Podcasts about Seabiscuit

champion thoroughbred racehorse in the United States

  • 241PODCASTS
  • 281EPISODES
  • 59mAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Nov 25, 2022LATEST
Seabiscuit

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Best podcasts about Seabiscuit

Latest podcast episodes about Seabiscuit

In The Money Players' Podcast
Del Mar Turf Festival Kick Off Show

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 28:05


Billy Koch and Michelle Yu join PTF to go over the Late Pick Five at Del Mar on Saturday, which includes the Grade 2 Seabiscuit.Saturday is also the Del Mar Fall Handicapping Contest. Go to dmtc.com for more information.

In The Money Players' Podcast
Del Mar Turf Festival Kick Off Show

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 28:05


Billy Koch and Michelle Yu join PTF to go over the Late Pick Five at Del Mar on Saturday, which includes the Grade 2 Seabiscuit.Saturday is also the Del Mar Fall Handicapping Contest. Go to dmtc.com for more information.

The Filmlings
146. The Equestrisode

The Filmlings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 97:29


From the very first photographs of motion, horses have been integrated with the cinema, so today Alex and Jonathan talk about different ways horses can be used to drive a story in The Black Stallion (1979), Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (2002), Seabiscuit (2003), and War Horse (2011). We discuss horses as both thematic metaphors and characterizations, what makes them so compelling to watch on film, and ultimately how horses reflect and amplify the virtues or vices of the human characters. Skip to: 13:42 – The Black Stallion 31:56 – Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron 50:12 – Seabiscuit (50:12) 1:10:39 – War Horse 1:29:27 – Overall 1:35:02 – Coming Attractions Coming Attractions: Touching the Void (2003) The Grey (2011) Everest (2015) Arctic (2018) For more information, visit the blog: https://thefilmlings.wordpress.com/2022/11/23/horses Join us on Discord for ongoing film discussion: https://discord.gg/MAF6jh59cF Support the Show! Patreon: https://patreon.com/thefilmlings Ko-fi: https://ko-fi.com/thefilmlings

Whitetail Bloodline
58 | Kentucky Public land Buck Down In 4 Days | River Bottom Swamp Bucks | Rut Hunting Whitetails

Whitetail Bloodline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 99:16


On this episode we switch it up and Jon and Tyler take over the hosting roles to talk about Gavin's Kentucky public land buck he shot 4 days into his rutcation. This was Gavin's first year hunting public land plus he was doing it out of state in Kentucky. He started scouting this swamp land marsh that is also river bottom and it makes for some unique whitetails. The first mature buck he got on camera was a beautiful 8 point he named “Seabiscuit” after hunting hard opening week and jumping this buck out of his bed on day 4 of our first hunting trip back in September, little did Gavin know he would come 30 yards eye to eye with this exact same buck over a month later in early November!! Gavin and Dylan's week hunting public land in northern kentucky was better than we could have even imagined, seeing a different mature buck every single day we were there!! Thanks for listening to this episode and we hope you enjoy it and as always we truly appreciate all the support and love hearing from y'all and seeing the deer you killed this year!! Lots of season left so get out there and get after them because you can't kill ‘em on the couch and the Bloodline Runs Deep!!

American Achievers
Season 2, Episode 14: Michael O'Neill

American Achievers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 45:06


Part 1 of 2: Television and film actor Michael O'Neill, best known for SEABISCUIT, THE WEST WING, and GREY'S ANATOMY, talks about the unlikely phone call that led him to Hollywood,  the lessons he learned from an aging star, and how he conquered a debilitating weakness.   

You Talking To Me?!
SCARY NEW SERIES: DARK SANCTUM

You Talking To Me?!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 1:59


From Mark Ramsey, creator of “You Talking To Me?!” comes something NEW: Dark Sanctum, a thrilling, hair-raising original podcast series inspired by The Twilight Zone and Tales from the Crypt. Dark Sanctum features Bethany Joy Lenz from One Tree Hill, Clive Standen from Vikings, and Michael O'Neill from Dallas Buyers Club and Seabiscuit.It's got tears and fears, scares, and even a little heart. We poured our best work into this project, and I am so excited for you to hear it. Listen to this taste of Dark SanctumFollow the show: https://wondery.com/shows/dark-sanctum/.Wondery Plus subscribers can binge-listen early and ad-free to Dark Sanctum. You can join Wondery Plus in Apple Podcasts or the Wondery App.

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2311: Gianni Russo ~ Actor in 9x Oscar Winning Movie "The Godfather" on Game Changing Success!

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 58:21


The Godfather 1 & 2, Any Given Sunday Rush Hour 2I just read on impactful book called : Hollywood Godfather: My Life in the Movies & The Mob! I read it cover to cover because it was intense & fascinating.Actor Gianni Russo has led an intriguing life.Gianni Russo was a handsome 25-year-old mobster with no acting experience when he walked onto the set of The Godfather and entered Hollywood history. He played Carlo Rizzi, the husband of Connie Corleone, who set her brother Sonny—played by James Caan—up for a hit. Russo didn't have to act—he knew the mob inside and out: from his childhood in Little Italy, where Mafia legend Frank Costello took him under his wing.Along the way, Russo befriended Frank Sinatra, who became his son's godfather, and Marlon Brando, who mentored his career as an actor after trying to get Francis Ford Coppola to fire him from The Godfather. Russo had passionate affairs with Marilyn Monroe, Liza Minelli, and scores of other celebrities. He went on to become a producer and starred in The Godfather: Parts I and II, Seabiscuit, Any Given Sunday and Rush Hour 2, among many other films.Hollywood Godfather is a no-holds-barred account of a life filled with violence, glamour, sex—and fun.Gianni Russo Wines launched nationally in 2009. And he has an expanded product line coming out this year.Born in Manhattan and raised in Little Italy and Staten Island, Russo overcame polio as a child to start his first “business” at the tender age of twelve, selling pens and erasers on the street corners. At eighteen Russo made his first trip to Miami, where he began to dabble in show-business, working in nightclubs and hotspots before deciding to pursue acting and move to Hollywood.His new book: Hollywood Godfather: My Life in the Movies & the Mob is an eye-opening read.© 2022 All Rights Reserved© 2022 BuildingAbundantSuccess!!Join Me on ~ iHeart Radio @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23baAmazon ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBAS

DCOMedy
Episode 74: Nonstop References To Horse Death

DCOMedy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 90:18


Giddyup y'all! We've got another horse-based film for you this month, as we take a look at Ready to Run. In many ways, it feels like a pretty standard story about a child coming of age and taking on the world of sports the same way their father did before he died. Except…sigh…there is a particular thing that happens in this movie that ruins the whole thing and…why am I trying to keep things vague? The horses freaking talk gang! No one will care if I spoil that, right? It's kind of important to our discussion so…head's up. Emma loves Seabiscuit and is telling you to Don't Worry Dohring. Lucas wants more stakes/investment and just now gets the Jeremy Renner app. Talking Points: Disney+ Acquisition, Subverting Expectations…But Badly, Sinbad Must Have Had A Terrible Agent, Horse Names, Gun Censorship, Researching the Patriarchal Jockey Community, The Cartoonishly Evil Villain, Everything Is Around the Racetrack, Toothpick Gambling, A Horse Loose At Carl's Jr, Low Effort Talking Animals, Stud Farms, Pointless Moody's Sweet Tricks, The Worst Financial Decision of All Time, Spooking A Horse Into Greatness, Obvious Flirting, The Rhythm of the Horse, The Terrible Soundtrack, Casually Dropping A Deeply Sad Story, How Does a Horse Wear Headphones?, The Viral Appeal of A Headphone-Wearing Horse, A Man Intimidating a Horse, Everyone's Favorite Segment, The Worst Kept Secret, A Psychic Link With a Horse, The Worst Rescue Attempt Ever, A Pointless Amount of Money, A Solid Heart-to-Heart, Road Trip!, The French/British Announcer, Gamer Girl Headphones, The “Twist”: Horse Spectators, WHO IS CRUMPY, Inconsistent Horse Colors, The Actual Twist, Yelling At An Official, Undercutting The Entire Journey, DJ'ing for Horses, The Kinsey Scale vs. The Dohring Scale, Get Your Votes In For Halloween!

Mathew J. Mari's View From Mulberry Street
Ep. 13 - GIANNI RUSSO INTERVIEW - Pt 2 - "The Hollywood Godfather"

Mathew J. Mari's View From Mulberry Street

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 17:56


GIANNO RUSSO INTERVIEW PT. 2 – The “Hollywood Godfather,” talks Hollywood.  In this final part of the Russo interviews, Gianni discusses Seabiscuit, Any Given Sunday, The Freshman, and of course his special relationship with Marlon Brando which went on for decades.  Gianni proves that he's a quite a character, especially when Matt gets him to open up about Marilyn Monroe.  It's all here in Episode 13, Gianni Russo Part 2.

Whitetail Bloodline
46 | Kansas & Kentucky Opening Week Recap | Early Season Kansas Whitetails | Kentucky Public Land

Whitetail Bloodline

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 90:31


On this Episode I'm joined by Jon and Tyler to talk about our past week and the opening week of deer season for the team. Jon chases early season Kansas Whitetails with his son as they hunt the 10 day youth season. Gavin and Tyler chase out of state public land Whitetails in the river bottoms and swamps of Northern Kentucky. Weather got the best of us on our Kentucky trip with crazy thunderstorms rolling in while we were hunting. We learned a ton on this trip and actually got eyes on a shooter we named “ Seabiscuit“. We cover a lot in this episode about early season Whitetails and the experiences/things we learned on the opening week. One thing we all agree and talk about is staying positive while you're out there hunting, no matter the cards you're dealt. Hope you guys enjoy this early season BS session style episode and we truly appreciate you listening to this episode!!

SRB Media Podcasts
My Life My Music-Hutch, Ossie and a horse named Sea Biscuit

SRB Media Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 30:21


My Life My Music with the guvnor Alan Hudson Al picks the tracks and reminisces about those songs and the characters that shaped the career & life of one of the games greatest talents..... #alanhudson #theguvnor #mylifemymusicWith the Gabbie CabbieMore podcasts at srbmedia.co.ukProduced and Edited by Chris Browne for SRBMediaFull podcast at www.patreon.com/srbmediaSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/srbmedia. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/srbmedia. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

CGI Fridays – A Visual Effects Interview Podcast
Animator and Digital Painter Adam Howard Part II: The Invisible CG of Birdman | CGI Fridays - Episode 7

CGI Fridays – A Visual Effects Interview Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 38:09


