Podcast appearances and mentions of John Steel

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  • 39PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about John Steel

Latest podcast episodes about John Steel

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Vintage Rock Pod 63: John Steel - The Animals

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:09


John Steel is a founding member of the brilliant 60s group, THE ANIMALS! The group were one of the leading bands of the British Invasion and had 10 top 20 hits both in the UK and US but will be forever remembered for one of the classic songs of all time, their rendition of House of the Rising Sun. Bruce Springsteen publicly declared The Animals as his favourite British group of the 60s, while Bob Dylan changed his sound after hearing them. They were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1994 in a class alongside Elton John, Sir Rod Stewart, Bob Marley, John Lennon and the Grateful Dead! In this interview John tells great stories from their time in the US, the crazy reception they received from the airport, falling out with Nina Simone, partying with Hermans Hermits and so much more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews
63. John Steel - The Animals

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:09


John Steel is a founding member of the brilliant 60s group, THE ANIMALS! The group were one of the leading bands of the British Invasion and had 10 top 20 hits both in the UK and US but will be forever remembered for one of the classic songs of all time, their rendition of House of the Rising Sun. Bruce Springsteen publicly declared The Animals as his favourite British group of the 60s, while Bob Dylan changed his sound after hearing them. They were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1994 in a class alongside Elton John, Sir Rod Stewart, Bob Marley, John Lennon and the Grateful Dead! In this interview John tells great stories from their time in the US, the crazy reception they received from the airport, falling out with Nina Simone, partying with Hermans Hermits and so much more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Moving America
Episode 45: How to Handle a Railroad Injury (an interview with John Steel, ESQ.)

Moving America

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 61:07


We are honored to be joined by John Steel, ESQ. for Episode 45. John has over 30 years experience handling railroad injury cases. He was kind enough to  answer our questions regarding the handling of a railroad injury. He also explains about the program his firm has to help railroaders handle disability claims.Steel and Moss, LLP https://steel-moss.com/This episode photo was provided by Jennifer Al-Beik.Our new intro and outro were provided to us by a long time friend, Dave Miller.  Be sure to check out his podcast.  https://www.daveanddoc.com/Connect with Moving America:InstagramFacebookWebsiteMerchandise:Moving America StoreSubscribe:Get the latest video podcast on YouTube

Research and Innovation
A balancing act between sustainability and profitability

Research and Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 17:16


In this episode, Professor Kerrie Unsworth (Leeds University Business School) and John Steel (Cafédirect) discuss the tensions and potential trade-offs between social, environmental, and financial goals. Kerrie asks John about Cafédirect's take on sustainability and social justice.  This podcast episode was recorded remotely in December 2021. If you would like to get in touch regarding this podcast, please contact research.lubs@leeds.ac.uk. A https://business.leeds.ac.uk/downloads/download/251/podcast_episode_40_-_kunsworth_and_jsteel (transcript of this episode) is available. For further information on Professor Unsworth's research, visit her webpage: https://business.leeds.ac.uk/dir-record/research-projects/1724/sustainable-and-productive-helping-manufacturing-smes-to-manage-multiple-goals (Sustainable and productive?! Helping manufacturing SMEs to manage multiple goals). About the speakers: Kerrie Unsworth is a Professor of Organisational Behaviour at Leeds University Business School. Her research focuses on how people juggle goals, tasks and identities and the effect this has on motivation and particular behaviours such as leadership, collaboration and pro-environmental behaviour.   John Steel is CEO of Cafédirect. He is a business leader and social entrepreneur with a passion for making business a force for good. Under John's leadership Cafédirect has returned to growth, become profitable and yet maintained its sustainability commitments to its producers. John is determined that Cafédirect, as one of the UK's pre-eminent Social Enterprises, plays a pivotal role in leading the change agenda. John is a passionate and genuine believer in the need for real change in the way business contributes to society and the wider world.  

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 598 (10-11-21): The Flu and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:02).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-8-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This revised episode from November 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. We start with a public health mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds, and see if you can guess what seasonal, precautionary procedure is taking place.  And here's a hint: thinking feverishlycould influence your answer. SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec “Any problems with any vaccines before?”“No.”“Feeling OK today?  No fever or anything like that?”“No.”“And no allergies to foods or medications that you're aware of?”“No.”  …“So, you know, a little bit of arm soreness; that's probably the most of it.  Redness, irritation.   Might be kind of tired for a day or so, or even a low-grade fever or a headache is possible and normal.  If that were to happen, whatever you take for a headache is fine.  Any questions about anything?”“No.”“All right.” …“All right, leave that bandage on for about 10 minutes or so, and take it off anytime you remember after that.  And here's your copy for your records.  Thanks.”“Thank you.”“Have a good day.”If you guessed, a flu shot, you're right!  You heard an influenza vaccination being given in October 2017 at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.  Flu season arrives every year with colder weather, bringing the potential to cause fever, body aches, and other symptoms, some quite serious or even fatal.  The flu affects millions of people in the United States each year, and health agencies like U.S. Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention and the Virginia Department of Health encourage vaccination for everyone older than six months, with some exceptions. But what does the flu have to do with water?  Consider these three connections. First, drinking plenty of fluids is a commonly prescribed treatment for flu sufferers in order to help prevent dehydration resulting from increased body temperature and other responses to the viral infection.  Infants, children, and the elderly are particularly at risk for dehydration. Second, the flu virus is transmitted between humans by respiratory droplets, and researchers have found that transmission is affected by air temperature and humidity. Specifically, transmission occurs more easily in cold, dry air, such as is typically found during fall and winter in temperate areas like Virginia. Third, waterfowl and shorebirds are among the various kinds of birds that harbor avian flu viruses, and water contaminated with aquatic birds' waste can potentially harbor avian flu for some time.  Understanding the factors related to the occurrence and transmission of avian viruses—including the role of contaminated water—is important in monitoring avian flu and its potential to spread to other birds, mammals, or humans. Flu season is upon us, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine by the end of October.  So if you hear this… VOICE - ~3 sec – “Are you here for a flu shot?” …now you'll have not only a health connection for the flu, but some hydrological ones, too. Thanks to staff of Kroger Pharmacy and Hokie Wellness for lending their voices to this episode. We close with some music for, or rather, against the flu.  Here's about 30 seconds of “Shots,” written by Wilson Stern and performed in a 2014, flu-shot-promoting video by the University of Florida's Student Health Care Center. MUSIC - ~28 sec Lyrics:“Last year less than half the population got their flu shot.  Why you wanna be stuck at home with a fever when you could be making this party hot?”“I heard that shot made you ill.”“Naw, son, that news ain't for real.  It tells your body what the virus looks like, so it knows how to deal”“Why you tellin' me this?  I got my flu shot last year.”“This virus mutates constantly, we got new strains here.”“Shots, shots, shots, shots….” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 393, 11-6-17, which has been archived. The influenza vaccination heard in this episode was performed October 24, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, by staff of Kroger Pharmacies, assisted by staff from Virginia Tech's Hokie Wellness program.  Virginia Water Radio thanks those staff people for their willingness to be recorded. The audio excerpt of “Shots,” copyright by Wilson Stern, was taken from the 2014 University of Florida Student Health Care Center video “Flu Shots,” copyright by the University of Florida; used with permission of Wilson Stern and the University of Florida's Division of Media Properties.  The 2 min./4 sec. video is available online at http://shcc.ufl.edu/services/primary-care/flu/flu-shots-music-video-lyrics/.   More information about Wilson Stern and the group Hail! Cassius Neptune is available online at https://www.reverbnation.com/hailcassiusneptune.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Colorized, negative-stained transmission electron microscopic image of influenza virus particles, known as virions.   Public domain photo taken in 1973 by Dr. F. A. Murphy, accessed from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=10072.Illustration of influenza infection, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Images of Influenza Viruses,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/images.htm.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection weekly map of flu activity, as of 10/2/21.  Map accessed online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/usmap.htm, 10/11/21.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chart of work to develop the annual flu virus vaccine, with data for 2020-21.   Image accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/infographics.htm. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TYPES AND NAMES OF INFLUENZA VIRUSESThe following information is quoted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC), “Types of Influenza Viruses,” November 18, 2019, online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/types.htm.“There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D.   Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics of disease (known as the flu season) almost every winter in the United States.  Influenza A viruses are the only influenza viruses known to cause flu pandemics, i.e., global epidemics of flu disease.  A pandemic can occur when a new and very different influenza A virus emerges that both infects people and has the ability to spread efficiently between people.  Influenza type C infections generally cause mild illness and are not thought to cause human flu epidemics.  Influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in people. ”Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: the hemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N).  There are 18 different hemagglutinin subtypes and 11 different neuraminidase subtypes (H1 through H18 and N1 through N11 respectively).  …Current sub-types of influenza A viruses that routinely circulate in people include: A (H1N1) and A (H3N2).  In the spring of 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged to cause illness in people. … “Currently circulating influenza A(H1N1) viruses are related to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus that emerged in the spring of 2009 and caused a flu pandemic ( see CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu website for more information).  This virus, scientifically called the ‘A(H1N1)pdm09 virus,' and more generally called ‘2009 H1N1,' has continued to circulate seasonally since then.  These H1N1 viruses have undergone relatively small genetic changes and changes to their antigenic properties (i.e., the properties of the virus that affect immunity) over time.“Of all the influenza viruses that routinely circulate and cause illness in people, influenza A(H3N2) viruses tend to change more rapidly, both genetically and antigenically. … “Influenza B viruses are not divided into subtypes, but instead are further classified into two lineages: B/Yamagata and B/Victoria. …Influenza B viruses generally change more slowly in terms of their genetic and antigenic properties than influenza A viruses, especially influenza A(H3N2) viruses.  Influenza surveillance data from recent years shows co-circulation of influenza B viruses from both lineages in the United States and around the world.  However, the proportion of influenza B viruses from each lineage that circulate can vary by geographic location.“CDC follows an internationally accepted naming convention for influenza viruses.  This convention was accepted by WHO [World Health Organization] in 1979 and published in February 1980 in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 58(4):585-591 (1980) (see A revision of the system of nomenclature for influenza viruses: a WHO Memorandum[854 KB, 7 pages]).  The approach uses the following components: *the antigenic type (e.g., A, B, C); *the host of origin (e.g., swine, equine, chicken, etc.; for human-origin viruses, no host of origin designation is given); *geographical origin (e.g., Denver, Taiwan, etc.); *strain number (e.g., 15, 7, etc.); *year of isolation (e.g., 57, 2009, etc.); *for influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigen description in parentheses (e.g., (H1N1). “One influenza A (H1N1), A (H3N2), and one or two influenza B viruses (depending on the vaccine) are included in each year's influenza vaccines.” SOURCES Used for Audio Antonia E. Dalziel et al., “Persistence of Low Pathogenic Influenza A Virus in Water: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Meta-Analysis,” PLOS One, 10/13/16, online at http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161929.  Anice C. Lowen and John Steel, “Roles of Humidity and Temperature in Shaping Influenza Seasonality,” Journal of Virology, Vol. 88/No. 14, July 2014, pages 7692-7695; online at http://jvi.asm.org/content/88/14/7692.full (subscription may be required for access). Anice C. Lowen et al., “Influenza Virus Transmission Is Dependent on Relative Humidity and Temperature,” PLOS, 10/19/07, online at http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.0030151. Public Library of Science, “Higher indoor humidity inactivates flu virus particles,” posted by Science Daily, 2/27/13, online at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227183456.htm. David Robson, The Real Reason Germs Spread in Winter, BBC Future, 10/19/15. Jeffery K. Taugenberger and David M. Morens, “1918 Influenza: The Mother of All Pandemics,” Emerging Infectious Diseases (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), Vol. 12/No. 1, January 2006, online at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/1/05-0979_article. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):“Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html;“Flu Activity and Surveillance,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivitysurv.htm(includes a weekly nationwide map of flu activity);“The Flu: Caring for Someone Sick at Home,” online (as PDF) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/general/influenza_flu_homecare_guide.pdf;“Flu Season,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm;“How Flu Spreads,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm;“Influenza (Flu),” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.html;“Influenza in Animals,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/other_flu.htm (information on flu in bats, birds, dogs, swine, and other animals);“Information on Avian Influenza,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/;“National Influeza Vaccination Week,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/index.htm;“Prevent Seasonal Flu,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/index.html;“Who Should and Who Should NOT Get a Flu Vaccination,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/whoshouldvax.htm. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pandemic Influenza Fact Sheet for the Water Sector, 2009. Virginia Department of Health, “Epidemiology Fact Sheets/Influenza,” September 2018, online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/influenza/. World Health Organization (WHO), “Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic),” November 13, 2018, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(avian-and-other-zoonotic). For More Information about Water an

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The FMCG Insider
Episode 25: The Future of Coffee with John Steel

The FMCG Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 32:56


In the fifth episode of Season 3 of The FMCG Insider, in association with HRA Global, Hamish chats to Cafédirect's John Steel. CEO of the UK's very first certified B-Corp Certified coffee company, John has been instrumental in making the unique coffee company's business model a success.  Over 30 minutes, John and Hamish discuss advantages of social enterprises and how these appeal to the younger generation coming into the workforce as well as the importance of being ethically motivated whilst maintaining a profitable business. If you would like to feature on the podcast or have any questions, get in touch at hello@thegroceryinsider.com. 

Blunt Talk with Gabriel Zamora
Skincare and Gossip with John Steel

Blunt Talk with Gabriel Zamora

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 90:13


Hi Everyone! I'm super excited to invite you to a conversation with one of my best friends, John Steel. We're obsessed with skincare, memes, gossiping and being gay. I hope yall enjoy this conversation! Follow the podcast on insta @blunttalk and John on his page @jsteel

Brand Talks
John Steel from Cafédirect discusses the Fairtrade movement and the benefits of B Corp status

Brand Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 42:40


We talk to John Steel from Cafédirect about how they’re making a profound difference to smallholder farmers across the world.

