Podcasts about showing

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 5,861PODCASTS
  • 7,769EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about showing

Show all podcasts related to showing

Latest podcast episodes about showing

TonioTimeDaily
Porn star stories

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:05


"4. Has working in adult entertainment made you more aware of your sexual health? Son of the Seas: “Yes, seeing yourself on camera makes you look at yourself a little closer. When it comes to working with other models in the industry being safe is one of the most important aspects of making content. I looked to porn for knowledge about sex, and I know others are still doing so. Showing that sex is both steamy and safe is what we as porn actors need to be doing.” 5. Have you ever had a partner that just couldn't deal with your job? Son of the Seas: “I've been in a polyamorous relationship with my two amazing boyfriends for three years now. Two of us work in the adult entertainment industry but we have never let this affect our relationship. We talk about everything that we are doing for work and decide things as a unit. Being 100% transparent with your partners is the only way to make a relationship work, whether or not you work in porn.” Tatt Twink: “I've definitely had boyfriends that have had a hard time with the idea of ‘sharing me' sexually with another person. I've always tried to be transparent around my partners when it comes to business, so they know there's nothing to hide.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Latino Happy Hour
64 - Showing Nalgita

Latino Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 96:02


This week on the happy hour, we talk about exhibition boxing, showing nalgita on IG, and those kids that sat out a song. Plus, no one must go but there is an interesting question.

Now Showing with Mike and Wayne
Now Showing with Mike and Wayne EP 67: Slasher Movies

Now Showing with Mike and Wayne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 64:32


This week we talk slasher movies.  Because of technical difficulties, we did not review any films this week.  The ones that were supposed to be for this week, will be on next weeks podcast.  We hope you enjoy our discussion of some great films.  New episodes every Friday.

Your Best Beautiful Life
89. Your Thoughts Are Showing

Your Best Beautiful Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 15:40


Welcome to episode 89! In this episode, Dr. Edie talks about how your thoughts are showing in your actions. You have the power to take your thoughts captive, listen to see how Dr. Edie does!   *********************************************   Everyone I know says they want to change their life. So few people I know actually do. The reason? They find change to be way harder than they anticipated and it's so easy to give up on yourself. You've probably been there too many times to count. You know something needs to change and you've really tried. But as soon as you get on track, life throws a curve ball at you. It feels like giving up on your goal is inevitable. Something HAS TO GIVE. I know, I've been there and I know the frustration. I also know the toll it took on me physically and on my emotional and mental health. I created my program just for YOU. FOR US. Join us in Life Mentoring School today!!    *********************************************   ★ SUBSCRIBE ♡ TO THE YOUTUBE CHANNEL (https://youtube.com/c/EdieWadsworthlifementoring)   ★ SUBSCRIBE ♡ TO THE PODCAST (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-life-mentoring-school-podcast/id1472947590)   Also follow me at: ►http://instagram.com/ediewadsworth ►http://facebook.com/Dr.EdieWadsworth ►http://lifeingraceblog.com

NYLO Music
SixxFoot - Boogieland (Extended Mix) | NYLO NY022X

NYLO Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:41


NYLO is excited to welcome back British sensation SixxFoot. The duo returns after their last outing hit the number 1 spot across the board in Beatport confirming their status as the next big thing. SixxFoot's sound profile resonates throughout their original music which is upbeat, atmospheric with some great vibes and iconic fills. It's fun with summertime feelings always shining thru that will help you get up and get a move on. Their latest EP comprises of 2 forward-thinking, feel-good UK house inspired, cut up house tracks. SixxFoot get us going with 'Boogieland' a moody and groovy driven tune with a cheeky vibe that leaves a long-lasting impression and will get any dance floor thrilled. 'Boogieland' is a perfect example of how SixxFoot is able to revitalize dated sounds and give them new shine, adding a stunning Jupiter 8 like synth bassline combined with a long ethereal pad, which rounds off the release perfectly and feels like the monumental end to a great night out. Next up is the title track 'Aiyana'; which delivers a totally tantalizing creation of temperamental basslines, supernatural electric wizardry, seductive echoing and a rocking piano. Showing off SixxFoot's signature soaring synths and lust-filled melodies that make for an Infectious blend of romance and debauchery. 'Aiyana' is dance floor gold in the purest sense, making it a ground-breaking soundtrack for the summer, which should not be missed! The dynamic duo definitely delivered another weapon with Boogieland; just close your eyes and get carried away by the exotic house rhythms of that will make you dance literally, like there is no tomorrow. SixxFoot's 'Boogieland' sees a worldwide release on October 11th, 2021 via all well-known digital content providers. Catalog #NY022X Release Date: September 20th, 2021 © 2021 NYLO. All Rights Reserved. For more information or news please visit: www.nylolab.com

NYLO Music
SixxFoot - Aiyana (Extended Mix) | NYLO NY022X

NYLO Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:23


NYLO is excited to welcome back British sensation SixxFoot. The duo returns after their last outing hit the number 1 spot across the board in Beatport confirming their status as the next big thing. SixxFoot's sound profile resonates throughout their original music which is upbeat, atmospheric with some great vibes and iconic fills. It's fun with summertime feelings always shining thru that will help you get up and get a move on. Their latest EP comprises of 2 forward-thinking, feel-good UK house inspired, cut up house tracks. SixxFoot get us going with 'Boogieland' a moody and groovy driven tune with a cheeky vibe that leaves a long-lasting impression and will get any dance floor thrilled. 'Boogieland' is a perfect example of how SixxFoot is able to revitalize dated sounds and give them new shine, adding a stunning Jupiter 8 like synth bassline combined with a long ethereal pad, which rounds off the release perfectly and feels like the monumental end to a great night out. Next up is the title track 'Aiyana'; which delivers a totally tantalizing creation of temperamental basslines, supernatural electric wizardry, seductive echoing and a rocking piano. Showing off SixxFoot's signature soaring synths and lust-filled melodies that make for an Infectious blend of romance and debauchery. 'Aiyana' is dance floor gold in the purest sense, making it a ground-breaking soundtrack for the summer, which should not be missed! The dynamic duo definitely delivered another weapon with Boogieland; just close your eyes and get carried away by the exotic house rhythms of that will make you dance literally, like there is no tomorrow. SixxFoot's 'Boogieland' sees a worldwide release on October 11th, 2021 via all well-known digital content providers. Catalog #NY022X Release Date: September 20th, 2021 © 2021 NYLO. All Rights Reserved. For more information or news please visit: www.nylolab.com

Equestrian Perspective
40. Josh Nichol On Building Relationships, Cultivating The Energy You Wish To Be In & Being Authentic

Equestrian Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:53


In this episode, I have a conversation with horseman and horsemanship trainer, Josh Nichol. Josh teaches people in person and on a global scale Relational Horsemanship Training and has a strong emphasis on cultivating deep connections with both our horses and ourselves. Together we chat about: - What Relational Horsemanship is - An overview of Josh's journey with horses - His exploration to follow his feel regarding what he wanted to do with horses and how to help them move at their best - How important it is to listen to ourselves and our horses - How we can use our energy to set an intention - The importance of being authentic and how to start to listen to your inner voice - Showing up unattached in training sessions vs needing to get things done - How to reframe bad horse days - Teaching horses how to respond to pressure with softness and so much more! Josh really speaks from the heart and has so much wisdom to share. I think anyone who listens to this episode will get a lot out of it. To find out more about Josh just click the links below: https://www.instagram.com/ahorsemanspursuit/?hl=en https://joshnichol.com/ To connect with me on Instagram click here: -https://www.instagram.com/felicitydavies_/ or jump on my website www.confidentequestrianprogram.com

RockyTalkiePodcast
Episode 49 - Common Sense

RockyTalkiePodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:04


Aaron, Jon, & Jacob follow up on Craig McLachlan and a very personal Richard O'Brien interview, then chat about Chocolate Covered Rocky Horror, and talk about some Common Sense knowledge for Rocky Horror audience, cast-members, and organizers. Global News: See More about Craig McLachlan's Defamation Case https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/craig-mclachlan-defamation-case-likely-to-be-heard-next-year-court-told-20211008-p58yf3.html See the Full Richard O'Brien Interview https://anchor.fm/cate-mackenzie/episodes/Cate-talks-to-Richard-OBrien-e1876um The Rocky Horror Show Broadcast Live in Cinemas: https://www.whatsonstage.com/london-theatre/news/the-rocky-horror-show-broadcast-live-cinema_55074.html Find a Showing at rockyhorrorincinemas.com: https://www.rockyhorrorincinemas.com/home/ Check out the Palace Theater in Hawaii https://www.hawaiitribune-herald.com/2021/10/05/hawaii-news/palace-theater-ac-project-finally-complete/ Community News: Chocolate Covered Rocky Horror on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChocolateCoveredRockyHorror/ and EarlLorrin.com: https://earlorrin.com Watch Stuart Matthew Price's Rocky Horror Medly: https://www.facebook.com/stuartmpriceofficial/videos/926476424894374/ and check out HeatherLundsteat.com: http://www.heatherlundstedt.com/new-events/ Music: - Intro/Outro - Jupiter's Smile by The 126ers - Stings - Library at freesound.org Script by Aaron Tidwell, Jacob Roger-Gordon and Meg Fierro Produced and edited by Aaron Tidwell and Meg Fierro Rocky Talkie is an Audiogasmic LLC Production

They Coined It, a Mad Men Podcast
"Frozen in Amber" (S4E7.1) (The Suitcase, Part One)

They Coined It, a Mad Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:41


Dan and Roberta dove so deep into the waters of The Suitcase, this cherished episode of Mad Men, that it seemed best to make it a 2-parter, so we bring you Part One today. Story on The Forum of the 12 Caesars Broadway Joe Sports Illustrated cover Ali / Liston II on YouTube ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Support us on Patreon - make a 1-time donation, or subscribe for early episode drops, extra discussions, and opportunities to appear on our end of season They Joined It. And get yourself some merch - you totally want Eminently Chewable across your chest or Your Dick Whitman is Showing on a mug (or our logo on anything). ___________________________________________________________________________________________ CONTACT US Feedback/Comments/Dirty Jokes: Questions@TheyCoinedItPod.com Patreon Instagram Twitter Facebook Producer - Roberta Lipp Graphics (including logo and merch) - Albert Stern (stickrust arts) Theme by Adam Michael Tilford (Venmo: @Adam-Tilford-1)

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!
Episode 243: Stabilize Your Life with Alisha GeeEmail: welifttorise@gmail.com Stabilize Your Life with Alisha Gee In this episode of Oh My Heath ... There's HOPE! Jana talks with Alisha Gee. Alisha believes that all areas of life are interconnected

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:15


In this episode of Oh My Heath ... There's HOPE! Jana talks with Alisha Gee.   Alisha believes that all areas of life are interconnected. Because of this, she focuses on teaching women how to improve in their personal lives, in their health, in their relationships, and in their business endeavors.   Alisha believes that NOW is the time for women to show up initially in all areas of their lives and to ditch the excuses. Through her program, Alisha is creating a movement of women ready for change and she invites you to join.   Alisha is a motivational speaker, as well as a performance coach for women who are showing up powerful in their business but haven't taken the time to heal from their past and focus on themselves first. She has been featured on FOX 10 News, NextGen Leadership Experiences, Voyage Phoenix, Total Girl Boss, Thrive Global, and more.   Her desire is to see women do WHATEVER IT TAKES to stop allowing their past to hold them back, and instead be empowered to move forward with confidence.   Alisha has created the Stand-Up & Stand Out Framework to drop the excuses and take a stand for yourself in all areas of your life. That means showing up for yourself first before you go out and support everyone else around you. Through this framework, she is supporting women all around the world.   Jana and Alisha talk about: 1) Surviving Childhood sexual abuse 2) You are not alone and it's not your fault 3) Escaping the destructive behavior and honoring yourself 4) No excuses show up and stand in your truth 5) You are worth fighting for 5) Stand up and stand out   This 30-minute episode is on: In this episode, Jana and Alisha, discuss surviving childhood sexual abuse and knowing you are not alone and it is not your fault. Escaping the destructive behavior that comes with trauma and learning to honor yourself. Showing up and standing in your truth and learning that you are worth fighting for.   Meet Alisha Gee: https://www.instagram.com/alisha_welifttorise/ https://www.facebook.com/geealisha/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/alisha-gee-8a01511a2/ Free Offer: If this message resonates with you and you would like to take your power back after painful past experiences then click the link below to get my FREE Ebook with steps on how to do so. https://we-lift-to-rise.mykajabi.com/free-ebook   Get in touch with Jana and listen to more Podcasts: https://www.janashort.com/   Show Music ‘Hold On' by Amy Gerhartz https://www.amygerhartz.com/music   Free Gift: Free Subscription to Best Holistic Life Magazine: https://www.bestholisticlife.com/   Connect with Jana Short: https://www.janashort.com/contact/ 

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Kylee Stone: Using the Power of Personal Stories to Create Meaningful Connections