 Our first two-part episode of CGI Fridays – and if you've caught up with Episode 6, you'll understand why – Australian-born veteran of small and large screen CG is, like many Aussies, a natural raconteur. When we left him he was recalling work on James Cameron's epic Titanic – which in 1997 overtook Star Wars' box office records – so it's appropriate that we rejoin him for CGI Fridays Episode 7 in the climatic final chapter of the Prequel Trilogy. His full IMDb lists his credits asAxanar (visual effects supervisor) (announced)Into the Wolves Den (visual effects supervisor) (pre-production)The Black Demon (visual effects supervisor) (post-production)Servant (TV Series) (Post VFX Supervisor - 1 episode)- Episode #4.1 (2023) ... (Post VFX Supervisor: Powerhouse VFX)Queer as Folk (TV Series) (visual effects supervisor - 1 episode)- Babylon (2022) ... (visual effects supervisor)Lady of the Manor (visual effects supervisor)Fear of Rain (visual effects supervisor)The Hurricane Heist (visual effects supervisor)Powers (TV Series) (visual effects supervisor - 10 episodes)Pee-wee's Big Holiday (visual effects supervisor)Self/less (visual effects supervisor)Away & Back (TV Movie) (on-set visual effects coordinator)Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (visual effects supervisor - uncredited)My Mistress (additional visual effects)Prelude to Axanar (Short) (on-set visual effects supervisor)Cosmos (TV Mini Series documentary) (visual effects consultant - 13 episodes)So You Think You Can Dance (TV Series) (visual effects artist - 1 episode)American Idol: The Search for a Superstar (TV Series) (visual effects artist - 16 episodes)Last Vegas (visual effects supervisor)The Internship (visual effects consultant)The 85th Academy Awards (TV Special) (visual effects supervisor - segment "Sally Field and sock puppet sketches", uncredited)The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (visual effects supervisor)The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (visual effects supervisor)Tower Heist (visual effects consultant)Unknown (visual effects supervisor)Season of the Witch (visual effects supervisor: additional photography, Shreveport)The Social Network (visual effects supervisor: Outback Post)Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey (Video short) (visual effects supervisor)X-Men Origins: Wolverine (visual effects supervisor: CafeFx)Punisher: War Zone (on-set visual effects supervisor: Pixel Magic)Rush Hour 3 (co-visual effects supervisor)Moola (visual effects supervisor)Eragon (sabre artist: ILM)Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (sabre artist: ILM)Mission: Impossible III (sabre artist: ILM)Cheaper by the Dozen 2 (sabre artist: ILM)The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (digital artist: ILM)Jarhead (sabre artist: ILM)The Island (sabre artist: ILM)War of the Worlds (sabre artist: ILM)Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith (sabre artist: ILM)xXx²: The Next Level (sabre artist: ILM)The Pacifier (sabre artist: ILM)Radius (Short) (visual effects supervisor)The Day After Tomorrow (sabre artist: ILM)Van Helsing (sabre artist: ILM)Peter Pan (sabre artist: ILM)Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (sabre artist: ILM)Tarzan (TV Series) (visual effects compositor - 1 episode)Out of Time (inferno artist: additional titles)Seabiscuit (interactive compositing artist: SPI)Ghosts of the Abyss (Documentary) (visual effects supervisor: Technicolor/Complete Post)Children of Dune (TV Mini Series) (visual effects - 3 episodes)Gods and Generals (visual effects supervisor: Complete Post Inc.)Life at Five Feet (TV Movie) (visual effects compositor)Will & Grace (TV Series) (visual effects artist - 53 episodes)That '70s Show (TV Series) (visual effects - 1 episode)My Big Fat Greek Wedding (digital compositor - uncredited)The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys (visual effects: Complete Post)My Wife and Kids (TV Series) (visual effects)Britney Spears Live from Las Vegas (TV Special documentary) (visual effects supervisor: opening sequence: Complete Post - uncredited)Star Trek: Enterprise (TV Series) (lead animator - 1 episode)Reba (TV Series) (visual effects)Elvira's Haunted Hills (digital compositor: main title)Along Came a Spider (digital compositor - uncredited)Children Are the Music in our Lives (visual effects supervisor)Monkeybone (visual effects supervisor)Dracula 2001 (digital compositor)Bruno (compositing supervisor)Titus (TV Series) (visual effects)Chain of Command (visual effects supervisor)The Magician's House (TV Series) (visual effects supervisor)Angel (TV Series) (digital compositor: 2001)Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (TV Series) (digital compositor - 98 episodes, 1993 - 1999) (visual effects artist - 1 episode, 1999)Star Trek: Insurrection (visual effects supervisor - uncredited)Letters from a Killer (visual effects supervisor: POP Film)Armageddon (visual effects compositing supervisor)Doctor Dolittle (digital compositor: POP Film)Flubber (digital effects compositor - uncredited)Starship Troopers (digital effects compositor - uncredited)Titanic (digital compositing supervisor: POP Film)An American Werewolf in Paris (visual effects animator - uncredited)The Devil's Advocate (visual effects supervisor: POP Film - uncredited)Batman & Robin (compositor - uncredited)Volcano (digital compositing supervisor)Just Shoot Me! (TV Series) (visual effects artist)Star Trek: First Contact (visual effects supervisor)Star Trek: Voyager (TV Series) (visual effects artist - 48 episodes, 1995 - 1996) (visual effects animator - 1 episode, 1995)Broken Arrow (digital effects compositor - uncredited)The Adventures of Captain Zoom in Outer Space (TV Movie) (visual effects artist)Timemaster (animation supervisor)Apollo 13 (visual effects animator - uncredited)Michael Jackson: Video Greatest Hits - HIStory (Video) (visual effects artist: Remember The Time)Batman Forever (compositor - uncredited)Fluke (main title design) / (visual effects designer)Legend (TV Series) (visual effects animator)Evolver (visual effects supervisor)Tales from the Crypt (TV Series) (digital compositor - 2 episodes)Treasure Island: The Adventure Begins (TV Movie) (digital compositor)Dumb and Dumber (visual effects compositor - uncredited)MacGyver: Trail to Doomsday (TV Movie) (visual effects animator - uncredited)Alien Nation: Dark Horizon (TV Movie) (digital compositor)Dinosaurs (TV Series) (visual effects artist - 65 episodes)The River Wild (visual effects supervisor)Where Are My Children? (TV Movie) (digital compositor)Blown Away (digital effects compositor - uncredited)Uncovered (visual effects: Digital Magic)Star Trek: The Next Generation (TV Series) (visual effects compositor - 60 episodes, 1992 - 1994) (digital compositor - 11 episodes, 1991 - 1992) (animaton supervisor - 1 episode, 1992) (visual effects animator - 1 episode, 1991)MacGyver: Lost Treasure of Atlantis (TV Movie) (visual effects)Shrunken Heads (digital compositor: Digital Magic)The Critic (TV Series) (digital compositor: Digital Magic)Viper (TV Series) (digital effects compositor)'Star Trek: Deep Space Nine': Behind the Scenes (Video documentary) (digital compositor)Philadelphia Experiment II (visual effects animator - uncredited)The Nightmare Before Christmas (inferno artist: ILM - 3D version 2006)The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. (TV Series) (digital compositor)Brooklyn Bridge (TV Series) (visual effects artist - 7 episodes)Coneheads (digital effects compositor - uncredited)Running Delilah (TV Movie) (digital compositor - uncredited)Super Mario Bros. (digital compositor - uncredited)Cliffhanger (digital effects compositor - uncredited)The Sandlot Kids (visual effects animator) / (visual effects compositor)Journey to the Center of the Earth (TV Movie) (visual effects animator - uncredited)Warlock: The Armageddon (visual effects artist: Digital Magic)Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman (TV Series) (digital compositor)Martin & Lewis: Their Golden Age of Comedy (TV Mini Series documentary) (digital compositor: Digital Magic)Toys (visual effects animator - uncredited)The Jacksons: An American Dream (TV Mini Series) (digital compositor - 2 episodes)Bram Stoker's Dracula (visual effects animator - uncredited)Mastergate (TV Movie) (compositor: Digital Magic)Bebe's Kids (visual effects animator)Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventures (TV Series) (digital compositor)The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (TV Series) (visual effects animator)Michael Jackson: Remember the Time (Music Video short) (visual effects artist: Digital Magic)Simply Mad About the Mouse (Short) (visual effects animator)MacGyver (TV Series) (visual effects animator - 2 episodes)Dark Justice (TV Series) (digital compositor)Family Matters (TV Series) (visual effects artist - 1 episode)Baywatch (TV Series) (digital compositor: Digital Magic)Round the Twist (TV Series) (visual effects animator: first series)While You're Down There (TV Series) (visual effects animator)Fame and Misfortune (TV Series) (effects animator)Rock Arena (TV Series) (digital artist - 1 episode)Woodstock (Documentary) (digital effects compositor: rating card explosion sequence - directors cut, uncredited)

Online Casino, Poker, Sportsbook
Seabiscuit: An American Legend

Online Casino, Poker, Sportsbook

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 13:24


This episode is also available as a blog post: https://gambleaddicts.com/seabiscuit-an-american-legend/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gamble-addicts/support

Shot@Love
Staying Together: Oscar Winner Chris Cooper & Marianne Leone Cooper, Actor/Writer Talks Highs Of Hollywood, Trading Off In Tough Times and Being A Team

Shot@Love

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 57:27


Today's topic is staying together. Every love story is profoundly different and unique. And for those who don't find everlasting love, we head to the movies to be reminded that it is possible and does exist. Movies teach humanity and make us feel less alone. They lift us up and instill hope. And sometimes we need movies so we can momentarily forget our lives and have a good cry or laugh so hard we forget why we were crying in the first place! If you are a great actor – their words and story are believable, and it can be life-changing. And if that character prevails through extreme hardship, their impact can be even greater. Today's guest is Oscar-winning actor Chris Cooper and his wife Marianne Leone Cooper, who's also an actress and writer, and their love story is beyond beautiful! They've lived through the most difficult of times–enduring the loss of their only son Jesse. Yet somehow, they learned to continue on–put their gifts and pain into purpose, leading Chris to win an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award and Marianne to write the best-selling memoir "Knowing Jesse, A Mother's Story of Grief, Grace and Everyday Bliss," which honors their precious child. Surviving and thriving through all these experiences wouldn't be possible without their love for each other. I've watched Chris's Academy Award acceptance speech many times to remind myself that true love is real and doesn't only exist in the movies.Chris Cooper is an actor known for his Oscar-winning performance in Adaptation and roles in American Beauty, The Bourne Identity, Seabiscuit, Capote, A Time to Kill, and Breech, to name a few. His wife, Marianne Leone Cooper, is a writer and screenwriter. She's known for her published memoirs and essays. She's also an actress most recognized for playing the role of Christopher Moltisanti's mother on the Sopranos. I admire them so much and the love they share. Today they share their powerful story and what it takes to Stay Together! Kerry Brett, Chris Cooper, and Marianne Leone Cooper cover a lot of ground. Topics include;Having different personalities is a strength and can help balance difficult times.What being a team looks like within a relationship?Find someone who makes you laugh so hard that you lose it! Having fabulous humor is key and awfully important in staying together.The importance of leading your partner when the other is lost.Why being a team was survival during challenges.When experiencing loss, don't expect your partner to grieve the same way. You can't expect others to feel how you feel at all times. Practice patience, not resentment, and have empathy.Mutual respect and kindness are crucial, don't be kinder to your friends than the love of your life. And don't forget to say thank you – it goes a long way.

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
Breeding 2.0 | ZED RUN Gambling Podcast (Ep. 14)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 68:41


So as we've learned more about Zed Run breeding 2.0, it seems like not only is base ability and distance preference passed down, but variance most definitely is too. I've seen this firsthand with a new breed I just did Melrose Avenue. Definitely was able to get her mother's high variance to go with her father's distance preference. That goes a long way towards helping improve the line a little. Now going forward it doesn't appear breeding lotto tickets will really hit like they used to. I could definitely see them tweaking the variance in new horses going forward for a breeding 3.0 update, though. I get they don't want variance luck to be the only way to build a stable but there needs to be a balance with skill and some luck sprinkled in. Perhaps the biggest nugget to drop was it seems progression is on the way. Horses will essentially have their power score and a potential score and it will take the best horse management to get the most out of it. This is a great development and gives me hope that a Zed Run version of Seabiscuit is out there. A perceived donkey that can thrive in the right hands. Can't wait to see how this works out going forward. This could lead to an entirely new strategy for both breeding and racing. Six horse races are now being experimented with a week after the screenshot was shared showing head-to-head racing. This is, hopefully, all leading to customizable private races where smaller communities can compete among each other without fear of getting killed by the bigger stables. If small stables only exist to kick up cash to the bigger ones the game is in trouble. In a perfect world, though, this is all laying the groundwork for that type of expansion. Becca from Zed Run is doing some class system user feedback sessions so I'm guessing the changes there are coming soon. The game still has Its kinks to work out but, at end of the day, it's still in beta testing and will take some work in the short term to achieve its full potential. I'm working on a breeding spreadsheet that appears to be really helping me. Once I get it fully dialed in the template will be available right here for you to download and use yourselves. Appreciate all the support everyone and please reach out to @ZedPodcast on Twitter if you have any questions. Good luck out there! SGPN FREE SURVIVOR POOL - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | OddsTrader.com/bluewire   Follow The Sports Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://twitter.com/ZedPodcast Instagram -http://instagram.com/zedgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Scott Bowser - http://twitter.com/scott_bowser Blake Meyer - http://twitter.com/buhhlockaye  Chase Sessoms - http://twitter.com/OfOaklawn Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

ZED RUN Gambling Podcast
Breeding 2.0 (Ep. 14)

ZED RUN Gambling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 68:41


So as we've learned more about Zed Run breeding 2.0, it seems like not only is base ability and distance preference passed down, but variance most definitely is too. I've seen this firsthand with a new breed I just did Melrose Avenue. Definitely was able to get her mother's high variance to go with her father's distance preference. That goes a long way towards helping improve the line a little. Now going forward it doesn't appear breeding lotto tickets will really hit like they used to. I could definitely see them tweaking the variance in new horses going forward for a breeding 3.0 update, though. I get they don't want variance luck to be the only way to build a stable but there needs to be a balance with skill and some luck sprinkled in. Perhaps the biggest nugget to drop was it seems progression is on the way. Horses will essentially have their power score and a potential score and it will take the best horse management to get the most out of it. This is a great development and gives me hope that a Zed Run version of Seabiscuit is out there. A perceived donkey that can thrive in the right hands. Can't wait to see how this works out going forward. This could lead to an entirely new strategy for both breeding and racing. Six horse races are now being experimented with a week after the screenshot was shared showing head-to-head racing. This is, hopefully, all leading to customizable private races where smaller communities can compete among each other without fear of getting killed by the bigger stables. If small stables only exist to kick up cash to the bigger ones the game is in trouble. In a perfect world, though, this is all laying the groundwork for that type of expansion. Becca from Zed Run is doing some class system user feedback sessions so I'm guessing the changes there are coming soon. The game still has Its kinks to work out but, at end of the day, it's still in beta testing and will take some work in the short term to achieve its full potential. I'm working on a breeding spreadsheet that appears to be really helping me. Once I get it fully dialed in the template will be available right here for you to download and use yourselves. Appreciate all the support everyone and please reach out to @ZedPodcast on Twitter if you have any questions. Good luck out there! SGPN FREE SURVIVOR POOL - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | OddsTrader.com/bluewire   Follow The Sports Gambling Podcast On Social Media Twitter - http://twitter.com/ZedPodcast Instagram -http://instagram.com/zedgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Scott Bowser - http://twitter.com/scott_bowser Blake Meyer - http://twitter.com/buhhlockaye  Chase Sessoms - http://twitter.com/OfOaklawn Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord  Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Woman in Revolt
E7 Teen Favorites: 'Tender Mercies'

Woman in Revolt

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 67:41


"Tender Mercies" (1983) is about a former successful musician named Mac Sledge (Robert Duvall) who lost everything good in his life due to alcohol. When the film opens, he and a friend are staying in a motel, getting drunk and fighting while the proprietor, Rosa Lee (Tess Harper), and her young son, Carl (known as Sonny, played by Allan Hubbard), watch from their porch. When the friend skips out before paying the bill the next day, Mac offers to work for Rosa Lee in order to compensate for the room. She agrees, but tells him that he can't drink while he's working there. Thus begins Mac's slow streak of improving his life. He sticks with sobriety, marries Rosa Lee, and starts writing music again. It's the kind of movie that's not really plot-driven … more slice of life, at arm's length, character study about Mac's quiet redemption. Other highlights are Betty Buckley, who plays Mac's successful country star ex-wife, Dixie, and Ellen Barkin as Mac's estranged teen daughter, Sue Ann. The screenplay is written by Horton Foote, who won the best adapted screenplay Oscar for “To Kill a Mockingbird” in 1962. He also won a best original screenplay Oscar for “Tender Mercies” in 1983 and has a Pulitzer Prize for drama for his play, “The Young Man From Atlanta” and an Emmy for a TV adaptation of William Faulkner's “Old Man.” The director, Bruce Beresford (who we completely forgot to mention by name — sorry, Bruce), is probably best known for “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989), although my personal favorite film of his is “Double Jeopardy” (1999). Here are some things we mentioned during the episode and/or that we think you should check out: Norman K. Denzin's article in The Sociological Quarterly that provides a feminist close-reading of the film. Unfortunately, you need access to JSTOR to read it, but if you email me (lindsay@womaninrevolt.com), I can send you a copy. 1991 Robert Duvall interview on "Later with Bob Costas" 2002 Horton Foote interview at the Austin Film Festival Tess Harper presenting an award to Bruce Beresford at the 2010 Woodstock Film Festival Some interesting trivia: Duvall's only Oscar is for this film. He had been nominated for the following films (but did not win): “The Godfather” (1972), “Apocalypse Now” (1979), “The Great Santini” (1979), “The Apostle” (1997), “A Civil Action” (1998), and “The Judge” (2014). Duvall's contract stipulated that all of the songs had to be sung by him. “Over You,” the song Dixie performs at the Opry, was also nominated for an Oscar. Duvall wrote two of Mac's songs, "Fool's Waltz" and "I've Decided to Leave Here Forever.” Others were country classics and not written for the film. Universal Studio lost faith in the film after it performed poorly at test screenings. They also sort of ignored Willie Nelson's offers to promote the film. David Lynch was a contender for director at one point. Can you imagine this film with him at the helm? Actually, it probably would have been like “The Straight Story" (1999). The film was selected to screen in competition for the prestigious Palme d'Or (Golden Palm) Award at the Cannes Film Festival in 1983. Robert Duvall made his official cinema movie debut as Arthur "Boo" Radley in “To Kill a Mockingbird” (1962), whose screenplay was written by Horton Foote. Horton Foote and Duvall worked together on five projects: “TKAM,” William Faulkner's “Tomorrow” (1972), “Tender Mercies,” “The Midnight Caller” (play, 1958 debut), and “The Chase” (1966, based on his 1956 novel). Tess Harper and Bruce Beresford worked together on three films: “Tender Mercies,” “Crime of the Heart” (1986), and “Alibi” (1989).  Jeannine Oppewall was hired as art director. Beresford praised her as "absolutely brilliant," especially for her attention to very small details, "going from the curtains to the color of the quilts on the floors." It was Oppewall who named the motel Mariposa, Spanish for "butterfly," which symbolizes the spiritual resurrection Mac Sledge would experience there. Oppewall has four academy award nominations for best art direction:  "Seabiscuit" (2003), "LA Confidential" (1997), "Pleasantville" (1998), and "The Good Shepherd" (2006).