Brand Talks
John Steel from Cafédirect discusses the Fairtrade movement and the benefits of B Corp status

Brand Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 42:40


We talk to John Steel from Cafédirect about how they’re making a profound difference to smallholder farmers across the world.

Pilates Elephants
24. Caged Lion: The John Steel Interview

Pilates Elephants

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2021 104:54


We regularly shine a light on Elephants in the room related to technique, cueing, teaching and so forth. In this episode, John Howard Steel is about to upend many things you thought you know about the history of Pilates. John learned Pilates directly from Joseph Pilates. He practiced at Joe's gym on Eighth Avenue from 1963 until Joe's death in 1967. After Joe died, John was instrumental in the continuation of Contrology; along with two others he formed a committee that kept the gym going and supported Clara, and he single-handedly convinced Romana to take on the starring role as Joe's successor. John's book Caged Lion is the surprising and delightful history of Pilates, from Joe's mysterious early life, through his time in New York and John's experience of learning Pilates (Contrology) from Joe, and striding arm-in-arm with Joe through the streets of New York, listening to Joe lecture about his favourite and only subject of conversation, Contrology. But the book goes far beyond Joe's life, it is the story of Pilates itself – how it transcended Joe's personality and his lifetime, and became a worldwide phenomenon bringing happiness to millions. I (Raph) have been teaching Pilates for 16 years and I was repeatedly surprised by Caged Lion, not to mention entertained. It is an enthralling read; a genuinely well-written book which brings the characters to life in 3 dimensions. If you have even a passing interest in Pilates you absolutely must read it, trust me. Cloe also recommends it I think. In this interview John and Raph discuss Joe's personality, his teaching style and what it was like to learn from him, we talk about what defines Pilates and ultimately how it doesn't matter what kind of Pilates you do, but rather HOW you do it. LinksBuy Caged Lion on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Caged-Lion-Joseph-Pilates-Legacy/dp/1733430709/ref=asc_df_1733430709/?tag=googleshopdsk-22&linkCode=df0&hvadid=341772748765&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=10391972975062047532&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9071445&hvtargid=pla-911928075018&psc=1 (here) Connect With Us On InstagramCloe https://www.instagram.com/cloebunterpilates/ (@cloebunterpilates) Raphael https://www.instagram.com/the_raphaelbender/ (@the_raphaelbender) Come Study With UsOur training is 100% online - you can certify anywhere in the world without leaving your home - no travel required. Certificate IV in Pilates Matwork and Reformer https://breathe.edu.au/certificate-iv-pilates/ (here) Diploma of Clinical Pilates https://my.captivate.fm/here (here) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: AdBarker - https://adbarker.com/privacy

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 115: “House of the Rising Sun” by the Animals

