorders.    KS: Sameer welcome and thank you for joining me today. I'm really excited about this conversation with you, and having our listeners get to know you and your work .  SA: Thank you for having me here. You know I listen to the podcast, and I wasn't expecting to be here one day. So, it's a privilege being here. I KS: Congratulations on receiving the Tavistock Distinguished Scholar Award. Can you tell us a bit about the impact of receiving this recognition?  SA: It's a big honor. You know, oftentimes as an early career researcher in the field of physiology or I guess any field me especially I'm wondering like, if I'm doing whatever I'm doing, is it making sense? Is it making a difference? Are people noticing it? So getting this award especially and people that have gotten before me and the work they're doing? It really validates what I'm trying to do as an indication of where I'm trying to take my research program and I'm hoping that it has an impact on people with aphasia, and as well as the broader research community. KS: Absolutely! I'm excited to start talking about your research. But before we get to that, I'd love to hear a little bit about how you came into the field of speech language pathology, because it wasn't a direct line. Your story is in fact quite interesting. And I think you refer to it as a winding path. Could you tell us a little bit about how you came to be working in the area of aphasia? SA: I started my PhD in theoretical linguistics, looking at generative phonology. And then I ended up taking a class with Dr. Loraine Obler. It was a class on the historical debates on language localization. And that really got me interested in language. After two years in theoretical linguistics, I switched tracks to neuro linguistics, communication science disorders. Because I really got interested in just language, more than just a theoretical perspective that I had as a linguist. And then, of course, there are two people that really had an impact on my career and continue to have an impact on my career. One is that I did my PhD with Dr. Jamie Reilley at Temple. And that's how I got interested into sort of the semantic aspects of aphasia. And he was really supportive and was really great in how we think about science and how we do science.  And then I would say that the person who's had the most impact and continues to have the most impact, and really has made me think about this field is Dr. Leora Cherney. And I'm really indebted to her in terms of how I think about this field, how I think about our participants, how I think about how aphasia impacts their life in totality. And just seeing that kind of dedication and thinking about research that is support to impact people's life. And getting that inspiration from Leora. She has been really critical for me to really falling in love with this field, because you're keeping your participants at the center of the work you do. I mean, you might not see the impact, but you're trying to keep them that that is what your aim is. And I guess that's how I kind of came to this field, you know, some from sort of theoretical linguistics and interested in semantics and then getting a postdoc with Leora. And being inspired by her and the support she's given me to explore things. And carry a different line of research, but always keeping the participants in mind. KS: So, you're a research scientist who works in a rehabilitation hospital. I'm not sure if our listeners know exactly what you do all day long. Would you walk us through a ‘typical day' – if there is such a thing? What do you do in your lab? Would you talk us through that a bit?  SA: Yeah, I, myself did not know what a research scientist is what I was doing! It was all new to me as well. It's different than a traditional academic position, and especially in a place like, Shirley Ryan AbiityLab, which is a rehab hospital. Especially the model in our rehab hospital is that researchers are integrated into the clinical care. So, what I mean by that is that our labs are situated right where therapies are happening. So even though we're not involved in therapy that's happening with the patients getting the care at that time, we can see different types of therapies. That might be OT (occupational therapists) giving therapy, or speech-language pathologists, physical therapists. So that's that integration. You really get to see patients. You get to see sort of different issues that you might not think about, because we're so discipline focused, right? So, it opens up your mind to all sorts of possibilities, collaborations, issues you might not think about. For example, physical factors are really important for people, but seeing that live and that being worked on, it has a different impact on you. The second thing is that, as a research scientist, you're not teaching classes. Your primary work is centered around research, which, which has its perks, but also that you miss sometimes that interaction, you might have had students in a traditional setting. Not that we don't get students (at Shirley Ryan AbilityLab), we do. But the primary focus is really getting the research program started. And there are no things like semesters, you have the whole year. We work on the hospital schedule. And as an early career (professional), a lot of what you do is dependent on how you get funded and that's how you established your lab. So we so for example, as an early career person, you might not necessarily have a lot of students working for you because we're not in a Communication Sciences Disorders department. So that's sort of different. But the main thing is that it's an academic environment, but it's not a university.  KS: Yeah yeah you're right there in the thick of all of that rehab work. That's fabulous. I had the honor of doing a tour at Shirley Ryan at one of the Aphasia Days before COVID hit and it's just such a beautiful facility. It's just stunning. I love hearing about your path and a little bit about your work life and I've been interested in your research for a while now. I'm so excited to have this conversation. Your work in in mood and depression is something that really is an important area and I was hoping as we get started in this conversation if you could frame for us why this is such an important topic that extends to research and clinical work. SA: This is such an important question. And when I started my post-doc in the field of aphasiology, I was not interested in depression or mood. I was really interested in  semantics. But, you know, talking to the patients being embedded in a clinical environment and talking to family members, everybody talked about the importance of mood, and depression. And what I realized is that everybody's talking about its importance. Everybody gives it a nod. But we're not all assessing it in a systematic manner. But we all recognize its importance, and people need this support. So, I started digging in and seeing in the literature what's going on. I came across this meta-analysis that was published in 2017, I think by Mitchell et al., and they looked at I think around 108 studies of stroke and only five studies with people with aphasia have looked at depression. I was like, that does not sound good. And then, studies that are in the field of aphasiology that look at depression used measures hadn't been validated in our field. So, I was like, we all recognize that this is an important problem and people need the support, but before we can go anywhere, that we need to figure out a way, how we can identify depression in people with aphasia, systematically.  And of course, the big challenge I started thinking about that time is “how do you ask people that have language deficits about their inner feelings? Without sort of prompting them?” You know, we all use scales, those of us who do assess depression, we might modify them. But sometimes those questions are tricky to understand. And if you're modifying them, you might lead a person on to an answer. That's one thing. We can rely on caregiver reports for depression, and they're good. But we also know that those reports can underestimate and overestimate depression. And they're highly impacted by caregivers' mood itself. That was another thing. So, I wondered what can we do that assesses this systematically? And we can also include people with severe aphasia, who we often just exclude from these studies and who might have some of these most issues when it comes to mood or depression. There's some work in neurotypicals, that use a variety of techniques. For example, eye tracking. Research has shown that people who are depressed, tend to look longer at sad faces, or stimuli that denote sad valence. And their response is blunted away from positive stimuli. For example, if people are depressed they might look longer at a sad face and they might also look away from a happy face. There is also work looking at heart rate variability as well which uses certain metrics that you could derive from variability in between your heartbeats might tell us something about depression. This is also true with the dilation of our pupils, or EEG. And of course, none of these measures are perfect. Like we know with anything, we're not getting perfect measurements. But I started thinking that “yes, they might not be perfect, but can I come up with an algorithm or some kind of a composite that takes all these things into account, because if they all point to the same problem, then that problem must be there.” So that's one of the things I'm trying to do right now is combine pupillometry, heart rate variability, and eye tracking to see if we can come up with some kind of a metric that can identify depression. That way, we can move away from language in the sense that we're only using minimal language in terms of directions. We might just show people a happy face, or some emotion that some stimuli that denotes emotion.  The second sort of thing, which is really important is that not thinking of depression as something you either have it or you don't have it. It's on a continuum. It could fluctuate. One day, you could have some symptoms. Another day, you might not have any other symptoms. Or in the same day, it might fluctuate. So, how do we assess that? Related to that is not just relying on some scores. For example, we all just take, like, let's say we take a common scale, like the PHQ-9 (Patient Healthcare Questionnaire-9th Edition) and we might take the scores, and we sum them up and say, “hey, this person they're above a cut off”. But in that kind of approach, we're also missing what these individual symptoms are doing. The person might not endorse every single symptom in that scale. But they might endorse some symptoms. So are we just going to say, “no, they didn't meet a cut off, but they had three symptoms that they were on the scale. For example, ‘I was sad. I was fatigued, I had a loss of appetite.” But everything else wasn't there. Are we just going to negate those symptoms? So how do we take these symptoms into account as well, when we are thinking about depression. Within the broader field of psychopathology, there's a lot of movement thinking about individual symptoms as well. So, I'm just basically taking that and applying it to our field. It's nothing new that I'm coming up with, rather is just really seeing what people in the field of psychopathology are doing, confronting all these problems. And thinking about how this can applied to our field, because they might really have a direct impact on something we're doing when it comes to treatment, right? For example, if we start thinking about individual symptoms and that day a person is fatigued. Well that might directly impacted how they respond to treatment rather than just as a sum score. So that's another angle I'm taking when it comes to this work and depression. KS: That is so important. We all know what matters, but can you help us to know like, how big of an issue is mood depression in aphasia, you know, incidence prevalence or what, you know, do we know anything about that? SA: We do. And if you look at the literature, once again, they're so varied. Some papers might report 70%, some papers might report 30%. But I would say at least, it ranges anywhere from 30 to 70%. But I think a lot of that is also dependent on how we're assessing it. Going back to the scales that we are using and how reliable those scales are. There was a systematic review early on that indicated most of these skills might not even be valid. Are we use a caregiver reports? Are we supplementing that with something? In the general stroke population, we know at least 1/3 of stroke patients have depression. And with aphasia, it's between that 1/3 to 70%. It is most likely much more than that. But I think, to really get at it, we really have to start thinking about the tools we're using. But we know it's an issue because clinicians report it, patients report it, caregivers report it, whatever literature we have, which is not much, those studies report it. In our own study, we looked depression that might not meet the threshold for major depression. And we had around 20%, and those that meet (criteria) for minor depression, those were like, 18% or so. So, it's in that 30-40% range. It's a big issue.  