Two Writers Slinging Yang
Rich Cohen: Longtime journalism and author, "The Adventures of Herbie Cohen: World's Greatest Negotiator."

Two Writers Slinging Yang

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 53:45


On the complexities and jots of writing a book about your father; on how to join "Boys in the Boat" and "Seabiscuit" as runaway best-sellers; on the art of the celebrity profile and Chris Pratt grilling Costco steaks.

Sunny Coast Clubhouse
Shaping Seabiscuit

Sunny Coast Clubhouse

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 15:25


Join Maddy as we discover fun Florida facts, play would you rather, and hear a story about an amazing sculpture! Everyone is welcome at the Clubhouse!

The Opperman Report
Hollywood Godfather: My Life in the Movies and the Mob - Gianni Russo

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 300:02


Hollywood Godfather is Gianni Russo's over-the-top memoir of a real-life mobster-turned-actor who helped make The Godfather a reality, and his story of life on the edge between danger and glamour. Gianni Russo was a handsome 25-year-old mobster with no acting experience when he walked onto the set of The Godfather and entered Hollywood history. He played Carlo Rizzi, the husband of Connie Corleone, who set her brother Sonny―played by James Caan―up for a hit. Russo didn't have to act―he knew the mob inside and out: from his childhood in Little Italy, where Mafia legend Frank Costello took him under his wing, to acting as a messenger for New Orleans mob boss Carlos Marcello during the Kennedy assassination, to having to go on the lam after shooting and killing a member of the Colombian drug cartel in his Vegas club. Along the way, Russo befriended Frank Sinatra, who became his son's godfather, and Marlon Brando, who mentored his career as an actor after trying to get Francis Ford Coppola to fire him from The Godfather. Russo had passionate affairs with Marilyn Monroe, Liza Minelli, and scores of other celebrities. He went on to become a producer and starred in The Godfather: Parts I and II, Seabiscuit, Any Given Sunday and Rush Hour 2, among many other films. Hollywood Godfather is a no-holds-barred account of a life filled with violence, glamour, sex―and fun.

The Opperman Report'
Hollywood Godfather: My Life in the Movies and the Mob - Gianni Russo

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 300:02


Hollywood Godfather is Gianni Russo's over-the-top memoir of a real-life mobster-turned-actor who helped make The Godfather a reality, and his story of life on the edge between danger and glamour.Gianni Russo was a handsome 25-year-old mobster with no acting experience when he walked onto the set of The Godfather and entered Hollywood history. He played Carlo Rizzi, the husband of Connie Corleone, who set her brother Sonny―played by James Caan―up for a hit. Russo didn't have to act―he knew the mob inside and out: from his childhood in Little Italy, where Mafia legend Frank Costello took him under his wing, to acting as a messenger for New Orleans mob boss Carlos Marcello during the Kennedy assassination, to having to go on the lam after shooting and killing a member of the Colombian drug cartel in his Vegas club.Along the way, Russo befriended Frank Sinatra, who became his son's godfather, and Marlon Brando, who mentored his career as an actor after trying to get Francis Ford Coppola to fire him from The Godfather. Russo had passionate affairs with Marilyn Monroe, Liza Minelli, and scores of other celebrities. He went on to become a producer and starred in The Godfather: Parts I and II, Seabiscuit, Any Given Sunday and Rush Hour 2, among many other films.Hollywood Godfather is a no-holds-barred account of a life filled with violence, glamour, sex―and fun.

Seemingly Ordinary
93. Lucia Brancato on Life's Deep Questions

Seemingly Ordinary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 65:29


Lucia Brancato is an English teacher and a wedding planner. We started off talking about books, but ended up on life's deepest questions.  Books include: Sea Biscuit, Unbroken, and Where the Crawdads Sing .(This episode was recorded in Sept. 2021.) 

La Niche Aventure
EP34 : Elise&Riley - La photographie animalière

La Niche Aventure

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 67:43


Dans ce nouvel épisode, je suis ravie de vous partager ma conversation avec Elise Julliard. Elise est photographe professionnelle spécialisée notamment en photographie animalière. Dans cette discussion, elle nous raconte son parcours avec Riley et nous parle des dessous du métier de photographe. De sa formation au matériel, en passant par la gestion d'un séance avec des poilus, vous saurez tout du métier de photographe animalier. En bonus, Elise nous partage ses meilleurs conseils pour que vous puissiez faire vos plus belles photos de vacances avec vos loulous pour cet été. Sommaire :  00:10 : Introduction 01:30 : Présentation d'Elise et Riley 06:15 : Son parcours pour devenir photographe animalier 19:45 : Les dessous du métier de photographe 42:40 : L'image de soi 50:55 : Conseil pour prendre de belles photos de son chien 01:06:55 : Soutenir le podcast On en parle dans cet épisode :  Film La légende de Seabiscuit : https://www.allocine.fr/film/fichefilm_gen_cfilm=47262.html Le compte instagram d'Elise : https://www.instagram.com/elisejulliard_animalier/ Le compte instagram de Riley : https://www.instagram.com/rileybordercollie/  La page Facebook d'Elise : https://www.facebook.com/elisejulliardphotographies Le site d'Elise : www.elisejulliard-photographies.fr Poursuivez votre écoute en suivant La Niche sur : Le site : http://laniche-aventure.fr/  Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/lanicheaventure/  Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/lanicheaventure  YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8FGY3ZcycTD6AfcTVNaIKA  Musique : Dolling - Cybersdf Source: https://soundcloud.com/cybersdf Licence: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.fr Téléchargement (6MB): https://auboutdufil.com/?id=502

Masculine Journey Radio's Podcast 28min
Neglect, Marginalization, Orphan Spirit After Hours

Masculine Journey Radio's Podcast 28min

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 27:25


Welcome fellow adventurers! The discussion about neglect, marginalization, and orphan spirit, continues right here on the Masculine Journey After Hours Podcast. The clips are from "Seabiscuit," and "The Chosen." There's no advertising or commercials, just men of God, talking and getting to the truth of the matter. The conversation and Journey continues.

Vicious Cycle
99 - Abortion Pills!!!!!!!!! with Susan Yanow

Vicious Cycle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 67:39


This week we're covering the topic that you (like the blosts) may know very little about – abortion pills! And contrary to what you may have heard, abortion pills are effective, safe, and even used among racehorse breeders to stop their horses from having foals. If it's good enough for Seabiscuit, it's good enough for us! Renowned reproductive justice advocate Susan Yanow joins us to tell us all the details of this (once again) very safe and effective method of terminating a pregnancy, and gives us a little hope in these dark AF times. abortionpillinfo.org plancpills.org aidaccess.org

SideTalks - The Official Sidewalk Podcast
#239 - So Incredibly Strange and Enjoyable

SideTalks - The Official Sidewalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 20:17


Oh, hey! Didn't see you there. Five. Minute. Fight. - Tobey Maguire "Seabiscuit was the horse's name!" Rachel & Corey's Top Six Summer Movies Part II Music by Splash '96 Sponsored by Revelator Coffee

Suburban Movie Guys
57. Jockey, Seabiscuit

Suburban Movie Guys

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 20:28


Matt and Grant are hosting their own third leg of the Triple Crown with two films about horse racing: Jockey, a new indy about the trial and tribulations of one of sport's most underappreciated athlete types, and the Oscar-nominated 2003 film Seabiscuit. The hosts are two old friends on Long Island in New York who have been watching movies together for 30 years.Check them out at suburbanmovieguys.com where you can sign up to follow them on the podcasting app of your choice, social media or subscribe to their newsletter for episode notifications.

BewilderBeasts
Ep 70: Betting on the Ponies

BewilderBeasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 40:28


This week a look at the less-greats in horse racing, including a horse named after a fruit, a horse named after a tuber, and an announcer has to call a race with a horse evidently named by a 17th century pirate. Let's GO!***** Resources for this week's episode: Youtube video of Tom Durkin calling the ARRRRR race….https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nf0wQzq9Yzg  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triple_Crown_of_Thoroughbred_Racinghttps://www.livescience.com/14020-kentucky-derby-weird-horse-names.htmlhttps://www.cnn.com/2012/11/14/sport/race-horse-names-betting-frankel/index.htmlhttps://horseracingsense.com/why-are-racehorse-names-so-weird/https://www.si.com/horse-racing/2021/04/29/kentucky-derby-best-and-worst-nameshttps://www.cnn.com/2016/04/15/sport/horsey-mchorseface/index.htmlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boaty_McBoatfacehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justify_(horse)https://www.denverpost.com/2022/05/08/how-did-rich-strike-win-kentucky-derby/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruler_on_Icehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pants_On_Fire_(horse)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jockey_Club_(United_States)Pot8oshttps://www.amusingplanet.com/2020/08/a-racing-horse-named-potoooooooo.htmlhttps://www.grunge.com/144630/royals-who-married-their-relatives/ Measure of Things websiteIntro/Outro: Tiptoe out the Back by Dan Liebowicz, Interstitial music by MK2Additional music and sound effects by Pixabay and Freesound.orgVisit BewilderBeastsPod.com or find BewilderBeastsPod on all social media platforms. Just look for the logo, you'll find it! Support the show

Flix and Clix
#79: THROWBACK. Seabiscuit Review (2003)

Flix and Clix

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 73:09


TWO BROTHERS ARE BACK. Like many of you, we saw the video of Rich Strike (the 80-1 underdog) come out of nowhere and WIN the 2022 Kentucky Derby. That inspired us to throw it back to 2003's Seabiscuit. A lot of people do not like this movie, the 2 brothers are not some of those people. As I say at the end of this episode, take some sweet tea and watch a good sports movie.WE HAVE A WEBSITE. Shout out to Jordan! He's the man. Check it out!flixandclix.comWe have a Patreon! If you would like to support us financially, this is the perfect way to do so!www.patreon.com/flixandclixFollow us on Twitter!@FlixandClixAnd Instagram!@flix_and_clix  

Wyrd Realities
Watching Wyrd: "Off to the Races movie reviews of War Horse, Sea Biscuit, Hidalgo, & Casey's Shadow"

Wyrd Realities

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 51:29


On this episode Wyrd Realities' Watching Wyrd crew as they discuss four movies about Man's 2nd best friend. Allen Gamboa brings to the table, Viggo Mortesen in Hidalgo is a 2004 epic biographical western film based on the legend of the American distance rider Frank Hopkins and his mustang Hidalgo. It recounts Hopkins' racing his horse in Arabia in 1891 against Bedouins riding pure-blooded Arabian horses. The movie was written by John Fusco and directed by Joe Johnston. Scott Baker's pick is the Korean Zombie flick, Alive (2020) - The film revolves around a video game live streamer 's struggle for survival as he is forced to stay alone at his apartment in Seoul during a zombie apocalypse. Rich Restucci's selected War Horse a 2011 war film directed and produced by Steven Spielberg, from a screenplay written by Lee Hall and Richard Curtis, based on Michael Morpurgo's 1982 novel of the same name and its 2007 stage adaptation. Scott Baker's film choice of the week was the true story of the undersized Depression-era racehorse whose victories lifted not only the spirits of the team behind it but also those of their nation. Seabiscuit is a 2003 American sports film co-produced, written and directed by Gary Ross and based on the best-selling 1999 non-fiction book Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand Hadley brought to the team her childhood favorite Casey's Shadow a 1978 film directed by Martin Ritt and starring Walter Matthau based on a sho rt story in "Ruidoso" (published April 29, 1974, in The New Yorker magazine) by John McPhee.[2][3] Much of the exterior shots were done in the town of Carencro, LA (20 miles north of Lafayette, LA). Be sure to sign in so we can see your comments and like, subscribe, and tell us what you think. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wyrd-realities/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wyrd-realities/support

Caged In Podcast
Coppola Connections 40: Seabiscuit (2003) Helen Sadler (Flixwatcher)

Caged In Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 79:32


This week I'm joined by one half of the Flixwatcher podcast and someone with the perfect name to discuss this film, Helen Sadler to chat about Seabiscuit (2003). We discuss the films saccharin tone, obvious beats and filmic language, along with how it captures the beats of a Sports Movie and how it encapsulates the period it's set but also the time it was made in the way it tells its story, looks and sounds.Our Coppola Connectee for this episode is: John SchwartzmanHelen Sadler on TwitterFlixwatcher on TwitterFlixwatcher on InstagramFlixwatcher on Apple PodcastsFlixwatcher on SpotifyFlixwatcher on AcastSUPPORT CAGED IN on PATREONBUY A PRINT NOW CAGED IN on TWITTERCAGED IN on INSTAGRAMCAGED IN on LETTERBOXDCAGED IN on FACEBOOKEMAIL CAGED IN NOWCaged In is apart of the Breadcrumbs Collective, head over to the WEBSITE to get all episodes of this show as well as other great shows. Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/cagedinpod. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Scoring at the Movies
Ep. 102 - Secretariat

Scoring at the Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 52:00


We've only covered horse racing on this channel once before, which was when we jawed about Seabiscuit several years ago. That movie is more famous and was more successful, partly because it beat Randall Wallace's biopic to the starting gate by 7 years.   In Secretariat, Diane Lane and John Malkovich make a fine owner/trainer team, but good performances don't offset the fact that there's nothing really at stake in this film. This record-setting horse and these silver-spoon people were not underdogs. They were going to be fine no matter what happened on the race track. To compensate, Wallace pumps in lots of made-up (or at least exaggerated) drama. On the bright side, the picture is entertaining and well-made. So mind-meld with your lady friend before easily winning the Triple Crown, but then have some fun breeding excessively as we break down the happenings in Secretariat.   Don't worry if you get covered in mud while you tweet us (@moviefiend51 and @scoringatmovies) or while sending us an email (scoringatthemovies@gmail.com)

The City's Backyard
The City's Backyard S2 Ep 31 Los Angeles Studio Singer and Voice over artist Leyla Hoyle! Leyla has recorded background vocals for Gloria Estefan, Justin Timberlake, Carlos Santana and many more!