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:03


Kylee Stone is a descendant of the Wakka Wakka and Kulluli First Nations with 25 years in the business of storytelling. She has an intrinsic talent in the power of personal stories to create meaningful connections. Certified in the neuroscience of resilience, Kylee's mission is to disrupt the status quo on the traditional view of leadership and enable people with the courage to take action in direct accordance with their vision, values, passion and purpose. Read more about Kylee. Learn more about The Passionistas Project. Full Transcript: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to the Passionistas Project Podcast, where we talk with women who are following their passions to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and today we're talking with Kylee Stone, a descendant of the Wakka Wakka, and Kalali First Nations with 25 years in the business of storytelling and an intrinsic talent in the power of personal stories to create meaningful connections certified in the neuroscience of results. Kylee's mission is to disrupt the status quo on the traditional view of leadership and enable people with the courage to take action and direct accordance with their visions, values, passion, and purpose. So please welcome to the show Kylee Stone. Kylee: Thank you. So good to be here with the two of you. Passionistas: We're so happy to have you here. What are you most passionate about? Kylee: I am passionate about the relationship between design and storytelling — so the design of storytelling and its ability to influence the way that we lead specifically, and more importantly, women's ability to do that. And when I say that, because I do believe that as an indigenous person and I'll, and I'll reference that… our cultural background is fundamentally historic. And what we know about storytelling is very different from a cultural perspective to what we know in the world today. But when we do look at that, fundamentally, the whole purpose of that really is, if you imagine sitting around a fireplace, for example, which, you know, from an indigenous cultural point of view is more around fire, where you would have people. You know, there was no language for it as what we've created today, but certainly it was all about people connecting. It was just about the connection of people. And so when we look at that lens and we put that over the world today, you know, if we even dissect, I suppose, the entertainment industry — movies, you know, I love drama, right? I love a good story. But great drama is based on a great story. And when we look about our relationship to the story, I think there's always a real connection where, you know, if you go to a great film and you cry, there's definitely a great story in that. You know, there's an immediate connection with us as a human being. So for me, I like to be able to take that, in terms of its architecture, and apply it to. Each of us has an individual understanding how that works for us at the level of human being, and then how that influences our strength, our character, our courage, and fundamentally the way we communicate so that we have the experience of being able to pursue what it is that is important. And for me, what that means is being able for a woman to express and experience her own self-expression. In terms of leadership for me, that's very different from what I've been raised in. I say this whole thing about a new paradigm of leadership because in my generation, I was raised pretty much in a model where you've got companies that are designed basically out of the industrial revolution, right, where it's very much a command and control method. But I think for me, I'm not saying it's not about change, so I'm very clear, it's not about change now. I'm not here to change. I'm here to create something new. And when we create something new, we're not changing the old we're actually just at work on crafting a new future. And that for me is really designed around women leading the way on that because I do think women are natural nurturers. They're natural storytellers. And I think that's where we can get a real transformation. Passionistas: Let's take let's step back. Tell us about your heritage and particularly your grandmother and mother. Kylee: Well, I'll start with my grandmother. So. My grandmother was, uh, born and raised at a controlled country. So I'm a descendant of the, a couple of nations. One is the Wakka Wakka nations, which is where my grandmother was born and her mother. So my great grandmother was a tree, was originally from a place called Kalali, which is when we talk about our nations. It's really the air in the region as an Aboriginal person. And. Um, some, a descendant of what what's called the stolen generation, which was a group of indigenous people who, children who were removed from their family because they were considered half. So the Wakka Wakka area was, was where a lot of the indigenous. So when the British came, they moved all the indigenous people out of their, their, their communities. And they put them into, I'm not sure what the technical term that you would call it, but they'd put them into areas. And one of those areas was called Wakka Wakka. So Wakka Wakka was not an original nations. It was. Multiple nations. And so my grandmother was removed from Kalali and taken to Wakka Wakka when she was discovered to be pregnant. And she was pregnant to the men who she was on a farm with. So she was already moved originally to a place where she was at which at two years old. So at two years old, she was taken from her family, put into a, essentially with the local school teacher and his family. So, you know, whilst on the one hand, you know, we look from the view called, oh my goodness. She was, she was removed from her family, how awful she wasn't put into an environment where she was not taken care of from the other way. When we look, you know, she was with a school teacher and his wife and their family. So she was there till she was 20. In her late twenties and then fell pregnant. And we have paperwork that actually says she wrote a letter basically to the police department, letting them know that she had fallen pregnant to the, to the gentlemen who was the, the owner of the property. But of course he denied. So that was when she was moved. So then she was moved to Wakka Wakka and, you know, within, I think six months later, she had gave birth to my grandmother in the Wakka Wakka region. And then all the women who were single and had children, there were homes for them on this property. So there was a home where there was the kids, there was a home where there was the mothers. Children. And then there was the rest of the community. And so she might, my grandmother was born and then in this particular part of the village. And so when she was three that the government had come in with buses, from what school here, the salvation army and the buses came in to take all the children who were half cast. So if they looked like they were white, they were taken and removed. To a salvation army residence where they were believed to be being raised for a bit of a better education and a better future that will given that we're given education, basically. So again, you know, uh, my grandmother was three taken from her mother. So you know that there is trauma and there's, uh, you know, horrifying kind of, you never want your daughter to be taken from your mother, you know, and nor do to your right. And at the same time, you know, if we look from the other view, you know, she's, she was given education education and she was given these other opportunities. So that was, that was my grandmothers, my grandmother, and right. My grandmother's story. So my grandmother had married a British man and they had children. There was some dysfunction in that relationship, you know, as for whether I can speak the truth to that. I really, I can't, I can't because sadly my grandmother's no longer here, but my, it was my grandma. It was a situation where my grandmother felt like she needed to leave. So she left and left my grandfather with all the. So there was my mother, my mother's dead. My mother was five twin sisters. She had twin sisters who were two years old. They had a brother and an older brother, so there was four of them. So he moved them into a home salvation army home, bizarrely enough. So at five years old mum was taken from a family and put into there with her sisters. And she, she lived there till she was 15, basically. So for 10 years, from five to 15, She stayed there on this property and then came out and one year later, after coming out, she fell pregnant with, with me. And so technically, uh, when I, when I started to, uh, understand the story, I discovered, you know, it was in the seventies. So I discovered that actually I was technically the first woman out of four generations to not have been taken away from or removed from my mother and in some respects. So yeah, it's. Uh, I think in the wa you know, it made me question actually, because I think when I looked back at the timing of that, you know, the seventies where the, the, the, the civil rights movement, there was a big push around women's liberation. And, you know, my mother was only 16 at the time. And at that time, she was told that if she gave birth to. She would not be welcome home because any woman who had a child out of wedlock, they would take the children from them. Now they didn't go to take the children from her, but they said to her, if you have this child, you're not coming home, you know, it's like disown the family, which is very common, you know, it wasn't, it's like, you know, we look at that now. Oh my God, that's just atrocious. But it was very common back then for a lot of women. In fact, it was only until 2012 that the government here actually did a national apology to all the women who gave. To children in the seventies and had their children's take taken away from them. So there was a generation of children who are now my age, who were raised without their biological parents, because they were out of wedlock. So it's kind of serendipitous too, in terms of my mother, she just clearly decided to be some kind of rebel and decided, no, that's not, that's not how it's going to go. Passionistas: She must have been incredibly strong to make that decision in the midst of that. Kylee: I think to myself, imagine being 16 years old in a hospital by yourself, isolated, having your family say, we don't want to part of it. And now you're stuck here. They did. I was in a waiting room for four weeks. They'd actually filled out all the adoption papers and she'd had four weeks to make the decision. And it was, she said it was the last day. She said it got to the last day. And she said, I just could not, I couldn't do it. I just could not bring myself to think about what it would look like if I had to try and find you. Passionistas: So how, how did those experiences impact your childhood and did they impact your life to this day? Absolutely as a kid, I would say no way. You know, I, I, I, my nickname as a kid was Smiley Kylee. I was a joyful kid. You know, my mother was 16, so she had lots of great friends around her and her friend's parents actually. So she had a lot of support that way. So I none, the wiser, you know, you don't know what you don't know, you don't know. So as. I don't know, except definitely subconsciously The, there was a, like, one of the things that I'm now dealing with is the, you know, the there's the whole theory around attachment theory. And you know, one of the things that, you know, because I was not raised in a very stable, traditional household, I was moved around a lot. So I'm not very attached to people. And that has been really difficult. You know, I've, I've lost my grandfather just recently. And it was really challenging because it was the first time I'd had, you know, I've only ever really lost grandparents. I've not had the experience. Well, we've had close friends, very young to pass. It's just a very different experience. Cause it's a tragedy, but people relatively close to. You know, I, I, I had this experience called God. I felt like a real cold beach, you know, because I just, I wasn't emotional, you know, I wasn't this really torn upset person. And I really, it challenged me because I thought, oh my God, what is wrong with you? You know, that was my immediate, what is wrong with you? I spoke to some friends of mine. One of whom is just got a background psychology, and she's just an extraordinary human in terms of what she knows. And she said, you know, she explained the whole thing about grief and this attachment theory. And I went, God, that explains everything. You know, the, the way I was raised, the knot I learned to not be attached, I was the kid that you could stick in the middle of the room and she'd be happy with anybody, you know? And so if I look at it from that perspective, it was like, well, of course. She, she expects people. I gotta leave, you know, and it wasn't a problem for me as a kid. In fact, it's one of my greatest skills, even as an adult, you know, I've mobilized, you know, I'm my, my whole strength. In fact, it's very aligned even to my cultural background. I'm all about community. I'm all about others. I'm all about, you know, being of service to everybody else. And you know, I, you can stick me in the middle of anywhere and I'll blend with anybody. And I think I've always fought for that. I've always fought for, for diversity and equality and injustice and, you know, enhance why it's no accident. I'm fighting against some hierarchical view of leadership. Like what the heck are you serious? Like, just because you've got a title and you're sitting on some top pain, half a million bucks a year for your salary doesn't mean I need to treat you any different to the person who's cleaning the goddamn bathroom, you know, and I respect that you've got experience and talent. I listen and respect that because that's fundamental to who we are in our culture is all respect. You don't need a title, have respect. You just have respect period. So that, that definitely shaped, had a massive impact in who I've become in life and how I've surrounded myself with creating communities and building communities. And, and what I'm doing in the area of women is, you know, even five years ago, I started a women's group called team women, Australia, and it was all about story to. And I called a team for the purpose of team. I D I didn't want this hierarchical view. Of course, it's taken me seven years to mobilize the damn thing, because I was stuck in the existing paradigm myself and say how we were trying to build it was inside that paradigm. And all it was it's like, why is this not working? It was like, oh my God, why didn't you just stop doing it? I know, finally, here we are, you know, post pandemic and it's mobilizing, you know, we took the lid off and off the boundary itself and just went, you know, actually the whole purpose is team and collaboration and community and create, you know, it's not about having some organizational structure and I just want to, if I can implement it there in terms of how I see what's possible in the world, then I'll, I'll I'll know I've kind of achieved what I'm here to, which. Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and you're listening to the Passionistas Project podcast and our interview with Kylee Stone. To discover the power of storytelling to ignite your passion, grow your influence and amplify the impact you have in business leadership and life, visit ThePerformanceCode.co. If you're enjoying this interview and would like to help us continue creating inspiring costs, please consider becoming a patron by visiting ThePassionistasProject.com/podcast and clicking on the patron button. Even $1 a month can help us continue our mission of inspiring women to follow their passions. Now here's more of our interview with Kylee. You also had the straightforward traditional career, and that certainly has impacted where you are today and you're thinking about structure, so tell us about that career. Kylee: I've had such a great career. I feel so blessed, you know, I really do. And I feel blessed because I was in a time when media, in my opinion, feet here in Australia was really thriving. So I got to work with some really just extraordinary, extraordinary people. And in fact, whenever I reflect on any of the jobs I've had, I like there's been people that have stuck with me my entire life since then, you know? So it was actually an accident that I landed in media. I did not want to leave home when it came to university. And at the time I was living on the gold coast, which there was, there was no university on the gold coast, which meant for me, if I was going to go do a university, I would have had to travel away from. Of course I did not have enough. My prefrontal cortex wasn't developed enough to have enough emotional intelligence to know what was going on, so I didn't go beyond it. Right. So I didn't go straight to university, but what it meant was I ended up going to, uh, you know, uh, did a full-time intensive college. On the gold coast in business and marketing and advertising. And, and I excelled, I mean, I'm, I'm very smart. And I, I taught, you know, I think I did three first-class honors, uh, in business management, sales management, and marketing itself. And then over the college, they had different areas of industry worked within the unit within the college. And I had came through his class on, was over the entire college. So I so. And it was on the graduation evening that, you know, typical graduation, you have sponsors tables, etc. And as I was coming off the stage with the awards, the guy who was the marketing director at the time at the media company, pulled me over and gave him his business card and said, listen, I've got a job for you. Just give me a call on Monday. And I was like, you beauty, you know, graduated college. The last thing you want to do is try and find a job. So that was, that was literally how much my study. I rocked up on his doorstep. No kidding. On the Monday morning, without an appointment, not knowing, I mean, I had no idea how, what was protocol and best way to do that. And anyway, he was in meetings. So I sat there for half the time until he was ready to say me. And that was the beginning of my career. You know, he actually did not have a job to be honest. He was like, I just want this person in here and made a job for me. So of course, the first six months of my job, my career was born. Boring on one aspect from a technical point of view, because I was in this marketing and promotions team and I had to pay stuff. In those days, newspapers, you had to paste up the content inside the paper. So that was part of my job, needless to say it was also fun because we had the very first Indy grand Prix here on the gold coast. And we were, you know, we were the major sponsors. So, you know, we got to go to these big fabulous events and stuff like that. But I was invited by the head of the research, uh, team to come in and say easy. Do you know anything about computers? I had done a bit of. A bit of what do you call it? Uh, just data stuff in college. Like nothing really learning how to talk. I was like, yeah, sure. I know how to use computers. He so great. He said, but because at the time his department with the exception of editorial that had one was the only department that had a computer. So he sees a great, can you come in and do you want to help me just do some data crunching? And he asked me, yeah, sure. Next night, I'm home that night with the manuals, you know, the old Microsoft Excel, Microsoft, I would manually. Teaching myself how to use a camera, as I say, he's a computer, but I went back and, uh, anyway, I fell in love with it. I fell in love with the data we had. Basically our job was to interpret the data, to help the sales teams, you know, sell and commercialize the business and help the editorial teams understand the readers of the paper and blah, blah, blah. And that's what I did for the next 20 years. I, I just, I loved it. I, I loved the connection between the data and being able to convert that into. You know, sales presentations for the sales teams and when they would sell, they would sadly they'd get all the bonus. And I didn't, but I was paid pittance at that stage as a 19 year old, but, but that's, I just loved it. I loved what I did and I just kept doing that. I did that for four years and he was a real supporter of mine and just, he was like, you got to get to Sydney, you know, get, get, take the next level. And I went for a job. I didn't get it initially because I didn't have a degree and I'd only just started doing a part time. And, but three months later they rang me back. Oh, the person with the degree didn't work out. Can you take the job still? Yeah. So that got me the big. Um, I moved down to Sydney at the time and, uh, worked for, uh, you know, our, our major metropolitan papers here, the Australian and the Telegraph. And this is the main ones and that's kind of what set me off. I just, then I, I, it, and it really was a methodical journey from there. It really was. I worked hard. I loved what I did. I got a promotion and then I got a pay rise. And then, you know, there was a bit of dysfunction in that team. I went and looked at our trade press and went, oh, I want to go work in the Marie Claire, you know, they're going to launch Marie Claire, I'd love to do that. And I got the job and that's how it unfolded. It really was like, no kidding. It's like the traditional, here's a letter. Here's the steps you take to get to the top. Here's what you need to do that. And you work hard. You do a good job next year, you'll get a 2.5% pay increase or whatever the CPI rate is at the time. And if you do that well, then you'll move up and then you'll move up and then you'll move up. And so I did that until 2006. Uh, and, uh, and in that time I've got to do some extraordinary work, launching some incredible brands and was then the marketing and strategy director for News Corp, which I know being global. Everyone knows that. So it's easy to say that, but, uh, I did that for six years and I just loved it. You know, I really, really loved my job. I had a T I, you know, worked on the expansion of this team and. Transformed the way that we worked at just hi, my commitment to delivering great products was at the heart of everything. And having people really enjoy what they do. I just really loved it. Loved it, loved it, loved it. And then of course, three kids had got to really suck on my God, how do I do this? So it was, that was, that was really the first turning point of like, oh my gosh, how do I get to, how do I get to still make a difference and be a leader? Do what I really love now that I've got three kids in my kids. You know, this was when I, when I'd had the third one. So the first. I navigated, like I went back to work after three, you know, three months. Cause my child, God bless him would sleep 12 hours a night. So I'd be up during the day and I'm like, oh my God, I can't handle this. Child's just to alert. I need to go back to. So I'm sleeping 12 hours and night. I feel really quite, except you're just running around crazy. I can't cope with this. I went back to work. So I went back to work two times, you know, with the first child and the second child went back to work. Full-time on both occasions and on both occasions, just, I think this is a story I think is really important for women to hear, because not all the stories about. You know, I know we hear a lot of bad stories about women who return to work and they get treated badly and they, you know, like that. And sometimes I think we do do ourselves a disservice by not being able to hear stories that actually go really well because when we hear stories that go really well, we've got an access into what could I have done differently to, to do that. And on both occasions, I got the biggest pay rise I've ever had in my career. And I got the biggest promotion I've ever head whilst I was on maternity leave. So it was an extraordinary time for me. And it wasn't until the day I had my third child and I went back to work that I, that it all fell apart. I was like, okay, three kids in three years, Colleen, who the hell, even kidding, like really, you can't keep doing this. You're going to burn out. You're going to kill your family. You know, something's got to shift and that's when everything started to change. Really. So what happened. Uh, huh, I call it the, I call it the dirty dancing story. So I'm w I'm walking. Literally my third child is 10 months old Harrison, so it was 2010. And, uh, I'm walking back into the office, thinking to myself, I am so desperate just to get a hot cup of coffee and be able to go to the toilet and piece, you know, three kids under three. And it was like, oh, I need to, I want to go. I want to go back part time. And I wanted to go back into my job because I just come up the back of three years of working on this major rebranding project and strategy, and is keen to get back into that project with the team. So I'm walking into the office and literally as I'm walking through the corridor, I think to myself, You are crazy. You can't do this. You can't, you cannot go back know to a full-time job or a big job, or you've got three kids. And so I sat into the, uh, sat down with him and said, look, I want to come back. And so I immediately decided for myself, I need to ask for part-time, that's the only way to do that. So I said, you know, can I part time he didn't want me in the job? He wanted somebody in that particular role full-time and he said, and I, and so I negotiated to split it. So I had marketing and strategy director and I said, well, what if I take the strategy? Part of all that work and the guy that's doing my MetLife, you know, he can kick the operational aspect. So he agreed. So I came back and did three days a week just doing strategy and. Showing up. It was really grateful. I'm really grateful to just be able to get away from having three kids and really the stress of that coming into work. And I was in an office and so right outside. So where are my, so I've been put into an office that was in the executive area and I don't know, you know, Certainly in Australia, you know, traditional corporate stolen environments, usually executive suites are either on a particular floor or certainly NewsCorp all over the world. It's like this, right? Either it's the Taj Mahal, which is what we would call it that sits at the top. Or there's a floor, a dedicated floor. That's all for the executive suites and it's luxurious. Right? So I'm in the. Area. So when I was marketing director, I was in the marketing area with all the staff. And so now here I am in the executive area, in an office, outside the executive boardroom. By myself and, you know, I should be grateful because I've got my own office and it's peaceful and it's quiet and blah, blah, blah. I can do my own thing. Yeah. Great. But then all of a sudden there was a day when my old executive team, so we're in the boardroom. They start walking in the boardroom and I'm sitting there on the outside. There's a glass window on my side, outside the office. And I think to myself, what the heck. What the, this is not, this is not the picture I imagined. So, so, and I had this like all of a sudden for myself. Okay. So I've just climbed 20 years to get to this role now, just because I'm doing three days a week and I was actually in the executive team, but now I'm sitting here no longer part of the conversation or not, not only am I no longer part of the conversation, I don't have any staff anymore. So I'm alone and. I don't have any accountability. I'm not accountable for a budget line. I'm just on the sideline. And I kid you not. That's like, you know, you know, that scene in dirty dancing where baby Houseman sitting in the corner, waiting for Patrick Swayze to, you know, he walks in the door, my Patrick Swayze didn't walk in the door, sadly. I thought, no, this is not okay. I am not okay with this. And I just, at that moment decided I needed to do something about it. I I'm not, I just need to do something about it. So I decided to go back to true style, made tomb, to turn things around. Went and sorted out the fact that I had completed my undergrad degree, I decided at that then I had a conversation actually with one of the guys at work. And I said, look, I said, what what's next for me? And honestly, what immediately Curt is the only thing I could do is I, well, if I'm going to compete here, I need to go get myself an MBA. That was immediately what I thought. But really that's what I thought. I thought, if you're going to compete there to get what you need to get you going to have an MBA. So I got to the guy who was CFO at the time, I said, right, I'm going to have to. And he said, well, you do realize you don't need to given your experience. You actually don't need to complete your undergrad. You could actually make an application to have it authorized and you could go and do your postgrad. Guess what I did. I submitted through to the university. I got my undergrad approved and they approved me to go into post-grad studies so that I could start doing an MBA and, or specializing in change management. Right. All the meanwhile still doing three days at work, still juggling the three children. Oh. And let's just say added a coach in there into the mix as well, because it was just like, ah, I don't know what the heck I'm doing. Right. And so I just, everything. And so that was what I decided to do. I was like, you know what? I got to turn this around. This is I'm not going to get stuck because in marketing, one of the big problems in marketing is everybody in the company always thinks they know better as a marketer. Somehow that's just one of those. It was a, everybody can do. And I thought I'm not going to get stuck with this future. So when I did make the decision to change, that's when I changed direction and went, okay, what is the future for me? If I looked out there somewhere in the future, and rather than looking at a step change, I was like, what could I imagine for myself? And I, and that was when I got present to the opportunity of transformation and actually dealing more directly with people as opposed to customer. And that was why I chose to do the change management certification. And then of course I did two subjects of that. Very proud, got two high distinctions in both subjects, but was sitting down there while I was submitting my final paper. It was a school holiday period when we were on holidays with the kids and on aided to submit this piece of work. And I, as I sat there doing it, the kids were at my fate and I, and I hadn't had another one of those moments. I looked down at them and I thought, is this what you want your life to be about? Do you want your kids. To grow up thinking that you and you, that you're going to look back not having had these moments because you're too busy attending to what you technically think is getting ahead in your career. Let's just so at that point I quit. I quit the study. I said, this is not the right time. I spoke to my boss at the time at work and they were doing a lot of transformation work and I made a request. I said, I can do that job. And I know I can do that job. I don't need to get a piece of paper to tell you I can do that job. And quite frankly, I've seen people doing that job who had the paper and they're actually not delivering results. And so he pointed me the hate of change and strategy planning at the point at that time, that new school and was put on a project. What that adjust again? I just loved, I loved to work with the people and literally that was my last gig at new school, but I did that for a few years. And at the same time was, became so passionate about, you know, other women who were dealing with the same stuff. And I remember walking in the office one particular day and I've got to the coffee shop, which is clearly the first step for any mother, get to the coffee first. And I'm standing in line with the coffee, having coffee. And there was a lady who was, I'd worked with maybe four or five years previously. She was standing in the queue behind me. And you tapped me on the shoulder, says, Hey, don't worry. I say, most of the time when I get to the front of the coffee shop, I'm like, don't talk to me. I just want to not talk to anyone. Just, you know, just nod and say, yes, good. Except the turnaround. I saw who it was. And I just said saving really, but you really want to know and very pissed off. Oh my God. Well, And I told her, I said, listen, I just really fed up with this whole, I've spent all these years to get where I've gotten. And I said, I just seriously just feel like my, somehow my intelligence just seems to be dissipated. You know, it's not relevant anymore. Or I should just be part time. And because I'm doing part-time, I'm not contributing at the level. Even though I had this really great trainers role, there was a lot of the aspects of the role that it wasn't getting. And when she said me too, I was like, really. And I'll tell you at that point, I honestly did not see that it was more than just me and I want to aspects, I go, that's very insolent. Right. But, but I didn't get at that point, the degree to which, because I hadn't, you know, there hadn't really been a huge awareness at that point around the issues of working women in senior leadership positions and the challenge. It was very early days. But when she said that, I said, that's awful. And I said to her, what are you doing? She said, well, what came up. I was like, really? And that was, as you, you know, as I was saying, I had gone and started taking a number actions. I'd got myself into a UGA gig. And so I said that basically, people, listen, I'm happy to share with you, you know what I've done. And to kind of start to carve out a new future for yourself. And we went and had lunch at the pub, sat down and started sharing with her about what I was doing. She said some amazing. And I said, oh, you know what I said, well, here's a few things to get you started. I've got to start it. And. Long story short, next minute, I'm running a weekly mentoring. Well, I call it a mentoring, but it was really a weekly chat with a group of women that went for, went up to 55 women who were all technically dealing with similar staff attempting to really carve out a future for themselves as a leader. And it went outside of new school. So we had women in news Corp, but then women in news Corp had friends who were in other companies and it just kind of went from there. And then. That's what turned into team women, Australia. Like we just like, oh, we did this event. And then that went like that and it just kind of organically just took off. Passionistas: What is leadership transformation? Kylee: Leadership transformation is two things. To firstly acknowledge it. So transformation is a new view. So if you think about a butterfly that was a caterpillar, it's still the same animal. It's actually still the same, right? In many aspects, it comes from the same core. What once was a caterpillar, has a new view, becomes this butterfly. So transformation is a process of seeing a new view that opens up a new world. And so leadership transformation is about acknowledging what we already know about leadership and our own view. So one of the things too, to have a transformation in the area of leadership, you've first got to get out of the way. What do I already know? And how do I already relate to leadership that's constraining myself. So for me, it was really confronting, I have lived inside of this paradigm where leadership is something that you do and you progress to, and you get some academic qualifications along the way. And then when you get those qualifications, you get into a position. And once you've got that position and you're accountable for people, you're released. Right? So I first had to get that my behaviors and how I was showing up was conditional on that, that's design. And so when I got that, I noticed that actually I have to separate myself from that perspective and to acknowledge that I'm not a leader because of my credentials. I'm not a leader because I have the title. I'm not only a leader if I get into a position where I have accountability of people. I'm not that, not that, not that, not that. Okay. Well, if I'm not that, then where does it exist? Does my leadership in being a leader exist and that's this whole new world. That's the leadership transformation. It is the transformed view of who I am and what's possible as a leader in the world. And that's the part where I say, you know, using the storytelling stuff, it's really by design. It's by design. Who you are as a leader is by design. And I've interviewed hundreds of people in various leadership roles, not just in a I'm a CEO or I'm a founder, or I've spoken to people who are in leadership development. And I've spoken to people who've exuberated leadership as an athlete. And I can tell you, you ask them what their definition of a leader is and not one single person says the same thing. So, leadership transformation is about the individual acknowledgement of what's been constraining the view, and then by design designing what that looks like for you. And so the design piece then is the same as story, you know, when you craft a story about how that new future is very similar. To brand story. And you know, this kind of brought in all of my background in building brands and media and storytelling was there very simply two things at the beginning level. That is what is the future I see for myself. What is that vision? We call it a vision. And then what is the purpose for that vision? What is my why for doing that? And when you bring those two things together. Quite simply, if there is a universal view, it's someone who has a vision for a future and is out to fulfill on it with purpose and connects people with purpose. They're not connected on anything other than the fulfillment of a vision with purpose. And how you do that is up to you. That's by design because what you want in the future you're committed to is going to be very different to the person beside you. But when we do that individually and we do it collectively, it is very powerful. It mobilizes, it really aligns people on what's really at the heart of who we are, which is our purpose. Each one of us has a purpose. People mistake often that my why is about my why? Well now actually that's, it's your why, but your why speaks about others. So my purpose is to create meaningful connections. It's about what happens out there in the world. It's not what happens in here. So in that aspect, it's a leader in the sense that you, you are clearly here in the service of others. And yet your view of others is not independent of you. It includes you. So there is no you and me, there's just who I am and who I am is who you are. There's no me and you there's just you and me, me and you. Passionistas: Tell us a little bit about the Unchartered Leaders Podcast, why you started that and what you hope people take away from it Kylee: Starting a podcast was actually one of the, one of the most challenging things I've done actually to do the first one. I was really nervous, but I, the thing that got me off the ground was a commitment to one thing in particular. And this is right. Goes right to the heart of my concern and my passion for creating a new paradigm of leadership and leadership transformation in particular. And I, and I, and I, because when I look at what happens in an organization, so in the current structure, in a hierarchy, what tends to happen, and I did this myself, you know, when things are not going well in a company, right. We all blame the boss. We blame the company, you know, it's definitely the people sitting at the top who are not doing this, who are doing that and data day to day. Right. So except when things go really well, we don't say, oh, it's because of the box. Right. We go, oh, that's because of us. It's because of what we did. We're so fabulous. Oh, give me a pay rise. Oh. But the bosses want to pay themselves more money. We have, but what about us? And it's because of the team and what we did. So what what's really, if we're really Frank, there is no freedom inside of it inside of bank. As someone who actually eats in that seat while that's all going on, that leader has no freedom to thrive and be successful. That I, that is not okay for me. I'm like, that's not okay, because if we want to be a leader, what are we doing to our leaders? What, who, who are we that we are not embracing a leader's decision? You know? And so for me, the uncharted leader podcast was to, to achieve things. One, I want it to be able to tell the stories of those who are in leadership. So people could get an insight into actually what it's really like. That they are human beings with a commitment to make a difference. They were you, they were at some point climbing someplace to get somewhere and are now being courageous enough to step into a role where they know everyone else is going to shoot them down. Fundament. You know, now it happens more at Australia here. I think then what it does potentially in Australia, because in the, at least in the states, you know, you don't have this tall poppy thing where you want to, people are really great about being, being okay to be celebrated. Whereas here it's, it's less. So I wanted a chance for people to, I want it to deal with that illusion called those people. You know, they've got beautiful stories to be told, so that's the first thing. And then the second thing is in sharing their stories. I wanted people who were aspiring leaders to get that being a leader is a great, is great. It's a great opportunity. See, in, in, in the world that we live in today, being a leader is a bad idea. Being a leader is a really bad idea because it's, you, you're going to get shot down. And, you know, people are going to have a whole stack of opinions about you. It's exhausting. It's a burnout, it's hard work. And so I'm like, yeah, Yana. What if being a leader was a really great idea because being a leader has more to do with how you choose to show up yourself and to operate from being accountable, rather than judge someone else. You know, we sit in our lounge rooms, complaining about our political leaders. We all do. And yet we complain sitting on our couch, never having, ever set in a role as being a prime minister or a president ever. Uh, so we're very good at sitting back and judging others and, and, and, and I'm saying, no, the uncharted leader is someone who's saying, okay, I'm going to step back and take a look over here for me. What is, what is it for me to express myself as a leader and to embrace that and to chart out a future that is completely uncharted. It is uncharted, no matter where you're at really, it's the way we think all of a sudden, because it's a pandemic it's uncertain. Are you kidding me? The world is, it's never been certain. I mean, we live in like with some certainly, I'm sorry. You walk out the front door. You've got no clue about what's going to happen. You know, this is an uncharted life. Being a leader is uncharted and let's embrace that because actually everything that we need in order to be the best leader we can possibly be is all over here within us. Passionistas: Thanks for listening to The Passionistas Project Podcast in our interview with Kylee Stone. To discover the power of storytelling to a night, your passion grow your influence and amplify the impact you have in business leadership and life visit ThePerformanceCode.co. Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women-owned businesses and female artisans to inspire you to follow your passions, get a free mystery box with a one-year subscription using the code FALLMYSTERY. And be sure to subscribe to The Passionistas Project Podcast so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time, stay well and stay passionate.