But I think the bigger issue is that we are really missing how many people have it? How many people have the different symptoms? And what we also have is an incidence rate, a snapshot of the incidence rate, right? Like, you know, at six months, at one year, but we really need to start thinking about daily and how sort of depression changes over time. It will not be sort of weekly or yearly, we don't have that much longitudinal work, either. When I talk about daily, I talk about real world as well. I don't know if that answers your question… KS: It does. Yes, absolutely. Yeah, I love that, that it's we have some ranges, they are not probably as accurate as they could be, because we don't have the right tools to assess it, and that they're just a snapshot that we're not really looking at this over time or, as you said that day, that daily basis.  SA: One thing that I want to point out is that, and even with the lack of tools it's good that we are still assessing for depression. I don't want to make it seem like that there's nothing out there. But I think like for all of us, even the tools we're coming up with, we should always be thinking in our own, how can we improve upon whatever we have. And we all get attached to the methods we use. But I think at the back of our head, we should always be like, “can we improve these methods? Can we do something better?” Because ultimately, it's not about us. It's about people, our patients, our participants, family members that we're trying to do these things for. So it's really great that tools do exist, but we have to be candid, that we might not be getting everything out of them. They're a great steppingstone, but we have to constantly go back and build and just keep on taking new developments in the field of psychopathology in the field of measurement science and applied to them so that our field is moving along as well. KS: It's kind of the essence of evidence-based practice, right? We're using the best tools that we have at the moment, but that certainly we need to be on the lookout for what's coming in the newer literature or tools. Sameer, you have some really cool projects going on related to depression and mood. You talked a little bit about them earlier, but could you give us a little more detail on what you've got going on?  SA: So, one thing I could kind of hone in on that I mentioned earlier is on eye tracking. Right now we're trying to come up with some kind of an algorithm where we are relying minimally on language. So just the directions are language based. We're getting people in, and we're doing a combination of eye tracking changes in the pupil dilation and heart rate variability, as people are looking at different stimuli that denote different emotions. We have a paper out that looks at the feasibility of it. And what we're basically looking at trying to quantify that using some existing scales and caregiver reports. Can we then take these metrics and see whether people are looking at sad or happy faces, or any other stimuli that denote emotions, and is that related to these traditional scales. And then how can we then come up with a metric based on these three measures, pupillometry, heart rate, and some of the eye tracking indices that can point out depression in people with aphasia? We're using these tools, but the approach is out there. Anytime people are validating new tools, they have to rely on existing tools and go through these different iterations. So right now, we're in the first iteration trying to see what kind of metrics we can extract and what those metrics can give us that are easy to use. And one thing is that eye tracking or heart rate variability over the years, they have become really accessible, and the tools are not expensive themselves. So, with the aim that down the line, can this be used in the clinical setting? Of course, we're far away from that. But that's the end goal, we hope as a quick diagnostic check. KS: Okay, yeah, that's what I was going to ask you, because we've got a lot of listeners who are clinicians. And, you know, sometimes as clinicians, it's difficult to see the relevance of things like eye tracking and heart monitoring, when you're reading literature, when you're trying to figure out, “How can I help this person right in front of me?” So, I was hoping you could explain a little bit why those tools to track variables are so important. SA: I think this is a great question. And I think the big thing is that sometimes we just need to demystify these tools. I liked the way you framed it. We really have to think of them as tools. They're tools that were trying to use to assess a problem that might be difficult with the traditional language measure. That's really it. It's not they are better than behavioral measures. It's that because people aphasia have difficulties in language production and comprehension, can we use something else that relies minimally on language? That's really it. It's not some kind of fancy approach. Yes the tools themselves might sound fancy and stuff, but really the aim is it's just a tool that's addressing a certain problem. And with heartrate variability, we can already see because now it's so common, right? All our Fitbit or Apple Watches, they all have it. And even at a basic level, we're starting to think like, “Oh, this is what my activity level refers to.” So, I've started thinking about those kinds of things in a clinical setting. And the same thing with eye tracking. If these tools are sort of readily available, can we train people to use them in a quick way? Because of course, you could do fancy analyses, but you could also look at just quick measures that if the pipelines are in a place that people could just pull it out. Just like when clinicians give a battery of tests, if you ask me, I'm not a clinician, that's really complicated. You're working with a human being you have to change it on the fly. But people get trained on it all the time and can do it. It is the same thing with these tools but if we are successful in coming up with these metrics and these algorithms.. why not? Can clinicians be trained on using these tools in a clinical setting.  KS: It's exciting to be thinking about that identification of depression or mood disorder. We've got lots of work to do on what to do once it's identified, but just the identification is, as you said, that first step. I was curious if you might be able to recommend something to our listeners, you know, as I said, lots of us are clinicians, about what we should know or do right now about supporting mental health and people with aphasia. SA: I think all the clinicians I've talked to everybody recognizes the problem. That's the biggest step first of all. I think then it is really being aware of systematically assessing it. To be clear, I don't want to negate the support part. That's the end goal. But if we're not assessing depression routinely, then we're missing a big chunk. I want to keep stressing that point. I think the one thing clinicians can do is to start assessing people to the best of one's capability. If you're using a scale, then being systematic with that scale. If you're giving it in one iteration, you're giving it one way, on Day One. When you give it again, try to be as close in how you previously administered it so that we we know that you are assessing that same construct.  The second thing is what I've touched on earlier, is that thinking of depression as a continuum and that it fluctuates. It's not enough to just give a screening once, or to assess this person's mood, pretreatment and post treatment. But what about daily? Because if you start looking at daily variability, you might really start thinking, “Oh, no, we're all here. Like the patient he was feeling kind of down today. I don't know if you've put enough effort into it or something along those lines.” Well, low motivation and those kind of things are symptoms of depression. So I'd like to encourage clinicians to start thinking about assessing this daily.  And I think then, once we start sort of assessing it routinely, and making it a part of our work and not thinking of it as separate. That's the key. Not thinking about it like language is here, depression here. Like you know, the work you do, Katie, on narratives or stories, this is all interactive. They're all impacting each other in some sort of a loop.  And then lastly, once we're getting these, and we're routinely assessing people and getting them, then thinking about getting mental health support. And for that, we really have to start thinking about interdisciplinary work. And you could speak to that as well, because I know that you have those projects going on. We can do everything on our own, working with psychologists, referring people…once we can define these basic systems, and then, you know, down the line and training psychologists or psychiatrists and different techniques that they can work with people aphasia. Or clinicians who are up and coming getting some training. And that this is just part of routine care. It's not something we recognize the importance, but then we kind of put it on the back burner.  