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2021


Episode one hundred and fifteen of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “House of the Rising Sun” by the Animals, at the way the US and UK music scenes were influencing each other in 1964, and at the fraught question of attribution when reworking older songs. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Memphis” by Johnny Rivers. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—- Erratum A couple of times I mispronounce Hoagy Lands’ surname as Land. Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. Information on the Animals comes largely from Animal Tracks  by Sean Egan. The two-CD set The Complete Animals isn’t actually their complete recordings — for that you’d also need to buy the Decca recordings — but it is everything they recorded with Mickie Most, including all the big hits discussed in this episode. For the information on Dylan’s first album, I used The Mayor of MacDougal Street by Dave Van Ronk and Elijah Wald, the fascinating and funny autobiography of Dylan’s mentor in his Greenwich Village period. I also referred to Chronicles Volume 1 by Bob Dylan, a partial, highly inaccurate, but thoroughly readable autobiography; Bob Dylan: All The Songs by Phillipe Margotin and Jean-Michel Guesdon; and Revolution in the Air, by Clinton Heylin. Transcript Today we’re going to look at a song that, more than any other song we’ve looked at so far, shows how the influence between British and American music was working in the early 1960s. A song about New Orleans that may have its roots in English folk music, that became an Appalachian country song, performed by a blues band from the North of England, who learned it from a Minnesotan folk singer based in New York. We’re going to look at “House of the Rising Sun”, and the career of the Animals: [Excerpt: The Animals, “House of the Rising Sun”] The story of the Animals, like so many of the British bands of this time period, starts at art school, when two teenagers named Eric Burdon and John Steel met each other. The school they met each other at was in Newcastle, and this is important for how the band came together. If you’re not familiar with the geography of Great Britain, Newcastle is one of the largest cities, but it’s a very isolated city. Britain has a number of large cities. The biggest, of course, is London, which is about as big as the next five added together. Now, there’s a saying that one of the big differences between Britain and America is that in America a hundred years is a long time, and in Britain a hundred miles is a long way, so take that into account when I talk about everything else here. Most of the area around London is empty of other big cities, and the nearest other big city to it is Birmingham, a hundred miles north-west of it. About seventy miles north of that, give or take, you hit Manchester, and Manchester is in the middle of a chain of large cities — Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, and Sheffield, and the slightly smaller Bradford, are more or less in a row, and the furthest distance between two adjacent cities is about thirty-five miles. But then Newcastle is another hundred miles north of Leeds, the closest of those cities to it. And then it’s another hundred miles or so further north before you hit the major Scottish cities, which cluster together like the ones near Manchester do. This means Newcastle is, for a major city, incredibly isolated. Britain’s culture is extraordinarily London-centric, but if you’re in Liverpool or Manchester there are a number of other nearby cities. A band from Manchester can play a gig in Liverpool and make the last train home, and vice versa. This allows for the creation of regional scenes, centred on one city but with cross-fertilisation from others. Now, again, I am talking about a major city here, not some remote village, but it means that Newcastle in the sixties was in something of the same position as Seattle was, as we talked about in the episode on “Louie, Louie” — a place where bands would play in their own immediate area and not travel outside it. A journey to Leeds, particularly in the time we’re talking about when the motorway system was only just starting, would be a major trip, let alone travelling further afield. Local bands would play in Newcastle, and in large nearby towns like Gateshead, Sunderland, and Middlesborough, but not visit other cities. This meant that there was also a limited pool of good musicians to perform with, and so if you wanted to be in a band, you couldn’t be that picky about who you got on with, so long as they could play. Steel and Burdon, when they met at art school, were both jazz fanatics, and they quickly formed a trad jazz band. The band initially featured them on trumpet and trombone, but when rock and roll and skiffle hit the band changed its lineup to one based around guitars. Steel shifted to drums, while Burdon stopped playing an instrument and became the lead singer. Burdon’s tastes at the time were oriented towards the jazzier side of R&B, people like Ray Charles, and he also particularly loved blues shouters like Jimmy Witherspoon and Big Joe Turner. He tried hard to emulate Turner, and one of the songs that’s often mentioned as being in the repertoire of these early groups is “Roll ‘Em Pete”, the Big Joe Turner song we talked about back in episode two: [Excerpt: Big Joe Turner, “Roll ’em Pete”] The jazz group that Burdon and Steel formed was called the Pagan Jazz Men, and when they switched instruments they became instead The Pagans R&B Band. The group was rounded out by Blackie Sanderson and Jimmy Crawford, but soon got a fifth member when a member from another band on an early bill asked if he could sit in with them for a couple of numbers. Alan Price was the rhythm guitarist in that band, but joined in on piano, and instantly gelled with the group, playing Jerry Lee Lewis style piano. The other members would always later say that they didn’t like Price either as a person or for his taste in music — both Burdon and Steel regarded Price’s tastes as rather pedestrian when compared to their own, hipper, tastes, saying he always regarded himself as something of a lounge player, while Burdon was an R&B and blues person and Steel liked blues and jazz. But they all played well together, and in Newcastle there wasn’t that much choice about which musicians you could play with, and so they stayed together for a while, as the Pagans evolved into the Kansas City Five or the Kansas City Seven, depending on the occasional presence of two brass players. The Kansas City group played mostly jump blues, which was the area of music where Burdon and Steel’s tastes intersected — musicians they’ve cited as ones they covered were Ray Charles, Louis Jordan, and Big Joe Turner. But then the group collapsed, as Price didn’t turn up to a gig — he’d been poached by a pop covers band, the Kon-Tors, whose bass player, Chas Chandler, had been impressed with him when Chandler had sat in at a couple of Kansas City Five rehearsals. Steel got a gig playing lounge music, just to keep paying the bills, and Burdon would occasionally sit in with various other musicians. But a few members of the Kon-Tors got a side gig, performing as the Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo as the resident band at a local venue called the Club A Go-Go, which was the venue where visiting London jazzmen and touring American blues players would perform when they came to Newcastle. Burdon started sitting in with them, and then they invited Steel to replace their drummer, and in September 1963 the Alan Price Rhythm And Blues Combo settled on a lineup of Burdon on vocals, Price on piano, Steel on drums, Chandler on bass, and new member Hilton Valentine, who joined at the same time as Steel, on guitar. Valentine was notably more experienced than the other members, and had previously performed in a rock and roll group called the Wildcats — not the same band who backed Marty Wilde — and had even recorded an album with them, though I’ve been unable to track down any copies of the album. At this point all the group members now had different sensibilities — Valentine was a rocker and skiffle fan, while Chandler was into more mainstream pop music, though the other members emphasised in interviews that he liked *good* pop music like the Beatles, not the lesser pop music. The new lineup was so good that a mere eight days after they first performed together, they went into a recording studio to record an EP, which they put out themselves and sold at their gigs. Apparently five hundred copies of the EP were sold. As well as playing piano on the tracks, Price also played melodica, which he used in the same way that blues musicians would normally use the harmonica: [Excerpt: The Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo, “Pretty Thing”] This kind of instrumental experimentation would soon further emphasise the split between Price and Burdon, as Price would get a Vox organ rather than cart a piano between gigs, while Burdon disliked the sound of the organ, even though it became one of the defining sounds of the group. That sound can be heard on a live recording of them a couple of months later, backing the great American blues musician Sonny Boy Williamson II at the Club A Go Go: [Excerpt: Sonny Boy Williamson II and the Animals, “Fattening Frogs For Snakes”] One person who definitely *didn’t* dislike the sound of the electric organ was Graham Bond, the Hammond organ player with Alexis Korner’s band who we mentioned briefly back in the episode on the Rolling Stones. Bond and a few other members of the Korner group had quit, and formed their own group, the Graham Bond Organisation, which had originally featured a guitarist named John McLaughlin, but by this point consisted of Bond, saxophone player Dick Heckstall-Smith, and the rhythm section Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker. They wouldn’t make an album until 1965, but live recordings of them from around this time exist, though in relatively poor quality: [Excerpt: The Graham Bond Organisation, “Wade in the Water”] The Graham Bond Organisation played at the Club A Go Go, and soon Bond was raving back in London about this group from Newcastle he’d heard. Arrangements were quickly made for them to play in London. By this time, the Rolling Stones had outgrown the small club venues they’d been playing, and a new band called the Yardbirds were playing all the Stones’ old venues. A trade was agreed — the Yardbirds would play all the Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo’s normal gigs for a couple of weeks, and the Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo would play the Yardbirds’. Or rather, the Animals would. None of the members of the group could ever agree on how they got their new name, and not all of them liked it, but when they played those gigs in London in December 1963, just three months after getting together, that was how they were billed. And it was as the Animals that they were signed by Mickie Most. Mickie Most was one of the new breed of independent producers that were cropping up in London, following in Joe Meek’s footsteps, like Andrew Oldham. Most had started out as a singer in a duo called The Most Brothers, which is where he got his stage name. The Most Brothers had only released one single: [Excerpt: The Most Brothers, “Whole Lotta Woman”] But then Most had moved to South Africa, where he’d had eleven number one hits with cover versions of American rock singles, backed by a band called the Playboys: [Excerpt: Mickie Most and the Playboys, “Johnny B Goode”] He’d returned to the UK in 1963, and been less successful here as a performer, and so he decided to move into production, and the Animals were his first signing. He signed them up and started licensing their records to EMI, and in January 1964 the Animals moved down to London. There has been a lot of suggestion over the years that the Animals resented Mickie Most pushing them in a more pop direction, but their first single was an inspired compromise between the group’s blues purism and Most’s pop instincts. The song they recorded dates back at least to 1935, when the State Street Boys, a group that featured Big Bill Broonzy, recorded “Don’t Tear My Clothes”: [Excerpt: The State Street Boys, “Don’t Tear My Clothes”] That song got picked up and adapted by a lot of other blues singers, like Blind Boy Fuller, who recorded it as “Mama Let Me Lay It On You” in 1938: [Excerpt: Blind Boy Fuller, “Mama Let Me Lay it On You”] That had in turn been picked up by the Reverend Gary Davis, who came up with his own arrangement of the song: [Excerpt: Rev. Gary Davis, “Baby, Let Me Lay It On You”] Eric von Schmidt, a folk singer in Massachusetts, had learned that song from Davis, and Bob Dylan had in turn learned it from von Schmidt, and included it on his first album as “Baby Let Me Follow You Down”: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, “Baby Let Me Follow You Down”] The Animals knew the song from that version, which they loved, but Most had come across it in a different way. He’d heard a version which had been inspired by Dylan, but had been radically reworked. Bert Berns had produced a single on Atlantic for a soul singer called Hoagy Lands, and on the B-side had been a new arrangement of the song, retitled “Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand” and adapted by Berns and Wes Farrell, a songwriter who had written for the Shirelles. Land’s version had started with an intro in which Lands is clearly imitating Sam Cooke: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, “Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand”] But after that intro, which seems to be totally original to Berns and Farrell, Lands’ track goes into a very upbeat Twist-flavoured song, with a unique guitar riff and Latin feel, both of them very much in the style of Berns’ other songs, but clearly an adaptation of Dylan’s version of the old song: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, “Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand”] Most had picked up that record on a trip to America, and decided that the Animals should record a version of the song based on that record. Hilton Valentine would later claim that this record, whose title and artist he could never remember (and it’s quite possible that Most never even told the band who the record was by) was not very similar at all to the Animals’ version, and that they’d just kicked around the song and come up with their own version, but listening to it, it is *very* obviously modelled on Lands’ version. They cut out Lands’ intro, and restored a lot of Dylan’s lyric, but musically it’s Lands all the way. The track starts like this: [Excerpt: The Animals, “Baby Let Me Take You Home”] Both have a breakdown section with spoken lyrics over a staccato backing, though the two sets of lyrics are different — compare the Animals: [Excerpt: The Animals, “Baby Let Me Take You Home”] and Lands: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, “Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand”] And both have the typical Bert Berns call and response ending — Lands: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, “Baby Let me Hold Your Hand”] And the Animals: [Excerpt: The Animals, “Baby Let Me Take You Home”] So whatever Valentine’s later claims, the track very much was modelled on the earlier record, but it’s still one of the strongest remodellings of an American R&B record by a British group in this time period, and an astonishingly accomplished record, which made number twenty-one. The Animals’ second single was another song that had been recorded on Dylan’s first album. “House of the Rising Sun” has been argued by some, though I think it’s a tenuous argument, to originally date to the seventeenth century English folk song “Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard”: [Excerpt: Martin Carthy, “Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard”] What we do know is that the song was circulating in Appalachia in the early years of the twentieth century, and it’s that version that was first recorded in 1933, under the name “Rising Sun Blues”, by Clarence Ashley and Gwen Foster: [Excerpt: Clarence Ashley and Gwen Foster, “Rising Sun Blues”] The song has been described as about several things — about alcoholism, about sex work, about gambling — depending on the precise version. It’s often thought, for example, that the song was always sung by women and was about a brothel, but there are lots of variants of it, sung by both men and women, before it reached its most famous form. Dave van Ronk, who put the song into the form by which it became best known, believed at first that it was a song about a brothel, but he later decided that it was probably about the New Orleans Women’s Prison, which in his accounting used to have a carving of a rising sun over the doorway. Van Ronk’s version traces back originally to a field recording Alan Lomax had made in 1938 of a woman named Georgia Turner, from Kentucky: [Excerpt: Georgia Turner, “Rising Sun Blues”] Van Ronk had learned the song from a record by Hally Wood, a friend of the Lomaxes, who had recorded a version based on Turner’s in 1953: [Excerpt: Hally Wood, “House of the Rising Sun”] Van Ronk took Wood’s version of Turner’s version of the song, and rearranged it, changing the chords around, adding something that changed the whole song. He introduced a descending bassline, mostly in semitones, which as van Ronk put it is “a common enough progression in jazz, but unusual among folksingers”. It’s actually something you’d get a fair bit in baroque music as well, and van Ronk introducing this into the song is probably what eventually led to things like Procul Harum’s “A Whiter Shade of Pale” ripping off Bach doing essentially the same thing. What van Ronk did was a simple trick. You play a descending scale, mostly in semitones, while holding the same chord shape which creates a lot of interesting chords. The bass line he played is basically this: [demonstrates] And he held an A minor shape over that bassline, giving a chord sequence Am, Am over G, Am over F#, F. [demonstrates] This is a trick that’s used in hundreds and hundreds of songs later in the sixties and onward — everything from “Sunny Afternoon” by the Kinks to “Go Now” by the Moody Blues to “Forever” by the Beach Boys — but it was something that at this point belonged in the realms of art music and jazz more than in folk, blues, or rock and roll. Of course, it sounds rather better when he did it: [Excerpt, Dave van Ronk, “House of the Rising Sun”] “House of the Rising Sun” soon became the highlight of van Ronk’s live act, and his most requested song. Dylan took van Ronk’s arrangement, but he wasn’t as sophisticated a musician as van Ronk, so he simplified the chords. Rather than the dissonant chords van Ronk had, he played standard rock chords that fit van Ronk’s bassline, so instead of Am over G he played C with a G in the bass, and instead of Am over F# he played D with an F# in the bass. So van Ronk had: [demonstrates] While Dylan had: [demonstrates] The movement of the chords now follows the movement of the bassline. It’s simpler, but it’s all from van Ronk’s arrangement idea. Dylan recorded his version of van Ronk’s version for his first album: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, “House of the Rising Sun”] As van Ronk later told the story (though I’m going to edit out one expletive here for the sake of getting past the adult content rating on Apple): “One evening in 1962, I was sitting at my usual table in the back of the Kettle of Fish, and Dylan came slouching in. He had been up at the Columbia studios with John Hammond, doing his first album. He was being very mysterioso about the whole thing, and nobody I knew had been to any of the sessions except Suze, his lady. I pumped him for information, but he was vague. Everything was going fine and, “Hey, would it be okay for me to record your arrangement of ‘House of the Rising Sun?’” [expletive]. “Jeez, Bobby, I’m going into the studio to do that myself in a few weeks. Can’t it wait until your next album?” A long pause. “Uh-oh.” I did not like the sound of that. “What exactly do you mean, ‘Uh-oh’?” “Well,” he said sheepishly, “I’ve already recorded it.” “You did what?!” I flew into a Donald Duck rage, and I fear I may have said something unkind that could be heard over in Chelsea.” van Ronk and Dylan fell out for a couple of weeks, though they later reconciled, and van Ronk said of Dylan’s performance “it was essentially my arrangement, but Bobby’s reading had all the nuance and subtlety of a Neanderthal with a stone hand ax, and I took comfort thereby.” van Ronk did record his version, as we heard, but he soon stopped playing the song live because he got sick of people telling him to “play that Dylan song”. The Animals learned the song from the Dylan record, and decided to introduce it to their set on their first national tour, supporting Chuck Berry. All the other acts were only doing rock and roll and R&B, and they thought a folk song might be a way to make them stand out — and it instantly became the highlight of their act.  The way all the members except Alan Price tell the story, the main instigators of the arrangement were Eric Burdon, the only member of the group who had been familiar with the song before hearing the Dylan album, and Hilton Valentine, who came up with the arpeggiated guitar part. Their arrangement followed Dylan’s rearrangement of van Ronk’s rearrangement, except they dropped the scalar bassline altogether, so for example instead of a D with an F# in the bass they just play a plain open D chord — the F# that van Ronk introduced is still in there, as the third, but the descending line is now just implied by the chords, not explicitly stated in the bass, where Chas Chandler just played root notes. In the middle of the tour, the group were called back into the studio to record their follow-up single, and they had what seemed like it might be a great opportunity. The TV show Ready Steady Go! wanted the Animals to record a version of the old Ray Charles song “Talking ‘Bout You”, to use as their theme. The group travelled down from Liverpool after playing a show there, and went into the studio in London at three o’clock in the morning, before heading to Southampton for the next night’s show. But they needed to record a B-side first, of course, and so before getting round to the main business of the session they knocked off a quick one-take performance of their new live showstopper: [Excerpt: The Animals, “House of the Rising Sun”] On hearing the playback, everyone was suddenly convinced that that, not “Talking ‘Bout You”, should be the A-side. But there was a problem. The record was four minutes and twenty seconds long, and you just didn’t ever release a record that long. The rule was generally that songs didn’t last longer than three minutes, because radio stations wouldn’t play them, but Most was eventually persuaded by Chas Chandler that the track needed to go out as it was, with no edits. It did, but when it went out, it had only one name on as the arranger — which when you’re recording a public domain song makes you effectively the songwriter. According to all the members other than Price, the group’s manager, Mike Jeffrey, who was close to Price, had “explained” to them that you needed to just put one name down on the credits, but not to worry, as they would all get a share of the songwriting money. According to Price, meanwhile, he was the sole arranger. Whatever the truth, Price was the only one who ever got any songwriting royalties for their version of the song, which went to number one in the UK and the US. although the version released as a single in the US was cut down to three minutes with some brutal edits, particularly to the organ solo: [Excerpt: The Animals, “House of the Rising Sun (US edit)”] None of the group liked what was done to the US single edit, and the proper version was soon released as an album track everywhere The Animals’ version was a big enough hit that it inspired Dylan’s new producer Tom Wilson to do an experiment. In late 1964 he hired session musicians to overdub a new electric backing onto an outtake version of “House of the Rising Sun” from the sessions from Dylan’s first album, to see what it would sound like: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, “House of the Rising Sun (1964 electric version)”] That wasn’t released at the time, it was just an experiment Wilson tried, but it would have ramifications we’ll be seeing throughout the rest of the podcast. Incidentally, Dave van Ronk had the last laugh at Dylan, who had to drop the song from his own sets because people kept asking him if he’d stolen it from the Animals. The Animals’ next single, “I’m Crying”, was their first and only self-written A-side, written by Price and Burdon. It was a decent record and made the top ten in the UK and the top twenty in the US, but Price and Burdon were never going to become another Lennon and McCartney or Jagger and Richards — they just didn’t like each other by this point. The record after that, “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”, was written by the jazz songwriters Benny Benjamin and Horace Ott, and had originally been recorded by Nina Simone in an orchestral version that owed quite a bit to Burt Bacharach: [Excerpt: Nina Simone, “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”] The Animals’ version really suffers in comparison to that. I was going to say something about how their reinterpretation is as valid in its own way as Simone’s original and stands up against it, but actually listening to them back to back as I was writing this, rather than separately as I always previously had, I changed my mind because I really don’t think it does. It’s a great record, and it’s deservedly considered a classic single, but compared to Simone’s version, it’s lightweight, rushed, and callow: [Excerpt: The Animals, “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”] Simone was apparently furious at the Animals’ recording, which they didn’t understand given that she hadn’t written the original, and according to John Steel she and Burdon later had a huge screaming row about the record. In Steel’s version, Simone eventually grudgingly admitted that they weren’t “so bad for a bunch of white boys”, but that doesn’t sound to me like the attitude Simone would take. But Steel was there and I wasn’t… “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” was followed by a more minor single, a cover of Sam Cooke’s “Bring it on Home to Me”, which would be the last single by the group to feature Alan Price. On the twenty-eighth of April 1965, the group were about to leave on a European tour. Chas Chandler, who shared a flat with Price, woke Price up and then got in the shower. When he got out of the shower, Price wasn’t in the flat, and Chandler wouldn’t see Price again for eighteen months. Chandler believed until his death that while he was in the shower, Price’s first royalty cheque for arranging “House of the Rising Sun” had arrived, and Price had decided then and there that he wasn’t going to share the money as agreed. The group quickly rushed to find a fill-in keyboard player for the tour, and nineteen-year-old Mick Gallagher was with them for a couple of weeks before being permanently replaced by Dave Rowberry. Gallagher would later go on to be the keyboard player with Ian Dury and the Blockheads, as well as playing on several tracks by the Clash. Price, meanwhile, went on to have a number of solo hits over the next few years, starting with a version of “I Put A Spell On You”, in an arrangement which the other Animals later claimed had originally been worked up as an Animals track: [Excerpt: The Alan Price Set, “I Put A Spell On You”] Price would go on to make many great solo records, introducing the songs of Randy Newman to a wider audience, and performing in a jazz-influenced R&B style very similar to Mose Allison. The Animals’ first record with their new keyboard player was their greatest single. “We Gotta Get Out Of This Place” had been written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weill, and had originally been intended for the Righteous Brothers, but they’d decided to have Mann record it himself: [Excerpt: Barry Mann, “We Gotta Get Out Of This Place”] But before that version was released, the Animals had heard Mann’s piano demo of the song and cut their own version, and Mann’s was left on the shelf. What the Animals did to the song horrified Cynthia Weill, who considered it the worst record of one of her songs ever — though one suspects that’s partly because it sabotaged the chances for her husband’s single — but to my mind they vastly improved on the song. They tightened the melody up a lot, getting rid of a lot of interjections. They reworked big chunks of the lyric, for example changing “Oh girl, now you’re young and oh so pretty, staying here would be a crime, because you’ll just grow old before your time” to “Now my girl, you’re so young and pretty, and one thing I know is true, you’ll be dead before your time is due”, and making subtler changes like changing “if it’s the last thing that we do” to “if it’s the last thing we ever do”, improving the scansion. They kept the general sense of the lyrics, but changed more of the actual words than they kept — and to my ears, at least, every change they made was an improvement. And most importantly, they excised the overlong bridge altogether. I can see what Mann and Weill were trying to do with the bridge — Righteous Brothers songs would often have a call and response section, building to a climax, where Bill Medley’s low voice and Bobby Hatfield’s high one would alternate and then come together. But that would normally come in the middle, building towards the last chorus. Here it comes between every verse and chorus, and completely destroys the song’s momentum — it just sounds like noodling: [Excerpt: Barry Mann, “We Gotta Get Out Of This Place”] The Animals’ version, by contrast, is a masterpiece of dynamics, of slow builds and climaxes and dropping back down again. It’s one of the few times I’ve wished I could just drop the entire record in, rather than excerpting a section, because it depends so much for its effect on the way the whole structure of the track works together: [Excerpt: The Animals, “We Gotta Get Out Of This Place”] From a creators’ rights perspective, I entirely agree with Cynthia Weill that the group shouldn’t have messed with her song. But from a listener’s point of view, I have to say that they turned a decent song into a great one, and one of the greatest singles of all time “We Gotta Get Out Of This Place” was followed by another lesser but listenable single, “It’s My Life”, which seemed to reinforce a pattern of a great Animals single being followed by a merely OK one. But that was the point at which the Animals and Most would part company — the group were getting sick of Most’s attempts to make them more poppy. They signed to a new label, Decca, and got a new producer, Tom Wilson, the man who we heard earlier experimenting with Dylan’s sound, but the group started to fall apart. After their next single, “Inside — Looking Out”, a prison work song collected by the Lomaxes, and the album Animalisms, John Steel left the group, tired of not getting any money, and went to work in a shop. The album after Animalisms, confusingly titled Animalism, was also mostly produced by Wilson, and didn’t even feature the musicians in the band on two of the tracks, which Wilson farmed out to a protege of his, Frank Zappa, to produce. Those two tracks featured Zappa on guitar and members of the Wrecking Crew, with only Burdon from the actual group: [Excerpt: The Animals, “All Night Long”] Soon the group would split up, and would discover that their management had thoroughly ripped them off — there had been a scheme to bank their money in the Bahamas for tax reasons, in a bank which mysteriously disappeared off the face of the Earth. Burdon would form a new group, known first as the New Animals and later as Eric Burdon and the Animals, who would have some success but not on the same level. There were a handful of reunions of the original lineup of the group between 1968 and the early eighties, but they last played together in 1983. Burdon continues to tour the US as Eric Burdon and the Animals. Alan Price continues to perform successfully as a solo artist. We’ll be picking up with Chas Chandler later, when he moves from bass playing into management, so you’ll hear more about him in future episodes. John Steel, Dave Rowberry, and Hilton Valentine reformed a version of the Animals in the 1990s, originally with Jim Rodford, formerly of the Kinks and Argent, on bass. Valentine left that group in 2001, and Rowberry died in 2003. Steel now tours the UK as “The Animals and Friends”, with Mick Gallagher, who had replaced Price briefly in 1965, on keyboards. I’ve seen them live twice and they put on an excellent show — though the second time, one woman behind me did indignantly say, as the singer started, “That’s not Eric Clapton!”, before starting to sing along happily… And Hilton Valentine moved to the US and played briefly with Burdon’s Animals after quitting Steel’s, before returning to his first love, skiffle. He died exactly four weeks ago today, and will be missed.