Cultivation Podcast
Workplace Care

Cultivation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 13:13


This week's Cultivation Podcast continues the journey of self-care by exploring how you can take care of yourself professionally so you can perform your job at the highest level possible.    You can't improve as an employee if you're worn out, burnt out, or bored. Showing up as the best employee possible is not just about serving your company, it's about being your best self to leave an impact on other people.   Here are some ways to take care of yourself in the workplace so you can achieve your potential:   Engage with Supervisor — Meet with your supervisor to see what their expectations are. Sometimes we set ourselves up with what we imagine our work expectations to be, only to find out they are completely different. Or if you own a business, meet with other business owners to find ways to raise the bar for yourself.  Challenge Yourself — Employees become lazy on the job when they get bored, which is why it's important to challenge yourself in the work environment. Every job has its own parts we don't like, but the goal is to overcome that and grow from it. Set up a Peer Group — Set up a group built for challenging one another and taking you all to the next level. A community for workplace tasks that is not about improving the company, but support to be a better employee and perform in a professional way. Set Healthy Boundaries — Have boundaries with staff and clients to avoid taking work home so you aren't drained. You can not give out your cell number or don't answer emails/work calls after 9 p.m. Very few things are a true emergency, so don't let someone else's emergency become your problem. Invest in Your Business IQ — Are you growing your skills? Get new training, read business books, listen to business podcasts to raise the bar for yourself. Attend Professional Development — We live in a digital age, but going in-person to conventions and conferences is super important. You have to soak up that environment and energy of a live event because it transforms your mindset. 

Kate Dalley Radio
101121 Their Desperation Is Showing Look Who Is Fighting Back

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:56


101121 Their Desperation Is Showing Look Who Is Fighting Back by Kate Dalley

Bull & Fox
Doug Dieken says Browns' run game showing it can wear down a defense; own defense needs more experience together

Bull & Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 7:00


Doug Dieken talks about the Browns' loss to the Chargers, the success in the run game despite offensive line injuries, the struggles of the defense, Kevin Stefanski's second guessing and more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Diz Runs Radio: Running, Life, & Everything In Between
986 Rich Stein Isn't Just Surviving MS, He Is Showing What's Possible

Diz Runs Radio: Running, Life, & Everything In Between

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 56:44


Rich Stein woke up one day and couldn't see out of one eye. A battery of tests later, he was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. A handful of years later, and with vision mostly restored, he's taken up running in a big way. Check out the full show notes for this episode at http://DizRuns.com/986. Today's show is sponsored in part by Headsweats. Step up your hat/visor game in 2021 and beyond, and support the show at the same time, by visiting http://DizRuns.com/headsweats. And don't forget to use the code DizRuns40 to save 40% at checkout! Love the show? Check out the support page for ways you can help keep the Diz Runs Radio going strong! http://dizruns.com/support Become a Patron of the Show! Visit http://Patreon.com/DizRuns to find out how. Get Your Diz Runs Radio Swag! http://dizruns.com/magnet Subscribe to the Diz Runs Radio Find Me on an Apple Device http://dizruns.com/itunes Find Me on an Android http://dizruns.com/stitcher Find Me on SoundCloud http://dizruns.com/soundcloud Please Take the Diz Runs Radio Listener Survey http://dizruns.com/survey Win a Free 16-Week Training Plan Enter at http://dizruns.com/giveaway Join The Tribe If you'd like to stay up to date with everything going on in the Diz Runs world, become a member of the tribe! The tribe gets a weekly email where I share running tips and stories about running and/or things going on in my life. To get the emails, just sign up at http://dizruns.com/join-the-tribe The tribe also has an open group on Facebook, where tribe members can join each other to talk about running, life, and anything in between. Check out the group and join the tribe at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thedizrunstribe/

The Nathan Barry Show
051: Sean McCabe - Launch a Successful Business by Starting With Writing