KS: Yes, right the back burner. Or say, “we don't have the tools, so we don't know what to do but we recognize it's a problem, but we don't do anything about it.” I agree. Sameer, since you brought up the interdisciplinary work and you have developed some relationships in psychology. I feel like you're kind of an exemplar interdisciplinary collaboration. Could you talk about how this collaboration has influenced your work and give our listeners any tips on how to develop such a rich collaboration? SA: All of the work I'm doing in depression and thinking about this is really influenced by people in the department of psychiatry and psychology. Much of my collaboration is with Dr. Stewart Shankman, who is the Chief Psychologist at Northwestern. And being a part of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) thinking about “how do we conceptualize depression?” and things like that. I just reached out to him, because I was interested in his work. I think we have to not be scared that people might not respond if we reach out. I just emailed him, and he was nice enough to respond. And I started attending his lab meetings and presenting our work to the lab and this problem, “how do you assess depression in people that have language deficits. How do we assess their inner feelings when they can't express themselves?” Being embedded in sort of in his work group, I was really exposed to this work. I don't think I would have been exposed to the work that people in that field are doing. For example, debates about how do we think about symptoms? Or how do we integrate these tools? How do we think about different emotions? And then applying it to our field of CSD. And thinking about metrics of depression. My work has really been influenced by how people in that field are grappling and using these issues. One can't do this work in a void. If there are people who are doing this work and that's their field, it only benefits us to form collaborations with them, learn from them, and bring our unique problems to them. So that we could come up with solutions that integrate the best of our knowledge domains. In other words, that team science approach is really the approach I'm taking towards this issue of depression. I think any work we do in the field of psychosocial disorders, mood, anxiety, fatigue, or whatever, I think it's really important that we start working with people who have focused their career on this issue. KS: I so appreciate you sharing that. And even just the simple tip of putting yourself out there to send an email and introduce yourself to someone who's from a different discipline to start that relationship is important. I envision through attending his lab meetings, you're there in his world, learning about things in a way that you wouldn't be, if you weren't a part of what he's got going on. And thinking deeply about how you can apply that to your interests in aphasia. I'm so excited. Our field just needs this innovation and it's exciting to hear about the work you're doing. SA: If I just did all on my own, I would have been just looking at what's in our field, what's in stroke, looking at papers…but you're not embedded in people who are doing this daily. They might not be doing it in our population, but this is what they're doing. And they're grappling with the conceptual issues as well. Tools, measurement, scales, everything. So that's a huge benefit to us because when we think about depression and stuff, yeah, the work has been done, but when you're embedded in that setting, you could take some of the newer things and start applying it as well. Seeing how we can move rapidly. And of course, then the flipside is like, also the collaborators have to be willing to collaborate with you. Dr. Shankman, he's been great. He's been willing and he's been great at mentoring me. I think most people, if you reach out, and you explain what you're trying to do people are willing and you also can contribute to their work, that I think that you know, these relationships will form. KS: Well, that is how cutting-edge work gets done. It's exciting to hear about it. You also have some additional interesting work, particularly in network analysis. Sameer, could you tell us what network analysis is, and why it's important to life with aphasia?   SA: In a nutshell, if we start talking about networks, networks are everywhere, right? Most of us are privy to the notion of social networks. That we're a bunch of friends, we're connected to each other. And a group of friends might cluster together, and then that cluster is connected to someone else. Anything, we take a look at it, if it's complex, it forms a network. Consider airports, highways, how they're interconnected. Certain things are central and more important than others. That's a network. People often give an example a flock of birds.  Birds might have different characteristics. But when they form a flock, it's made up of different parts, but they're all interacting together to form that flock. That's basically what network is. And it's derived from graph theory in mathematics. But at the end of the day, it's about looking at complexity. Anything that's complex, we could think of it as networks. So the work of network analysis, it's a collaboration between me and Dr. Nichol Castro at Buffalo. Both of us are interested in this approach and we decided to tackle this together. Right now we're building a network model of aphasia. One of the reasons, we decided to think about network approach is that going back, you know, we have these these two approaches, and people do integrate them. People do give nod to them, but impairment-based approach an LPAA (Life Participation Approach to Aphasia). And it's not to say that people that focus on impairment don't care about LPAA, or people that embrace LPAA, don't care about impairment. But generally, there is some kind of distinction being made, either implicitly or explicitly. And you might give nod that one thing is more important than other. But me and Nichol, we started thinking rather than thinking, “Okay, rather than thinking about what is important (language, or depression or anxiety) what about coming up, and thinking about all of them interacting in the network. And not assigning a priori importance to either one of them but rather looking at these interactions between multiple factors, and how they might impact each other, so that we're not missing anything, because aphasia is complex. It's not just about language. It's not just about depression. It's not just about supports (social support). It is about everything. So that's where a network model becomes useful. And then from there on building these initial models, then one could start thinking about treatment. That it is possible in a network, that one thing is more important than the other. And that is taking it one step further in an individual, Individual, A versus B, something might be more important in Individual A, like depression, and in Individual B it's communication confidence. We could start by building a big model first. And of course, all these things have steps and eventually come to that and thinking about how can we identify critical, important factors for a person that we could intervene on? But before we could do that, we wanted to build a bigger model at a group level, and start seeing what things are important in this network? And, and not thinking like, “Okay, I'm gonna just call aphasia…and we all are used to saying ‘aphasia is a disorder of language. Blah, blah, blah,' could be also impacted.' But aphasia is a complex disorder, let's see how these all these things interact.” You don't have to assign the importance to A or B. Or say like, “Okay, I'm going to look at attention, maybe that's about language.” Instead, let's see how all of them are impacting each other and are some things more important than others. I think with this kind of approach…all of us have this thinking. We're just trying to come up with a model that addresses this. And eventually, then this kind of model doesn't have to be just limited to outcomes. People could integrate brain, genetics, you could have different layers. And that goes back to your work about interdisciplinary collaboration. When you start thinking about things as a network, that can also extend to the network of people who are doing work in aphasia. That if it's a complex disorder, and people are looking at all these complexities, because not everybody can do everything that we can take the network of future researchers, and then why not integrate and use that network model for the vision and see all these things? That's what we kind of really are trying to get at. KS: The potential is powerful. Wow. Well, you've got a manuscript in the works that's about this complexity of participation poststroke. I really enjoyed reading about the project. But one thing that really struck me in the findings was how positive affect impacted participation. Could you tell us about this and the project?  SA: So this is all pre-existing data. We wanted to establish some sort of causal relationship at Time Point 1. For example at 3 months post discharge, can you predict something at 12 months post discharge? And one the reasons we were interested in positive affect is that we always think about depression, but positive affect is there too, right? And having positive affect could impact people in a positive way. We wanted to look at all these things, put them on the network and see how they're interacting to determine what might be causing or establishing some sort of causality. What was really interesting is that we thought that perhaps social support would predict participation. But it was really positive affect early on, that was predicting many of these things. When you really start thinking about it, it's not that surprising, because if you're feeling positive, and psychology, then you're going to seek out more help. And then you're going to seek out more help, you might participate more in the community. But having that affirmation is critical, because then once again, it goes back to a question mental health support. How can we focus on positive affect, as well, in our treatment? Maybe, if that's kind of integrated with intervention. If people are feeling better, or happier with that sort of, you know, give them some push towards seeking more help? And it's all cyclical, right? And that's what we are seeing, at least in this early work. KS: Oh, it's really interesting. I think clinically we know that in our gut, but is there something we can do to promote that or help support that down the road? This fabulous, fabulous! Well, Sameer, this time has gone by quickly. I've enjoyed the conversation. As we wrap up, do you have any final thoughts you'd like to share with our listeners? SA: Thank you for having me here. And it's a privilege being in this field, especially as somebody who was trained early on as a linguist, and now I'm doing complete something else. And I'm working with clinicians. It's an honor to participate. It's really a privilege. Thank you for having me here. KS: It's fabulous that you're here and doing this important collaborative work. Thanks for spending time with us today. You've given us lots of food for thought. Listeners, check out the show notes and I'll have links to all of the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab details there as well as Sameer's work and some of the other things that we talked about during today's conversation.  On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing library of materials go to www.aphasiaaccess.org If you have an idea for a future podcast topic email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.   Websites and Social Media Shirley Ryan Ability Lab  https://www.sralab.org/   Shirley Ryan Think + Speak Lab https://www.sralab.org/research/abilitylabs/think-speak-lab  Shirley Ryan Affective and Emotion Rehabilitation (SAfER) Lab https://www.saferlab.net/   Shirley Ryan Ability Lab on Twitter/Facebook @AbilityLab    Interested in Digging Deeper?  Ashaie, S., & Castro, N. (2021). Exploring the complexity of aphasia with network analysis. Journal of Speech-Language-Hearing Research, 64(10), 3928-3941. https://doi.org/10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00157  Ashaie, S. A.,  & Cherney, L. R., (2020). Eye tracking as a tool to identify mood in aphasia: A feasibility study. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 34(5), 463-471. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1545968320916160  Ashaie, S. A., Engel, S., & Cherney, L. R. (2022). Test-retest reliability of heart-rate variability metrics in individuals with aphasia. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 18, 1-25. https://doi.org/10.1080/09602011.2022.2037438  Ashaie, S. A., Hung, J., Funkhouser, C. J., Shankman, S. A., & Cherney, L. R. (2021). Depression over time in persons with stroke: A network analysis approach. Journal of Affective Disorders Reports. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadr.2021.100131  Mitchell, A. J., Sheth, B., Gill, J., Yadegarfar, M., Stubbs, B., Yadegarfar, M., & Meader, N. (2017). Prevalence and predictors of post-stroke mood disorders: A meta-analysis and meta-regression of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorder. General Hospital Psychiatry, 47, 48–60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2017.04.001 