america tv american new york history friends english earth apple babies house uk england water british land home european seattle local price revolution forever south africa north new orleans prison fish mayors massachusetts animals britain beatles atlantic cd bond kansas city manchester liverpool wood columbia rolling stones air latin scottish rock and roll birmingham clash steel stones bob dylan crying newcastle twist leeds bach playboy bahamas great britain schmidt richards sheffield vox lands my life southampton bradford gallagher beach boys hammond excerpt eric clapton appalachian farrell nina simone kinks wildcats appalachia ray charles frank zappa tilt mccartney sunderland neanderthals pale chuck berry argent sam cooke emi rising sun tom wilson rock music kettle randy newman donald duck arrangements greenwich village pagans zappa incidentally jerry lee lewis jeez moody blues minnesotan wrecking crew yardbirds korner suze john hammond john mclaughlin decca ginger baker johnny b goode gateshead righteous brothers pretty things berns weill eric burdon all night long jack bruce ian dury blockheads alan lomax hold your hand shirelles louis jordan middlesborough bill medley on you mose allison whiter shade go now johnny rivers baby let big bill broonzy gary davis big joe turner sunny afternoon joe meek let me be misunderstood american r barry mann dave van ronk looking out i put a spell on you burdon john steel alan price reverend gary davis jimmy witherspoon marty wilde blind boy fuller bert berns ronk chas chandler elijah wald procul harum macdougal street andrew oldham animalism gwen foster clarence ashley georgia turner tilt araiza
A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 115: "House of the Rising Sun" by the Animals