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:59


Sean McCabe is the founder and CEO of seanwes media, and Daily Content Machine. Sean is a prolific and successful creator, author, and influencer. His course, Learn Lettering, made $80,000 in the first 24 hours. For nearly a decade his podcast, blog, and courses have helped creators grow their brands, content, and skill sets.Sean's website is a treasure trove of courses and resources for anyone looking for business knowledge and creative support. Sean's book, Overlap, shows creators how to turn their passion into a successful business while working a full-time job. His podcast includes almost 500 episodes on content creation and entrepreneurship. His latest venture, Daily Content Machine, turns creators' best content into clippable moments they can share across their social media accounts.I talk with Sean about what it's like being a successful creator. We talk about growing your audience and connecting with them. We cover how to learn new skills fast, and about developing a growth mindset. We also talk about managing stress as a founder, how to handle burnout, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: Why good writing is the foundation of great content How to connect better with your audience Leveraging short-form content to grow your brand Pricing at full value without feeling guilty How to avoid burnout, and what to do if you're already there Links & Resources Sean McCabe on The Nathan Barry Show episode 003 Craft + Commerce conference ConvertKit Enough Ryan Holiday James Clear Marie Forleo Ramit Sethi Sean McCabe's Links Follow Sean on Twitter Check out Sean on Instagram Sean's website Daily Content Machine Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Sean:If you are a founder, you should be in therapy. Full-stop. You need a therapist. I thought I didn't. I had a great upbringing. I'm all good. Everything's healthy. I don't have any problems. The problem was I didn't know the problems that I had. I didn't realize what I was stuffing down. I didn't realize what I was avoiding.There is so much to unpack that you don't know you need to unpack.[00:00:30] Nathan:In this episode I talk to my friend, Sean McCabe. We've known each other for seven years now. It's been a long time. We've been in a mastermind group together. He's actually been on the show before. Sean is a wildly talented designer. He got his start hand-lettering.I think last time he was on the show, years ago, we were talking about that aspect of his business and how he built this substantial course business. Selling courses on hand-lettering, on marketing, on writing. He's spoken at our conference Craft + Commerce, all kinds of things. Sean is one of the most prolific creators that I've ever known.It's also super fun that he's a friend and lives right here in town. We just have a great conversation. We talk about how you create content, which is one of those things that it's not even how you create content, it's why. Where that comes from. The internal drive in what you use. Where you choose to have as a source of fuel and energy to put into that creative output.How some sources are really good and productive, and others can be kind of like a house of cards, and it can be harmful. We also talk about scaling teams as a creator. How do you know when to build out a team around your business? He's done that two different ways. So I get to ask him about some of the things he's learned and applied differently.I'm going to stop there. There's a lot of good stuff. So with that, let's dive in.Sean. Welcome to the show.[00:01:59] Sean:Hey, Nathan, just saw you recently. We were playing volleyball, or something.[00:02:03] Nathan:Or something, like two days ago. You moved to my city. It's kind of…[00:02:08] Sean:Yeah. It's horrible. It's a terrible place. Boise. Don't move to Idaho.[00:02:15] Nathan:You mean Iowa? Boise, Iowa.[00:02:17] Sean:Iowa. Yeah. Don't, yeah. Did I do okay?[00:02:21] Nathan:Yeah. That's exactly what you're supposed to say. If you Google something about Boise, Google has the accordion of extra questions, or things you might want to know. One of them is, “Does Boise smell?” and it's just like auto complaints in there.And I was like, what is up with that? I clicked on it, and it's this satirical article that has 12 reasons you shouldn't move to Boise. One of them is the city dump is right in the middle of the city. Another one is like that the Ebola outbreak hasn't been fully contained yet.So it's not really safe. I think there was something about lava. Anyway, it's just an article about all the reasons to not move to Boise. So I think you're right in line.[00:03:08] Sean:Stay, away. That's what they tell me to say.[00:03:11] Nathan:Yes, but if someone were to ignore that and move to Boise, they could come to our weekly volleyball game on Wednesday nights.[00:03:19] Sean:It's casual. It's open.[00:03:21] Nathan:Let's try it. Yeah. It's been so fun having you and Laci here. It's also been fun because you started a new company. Your company is producing and editing and creating all the clips for this podcast. So, connections on so many levels.[00:03:37] Sean:Yeah. We produce this show, like the video show, the audio show, and then find clips and make those clips for social media. It's been great. We love this show. Our team's favorite content. So, I'm a little biased, but it's fun to be on. Because my team's going to work on this.[00:03:58] Nathan:Yeah, exactly. I made sure to spell your name correctly in the setup, and I know they'll get it all.I wanted to ask what sparked—like maybe first give a summary of Daily Content Machine, since that's what you're spending nearly all of your time on. More than a normal amount of time on. So, what sparked it, and what is it?[00:04:19] Sean:Fun fact. This is not the first time I've been on the show. The last time was episode three, 2,624 days ago.[00:04:30] Nathan:Give or take[00:04:32] Sean:I was doing different stuff then. It's been a crazy journey. Right now the newest iteration is an agency.We produce video clips. We turn long form video shows. If you have a video podcast or other kind of long form video content, we found that the hardest part is finding all the good moments in there, and turning those into short clips. That's what we do. I designed it for myself, really.I wanted it to be where you just show up, you record, and, everything just happens? What is your experience, Nathan, with having a video and audio podcasts made, and clips and all that published? What do you, what's your involvement.[00:05:14] Nathan:Yeah. So I think about who I want on the show, I email them and say, will you come on the show? And then I talked to them for an hour, and then I read no, either way. I don't even do that. Yep. That's my full involvement. And what happens is then really what I see is when the show comes out, which I don't touch anything from that moment on. I actually probably notice the show coming out like, oh yeah, that's the episode that we post this week. Cause we have a three week delay on our, production schedule. And so I noticed like, oh yeah, I had a David Perell on the show when I get the Twitter notification of like, David, Perell just retweeted you.And I'm like, oh, what did oh, right. Yeah. Because his episode came out and then every, I mean, David was especially generous. Right. But every clip that week seven in a row, he retweeted and posted to his, you know, hundreds of thousands of Twitter followers. Right. Cause it makes him look really good. It's clips of him delivering these, you know, soundbites of genius, perfectly format.And he's like great retweet share with my audience. I think that one, I picked up like hundreds of new Twitter followers, just, you know, maybe more just from, from, that. So it's a, it's a great experience. The side that I haven't done as much with that I really want to. and you and I talked about this a lot when we. Like early days of Daily Content Machine and what could it be? And, and then, getting my show set up on it is the transcripts in the show notes that you all do. cause first you found the most interesting points of the show and then second there's text versions of all of that. And then they're all like neatly edited and, and everything.And so,[00:07:01] Sean:A lot of re-purposing options.[00:07:04] Nathan:Yeah, so like if you ask the same question or a similar question, like, Hey, how'd you grow from a thousand subscribers to 10,000. Tell me about that process. If you ask that consistently, which I'm not great about asking the same questions consistently, but then over the course of 20, 30 episodes, you have this great library of answers to that question and you could make like compile it all, write some narrative and it's like, oh, there's an ebook that would be 15 pages long and could be a free lead magnet or a giveaway or anything else. It's just a total by-product of the podcast and Daily Content Machine. So I'm a huge fan. That's my experience.[00:07:42] Sean:Well, it's great to hear. yeah, we wanted to make it, I wanted to make it, so I just show up. I record myself doing a podcast with the camera on, and then I walk away. Like I don't have to, the footage sinks. It goes to the team. They produce it. They made me look good. They make me sound good. They find all of the best things. I said, things my guests said, they think about my target audience. What are their struggles? What are their goals? What do they want, what do they need? How would they search for it? How would they say it themselves? And they work together to come up with good titles for them, then produce it, flawless captions, you know, do the research, how's the guests build their name.How does their company name capitalize? Like make sure it's, it's all polished and then publish it everywhere. So I just show up once a week for an hour and record, and then I get to be everywhere every day. That's that's at least the goal. And I'm hearing you say like one of the benefits, but one of the benefits of finding clips out of your long form shows to post on social media is you give your guests something to share.And there's kind of two, two ways of approaching podcasts. And one is kind of the old school way, you know, People used to blog and the used to subscribe to RSS feeds and like, you know, that's how they consumed their content. And definitely you still want to build your own platform, have a website, have a blog, you know, definitely have an email newsletter on ConvertKit but now we're, we're posting Twitter threads. We're posting more content natively and people are consuming more natively on the platforms. So there's the old idea of, I have a podcast, here's a link, go listen to my podcast, go watch my podcast, go watch my video shifting from that to, Hey, why don't we deliver the best moments of the show?Because people are consuming short form content, and that's how they're evaluating whether they want to subscribe, whether they want to spend an hour listening in depth to that interview. We're giving them all of these entrance points and just providing value natively on the platform. Instead of asking them to go off the platform and interrupt their experience, it's here you go.Here's some value here's where you can get more.And, and that that's such a great way to. Bring new listeners on as well as to give the guests something to share, because think about the experience between a guest, being told like, Hey, your episodes out, will you, will you share a link to it? And they're like, Hey, I was on a show, go listen to the show.It's such a great interview. You know, we, we do it. We want to help out that, that person with the podcast. But imagine if the best moments that, where you said that the smartest things with all of your filler words remove and your tangents remove was tweeted, and there's a video right there. All you have to do is hit retweet.It's free content for you. It looks good. But then also for you as the show host, it promotes your show and gives you a new awesome.[00:10:28] Nathan:The other thing in it, like the retweet is fantastic, but a lot of people want that as original content on their social channel. And so having like the, the deliverable that I get from you all is, is. Yeah, it just shows up in Dropbox of here's all the videos for all the platforms and everything, you know, from my archives and all that.And I've sent those on to the guests when they're like, Hey, can I post this? Not every tweet. Like I want to post it with my own, title or tweaks on that. And so I can just share that whole Dropbox folder and they'll, they'll go find the exact thing they want to share and, and use it in their own softens.Like, yes, absolutely. Because the pre-roll or like the, or the post roll on that video is like, go subscribe to item newsletters. It's like, yes, please.[00:11:14] Sean:And it's not like Nathan, that you would have trouble getting guests, but if one had trouble getting guests for their show, or you want to get someone that's like really big, really busy, they get all kinds of requests all the time. Well, imagine if they're evaluating between these different shows, you know what, what's the audience size?What am I going to get out of it? You know, especially if you don't have millions of downloads on your podcast. Well, if you're providing these additional assets, like, Hey, we're going to make clips of this. You're going to get content out of this. It can help people make that decision to come onto your show as opposed to maybe another.[00:11:46] Nathan:Yeah, totally. I want to go, so somebody different directions. This is, we talked about an agency and the business that you're starting. I have a question that I've kind of asked you one-on-one sometimes. And I want to know why build a business with a team and like build this X scale of business rather than go the indie creative route.Right? Because if we want to, if you wanted to say independent, no team, you could probably make a business doing $250,000 a year. Work on it, maybe 20 hours a week, something like that, you know, hanging out in the studio, you'd still have your podcast. You could sit down and like, you're one of the most prolific writers I've ever met. so you could do a bunch of those, those things. And yet you keep trying to do and succeeding in doing these much harder businesses of building a team. And I have to know why.[00:12:39] Sean:Nathan, I don't know. I don't know why. I kind of know why, uh it's it's like it's going to get deep. I mean, it, it probably really goes back to childhood and being, being the oldest of 13 kids feeling like. I don't know if my parents are watching, but like, I felt this, this pressure to be successful, to be a good example, to be, to be a leader, you know, like to be productive.And, you know, I'm working through a lot of that stuff in therapy, like learning, like where did my motivations come from? And like, you know, it is this healthy because, you know, you know, my, my background of extreme workaholism for like 10 years, like, Nope, no joke. It was really bad. Like 16 hour days, seven days a week for 10 years, like all I did was work and like that's, that's my tendency.And I think something beautiful came out of that, which is this sabbaticals idea where since 2014 now I've taken off every seventh week as a sabbatical. So I work six weeks and I, I take off a week and we do that with our team and all of our team members. I paid them to take off sabbaticals and it's just been beautiful.The heartbeat of the company. And like, it's been really good for me as well in terms of, you know, burnout prevention and just unlocking my best ideas, but that's, that's my tendency. And, you know, th there's, there's all kinds of reasons. And, you know, there there's messages that we hear that maybe were said or implicit, you know, growing up that we internalize.And so I think, honestly, Nathan it's, it's probably just like chasing, like, I'm going to be dead honest, like, like it's, it's just like, I think of your post that post that you titled about enough, you know, and, you know, thinking through it, like, like if I were to just think of a number, you know, it's like, no, that's not enough, you know, and I know that's not healthy.So like, yeah, I could totally, I could totally do the solo thing. I could totally make 600. Work part-time, have less stress and maybe I should, you know, maybe I will eventually, but there's something in me that wants to build something bigger, but at the same time, it's just so much fun. Get it, like, I just love processes and systems and like, you know, building things that can scale.And so, yeah, it's.[00:15:08] Nathan:Well, let's lean into it more because I have the same thing on two different sides. Like I made the same leap from a solar creator to having a team. and there's sometimes I miss aspects of the solo creator thing. Like there's a level of simplicity and like, I look at somebody's product launch or something, and it does $25,000 or $50,000.And I'm like, oh, I remember when that amount of money was substantial in that it moved the needle for the business and like, and drove real profits. Now, like 25 or $50,000 gets eaten up by that much of expenses, like immediately, you know, cause the, the machine is just so much, so much bigger. And so I have the same thing of, of pushing for more and trying to figure out what. Like, what is that balance? And, and, yeah, I guess, how do you think about the balance between gratitude and enough and drive and ambition?[00:16:08] Sean:Yeah, that is a great question. It is. It is a balance. And as someone who has a tendency towards all or nothing thinking like, I'm, I just get obsessed. Like if I'm, if I'm about something like, I'm just all in, or I don't care at all. Like I'm really not in between. And that I think is a double-edged sword.Like it's a reason for my success, but it's also a reason for all of my downfalls and like, you know, going years without exercising and losing relationships and friendships, because I was so consumed by what I was building, you know, it is very much a double-edged sword. And so I think the answer is balance, you know, in what you're saying, w what do you, what do I think about the balance?I think it is a balance. It has to be, you have to be operating from a place of enough and then have things that are pulling you forward. You know, something that you're working towards having goals I think is healthy. You know, it's. Something that gets you out of bed in the morning. You're excited about what you're doing.You have this vision for where you're going, but it's operating from a healthy place of, I'm not doing this to fill a void in my soul. Right? Like I'm not doing this because I believe I'm not enough because I believe I'm not worthy of something. But, but because I know, yes, I matter I'm worthy. I'm important.And I'm excited. Like, I think that's the, I'm not saying I'm even there. I just think that's the balance to strike[00:17:34] Nathan:Yeah. I think you're right in this. It's interesting of the things that you can do in your, I guess, life, maybe the creative Dr.. I think there's a tendency of using that insecurity to drive creative success that can work really, really well for an amount of time. Like if you need to finish a book, grow your audience to a thousand subscribers, you know, like accomplish some specific goal.And he used the chip on your shoulder and the feeling of like, this person doesn't believe in me and that like triggers those deep insecurities on one hand, it's wildly effective and on the other, it can be super destructive and it's such a weird balance and place to sit in.[00:18:21] Sean:Yeah, a double-edged sword, for sure. Like it can, it can be what helps you succeed? And it can be your downfall. So you have to wield it wisely. unintentional illiteration you ha you have to be careful with that because it's so easy to just get consumed by it, to drown in it, to let this, you know, whatever it is, this, this, this drive, this motivation, the chip on the shoulder, whatever it is to let it take you to a place where you're just like, along for the ride, you know, on a wave, going somewhere on a, on a, you know, a tube floating down the river, right.You're just being taken somewhere, but are you being taken where you wanna go?[00:19:05] Nathan:Well, yeah. And then realizing, like, it might feel like you are up into a point, but then I guess if you're not aware of it and you're not in control of it, then you'll get to the point where the thing that you were trying to succeed, that the book launch, you know, hitting $10,000 in sales or whatever else, like that's not going to have any of the satisfaction and.[00:19:25] Sean:If I can take an opportunity here just to speak very directly to a point. If you are a founder, you should be in therapy. Full-stop like you, you need a therapist. I thought I didn't. I was like, I had a great upbringing. I'm all good. You know, everything's healthy. I don't have any problems. The problem was, I didn't know the problems that I had.I didn't realize what I was stuffing down. I didn't realize what I was avoiding. There's so much stress, you know, being a founder or even any, any C level executive in a company, like there's just so much going on, and you're responsible for so many things it affects your personal life. It affects your relationships.It affects how you see yourself. There is so much to unpack that you don't know, you need to unpack. And there's probably also stuff that, you know, you need to unpack. and Maybe you don't want to, but I went my entire life until the past year. Never going into therapy, never went to therapy. I'm like, yeah, that's great.You know, if you have some serious problems or a really bad childhood or whatever, like yeah. That's, you know, I support, it like positive, you know, like golf clap and I'm like, oh my gosh since I've been going on. I'm like I didn't know why I was doing the things I was doing, what my reasons were, what my motivations were, the ways that it was unhealthy to me, the way that it was affecting my relationships.So I just want to encourage everyone to go to therapy. I promise it's going to be beneficial[00:20:53] Nathan:Yeah.I cannot echo that enough. I've had the same experience and just having someone to talk through whatever's going on in your life, whatever, like even just interesting observations. When someone said this, I reacted like that. And that doesn't quite add up. Like, can we spend some time digging into that kind of, you know, and you realize that like, oh, that wasn't, that wasn't a normal, like healthy reaction.And it had nothing to do with what the person said or who they are or anything like that. I had to do it. This other thing, the other thing that I think is interesting about therapy is when you're following people online, you're partially following them for the advice and what they can do for you and all of that.But I think the most interesting creators to follow are the ones who are on a journey and they bring their audience, their fans, along that journey with them. And a lot of people are on a really shallow journey or at least what they put out online is a really shallow journey of like a, I'm trying to grow a business from X to Y I'm trying to accomplish this thing.And it's like, Like, I'm happy for you. There's like tips and tactics that you use along the way. And that's moderately interesting, but I think if you're willing to dive in on therapy and why you do, or you make the decisions that you do and what really drives things, it makes for as much deeper journey, that's a lot more interesting to follow. And all of a sudden the person that you followed for like learning how to do Facebook ads is talking about not only that, but the sense of gratitude that they were able to find in the accomplishments that they made or how they help people in this way or other things that's like a really authentic connection.And I think that, even though like growing a more successful business is not the goal of therapy and, and all of that. Like, it has that as a by-product.[00:22:42] Sean:It does. It definitely does. Although I'm, I definitely look at things the way that you're saying, which is like, what is. Productive output of doing this thing. And it's like, yeah, that's why I need to be in therapy to understand why I apply that lens to absolutely everything. but I I've found it immensely helpful.I would say I would echo what you're saying. in terms of sharing your journey, both the ups and the downs. I think that the highs of your journey are only as high as the lowest that you share, because otherwise it's just kind of it's, it's flat, you know, there's nothing to compare to like th th in the hero's-journey-sense you know, we we're rooting for the underdog who is going through challenges, and then we're celebrating with them when they have the wins.If you know, if you're not sharing the, the, the low points, it's not as relatable. Now that doesn't mean you have to share everything you're going through. You don't, you know, you can keep some things, you can keep everything personal. I'm just saying, if you have the courage to share what you're going to find is that you're not alone.You're not the only person going through these things. You're not the only person feeling these things. And sometimes the biggest failures or, or the things that, that hurt the most or the most difficult to go through when you share those, those can actually resonate the most. That can be where your, your community really steps up.And you, you feel that, more than any other time.[00:24:07] Nathan:Yeah. I think that, like I wrote this article a few years ago, titled endure long enough to get noticed, and it was just actually wrote it, it was off the cuff. I was on a plane just like needed to get something out that week. And it was an idea about serum on my head and I wrote, wrote it out, send it off.And, just the replies from it, because it took a more personal angle and it was talking about some of the struggles and a bunch of the replies were like, oh, that's exactly what I needed in this moment. Like, I was about ready to give up on this thing, you know? And, and that was that bit of encouragement. It ends up being this thing that feeds both ways. If you're able to take care of your audience and then if you let them, your audience can take care of you of saying like, oh, that that was really, really, meaningful.[00:24:49] Sean:Can I turn it around on you for just a second and, and ask, I, I know Nathan, you've been writing recently, you're on a bit of a streak and for those. Following your journey for a long time. They know you've, you've gone on streaks for periods of time. You made an app to log those things. We're talking about this recently.And I was just curious, what, what made you start writing again? And it may be, if you can touch on like the identity piece that you were sharing with me.[00:25:17] Nathan:Yeah.So most good things that have come in my business. Many of them, at least for a whole period of time, he came from writing. I wrote a thousand words a day for over 600 days in a row. And like, that was. Multiple books, a 20,000 subscriber audience, like just a whole bunch of things so I can work it from and everything else. And I've, I've tried to restart that habit a handful of times since then. And yeah, you were asking the other day, I'm trying to think, where are we out of the brewery? Maybe? I don't know.[00:25:51] Sean:Yeah. Something like.[00:25:51] Nathan:Well, I've all something. And you're just asking like, Hey, you're restarting that what what's driving that. And the thing that came to, I actually came to it in a coaching therapy conversation was like, I'm a writer. That's who I am. You know, it's part of my identity and yes, I'm also a, a creator and a startup founder and CEO and whatever else, but like, realizing that. I'm most at home when I'm writing, that's not what I'm doing. Writing is my full-time thing. And like, here's the cadence that I put out books, you know, obvious thing of like Ryan holiday, he's super prolific, like a book or two a year, you know?I'm not a writer in that way, but I, I have things to say and, words have an impact on people in the act of writing has such an impact on me that I realized that I feel somewhat of this void if I don't exercise that muscle and stay consistent of not just like teaching and sharing, but also taking these unformed thoughts that bounce around in my head and it, and like being forced to put them out in an essay that is actually coherent and backs up its points and like, Yeah, it makes it clear.So anyway, that's the, that's why I'm writing again. And so far it's been quite enjoyable. I'm only on, I think, 20 days in a row of writing, writing every day, but it's coming along now. I have to look. 21 today will be 22.[00:27:19] Sean:Nice. Yeah. Right. Writing is so great for clarifying thinking. And I love the, the identity piece. It's like, I'm a writer, you know, that's what I do. And I think it's interesting to think about whether it's kind of chicken and the egg, right. Maybe, maybe James clear would, would disagree, but like, does it start with a belief that you're a writer and therefore you write, or is it the act of writing that makes you a writer?And if you, if you aren't writing, then you're not.[00:27:50] Nathan:Yeah. I wrote something recently and maybe it's a quote from somebody of, if you want to be the noun and you have to do the verb, you know, and so we're looking for, how do I become a writer? How do I become a painter? How do I become a musician An artist, any of these things? And it's like, if you want to be a writer?Yyou have to write, you know, like, and I think we, we get so caught up in the end state that we start to lose track of the, the verb, the thing of like writers, write painters, paint, photographers, take photos, you know? And so if you're not seeing progress in that area, then it's like, well, are you actually doing the verb?And yeah, that plays a lot into identity and, and everything else.[00:28:37] Sean:I like what James, James clear says about like casting a vote for the person you want to[00:28:43] Nathan:Yeah, I think I referenced James on. So it's the, I reference you probably every fourth episode. And then James, maybe at like, just on alternating ones.So the thing that I quote you on all the time is the show up every day for two years, like I always had create every day as a poster on my wall, and I really liked the for two years, angle. And so I I'd love for you to share where does the for two years part come from and why, why that long? Why not for two months or two decades or something else?[00:29:16] Sean:Right. It really, the whole show up every day for two years, idea came from me, drawing letters, hand lettering. You know, you think of the Coca-Cola logo. That's not a font. That's, you know, customer. That's what I would do is draw letters. Like, like what you have behind your head, that type of style of lettering.And I just enjoyed doing that and I, it wasn't a job or anything, and I really didn't pursue it seriously for a long time, even though I enjoyed it as a kid, because I thought I could never make a living at this, you know? And it's that like productivity filter again, what can I be successful at? You know, as opposed to like, Hey, what do I enjoy?You know? And, it took an artist telling me, Hey, if you enjoy it, just create. because cause you enjoy doing it. Just create. I was like, yeah, I don't know why I needed that permission, but I did. And I just started creating and I was creating for me, like, because I loved it. And I was sharing on Instagram and Twitter and places like that, the drawings I was making, but nobody really cared or noticed for the first two years.And it, it, it, that was okay with me because I was doing it for myself. I loved the process. I love the act of. But somewhere right around two years, it was just this inflection point. It's kinda like you say, you know, like do it until you're noticed, right. And people started asking for custom commissions, do you have posters?Do you have t-shirts? And the reason I recommend that people show up every day for two years is it's not going to happen overnight. You know, hopefully in that time you find the reason for yourself that you're showing up. and the two years part is arbitrary for some people within eight months, they're on the map and people notice their work and maybe they could quit their job or, or whatever.Right. But two years is really just to give people a mark, you know, to, to work towards. by that time they figure out like, oh, it's not actually about two years. It's about showing up every day.[00:31:16] Nathan:Yeah. And a lot of what I like about two years is it since your time horizon correctly. and it helps you measure your like past efforts. I think about, you know, if you've thought about starting a, like learning a musical instrument or starting a blog or any of those things, you're like, eh, I tried that before, you know, and you're like, yeah, I showed up most days kind of for two months, maybe, you know, like when you look back and you analyze it, you're like, oh, I didn't show up every day for two years. And there's also sort of this implicit, I guess conversation you have with yourself of like, if I do this, will I get the results that I want? And cause the, the most frustrating thing would be to put in the effort and to not get the results and how the outcome you're. Like, I tried it for so long and I didn't get there. And so I believe that if you're doing something like creating consistently showing up every day, writing every day for two years and you're publishing it and you're learning from what you, you know, the results you try and consistently to get better, you almost can't lose. Like, I don't know of examples of people.Like no one has come to me. I actually emailed this to my whole list and said, like, what is something that you've done every day for two years, that didn't work. And people came back to me with story after story of things that they thought would be that. And then it like started working a year or year and a half in, or at some point in there because it's really hard to fail when you're willing to show up consistently for a long period of time.[00:32:54] Sean:And I think there's a point of clarification there kind of a nuanced discussion where some people might say, well, you know, where where's, where's the other end of the spectrum, where you're just continually doing a thing that doesn't work, you know, doing the same thing and expecting different results.And I don't think that's what we're talking about here. Like when we say show up every day, Showing up everyday to your craft, you know, for yourself to better yourself, whether that's writing or drawing or working on your business. This doesn't mean never course-correcting, this doesn't mean adapting or adjusting to find product market fit.We're talking about showing up for yourself. This doesn't mean even posting every day. It's not, it's really not for others. Like share what you want. If you want to tweet every day, if you want to blog or post your art every day, go for it. I actually tried that and, you know, it was pretty exhausting and that's part of why I made Daily Content Machine.I was like, how about I show up one hour a week and you turn that into Daily Content for me. but still on all the other days, I want to show up for myself. And, and often for me, it starts with writing as well. I think it all starts with writing, whether it's a business idea or a course or a book or content like writing is just the seed of all of that.So I like writing, not because I. It was born a rider or anything. I just see results from it. So for me, it's showing up in writing, even if I'm not posting that, or I'm not posting it now, you know, it's just for me.[00:34:19] Nathan:Yeah. And that's an important point because a lot of the time my writing is just chipping away at some bigger thing. Like some of the long essays that I've written have been written over the course of three or four months, you know, it's not like I got it together and like published it and it was ready to go.It was like an ongoing thing.What, like, what are some of your other writing habits? Because you're someone who has written a ton, I've seen you consistently write like 4,000 words a day for an entire month and stuff like that. yeah. When someone asks you, how do I become a better writer? How do I write consistently any of that? What are some of your tips?[00:34:55] Sean:Yeah. I'll tell you how not to do it, which is how I've done it, which is back to our earlier discussion. Just kind of all or nothing. my first book I wrote in 14 days, 75, 80,000 words, and my, my second book, which I still haven't edited and published. I was like, I want to show people that things take, as long as the amount of time you give them, how long does it take to write a book a year, 10 years a month?You know, two weeks, I was like, I'm going to try and write a hundred thousand words in a single day. So I live streamed it, and my idea was to speak it and have it dictated, right. Have it transcribed. I made it to 55,000 words. And these are like, it's, it's all you, you can find it. it's, it's coherent words like this.Isn't just feel like, like the book was in my head. I made it to 55,000. My voice was going and I'm like, I think I've got most of the book. I'm not going to kill my voice. And that's, as far as I made it. So I failed on the goal, but still got 55,000 words. But then for the next, like three, three or six months or something I hardly wrote.Cause I was just like, oh yeah, you know, look what I did. You know, I wrote all those words and it's like, no, that's not the right way to do it. Like I actually, I think there was a point to what I was doing and it was, it was a fun stunt or whatever, but I kind of regret that, you know, I wish I just stuck to, you know, you had that, that idea of like write a thousand words a day and this is something I would share with people as like an idea for starting out, Hey, try and read a thousand words a day.And I found out people would get stuck on that. They'd be like, I wrote 830, 2 words. I'm a failure. I'm just gonna give up and wait until the weekend when I have more time. And it's like, no, that's not the point. The point is to just show up and, and put some words there. So maybe for you, it's a time like write for 20 minutes, write for 15 minutes, write three sentence.And maybe you keep going, you know, but like put in the reps, show up, you know, put on the running shoes and go out the front door. If you don't run the five miles, that's fine. You know, walk around the block, but show up. And so I I've done it both ways and I don't prefer the stunt way where I write 50,000 words in a day.I prefer the, the, the ones where I write 400 words every single day, that week[00:37:06] Nathan:Yeah, I think that's absolutely right. And I've, I've, had that a lot of times where I was like, oh, I can't write today because I, I wouldn't have time to hit 500 or a thousand words. And so that's something I'm doing differently this time around of like, look even a hundred or 200 is a, is a success, any amount of, of doing the reps as good.[00:37:26] Sean:I want to lean in on that idea of defining success as less. What I mean by defining success as less is, and this is especially helpful. If you're going through a hard time, if you're feeling burned out, if you're feeling depressed, w with remote work, growing and growing, you know, w we're commuting less, we have more time.We have more flexibility in our day, but we, we tend to fill that time with just more and more work. And it's really easy to get to the point where you feel overloaded. And you, you go into your day just too ambitious thinking. You can get too many things done and ending with disappointment. Like I didn't get all the things done, you know, and you're just on this perpetual cycle of disappointment every day, setting yourself up for disappointment, trying to do too much.And instead of defining success as less. And so if you're, if you're feeling depressed, I mean, this gets as small as today as a success. If you brush your teeth, like today's a success. If you shower, today's a success. If you walk around just your block, that's it not run a mile, you know, not come up with a new business plan or outline a whole course or something.Less defined success is less, when I would do podcasts, I, you know, a podcast is what an hour, maybe two hours or something like that. But it takes a lot of energy. If you've never been on a podcast, you know, it takes energy to record. And I would feel bad after I record a podcast, not getting as much done afterward, you know, like, oh, I didn't get that much done.I mean, I recorded a podcast, but then I was supposed to have this and this and this, and just beat myself up. And I realized like, Hey, that, that podcast I recorded, that's going to be heard by thousands of people. That's really high leverage work. And I brought my best self and I really showed up and I really delivered.And that was good work. And you know what, on days where I have a podcast, I'm going to define that day as a success. If I show up and record that podcast, anything else is a bonus. And, and you just make that smaller and smaller and smaller until it's accessible to you until it's attainable for you. So maybe it's like write three sentences.If you show up at all to your writing app and write three sentences, the days of success. And what you'll find is more often than. You'll keep going.[00:39:34] Nathan:I think that's so important in, and I imagine most creators have been in that position of no motivation feeling depressed. And then you beat yourself up because you didn't get anything done, like deriving yourself worth. This kind of goes back to the earlier conversation, driving your self worth from what you create can both be very powerful in that it can feed itself really well.And then it is also incredibly fragile. And I've gotten to that point where if you end up in the downward spiral version of that, then like not creating, not accomplishing something. Leads you to feel more upset and depressed and so on. And it like when it works, it works well. And when it stops working, it fails spectacularly.And I think you're right. That the only way out of it is to lower that bar of success to something crazy low that you can't consistently. And then, you know, gradually you're way out of it from there.[00:40:34] Sean:Yeah, you, you are more than what you do. You are more than what you create. You are more than what you produce. You are more than your job. You are not your company. You're not the money in the bank. You're not how much you make each month. You're not the decline in revenue from this month compared to last month.Like you're none of those things. You're a person you're a human outside of that with independent work. And that's such a hard thing to internalize, but, but if you can, I mean, you, you, you just become impervious to all the things that can come against you. You know, you just become unstoppable. Nothing's going to phase you.Like you can embrace the highs and embrace the lows and just ride the rollercoaster. And I'm just describing all the things that I don't know how to do, but I'm working.[00:41:20] Nathan:Yeah. It's all the things that we're trying to, like lean in on and remind ourselves of, in those, in those tough times, I have a friend who has his game, that he played his, a few little kids, and his sort of a little game that he plays with them over time. And he like in a playful, joking voice, he asked them like, oh, what do you need to do to be worthy of love? And it's like turned into the thing for they, like, they're like nothing, you know? And he's very purposefully trying to counteract this idea of like, oh, I need to earn worthiness. I need to earn love. If, if I like show up for my parents in this way, if I take care of my family in that way, if I'm not a burden on other people, then like, Then I'll be okay and I'll be worthy of love and all of that.And so he's just playing it, like making it a playful thing with his kids from a very young age to basically instill this idea of like, you are a complete whole person and you can't, like earn worthiness of love and you also can't lose it.[00:42:19] Sean:I'm just thinking of the titles for this episode, that my team's going to come up with, like how to be a founder worthy of love.[00:42:26] Nathan:Yes, exactly.[00:42:28] Sean:Don't use that title.[00:42:31] Nathan:Okay. But I want to go, you've built a, a team twice, for first for Sean West, as a business, you know, of the course and content, community business. And then now for Daily Content, I want to get into, like what you like, how you built the team differently between those two times and what you learned. but before we do that, let's talk about as a solo creator. When you're thinking about making that leap to something where you need a team to build it to the next level, maybe you're at a hundred thousand dollars a year in sales, and you're looking at maybe the roommate's eighties and the Marie Forleo's of the world where like a few, rungs above you on the same ladder.And you're like, okay, that would require a team. What are some of the things that you think people should consider in that leap?[00:43:22] Sean:My biggest mistake was applying the right advice at the wrong time.Like I'm not a, I'm not a reckless person. Like I'm going to do my research and learn and like get all the smart people's advice. And so every, every big mistake I've made was as a result of applying great advice from smart people at the wrong time.And so it's, and, and I don't think I've ever heard anyone really, really talk about this. There's a lot of people slinging advice who should really be asking questions, but at the same time, you can't even blame them. Cause like Twitter, there's no room for nuance. Like you tweet fortune cookie tweets, you know, with, with advice and like, hope that people apply it at the right time.Like, that's just kind of how it goes. But like, you know, to, to your point of like looking to other people and what they've built and like, oh, that's what I would need and stuff, you know, I, I heard things. Delegate, you know, you don't want superhero syndrome. Like you need to empower other people and delegate the things you're not good at delegate the things you don't like to do, delegate the things you're good at.And you like to do, but you shouldn't do because you're the founder and you need the vision, you know, like, so it's like delegate, delegate. And so, okay. All right. Hire. This is going to sound really stupid, but no one told me that you need to make sure the thing that you're doing is working before you hire, because hiring is scaling, which means to make something bigger.And if you've got a bucket at the beach and the bucket has holes in it, and you scale that bucket, you have a bigger bucket with holes. Like th th that's not better. That's like, do you, do you like the stressful problems you have now? How would you like problems with another zero on that? Like you have $30,000 problems.Do you want $300,000 a month problems? Like, you know, it's not fun. so nobody's told me that and looking back, it's like, it's so dumb. Like, do you think making this big. Automatically makes it better. It's just going to automatically make the problems go away. No, you need to, you need to scale. What's working, do more of what works and, and, and slow down and hold off and make sure the thing you have is working before you grow it.I don't know if I answered the question, but I'm just speaking to my past self.[00:45:32] Nathan:You totally did. So what are the things that, like, how does that play out as you're building Daily Content Machine, versus the previous team?[00:45:40] Sean:The difference here is my, my previous business required me to function and I hired people around me, you know, to support me. So I wasn't doing all the work, but I had to show up. I had to, you know, whatever I had to write, I, you know, come up with an email or blog or. Or live stream or podcast or whatever.It was like, it was built around me and there's nothing wrong with that. Like, that's totally fine. You can build a business where you do what you love and you're supported by your team. I just found that you can, you can do something that you love and burnout, like after you do that for years and years and years, it's not even that I don't like podcasting or I don't like writing cause I actually do what it ultimately came down to is that I don't like having to do it.And if I don't, if I don't, then everything falls apart. And so with this new business, the agency, it was like, okay, like the first thing I want to build from is this can't require me to function. It has to be built in a way that the team can run things where it's like, I don't have to be on the strategy call.I don't have to do the marketing. Like my face isn't necessarily the reason people are coming to. and that, that really shifted how we build things.[00:47:01] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, that, that's a huge thing. And like, I imagine you defining all of these roles and early on, you might be doing a bunch of them to test if it works and to build out the systems, but none of them are like defined by your own unique skillset. Like you actually I've loved watching your systems and the, as you've shown me behind the scenes, because you're breaking it down and you don't need one person who is a fantastic video editor and copywriter and project manager talking about that, actually, because I think so often we're trying to find the employee or the team member. That's like the, the unicorn perfect fit. And you've made a system that doesn't require.[00:47:42] Sean:Exactly. And we did start out that way, where, when, when I was initially hiring for, you know, this Daily Content Machine service that we have, what's involved in that process and we talked. Clients and prospects all the time that like the Mo one of the most common things they try to do is either build a team in-house that can find all the best moments scrubbed through the long form content, edit it.Well, you know, titles, research, all of that, the build that team in house, or hire a freelancer and the problems with either of those is like what I've identified as it comes down to the person doing, doing content repurposing well requires nine key skills among them like copywriting and marketing and design and animation and rendering, and like, you know, SEO and all of that stuff.And I'm not saying there's, there's no one out there with all those skills, but, but those people are doing their own thing most of the time,[00:48:38] Nathan:I think I'm a pretty good Jack of all trades. And I think if we get to five of those, probably maybe on a[00:48:45] Sean:You could probably do most, I can do most too, but I don't scale, you know, so I'm trying to, I'm trying to scale me. and the first thing I tried to do was hire someone who could do all the things like, okay, you need to be able to, and that very quickly was not the way that was not going to work.So we realized we need specialists. We need people who are really good writers. We need people who are really good animators. People who are good editors, people who are a good quality assurance, reviewers, people who are good project managers, you know, all of that. And that's, that's what probably sets us apart.You know, the most unique thing is like, we learn about your audience and we find all of the moments and like teaching people, I've talked to people who have their own teams, or they're trying to build teams for doing this. And that's the hardest part is how do you teach someone how to find those moments?Like video editing is commoditized. You can find a video editor anywhere, but what happens when you try and get a freelancer who can just chop up clips and animate it and put a slap a title on it? Yeah. Th they're not, they don't care about the quality. They're not capitalizing the book titles and the company names and spelling the guests.Right. You know, and the titles of the clips, that's like half of it, you know, like half of it is the title, because that's going to determine whether someone sticks around and clicks or watches or whatever, and they're not thinking the right way, or they're not finding the right moments. And so the person who's outsourcing, they're trying to go from, I've been doing this myself.I've been editing my own video. I've been scrubbing through my own long form content to now, okay, you have got this freelancer, but now you're a project manager and a quality assurance reviewer because their work isn't up to par. And so I have people asking me like, how do you teach people how to do this?Well, how to find those moments, what's going to provide value to the audience. How do you title it all? and that part, I'm not giving away because that's, that's our home.[00:50:33] Nathan:Yeah. And that, that makes sense. So you described Daily Content Machine as an agency and it is, but I was like, great. You're an agency. Here's my other idea for a show where. Like a dream it up and produce it. Or actually we build my website for me, like your, your designers on all that.Right. And your answer would be like a flattened and I think that's really important for the business. So can you talk about the difference between the agency that you're running in productized services and how you think about making that scale versus like a, an agency of, Hey, this is our hourly rate.These are the projects we're best at, but we'll kind of take on anything.[00:51:11] Sean:So maybe I'll I'll I'll title the clip of this moment, how here's, how you will try it like this. Here's how you create a six figure agency. And for. It is by saying no to almost everything and getting really specific about what you offer and to whom. So my previous, the previous iteration of my business, I was out of a scale of one to ten I was working at a level 11 effort, you know, to bring in six figures with this version of the business. It's like a one or two in terms of, you know, getting people to give you vast amounts of money. And the difference is in what you're providing and, and to whom. So you've kind of got this, this matrix of products or services that either make money for your clients, or they're just nice to have.And then on the people side, you have, it's a generalization, but people who have money and people who don't, and I was always playing on hard mode, you know, I was trying to sell like kind of more premium stuff to people who didn't have money. And I'm like, you know, feeling bad about not being able to give stuff to the people who don't have money.And it's like, you know, what a really great way to do this would be to provide premium services that make money for people who have. So I decided I'm going to start with six to seven figure business owners. What is it that they need? And what is it that, that I'm good at, you know, core competencies. And that's where we came up with this idea.And the hardest part has been not giving into shiny object syndrome. All of the things that we could do, all of the services that I want to build. And it's like, no, there's so much more juice in this one thing. If we just stick to this and just become the best at finding, identifying, and producing and distributing clips from long form content and just be really, really good at that.There's enough complexity in that, you know, and just see that as the game, like, how can we get really good at this? How can we sell this better? How can we deliver it better? How can we increase the quality and just getting really focused and aligning what you offer the value of that to the people you're offering it to within four weeks with just a page and a form.This was a six figure book.[00:53:16] Nathan:When I think about the price of the offering. So I think I have. for what I pay for and Daily Content Machine paying about $5,000 a month. Is that right? I think somewhere in there.[00:53:28] Sean:So, what we didn't say is you, you kind of talked me into, adding another service, which is, we also do the video and audio show notes, transcript, like podcast production piece. So like, we'll produce the full thing. You just show up and record sync the footage to us. We'll produce the show and we'll make the clips.That's actually been a really nice bundle, but I'm like, okay, that's it, that's it. You know? So you kind of have some extra services in there.[00:53:53] Nathan:Yeah.To be clear, you don't want to let your friends, even if they live in the same town, as you convince you to like change your agency,[00:54:00] Sean:Nathan's very convincing.[00:54:03] Nathan:I distinctly remember. I even invited you over for dinner and convinced you of it,[00:54:07] Sean:How am I supposed to say no,[00:54:08] Nathan:Exactly.[00:54:10] Sean:You made an offer. I couldn't refuse.[00:54:13] Nathan:But in that, so you're talking about like what you're selling to someone who might not be able to afford it, or like you might make a course that you charge $5,000 for that is absolutely worth every bit of that when in the right person's hand and apply it in the right way. But you're going to have a bunch of people trying to buy it, who like, aren't that person who's going to get the leverage to make it a clear 10 X value or something like that. And so you might have in this position where someone's like, oh, $5,000 is expensive. Should I buy it? I don't know. And you're like, honestly for you, I don't know if you should buy it.Like you're not in the target market and that's, that's $5,000 one time in the case of this. And this agency, this productized service, I guess, $5,000 a month. And so actually two of those clients, and you've got a six figure a year agency business. And it's just interesting. The thing that you said made me really drove home the point of, there's not necessarily a correlation between effort and income and, and effort and output. And so you found a model and kept, kept tweaking until you found one where it was like, look, there's a ton of work that goes into this, obviously. And there's a bunch of really smart people working on editing and transcribing and captioning and everything in the show. but like, it, it doesn't have to be crazy complicated, whereas some of the other business models that you and I have both tried have been way more effort for way less.[00:55:40] Sean:Yeah. And what can really hold you back is not realizing who you're trying to market to. And. getting Talked down in your prices by accidentally catering to the wrong people. So like people who can't afford your services, you could get on call consultation calls with them. And they're just like, I just don't have this much money and can you do discounts?And you, you almost start to feel bad. Like, you know, how can I charge this much? I must be charging way too much. And it's like, or maybe you're serving the wrong customers. Like, you know, when you talk to the right people, that may actually be really cheap. I remember when I started designing logos, this is like a decade ago.My first logo, I charged like 150 And then, once I sold that I got enough confidence to charge 300. And then I was like, I, you know what, instead of doubling again, I'm going to charge $750[00:56:30] Nathan:Ooh.[00:56:31] Sean:I did that. And you know, I'm like slowly building on my portfolio and I got up to like, $1,500 and clients were paying that and right around there, you start to get people resisting.Now you've got a price with a comma and it gives people. pause And they're like, can you come down? Can you do a little bit cheaper? And it's so tempting. You, you want to do that because you want the job. You, you want them to be happy. It could be a good portfolio item. And I remember just kind of fast forwarding through this, but like, you know, just mindset shifts and stuff.Eventually I got to the point where there was this startup out of San Francisco they wanted a logo. And I was like, this would be really valuable for this company, you know? And I somehow mustered up the courage to charge $4,000. And I found out later from a friend of a friend, you know, from someone that worked there that they thought I was like super cheap because someone else they knew or some other agency was going to charge $25,000 And I was like, wow, like I'm over here. Just like feeling bad about my prices, thinking I'm going so big. And really I'm. I was just serving the wrong code.[00:57:34] Nathan:Yeah. And it's so interesting because the person who's only able to pay $500 or only thinks the logo is worth $500. It's not that they're wrong or they're devaluing your service or something like that. It's that maybe it's for a side project or it's for a business that just got off the ground or any of that. And so it's not worth getting offended over or something like that. It's like, we just don't have product market fit, like product customer fit. It's not a thing here, you know, and my services are better for, you know, bigger, more established companies. So the saying no to, to, services, occasionally getting talked into specific services by your somewhat annoying local friends. but then where does it go from here as far as what are you looking to, to, to add more clients and, and keep scaling and growing?[00:58:30] Sean:Yeah. That's what we're trying to figure out right now is it's always tricky. It's a blessing and a curse when you have an audience, because it can kind of create false product market fit. Like you, you think you have something and then you exhaust your audience and then you're like, oh, like I kinda need to figure this out.You know, that's like, we're experiencing that right now because like, I was getting like 40% close rates on consultation calls on sales calls, and now we're not, and it's. Oh, no, like what's happening. And it's like, well, I think those people probably knew me for several years, you know? And then like, there's just all this trust and still Nathan we're a year in and we don't have, like, we don't have a proper website for, for the agency.It's like a page with a form. That's it? There's no, there's no examples. There's no case studies. There's no portfolio item and we've made it this far. but you know, when people don't know you, they need that social proof and they want the examples and they're looking for past versions of success. And like the sales cycle is a little bit longer.And so that's where we're at right now is like figuring out kind of like Mar marketing channel fit. And I know well enough to know, like it's better to, and back to right advice, wrong time. it's a good idea to be everywhere if you can, you know, cause different people consume on different platforms.Even if you don't use Instagram. Other people do, even if you don't use YouTube, other people do it's. Beyond LinkedIn, even if you don't, you know, that like there's, there's some, there's some sound reasoning to that at the same time. You don't want to try to do all of that all at once, you know, and, and spread yourself too thin, like pick one channel, do one channel.Well, and when you've got that down and it's easy and you have systems and it's not taking too much time, then expand to another channel with the goal of like, ultimately diversifying kind of like investments. You don't want to just diversify all at once. You know, like, like try some things out, you know, focus on one thing at a time, see what works for us.I, at least I know that much. And so it's like, okay, I'm not trying to do every version of marketing, you know, like, oh, do we do affiliates? Do we do ads? You know, do we do content? Do we do cold outreach? You know? I'm trying not to do everything at once. So we're kind of dabbling in one thing at a time and seeing what fits.[01:00:48] Nathan:So how many clients do you have now for the agency that are the consistent tenders?[01:00:53] Sean:Not a lot. It's still very small. And we've had like, I it's under a dozen cause like some, we had like several accounts, like not renew and stuff. So it's still very small. And for three or four months, I stopped marketing and sales completely because I did not want to break this thing with scale because I notice things in operation that were the operations that were not going well.I'm like, this is going to be really bad. Like if we just sign more clients, it's going to be really bad. So, I had clients pay upfront for like six months or 12 months of service, which kind of gave us time to focus on operations. And now everything's humming along smoothly. Like the systems we've built can support like dozens or hundreds of accounts, even like, we don't need it right now, but it'll support where we want to go.But it's still a very, it's actually very small, like again done, like almost no marketing a year end, still don't have a website. Like it's pretty much just been all internal focused.[01:01:52] N