The City's Backyard

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 42:45


We check in this week with Studio Singer and Voice Over Artist Leyla Hoyle! Leyla is from Lima Peru and lives in Los Angeles,  California. She has recorded background voals for an impressive list of international stars such as Gloria Estefan, Justin Timberlake, Chris Stapleton, Demi Lovato, Celine Dion,  Andrea Bocelli, Julio Iglesias, Carlos Santana, and many more! She also sang in the animated movies, Ice Age 2, Happy Feet. The Emperors New Groove, Nacho Libre, Sea Biscuit and many other including the recent Disney movie Encanto which won an Academy Award as Best Animated Film! Leyla has also done vocal coaching for many well known artists! Listen to the podcast to find out more about the lovely and talented Leyla Hoyle! 

The Tip In Maple Leafs  Podcast

In this episode Chad and Dale discuss... 34 hits 50 goals. We also discuss, the Leafs huge wins over the bruins and Jets, why this team shows up for big games, Mrazek out as a leaf?, The PP and PK, Willy is back, JT looks good with new line mates, Seabiscuit keeps it going and we look ahead to the 4 game road trip. We also have a Just the Tip and a new segment - "The Eagles Nest" All this and more on the Tip In Maple Leafs Podcast We would also like to thank all our listeners for tuning in. You can donate to our Patreon page to help bring you more frequent, better sounding episodes. https://www.patreon.com/thetipinpodcast Follow us Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thetipinmapleleafspodcast/ Twitter: twitter.com/thetipinpodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thetipinmapleleafspodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE2Qxukv1KYUHAllSt62awQ/videos?view_as=public Email: thetipinpodcast@gmail.com Intro Music - Hang For Days by Silent Partner

The Tip In Maple Leafs  Podcast
Ep 138 Seabiscuit

The Tip In Maple Leafs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 56:50


In this episode Chad and Dale discuss... Giordano makes his Leafs debut, a win over the Devils, Mrazek is back from the dead, Marner is on fire, Leafs jump into second and Chad tells a tale of being blackmailed. We also discuss pad measurements and talk to our live stream audience. All this and more on the Tip In Maple Leafs Podcast We would also like to thank all our listeners for tuning in. You can donate to our Patreon page to help bring you more frequent, better sounding episodes. https://www.patreon.com/thetipinpodcast Follow us Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thetipinmapleleafspodcast/ Twitter: twitter.com/thetipinpodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thetipinmapleleafspodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE2Qxukv1KYUHAllSt62awQ/videos?view_as=public Email: thetipinpodcast@gmail.com Intro Music - Hang For Days by Silent Partner

Hate Watch / Great Watch
Episode 0077: THE GREAT GATSBY (2013)

Hate Watch / Great Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 100:29


77. The Great Gatsby (2013)Hello Excellent Old Sports!The ‘20s are roaring, the vibes are impeccable, and we're still talking about Baz Luhrmann flicks! It's The Great Gatsby (2013)! We discuss Holden Caulfield, Conan O'Brien, various Spider-Mans, Don Knotts, and Seabiscuit and of course decide whether this is a Hate Gatsby or a Great Gatsby! It's Lovin' with Luhrmann - part 4 (of 2?)