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2021 49:51


Episode one hundred and fifteen of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "House of the Rising Sun" by the Animals, at the way the US and UK music scenes were influencing each other in 1964, and at the fraught question of attribution when reworking older songs. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Memphis" by Johnny Rivers. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Erratum A couple of times I mispronounce Hoagy Lands' surname as Land. Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. Information on the Animals comes largely from Animal Tracks  by Sean Egan. The two-CD set The Complete Animals isn't actually their complete recordings -- for that you'd also need to buy the Decca recordings -- but it is everything they recorded with Mickie Most, including all the big hits discussed in this episode. For the information on Dylan's first album, I used The Mayor of MacDougal Street by Dave Van Ronk and Elijah Wald, the fascinating and funny autobiography of Dylan's mentor in his Greenwich Village period. I also referred to Chronicles Volume 1 by Bob Dylan, a partial, highly inaccurate, but thoroughly readable autobiography; Bob Dylan: All The Songs by Phillipe Margotin and Jean-Michel Guesdon; and Revolution in the Air, by Clinton Heylin. Transcript Today we're going to look at a song that, more than any other song we've looked at so far, shows how the influence between British and American music was working in the early 1960s. A song about New Orleans that may have its roots in English folk music, that became an Appalachian country song, performed by a blues band from the North of England, who learned it from a Minnesotan folk singer based in New York. We're going to look at "House of the Rising Sun", and the career of the Animals: [Excerpt: The Animals, "House of the Rising Sun"] The story of the Animals, like so many of the British bands of this time period, starts at art school, when two teenagers named Eric Burdon and John Steel met each other. The school they met each other at was in Newcastle, and this is important for how the band came together. If you're not familiar with the geography of Great Britain, Newcastle is one of the largest cities, but it's a very isolated city. Britain has a number of large cities. The biggest, of course, is London, which is about as big as the next five added together. Now, there's a saying that one of the big differences between Britain and America is that in America a hundred years is a long time, and in Britain a hundred miles is a long way, so take that into account when I talk about everything else here. Most of the area around London is empty of other big cities, and the nearest other big city to it is Birmingham, a hundred miles north-west of it. About seventy miles north of that, give or take, you hit Manchester, and Manchester is in the middle of a chain of large cities -- Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, and Sheffield, and the slightly smaller Bradford, are more or less in a row, and the furthest distance between two adjacent cities is about thirty-five miles. But then Newcastle is another hundred miles north of Leeds, the closest of those cities to it. And then it's another hundred miles or so further north before you hit the major Scottish cities, which cluster together like the ones near Manchester do. This means Newcastle is, for a major city, incredibly isolated. Britain's culture is extraordinarily London-centric, but if you're in Liverpool or Manchester there are a number of other nearby cities. A band from Manchester can play a gig in Liverpool and make the last train home, and vice versa. This allows for the creation of regional scenes, centred on one city but with cross-fertilisation from others. Now, again, I am talking about a major city here, not some remote village, but it means that Newcastle in the sixties was in something of the same position as Seattle was, as we talked about in the episode on "Louie, Louie" -- a place where bands would play in their own immediate area and not travel outside it. A journey to Leeds, particularly in the time we're talking about when the motorway system was only just starting, would be a major trip, let alone travelling further afield. Local bands would play in Newcastle, and in large nearby towns like Gateshead, Sunderland, and Middlesborough, but not visit other cities. This meant that there was also a limited pool of good musicians to perform with, and so if you wanted to be in a band, you couldn't be that picky about who you got on with, so long as they could play. Steel and Burdon, when they met at art school, were both jazz fanatics, and they quickly formed a trad jazz band. The band initially featured them on trumpet and trombone, but when rock and roll and skiffle hit the band changed its lineup to one based around guitars. Steel shifted to drums, while Burdon stopped playing an instrument and became the lead singer. Burdon's tastes at the time were oriented towards the jazzier side of R&B, people like Ray Charles, and he also particularly loved blues shouters like Jimmy Witherspoon and Big Joe Turner. He tried hard to emulate Turner, and one of the songs that's often mentioned as being in the repertoire of these early groups is "Roll 'Em Pete", the Big Joe Turner song we talked about back in episode two: [Excerpt: Big Joe Turner, "Roll 'em Pete"] The jazz group that Burdon and Steel formed was called the Pagan Jazz Men, and when they switched instruments they became instead The Pagans R&B Band. The group was rounded out by Blackie Sanderson and Jimmy Crawford, but soon got a fifth member when a member from another band on an early bill asked if he could sit in with them for a couple of numbers. Alan Price was the rhythm guitarist in that band, but joined in on piano, and instantly gelled with the group, playing Jerry Lee Lewis style piano. The other members would always later say that they didn't like Price either as a person or for his taste in music -- both Burdon and Steel regarded Price's tastes as rather pedestrian when compared to their own, hipper, tastes, saying he always regarded himself as something of a lounge player, while Burdon was an R&B and blues person and Steel liked blues and jazz. But they all played well together, and in Newcastle there wasn't that much choice about which musicians you could play with, and so they stayed together for a while, as the Pagans evolved into the Kansas City Five or the Kansas City Seven, depending on the occasional presence of two brass players. The Kansas City group played mostly jump blues, which was the area of music where Burdon and Steel's tastes intersected -- musicians they've cited as ones they covered were Ray Charles, Louis Jordan, and Big Joe Turner. But then the group collapsed, as Price didn't turn up to a gig -- he'd been poached by a pop covers band, the Kon-Tors, whose bass player, Chas Chandler, had been impressed with him when Chandler had sat in at a couple of Kansas City Five rehearsals. Steel got a gig playing lounge music, just to keep paying the bills, and Burdon would occasionally sit in with various other musicians. But a few members of the Kon-Tors got a side gig, performing as the Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo as the resident band at a local venue called the Club A Go-Go, which was the venue where visiting London jazzmen and touring American blues players would perform when they came to Newcastle. Burdon started sitting in with them, and then they invited Steel to replace their drummer, and in September 1963 the Alan Price Rhythm And Blues Combo settled on a lineup of Burdon on vocals, Price on piano, Steel on drums, Chandler on bass, and new member Hilton Valentine, who joined at the same time as Steel, on guitar. Valentine was notably more experienced than the other members, and had previously performed in a rock and roll group called the Wildcats -- not the same band who backed Marty Wilde -- and had even recorded an album with them, though I've been unable to track down any copies of the album. At this point all the group members now had different sensibilities -- Valentine was a rocker and skiffle fan, while Chandler was into more mainstream pop music, though the other members emphasised in interviews that he liked *good* pop music like the Beatles, not the lesser pop music. The new lineup was so good that a mere eight days after they first performed together, they went into a recording studio to record an EP, which they put out themselves and sold at their gigs. Apparently five hundred copies of the EP were sold. As well as playing piano on the tracks, Price also played melodica, which he used in the same way that blues musicians would normally use the harmonica: [Excerpt: The Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo, "Pretty Thing"] This kind of instrumental experimentation would soon further emphasise the split between Price and Burdon, as Price would get a Vox organ rather than cart a piano between gigs, while Burdon disliked the sound of the organ, even though it became one of the defining sounds of the group. That sound can be heard on a live recording of them a couple of months later, backing the great American blues musician Sonny Boy Williamson II at the Club A Go Go: [Excerpt: Sonny Boy Williamson II and the Animals, “Fattening Frogs For Snakes”] One person who definitely *didn't* dislike the sound of the electric organ was Graham Bond, the Hammond organ player with Alexis Korner's band who we mentioned briefly back in the episode on the Rolling Stones. Bond and a few other members of the Korner group had quit, and formed their own group, the Graham Bond Organisation, which had originally featured a guitarist named John McLaughlin, but by this point consisted of Bond, saxophone player Dick Heckstall-Smith, and the rhythm section Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker. They wouldn't make an album until 1965, but live recordings of them from around this time exist, though in relatively poor quality: [Excerpt: The Graham Bond Organisation, "Wade in the Water"] The Graham Bond Organisation played at the Club A Go Go, and soon Bond was raving back in London about this group from Newcastle he'd heard. Arrangements were quickly made for them to play in London. By this time, the Rolling Stones had outgrown the small club venues they'd been playing, and a new band called the Yardbirds were playing all the Stones' old venues. A trade was agreed -- the Yardbirds would play all the Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo's normal gigs for a couple of weeks, and the Alan Price Rhythm & Blues Combo would play the Yardbirds'. Or rather, the Animals would. None of the members of the group could ever agree on how they got their new name, and not all of them liked it, but when they played those gigs in London in December 1963, just three months after getting together, that was how they were billed. And it was as the Animals that they were signed by Mickie Most. Mickie Most was one of the new breed of independent producers that were cropping up in London, following in Joe Meek's footsteps, like Andrew Oldham. Most had started out as a singer in a duo called The Most Brothers, which is where he got his stage name. The Most Brothers had only released one single: [Excerpt: The Most Brothers, "Whole Lotta Woman"] But then Most had moved to South Africa, where he'd had eleven number one hits with cover versions of American rock singles, backed by a band called the Playboys: [Excerpt: Mickie Most and the Playboys, "Johnny B Goode"] He'd returned to the UK in 1963, and been less successful here as a performer, and so he decided to move into production, and the Animals were his first signing. He signed them up and started licensing their records to EMI, and in January 1964 the Animals moved down to London. There has been a lot of suggestion over the years that the Animals resented Mickie Most pushing them in a more pop direction, but their first single was an inspired compromise between the group's blues purism and Most's pop instincts. The song they recorded dates back at least to 1935, when the State Street Boys, a group that featured Big Bill Broonzy, recorded "Don't Tear My Clothes": [Excerpt: The State Street Boys, "Don't Tear My Clothes"] That song got picked up and adapted by a lot of other blues singers, like Blind Boy Fuller, who recorded it as "Mama Let Me Lay It On You" in 1938: [Excerpt: Blind Boy Fuller, "Mama Let Me Lay it On You"] That had in turn been picked up by the Reverend Gary Davis, who came up with his own arrangement of the song: [Excerpt: Rev. Gary Davis, "Baby, Let Me Lay It On You"] Eric von Schmidt, a folk singer in Massachusetts, had learned that song from Davis, and Bob Dylan had in turn learned it from von Schmidt, and included it on his first album as "Baby Let Me Follow You Down": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Baby Let Me Follow You Down"] The Animals knew the song from that version, which they loved, but Most had come across it in a different way. He'd heard a version which had been inspired by Dylan, but had been radically reworked. Bert Berns had produced a single on Atlantic for a soul singer called Hoagy Lands, and on the B-side had been a new arrangement of the song, retitled "Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand" and adapted by Berns and Wes Farrell, a songwriter who had written for the Shirelles. Land's version had started with an intro in which Lands is clearly imitating Sam Cooke: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, "Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand"] But after that intro, which seems to be totally original to Berns and Farrell, Lands' track goes into a very upbeat Twist-flavoured song, with a unique guitar riff and Latin feel, both of them very much in the style of Berns' other songs, but clearly an adaptation of Dylan's version of the old song: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, "Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand"] Most had picked up that record on a trip to America, and decided that the Animals should record a version of the song based on that record. Hilton Valentine would later claim that this record, whose title and artist he could never remember (and it's quite possible that Most never even told the band who the record was by) was not very similar at all to the Animals' version, and that they'd just kicked around the song and come up with their own version, but listening to it, it is *very* obviously modelled on Lands' version. They cut out Lands' intro, and restored a lot of Dylan's lyric, but musically it's Lands all the way. The track starts like this: [Excerpt: The Animals, "Baby Let Me Take You Home"] Both have a breakdown section with spoken lyrics over a staccato backing, though the two sets of lyrics are different -- compare the Animals: [Excerpt: The Animals, "Baby Let Me Take You Home"] and Lands: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, "Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand"] And both have the typical Bert Berns call and response ending -- Lands: [Excerpt: Hoagy Lands, "Baby Let me Hold Your Hand"] And the Animals: [Excerpt: The Animals, "Baby Let Me Take You Home"] So whatever Valentine's later claims, the track very much was modelled on the earlier record, but it's still one of the strongest remodellings of an American R&B record by a British group in this time period, and an astonishingly accomplished record, which made number twenty-one. The Animals' second single was another song that had been recorded on Dylan's first album. "House of the Rising Sun" has been argued by some, though I think it's a tenuous argument, to originally date to the seventeenth century English folk song "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard": [Excerpt: Martin Carthy, "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard"] What we do know is that the song was circulating in Appalachia in the early years of the twentieth century, and it's that version that was first recorded in 1933, under the name "Rising Sun Blues", by Clarence Ashley and Gwen Foster: [Excerpt: Clarence Ashley and Gwen Foster, "Rising Sun Blues"] The song has been described as about several things -- about alcoholism, about sex work, about gambling -- depending on the precise version. It's often thought, for example, that the song was always sung by women and was about a brothel, but there are lots of variants of it, sung by both men and women, before it reached its most famous form. Dave van Ronk, who put the song into the form by which it became best known, believed at first that it was a song about a brothel, but he later decided that it was probably about the New Orleans Women's Prison, which in his accounting used to have a carving of a rising sun over the doorway. Van Ronk's version traces back originally to a field recording Alan Lomax had made in 1938 of a woman named Georgia Turner, from Kentucky: [Excerpt: Georgia Turner, "Rising Sun Blues"] Van Ronk had learned the song from a record by Hally Wood, a friend of the Lomaxes, who had recorded a version based on Turner's in 1953: [Excerpt: Hally Wood, "House of the Rising Sun"] Van Ronk took Wood's version of Turner's version of the song, and rearranged it, changing the chords around, adding something that changed the whole song. He introduced a descending bassline, mostly in semitones, which as van Ronk put it is "a common enough progression in jazz, but unusual among folksingers". It's actually something you'd get a fair bit in baroque music as well, and van Ronk introducing this into the song is probably what eventually led to things like Procul Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale" ripping off Bach doing essentially the same thing. What van Ronk did was a simple trick. You play a descending scale, mostly in semitones, while holding the same chord shape which creates a lot of interesting chords. The bass line he played is basically this: [demonstrates] And he held an A minor shape over that bassline, giving a chord sequence Am, Am over G, Am over F#, F. [demonstrates] This is a trick that's used in hundreds and hundreds of songs later in the sixties and onward -- everything from "Sunny Afternoon" by the Kinks to "Go Now" by the Moody Blues to "Forever" by the Beach Boys -- but it was something that at this point belonged in the realms of art music and jazz more than in folk, blues, or rock and roll. Of course, it sounds rather better when he did it: [Excerpt, Dave van Ronk, "House of the Rising Sun"] "House of the Rising Sun" soon became the highlight of van Ronk's live act, and his most requested song. Dylan took van Ronk's arrangement, but he wasn't as sophisticated a musician as van Ronk, so he simplified the chords. Rather than the dissonant chords van Ronk had, he played standard rock chords that fit van Ronk's bassline, so instead of Am over G he played C with a G in the bass, and instead of Am over F# he played D with an F# in the bass. So van Ronk had: [demonstrates] While Dylan had: [demonstrates] The movement of the chords now follows the movement of the bassline. It's simpler, but it's all from van Ronk's arrangement idea. Dylan recorded his version of van Ronk's version for his first album: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "House of the Rising Sun"] As van Ronk later told the story (though I'm going to edit out one expletive here for the sake of getting past the adult content rating on Apple): "One evening in 1962, I was sitting at my usual table in the back of the Kettle of Fish, and Dylan came slouching in. He had been up at the Columbia studios with John Hammond, doing his first album. He was being very mysterioso about the whole thing, and nobody I knew had been to any of the sessions except Suze, his lady. I pumped him for information, but he was vague. Everything was going fine and, “Hey, would it be okay for me to record your arrangement of ‘House of the Rising Sun?’” [expletive]. “Jeez, Bobby, I’m going into the studio to do that myself in a few weeks. Can’t it wait until your next album?” A long pause. “Uh-oh.” I did not like the sound of that. “What exactly do you mean, ‘Uh-oh’?” “Well,” he said sheepishly, “I’ve already recorded it.” “You did what?!” I flew into a Donald Duck rage, and I fear I may have said something unkind that could be heard over in Chelsea." van Ronk and Dylan fell out for a couple of weeks, though they later reconciled, and van Ronk said of Dylan's performance "it was essentially my arrangement, but Bobby’s reading had all the nuance and subtlety of a Neanderthal with a stone hand ax, and I took comfort thereby." van Ronk did record his version, as we heard, but he soon stopped playing the song live because he got sick of people telling him to "play that Dylan song". The Animals learned the song from the Dylan record, and decided to introduce it to their set on their first national tour, supporting Chuck Berry. All the other acts were only doing rock and roll and R&B, and they thought a folk song might be a way to make them stand out -- and it instantly became the highlight of their act.  The way all the members except Alan Price tell the story, the main instigators of the arrangement were Eric Burdon, the only member of the group who had been familiar with the song before hearing the Dylan album, and Hilton Valentine, who came up with the arpeggiated guitar part. Their arrangement followed Dylan's rearrangement of van Ronk's rearrangement, except they dropped the scalar bassline altogether, so for example instead of a D with an F# in the bass they just play a plain open D chord -- the F# that van Ronk introduced is still in there, as the third, but the descending line is now just implied by the chords, not explicitly stated in the bass, where Chas Chandler just played root notes. In the middle of the tour, the group were called back into the studio to record their follow-up single, and they had what seemed like it might be a great opportunity. The TV show Ready Steady Go! wanted the Animals to record a version of the old Ray Charles song "Talking 'Bout You", to use as their theme. The group travelled down from Liverpool after playing a show there, and went into the studio in London at three o'clock in the morning, before heading to Southampton for the next night's show. But they needed to record a B-side first, of course, and so before getting round to the main business of the session they knocked off a quick one-take performance of their new live showstopper: [Excerpt: The Animals, "House of the Rising Sun"] On hearing the playback, everyone was suddenly convinced that that, not "Talking 'Bout You", should be the A-side. But there was a problem. The record was four minutes and twenty seconds long, and you just didn't ever release a record that long. The rule was generally that songs didn't last longer than three minutes, because radio stations wouldn't play them, but Most was eventually persuaded by Chas Chandler that the track needed to go out as it was, with no edits. It did, but when it went out, it had only one name on as the arranger -- which when you're recording a public domain song makes you effectively the songwriter. According to all the members other than Price, the group's manager, Mike Jeffrey, who was close to Price, had "explained" to them that you needed to just put one name down on the credits, but not to worry, as they would all get a share of the songwriting money. According to Price, meanwhile, he was the sole arranger. Whatever the truth, Price was the only one who ever got any songwriting royalties for their version of the song, which went to number one in the UK and the US. although the version released as a single in the US was cut down to three minutes with some brutal edits, particularly to the organ solo: [Excerpt: The Animals, "House of the Rising Sun (US edit)"] None of the group liked what was done to the US single edit, and the proper version was soon released as an album track everywhere The Animals' version was a big enough hit that it inspired Dylan's new producer Tom Wilson to do an experiment. In late 1964 he hired session musicians to overdub a new electric backing onto an outtake version of "House of the Rising Sun" from the sessions from Dylan's first album, to see what it would sound like: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "House of the Rising Sun (1964 electric version)"] That wasn't released at the time, it was just an experiment Wilson tried, but it would have ramifications we'll be seeing throughout the rest of the podcast. Incidentally, Dave van Ronk had the last laugh at Dylan, who had to drop the song from his own sets because people kept asking him if he'd stolen it from the Animals. The Animals' next single, "I'm Crying", was their first and only self-written A-side, written by Price and Burdon. It was a decent record and made the top ten in the UK and the top twenty in the US, but Price and Burdon were never going to become another Lennon and McCartney or Jagger and Richards -- they just didn't like each other by this point. The record after that, "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood", was written by the jazz songwriters Benny Benjamin and Horace Ott, and had originally been recorded by Nina Simone in an orchestral version that owed quite a bit to Burt Bacharach: [Excerpt: Nina Simone, "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood"] The Animals' version really suffers in comparison to that. I was going to say something about how their reinterpretation is as valid in its own way as Simone's original and stands up against it, but actually listening to them back to back as I was writing this, rather than separately as I always previously had, I changed my mind because I really don't think it does. It's a great record, and it's deservedly considered a classic single, but compared to Simone's version, it's lightweight, rushed, and callow: [Excerpt: The Animals, "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood"] Simone was apparently furious at the Animals' recording, which they didn't understand given that she hadn't written the original, and according to John Steel she and Burdon later had a huge screaming row about the record. In Steel's version, Simone eventually grudgingly admitted that they weren't "so bad for a bunch of white boys", but that doesn't sound to me like the attitude Simone would take. But Steel was there and I wasn't... "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" was followed by a more minor single, a cover of Sam Cooke's "Bring it on Home to Me", which would be the last single by the group to feature Alan Price. On the twenty-eighth of April 1965, the group were about to leave on a European tour. Chas Chandler, who shared a flat with Price, woke Price up and then got in the shower. When he got out of the shower, Price wasn't in the flat, and Chandler wouldn't see Price again for eighteen months. Chandler believed until his death that while he was in the shower, Price's first royalty cheque for arranging "House of the Rising Sun" had arrived, and Price had decided then and there that he wasn't going to share the money as agreed. The group quickly rushed to find a fill-in keyboard player for the tour, and nineteen-year-old Mick Gallagher was with them for a couple of weeks before being permanently replaced by Dave Rowberry. Gallagher would later go on to be the keyboard player with Ian Dury and the Blockheads, as well as playing on several tracks by the Clash. Price, meanwhile, went on to have a number of solo hits over the next few years, starting with a version of "I Put A Spell On You", in an arrangement which the other Animals later claimed had originally been worked up as an Animals track: [Excerpt: The Alan Price Set, "I Put A Spell On You"] Price would go on to make many great solo records, introducing the songs of Randy Newman to a wider audience, and performing in a jazz-influenced R&B style very similar to Mose Allison. The Animals' first record with their new keyboard player was their greatest single. "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place" had been written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weill, and had originally been intended for the Righteous Brothers, but they'd decided to have Mann record it himself: [Excerpt: Barry Mann, "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place"] But before that version was released, the Animals had heard Mann's piano demo of the song and cut their own version, and Mann's was left on the shelf. What the Animals did to the song horrified Cynthia Weill, who considered it the worst record of one of her songs ever -- though one suspects that's partly because it sabotaged the chances for her husband's single -- but to my mind they vastly improved on the song. They tightened the melody up a lot, getting rid of a lot of interjections. They reworked big chunks of the lyric, for example changing "Oh girl, now you're young and oh so pretty, staying here would be a crime, because you'll just grow old before your time" to "Now my girl, you're so young and pretty, and one thing I know is true, you'll be dead before your time is due", and making subtler changes like changing "if it's the last thing that we do" to "if it's the last thing we ever do", improving the scansion. They kept the general sense of the lyrics, but changed more of the actual words than they kept -- and to my ears, at least, every change they made was an improvement. And most importantly, they excised the overlong bridge altogether. I can see what Mann and Weill were trying to do with the bridge -- Righteous Brothers songs would often have a call and response section, building to a climax, where Bill Medley's low voice and Bobby Hatfield's high one would alternate and then come together. But that would normally come in the middle, building towards the last chorus. Here it comes between every verse and chorus, and completely destroys the song's momentum -- it just sounds like noodling: [Excerpt: Barry Mann, "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place"] The Animals' version, by contrast, is a masterpiece of dynamics, of slow builds and climaxes and dropping back down again. It's one of the few times I've wished I could just drop the entire record in, rather than excerpting a section, because it depends so much for its effect on the way the whole structure of the track works together: [Excerpt: The Animals, "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place"] From a creators' rights perspective, I entirely agree with Cynthia Weill that the group shouldn't have messed with her song. But from a listener's point of view, I have to say that they turned a decent song into a great one, and one of the greatest singles of all time "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place" was followed by another lesser but listenable single, "It's My Life", which seemed to reinforce a pattern of a great Animals single being followed by a merely OK one. But that was the point at which the Animals and Most would part company -- the group were getting sick of Most's attempts to make them more poppy. They signed to a new label, Decca, and got a new producer, Tom Wilson, the man who we heard earlier experimenting with Dylan's sound, but the group started to fall apart. After their next single, "Inside -- Looking Out", a prison work song collected by the Lomaxes, and the album Animalisms, John Steel left the group, tired of not getting any money, and went to work in a shop. The album after Animalisms, confusingly titled Animalism, was also mostly produced by Wilson, and didn't even feature the musicians in the band on two of the tracks, which Wilson farmed out to a protege of his, Frank Zappa, to produce. Those two tracks featured Zappa on guitar and members of the Wrecking Crew, with only Burdon from the actual group: [Excerpt: The Animals, "All Night Long"] Soon the group would split up, and would discover that their management had thoroughly ripped them off -- there had been a scheme to bank their money in the Bahamas for tax reasons, in a bank which mysteriously disappeared off the face of the Earth. Burdon would form a new group, known first as the New Animals and later as Eric Burdon and the Animals, who would have some success but not on the same level. There were a handful of reunions of the original lineup of the group between 1968 and the early eighties, but they last played together in 1983. Burdon continues to tour the US as Eric Burdon and the Animals. Alan Price continues to perform successfully as a solo artist. We'll be picking up with Chas Chandler later, when he moves from bass playing into management, so you'll hear more about him in future episodes. John Steel, Dave Rowberry, and Hilton Valentine reformed a version of the Animals in the 1990s, originally with Jim Rodford, formerly of the Kinks and Argent, on bass. Valentine left that group in 2001, and Rowberry died in 2003. Steel now tours the UK as "The Animals and Friends", with Mick Gallagher, who had replaced Price briefly in 1965, on keyboards. I've seen them live twice and they put on an excellent show -- though the second time, one woman behind me did indignantly say, as the singer started, "That's not Eric Clapton!", before starting to sing along happily... And Hilton Valentine moved to the US and played briefly with Burdon's Animals after quitting Steel's, before returning to his first love, skiffle. He died exactly four weeks ago today, and will be missed.

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Música de Contrabando
MÚSICA DE CONTRABANDO T30C073 Santiago Campillo y Paula Molina nos presentan su proyecto SONORA, de auténtico rock sureño (02/02/2021)

Música de Contrabando

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 89:26


En Música de Contrabando, revista diaria de música en Onda Regional de Murcia (orm.es, 00,00h). Hilton Valentine, que fundó The Animals a principios de los años 60 en compañía de Eric Burdon, Chas Chandler, Alan Price y John Steel, fue el autor de ese arpegio famoso en ‘House of the Rising Sun’. Este finde nefasto para la música también se ha llevado a SOPHIE, una de las productoras fundamentales del siglo XXI. Pasó de nuevo con Glastonbury y ha vuelto a pasar con Coachella. El festival californiano, que tenía que acontecer en Indio Valley en dos fines de semana de abril de este 2021, se ha cancelado tal y como sucedió hace un año a causa de la pandemia. El alabado último trabajo de The Killers, Imploding The Mirage, ha recibido un tratamiento Deluxe. La colección Deluxe contiene versiones desnudas o live de temas tan queridos como “Blowback” y “Caution,” además de la nueva canción, “C’est La Vie”. Brighton 64 publican nuevo single, “Debo marchar”,aparece en la cara B, quedó fuera del álbum anterior por falta de espacio y lo han querido recuperar en esta ocasión. Maika Makovski ha regresado , tras cinco años de ausencia, con el estreno de un nuevo single titulado Reaching out to you, de ritmo frenético. Clap your hands say yeah estrenan, arropados por cuerdas, "cyhsy, 2005", otro adelanto de New fragility, su nuevo disco, Khruangbin estrenan vídeo para la relajante "dearest alfred", de su último disco Mordechai, y estrenan masajeante remezcla que Knwledge ha hecho para el mismo tema. The Feels firmaron una de las mejores canciones de 2020, "She's probably not thinkin' of me". Christian Migliorese es un orfebre del Power Pop, de la melodía, de la canción perfecta y este single es una prueba de ello. No teníamos noticias de Octubre Banda Octubre desde que en 2015 publicaran el sensacional “Mouseland”, Pero, por fin, podemos escuchar un adelanto de su nuevo EP, que provocará la admiración de los seguidores de Teenage Fanclub y el sonido Rickembacker. Love of Lesbian publicarán el próximo 16 de abril ‘V.E.H.N.’, un nuevo disco que responde también al nombre de ‘Viaje épico hacia la nada’. El tercer sencillo que se acaba de dar a conocer resulta el más interesante. ‘El mundo’ es además uno de los virales del momento en Youtube España. En " MARGARITA QUEBRADA (live)" están incluidos los tres temas que el trío valenciano interpretaron en directo en el concierto emitido en el Festival internacional virtual Luna Negra el pasado 19 de diciembre de 2020, junto a "Mis ojos", una nueva canción grabada en estudio. Celeste lanza su álbum de debut ‘NOT YOUR MUSE’. El lanzamiento de su primer álbum viene a completar un año relevante para una artista de éxito en 2020, ganadora del BBC Sound y del premio Rising Star en los BRITS. La banda británica Clean Bandit presenta su nuevo single 'Higher' junto al rapero Iann dior. Sidecars publican “Galaxia”, una canción sobre el miedo y el instinto de supervivencia con unos versos que calan rápido («Júrame que no hay ciencia cierta / Solo ciencia ficción»), que se encuentra dentro de su último álbum “Ruido de Fondo”. Santiago Campillo y Paula Molina Garcia-Mora Paula Molina nos presentan su proyecto SONORA, de auténtico rock sureño, del que estrenamos un par de canciones.

Vox&Hops
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride)

Vox&Hops

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2021 46:13


A conversation about how he coped with 2020, his 1st brews, the soundtrack to his youth, dropping three releases during a pandemic, never taking the easy way out, why he still creates, using art as a cathartic release & his hangover cure. Throughout this interview Aaron was drinking Darkland Brewery 's "Old Earth" the My Dying Bride Lager which clocked in with a 4.5% ABV. & Matt was enjoying Kahnawake Brewing Co. 's "Wizard". This NEIPA poured out with a milky hazy veil, radiated tropical fruits on the nose, slammed a slightly sweet tangy citrus finish & was madly crushable despite its 6.8% ABV! This is a Heavy Montreal presents Vox&Hops episode! Heavy Montreal is Montreal's premier metal promoter. They host one of North America's best Metal Festivals & present countless amazing events during the rest of the year. I am truly honored & extremely excited to have them involved in the podcast. Make sure to check out Vox&Hops' Brewtal Awakenings Playlist which has been curated by the Metal Architect Jerry Monk himself on either Spotify or Apple Music. This playlist is packed with all the freshest, sickest & most extreme albums each week!!! *** Thanks to our friends at Heartbeat Hot Sauce Co. for sponsoring this episode! *** Photo Credit: John Steel Episode Links: My Dying Bride: http://mydyingbride.net/ Darkland Brewery: https://www.darklandbrewery.co.uk/ Kahnawake Brewing Co.: http://www.kahnawakebrewing.com/ Heavy Montreal: https://www.heavymontreal.com/en Vox&Hops Brewtal Awakening Playlist: Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/ca/playlist/brewtal-awakenings/pl.u-mJy8gErtNXD1gZB Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4VzBrrn0bRpaWtJNv8qa6k Heartbeat Hot Sauce Co.: https://www.heartbeathotsauce.com/ John Steel: https://johnsteelphotography.com/ Sound Talent Media: https://soundtalentmedia.com/ Support the Vox&Hops Podcast: https://voxandhops.bigcartel.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Darien Gold’s ALL THINGS PILATES
2020 Season Two highlight show

Darien Gold’s ALL THINGS PILATES

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2020 23:45


As Season Two comes to a close and we say good-bye 2020, we wanted to share four of our outstanding podcast and radio show interviews. We begin with John Steel, author of the hotly debated book, Caged Lion...

By Latin Men
Skincare Secrets w/ John Steel

By Latin Men

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2020


CEO/Founder of Steel Skin, John Steel, is here!!In a one-on-one interview with Kevin, John opens up about his experience being the child of immigrants and how that effected him. He describes what it was like to start a company completely on his own. John shares some skincare secrets, busts some beauty myths and tells us whether KYLIE or RIHANNA have the better skincare collection.Follow John on instagram @JSteelFollow his company Steel Skin @SteelSkincare or online www.steelskin.co

Darien Gold’s ALL THINGS PILATES
John Steel ~ Author of Caged Lion: Joseph Pilates & His Legacy

Darien Gold’s ALL THINGS PILATES

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2020 68:54


Our guest, John Steel, author of the recently published book, Caged Lion shares pieces of his story and the unique relationship he had with Joe Pilates. For Joe, his Contrology method would solve every physical and mental ailment to anyone who practiced it. For John, it was a time in his life when he needed something to help anchor him and so Contrology found its way into his life. John takes us back to the 1960’s when he first met Joe and Clara. Part biographical, part historical and even part controversial - this book has it all.

Ossom Sessions™
Ossom Sessions // 30.04.2020 // by Robert Peterson

Ossom Sessions™

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2020 60:00


1. Grace Jones - Love On Top Of Love (Killer Kiss) (The Cole & Clivilles Garage House Mix) Capitol Records 2. Mr. Lee - Pump That Body (Deep House Instrumental) Jive 3. Coflo - Lux (Radio Mix) Local Talk 4. Lars Behrenroth - Madness Last Night (Original Mix) Deeper Shades Recordings 5. DJ Steaw - Sky Hunt (Original Mix) Local Talk 6. Deee-Lite - Bittersweet Loving (Todd Terry Remix) Elektra 7. FOMO feat. Chaka Khan & Taka Boom & Mark Stevens - House Of Love (Extended version) Shaboom Records 8. Andy Lakey & John Steel & Ian Campbell - Uncontrollable (Original Mix) Dopewax 9. Kim English - Learn 2 Luv (Tommy Musto's Believe In Dub) Nervous Records 10. Kerri Chandler & Jerome Sydenham - For My Portugese Concubine (Original Mix) Ibadan 11. Miguel Migs - Lionels Jam (2012 Remix) ITH 12. Louis Benedetti feat. Sy Smith - I Want You For Myself B/W Revelation (Louis Benedetti Alternate vocal Mix) Soulshine 13. Christopher Cross - Ride Like The Wind (Joey Negro Extended Disco Mix) Z Records www.ossomrecords.com DON’T KNOCK, THIS IS OSSOM.

Safia Minney talks with George Monbiot
Safia Minney meets John Steel

Safia Minney talks with George Monbiot

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2020 35:23


Episode 15: John Steel Safia talks to John Steel, CEO of Cafédirect, about the iconic & pioneering Fairtrade coffee brand that put Fairtrade into our supermarkets in the 1990s.John explains how starting his career with Rowntree, a company established on Quaker traditions, grounded him in the guiding principle that business should be about improving society and not just about making money. Rowntree was acquired by Nestle in 1988. “We need to find a way of getting the world to change more rapidly and have generosity of spirit that human beings should have,” says John.Cafédirect began in 1991 as a response to the 1989 global collapse in coffee prices and was the first brand to go into the supermarkets, promoted jointly by Oxfam, Traidcraft, Equal Exchange and Twin Trading.It also launched the Fairtrade mark, from which hundreds of products and product categories have followed. It has grown to £14 million turnover, growing 10% in 2019, led by its’ popular Machu Picchu roast filter coffee and a premium range launched with Waitrose. The company works with approximately 600,000 small-scale coffee farmers. John says “the environment is now so positive for businesses like Cafédirect where the consumer is increasingly saying ‘I want to choose to use my money to make a difference’.”In the future, John explains that he would like to raise awareness of how business can be done better, to influence other companies to buy in the right way and “work closely with farm communities to make a profound difference on the environment and their livelihoods, as the future of food and drink depends on that.”He recalls visiting a small, struggling co-operative near the ruins of MachuPicchu and seeing how the Fairtrade business model can make a real difference. Cafédirect were able to support the community with a loan, enabling them to not only survive, but flourish and establish a reliable income stream and go on to win an export award for quality coffee.He explains that Cafédirect work through more than 40 co-operatives , varying from small groups of 300 families to many thousands. The company doesn’t want farmers to be dependent on Cafédirect so their business is a small percentage of the farmer’s total income. John wishes that more coffee companies would buy coffee from the farmers on Fairtrade terms.The Fairtrade model ensures farmers get a minimum price guarantee and the co-operative adds a premium to improve communities. John points out the importance of this guarantee in a volatile market - coffee prices can go down to as low as 88c per kg , much lower than the $1.35 farmers need to subsist. “A consistent reasonable price is a basic requirement in a moral society.”John believes that there is still room for consumers to understand the real connection between the coffee farmers and their role as ‘stewards of nature’. He says “Cafédirect is a pioneering business and change needs to occur with greater scale and impact. Businesses managed properly can mobilise consumers just as David Attenborough mobilised consumers against plastic waste. The business model Cafédirect uses is successful. When you talk to a student about the different business models you can adopt, trading on fair trade terms, buying organically, working directly with small holder farmers and working with them to help them think about how to manage the environment, every single person in the room will go away thinking ‘why should I buy anything else?’”John admits some frustration competing with a growing number of Fair Trade and ethical labels and advocates one mark which guarantees ‘good’ business. As the first coffee company to become a ‘B Corp’, and working closely with social enterprise UK, he sees Cafédirect leading the way, “I see a collaborative business model that is looking at how we improve the lives of farmers and setting an example of how business can lead change.”John and Safia finish by discussing thought leadership and systems change in the light of the events of ...