Productive on Purpose
Episode 099: Profiles in Purpose: My Q3 Review

Productive on Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:15


Hey, POP Squad!Another quarter has gone by! Can you believe it? We have been rocking together since the beginning of 2020, and so much has changed, so much is going to change as well.That's why you absolutely cannot miss next week's Episode 100! It is going to blow your mind.In today's episode, I share all my quarter 3 wins and failures. I have had some of my highest highs and some of my lowest lows since starting my business this quarter. Nonetheless, I am so grateful for the direction that God has taken me.The beginning of the quarter was not easy.  I was having some doubts about where my business was and the direction I wanted it to take. But it was really that my spirit was unsettled because I was feeling that God wanted to do something new in my business. Then I realized what it was! I've known from the onset that I was called to serve doctors, women doctors, and more specifically, Black women doctors. But I had resisted because stepping out and niching down was scary. However, I had to clarify my message so that I could show up both powerfully and with certainty for my right clients. It required a lot of intentional internal work.  I had to go all-in on my mindsets and beliefs. I had to seek God relentlessly through the process.Eventually, I was able to relaunch my coaching program,  Purposed to Profit™ , relaunch my Facebook group and rebrand myself as the high ticket coach on Instagram.I was able to niche all the way down to serve Black women doctors who want to develop and confidently sell high ticket coaching programs and learn the secret to building a 6-figure (and beyond) coaching business from scratch. In the process, I was able to make 60K just in the month of September. And those are just some of the wins...In this episode, I share about:Being certain and being aligned in my business.Shifting my beliefs and mindset.Showing up in sufficiency versus scarcity.Tugboat energy versus lighthouse energy.Mentioned in this episode:My Q2 ReviewEpisode 084: Mindset Shifts You Need To Make If You Want To Be a High Ticket Coach********************************************************************Apply to join Purposed to Profit™ Elite: Group Coaching Program by clicking HERE and we'll discuss how we can work together.Join my FREE private Facebook Group The High-Ticket Doc™| High-Ticket Coaching For Women Doctors by clicking HERE and you'll access my Free training on The Secret to High-Ticket as a Brand New Coach.