Club Soccer Dads
CSD Qatar Edition - Jornada #4

Club Soccer Dads

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 73:24


Jornada aguada llena de changuerias, lloriqueo y objetos voladores, que lindo es CSD en temporadada de Huracanes.

JenaZeit von RADIO OKJ
Vorwürfe gegen FDP-Stadtpolitiker nach homophoben Predigten

JenaZeit von RADIO OKJ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 9:40


Gegen Stefan Beyer (FDP) wurden am Rande des CSD in Jena Vorwürfe laut. In Predigten seiner Gemeinde, erklärte er Homosexualität zur „Sünde“ und „Abkehr Gottes“. Wir haben die Geschehnisse aufgearbeitet und mit Beyer selbst darüber gesprochen.

BDSM - Die Kunst der Unvernunft
Cailín Glas - BDSM ist mehr als nur...

BDSM - Die Kunst der Unvernunft

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 126:37


Ich bin (schon wieder) nach Hamburg gefahren und habe Cailín Glas besucht. Sie ist 30 Jahre alt und ich würde sagen dass sie Kink-Positivity-Aktivistin in Wort, Bild und Tat ist. Wir sprechen über das Übersehen von BDSM, Veränderungen im Kink, Breathplay, Klammern, Spanking, Petplay, XelK, den CSD in Hamburg und ich bekomme auch ein kleines Vokabeltraining. Die Shownotes enthalten mehr Infos, Links und Bilder. Wenn Dein Player die nicht anzeigt, schau mal hier: https://kunstderunvernunft.de/188-cailinglas Podcast-Webseite: https://kunstDerUnvernunft.de Unterstütze die Unvernunft, damit sie weiterhin vollständig und frei für alle erscheint: https://kunstderunvernunft.de/about/donate Instagram: kunstderunvernunft Twitter: @kunstunvernunft

Thai Expat Daily Show
EP 213 - THAILANDS DIGITAL NOMAD VISA, Mountain B Club, Foreigner Arrested, Thailand News Today