The Creativity, Education, and Leadership Podcast with Ben Guest

The beauty of the Amazon Adwords is everybody who's searching on Amazon Books is a book buyer. You don't have to convince them to buy a book. You only have to convince them to buy YOUR book.This is a bonus episode of my miniseries on how to PLAN, WRITE, EDIT, and PUBLISH your book. This episode is how to MARKET your book.My co-host for the series is Greg Larson. Greg has written and edited more than 80 books.In Part 1 we reviewed how to PLAN your book.In Part 2 we reviewed how to WRITE your book.In Part 3 we reviewed how to EDIT your book.In Part 4 we reviewed how to PUBLISH your book.Today Greg and I and special guest Mark Paul review how to MARKET your book.Mark's self-published book The Greatest Gambling Story Ever Told: A True Tale of Three Gamblers, The Kentucky Derby, and the Mexican Cartel, has sold more than 40,000 copies which puts it in the 99.99th percentile of books sold. The Los Angeles Times says, “It's light, it moves quickly, it's fun.”Greg's book, Clubbie: A Minor League Baseball Memoir, has sold more than 4,000 copies which puts it in the 98th percentile of books sold. The Los Angeles Daily News says, “If Clubbie isn't the best piece of baseball literature since Ball Four, it's the leader in the clubhouse.”My book, Zen and the Art of Coaching Basketball: Memoir of a Namibian Odyssey, has sold more than 400 copies which puts it in the 60th percentile of books sold. The New York Daily News says, “I was hooked from the start. A terrific read of the can't-put-it-down variety!”In this episode I first interview Mark and we talk best book marketing practices and what he learned moving 40,000 books. Then I take the best marketing advice from a previous interview I did with Mark and present that advice. Finally, I take the best marketing excerpts from Greg from our first conversation and present those. Enjoy!TRANSCRIPTBen Guest:Hi everyone. This is Ben Guest, and I've just finished a four part mini series with Greg Larson on how to plan, write, edit, and publish your book. So this is a bonus or companion episode on an important part of publishing your book which is, after you publish it, you have to market it. What good is a book that no one reads, right?So this is a special episode where I've taken three different interviews and taken the best parts of those interviews about marketing and combined them. The first is a brand new interview with the author, Mark Paul, who I've had on previously. Mark self-published his book called The Greatest Gambling Story Ever Told, and at this date, he's sold more than 40000 copies, which is amazing. If you sell more than 4000 copies, you're in the top 2% of books sold in one calendar year, to sell 40000 is in the 99.9999 percentile.It's an astounding number of books, especially self-publishing, the other distribution and marketing muscle of a traditional publishing house. So Mark knows his stuff. In the first interview, which leads off this episode with Mark, we talk two things. We talk genre choice at the beginning, before you even start planning your book, thinking about genre choice and using a great tool called Publisher Rocket, which is available on kindlepreneur.com.I'll link to that in the show notes. And then we talk about Amazon Ads and kind of the back end after you've published, how to market your book. After that is the first interview I did with Mark several months ago, and that was Episode 34. I've taken the best parts of that episode that apply just to marketing and chopped that up and included that. And then the third part of the episode is the very first interview I did with Greg Larson also several months ago, and I've taken the best parts of that interview that applies solely to marketing and chopped that up.So you're getting a brand new interview with Mark Paul, the excerpts of the best bits of marketing advice from Mark Paul from a previous interview and the best marketing advice from Greg Larson from a previous interview. So this should be a helpful introduction to book marketing. If you enjoy this episode, please recommend it to others. Please like the podcast on the platform of your choice and subscribe to my weekly newsletter at benbo.substack.com, B-E-N-B-O, .substack.com. Benbo is my family nickname. So, benbo.substack.com. I put all of this content out here for free. So if you enjoy it and you find useful advice or information in it, please take a minute to like and subscribe. Thank you and enjoy the episode.Ben Guest:Mark, thank you so much for coming on.Mark Paul:Glad to be here again.Ben Guest:You are the man when it comes to moving books, you've sold over 40,000 books of your self-published fantastic book, The Greatest Gambling Story Ever Told.Mark Paul:Thank you. I love mark getting my book. I never stop. If you're around me, you're going to hear about my damn book, I guarantee it.Ben Guest:So somebody comes to you, they have an idea, they want to write a book. How would you advise them to think about the process of marketing before they even start writing their book?Mark Paul:The number one thing I learned that I didn't know until after published my book and started marketing my book is, unfortunately, you're not going to sell many books unless you're in a genre that people buy a lot of books. You can sell a lot of books with an average book in a high demand genre, as opposed to having a magnificent book in genre that nobody cares about, nobody buys books.Mark Paul:But I mentioned to you that I wrote a book that in its premise is about a female, a filly trying to win the Kentucky Derby against the male colts, something that had only occurred twice in 150 years. And that's a great story, but there's not a lot of people out there looking to buy books in the horse racing genre. So I would've really probably not sold a lot of books, but I got lucky because my book had a big component to it, is that the guys that bet on this filly to win the Kentucky Derby made the bet at a little rinky-dinky racetrack in Tijuana, that they found out late was owned by the Mexican cartel.Mark Paul:So now they were faced with this dilemma, which kind of a cool thing where could a filly, a female beat the colts in the Derby. And of course now you've got, women are interested, you've got women engaged, sports fans, horse racing people, but now I have a genre of true crime and I'd probably have sold 10 books in true crime genre for every book I sold on horse racing, even though you could say my book is about ...Ben Guest:And you've mentioned that either on the first episode we did or off air, that when your book broke into the top 10 on Amazon of true crime, then I think you saw a bump in sales. Is that correct?Mark Paul:Absolutely. One thing I learned is you have to always be afraid. I lived in fear of falling into the well, and once you get into the Amazon algorithm well of not selling books and not being something that they think their audience wants, I don't know how you ever crawl back out of the well. One thing that I did is I really studied Amazon ad words and I realized quickly in marketing that Amazon is magnificent in one way.Mark Paul:And that normally when you run an ad, if you were going to run a Google ad words about your book, the problem is, is that most people, 99% of the people that are seeing it, aren't there to buy a book. So, you're up against it and you're wasting your money. The beauty of the Amazon ad words for books is everybody who's searching on Amazon books for a book is a book buyer.Mark Paul:So you don't have to convince them to buy a book. You only have to convince them to buy your book. So you already, you've got a real buyer on your hands there. So now you need to get into that algorithm and its success to get success. One thing that I did, I was not out afraid, especially in the beginning to spend money on buying ad words and having a budget for my book.Mark Paul:And they always tell you, well, if you're on Amazon basically, and you're self-published, you can get about 70% of every dollar of sales. So they say as long as you're spending money and you're not spending more than 70 cents per dollar received, you're at least breaking even, which was kind of my immediate goal. But I actually thought about it after a while. I was saying, well, I'm selling books, but I'm not making any money because I'm spending 70 cents every book that I sell.Mark Paul:But then I realized something, this might seem self evident, but it wasn't, it dawned in me, I said, well, hold on, I'm getting 70 cents for every dollar I spend, but that's only for my Kindle books, for my eBooks, but for every ebook I was selling, now I was shocked at this, for every ebook book that I sold I'd sold two paperbacks, and I wasn't paying anything for my paperback.Mark Paul:So although I was spending all this money to sell my eBooks, I wasn't realizing that I was selling twice as many of this on my paperback books. So don't be afraid to spend money on your ad words, especially out of the gate, and especially, obviously find a category or two that you can dominate. Find a little niche category that you can be the number one author in. And that'll give you that cool little Amazon orange banner, that you're a number one author and when you die on your gravestone, you can write that I was a number one author. It might have been in the category where I was joke is, gay dinosaurs. It's a very small category, but by God, I'm number one.Ben Guest:Here lies John Smith, beloved father, son, and best selling author in.Mark Paul:They can never take it away from you.Ben Guest:They could immediately leave off the category. Love it. So let's talk Amazon ads. Can you kind of break down for the listener how Amazon on ads work? I think there's a bidding process.Mark Paul:Yeah, the best thing that I found, and I don't get any money for this, or what is it? Rocket-Ben Guest:To Rocket ...Mark Paul:Fantastic. They're really cheap. It's $35 a year or something to join. And when you go on Publisher Rocket, you finally understand there's all of these categories. Well, first of all, when you go on Amazon, they tell you, you get three categories, but you really don't. You really get 10 categories. All you have to do is email them and tell them the 10 categories you want your book in. So, that's really important. So if you go and you study all these categories and you know similar books to yours, what categories they're in, then I would try to pick five of them that are big selling categories, like true crime.Mark Paul:And then I would try to pick a few of those that are really minuscule little small genres that perhaps you can be number one or at least top three in for that. And one thing about that website is they'll actually tell you all of the keywords that those books are using in their ads. So you need to know all the ad words. And then what I did too, I created these lists and listenings of any book that was like my book, any categories, words that were like my book.Mark Paul:And also then I would actually advertise all the competing books and all the competing authors. And I would bid on all of those keywords as well. The best course racing book ever written was Laura Hillenbrand, Sea Biscuit. And so, I would bid on Laura Hillenbrand, her name. I would bid on Sea Biscuit and I would want anybody who's looking for Sea Biscuit, I would hopefully have my I book come up before Sea Biscuit because I was paying good money for it, because I wanted to dominate the horse raising genre.Ben Guest:And that advice is so key, and that's exactly the advice that you gave me before I published my book and I followed it to a T. So you identify some categories that are big categories and then you identify a couple of categories that are super small and niche. Just to give the listener an example, a funny example. So I downloaded on my phone the other day, Twitter and Facebook. So I go to the Apple app store and I search for Facebook. And the first thing that comes up is Facebook, right?Ben Guest:So I download it. Then I search for Twitter. The first thing that comes up is Facebook, meaning Facebook has bid well in that ad space, right? So Twitter comes up second under their own search. So it's the same thing, whatever book you're writing, you want to find, my friend, Greg Larson calls it, your pilot author.Ben Guest:Somebody that the author in the book is comparable to yours, and then you can see like Mark is saying, on Amazon ads, you can say, Stephen King, when people search for Stephen King Misery, my book comes up first. Now something like that, a huge book, a huge author, you're going to bid really high. But then I identify more niche authors in niche books because again, to your point, someone going on the Amazon bookstore is going to leave with a book, it's going to be someone else's book or it's going to be your book.Mark Paul:Exactly. And you wouldn't want to bid on Stephen King because it'd be too expensive. And you don't want bid on things that aren't related to your book because people aren't going to buy your book. So you have to make sure that if you wrote a book on basketball coaching, I'd be bidding on Phil Jackson and Showtime and Coach K and all that stuff. That's what I'd be bidding on, not Stephen.Ben Guest:100% and so jet us to break this down for the listener. So I wrote a book about the power of meditation and the impact that it had on coaching basketball. Obviously Phil Jackson is a number one for that. And so when I did my Amazon categories, which Mark mentioned, not category, sorry, keywords, when I did my Amazon keywords for my book, one of the keywords I put in was Phil Jackson and basketball.Ben Guest:And then Phil Jackson has several books and I included the titles of all his books. So that means when it's a keyword, that means when someone searches for that keyword, your book is going to show up in that search. Now that's totally free. Then separate the Amazon ads that you bid on, I would bid on Phil Jackson, I would bid on More Than A Game, which is the title of one of his books, Sacred Hoops, another title, things like that.Ben Guest:So there's keywords, which are free, there are categories which we've talked about. So again, my book would fall under basketball, coaching, sports, things like that, memoir, travel writing. Those are free when you register your book and upload your manuscript to Amazon, and then you pay for the Amazon ads, but it's the same principle. The same principle applies across all these things.Mark Paul:So I would say that was the number one thing that I did was spend money. And then what's great is that if you start doing well, then as you have more revenue and more sale, you can spend more money. And as you spend more money, you climb up these charts. And so I'm sorry, I just, it's a vicious capitalistic system, but if you can either accept it or fail, it's your two choices.Ben Guest:Yes. And so we've talked about the back-back end, right after you've published your book, after you've done all of that work, but you mentioned at the top, something you should think about even before you begin writing, even before you begin outlining, which is genre choice. And again, Publisher Rocket is very helpful in that. Mark, can you talk about genre choice? And if you were advising someone who wants to write a book, what they should think about when it comes to genre choice?Mark Paul:Well, you'll quickly realize that there's, I don't know me, maybe 15 genres that are big sellers and that's a good thing and a bad thing. The good thing is that if you can get into those genres, you could sell a hell of a lot of books. The bad thing is that the bigger the genre is, the better selling it is, now you've got to compete with all of the romance novels and all the things that are selling, but you need to be aware of it up front and realize that if you're writing a book that's in a genre that people don't sell books in, nobody is searching for your book and you could have a magnificent book.Mark Paul:And I still would tell you to write it if it's a story that you want to tell in your heart, it's important to you and you write a great book, that's a goal unto itself, and there's nothing wrong with that at all, but then don't be disappointed when it doesn't sell, because nobody in the history of mankind has ever sold a lot of books in that genre.Mark Paul:But the good news is that these genres are diced up in a lot of different areas. I mentioned true crime. I learned right away, I could not ... Even now, actually one thing nobody really talks about is paperback versus ebook sales. And that's an interesting thing as I said a moment ago that I sold twice as many paperbacks, I sold two paperbacks for every ebook that I sold, which surprised me, but that's kind of a standard thing in the industry.Mark Paul:But I also learned that I cannot compete, I could not compete as a self published author in hard copy crime segments because I was just dealing with all of the true crime books in paperback that are sold at the airports, that are sold at Barnes And Noble, that are sold by the big publishers.Mark Paul:I didn't have that behind me. And there's an area that I couldn't compete in, but I could sure as hell compete in the ebook categories of that. So even now I have bookmarked on my computer and my book has been out now for almost two and a half years, I've bookmarked horse racing, Kindle horse racing books, best sellers.Mark Paul:And I'll click on a couple times a week and see how my book's doing. I don't even bother to click on any true crime category for hard copy or for paperback, because I know that I'm not going to do well in that area. Because I don't have the infrastructure, the physical distribution channel that the big publishers have. You're not going to compete there, doesn't mean you're not going to sell paperback, I'm not telling you. I would absolutely tell you to do it, ebook and definitely a paperback.Mark Paul:And you can do a hard cover if you want to or not. It's not that important, but I definitely would tell you to do a paperback because you'll sell more paperbacks than you do eBooks, but just basically market your ebook because that's the only area that you can really be competitive. And then realize too, when you check your sales, you can check your sales specifically, oh, how am I doing in best selling basketball books in eBooks and how am I doing in best selling basketball print books?Mark Paul:And I guarantee you, then you're probably getting your ass kicked in paperback basketball books because you're not in the airports, you don't have that distribution, but you actually can compete in the ebook category.Ben Guest:Mistake I made was, so Amazon now offers paperback, hard cover and I published in all three at the same time, but the sales report is broken up into ebook and print, meaning combination, paperback and hard cover. So especially the first couple of weeks say coaching basketball, I was number one in ebook and then I was number five in paperback and number 12 in hard cover.Ben Guest:So my hard cover and paperback sales cannibalized each other. So one way I encourage authors to think about publishing, one of the few things that the traditional model has correct, I think is you publish your hard cover first, hard cover and ebook together, then paperback later because on Amazon, your paperback and hard cover sales are going to cannibalize each other. Mark, last thing for you-Mark Paul:I wouldn't agree. I always-Ben Guest:No, go ahead.Mark Paul:When you have people with differing opinions, I wouldn't do that because if I'm taking the time out of the gate to sell books, you are always going to sell more books early than you are late. My wife has to put up with me all the time now. I will come in and I will say to her, "How are you doing?" And she'll say, "How are you doing?" And I go, "Oh, I'm really depressed. My book isn't selling well anymore."Mark Paul:And it's like, what do I expect? I expect two and a half years later, I'm going to sell just like I did in day one. You think, well maybe you should, you have a best selling, you have a lot of great reader comments, I have over 1700 reviews, why wouldn't I sell more books now? And I think the reason is, is that people that are going to buy basketball books, you've saturated after a few months. People that are going to read books about the cartel like my book, horse racing like my book, sports like my book, after a while you run through your core audience.Mark Paul:But if you're going to launch early because for every paperback, for every ebook you're going to sell, you're going to sell more paperback. So I'm not sure. I would probably do them both at the same time. Points well taken.Ben Guest:No, I always love disagreement because then there's learning there. So my take on this is, so right now Amazon's always changing a little bit, with eBooks, you take home 70% of the sales and with paperback and hardcover, you take home 60%. So for example, my paperback is priced at 7.99. My hard cover at, I think 14.99. So obviously you make more money on the hard cover.Ben Guest:So my thinking, but Mark, tell me if you disagree or you have a different approach or you would advise someone differently is, next time publish ebook and hard cover because I'm going to generate more profit from the hard cover and more sales on launch week and launch month, publication week and publication month. Therefore, if people don't have the option for paperback, whether they're going to take home 70% of ebook sales or 60% of the more expensive hard cover.Mark Paul:It would depend on how expensive your hard cover because my ebook was 7.99, my paperback was 14.99 and my hard cover was 24.99, you're