FathersFyre
148 - 15 years old and surprise you're a dad - What now?

FathersFyre

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:50


This week I visit with Andy Van Order owner of Andy's Auto Care +. We explore his amazing story of becoming a dad at 15 and manning up to take care of his son. No, it wasn't easy but he dug in and not only did what was required to raise and support his son but to become the man he is today. Join the conversation as we explore Being the dad of 7 kids Having a kid at 15 years old Made it a goal of being a better dad than mine Not having the support of peers and his mom Facing the stage where half the kids are out of the house and half are still at home At that time his mom was dealing with depression so working through the challenge of having a kid by himself The goal of getting off government assistance When he was single was at the point of never getting into a relationship again. When he finally met his wife - committing to being in it for the long haul Key things he and his wife have done to make it 15 years Praying together as a family Dynamic of being a dad with such a range of kids' ages. Be present - relish every moment even changing the diapers Showing love, taking kids out separately Guest Andy Van Order Andy's Auto Care + Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Andysautocareplus Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/andysautocareplus/ Host: Jody Sedrick jodysedrick.com Instagram: @jodysedrick New Book: Learn to Dance With The Currents of Life - When You Feel Like Drowning

The Shameless Mom Academy
588: 7 Simple Ways To Show Up For Your Life

The Shameless Mom Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 31:05


Everyday you have the chance to show up for yourself, your family and your community in a myriad of ways.  On hard days, showing up feels nearly impossible.  Heck, some days it is impossible.   As we endure the most relentless of seasons, there are a number of ways you can show up, one small step at a time - to keep up your drive, your sense of self, and a bit of momentum.  Showing up in small ways over a long period of time makes a really big difference in the entire trajectory of your life.  How do I know this?? Because I'm the poster child for showing up in small ways one million times over again.  It's what I do.  It's how I built an award winning fitness business.  It's how I built this podcast (that's nearing 600 episodes), it's how I kept going when infertility felt like it would win over and over again. Showing up doesn't have to be a big production.  It can be small, simple steps that keep you moving forward just a bit at a time - enough to help you see that you are actually moving forward.  In this episode, I share 7 simple ways you can show up for your life.  Practicing any one of these will have great impact over time.  Let's keep showing up, my friends. Link mentioned: Join Traci and me for Traci's virtual book launch on October 20th: Social Justice

Over The Ropes: Wrestling Podcast
OTR Ep37: AEW is Showing Out!!! Its Draft Time WWE! Who is going Where?

Over The Ropes: Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 55:26


This episode we will discuss a banking episode of AEW Dynamite this past Wednesday. Also, we will discuss what kind of shake up the WWE Draft will have on RAW and SMACKDOWN. Tune In for this exciting episode!!! Oh yea we lit on this one!!!!

Evil Thoughts
Butt Crack

Evil Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 18:20


Showing her azz is what she does! Madonna straddled Jimmy Fallon's desk. Hilarity ensues.

Arroe Collins
Renee Taylor From The Movie Tango Shalom

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 21:11


Tango Shalom was directed by Gabriel Bologna, son of Renée Taylor and the late Joseph Bologna. The cast includes Golden Globe Nominee Lainie Kazan (My Big Fat Greek Wedding), Oscar and Emmy Award-winner Renée Taylor (Adam Sandler's The Do Over, The Producers, The Nanny), Karina Smirnoff (Dancing With The Stars), Joseph Bologna (My Favorite Year, Blame It On Rio, Big Daddy, Lovers and Other Strangers), Jos Laniado Claudio Laniado (Mudbound), Bern Cohen (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel), and Judi Beecher (Taken 3, Family is Family, La Garconne). Synopsis: When a female Tango dancer (Smirnoff) asks a Rabbi (Jos Laniado) to enter a dance competition, there's one big problem-due to his Orthodox beliefs, he's not allowed to touch her! Desperately in need of splitting the prize money to save his Hebrew school from bankruptcy, they develop a plan to enter the competition without sacrificing his faith. The bonds of family and community are tested one dazzling dance step at a time in this lighthearted fable. In Los Angeles, the film can be seen at Landmark Theaters on Pico and Town Center 5 in Encino, and September 10 opens at The Laemmle in Newhall. In New York, at AMC Empire 25, The Village East Cinema By Angelika, and also opens on September 10 at The Cobble Hill 5 and Williamsburg Cinemas Brooklyn, Kew Garden 6 Queens, and Malverne 5 and Roslyn 4 on Long Island. Canadian Cinéma Cineplex locations include Forum et VIP - Montreal, Empress Walk - Toronto, and Fifth Avenue Cinemas - Vancouver. Tango Shalom finished its three day weekend engagement better than expected at $20,581, with an astonishing per theater average of $5,145 (second best only to Marvel's Shang-Chi). Tango Shalom also claims bragging rights to the best 2021 exclusive opening, as well having the best PTA, this Memorial Day to Labor Day summer season. Showing daily gross increases this weekend (Saturday +32% from Friday and Sunday +54% from Saturday) boasts to be the number one independent film release this weekend. On Friday, September 10, the interfaith movie that promotes peace, tolerance and inclusion, will expand onto more screens in New York and Los Angeles, and also across Canada in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver with additional screens to be announced soon.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2: Businesses getting ready for having customers showing proof of vaccination

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 33:43


1PM - The Fastest 15 // Businesses getting ready for having customers showing proof of vaccination // NYTimes issues correction after exaggerating child covid hospitalizations // 710 ESPN's Dave Wyman drops by to chat sports and music See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Now Showing with Mike and Wayne
Now Showing with Mike and Wayne EP 66: Creature Features/Werewolf Movies- The Many Saints of Newark- The Guilty

Now Showing with Mike and Wayne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 65:57


This week we talk about Creature Features and Werewolf movies.  We finally get to review The Many Saints of Newark, and then we take a look at the Netflix remake of The Guilty.  New episodes every Friday.

WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE (with doctor shannon) | Stop Drowning | Start Sipping | Daily Inspiration | Hope | Certainty | Abundanc

Whether you're married, in a relationship, or not…this message is for all souls. If you love, and/or desire love, doing these 3 things are vital for all relationships. The relationship you have with your soul is lifelong. Until death do you part…and beyond. It matters more than the relationship you have with others. It also has a huge affect on all of your other relationships. So how do you redefine dating? It starts with how you date yourself. Heart and soul. Connecting your heart and soul. And YOU connecting with your heart and soul. Your head and your heart. It's connecting with who you really are. As you know, I've written a best-selling book, Date Yourself Well: The 12 Best-Selling Engagements of Becoming The Great Lover of Your Life. What does this mean? How do you DATE YOUR SOUL? As we've discussed in the past two episodes, the soul is your mind, will, and emotions. Dating your soul starts with: 1. Making a conscious decision. It's YOU choosing to date yourself. In order to love you, you must know you. In order to know you, you must spend time with you. If you desire to really know and love you, you must choose to spend time…and date YOU. Yes, ask yourself OUT. What would that look like for you? I made a choice with my mind, and was led by my heart to SHOW UP for myself. Showing up for YOU is the first step. Then... 2. SPEAKING UP. Going all in. You learn what's IN you, and you bring “her” to the surface and allow her (YOU) to speak. You PURSUE her. 3. Going passionately into your feelings. Allow your emotions to be felt. Allow your feelings to have their place, and voice. Pay attention. Give yourself the opportunity to feel you. To truly feel yourself from the inside, out. You STAND UP. For you and what you believe… You get to know YOU, your heart and soul. If you can date your soul well, you can date yourself well. You can love yourself well. You'll be able to love your life, life's work, and those in your life well. I promise you. It'll change everything for you. Please grab your SACRED S.O.L. DATE JOURNAL (Daily Action To Engage yourself.) TODAY'S SACRED S.O.L. STEP: You're invited to join me, and other S.O.L. DATE SISTERS from around the globe on Tuesday nights (7:00 - 8:00 pm US- Central Time.) for a LIVE, virtual S.O.L. DATE. Go to www.soldateyourself.com, where you can download my SIX SACRED S.O.L. DATE SECRETS and thank you for allowing me to share this incredible journey with YOU! IT'S A DATE! Thank you for being here, and allowing me to Sip On Life with you. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning in your life, please don't hesitate to reach out. YOU ARE NOT ALONE... Request a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well — The Best-Selling 12 Engagements Of Becoming The Great Lover Of Your Life (all you'll pay for is shipping.) www.dateyourselfwell.com If you've received value from the podcast, please let me know. I'd LOVE to hear from you — please email me at: drshannon@doctorshannon.com AND PLEASE TELL YOUR BESTIES AND INVITE THEM TO SIP ON LIFE WITH US. FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM @doctorshannon! See you there... And learn about an incredible opportunity for a select sacred group of 25 women who are ready and willing to RISE UP AND BE THE WOMAN. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning, please don't hesitate to reach out. I'd be more than happy to schedule a Discovery Call with you to see if Healing Life Coaching is a good fit for you. Email me at drshannon@doctorshannon.com Come over to the WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE S.O.L. MOVEMENT Closed FB Group and Join the MOVEMENT: https://www.facebook.com/groups/WSOLMovement/ By the way, if you haven't already listened/downloaded my new song (EPISODE 291), you can also listen to it here: letsnottalkaboutex.com, and cast your vote for your favorite version. Visit WomenSippingOnLife.com for more free resources, including my CHECKLIST FOR CHANGE, Engagement Checklist + Evaluation Rating, Six Sacred S.O.L. DATE Secrets…and a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well. You can also check out my Dr. Shannon Facebook Page for more daily S.O.L. TRAINING. I look forward to seeing you again tomorrow. Please invite your best girlfriends to come and join our S.O.L. PARTY. xo Dr. Shannon. Inspiring minds that want to grow and hearts that want to know, so you can love you, your life, and your life's work well. ONE SIP AT A TIME. A special thanks to the following souls for helping me launch our WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE podcast… Intro/Outro done by UNI V. SOL  Outro music by Jay Man: Mind Over Matter (www.ourmusicbox.com)  Podcast cover design and web site done by: Pablo Aguilar (www.webdesigncreator.com) Podcast cover photo by Kate Montague of KM Captured (www.kmcaptured.com)

What's Going On Chicago?
Justin Fields gets first win as a starter, and the Fields era will begin in Vegas!

What's Going On Chicago?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 21:41


Justin Fields gets his first career win at home against the Detroit Lions.  Showing flashed of great throwing ability, Nagy has announced he is now the starting QB in Chicago. So let the Fields era begin.  The Bears head to Las Vegas to take on the Raiders, and their aggressive defense. Can Field get another win?  Anything can happen!

Talk is Cheap: A New York Giants Podcast
Can Daniel Jones keep the train rolling after stellar Week 4 showing? Previewing Giants-Cowboys

Talk is Cheap: A New York Giants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 21:32


The New York Giants had a shocking upset against the Saints and people like Daniel Jones, Andrew Thomas, Kadarius Toney and even Jason Garrett deserve some praise. Zack Rosenblatt and Darryl Slater discuss whether they can keep that going against the Dallas Cowboys this week. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

RAD Radio
10.07.21 RAD 05 Showing Proof Of Vaccination

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 23:21


Showing Proof Of VaccinationSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Equestrian Perspective
39. Past Not So Great Experiences With Horses & How I Would Mitigate Them From Happening Now

Equestrian Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 43:23


In the past, I have forced horses to do things. I have lunged horses for hours, used tack that didn't fit, used tongue ties, used earplugs, let people hit my horses, used draw reins, yanked, kicked and felt let down by my horses 'poor' behaviour.  I wanted to share some of these experiences with you all and explain how I would mitigate them from happening now. Because I can't go back in time and change what I did, I might be able to help someone who listens to realise that there is a better way to work through these situations. I genuinely believe that when these things happened, I was doing the best I could with the knowledge I had, and so were those around me. My intentions were good, and I loved my horses so much, I just didn't know of another way.  I hope that this episode makes you feel not so alone and inspires you to think outside the box and realise that you can help your horse through any situation you encounter.  To connect with me on Instagram click here: - https://www.instagram.com/felicitydavies_/ To download my free Prepare Your Horse For Any Environment Traning Checklist click here: https://www.confidentequestrianprogram.com/trainingchecklist To join my Facebook group - Confident Equestrian Community click here: https://www.confidentequestrianprogram.com/confident-equestrian-community To find out more about The Confident Equestrian Program and book a free call then visit www.confidentequestrianprogram.com/CEP  

They Coined It, a Mad Men Podcast
"A Fur Too Far" (S4E6) (Waldorf Stories)

They Coined It, a Mad Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 56:25


Welp. You will hear a great many sighs from your hosts. We are especially interested in your take on this episode of Mad Men - what do you think of it? How does it leave you feeling? Scroll down for all the ways to let us know. And enjoy our discussion of “Waldorf Stories.” ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Support us on Patreon - make a 1-time donation, or subscribe for early episode drops, extra discussions, and opportunities to appear on our end of season They Joined It. And get yourself some merch - you totally want Eminently Chewable across your chest or Your Dick Whitman is Showing on a mug (or our logo on anything). ___________________________________________________________________________________________ CONTACT US Feedback/Comments/Dirty Jokes: Questions@TheyCoinedItPod.com Patreon Instagram Twitter Facebook Producer - Roberta Lipp Graphics (including logo and merch) - Albert Stern (stickrust arts) Theme by Adam Michael Tilford (Venmo: @Adam-Tilford-1)

The Lessons in Real Estate Show
Episode 91: Family Offices and the Veteran Housing Crisis with James Marszalek

The Lessons in Real Estate Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 60:16


We all need a roof above our heads. The first and most crucial in Maslow's hierarchy of needs. When you meet your basic housing need, time and opportunities become abundant. Not to mention the mental benefits of getting to live properly. It is a tragedy how many families and veterans in the military can't even meet this basic necessity. James offers a solution. In fact, he manages a fund that directly helps house military families and service members. In this episode, James takes us through his passionate journey and the colossal financial world of single-family offices. James is another Lean advocate. He believes the 2 seconds improvements we make will snowball into more time and more money. He dreams of building an empire and giving back to the veteran community, teaching financial independence. Now on his way to creating business #3, James also dreams of a roof above every head. A true family man. In this episode, James shares how you don't have to sell something and what a single-family office is, the grand empire he dreams of building one day. Check out his passionate plans, watch the episode now! Click here on the link below to find how you can begin a success story just like this. pintocapitalinvestments.com. In this episode, we explore: Benefits while on active duty Consumerism and how to budget Learning the rules, Playing the game Asking the right questions Education on VA loan What is a single-family office Vertical integration Homing military family members About James: Guest Bio: James is a Passionate Entrepreneur and Lean Thinker. Focused on Growth, Pro-activity, Team, Emotional Intelligence, Innovation, Value, and Freedom. He was trained by the US Army in Combat Tactics, Preparation, Accountability, and Psychological Operations. James was inspired and motivated by the process of building businesses and is currently on business #3, which I'm fostering into an Idea Meritocracy Organization. He values radically open-minded people with principles and character and is constantly learning, networking, and brainstorming. Now on the path to building my own Single Family Office. He is passionate about: - Giving back to the Veteran Community. - Inspiring others to put good into the world. - Showing people the path to financial independence. - Scaling ideas and businesses across the country. - Pioneering on the front line of innovation. - Surrounding myself with higher-level thinkers. Snapshot Timestamp: 47:04 What is your number one failure in real estate? Starting with single-family and not asking the right questions 2. What advice do you have for other military investors to be successful? Learn the VA loan inside and out 3. What inspired you to serve your country? The military guns, airplanes, and the career was very appealing 4. What is your dream? Financial freedom and giving back Connecting with the Guest LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamesmarszalek/ #VAlaon #veteranhousing #singlefamilyoffice

Locked On Blazers – Daily Podcast On The Portland Trail Blazers
New look defense, Anfernee Simons showing growth and more preseason thoughts w/ Casey Holdahl

Locked On Blazers – Daily Podcast On The Portland Trail Blazers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 47:57


Casey Holdahl of Trailblazers.com joins the show to talk Anfernee Simons, Portland's new-look defense, Larry Nance Jr. and more after the Blazers' first preseason game. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Focus on WHY
213 Innovation Takes Courage with Dr Lizzy Bernthal

Focus on WHY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:05


After serving 25 years as a healthcare professional in the British Army (Lt Col) with a PhD in psychological wellbeing, Dr Lizzy Bernthal has a new mission in life; to eliminate toxic leadership from the workplace. Showing people how to overcome their inner war zone, Lizzy is empowering those who lack confidence or are too scared to speak up or show up. Creating ripples of positive change, believing that failure is purely feedback and encouraging people to become powerful and purposeful leaders, Lizzy demonstrates that innovation takes courage.   KEY TAKEAWAY “What does integrity really mean? Are you living in integrity? What does innovation mean? You cannot have innovation without courage because innovation by definition is a risk. In order to take a risk, that takes courage.”   ABOUT DR LIZZY BERNTHAL Dr Lizzy Bernthal is a confidence leadership coach, international speaker, author, wellbeing, resilience and cultural change specialist. She supports leaders to stand tall, rediscover their voice to own their awesomeness so they can soar.  She designs and delivers transformational programmes for businesses to find their purpose, embed their values to create an innovative, collaborative, inclusive culture to enhance resilience and leadership.   Lizzy was awarded Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2017 for her global contribution to Higher Education.     CONTACT LIZZY Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lizzy.bernthal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lizzybernthal-resilience-specialist/ Website: https://www.rypotential.co.uk Eventbrite:https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/dr-lizzy-bernthal-30085164224         ABOUT THE HOST - AMY ROWLINSON Amy is a Life Purpose Coach, Podcast Strategist, Top 1% Global Podcaster, Speaker, Mastermind Host and Property Investor. Through coaching and workshops, Amy works with businesses to Focus on WHY to create people-centred environments, by improving productivity and employee engagement by focusing on fulfilment, values and purpose. Amy inspires and empowers entrepreneurial clients to discover the life they dream of by assisting them to make it their reality through their own action taking. Helping them to focus on their WHY with clarity uniting their passion and purpose with a plan to create the life they truly desire. If you would like Amy to help you to launch your podcast or to focus on your WHY then please book a free 20 min call via www.calendly.com/amyrowlinson/enquirycall Please sign up for the weekly Friday Focus newsletter at https://www.amyrowlinson.com/subscribe-to-weekly-newsletter   CONNECT WITH AMY https://www.linkedin.com/in/amyrowlinson/ https://www.instagram.com/focusonwhy/  https://www.instagram.com/amy.rowlinson/ https://www.facebook.com/RowlinsonAmy/ https://www.facebook.com/focusonwhy/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/focusonwhy/ https://www.joinclubhouse.com/@amyrowlinson   HOSTED BY: Amy Rowlinson   DISCLAIMER The views, thoughts and opinions expressed in this podcast belong solely to the host and guest speakers. Please conduct your own due diligence. 