Dream Business Radio
Software for Startups – John Steel

Dream Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2020 27:33


Dream Business Radio #379 On this week’s show I interview the founder and CEO of Series Code, a company that develops soft-ware for startups. John has been coding since he was a teenager and together with his team is able to now help startups build and maintain software needed to grow their businesses. John is also a world class poker player! Download MP3 Connect to John on their website: www.seriescode.com/

Social Enterprise + Fair Trade (WFTO)
Talking social enterprise

Social Enterprise + Fair Trade (WFTO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2020 19:20


What exactly is a social enterprise? How can they transform the business world? In this episode, Erinch Sahan speaks with John Steel, CEO of Cafedirect, and Peter Holbrook, Chief Executive of Social Enterprise UK on the future of mission-led enterprises and the role of ethical business.

fred and walk in the house music
LA BIBLIOTHEQUE CHAPITRE 1

fred and walk in the house music

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2020 62:08


John Steel - souljam3000 - Jay Kay sunset remix (NEW) Alastair Lane - my love (NEW) Adeva - beautiful loce - classic club mix Anabel Englund - london headache Soul Casino - come on train (NEW) Alan Braxe the Spimes - time machine - Chateaubriand remix Positive Flow feat Heidi Vogel - children of the sun Moonmen - A' Bullett LPA City - sunrise - Fred de la House Danube Dance Unik Chill (not commercial) Bond Jobe - in your arms - Late night mix Jask Jocie - surrender your love - Jask's romantic reprise Jo Piacello - cubanito (NEW) Triangle Sun - summer of our love

Rodney Dion Live
Original Member & Drummer of The Animals John Steel

Rodney Dion Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2019 13:40


Talking to Original Member & Drummer of The Animals John Steel. Promoting the Aussie tour and diving deep into the background of The Animals' number one hit song "House Of The Rising Sun".

Scars and Guitars
John Steel (The Animals)

Scars and Guitars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2019 62:51


John Steel (The Animals). Andrew and John cover a heap of ground in this chat. Made possible by The Animals 2019 Australian tour.

Medical Error Interviews
Elsie Saba: Tell the World of Doctor's Death Traps, Deceit and a License to Kill

Medical Error Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2019 52:55


Author Elsie Saba tells about her experience of misdiagnosis of an ovarian tumour and subsequent surgery where the surgeon removed the tumour, her ovary and - to Elsie’s surprise - he also took out her uterus. But Elsie didn’t have an ovarian tumour. And the surgeon didn’t remove her ovary. What the surgeon did do was leave Elsie with immense pain, an inability to urinate, falsified her medical records, and then told her it was all in her head. As you will hear, Elsie is a fighter and wants to warn others about the dangers in the medical industry and has penned an account of her medical experiences in her book Tell the World of Doctor’s Death Traps, Deceit and a License to Kill. SHOW NOTES Fulbright Scholarship 0:05:30 Elsie Blanche Saba was born in 1930 - born in Nazareth, when it was in Palestine - when she was 2 months she went with her mother to see her father who was working on an archeaological dig in Egypt for Princeton University - then transferred to Antioch (Turkey) to excavate Roman artefacts - Elsie went to a private school 0:07:30 WW II started and Princeton closed the project - her family to moved to Haifa until Germans bombed and they moved to Nazareth - her parents enrolled Elsie in Smith's College in Jerusalem until 10th grade boarding school with German nuns - when war got worse and they closed the school - so her parents hired French nuns to teach Elsie - when she finished high school, Elsie told her parents she wanted to smuggle herself to the American University in Beirut, Lebanon 0:09:30 Her father said she would be killed crossing the mountains - Elsies parents hired a smuggler to get Elsie across the mountains to Lebanon - eventually she went back and forth 4 times 0:11:30 After she graduated from university she returned to Nazareth until 1955 and moved to the US to attend Kalamazoo University with Masters Degree - in 1962 Elsie won the National Travel Award and in 1964 she won a Fulbright Scholarship to study in Paris 0:12:30 Elsie taught high school in San Diego - in 1972 while helping her students she fell on the floor and went to her internist and he took an x-ray of her back and her ankle - Elsie had severe pain but the internist said it would go away - then Elsie started hemorrhaging and went to a gynecologist and he said Elsie had an orange size ovarian cyst and he needed to operate - Elsie said 'no', she felt she the problem was in her right kidney - but he wouldn't listen and Elsie got another referral 0:14:30 Else went to Dr Vandenberg and he agreed she needed an IVP (x-ray of kidneys) and that she did not have an ovarian cyst - but her internist, Dr Pund, refused the IVP - Elsie begged him for IVP because she knew her right kidney was the problem - Dr Pund said he was not following Dr Vandenberg's orders and told Elsie to have the operation to remove the ovarian cyst - after the operation Elsie could not urinate and told her gynecologist and he said it was 'in her head' 0:16:30 The gynecologist said her removed the cyst and her right ovary and a hysterectomy - for 3 months she went to many doctors and the gynecologist said Elsie was healthy, but her internist refused to sign her disability form and told her to go back to work - Elsie told him she couldn't urinate, and he said he would tell the gynecologist to send Elsie for IVP (to x-ray her kidney)     Ovarian cyst surgery   0:18:30 Elsie asked the internist to send her for IVP but he refused and 'didn't want to get involved' - Elsie went for kidney x-ray and then was sent to a urologist and he said he had to do exploratory operation to find the problem - but Elsie's parents said 'no' and told her to go Dr John Steel, urologist and he took x-ray and diagnosed Elsie with a utero pelvic obstruction and that she was born with it 0:20:30 The nerves of the right kidney are pressing against the ureter and causing the obstruction - he sent Elsie to the hospital for an operation - when she woke she could not move her hands, her arms, legs, or breathe, she was dying - Elsie's parents moved from Israel to San Diego 0:22:30 Elsie's parents hired 3 nurses to care for Elsie in the hospital - Elsie told Dr Pund that she did not believe him when he said she had an ovarian cyst - Dr Pund said he saw the cyst and the ovary removed, but Elsie did not believe him - Elsie had a draining tube inserted to drain urine - Elsie was also harassed by her employer / school 0:24:30 Elsie's class was full of trouble makers - the school had the highest criminal rates - their school wanted Elsie to return, but Elsie said she was too sick - 4 days later Elsie was back home but so sick, she will never forget it: Elsie could not move or ask for help, but she saw a beam of light focus on her utero pelvic obstruction 0:26:30 Elsie went to many doctors telling them the location of her pain, they all said it was 'in her head' - Elsie had to return to work teaching but was still in severe pain and went to see Dr Pund, but he was not there, so Elsie saw his colleague Dr Carmichael, but he refused to help her - Elsie tried many other hospitals and none would help her - she wrote many letters but no one would help her 0:28:30 Elsie's bungalow and classroom where very cold - when Elsie got home from work she cried because of the pain - in the middle of one night, Elsie heard a voice in her sleep telling her to see Dr Michael DeBakey in Houston, Texas - this was after Stanford doctors told her they would do nothing for her - Elsie went to an attorney and said insurance was not paying her because her medical files have been falsified 0:30:30 She hired the attorney - the hearings kept getting postponing for 8 years, then Elsie was told that the statute of limitations prevented her from presenting some of her evidence - Elsie asked her attorney why he didn't protect her, and he said 'because you are nothing, you are a woman and these are 6 male doctors and you are nothing, he kept repeating 0:32:30 Without a doctor, Elsie had to get treatment other ways - she got doxycycline from Tijuana in order to survive - in 1979 Dr DeBakey hospitalized Elsie for 2.5 weeks to run many tests - Elsie found out she still had her ovary and the hysterectomy was unnecessary, and the ovarian cyst did not exist, she never had it - in the court room, the defense claimed Elsie's right ovary had been removed, but she had the recent x-ray to prove it, but the judge refused to allow that evidence     Courts are for the rich   0:34:30 Dr DeBakey's report, which is in Elsie's book, said she still had her ovary, and her right kidney had some minor damage from the obstruction, but she should never have been given toxic antibiotics from Dr Steel, they made her very sick - and she didn't even have an infection according to the Houston urologist - but no doctors want to be involved in the scandal 0:36:30 Elsie had many tests from different hospitals and none of them showed infection - before Dr DeBakey died, Elsie went back to get the tests repeated - he told her she needed annual xrays of her kidneys and an MRI - Elsie made a mistake in telling Dr Pund that she was seeing Dr DeBakey and word got back to Dr Steel 0:38:30 A nurse told Elsie that Dr Steel instructed another doctor not to tell Elsie the true facts - Elsie had a dream of the doctors pushing over a cliff but she managed to escape - Elsie called a taxi at 10pm and snuck out of the hospital without being seen - and in the morning flew back to San Diego - for the next 12 years Elsie lived with pain and without a doctor - she then met Dr Marino 0:41:00 Dr Marino was her doctor until he retired a few years ago, now she has no doctor - Dr Steel had done Elsie's abdominal surgery through her back, cutting her nerves, including her sciatica, and that's why she can't walk and has to use a walker 0:42:30 Elsie has written her book to warn others that going to a prominent doctor does not mean they are honest - going to the best hospital, does not mean they are honest - Elsie has a nurse who comes once a month to re-new her medication and will write a prescription - Elsie realizes she will never get help in the US because of her falsified medical record 0:44:30 Elsie wants to send copies of her book to woman in Congress - 'wake up', you have to pass laws to stop doctors from falsifying records, cannot prevent other doctors from helping patients - the law has to be changed - American courts are corrupted and if you're not a millionaire, the courts are not for you - the courts are for the rich doctors, the rich insurance companies - Elsie had to pay 1,000s of dollars in premiums and her insurance company did not help her because her health records were falsified 0:46:00 Elsie's attorney wonders if the judge in her case was bribed - Elsie sued 6 doctors, but she didn't want their money, she just wanted her medical record to have the truth so she can get help - years later Elsie found out Dr Steel's license was revoked for scandalous reasons - Elsie couldn't write her book sooner because she kept falling - she broke her wrist, her hip and injured her liver 0:48:00 On one of Elsie's mountain crossings, she met a Catholic priest, Father Michael, who said he was a psychic - she later found out he was the best psychic in the Middle East - he told Elsie that she would have a severe operation in her lower abdomen - he said she would die for a few seconds but would make it 0:50:00 The priest also told Elsie that she would write a book about her experience and it would be heard by many and change a few things in the medical profession - Elsie paid for the publishing of the book because she wants to help people - she wants to tell people that if someone says you're crazy, don't believe them, believe yourself - and that is Elsie's story.       Connect with Elsie   Buy Elsie's book on Amazon   Buy Elsie's book from Outskirts Press   Social media:   https://facebook.com/outskirtspress https://twitter.com/outskirtspress https://pinterest.com/outskirtspress https://instagram.com/outskirtspress   _____________________________________________________   Like what you read / heard / watched? Support Medical Error Interviews Become a Patron Support Medical Error Interviews on Patreon by becoming a Patron for $2 / month.  Or $5 / month to be a Premium Patron and watch the video versions of Medical Error Interviews. Be my Guest If you are a survivor, a victim’s surviving family member, a health care worker, advocate, or policy maker and have a medical error experience you would like to share, send me an email with a brief description of your experience:  RemediesPodcast@gmail.com  Scott Simpson:  Counsellor + Podcast Host + Patient Advocate I am a counsellor, patient advocate, and - before I became sick and disabled - a passionate triathlete. Work hard, train hard, rest hard. Like me, many of my clients at Remedies Counseling have experienced the often devastating effects of medical error. I have been living with HIV since 1998, and thanks to research and medications, it is not a problem in my life.  I have been living with ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis) since 2012, and thanks in part to medical error, it is a big problem in my life. Need a Counsellor? If you need a counsellor for your experience with medical error, or living with a chronic illness(es), I offer online video counseling appointments. **For my health and life balance, I limit my number of counseling clients.**  Email me to learn more or book an appointment:  RemediesOnlineCounseling@gmail.com     

Rotary Matters
Rotary Youth Leadership Award

Rotary Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2019 77:09


RYLA is a week long residential personal development course for 18-27 yrs old, which gives young people a chance to come together in a supportive environment to learn about teamwork, communication and motivation and to develop life long leadership skills. We meet RYLArian Luke Prangell who attended RYLA 2018 and John Steel, from St Ives Rotary Club who directs RYLA in this area. An inspiring story of Rotary in action.

Mr. G from French Riviéra
SAVOIRfaire by meSSieurG sur la Pl@Ge

Mr. G from French Riviéra

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2019 142:13


TRACKLIST 0:00 Chris Isaak - Wicked Game 5:30 Love & Money - Strange Kind Of Love 25:00 Love Unlimited Orchesta - Bayou (12 Club Version) 31:00 Gladys Knight & The Pips - I Heard It Through The Grapevine 34:30 Barry White - What Am I Gonna Do With You 42:00 Barry White - Your Sweetness Is My Weakness 44:00 Barry White - My Sweetness Is My Weakness 49:00 COEO - Japanese Woman 55:00 John Steel, Andy Lakey and Ayden Vice - You Want Me 58:00 Martina Topley Bird - Crystalised 1:00:00 Martina Topley Bird - Crystalized 1:11:00 Black Cadmium/Kevin Ney - The Nasty 1:14:30 Edwin Starr - War 1:20:00 Alessandro Sarsano/Jose De Divina - Brazilian Sky (Instrumental Dub) 1:26:00 Local Options - Be My Satellite 1:29:00 Mood J - Looking Further 1:31:30 Mood ll Swing - Sunlight In My Eyes (Satoshi Fumi Re-Edit) 1:42:00 Alex Herrera - Lift Me Up (Original Mix) 1:45:00 Christos Fourkis - Imommaye 1:46:30 DJ Steaw - Beat For U (Original Mix) 1:49:00 Morsy - Balearic Bounce 1:52:00 Igor Gonya;Frikardo - Alcopoisoning (The SyntheTigers Remix) 1:53:00 Frikardo - Alcopoisoning 1:56:00 Ioan - Saltwater 1:57:00 Jonk & Spook - Party! (Original Mix) 2:06:30 Kaskade - Gonna Make It 2:09:30 Kimara Lovelace - Circles 2:16:00 Marvin Gaye - Ain't Nothing Like The Real Thing (The Rurals Cool Mix) 2:20:30 Mike Millrain - Good Luv 4 U (Original Mix) 2:24:30 Mistura feat. Angela Johnson - Do You Love Me?