just not going to sell a lot of stuff at 24.99. So I'm not sure I would agree with that.Ben Guest:That makes perfect sense. You'd have to weigh sort of how many sales are you losing by not having to paperback because like you, the vast majority of my sales have been paperback. Go ahead.Mark Paul:Stay at the top with that algorithm, you have to fight and kick and you've at least got to get into that bloodstream somehow, at least. Again, in your little genre and your little niche, you have to be at the top of that or you just, you're not going to get the rankings you want.Ben Guest:And we've talked about this and you mentioned this on the first episode we did, one of the best ways to stay on top of the algorithm, and this isn't something you or I have done, is to have a series. If you're dropping a new book every three months or six months of, the virtuous cycle of that, virtuous circle of that is your third book is going to generate sales for your second and first, your fourth book, so on and so forth.Mark Paul:I couldn't agree. If you said to me, what did you learn in your five year saga of writing a book and publishing it and marketing it, and you said, Mark, you have to feed your family by being an author, what would you do? First of all, I would be scared to death because do not do this for money, by God do not do this for money.Mark Paul:It's difficult. I sold 40000 books and I'm telling you don't do it for money, but I've definitely, I would do a fictional series. And that gives you a lot of things you can do. And you can give away the first book in your series and get people to like your characters or you can sell it in 99 cents and you could do a lot of promotions. And I also, this is probably completely wrong, but first of all, I'm no expert, I've written one book in my entire life, one nonfiction book.Ben Guest:You're no expert, you've only sold more books than 99.999% of authors.Mark Paul:I've only done one. And I can tell you that, I think that writing a non-fiction book is so much harder than writing a fictional book because first of all, you're going to wind up spending six months or two years just doing the research to be accurate in your book, even if it's about your own life.Mark Paul:So that's going to take a lot of time and then you can't just make stuff up. You can't just get creative and start banging out 10 pages a day freelancing. It's got to follow very narrow script and times. But in writing fiction, if you're just creating, then I think you could bang out a lot more pages and you could do a lot books. And I definitely think the only way to make money, only way to make money as an author would be to have a series of books that you're always promoting. No question.Ben Guest:100% and then that back list just generates steady income. Last question, back to genre choice, and again, Publisher Rocket is a great tool to help select which genres, which categories to be in. So let's say someone's writing travel memoir about Namibia, very small interest built in audience for that. Would you recommend trying to identify a more popular genre that you could in a truthful way, in an accurate way link your book to, or would you say just don't write it?Mark Paul:If you told me, oh, I would tell you, well, you have to ask yourself why you're writing it. Are you writing it to sell books? Are you writing it to get it shared or you're writing it for, do you want to share it with your children and your two neighbor? I would market that book. I would never talk about Namibia. I would talk about Africa, but more importantly, I would talk about overseas travel in that I would try to somehow tie in Anthony Bourdain or some famous guy who has a well known genre. And I'd say, I want anybody who's thinking of buying an Anthony Bourdain travel book to look at my book.Mark Paul:I would say and I would go, how does he do it? Where do they advertise? What are their keywords? What's the imagery that they want? That's what I'd want to capture. If you get too narrow, you have no chance to sell. But travel, that's a really good comparison, Ben. And if you had a travel book about a small place, don't make it about the small place, make it about the grand experience of travel to far away, dangerous, unique places.Ben Guest:And for the audience, Mark has a fantastic website with an unbelievably kick ass book trailer for his book, which in the first episode we did, he strongly recommended doing a book trailer. I took that advice. So I can't encourage you strongly enough to go to Mark's website, which is markpaulauthor.com.Ben Guest:And he also has a couple blog entries that he's put together, talking more in depth about all these topics.Mark Paul:And all our podcasts, my podcasts are there, including all the ones that are done with you and you do a great job, Ben. And by the way, what a great book, I really enjoyed your book a lot.Ben Guest:Thank you very much. Oh, and so you mentioned your book at the top. For the audience out there, you place this incredible bet with what ended up being a cartel in Tijuana. Did you collect them?Mark Paul:Well, everybody thinks that my book, because it's about a filly trying to, a true story, it's a true story about a filly trying to win the Kentucky Derby, they think that in ... I will tell you part of the ending is that she actually is successful and she actually wins the Kentucky Derby, but that's not when the book ends. In many ways, that's when the book starts because now these guys are faced with, can they get into Tijuana and can they collect their prize without getting killed? And no, I'm not going to tell you that, you have to read a book.Ben Guest:I love it. And that was the advice off air Mark gave to me about, don't tell people the ending, right?Mark Paul:They've got to buy the book, so don't give away my ending.Ben Guest:You worked hard on it. I worked hard on mine so people can buy it. And Mark's book, we were talking off air and came up with this sort of description of it. It's sort of a combination, heist story, right? So now you've got all this money in Tijuana, how do you get it out? And it's a buddy ...Mark Paul:It's a buddy cop movie combined with Ocean's 11. We've thrown a little bit of the Me Too movement in with the girls kicking ass on the boys.Ben Guest:And as listeners may know, I'm now out in Los Angeles and Mark lives in Beverly Hills. So Mark, I will see you Thursday for dinner. Thank you so much for coming on.Mark Paul:Great. Great talking.Ben Guest:Thank you. So, that was my interview with author Mark Paul. Now here are clips from my first interview with Mark that I did last year. Here, we talk about the importance of an author website, making a trailer for your book, like a movie trailer, but it's a book trailer. And we do a deep dive into using Amazon ad words.Mark Paul:It doesn't matter how well edited it is or how great the cover is, if it's a boring topic that people don't care about, you're in trouble. One of the things I've been fortunate with my book on is that my book was actually number one in 10 Amazon categories. And one thing I learned about categories of books that's hugely important, in other words, I'm number one in horse racing, almost always [inaudible 00:30:48], number one in sports gambling, number one in gambling, those are great and I'm very proudly be number one in there.Mark Paul:But typically, I just checked the day, I always check this, [inaudible 00:30:58], I just checked today after two years, I just checked today, I'm number two or number three in biographies of true crime, white collar crime and organized. And the funny thing is that, if I was number 10 in organized crime, I would sell five times more books than I would be number one in horse racing, number one in sports gambling and number one in gambling because not a lot of gamblers and horse racing people buy books, but people are searching for true crime books all day long.Mark Paul:So one of the things that we'll talk about with ad words and the like is, what really helped my book, why did I sell so many books? I sold 10000 books in the first 90 days and right now, I've sold about 35000, the reason which is not like James Patterson or something, a big author, but for self-published authors they're good, is that I'm like a country music song who crosses over onto the pop charts. And you could sell a lot more songs on the pop charts than just the country charts along.Mark Paul:So that's a really big thing is if you write a book, try to figure out how not to market it to just one genre, try to market it in many genres, but specifically, gosh, darn it, figure out how to sell it in categories that people are looking for, because you could have the greatest book in the world but if it's about some obscure topic, it doesn't matter. Nobody's going to find you because nobody's looking for you.Ben Guest:I think that's so key. And maybe we can talk about keyword selection, Amazon keyword selection in a second. And one of the benefits of all of what you just described happening is that of course, as you know the Amazon algorithm kicks in and starts recommending the book to like buyers. You said young authors, when you're talking to them and you give advice, what are some of the pieces of advice you find yourself telling multiple people?Mark Paul:Definitely hirer a professional, having a great cover is super important. Having a great title is important. I had a title that I liked much more than the title that I used. I like in horse racing, the Kentucky Derby's referred to as the greatest two minutes. And initially my book was titled the greatest two minutes. I love that title, but it doesn't do anything.Mark Paul:Now, my title's almost confrontational in face. The Greatest Gambling Story Ever Told, all the gamblers go, no, it's not. I know a better story. My cousin Jimmy, well, now they know about it and they're talking about it, right? So, title's important, cover's important. And then really I would say looking at lots of different categories and you mentioned Amazon, which is the dominant place. I probably sold 92% of all my books solely on Amazon. Even though I published wide, I'm on Barnes And Noble and I'm on Apple Books.Mark Paul:The thing is on Amazon., you can spend money and you can market and you could affect your sale. I don't know how to affect and change my sale on Amazon or Barnes And Noble, I'm kind of at their mercy. And Amazon, you can spend money and get results. So one thing I learned at Amazon early is that when we self-publish your book, they tell you can be in three categories.Mark Paul:So you could be in history. You could be in American history and history of civil war. But what they don't tell you is that you actually can be in 10 categories. All you have to do is ask. And if you email them, you go to the chat rooms, just so you need to go research really carefully, all those specific categories. And one of the things that I learned right away, I would try with those 10 categories is try to pick two or three categories that you can hopefully dominate or be number one in, and then try to choose other categories that are maybe much more competitive, like true crime.Mark Paul:And true crime or I have to compete with Bill O'Reilly that. I have to compete with these really big, well known authors, but by being next to Bill O'Reilly I sell a lot more books. So I would say pick an easy category. To me, there's a category called track betting, well, there's probably, two books published every 10 years in track betting.Mark Paul:So how can I not be number one in track betting when I go to do my ad words and pay for ad words, I make sure I just outbid everybody because you know what happens, by being number one in this dinky little category I get to have that really cool number one orange banner on Amazon, it says, number one best seller. It is. And maybe you're in a category of gay dinosaurs or something. It's not a lot of competition, but figure it out, and then find some categories or a lot of books that are selling.Mark Paul:I tell you, I don't get any money for [inaudible 00:36:13] I'm associated with. Going to Publishers Rocket is a really great tool to be on. For next to nothing you can go on in, they'll give you all the categories. And when you click on it, they'll give you the categories and the keywords and they'll tell you how many, each of those books that are in the top categories, how many they're selling, how many books they're selling, how many published paperback books and hardcover books they're selling, and really look at those categories. That's huge.Ben Guest:100%. I use that tool all the time because it helps you know your competition.Mark Paul:Exactly. Also, make sure that you also do your book in hardcover, in paperback, not just in ebook. One of the things that I learned earlier is, when I first started advertising on Amazon keywords, they're going to tell you, you're getting about a 70% commission split, so if you sell a book for $10, you're going to keep about seven and Amazon is going to get about three.Mark Paul:That's true, but that's also minus your ad cost. So they tell you really, they call it ACOS, average cost of sale, how much you're paying for your ads versus how many sales you're getting, that number and you shouldn't be spending more than 70% of your ACOS, your average cost of sale, where you're advertising, you're selling books [inaudible 00:37:40] money.Mark Paul:Well, first of all, like I told you, I don't mind in the little categories, I don't mind this money because by God, we work so hard, at least come out with a couple of these cute little Amazon batters, you can cut and paste, do a paint version, and save that image and you'll have it for all the time and put it up in your wall and you can say I was an Amazon.Mark Paul:So definitely, don't be afraid to dominate in the little categories. But one thing that I learned is I would say, sometimes I would go oh, my ACOS with 83 cents. I would go, oh, that's shitty. I'm getting my ass kicked here. I'm spending more money than I'm receiving in my commissions. But then about four months later, I got my first commission for my paperback sale.Mark Paul:And then it dawned at me because one thing that was really shocking to me in this world of wifi and internet and online and Kindle readers and everything, I still sell about two thirds of my book are prints. People go ahead and buy my book for $15 instead of $8, because the paperback's $15 and the ebook is $8, but I still sold two times as many paperbacks.Mark Paul:So what I'm saying is that if I wound up spending 83 cents to get a 70 cents sale, I wasn't doing any ... I was also getting my paperback sales out of that number. I started realizing that maybe I could actually be spending a hundred cents. I could be losing by my ebooks, as long as I'm selling a ton of print books, I'm making money. So, that's okay. I also did an audio book.Ben Guest:Talk to us about that.Mark Paul:I really enjoyed doing my audio book. First of all, I would not recommend being your own narrator unless you're exceptional. I'm pretty comfortable with public speaking. I never showed up, I'm always talking, but it doesn't mean I'm a good narrator. The narrator that I had [inaudible 00:39:47] is really fantastic. So I would do that. It's really enjoyable. I don't know, I've made money at it, but I probably three, four, 5% of my books sales have been audio books, but it was really enjoyable.Mark Paul:I'll tell you what, one thing that I would really encourage everybody to do, when I die and go to my maker and I go, what are your five proudest moments? I'll tell them that marrying my great wife and having my two sons but in the top five will be the book trailer that I did. I did my own book trailer. It's on my website, makrpaulauthor.com. That book trailer is 58 seconds long and it's had 38, excuse me, over 310000 downloads, if you could imagine.Mark Paul:300000 downloads. And that was a really good way for me to sell my book. And I really enjoyed doing that. What I did is I don't have any video on it. I used all still photos, photos that I purchased combined with some stock video footage, a little bit of stock video footage that I was able to purchase from Shutter Stock for one of those places.Mark Paul:And then I did do my own narration and I went to a sound studio and I paid, it wasn't that expensive, I think I paid about $180 for the hour in the sound. And they recorded that and spliced it together for me. But I really think having a book trailer in today's visual world, particularly for young people is really valuable. I was out at a cocktail party getting, I ran into a big movie person, right?Mark Paul:I was telling them about my book. And they were fading in interest and I said, "Hey, do you have 57 seconds?" And I just took out my cell phone and I put on my download by ... I showed them my book trailer and within a minute they were like, oh, you've got to see this, bringing other people over. And I emailed them my ebook and they're reading it right now, people that are not interested, visually they can see that link, I will definitely do a book trailer.Ben Guest:Ah, that's such great advice. I mean, I'm just making a list here, Mark, of the gems that you're dropping. So just keeping track, book trailer-Mark Paul:Author website, you've got to have a good author website. It has to be there, it has to be something of interest.Ben Guest:Talk to me about that please.Mark Paul:Oh, I just, again, I hired a company that does ... I used Author Bites. I did promotion with them. I was very happy with them. I like going to one of these companies that's already done 800 off their websites. So, they know what they're doing and then you can go on and steal all the best ... There's no reason to reinvent the wheel. Just go look at the five author websites that you think fit your book the best and go copy what they're doing. I probably spent, I don't know, $1000 on my website. It wasn't importantly expensive, maybe a little bit more.Ben Guest:Imagery is really important, having some good pictures and visuals that you can market with are important.Mark Paul:So, my book has a lot of different genres in them. I think that's one of the reasons it was successful. Yes, it's about sports. Yes, it's about a race horse, and a female race horse. And that helped me because women buy two thirds of all books and women don't buy books typically about sports gambling but they do buy books about horses. So I found places, there's horse lover websites, and I would publish my book and promote it and pay to be on the horse lover's websites. So, everybody else has got a romance novel about a woman being swept off her feet by a handsome young rodeo star.Mark Paul:And there's my book next to it, but it's there, I sell books there. And then I sell books in gambling. But I sell more books in true crime because the gamblers had to try to [inaudible 00:43:50] the cartel. So again, every book was different, but if you can get knowledge and spread it out and try to be a crossover hit, you'd have a lot better chance of selling than just being, just one book in one narrow genre.Ben Guest:Of all the different things you've done to market your book, what's had the greatest ROI?Mark Paul:Amazon as words, that's by far, that was the game changer for me. Authors are very analytic and we're the kind of people that when we buy a car we'll actually read the owner's manual before we drive the car. When I was already to launch my book, I probably spent 30 hours every week for the first month looking at Amazon ad words, really studying it, trying to understand it. There's another, you probably know it, there's other service called-Ben Guest:Kindlepreneur.Mark Paul:That's it. Thank you. Kindlepreneur is phenomenal. And one of the things that I realized when I would look at the book descriptions, book descriptions are really important and you have five seconds to grab people, so when you're going to write your book description, and you're going to get your book reviews up there, a couple of really important pieces of advice, one, it's more important who gives you the review then what the review is.Mark Paul:Because I know me, when I'm reading a review, I don't really care whether it's a glowing review that was written by the guy's mother, right? But if I can see the review that is written by some name, maybe written by somebody from the LA Times or, even something that has some credibility with me, that's really important.Mark Paul:So I'm an [inaudible 00:45:40] author. I didn't know anybody. I didn't have any reviews, critical reviews. I didn't have Laura Hillenbrand who wrote Sea Biscuit giving me a review. So I said, what the hell can I do to get names up there? Well, I live in Beverly Hills, there's a lot of movie people here and I got all my movie friends, some of my friends had been involved with maybe they were the cinematographer for a big movie, maybe they were a publisher.Mark Paul:So I could write, cinematographer for Lone Survivor, and then I would put Lone Survivor in bold, but now people go, oh look at this. The guy that was involved in Lone Survivor like this. And then over time I would get, eventually I started getting more reviews. I did get an LA Times and of course that featured among LA Times. So the other thing with Kindlepreneur is that when you go online and you look at book descriptions, or look at books that don't sell and look at with James Patterson or these top selling authors, I noticed something, drop off over here, the bigger selling authors, their copy has a lot of white space, but it also has bold. It has italics, it has quotation marks.Mark Paul:It isn't just a bunch of uniform, two paragraphs of tightly spaced information that nobody's going to take the time to read. And the way that you have to do that is just free in Kindlepreneur, you write what you want it to write, and it has to convert it to this unique code that Amazon uses. And it just, you print what you want and you drop it into this online tool at Kindlepreneur, and then it publishes it the way you want it to be.Mark Paul:It's really important. If you look at my copy in The Greatest Gambling Story Ever Told, it lays out in full, it shows that I have the LA Times as a review and I have people that they might recognize it that wrote reviews because people are scanning, they're probably having a glass of wine and they're on their iPad. They're not reading every detail word, they're making a decision, do I want to spend $7 on this book, and make it really attractive. That's super important.Mark Paul:And your copy needs to grab them. Don't tell them about some esoteric thing. Tell them about why this is exciting and why they're going to want read it. One of the tag lines that I use a lot is, would you bet your life on a 50 to one shot? [inaudible 00:48:27] something that's a book, something that grabs them. And the other thing is you can see, always be marketing. I'd swear to you when I go out, I sell books when I'm in an elevator.Mark Paul:I love my book. I found out how to make it really exciting where people want to buy it and I'm always selling books. I can books at a picnic. And one of the things that I do on my website, I do get people to contact me. I go back to anybody who talks to me, and I have kind of an epilogue that I have in there, but in my epilogue and the only thing that I have highlighted in yellow is please leave a review. And I have the link because they don't know how to leave it, they don't know what to do.Mark Paul:And you just give them a link. And my friends that I wanted to post a review, I send them a link and I email them, please give me a review. Do not publish your book until you have at least 10 reviews.Ben Guest:I've seen that advice over and over again, even to the extent that some people say, if you're writing a fiction series and you think you have something, write the first two or three books before you publish the first one, just so that they're lined up, ready to go. You mentioned Amazon ad words and I've heard advice about that, but I haven't yet started with Amazon ad words. Could you talk to me about that process and what you've learned and KDP, it's called KDP select or whatever it is?Mark Paul:You just go to KDP and you can upload your book. Although I really would encourage you to hire a publisher, a paid publisher who will do all the things that you need to do, put it in the right formats and all published properly. They do all of that for you, although you certainly can do it yourself. If you're on a limited budget, I would not publish my book because I couldn't afford to pay somebody to do these services.Mark Paul:I fortunately could pay somebody to make sure all the wording was done and formatted properly. I elected to publish wide. In retrospect, I don't think I'd bother. I think I'd just go to Amazon. You can't fight them, they're just too big and powerful and you're going to sell majority of your books there anyway. And then they have, how you can do campaigns and they break down the ... I haven't been doing this as avidly as I was two years ago, they have different ...Mark Paul:You can. I did multiple, multiple, multiple, multiple campaigns. And I came up with about 600 ad words that I could market my books and that might seem crazy. But again, that Publisher Rocket really helped me because what I would do is I would look at okay, in the 10 categories that I'm competing, what are the 10 books that are in those categories?Mark Paul:And then I would see, I would put in their books in Publisher Pocket and it would tell me what the most popular keywords are in those categories. So I would go, I sell books in true crime. What are the most popular keywords for true crime? I would put together a list of all of them. And then I would go, all right, I sell books in the horse race. What are the keywords in the horse race? All these different categories.Mark Paul:And then I would do separate campaigns. I would start a campaign just for horse racing. I would start a campaign just for gambling. You know where else I sell books? I sell books in the history of sports and there's some big books in there. There's a book called Boys In The Boat, which is a really good book. But [inaudible 00:52:09] and I would study that book and I would see what the keywords that they used in order to sell books.Mark Paul:So I'd come up with this really broad ... The other thing that they do, that's really good again, Publisher Rocket is they'll print this out for you. And it's $50 a year. [inaudible 00:52:31], they'll tell you all of the books that are the top sellers and those books, and those book's authors become keywords.Mark Paul:So in other words I said, all right, my book, the number one book of all time, maybe in horse racing is Sea Biscuit. So I advertised Sea Biscuit and all my ad words, I advertised Laura Hillenbrand, the author. If somebody's searching for Laura Hillenbrand, they're going to see my book come up. If somebody's searching Boys In The Boat, they're going see my book come up.Mark Paul:And so, I really did a lot of keywords, a lot of advertising. And there's a saying, it's not my quote, [inaudible 00:53:14] but he says, when I was first starting to market and advertise, there's this saying that says, I didn't think, I experimented. And that's kind of what I did. I didn't know what would work. So I just did it all, but I wasn't afraid to spend money either. And I know that I had an advantage there that I could spend money.Mark Paul:And if I lost five grand, that was okay. Turns out I didn't, I made money, but that's because I was willing to spend money. The other things that they do is they have these campaigns that are basically auto fill campaigns, where Amazon will go out and choose the keyword for you. I'm not online right now, I don't know exactly what they're called, but you can't miss them.Mark Paul:And I can tell you that those Amazon auto campaigns that they do, where Amazon chooses the words are far better than anything you could do on your own. So if you said, I'm not techy, I don't want to come up with 600 ad words, I don't want to spend 30 hours a week, fine. Then just go with their auto campaigns, but you need to monitor them every single day. I don't need to monitor them every day now after two years.Mark Paul:But when you first start, I would monitor them twice a day because I would see a campaign that's selling, maybe I'm spending money, I'm spending $200 a day on that campaign. But if I'm bringing in, especially if I was spending $200 day in that campaign, I was bringing in $150 of revenue, I was okay with that in the first month. I didn't care if I lost money, I wanted to see what worked.Mark Paul:I figured out how to fine tune it. And I've done that. So now after a month or two, I can pair it down to what doesn't work and spend more of my money on what does work. As an author, you cannot sit in your room and wait for the world to find you, the world doesn't work that way. You have to put yourself out there and unfortunately you have to spend money, right? I really believe you really do have to spend money in order to let people know that you're there.Ben Guest:I mean, there are eight million ebooks on Amazon Kindle, on the Kindle store.Mark Paul:And when I was at the top, when I was selling the most books, some months, let's say I was selling 5000 books a month, I was probably the 5000th best seller on Amazon means, that means that I never got to be in the top 100 on Amazon, even top 1000 on Amazon. But I was still selling 5000 books [inaudible 00:56:02]. So, it's a big world.Ben Guest:If you extrapolate from eight million books on the Amazon Kindle store, you're in the 1% of sales.Mark Paul:What's great about Amazon ad words, I will say this is that if people are on Amazon Kindle and they're searching for books, they're going to buy a book. If you go and do an ad on YouTube, the chances of the person on YouTube that actually reads books is maybe one in 100, right? But if they're on Amazon Kindle searching for books, they're going to buy a damn book. All you have to do is convince them to buy your book. That's a lot easier to sell.Ben Guest:Let's end with a question. Oh, do you think it's a better use of time and money to do the auto Amazon ad word campaign or to fine tune your own keywords?Mark Paul:If you can only do one, the auto's absolutely. I don't know how they do it. They are better at it. I can say now I do, I spend a lot more time with the auto campaigns than I did before because I learned how good they are. But I also think that I can't give you the analytical backup for this, but I think that the fact that I was out there and I was doing lots of campaigns, I think also helped Auto campaigns.Mark Paul:I think that the computer algorithm saw, this guy is spending money, people are clicking his links, they're buying books and you need to go up into that food chain where they think they have something to sell. Also, I did something now. I just went on to Kindle Unlimited. I resisted it 18 months, but now after 18 months or so of my book being on the charts, I've noticed that my sales, they're still good.Mark Paul:I was selling, when things were really going good, I was selling 5000 books a month. Now I'm selling about 700 and I don't like that. I go, what do I got to do? So I started doing, I noticed a lot of the top selling books are Kindle Unlimited. So I did that and I've only been doing that for four days.Mark Paul:So I don't know what I'm doing there either. There's a certain joy of that. I clicked on it this morning and I saw that I'd already had, I forget-Ben Guest:The page reads?Mark Paul:Yeah, 2000 page reads today. I thought, well, my book is 200 pages long, 10 people have read my book. And as an author, isn't that really what it's about? I mean, if I could have done all of this and lost money, a little bit of money, it still would've been one of the greatest joys of anything I've ever done in my life. It's fine.Mark Paul:And so going on this morning seeing, wow, 10 people, because I could see the page reads have read my book, that was good and it made my day. That's cool. I think that if you do things, not for money, but for passion, you'll probably make money that'll come through.Ben Guest:And now last but not least, here are excerpts from the very first interview I did with Greg Larson way back in August of last year and the best marketing advice that he had. We talk about creating an ecosystem around your book, creating a website, a YouTube page, et cetera.Ben Guest:Greg goes into detail with all of that. We also talk about finding your pilot author and following the same path that your pilot author followed. Tons of great advice in this. Enjoy. Greg, thanks so much for coming on. Let's start with book promotion, and maybe we can start with your website. The website is fantastic. Let me make sure I have the right address to send everybody to. It's clubbiebook.com. So that's C-L-U-B-B-I-E, book.com.Greg Larson:Yes, sir.Ben Guest:Can you talk about putting the site together and your thoughts with book promotion.Greg Larson:Yeah. As far as putting the sites, I'd actually asked a lot of authors about their advice on creating a website. A lot of people say, oh, it's not necessary, hire somebody else to do that. I have just enough experience with say web design or SEO marketing, all that kind of stuff to be dangerous enough. As far as book promotions go and creating the website, my only thought process with creating the website was for people who add a good time reading the book, I want to give them extra content to enjoy for free as much as possible.Greg Larson:So, that's the way it's designed. It's for you read the book and you show up and there's a bunch of behind the scenes pictures and old videos from the years of being a clubhouse attendant in 2012, 2013, and as far as promos in general go, I mean, I take every single opportunity that comes my way. I created my own podcast, I chop up into clip up on my YouTube channel.Greg Larson:My thought was I need to create as much content as I possibly can around this book. And that's the only way people are going to find it. Otherwise, a lot of people just put a book out and they expect the world to just find it and make it great. Sorry, art is not a pure meritocracy. It is meritocracy plus marketing.Ben Guest:100%. One of the best nonfiction books written in the past 30 years or so is Freakonomics. And I was listening to an interview with one of the co-authors, Steven Levit. And he was saying, because of Freakonomics, he gets sent books all the time to blurb and he thought at first there was going to be a lot of mediocre books and not well written books. And he is like, there are so many great books out there and they're just undiscovered because there's so much material in the market.Greg Larson:Oh yeah. I don't know. I mean, there are millions of books self-published on Amazon every single year. And what is it that separates a book that's never discovered, that nobody reads and a book that a bunch of people read that enters the cannon or the zeitgeist? A lot of it is marketing and quality. I don't know. Nobody wants to hear that. When I was in school, I would've preferred not to hear that. My professors would've told me that, that's not true. But here we are.Greg Larson:What's the lowest level media outlet that I can get attention from? And maybe it's a local news station. Boom. I take that local KUT Austin, Austin's NPR station gives me some attention. And then I use that to leverage into a pitch to CBS Sports radio. And I use that to leverage into a pitch to the LA Times.Greg Larson:And then it's just like, boom, boom, boom, climbing up the ladder. And to be perfectly frank, not all of them directly correlate to book sales. I can usually see a jump whenever something new comes out. But what it does create is this perception of being everywhere. You know what I mean? I have to think about it as a branding effort. It was a piece of art that I created my book Clubbie, but once it became published, it went from being an artistic endeavor to a business. And that's how I had to think about it. So now I'm thinking about what's my brand strategy and my brand strategy is make sure every person who enjoys baseball books finds out about my book.Ben Guest:So here's the million dollar question based on what you just said. What does correlate?Greg Larson:What I've found especially in the last year has been doing podcasts has, the most concentrated book sales I've seen have been doing podcasts and oddly enough radio shows, which I never would've expected. It's one of those people expect that to be a dying medium and maybe in some ways it is, but a lot of people still listen to the radio in their car.Greg Larson:So for example, I was on The Fan in Baltimore. My book takes place in Baltimore. After I did that show, it's a 15 minute spot, the next day I saw my sales jump up. I don't know exact numbers. I can just see the Amazon sales rank, but it jumped up tens of thousands of spots on the Amazon sales rank, which shocked me because everybody says radio is dead.Greg Larson:As far as book promotions go, I don't think that's accurate. Podcasts are actually better because once this goes up on your website, it stays there. Radio is one and done unless I capture it somehow, which I try to do as well. That's another one. I try to record as many radio interviews as I possibly can and then put it on my YouTube channel.Ben Guest:This is all great stuff. What is it about radio shows that bump up sales, do you think?Greg Larson:Part of it, there's still this perception that, because there's a higher barrier of entry, there's still this perception that radio is, I don't know, a more classic medium that has more prestige as opposed to podcasts, there's still this perception of anybody can do it, therefore being on a podcast, doesn't hold the same social status. That's going to change and that is changing, but there is something about it.Greg Larson:It's analogous to traditional publishing versus self-publishing. Self-publishing is going to dominate traditional publishing. But those old morays are hard to fight again, TV versus YouTube, it's all the same exact sort of change there. A lot of my readers are still stuck in some of the old morays of the past, as far as media goes.Greg Larson:And I'm going to use that to my advantage and get on the radio. And I don't know, it's not only old people. When I tell people that I was on CBS Sports radio or ESPN radio or something like that, it's still, there's a little ding that says oh, that's official, right?Ben Guest:So how do you get on radio programs?Greg Larson:I send out pitch emails, I try to send them out every single day. Today I sent out two pitch emails, every weekday at the very least. So what I started with is I start with local stations and try to work my way up from there, like I said, but what I'll start with is I try to frame my book as part of a larger discussion. I don't say, I'm an author and you should promote my book. I say, here's, what's going on in minor league baseball right now.Greg Larson:There's a bunch of in income inequality issues in minor league baseball, there's contraction going on. And not only are those issues a microcosm of what's going on at the US at large, but I'm the perfect person to talk about it because I wrote a book about minor league baseball that came out this summer. And I word that in a way that's, I don't know, more nimble than that, but then I include a couple of status markers, like for reference here's my interview that I did on MLB Network, that kind of thing.Greg Larson:And my success rate is, if I get a 12% success rate in a week, that's good for me. So sending out media pitch emails, I expect a huge rate of failure. And I think that's what keeps a lot of authors from doing it.Ben Guest:And I think that's also helpful because we talked earlier about how marketing is an important component of the process. And I also think sometimes, we mention this off air as well, authors, we can be so internal that we don't pay attention to that. And it's such a closed world that being able to share this information is just so helpful.Greg Larson:Oh yeah, where I didn't even know who to pitch in the first place. And most people don't. What I did was, it seemed so obvious after I thought of it, but it was such a revelation to me, I found an author who had published a book similar to me the year before. And I just pitched every single media outlet that had covered his book.Greg Larson:And then not only do I know who's interested in my work, but then I can actually use him as a launching point of saying, hey, I noticed that you covered Brad Balukjian last year. My book is very similar from the same publisher. Here's what it's about. That has been a godsend to me, because a lot of authors don't even know who to reach out to.Ben Guest:Greg, that is so smart. So the pitch email, the structure is something along the lines of, here's some things that are happening in baseball. Here's how my book is connected to that. Here are some other interviews or media hits that I've done. Is that right?Greg Larson:You want me to read you a pitch word for word? Would that be helpful for anybody?Ben Guest:That would be fantastic.Greg Larson:Here's a pitch that I just gave to NPR using my local NPR as a launching point, I say, hi person, I'm Greg Larson. And I recently published a book with university of Nebraska Press that helped bring light to income inequality issues in minor league baseball. Some baseball fans know the facts and figures around these problems. And then I give a couple of facts about minor league baseball, but most people don't know what that world looks like on the inside and how it is a perfect microcosm of economic issues in America.Greg Larson:With the changes taking place this summer and rampant income inequality across the country, I believe this story helps highlight issues that plague the US at large and would be a perfect fit for NPR programming. What do you think? And then I give them my cell phone number and then I send them a link to a media kit where it's just a Google drive that has pictures and has blurb images that I created and a full PDF of the book.Greg Larson:And then I say also for reference, here's my recent interview in Austin's NPR station, KUT, best Greg Larson. That gives me a 10 to 15% success rate. So I think about it in terms of opening with personalization. Why am I contacting you? What have I seen of yours, liked recently, why is this issue important? How does my book fit into the conversation? Let's schedule a time.Ben Guest:So, let's go back to the website for a minute.Greg Larson:Sure.Ben Guest:What were the fundamentals of the website design for you?Greg Larson:So I chose Square Space, which is a software that I'm somewhat familiar with. It's just plug and play. And I was just, as far as design goes, I created a logo with somebody on Fiverr, I think, and that cost me a couple bucks, maybe 15 bucks. And then I used that cheap logo to take it to a more expensive designer, then I paid 300 bucks to have them make a more professional looking one.Greg Larson:And so have I seen a direct ROI on say, that logo design that's all over the website? Probably not, but again, it just creates this whole aesthetic. I can put that logo on my newsletter. I can put that logo on every piece of media that