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 131 Part 2: Make Your Website Shine: Expert Tips for Jewelry Brands with Michael Burpoe, Director of User Experience for Punchmark

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 25:07


What you'll learn in this episode: Why you won't see results if you have a “set it and forget it” mentality about your website Why jewelers should give their website as much attention as a brick-and-mortar location How jewelers can use tricks of the trade to encourage customers to purchase items online, even if jewelry is traditionally bought in person  How jewelry brands can take advantage of the new shopping feature on Instagram Why the jewelry business is more like Crate & Barrel than Sephora—and why that distinction is important About Michael Burpoe Michael Burpoe is Director of User Experience for Punchmark, a digital marketing agency that specializes in the jewelry industry. Michael created Punchmark's UX team, which was assembled to take very specific initiatives toward fine-tuning tools and features, and improving the platform on both the front-end and back-end. Since early 2019, Michael has also headed up the strategy, planning, and execution behind Punchmark's Livestream Education program, the In The Loupe podcast, and the Punchmark Community on Facebook. Originally from Saranac Lake, NY, in Michael's spare time you can find him practicing Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or painting cityscapes.  Additional Resources: In the Loupe on Spotify In the Loupe on Apple Podcasts Website Blog Facebook Photos: Design Themes: Podcast Logo: Website Samples: After working with jewelry brands of all sizes for the last several years, Michael Burpoe has learned a thing or two about the strategies that make jewelry businesses more successful online. As Director of User Experience for Punchmark, Michael has helped even the most hesitant jewelers invest in their websites and reap the rewards of a fine-tuned digital marketing strategy. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to explain why selling jewelry online is only going to become more common; how to make customers feel comfortable buying luxury items online; and how jewelry companies can use digital marketing tricks to increase sales. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Do you find that the people who are calling your company, prospective clients, do they tend to be in an older demographic, like a baby boomer? Not that they don't understand what you're saying, but do they see themselves in you, let's say? Michael: That's a great question. It depends. If you had asked me when I started out at Punchmark about five years ago what the average demographic of people coming to us for a website is, a lot of the time, it's an older demographic. Probably 60, 65 or so, looking for their first website or saying, “Oh I have this really bare-bones website and we need to get a modern website.” The reason why is because they went to some jewelry show and they were told by a speaker, “Hey, you need to have an online presence,” and they're like, “Alright, I'm here,” but they haven't really been convinced of the value of it.  Now what I'm seeing is that, again, we're in a Covid world where the impending-ness and the seriousness of business are paramount. A lot of times the people who are running the website aren't the owners anymore. They know it's a full-time job, like I said. You can't have the business owner being the only one that touches the website. It's not going to get the love it needs. A lot of times we're seeing younger people who are involved in the online business, whether that means it's their store manager or the children of the owner. Sometimes they are specialists who they hired specifically for their website, which I advocate for. We're seeing a switch in that. I think a lot of people still need to be convinced of the value of a website, but it's becoming better, I'd say. Sharon: I'm almost afraid to ask, but once you've done the website, do your clients understand that's just the beginning? That there's SEO, PPC and social media? Do they understand there's a lot more? Michael: Early on when I first started here, they did not know that. They thought that it was a set it and forget it methodology. They get it up, they launch their website, they push it live, and they think it's going to do all the things for them. That is not the case, and we do our best to communicate that as early and often as we possibly can. I always say to people, “Your website will never be done—ever, ever, ever, ever. It has to be constantly updated.” We do have services for that kind of stuff. This isn't a sales pitch. We do have services where people can pay for us to do a lot of the ongoing work: creating landing pages, doing their social media, taking on their SEO strategy. There are services out there for them, not just with us, but we need people to understand that you can't just set it up and it's going to make $1 million on its own. It takes some work. It takes some thought. Sharon: You said an important word, strategy. How do you explain to them that you can't have it look like the Lifesavers package over here and the Tiffany package over there? How do you explain this? Michael: It depends on your service. Every business, it's like its own unique person. They all have brand voice and brand ideology and all those things that come into it; that's the bigger picture. When it comes to the web presence in general, it comes into things like what are your goals as a business? What is your brick and mortar doing as far as dollars? Is it a $1 million dollar store? Is it a $5 million store? Is it a $20 million store?  We service the entire gambit. Are you in a small town? That gives you a different strategy. Do you have competitors? Are there other jewelry stores in your town? I'm from a town of 4,000 people. There was one jewelry store in the next town over, and those people have a different strategy for, for example, pay-per-click or SEO than people in Los Angeles, where there's a jewelry store every mile. That is a different strategy as far as how centralized they should be targeting, how broad. The people in the next town over who have a jewelry store, they can set their search radius to 40 miles or 50 miles, whereas the people in Los Angeles need to be targeting very hyper-specific keywords. It's also going to cost a lot more money because the competition is more. So, it all depends. There's no hard-and-fast rule when it comes to, “Oh, you need to be doing X,” because it has to be tailored to what your business approach is as well as where you're located. Sharon: I'm sure you're thinking about this when you're thinking about the user experience, but tell us more about how that role differs. Doesn't everybody in a sense have direct user experience? Michael: I think that's a great question also. User experience is very much the nebulous specter that we're always trying to catch. I always say I can feel it when I feel it. Buying with Amazon—I hate using Amazon for the experience, but let's even talk about Nike. Nike makes great shoes. I buy all my shoes from Nike. Well, what Nike does that is so incredible is that they make it so you can find your product as seamlessly and without pause as possible. When I am buying a pair of shoes, I know I can go in and find the shoes I want without having to look. You go on. You click on shoes. They ask you men's or women's shoes. Well, I want men's. Do you want running shoes or trail shoes, because there's a difference? I want street running shoes. You click on those. They show you all of them. They have alternative angles. Those are all things that go into user experience. The other things that go into it are kind of magic tricks. For example, people who are listening at home, do this: go to Nike and add a product to your shopping cart. Go to check out in the shopping cart. What you're not going to realize until I point it out to you is that the entire navigation goes away; it disappears. The only thing that shows is the Nike logo on the top. This is true for Burberry. This is true for Amazon. When you get into the buy funnel—buy funnel, that's a fancy word for when you get into the checkout process—they get rid of as many distractions as possible. They understand that you are as close as possible to taking out your wallet and paying for those shoes or what have you, and they don't want to distract you with the opportunity to go back and read about the latest tube tops. They want you to go in and buy those shoes, and they get rid of all the distractions. That's one thing we're trying to improve as well as our checkout experience.  You can see this in real life. There is user experience in real life, and one of those examples is Michael's, the craft store. There's a reason why they make the checkout line so frigging long. It's because they don't want you to get in line and see how long the line looks and then leave. They want you to get into it, and the chance of your leaving and not converting on your sale is much lower if you're going to have to bump into other people and exit the—what is it called—the cattle line. It's very important. People have done the strategy and thought about this kind of stuff, and you can see it everywhere on websites with user experience. Sharon: That's interesting. Maybe you do this on some of the sites—I'm thinking maybe it's Postmates that does this—but you check out people who bought what you bought, those pants or this top or whatever. Michael: Right, upsells. Sharon: I guess. It seems like that might be another strategy. Is it Home Goods where the checkout line is full of all the little impulse purchase things, the dollar items? Michael: Well, they know that those impulse purchases, that's exactly what they are.  They're impulse, which means I'm going to reach over and grab the stuffed animal for my significant other at home without thinking about it. If they took that stuffed animal and put it in one of their aisles, the chance of my doing that is going be less. Also, the time I'm going to spend in front of that stuffed animal is going to be quite a bit higher while I'm standing in line as opposed to walking down an aisle.  It all comes down to data. There you can find all these really interesting things. I use this example all the time; you buy a pair of sapphire earrings. Well, if you have a little bit of a budget, maybe you should get a sapphire bracelet or a sapphire necklace and those sorts of things. Maybe you don't; no problem. But when it comes to offering that and the chance that they convert on it, one in 10, even one in 100, well, you just sold double the amount of your product. It's all about those little things that go into having a successful website. It's taking into account previous trends and things that are hot, you might say, and leaning into them. Sharon: As the Director of User Experience, I know it's all about data no matter what, but are you looking at that data and saying, “This is how we can improve the experience”? What are you looking at, exactly? Michael: You can do things in a variety of different ways when you look at data. Two years ago, Punchmark had a big switch where we measure everything now internally and externally. The mindset is that you can't fix what you can't measure. A lot of what we're seeing is that the average transaction size is going up. What that means, if you think about it a little bit, is that people are becoming more comfortable buying stuff online. The other thing we're seeing as far as data is financing. There are companies like Sezzle and Affirm where you can see a variety of different options. We're seeing that retailers that offer some type of financing, shoppers want the opportunity to use that. Affirm allows you to split payments into up to 12 payments.  Why is that good? Well, buying jewelry is a luxury. It's expensive. If I'm going to say, “O.K., you need to throw down $1,000 for this bracelet,” maybe they don't have $1,000. Maybe you won't ever be in a financial state where you can afford $1,000 off the top and hand it over, but if I was to say, “O.K., you can pay me $100 for 12 months,” the odds are that fits a little bit better. We are looking at the state of these retailer websites that offer financing options, and we see that they are converting on higher-ticket price point items a lot more frequently. That's an example of the things we look for that we can reverse engineer. Sharon: What differences do you see between a website for the rest of us versus for those in the jewelry industry? Are there certain things that jewelry industry professionals, whether you're a jeweler, a retailer, a maker, a bench jeweler, should keep in mind, as opposed to somebody who manufactures widgets? Michael: To make sure I'm answering your correct question, you're saying a difference between a small-town jeweler versus a Tiffany? Sharon: I'm saying more if somebody who manufacturers bandages decides they're going to do a website because they want to attract wholesale clients versus a jewelry industry retailer or manufacturer, are there certain things that you think are different? Michael: Yeah, absolutely. We have to look at the similarities in the products and also the prices of these products. Back to jewelry and luxury items, it's a one-time purchase, one-time meaning if you buy this $1,000 bracelet and you wear it every day for a year and you love that bracelet, you're probably not going to go back and buy the same bracelet again. Maybe you would, but probably not; that's not what we see. The reason is because that bracelet is still as good as the first time you got it, and that has to do with luxury, long-terms items.  A similar industry that has a similar buying state of mind is the furniture business. For example, think about the similarities if I buy a couch. Couches are really expensive if you're curious. We'll pretend this couch is $4,000. I love that couch. If I sit on it every single day for a year and I think to myself, “Man, this couch is awesome,” odds are I'm not going to go back and buy that same couch, but I could buy a matching loveseat. The same thing with jewelry. If I like that bracelet, I'll probably buy a matching earring. You mentioned bandages. Bandages would be a recurring purchase. I try my best never to compare jewelry stores to websites like Sephora. They make makeup and beauty products. I'm very fascinated by Sephora's business model. If I buy a concealer, for example, and I love that concealer—some women get really attached to certain products if it's the right fit for them—and I use it every single day for one year, I will probably run out. If I really like it, I'm going to buy it again. That's why there's a different mindset in the purchasing and buying state-of-mind for shoppers for luxury one-time purchases and recurring purchases. We try to lean into other sites, like a Burberry who sells a fashion product like a trench coat. If you wear it all the time, you're not going buy the trench coat again; you're going to buy something similar. Sharon: Interesting. There's so much to talk about when it comes to marketing this stuff.  Michael: Thank you. Sharon: What do you see as the top three mistakes that those in the jewelry industry make on their websites or when you're talking digital marketing? Michael: I think the first mistake—and we've already talked about this ad nauseum, so I won't spend too much time on it—is the crockpot methodology, thinking that it's going to sell on its own. That's unfortunately just not the case. You need to be thinking about it. You need to be updating things and creating new pages and working on your SEO. That's probably one.  Number two has to do with imagery. Jewelry is the most visually impactful product that might be out there. I really can't think of anything else, because what it comes down to is not the functionality of the jewelry. A bracelet, it's on your wrist and it looks good, and that's the functionality of it. Beyond that, maybe with earrings, how they move, but not really. It comes down to what it looks like. The end goal is I see it, I want it and I get it. I think a lot of times, these retailers don't put enough time into finding the right products, taking their own product photos or having lifestyle, which is to say having models with the jewelry on their website. As an example of a product details page, when you're shopping for a specific product, you can have, for example, a front view of the piece of jewelry, a side view of the piece of jewelry, maybe an up-close version if it has embossing or engraving or something like that, and then a photo on someone. You probably have a worker in your store; have them put the jewelry on. Snap it with a nice background. Now people can see how it wraps, how it looks around that person's body. I think that that is absolutely a driving force in how you can sell, so that's a good one too. Sharon: That's interesting. The positive would be that the websites that do have that—I see it more and more, where now it's frustrating when you swipe and that's it. There's only one hero shot and that's it.  Michael: If it's just one thing, like a pendant, I want to see what the back of the pendant looks like. It's going to be common that I have to see the back of the pendant. I want to see what the clasp looks like. Does it have a lobster clasp or some fancy clasp? Showing that information, like we talked about in the beginning, aids in that comfortability and that confidence when they fork over a couple of thousand dollars on this piece of jewelry. They need to feel confident it's the right purchase. Sharon: You want to see how it looks on somebody's wrist, even if it's just a plastic mannequin. How does it look on a neck? I don't know if this is my last question because I could ask you questions all day long. Michael: No, I appreciate it. Sharon: What I noticed, and I find it a little concerning being a baby boomer who's looked at marketing for a long time, it seems that everybody is moving onto Instagram. Every jeweler has moved to Instagram. They may have a Facebook page and they may have a Twitter—I don't know what the others are—but it seems they're skipping a website. It's like, “Oh, I don't need the website. I'm just putting everything on Instagram.”  What are your thoughts about that? Michael: Again, I might be biased—I'll get that out of the way first. I will say this: I think the shopping tools on Instagram are absolutely marvelous. Full disclosure: I really dislike the company Facebook. I'm not a fan of them, but what they have done is make a whole suite of tools that go with Instagram. For example, if you do these collection photos where you show a bracelet, a necklace, earrings and a ring all on one page, you can tag those products. A lot of the time, they do rely on having a website as the hub, so they're feeding the information in. I don't know if the website's time is heading toward the sunset and going fully Instagram is nigh, but I will say the tools on Instagram are incredible.  The other thing they do offer is fantastic retargeting. If you go on there and you like a product, as in double-tap it, they're going to re-serve that to you, and they can get better at fine tuning it. You can tell that Instagram is serious about being a shopping tool because they've replaced one of the five icons on the bottom of the Instagram app to become a shopping bag so people can buy easier. Sharon: Very smart. I also find it annoying, but understandable and smart, that every time I say, “Oh yeah, I like this,” “Well, we need your email address. Do you want to see anything else you want on your email address?” No, don't give me the discount. I don't want to give you my email address. Let me just see the product. But you can't do that. Michael: It's all about that retargeting. It's because it works, unfortunately. Sharon: No, it does. Michael: As someone who has worked in the industry for enough time, it can be very easy to get jaded about this kind of stuff and be like, “They're just flooding my inbox with all this stuff.” I get it. If I was on the edge of buying this product and I don't buy it, and you're hitting me back with a discount code: “Hey, get 20 percent off on this thing,” well, I was going to buy it for 100 percent. Now it's a little bit off, and now I can rationalize it better and get it. It does work. Sharon: Absolutely, or they wouldn't be doing it. I'm sure they're looking at the data. Michael, thank you so much. This is so interesting, and I'm sure it's given a lot of people ideas about what they need to go back and revisit or start doing. Thank you so much for being with us today. Michael: Thank you so much, Sharon, for having me on. I really appreciate it. If you guys want to hear more about emerging tech and information regarding the jewelry industry, we have a podcast called In the Loupe. That's on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, whenever you want it. We have a lot more information about different merging tech. You can learn more about Punchmark general at Punchmark.com. Sharon: Thanks. I do want to mention that you have a lot of very informative articles on your site. Michael: I appreciate that. Thank you so much. Sharon: It's definitely worth checking out. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

Lead to Succeed
Leading Through Showing with Simon Severino: Lead to Succeed 75

Lead to Succeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:53


Many leaders make the mistake of leading through telling instead of leading through showing. In this episode, Simon Severino teaches us vital lessons on leadership and his 90 days strategy sprint. Listen in to this latest episode of Lead to Succeed.