Thai Expat Daily Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 16:19


Want to support the show? Then why not buy me a coffee! You can do so by following the link belowhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/thaiexpatshow--Interested in starting your own podcast like the Thai Expat Daily Show? I use Buzzsprout and I can't recommend it highly enough. It makes everything super easy. Sign up today to get on the path to making great podcasts!https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1751572--Check out our website and forum - https://www.thaiexpatdailyshow.com--LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos every dayhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB8khQ_NapVMDiW09oqL-rw--Listen to our podcast on Spotify, Apple, and Amazon or on our podcast website: https://thaiexpatdailyshow.buzzsprout.com--Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/thaiexpatdailyshow--Thailands Daily News RoundupTourist arrested over TikTok fishing video A Dutchman has been arrested in Phuket on a charge of illegally catching parrotfish in the waters of Mu Koh Phi Phi National Park in Krabi. Source - The Bangkok Post--Mountain B fire families want CSD police to take over the investigationThirteen representatives of the injured and dead from the Mountain B pub fire in Thailand's Chon Buri lodged a complaint with the Crime Suppression Division (CSD) police today (Monday), in an effort to get them to take over the investigation from the local police, saying that they do not trust local officials.Source - Thai PBS World--“100” VS “500”: What is the fuss all about?Parliament President Chuan Leekpai tried his best to give legislators their last chance to vote on the bill by calling a special joint parliamentary session on Monday. But the obviously deliberate absence of a large number of MPs and senators doomed his attempt, causing the bill to fail to meet its 180-day deadline.Source - Thai PBS World--Thailand's New LTR Visa – Work from Thailand Professionals - Digital Nomad Visa 2022 Thailand is introducing a new visa called “Long-Term Resident (LTR) Visa” which is a program that provides a range of tax and non-tax benefits to enhance the country's attractiveness as a regional hub for living and doing business for ‘high-potential' foreigners.TEDS Media--#ThaiExpatDailyShow #LTRthailand2022 #ThailandDailyNewsSupport the show

N-JOY - Radiokirche bei N-JOY
CSD und Trauung für alle in Lübeck

N-JOY - Radiokirche bei N-JOY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 1:47


Queeres Leben gehört in die Öffentlichkeit, sagt Christian Till. Er ist Vorsitzender des Vereins, der in Lübeck die Pride Week mit dem CSD auf die Beine stellt. Denn queere Liebe und angstfreie Comming-Outs sind immer noch keine Selbstverständlichkeit.

Club Soccer Dads
Qatar 2022 - Jornada #1

Club Soccer Dads

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 61:36


Analizamos una de las mejores primera jornadas en la historia de CSD, con empates, goleadas, papelones, tarjetas y capitanes exhibisionistas.

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast
Vicki Haddix & Janine Peca (Part 2): A Neuroaffirming Approach to Overstimulation and Sensory Needs

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 41:11


Vicki Haddix is an AAC Specialist and Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Memphis who teaches their course on AAC for the Communication Sciences and Disorders program. Janine Peca is an autistic adult who recently went through Memphis's CSD program and is now an SLP. Janice shares about a recent presentation she made on neuroaffirming practices, including a fascinating portion on what it feels like to be overstimulated, and Vicki shares about how she improved her classes design by giving choices to students whenever possible.    Before the interview, Rachel and Chris talk about Rachel's recent two-week vacation to Spain and France and Chris's Roadtrip to ISTE. Rachel and Chris discuss using Google Translate to translate between languages in real time, scanning pictures for text translation and text to speech, the Wonderfully Inclusive Scavenger Hunt at ISTE, and more!   Key ideas this week:  

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast
Vicki Haddix & Janine Peca (Part 1): Increasing AAC Skills Through Mentorship

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 43:50


This week, we share Rachel's interview with Vicki Haddix and Janine Peca! Vicki Haddix is an AAC Specialist and Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Memphis who teaches their course on AAC for the Communication Sciences and Disorders program. Janine Peca is an autistic adult who recently went through Memphis's CSD program and is now an SLP. Vicki shares about making pre-service education more interesting and engaging, and the need for increasing mentorship for recent graduates. Janine shares some of her experiences as an autistic adult, including some of the ways neurodiversity was and was not supported during her undergraduate and graduate experience.    Key ideas this week:  

SODOM & CORONA - Der epidemische Pandemie-Podcast mit Niels Ruf & Gästen
Margarita-Massaker mit Tarot-Transe NINA QUEER | SODOM & CORONA #54

SODOM & CORONA - Der epidemische Pandemie-Podcast mit Niels Ruf & Gästen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 85:36


Pünktlich zum CSD macht NINA QUEER das Triple voll und besucht uns bereits zum dritten Mal im Seuchenstudio - und toppt dabei nicht nur ihre eigenen Besuche zuvor, sondern eigentlich alle Gäste, die wir je hatten. Da lässt Niels sich natürlich nicht lumpen und zaubert sommerliche Wassermelonen-Margaritas, bis der Mixer explodiert. Zwischen Tarot-Kartenlegung (Spoiler: Niels ist basically doomed) und Behelfs-Cocktails geht es dann um Reality-TV-Tratsch, Drogen- und Penisgeschichten und natürlich die neuesten News aus der LGBTQ-Szene. Wie's scheint, sind dass die gleichen Freaks wie der Rest von uns. Aber hört (und seht) selbst! ⭕️ SODOM & CORONA UNTERSTÜTZEN https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=V6BLDWHWAPKRN ⭕️ SODOM & CORONA INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/sodoom_und_corona/?hl=de ⭕️ NIELS RUF INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/nielsruf/?hl=de ⭕️ SODOM & CORONA bei FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/nielsrufoffiziell/ ⭕️ NINA QUEER INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/ninaqueer/?hl=de

Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ... - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Der Tag mit Martina Weyrauch - Sorge angesichts der Unberechenbarkeit

Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ... - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 35:42


Angesichts der Energiekrise sei gerade jeder gefordert, sagt Martina Weyrauch, Leiterin der Landeszentrale für politische Bildung. So überwinde man auch die Angst. Weitere Themen der Sendung sind das Bürgergeld, Porsche-Gate und der CSD in Berlin.Frenzel, Korbinianwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ...Direkter Link zur Audiodatei

Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ... - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Der Tag mit Martina Weyrauch - Sorge angesichts der Unberechenbarkeit

Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ... - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 35:42


Angesichts der Energiekrise sei gerade jeder gefordert, sagt Martina Weyrauch, Leiterin der Landeszentrale für politische Bildung. So überwinde man auch die Angst. Weitere Themen der Sendung sind das Bürgergeld, Porsche-Gate und der CSD in Berlin.Frenzel, Korbinianwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, Studio 9 - Der Tag mit ...Direkter Link zur Audiodatei

GAG - Der Podcast
Episode 128 - Im Osten ist der Teufel los!

GAG - Der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 44:48


In Episode 128 Updaten wir euch mal wieder über unser Leben und nehmen euch mit in eine Welt der CSD‘s, Ost-West-Konflikte und Liebe. Die aktuelle Episode GAG der Podcast ist von unseren guten Freunden von Urban Outfitters gesponsert, in deren Berliner Store wir am 28.07. einen Live-Podcast aufnehmen werden. Im Zuge dessen habt ihr jetzt die Chance 3mal 100€ als Einkaufsgutschein zu gewinnen!!! Alles was ihr dafür tun müsst: Teilt diese Episode auf Instagram und markiert @gag.der.podcast und @urbanoutfitterseu. Viel Glück!!!

Ach, papperlapapp!
PRINCESS CHARMING: Dora & Paula - Sind sie ein Paar? - Über Druck und Gefühle in der Villa

Ach, papperlapapp!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 36:08


Dora und Paula, oder sollten wir vielleicht sagen "Dopamin"? Wir shippen sie doch alle!

About, From, & With: A SLP Podcast
S2E1. Applying for Research-Intensive Faculty Positions

About, From, & With: A SLP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 44:41


In this episode, I talk with Dr. Teresa Girolamo about her recent journey on the academic job market. Dr. Girolamo shares her experiences applying to CSD faculty positions at research-intensive universities. She discusses how she chose positions to apply to, stayed organized during the interview process, crafted her job talk, and prepared for interviews. Dr. Girolamo also mentions many resources that she has uploaded onto her website (teresamgirolamo.com) for others to use as a guide during their own job search. To find the full show notes, visit aboutfromandwith.com. Follow me and the podcast on Instagram @danikapfeiffer.slp and @AboutFrom_With on Twitter.

About, From, & With: A SLP Podcast
Trailer: Season 2 Preview

About, From, & With: A SLP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 3:45


In this brief, trailer episode, I discuss what to expect from Season 2 episodes. Tune in this season to hear a mix of solo and interview episodes about the academic job market. In the solo episodes, I'll share my experiences applying to CSD faculty positions. In the interview episodes, I'll chat with others who recently went on the job market about applying to research-intensive, teaching, clinical educator, and non-tenure track faculty positions. I'll also talk with CSD faculty members that were recently on faculty search committees about their role on the other side of the table and their advice for those going on the market. You can find the show notes and transcripts at http://www.aboutfromandwith.com and connect with me on Instagram at @danikapfeiffer.slp or Twitter @aboutfrom_with.

hr2 Der Tag
30 Jahre Christopher Street Day – Queeres Leben in Deutschland

hr2 Der Tag

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 52:08


An diesem Wochenende feierte Frankfurt 30 Jahre Christopher Street Day. Was damals begann, in Erinnerung an den Protest homosexueller Amerikaner gegen eine willkürliche Polizeirazzia im Stonewall Inn in der Christopher Street in New York, ist heute eine selbstbewusste bunte Parade geworden. Was aber hat dieses Straßenfest, das vielen zu kommerziell auftritt, mit der Wirklichkeit queeren Lebens zu tun? Wie einfach wird einem heute die sexuelle Orientierung gemacht? Und wie sieht es im Vergleich zum außereuropäischen Ausland aus? Wir schauen einmal genau hin, was es bedeutet heute in Deutschland nicht einer heterosexuellen Norm zu entsprechen.

SPUTNIK Pride
Happy Pride beim CSD Leipzig

SPUTNIK Pride

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 25:45


20.000 Menschen waren beim CSD Leipzig und mittendrin Kai und Robin mit dem Mikrofon. Alles zur Parade, Do's and Dont's beim CSD, die besten Looks und natürlich eure Stimmen aus der Community gibt's hier.

UnterFreunden!
Episode #9 eine Ausgabe zum PRIDE 2022

UnterFreunden!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 37:56


Der Sommer steht in den USA wie auch in Deutschland im Zeichen des PRIDE, des Christopher Street Day (CSD) und den Menschen aus der LGBTQI+ Community.Jesse George spricht mit der Musikerin und Aktivistin Achan Malonda und dem designierten Pressesprecher der US-Botschaft Andy Halus über die Geschichte des CSD und was die queere Community in all Ihrer Diversität ausmacht.Steht der CSD heute noch für den Kampf und Protest um gleiche Rechte? Warum müssen wir auch heute noch für die Rechte queerer Menschen einstehen?Gibt es auch in der Community Ungleichbehandlungen? Und wie fühlt sich der PRIDE nach zwei Jahren Pandemie an?Korrektur: Die Obergefell v. Hodges-Entscheidung am obersten Gerichtshof der USA ist nicht 2005, sondern 2015 gefallen.SHOWNOTES:White House: A Proclamation on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, And Intersex Pride Month, 2022:https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2022/05/31/a-proclamation-on-lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender-queer-and-intersex-pride-month-2022/Malonda neue Single: Disko im Kopf:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXx0lokjr5gLSBTIQ-Lexikon:https://www.bpb.de/themen/gender-diversitaet/geschlechtliche-vielfalt-trans/245426/lsbtiq-lexikon/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

GAG - Der Podcast
Episode 127 – P*ssy Juice Makes The People Gay!

GAG - Der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 44:42


In Folge 127 unseres zeitgenössischen Podcastwerks reden wir über Famile. Wie eig jede Familie ihre Problemchen hat und warum wir da jetzt durch müssen, findet ihr hier! Die aktuelle Episode GAG ist von unseren Freunden von NYX Professional Make-Up gesponsert, denn „Makeup has no gender!“ und ist für alle da. Danke, dass ihr uns ganzjährig unterstützt und wir auch den CSD in Berlin wieder zusammen verbringen! Proud allies for all!!!!

Stadt mit K - News für Köln
214 - Corona-Experte: Beschränkungen im Herbst / Fall Ue.: Kein Nachspiel für Woelki / CSD: Tanzende Polizistin

Stadt mit K - News für Köln

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 11:18


Informativ, sachlich, aber auch unterhaltend: „Stadt mit K – News für Köln“ ist der Podcast mit dem besten Nachrichtenüberblick für Köln. In zehn Minuten erhalten Sie jeden Tag den Überblick des Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger zu den Themen der Stadt. Wir bieten Schlagzeilen und tiefergehende Informationen, direkt aus den Redaktionsräumen in Köln. Hören Sie unsere Redakteurinnen und Redakteure in Gesprächen zu den Themen, die sie teilweise seit Jahren bereits begleiten – von U-Bahn-Bau über Corona-Pandemie bis Kriminalität. So erhalten Sie qualitative Informationen auf einem neuen Weg.

Zart Bleiben
4.6 Zart Bleiben – die Pride-Frage mit Barbie Breakout

Zart Bleiben

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 58:12


Drag Aktivistin Barbie Breakout ist zurück bei Zart Bleiben und stellt mit Fabian Hart die Pride-Frage: Kann man stolz darauf sein queer zu sein? Was hat dieser Stolz mit Manhattan zu tun und vor allem mit Münster? Warum ist die Gay Rights Movement nicht einfach nur mit „Schwulenbewegung“ zu übersetzen und was sagen Stormy, Sylvia und Marsha dazu?