Peakland UMC
Perfect Imperfections

Peakland UMC

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 4:37


Trusting God At All Times Daily Devotional. We have become horse people at our house and the story of Seabiscuit is one of our favorite stories. In the mid to late 1930's with the country firmly in the grip of the Great Depression, the little thoroughbred horse, all 62 inches of him from shoulder to ground, became a symbol of hope for the country.

Bill and Ryan's Kitchen Sink
Tech savvy? Not! Meatloaf, Saget, Seabuiscuit, Stop motion and Movie Props!

Bill and Ryan's Kitchen Sink

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 21:36


Stop in the name of motion! What? Castle Noel in Medina Ohio, Props and collections and whatever happened to Seabiscuit?

Revisiting the Oscars
Episode 19: 2003

Revisiting the Oscars

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 89:19


We're off to Middle Earth for the third and final time on Revisiting the Oscars as we talk all things Return of the King, one of the most successful Oscars winners of all time in our episode on the 2003 Oscars!It's a globetrotting episode as we're also off to Tokyo for Lost in Translation, the Galapagos Islands for Master and Commander, Boston for Mystic River and California for Seabiscuit - the movies that tried and failed to halt Lord of the Rings record quest! Bingham also enlightens us on his festival going days in his younger years, whilst Mason puts in his audition for voiceover work and we hear more controversial opinions on Disney and Pixar classics.... 2003 Best Picture NomineesLost in TranslationMystic RiverMaster and Commander: Far Side of the WorldSeabiscuitLord of the Rings: Return of the King *This podcast does contain spoilersIf you're enjoying the podcast please give us a 5-star rating, subscribe to the show, and join us on our social media channels!FOLLOW US!Twitter: https://twitter.com/UpLateAtNightAgInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/uplateatnightagain/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/revisitingtheoscars/Website: https://uplateatnightagain.com/Podcast Links: https://revisitingtheoscars.buzzsprout.com/Episode Link: https://uplateatnightagain.com/2022/01/20/revisiting-the-oscars-podcast-episode-19-2003/ If you'd like to watch any of the films in advance or after the show, then I'd recommend www.justwatch.com/uk to find out what streaming options are available to you. 

In Search of Green Marbles
Ep. 8: AQ, the Superior Sibling of IQ and EQ

In Search of Green Marbles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 12:52


Weiss seeks to hire people with the right combination of IQ, EQ, and AQ. The latter is defined as adversity quotient or adaptability quotient. Jordi looks at specific traits in people to measure their AQ, which include flexibility, agility, curiosity, and learning. In addition, grit and resilience reflect the ability to overcome adversity, which is an equally important attribute.The rise of quant strategies that accelerated in 2009 is an example of how Jordi and the firm had to be adaptable. The approach Weiss sought to take was a human+machine approach, reflecting the firm's view that combining the two forces would lead to better outcomes. Today, the rise of cryptocurrencies is another example where adaptation to a changing environment will be needed in the years to come.Jordi ties the September 11th attacks together with the famous Emerson quote: “Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood. He believes that AQ allows one to view 9/11 as part of a journey. This is hard with such a tragic event and, in Jordi's case, when you lose your best friend, but the wisdom of knowing you can overcome adversity is paramount.Can AQ be learned or nurtured? Jordi emphatically believes the answer is yes to both and he has sought to accelerate this process with the younger people at Weiss by getting them to open up about their experiences. His key question: What did you learn from this experience? This helps Jordi recognize an individual's personal growth and wisdom.The final topic of conversation is about Jordi's grandmother, Tex, who served as Jordi's inspiration around AQ and was the topic of a recent whitepaper that Jordi wrote. How do Seabiscuit, Cinderella Man, and Babe Ruth connect with AQ? Listen in to hear the answer.Resources:The history of AQSteve Hargadon on Ralph Waldo EmersonCinderella Man PreviewDisclosures: This podcast and associated content (collectively, the “Post”) are provided to you by Weiss Multi-Strategy Advisers LLC (“Weiss”). The views expressed in the Post are for informational purposes only and are subject to change without notice. Information in this Post has been developed internally and is based on market conditions as of the date of the recording from sources believed to be reliable. Nothing in this Post should be construed as investment, legal, tax, or other advice and should not be viewed as a recommendation to purchase or sell any security or adopt any investment strategy. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. You should consult your own advisers regarding business, legal, tax, or other matters concerning investments. Weiss has no control over information at any external site hyperlinked in this Post. Weiss makes no representation concerning and is not responsible for the quality, content, nature, or reliability of any hyperlinked site and has included hyperlinks only as a convenience. The inclusion of any external hyperlink does not imply any endorsement, investigation, verification, or ongoing monitoring by Weiss of any information in any hyperlinked site. In no event shall Weiss be responsible for your use of a hyperlinked site. This is not intended to be an offer or solicitation of any security. Please visit www.gweiss.com to review related disclosures and learn more about Weiss.

The Freestyle Boys with Rob Nunnery and Casey Patterson

The Freestyle Boys record a pre-match early morning episode before going to battle at MLP on Sunday. Referenced Links: https://www.patreon.com/freestyleboys https://blqk.coffee/ https://www.elog.com/ https://anchor.fm/the-freestyle-boys/message https://www.majorleaguepickleball.net/ Time Stamps: [0:00] Rob and Ben talk about how Ben always gets “The Shiver” from SeaBiscuit's first win. [1:37] Ben brings up Rob's 6-2 singles results in their most recent Major League Pickleball Match and they break down the match and Tournament. [7:15]Ben and Rob introduce BLQK Coffee and talk about their social giveback as well as a few other MLP Team owners similar missions. Steve Khun who created MLP and how well the tournament is going as a result of Steve's perfectionist demeanor. [11:18] Ben fanboys over Elon Musk and the remote possibility that he might attend the MLP tournament at Dreamland in Dripping Springs Texas. [12:55] The media is insane at MLP including a new Pickleball magazine and Apple+. The guys discuss who the main characters of pickleball are including the Sher Bear himself, Ryan Sherry. [14:34] Mike Bettencourt get his props for being the “Most dedicated listener” and is the first beta tester for Ben's new website and Crypto Currency Management Service Elog.com [17:53] Ritchie Tuazon, co-owner of BLQK Coffee and Owner of Major League Pickleball team Team BLQK joins the conversation to talk about his favorite moments of the tournament so far. [24:28] The guys discuss their favorite places in Austin Texas for food and entertainment. Richie asks about Ben's 12 Handicap in his golf game and Rob discusses his previous golf experience prior to pickleball as well as some of the other Pro Pickleball players who play golf. [29:15] Rob talks about the creation of MLP and DUPR's Fantasy pickleball event and how it's amazing that it came together in a very short period of time for people to be able to use before the first MLP event. [31:15] Ben brings up The Freestyle Fam Patreon and some of the amazing benefits that The Freestyle Fam patrons get including bonus episodes, exclusive merch and the ability to direct the show. They also talk about ways people can provide value to companies and other entities and become an important part of that entity organically. [34:44] Ben was Doc Holiday for Halloween and tells us how he got really into the costume but stayed responsible for the weekend. [35:55] Questions of the Week: Ritchie asks about the upcoming matchup for Team BLQK today against the Pickle Ranchers. He asks Ben what Pro he would go on a backpacking trip with. Ben's answer was easy. Ritchie follows up with what Pro he would pick to have to build a house with. Lee Whitwell gets the admiration of the room for her recent performance at MLP. Episode Summary: The Freestyle Boys record a pre-match early morning episode before going to battle at MLP for Team BLQK on Sunday. They invite BLQK Coffee co-owner Ritchie Tuazon to sit in and fire off some questions about the event as well as some very unexpected theoretical questions for Ben Johns. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-freestyle-boys/message

Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast
EPISODE 21: 10 TRIUMPHANT SPORTS MILESTONES SET IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:40 Transcription Available


In this week's episode of Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast, host Jon Steinberg shares his list of top ten triumphant sports milestones set in Southern California. His list includes Andre Agassi defeating Pete Sampras in Indian Wells, Tiger Woods winning the US Open at Torrey Pines, the Broncos defeating the Packers at Qualcomm, Kirk Gibson walk off winning home run at Dodgers Stadium, Seabiscuit's last race win at Santa Anita Racetrack, the US Women's Soccer World Cup win at the Rose Bowl, UCLA's NCAA win at the San Diego Sports Arena, Mohammad Ali defeating Ken Norton at The Forum, The Los Angeles Lakers defeating the Indiana Pacers at the Staples Center and the 1932/1984 Olympics at the Coliseum. Instagram: @livinginthesprawlpodcastEmail: livinginthesprawlpodcast@gmail.comCheck out our favorite CBD gummy company...it helps us get better sleep and stay chill. https://www.justcbdstore.com?aff=645Check out Goldbelly for all your favorite US foods to satisfy those cravings or bring back some nostalgia. Our favorites include Junior's Chessecakes from New York, Lou Malnati's deep dish pizza from Chicago and a philly cheesesteak from Pat's. Use the link https://goldbelly.pxf.io/c/2974077/1032087/13451 to check out all of the options and let them know we sent you.Use code "SPRAWL" for (2) free meals and free delivery on your first Everytable subscription.Support the podcast and future exploration adventures. We are working on unique perks and will give you a shout out on the podcast to thank you for your contribution!Living in the Sprawl: Southern California's Most Adventurous Podcast is on Podfanhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/sprawl  Looking to start a podcast? Buzzsprout is the best and easiest way to launch, promote and track your podcast...trust me, I did a lot of research beforehand. Let Buzzsprout know we sent you, support the show and get a $20 Amazon gift card when you sign up.  https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1735110Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/livinginthesprawlpodcast)

Coffee Break With Mary B's 5th Son
Marshall Fields Day Memories - Part 1

Coffee Break With Mary B's 5th Son

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 27:41


Welcome to our Marshall Fields Day Memories episodes.  We are kicking off this September's month long journey extravaganza with part 1! We are so excited for everyone to take part in this incredible walk, jog, and sprint down memory lane with Jeff, Jeff's brother, Jeff's brother's wife, and of course Jeff's WIFE, PAM!!!! As always we have our new and improved coffee review and movie review. This week it is Seabiscuit. Please enjoy your Sunday morning coffee with Jeff and his guests this special month.

Inspirational Motivational Leadership
Seabiscuit Movie Clip To Inspire You To Bounce Back in Life

Inspirational Motivational Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 3:27


Your key to success and failure find out now !

Advertise This!
Seabiscuit 2: Scott the Dog

Advertise This!

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 43:37


The guys' latest client is bringing laughs to the old bank building in town as Jimmy and Mark meet in a nostalgic setting. Will they share a plate of spaghetti? Is there someone else here???

Field Of Screens - The Sports Movie Podcast
Seabiscuit (2003) - Forrest Gump, but there's a horse (FoS #17)

Field Of Screens - The Sports Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 107:02


This week James and dKiff weren't too jazzed to be watching Seabiscuit, a tale of a little horse that could. But dKiff forced them into it so he could loosely tie it to the Grand National then didn't finish the edit in time so here we are. Still a good episode though! Enjoy! GET IN TOUCH Email: fieldofscreenspod@gmail.com Twitter: @fos_pod

A Shot of Business Central and A Beer
Interview with Mike Silver from Microsoft | A Shot of Business Central and A Beer | Episode 24

A Shot of Business Central and A Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 64:40


Welcome back to another episode of A Shot of Business Central and A Beer, presented by Solution Systems, a Gold Microsoft Partner. The weather is warming, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and Business Central is galloping toward cloud dominance. New customers and functionality are being added so quickly that only Seabiscuit could keep pace, but can Business Central get better? What is driving the recent global demand for this product? We have questions that need answers and we're sure you do too, that's why we've brought in Mike Silver from Microsoft to the podcast to talk all things Business Central. Also in this episode, we've curated the latest Business Central news for you, we'll give you our thoughts and experiences on the two newest dimension features, and we tested and reviewed the Use Dynamics app. Subscribe to the Podcast on all Platforms ➢ https://www.solsyst.com/podast-locations Podcast Show Notes ➢ https://www.solsyst.com/post/a-shot-of-business-central-and-a-beer-episode-24 Microsoft Software Information: ➢ Dynamics 365 Business Central: https://www.solsyst.com/dynamics-365-business-centralMake ordering, selling, invoicing, reporting, and manufacturing easier and faster. ➢ Dynamics 365 for Sales: https://www.solsyst.com/dynamics-365-for-salesDifferentiate your business, build loyalty, and maintain your reputation with Microsoft CRM. ➢ Microsoft 365: https://www.solsyst.com/microsoft-365-businessFamiliar, secure, top-of-the-line productivity and collaboration tools that are always the latest version. ➢ Power BI: https://www.solsyst.com/microsoft-power-biTransform your company's data into rich visuals and spot trends as they happen and push your business further. Follow Solution Systems ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/solution_systems/ ➢ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Solution-Systems-Inc-354733749699/ ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Solution_System ➢ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/solution-systems-inc- ➢ Blog: https://www.solsyst.com/blog Podcast Hosts ➢ Ken Sebahar | LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-sebahar-26237515/ ➢ Michael Intravartolo | LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/intravartolo/ Podcast Directed by Ken Sebahar ➢ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-sebahar-26237515/ Podcast Produced by Michael Intravartolo ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/insta_travs/ #Podcast #MSDyn365bc #ERP #Microsoft #Software 0:00 Podcast Opening 1:20 Intro and “Special” Beer Review 9:30 Mike Silver Interview 33:40 New Business Central News 41:36 New Dimensions Features: Dimension Value Limitations & Dimension Corrections 56:42 Use Dynamics App Review

The Quidditas Factor
Hollywood Legend Gianni Russo Talks About Love, Family and Life Lessons.

The Quidditas Factor

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 22, 2020 59:37


Gianni Vito Russo is an actor, producer, entrepreneur and singer. He is best known for his role as Carlo Rizzi  in the 1972 film The Godfather. Gianni was born in Manhattan, raised in Little Italy. Russo went on to act in more than 46 movies, including Goodnight, My Love, Lepke, Laserblast, Chances Are, The Freshman, Side Out, Another You, The Freshman, Super Mario Bros., Any Given Sunday, Seabiscuit and Send No Flowers.  Russo is also a singer. In 2004, he released a CD called Reflections that pays homage to Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. Russo owns a wine brand, Gianni Russo Wines, which debuted in 2009. In his life he has met and interacted with many prominent figures such as Marilyn Monroe,  Frank Sinatra, Pablo Escobar and Pope John Paul II.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/quidditasfactor)

On the Guest List...
"Kill Your Internet" Podcast Episode 38 "Toby MaGuire was Great as Seabiscuit" ft. The Brevet

On the Guest List...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 71:33


The Gear Car is back in full effect, talking the VMA's, the death nell of the old model of the music industry, what they've been listening to, and top movie characters of all time. Colin chats with John and David from The Brevet about touring, new music, cutting singles during quarantine, and why David is on a farm in Alaska.