Music From 100 Years Ago

Some of the hits from 100 years ago.  Songs include: Dardanella, You Ain't Heard Nothing Yet, Till We Meet Again, Take Me to the Land of Jazz, A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody and I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles. Performers include: Ben Selvin, Al Jolson, Marion Harris, Vernon Dalhart, Bert Williams and John Steel.

Garage Rock
Interview: The Animals

Garage Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2018 8:35


Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, The Animals are heading to Australia to play their greatest hits across the country. Founding member of The Animals back in 1963, drummer John Steel has a chat with Cam and Steve about the upcoming tour and the legacy of their songs including 'House of the Rising Sun' and 'We Gotta Get Out of This Place'.

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast
Korean War #24: UNprecedented

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2018 41:34


UNprecedented - get it, because UN = United Nations, and it's unprecedented because it's never happened before?! I'm a genius! Episode 24: UNprecedented looks at the role of the United Nations, which the US used, for a variety of reasons, to frame its intervention in Korea. Here we look at the key moments in the history of UN, and we chart its development over the late 1940s as it became more heavily involved in the issues of the post-war world. Many nations placed their faith and trust in this new order; it was eagerly hoped that it would not go the way of the League of Nations, and that the UN at least would not cower in the face of armed aggression. So it was that the UN, by summer 1950, had built upon a history of peaceful intervention, foreign debate and great expectations even before Washington determined to appeal through the UN for the act in Korea that was desired.Although it couldn't be known at this early stage what way the Korean War would go, it was believed that the best way to legitimise the American act would be to operate through this new body, for a variety of reasons. The two resolutions on 25th and 27th June will be here examined and placed in their proper context, as will the strange absence of the Soviet Union from the UN Security Council. With no Soviet veto, everything could proceed as planned, and in this episode we return the point of Stalin's end goal - that of uniting the West against communism in Korea, and then against the Chinese. These goals were possible thanks to the UN, and thus it has to be said, as it did before, Washington again made Stalin's job much easier than it would have been had he been forced to go it alone.As we'll note though, the US wasn't doing anything especially extraordinary by asking the UN to weigh in on the Korean issue. After all there had been Korean commissions sponsored and supported by the UN since after 1945, so it seemed only logical to many within the UN's many Korea bodies to approve of the defence of the South Korean regime, and to condemn the North in the strongest possible terms. Such condemnation, in time, would be used to justify still greater actions, and from these protocols would the several armed delegations from 16 different states emerge. All such developments were instigated here.********Music used: "Bring Back My Blushing Rose", by John Steel, published in 1921. Available:http://freemusicarchive.org/…/A…/Bring_Back_My_Blushing_RoseKorean War section of the website Remember to BEFIT!B is for blogE is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.comF is for Facebook, the Page and the GroupI is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribeT is for TELL ANYONE!Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years WarAre you TeamFerdinand or

KISS FM Weekend Essentials
Silverfox - Weekend Essentials KISS FM 4th May

KISS FM Weekend Essentials

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2018 115:41


ON THE RELOAD!!! Weekend Essentials on KISS FM. Sevenever, wilyamdelove, liya fran - Heartbeat Casa Devi - Peaceful Thoughts - Club Mix Andy Lakey, John Steel, Iam Campbell - Uncontrollable - Stolen Soul Remix Books - The Spice Must Flow Derrick Da House - Sweet Chocolate Din Jay - Need U Finskit - White Drawler Henrik Villard - Stand For Something Thierry Tomas - Easy Thierry Tomas - Pusher Will Sonic, Iner, Radkevich - Riga Balsam Saison - El Topo Roberto Pedoto - One Way Easttown - Life Easttown - Circulation David Lowell Smith - Pushing Buttons Camio Sanjuan - Gofio Icee1 - Anything Computer - Silverfox Remix Crazy Rabbits - Stone Disco Don Rimini - Workin With Peter Brown - The Break Arie Mando - Be True 2 me Dimitri DJ - Music Is The First Language Jazzman Wax, Bonetti , Iban Montoro - Kumba

House Arrest With AM2PM
House Arrest 035

House Arrest With AM2PM

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2018 119:56


London based AM2PM aka DJ Matt Kye and Alec Sun Drae in the mix with 2 hours of deep, tech and bumpy House and a touch of Garage with some exclusive promo action just for you topped with some regular features: “House Arrest Hat Trick” - 3 classic tracks back to back as well us “One From Us” which showcases one of AM2PM’s original releases or remixes. So Lock in and let these guys Lock you up - This is House Arrest! 01. Patrick Reeman – Turn It Up (AM2PM Extended Mix)02. DJ E Clyps – Pancakes (Extended Club Mix)03. Chrissy Feat Miles Bonny – Back In Time (Extended Mix)04. Liz Asaro – Take Me Home (Oggie B Remix)05. Detroits Filthiest – Handprint (Aeroplane Remix)06. Back To 96 – No More Lonely (Urban Youth Make 'Em Shuffle Mix)07. Hot Key – Amore (Original Mix)08. Rapson Feat Nathan Thomas – Heat (Scott Diaz Remix)09. Syn Cole Feat Kirstin – Got The Feeling (Zac Samuals Remix)10. Ben Dooks – Nocturne (Original Mix)11. Full Intention & Blaze – Give It Time (Original Mix)12. DAF & Blackhill – Right Place (Tom Finn Remix)13. John Steel, Ian Campbell – Detroitism (Original Mix)14. Paul Morrell Feat Indigo Marshall – Desire (Freejak Remix)15. Swing City – Calling (Original Mix)16. Campaner – Free Your Body (Original Mix)17. Cabrillo – Keep The Record Playin (Original Mix)18. Y.O.U.N.G - Lazy (AM2PM Club Mix)19. Dominique Young Unique – Karate (Bump & Flex Club Mix)20. HOUSE ARREST (TRACK OF THE MONTH) 21. Kings Of Tomorrow Feat Kandace Springs – Faded (Sandy Rivera Classic Mix)HOUSE ARREST GUEST HAT TRICK – JC Unique (Unique 2 Rhythm Records)01. 86 Deep – Hot Night (Original Mix)02. Sebb Junior – My Love My Sins (Original Mix)03. JC Unique – Chase The Sun (Original Mix)HOUSE ARREST (ONE FROM US)22. Stephen Nicholls – Skies The Limit (AM2PM Remix)

House Arrest With AM2PM
House Arrest 011

House Arrest With AM2PM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2017 120:11


London based AM2PM aka DJ Matt Kye and Alec Sun Drae in the mix with 2 hours of deep, tech and bumpy House and a touch of Garage with some exclusive promo action just for you topped with some regular features: “House Arrest Hat Trick” - 3 classic tracks back to back as well us “One From Us” which showcases one of AM2PM’s original releases or remixes. So Lock in and let these guys Lock you up - This is House Arrest! 1. Electronic Youth – The Way It Was (Filtered mix) 2. Ryan Blyth X Scrufizzer X Rae Hill – You & Me (Extended mix) 3. Stephen Nicholls – Feel Devotion (Original Mix) 4. Ryan Riback – One Last Time (Sonny Whartons lets not complicate it dub) 5. Teddy Black – Alexas Groove (Original mix) 6. Juic3box & Alice French – True Love (Gue?? Who Remix) 7. Eat More Cake – Hide The Light (Hide from the main room mix) 8. John Steel, Ian Campbell,Andy Lakey – You Get so Give (Original mix) 9. Xander Ace – Give it Up (Stonebridge, Damon Hall Remix) 10. Axel Doorman – This Aint A Classic (Original mix) 11. Cacciola – Paradise (Extended Mix) 12. Gershon Jackson – Huggin & A Luvin (Chocolate Puma Remix) 13. Lovra Feat Tess Leah – Right Back (Original mix) 14. Jaques Le Noir – Petra (Original mix) 15. Austin Mahone Feat Pitbull – Lady (Scott Forshaw & Greg Steiner Remix) 16. Dario D'Attis – I Cant Stop (Original mix) 17. DJ SKT – Must Be A Reason (Club Mix) 18. Maff Boothroyd Feat AWR – World Within My Hand (Extended Mix) 19. Hurlee – True Love (Original Mix) 20. MDE X Tough Love Feat Tess Leah – Magical (Extended Mix) 21. 1st Stop White Label – Go To Work (Nouvelles Holding on Remix) 22. Nelson – Badbwoy Sound (Original Mix)HOUSE ARREST (TRACK OF THE MONTH) 23. Mike La Funk Feat Lyla Bull – Alive (Cup & String Remix)HOUSE ARREST (HAT TRICK) 24. Baby D – Everyones Gotta Learn Sometime (Original mix) 25. Black Box – Ride On Time (Original mix) 26. S Express – Theme from S Express (Original Mix)HOUSE ARREST (ONE FROM US) 27. AM2PM – Turn Me Out (Original mix)

townHOUSE - seductive House Mixes
townHOUSE 54~Vocal & Deep House mix (ft on BeachGrooves.com) inc Guest mix by EDDISON

townHOUSE - seductive House Mixes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2017 0:16


townHOUSE 54~A seductive mix of Vocal & Deep House tunes ╭ Head to my Mixcloud link to listen again ╰▶ www.mixcloud.com/jakarl/townhouse-54 As heard on BeachGrooves.com Monday 30th Jan 2017 Spain's No.1 Deep House DJ Station Includes guest mix by EDDISON Tracklist: 1. Cimo Fränkel-Too Much In Love (Groozm Ext) [Armada Deep] 2. Stolen Soul & John Steel & Ian Campbell ft Talia Shewchuk-Mean To Me (Vocal) [Karmic Power Records] 3. Memoryman Aka Uovo-Dance Track (Orig) [DFTD] 4. Airdice-Hey Chica (Toni The Mmg and Bennisch) [Musicheads Lounge] 5. Joeski David Herrero-Rise Up (Orig) [Maya Records] 6. Black Coffee ft Toshi-Buya (Loco Dice Kliptown Love) [Get Physical Music] EDDISON GUEST MIX 1. B Ayce ft Stephanie-Hold On (Soulfuledge) [Duffnote] 2. Othersoul-Ahora Es (Orig) [Tejal] 3. Spencer Morales ft Randy Roberts-Without Your Love (Sean McCabe Classic) [Quantize Recordings] 4. Inner Souls-Neighbourhood (Ross Couch Vox Dub) [Liquid Deep] 5. Kenny Dope pres DJ Gomi ft Antonio Hart-Piano Groove (Main) [Dopewax] 6. Souxsoul-Remember Me (Soulmagic) [Deeptown Music] 7. Joey Negro-Free Bass (Joey Negro Funk Equation) [Rebirth]

Luke and Susie Podcast
Episode 290: John Steel from The Animals; Rowdy McLean - stupid, dumb or both?

Luke and Susie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2017 26:43


The original line-up of English band The Animals had a short but sweet reign on the music charts in the 60's. With a number of line-up changes over the years, The Animals & Friends are still gigging, featuring original members John Steel & Mick Gallagher. They're touring Australia in May, and we caught up with John to walk down memory lane. For more info, see the episode page: http://lukeandsusie.com/portfolio-item/episode-290-john-steel-from-the-animals-rowdy-mclean-stupid-dumb-or-both/

Makkeno Podcast
Dmitriy Makkeno - Live Soulful 01.02.2017

Makkeno Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2017 70:21


ДЖИНГЛЫ ОТСУТСТВУЮТ !!! Jingle MISSING  00:00 Soulbridge feat. Raye Cole - Got My Eyes On You (Classic Mix) 05:06 Al Mack & Jaqueline & Louie Balo & Mack Vibe - Mr Meaner (feat. Jaqueline) (Louie Balo Edit) 07:19 Stolen Soul & John Steel & Ian Campbell feat. Talia Shewchuk - Mean to Me (Vocal Mix) 09:54 Jerem A feat. Bibi Provence - I'm Gonna Do My Thang (Jerem A Funky Mix) 12:56 Bart Gori - Tell Me (Vocal Mix) 15:30 Bart Gori - Tell Me (Vocal Mix) 18:41 DJ N-Joy feat. Danny Losito - Just Love Will Do (Delicious Of Funk Remix) 20:46 Cimieon feat. Letta - Creep (Husky's Bobbin Head Mix) 25:14 Kindred Soul - Don't Wanna Be (K-Soul Groove Mix) 29:17 Cristian Manolo & Luca Rutigiano - Night of Love Forever (House Device Fly Mix) 32:36 Seb Skalski feat. Donna Hidalgo - Crossroads Of Love (Original Album Mix) 35:17 Dezarate & Freddy Marquez - Welcome To Ibiza (Original Mix) 37:30 Alex Aleman - JazzMe (Original Mix) 38:19 Valerio Conte & Marcello Ferrarese - Joyful (Original Mix) 42:30 Papa Tony feat. Jade MayJean Peters - Come Closer (Allovers Remix) 45:15 Four Kings Ft. Sybil - Together You & I (Sanny X Disco 54 Remix Club Mix) 48:51 Norty Cotto feat. Michelle Rivera - You Deserve (Original Mix) 49:40 Luca Lala feat. Tiziano Di Sansa - Sax Pleasure (Original Mix) 51:08 Dave Mayer & Husky feat. Tommie Cotton - Feel the Music (Original Mix) 53:30 Random Soul - Wonderland (Avon Stringer Remix) 57:22 Aeroplane & Purple Disco Machine Ft. Aloe Blacc - Counting On Me (Original Mix) 59:34 Distant People - No I Ain't Done (The Squeeze Classic Redzone Mix) 1:03:26 Ralphi Rosario & Linda Clifford - I Hear The Music (Demuir's Deep Inside U Remix)