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg
Magnesium L-Threonate: Benefits and Clinical Applications

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 17:39


Many factors in our modern society increase the risk of magnesium deficiency, placing a vast number of individuals at risk of suboptimal levels. An individual's magnesium level can become depleted from issues such as medication usage, chronic diseases, poor magnesium content in crops and soil, and the increased consumption of refined and processed foods. Magtein Magnesium L-Threonate Click here to learn more about the Hedberg Institute Membership. Magnesium L-threonate offers a cost effective, safe for long term use, and well tolerated form of magnesium that provides optimum levels. It has been shown to be the only form of magnesium capable of increasing magnesium levels in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This ability to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) increases its efficacy for use in many chronic disease states, especially those associated with central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. Conditions that respond to magnesium l-threonateMagnesium L-Threonate and PainMagnesium is useful for treating chronic pain and inflammation that occurs due to the activation of the NMDA receptor during trauma. The NMDA receptor, which is normally not activated, becomes activated during traumatic physical or emotional events. During periods of excitotoxicity, calcium shuttles through the NMDA receptor and causes increased immune system responses (release of substance P, mast cells, immune cells, oxidative stress). Magnesium works to inhibit calcium influx through the NMDA receptor thereby decreasing oxidative stress as well as decreasing inflammation by blocking substance P. Blocking the NMDA receptor also serves to inhibit cortical spreading depression (CSD).3 Magnesium L-Threonate and MigraineMagnesium is also useful in treating migraine due to its ability to inhibit platelet activation. Platelet activation stimulates the release of serotonin which triggers spasming of blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in migraine. Magnesium inhibits calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) mediated vasodilation, another driver of migraine.3 Magnesium threonate is especially useful for the treatment of migraine as it is capable of crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB) and providing Mg2+ directly to the affected area. Magnesium L-Threonate and the EarMagnesium helps protect against hearing loss from noise as well as drug ototoxicity by decreasing the oxidative stress created by these stressors. Magnesium is also protective in sudden sensorineural hearing loss due to issues such as viral infections, vascular impairment, CNS disorders, inner ear abnormalities, or immune related mechanisms. Magnesium provides protection from hearing loss due to its ability to function as a Ca2+ antagonist, vasodilator, antioxidant, and a non-competitive NMDA antagonist.3 Magnesium threonate, with the ability to enter the CNS, is particularly useful in working with individuals with tinnitus. Protecting and Repairing the Hippocampus: Learning, Memory, and Emotion Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with a magnesium deficiency in the serum or brain.7 Yu, Guan, Gu (2015) found that magnesium L-threonate enhanced the clearance of amyloid beta, the plaquing seen in AD. They demonstrated that magnesium L-threonate was able to slow the progression of AD.7 Magnesium threonate treatment was even effective at preventing synapse loss and memory decline when used in mice with end-stage AD.8 It has also demonstrated the ability to be neuroprotective against oxidative stress and hippocampal neuronal apoptosis.9 Chemotherapy-induced memory/emotional deficitsMagnesium L-threonate prevented oxaliplatin(OXA)-induced behavioral and synaptic changes in a 2020 study conducted using rats. This study showed that magnesium L-threonate prevented the OXA-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-кB).

0630 by WDR aktuell
Nachhaltige Atomkraft? I Bauernproteste in den Niederlanden I Bleiberecht I LGBTQ-Diskriminierung im Job I 0630

0630 by WDR aktuell

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 17:08


Matthis und Minh Thu hatten Spaß am Eröffnungsspiel der Fußball-EM der Frauen und danach geht's um diese eher unsportlichen Themen: Was es bedeutet, dass die EU Atomkraft und Erdgas als klimafreundlich einstufen will (01:08). Warum in den Niederlanden Landwirt:innen mit ihren Fahrzeugen Straßen und Supermärkte blockieren (05:04). Wie es die Bundesregierung gut integrierten Ausländer:innen einfacher machen will, ein Bleiberecht zu bekommen (08:17). Warum Diskriminierung von queeren Menschen am Arbeitsplatz immer noch ein wichtiges Thema ist (11:21). Ihr wollt uns eure Meinung geigen oder uns in den Himmel loben? Feedback und Themenwünsche nehmen wir gerne entgegen als Sprachnachricht an 0151 15071636 oder per Mail an 0630@wdr.de. Mehr News aus unserem Team gibt's den ganzen Tag drüben bei Instagram: www.instagram.com/tickr.news Von 0630.

Top-Thema mit Vokabeln | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
Feiern für Toleranz und Vielfalt: CSD in Köln

Top-Thema mit Vokabeln | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 2:50


Musik, bunte Kostüme, Partystimmung: Nach zwei Jahren Corona-Einschränkungen feierten über eine Million Menschen den Kölner Christopher Street Day wieder in voller Größe. Zur Begrüßung sprach der Ministerpräsident.

WDR 5 Politikum
Unnütze Sanktionen & Begrenzte Toleranz - Meinungsmagazin

WDR 5 Politikum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 14:26


Moderatorin Andrea Oster diskutiert, ob Sanktionen gegen Russland der richtige Ansatz sind. Reporter Clemens Hoffmann wollte wissen, wie groß die Offenheit für queere Menschen abseits hipper Großstadtviertel ist. Und: CNN auf der Bremse. Von WDR 5.

0630 by WDR aktuell
Kanzler Scholz über Bubatz I Schüsse in Kopenhagener Einkaufszentrum I Abzug aus Lyssytschansk I Diskussion über Kleiderordnung bei Wimbledon I 0630

0630 by WDR aktuell

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 17:12


Am Wochenende war der CSD in Köln. Flo und Minh Thu wollen von euch wissen wir ihr zum CSD steht. Und darüber reden Flo und Minh Thu heute außerdem: Das sagt Bundeskanzler Olaf Scholz über die steigenden Energiekosten, Corona und darüber, wann Bubatz legal wird (02:31). Was wir bisher über die Schüsse in einem Einkaufszentrum in Kopenhagen wissen (07:30). Darum will Selenskyj die von Russland eroberte Stadt Lyssytschansk trotz des Rückzugs der Armee nicht verloren geben (10:13). Darum ist die strenge „All-White“ Kleiderordnung beim Tennis in Kritik und was die Periode damit zu tun hat (13:16). Wie steht ihr zum CSD? Warum findet ihr denn CSD wichtig, was findet ihr vielleicht kritikwürdig? Schreibt uns: 0151 15071635 oder 0630@wdr.de. Mehr News aus unserem Team gibts auf Instagram @tickr.news Von 0630.

Böttinger. Wohnung 17
Kübra Sekin über Liebe und die Leidenschaft zur Performance

Böttinger. Wohnung 17

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 33:18


Anlässlich des Christopher Street Days hat Bettina Böttinger erneut ihre private Wohnungstür in Köln geöffnet. Zu Gast: Schauspielerin Kübra Sekin. Die Bochumerin steht schon seit der Schulzeit auf der Bühne und entdeckt früh ihre Leidenschaft zur Performance. Sie spielt im ARD-Film "Das Leben ist kein Kindergarten" von Oliver Wnuk, performt am Kölner COMEDIA Theater und sitzt in der Jury des Westwind-Festivals. Ob auf der Theaterbühne oder vor der Kamera, Kübra überzeugt durch Strahlkraft und Empowerment. Neben ihrer künstlerischen Arbeit ist Kübra Sekin eine der starken Stimmen zum Thema Ableismus. In den sozialen Medien moderiert sie seit 2017 als Botschafterin der Aktion Mensch in über 50 Folgen des YouTube-Channels "Kübras Vlog". Diese Podcast-Folge ist übrigens eine ganz besondere - es gibt sie auch als Video in der ARD Mediathek: https://www.ardmediathek.de/video/wdr/boettinger-wohnung-17-kuebra-sekin-2-2/wdr/Y3JpZDovL3dkci5kZS9CZWl0cmFnLTY1YTY0MWMyLWNjZDQtNDY0Yi1iYWQzLWUyM2Q1ZTE3MDhhZQ ● Feedback und Kommentare gerne an wdr2@wdr.de oder über die WDR 2 App. Von Bettina Böttinger.

Fußball – meinsportpodcast.de
Ronaldo bald in Lederhosen?

Fußball – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 18:14


Guten Morgen allerseits! Weil Lena am Wochenende beim CSD in Köln ordentlich gefeiert hat und sich vor der anstehenden Frauen-EM erstmal etwas ausruhen muss, springt MML-Redaktionsleiter Niels an diesem Morgen für sie ein. Gemeinsam mit Maik gehts ran an die News des Tages. Läuft CR7 bald im Bayern-Trikot auf? Passt Süle zum BVB? Und wie viel Technik ist beim Fußballspiel erlaubt? Das und mehr gibts zum Wochenbeginn in einer frischen Folge MML Daily. Viel Spaß! Du möchtest deinen Podcast auch kostenlos hosten und damit Geld verdienen? Dann schaue auf www.kostenlos-hosten.de und informiere dich. Dort erhältst du alle Informationen zu unseren kostenlosen Podcast-Hosting-Angeboten.

Ach, papperlapapp!
#157 HAPPY PRIDE: Wir müssen weiter demonstrieren!

Ach, papperlapapp!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 36:18


Der CSD Köln hat sich für uns nach einem Safe Space angefühlt, wir sind unfassbar dankbar für so viele tolle grossartige Momente! Trotz unserem aktuellen Hoch, müssen wir natürlich aber weiter demonstrieren, denn Gleichberechtigung haben wir noch lange nicht erreicht!

ASHA Voices
An SLP Examines Opioids, Respiration, and Health Care

ASHA Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 22:47


On this episode of the podcast, we're joined by SLP Wendy Olsen for a conversation of interest to SLPs in health care. Olsen discusses the effects of opioids on respiration and how collaboration may be the key to meeting patients' needs. Olsen is a post-doctoral researcher at the Breathing Research and Therapeutic Center at the University of Florida. The interprofessional research center focuses on issues of respiration in health care and rehabilitation. She joins the podcast from Florida to discuss the opioid epidemic and to highlight research that may be of interest to other SLPs who treat patients affected by opioid use. This is the third episode of our 2022 series looking at how the opioid epidemic affects the work of CSD professionals.

El Larguero
El Larguero completo | Entrevista a José Manuel Franco y a Roberto Martínez

El Larguero

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 105:02


Entrevista a José Manuel Franco, presidente del CSD. El Barça activa las famosas palancas económicas. Entrevista a Roberto Martínez, seleccionador belga. Jon Uriarte se somete al test de los candidatos en El Larguero antes de las elecciones a la presidencia del Athletic. La Quebrantahuesos queda suspendida por altas temperaturas.

Private Practice Elevation with Daniel Fava
110 - Using Clinical Supervision to Uplevel Your Private Practice Growth- Dr. Amy F Parks - 4 11 22 3.03 PM

Private Practice Elevation with Daniel Fava

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 25:48


In this episode of The Private Practice Podcast, you're going to learn how making clinical supervision a part of your private practice can help you uplevel your business and career growth.   The trouble is, with the current associations available to therapists and confusing state licensing protocols, it can be hard for supervision-seekers to find a supervisor with whom they resonate.   After all, new graduates are looking to start their careers off on a solid foundation, and a great supervisor can truly impact the trajectory of their careers as mental health professionals.   But someone is solving the problem by connecting supervision-seekers with supervisors across the United States…   Enter Dr. Amy F Parks.   Dr. Parks is a licensed therapist with more than 35 years of experience in the mental health field. She is an LPC and a Nationally Accredited ClinicalSupervisor.   She's also the creator of The Clinical Supervision Directory.   The Clinical Supervision Directory (CSD) is the first directory of its kind in the mental health profession. Previously, mental health professionals like LMFTs, LCPs, and LCSWs relied on inadequate, often piecemeal, information when searching for a clinical supervisor to begin practicing therapy   The CSD changes the old ways of searching for supervision completely by providing a one-stop-shop for supervision-seekers to research and find the supervisors that are best for them. In This Episode, You'll Learn: The story behind The Clinical Supervision Directory and why Dr. Amy created it The biggest challenges new therapists face when trying to find the right clinical supervisor How clinical supervision can be the next step for your career development Ways to get your name out there so you can find supervisees and grow your clinical supervision How joining The Clinical Supervision Directory can help improve your SEO and social proof, helping you be seen as an expert in your field Email Dr. Amy for A Discount Code If you'd like to list yourself as a supervisor on The Clinical Supervision Directory, email hello@the-csd.com for a special discount code available for The Private Practice Elevation Podcast listeners. Subscribe & Review in Apple Podcasts If you're not yet subscribed to the podcast I want to encourage you to do that today. This is the best way to make sure you don't miss an episode! Click here to subscribe on iTunes.   And if you're feeling extra generous, I'd love to hear what you think about the podcast. Reviews help others find the podcast plus I'd really love to hear what you think! Click here to leave a review. Just click on “Ratings & Reviews” then “Write a review.” Let me know what you like best about the podcast. Thank you!   Links mentioned in this episode:  The Clinical Supervision Directory About Dr. Amy F Parks Dr. Parks is a licensed therapist with more than 35 years of experience in the mental health field. She is an LPC and a Nationally Accredited Clinical  Supervisor.   Areas of Interest: Children, Teens & Families Owner/Clinical Director @ The Wise Family, Counseling, Assessment &Education in Northern Virginia www.thewisefamily.com Licensed Professional Counselor, Virginia PhD, Educational Psychology, specialty Developmental Neuroscience Adjunct Professor, TCSPP  Clinical Supervisor, HCA Health Systems  Chief Executive Office, CSD Launched July 1, 2021 (conceived Nov 2020)Planned partnership with ACA's 55,000 members and 460 CACREPUniversities nation-wide hello@the-csd.com