Conquer The Noise
Reilly Brock - Imperfect Foods | Purpose & Passion in Business - Episode 30

Conquer The Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 48:52


We are speaking with Reilly Brock, the former associate creative director at Imperfect Foods. Imperfect Foods is a DTC brand that was founded to fight food waste by finding a home for the imperfect or “ugly” fruits and vegetables that farms couldn't sell to grocery stores. This is one of Jonathan's favorite subjects and we will be diving into how you can reduce food waste in your own home, Imperfect Foods efforts to create a sustainable business while talking through the role a creative director has and how Reilly uses creativity to educate consumers. ReilIy has had an eclectic career from cooking tacos in food trucks to apprenticing through Europe and working at places like Mission Chinese food in SF. Following his passion for food he ultimately found that the lifestyle as a chef wasn't sustainable. Thereafter he pivoted to event planning and content marketing as a way to marry reading, writing and storytelling with his love for food.After he joined Imperfect, he learned to look upstream. It was eye opening to see all the stuff in the walk in fridge and think about how farmers would have outcomes of throwing away due to not being able to distribute it. All of us make choices about how we use food in our homes. We can all be that bridge between people who care about waste reduction part time and full time. Showing people at home, there's some common sense ways you can prevent waste before it starts. His role is the translator and storyteller between different worlds where customers can understand the scope and how we can all push ourselves to make a bigger impact. He talks about how 40% of waste in the supply chain happens in our homes. The top thing is shopping with intention and a plan. If you look at things that go to waste, its impulse buys -- hopeful kale purchasing.He advises to plan with the shelf life of your ingredients in mind. Prioritizing that over what you feel like eating for dinner. Herbs go to waste and it makes sense; they're tender, fragile and the recipe usually doesn't' call for the entire bunch so what do you do with parts you can't fully use? He also advises to clean your fridge at  least once a month and to get comfortable with rescue recipes that absorb ingredients from other recipes that can collect the motley crew of odds and ends.Early in his career, he was focused on “asset up” - executing at a velocity to keep telling a story one piece of content at a time. Over time he has realized that it should be strategy-down. It's tough because it takes people. A well-balanced team of strategic, and organizational thinkers, allows for awesome cross channel pushes. It takes more time and energy but allows for more impact. One part of his strategy is he tries to remember it's a two way street - it should be about us learning. When something doesn't get as much engagement, it's a great sign to learn, iterate and adapt. When you get comments from the community, that's free data and learnings as a creative to run with and lean on.Their open kitchen series is filled with amazing, thoughtful questions which pushed him to learn and solve. What are actual pain points and not just what are my goals for them to hear from them. It's about listening as much as it is a plan. Unfortunately, they don't teach you a lot about the environment in school. He learned relatively recently what all the numbers on the bottom of plastic bottles mean. Unfortunately, not all plastics are easily recyclable. We learned recently we need to educate people. Knowing what's in what you're consuming is unfortunately a really opaque landscape.Democratizing knowledge is fun to do as a mission driven brand. On the flip side, it's frustrating - companies can make it so hard for people to know what to do with materials that are hard or impossible to recycle. It's on YOU, consumers, to figure out what to do with them. It's hard to have to wade through it all. How do you make the right choice an easier choice to make? Real power is not to choose from a menu of options, but to create a menu of options. The real power is the people who choose what is or is not at the store. Stuff that is fantastic isn't even making it to the stores when it can/should be sold at retail.Their sustainability team has been exploring giving people a better default option. We're currently more or less the only company that makes it free/easy to recycle from your doorstep. Between delivery and packaging, they are exploring ways to cut that down. Insulated liners and gel packs are things you can't reuse around the house. They wanted to liberate people from gel pack freezer tetris and did an 80/20 analysis. They found it was these that are the biggest headache so after drop off they will take back the packs. The win was making a circular system despite how complicated it was. It requires customers to be meaningfully involved every week. But, a huge win to offer a better default option that closes the loop on a wasteful thing. They realized a bigger opportunity to make a scalable impact if they could be a full grocery store. They saw it as a chance to be a more meaningful part of customer's lives and shift from a niche thing to add to shopping experience to being a majority par.It's a balance to show that we're broadening and enhancing as opposed to changing. What is the throughline and how can I tell some new stories about our enhancements but that the DNA of our company is alive and well and intact. A huge reason food goes to waste in people's homes is due to dates -- dates are conservaate estimates of peak quality, not hard and fast predictions of food safety. Dates are usually designated at the state level. That, plus best buy, use by, sell by. When youre talking about canned beans or dried quinoa, evoo etc -- the date is one piece of data, but it's not the only or most important one. Use your common sense, best judgement and ability to research as well as senses to tell if it's still good to eat.

On Mic Podcast
Liz Hauck -229

On Mic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Liz Hauck is the author of the highly acclaimed new book,  “Home Made: A Story of Grief, Groceries, Showing up — and What We Make When We Make Dinner.” This young teacher tells the story of her living out a dream of her late father to begin a cooking program that would instill hope, dignity and a sense of community in the lives of troubled teenager.  Rich in character and dialogue, it's a relatable tale that will touch your heart. On Air: My Fifty Year Love Affair with Radio,” now available at Amazon. Jordan Rich is Boston's busiest podcaster, appearing on over 400 podcast episodes and currently hosting 16 shows. To connect with him, visit www.chartproductions.com.

The Dom Giordano Program
NYC's Coretta James Pens Hand-Written Notes Showing Appreciation to Police Officers

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:12


New York City resident Coretta James, who went viral this week for an incredible act, joins the Dom Giordano Program as Dom's ‘Hero of the Week.' Coretta made headlines after it came out that she has written over 4,000 thank-you notes to NYPD officers, and does not plan to stop until she writes a letter to every single NYPD officer. James explains that this started back in 2017 when she realized that police really do a thankless job, and she wanted to make sure that every officer felt at least a tidbit of appreciation. James tells that she has written letters for officers in other cities, too, including for officers in Philadelphia. (Photo by Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Arroe Collins
Renee Taylor From The Movie Tango Shalom

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 21:11


Tango Shalom was directed by Gabriel Bologna, son of Renée Taylor and the late Joseph Bologna. The cast includes Golden Globe Nominee Lainie Kazan (My Big Fat Greek Wedding), Oscar and Emmy Award-winner Renée Taylor (Adam Sandler's The Do Over, The Producers, The Nanny), Karina Smirnoff (Dancing With The Stars), Joseph Bologna (My Favorite Year, Blame It On Rio, Big Daddy, Lovers and Other Strangers), Jos Laniado Claudio Laniado (Mudbound), Bern Cohen (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel), and Judi Beecher (Taken 3, Family is Family, La Garconne). Synopsis: When a female Tango dancer (Smirnoff) asks a Rabbi (Jos Laniado) to enter a dance competition, there's one big problem-due to his Orthodox beliefs, he's not allowed to touch her! Desperately in need of splitting the prize money to save his Hebrew school from bankruptcy, they develop a plan to enter the competition without sacrificing his faith. The bonds of family and community are tested one dazzling dance step at a time in this lighthearted fable. In Los Angeles, the film can be seen at Landmark Theaters on Pico and Town Center 5 in Encino, and September 10 opens at The Laemmle in Newhall. In New York, at AMC Empire 25, The Village East Cinema By Angelika, and also opens on September 10 at The Cobble Hill 5 and Williamsburg Cinemas Brooklyn, Kew Garden 6 Queens, and Malverne 5 and Roslyn 4 on Long Island. Canadian Cinéma Cineplex locations include Forum et VIP - Montreal, Empress Walk - Toronto, and Fifth Avenue Cinemas - Vancouver. Tango Shalom finished its three day weekend engagement better than expected at $20,581, with an astonishing per theater average of $5,145 (second best only to Marvel's Shang-Chi). Tango Shalom also claims bragging rights to the best 2021 exclusive opening, as well having the best PTA, this Memorial Day to Labor Day summer season. Showing daily gross increases this weekend (Saturday +32% from Friday and Sunday +54% from Saturday) boasts to be the number one independent film release this weekend. On Friday, September 10, the interfaith movie that promotes peace, tolerance and inclusion, will expand onto more screens in New York and Los Angeles, and also across Canada in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver with additional screens to be announced soon.

Rent Perfect with David Pickron
Ep. 49 3 Key Questions to Ask When Showing a Property

Rent Perfect with David Pickron

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 11:34


When you have the opportunity to show your property to a potential tenant, find a way to naturally weave the three informative questions from this episode into the conversation.  Their answers will help determine whether they are a good fit for your property.

Creating Confidence with Heather Monahan
The KEY To Building Your Own Brand With Tony Whatley Founder of 365 Driven Episode 153

Creating Confidence with Heather Monahan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:53


Ever wondered how to find the confidence to build a personal brand and go after your goals? Well wonder no more! Today I have on the amazing and successful business entrepreneur, Tony Whatley to teach us just that. Showing entrepreneurs how to start and scale their businesses using his brand, 365 Driven, Tony helps early level entrepreneurs everywhere achieve excellence. He will teach us how to evaluate our ideas against each other and then go all in! Tony is impacting the generational legacy of millions by teaching confidence and breaking down the business principles for us. Tune in to get over your fears and break FREE from your excuses! About The Guest:Tony Whatley is a brilliant business mentor, podcast host, and best selling author of the Side Hustle Millionaire. Tony climbed his way to success after he found himself in a terrifying car accident that forced him to reflect on his life's work and how he would be remembered. He left his corporate lifestyle behind after about 25 years and co-founded his own company, LS1Tech, a growing online automotive community that is one of the largest of its kind today. Now, as the founder of 365 Driven, Tony has created a community for entrepreneurs to establish themselves and grow their businesses using his expertise and hands-on coaching.Finding Tony Whatley:Website: https://365driven.com/Read Side Hustle Millionaire Listen to 365 Driven LinkedIn: Tony WhatleyInstagram & Facebook: @365drivenYoutube: @365 DrivenClubhouse: @365drivenJoin the Facebook Group 365 Driven Entrepreneurs Review this podcast on Apple Podcast using this LINK and when you DM me the screen shot, I buy you my $299 video course as a thank you! To pre-order Overcome Your Villains NOW and get the bonus bundle click here: https://overcomeyourvillains.comSee acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

kristo's astrology
hey, your Authority is showing

kristo's astrology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 4:10


Zeitgeist for Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - There's a New Moon in Libra and Pluto turns Direct... transcripts and links at: http://kristo.com/ (kristo.com) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClYjfm5hYm8pGKSgtnqlw5A (kristo's YouTube channel) talk to me... Music and Sound credits: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4521-thief-in-the-night (Thief in the Night) by https://incompetech.com/ (Kevin MacLeod) - Licensed through https://filmmusic.io/ (filmmusic.io) https://filmmusic.io/song/3906-in-your-arms (In Your Arms) by https://incompetech.com/ (Kevin MacLeod) - Licensed through https://filmmusic.io/ (filmmusic.io) https://freesound.org/people/Nighteller/sounds/196262/ ("ciao") courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Nighteller/ (Nighteller) and https://freesound.org/ (freesound.org) - http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License) https://freesound.org/people/Nighteller/sounds/196263/ ("ciao ciao") courtesy of https://freesound.org/people/Nighteller/ (Nighteller) and https://freesound.org/ (freesound.org) - http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ (This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License)

Rugby on Off The Ball
Gordon D'Arcy | Munster have a lot to be excited about | Leinster's showing

Rugby on Off The Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 31:45


Gordon D'Arcy & journalist Cian Tracey join Joe Molloy on Monday Night Rugby to discuss Leinster, Munster and all the top stories from this weekend's URC action!   #TeamOfUs | @VodafoneIreland

AP Audio Stories
2 win medicine Nobel for showing how we react to heat, touch

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 1:32


Professor Game Podcast | Rob Alvarez Bucholska chats with gamification gurus, experts and practitioners about education

Mike Rizkalla is a visionary entrepreneur with a deep understanding of the advances made in the field of robotics with an award-winning track record in innovation and UX. He aims to enrich the lives of families through magical tech experiences. He is skilled at developing new business and creating digital products that push the boundaries of what is possible, bringing a unique perspective to projects. His latest project is Snorble®, a customizable interactive character that can improve kids' sleep habits and help them develop healthy daily routines.

Diversified Game
IVAN ROSE GIVES THE GAME ON SHOWING ENTREPRENEURS HOW TO SELL THEIR BUSINESS FOR A PROFIT

Diversified Game

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 29:49


Contact Ivan: https://www.linkedin.com/in/irosa/ This is the Diversified Game Podcast with Kellen "Kash" Coleman a podcast giving entrepreneurial advice from a diverse and inclusive perspective. Submit to Be Our Guest: Send your bio, epk, one sheet, and decks to diversifiedgame@gmail.com Book Consulting Time with Kellen www.cprfirm.com Buy Our Swag/Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 https://diversifiedgame.bigcartel.com/ Support Us On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gamediversified Follow the Diversified Game Experience: http://diversifiedgame.com https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 http://instagram.diversifiedgame.com http://facebook.diversifiedgame.com http://twitter.diversifiedgame.com http://youtube.diversifiedgame.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/support

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Habdala - Using Beverages Other Than Wine; Drinking the Wine

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 5:49


A number of Halachic authorities, including the Rama (Rav Moshe Isserles of Cracow, 1525-1572) and the Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909), record a custom to pour some wine out of the Habdala cup after the conclusion of Habdala, and then extinguish the candle in the wine that was poured. It is also customary to take some of the leftover wine and place it on one's eyes and face. This is done for the purpose of Hibub Misva – to demonstrate our love and affection for the Misvot. The Hid"a (Rav Haim Yosef David Azulai, 1724-1806) emphasizes that one should not underestimate the importance of "Shiyureh Misva" – the "leftovers" of a Misva. Showing our love for that which had been used for a Misva, even if it only the "leftovers," is very significant, and has the power to save a person from calamity.The Rama also writes (as understood by the Aruch Ha'shulhan) that it is customary to fill the cup before Habdala all the way to the rim, so that some wine will automatically spill when one lifts the cup, as an overflowing cup can bring blessing. This is mentioned also by the Ben Ish Hai, and this is, indeed, the accepted practice.Although it is customary to add several drops of water to one's cup of wine on other occasions, Rav Haim Vital (1542-1620) taught that this is not done with the Habdala cup.The Shulhan Aruch writes that one may not recite Habdala over bread. Kiddush may be recited over bread, because Halacha requires reciting Kiddush in the framework of a meal, and thus the Kiddush is connected to the bread. Habdala, however, does not need to be recited in the framework of a meal, and thus there is no connection at all between Habdala and bread. As such, one may not recite Habdala over bread.One may, however, recite Habdala over "Hamar Medina." Hacham Bension Abba Shaul (Israel, 1923-1998) and Hacham Ovadia Yosef understand this term as referring to intoxicating beverages which are commonly drunk in the country where one lives. In contemporary society, this would include beer, scotch, cognac, brandy, and the like. (Arak would likely qualify as "Hamar Medina" in Israel; it is doubtful whether it would qualify here in the United States.) Ashkenazim, following the ruling of Rav Moshe Feinstein (Russia-New York, 1895-1986), maintain that even non-alcoholic beverages qualify as "Hamar Medina," and thus they allow reciting Habdala even over milk, tea, coffee and the like. The only criterion according to Ashkenazic tradition is that the beverage must be something that a host would serve to a guest for honor, and not merely because the guest is thirsty. Sephardic tradition, however, as noted by both Hacham Bension Abba Shaul and Hacham Ovadia Yosef, does not follow this view, and allows reciting Habdala only on alcoholic beverages. The Mishna Berura (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan, 1839-1933) maintains that "Hamar Medina" may be used for Habdala only if one does not have wine. One who has wine must, according to the Mishna Berura, use it for Habdala. Hacham Bension Abba Shaul, however, disagrees, noting a clear distinction between the Shulhan Aruch's formulations in the contexts of Kiddush and Habdala. In discussing the laws of Kiddush, the Shulhan Aruch writes that one who does not have wine may use "Hamar Medina" for Habdala, whereas in the context of Habdala, he writes simply that one is allowed to recite Habdala over "Hamar Medina." The clear implication is that "Hamar Medina" is acceptable for Habdala even if one is able to recite Habdala over wine. Hacham Ovadia Yosef, in Hazon Ovadia, appears to disagree with Hacham Bension's conclusion, as he writes that "one who does not have wine" may recite Habdala over "Hamar Medina." It would therefore appear that one should preferably use wine for Habdala, but one who does not enjoy drinking wine may certainly use beer or other intoxicating beverages, in accordance with Hacham Bension's position.Strictly speaking, it suffices to drink just 1.7 ounces or so of wine from the Habdala cup. However, since there is a debate among the Halachic authorities as to whether one who drinks this amount of the Habdala cup recites a Beracha Aharona, one should preferably drink a full Rebi'it – 3.2 ounces – so that he will be required to recite a Beracha Aharona according to all opinions.Summary: One should preferably use wine for Habdala, but one who does not like wine may use another common alcoholic beverage, such as beer. Although Ashkenazim allow using non-alcoholic beverages for Habdala, Sephardic practice requires using an intoxicating beverage. One should drink at least 3.2 ounces of wine from the Habdala cup. It is customary to fill the cup to the top before Habdala, so that some wine will spill out when one lifts the cup. It is customary after Habdala to spill out some wine and use that wine to extinguish the candle, and to place some wine on one's eyes and face.

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family
46. How You Can Show Up For Others In Times Of Grief with Taylor and Chris Pierce

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 99:46


Hey guys! Chris and Melissa here, since moving to Hawaii we have had the chance to meet so many amazing people and hear their incredible stories. One couple in particular, who live right down the street from us, Chris and Taylor Pierce, have a story that has been particularly impactful. They have experienced a tremendous amount of loss and grief throughout their marriage. Frankly, a lot more grief than anyone should have to go through in life. Through miscarriages, a lost baby, and just last year the passing of their 8-year-old son, Griff.  In today's episode, we have a deep and honest conversation about grief and how you can support those who may be going through a difficult time. One of our mottos is “Smith's show up for people”, but when it comes to loss and grief it's hard to say what that looks like. We loved learning how to better do that from the Pierces!  Join us as we discuss Chris and Taylor's everlasting courage and their journey navigating loss through difficult pregnancies and miscarriages to the joy of adopting and growing their family. You'll hear the inspiring story of Griff, an 8-year-old who lived life to the fullest and always wore his heart on his sleeve.   You'll hear their advice on how you can best show up for those who are grieving as well as the different ways that people supported them through their loss. Grieving is a complex process that shows up differently for everyone, and Chris and Taylor talk about how they work through this together as a team, and a family.  They share many specific ideas, including how one of the most impactful things you can do is listen.   We are so thankful and honored that Chris and Taylor were willing to tell us their story and we are so inspired by the bright and lasting legacy of light who is Griff. Our hope for today's episode is that you are able to better support the ones you love through any grieving process.  To follow more of our journey, check out the links below! More Of What's Inside: Showing up for others in a time of grief Miscarriages, adoptions, and pregnancy Dealing with a year of hospital visits The moment they realized they needed a change How showing up manifests differently for everyone The power of just showing up Helping children through grief Sayings that are not helpful Why you shouldn't assume, but ask Listening to their stories of loved ones lost Understanding the longevity of grief Giving yourself grace under grief And much more!  LINKS Website:   familybrand.com Social:   Facebook: www.facebook.com/FamilyBrandOfficial Instagram: www.instagram.com/ourfamilybrand YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCGu-7odB6gkPbyXpUIQLkrg Twitter: https://twitter.com/OurFamilyBrand   Free course:   familybrand.com/10steps   Episode Minute By Minute: 0:02 - What we cover today 1:57 - Introducing Chris and Taylor 6:56 - Why we wanted to tell this story 9:26 - Taylor and Chris' journey with pregnancy 14:56 - The first sign of issues with Griff 20:17 - Taking advantage of the time they had left 24:53 - Finding the courage to take back their family 29:07 - Creating a good life for Griff 34:43 - Remembering Griff 39:01 - The time before Griff passed away 44:49 - Taking him to the hospital for the last time 49:36 - Knowing that this time would be different 54:02 - The blessing of spirituality  58:41 - Dealing with grief during a pandemic 1:03:06 - The small things that mattered 1:07:56 - What not to do in times of grief 1:11:37 - What you can/should ask people in need 1:15:43 - Showing up is longterm 1:20:14 - Taylor and Chris' advice to those in grief 1:25:03 - Giving space to family and grieve how they need 1:29:57 - Working through grief with your spouse 1:33:20 - Grieving as a family 1:38:18 - Closing thoughts and advice

Locked On Bengals - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Bengals
Joe Burrow Showing Improvement, Ja'Marr Chase Shining | Bengals Film Review

Locked On Bengals - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Bengals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 32:26


Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow had one of the best games of his young NFL career in Sunday's 24-10 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers. James Rapien is joined by Mike Santagata aka Bengals Sans to break down Burrow's performance, plus they talk about Ja'Marr Chase, Jackson Carman's first start, an impressive defense and more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Purple Insider - a Minnesota Vikings and NFL podcast
Was the win over Seattle the best Kirk Cousins showing as a Viking?

Purple Insider - a Minnesota Vikings and NFL podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 38:58


From inside US Bank Stadium, Matthew Coller and Sam Ekstrom break down the Minnesota Vikings' win over the Seattle Seahawks. Was this the best we've seen from Kirk Cousins? Are the Vikings finally leaning into Cousins offensively and trusting him more? What does it mean that they are using all of their weapons on offense? What do we make of the tale of two halves on offense and defense? How the Vikings' win sets up for a huge game against the Cleveland Browns and lays out the path to .500 by the bye week or better. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices