Podcasts about omny studio

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Best podcasts about omny studio

Latest podcast episodes about omny studio

Podland News
iHeartMedia purchased podcast plays to game their download numbers and the IAB says it's ok!? John Spurlock talks OP3.dev and how it could help filter this bad practice.

Podland News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 89:59 Transcription Available


SPECIAL GUESTS:Morten Strunge - PodimoJohn Spurlock  - OP3.devSHOW NOTES & LINKS:Podcast companies are buying short podcast plays within mobile game apps, causing official downloads of shows no one may be playing longer than twenty seconds according to Bloomberg's Ashley Carman. Time has also published the story outside a paywall.Players get game tokens if they listen to a podcast for just twenty seconds. (Carman posts a graphic). But, because more than 60 seconds of audio are downloaded by the player, as demonstrated in this article in Sounds Profitable, these plays count as an IAB-certified download from podcast hosts and in prefix services like Podtrac. That allows podcasts promoted in this way to charge for the ads delivered in the show, and for that traffic to be counted in rankersHow many downloads per episode is “good”? Omny Studio publish their data.Podcast episodes are getting shorter, says Rephonic.September 15, 2022: Podimo, the European subscription podcast service, has raised €58.6m ($58.5m) in funding. It had previously raised more than $116m. The Open Podcast Prefix Project has been quietly launched by John Spurlock. It's a prefix analytics service committed to open data and listener privacy; and places listener data in the open. It could power trending and popularity data; or give independently-verified stats to advertisers.Open podcast analytics prefix service OP3 has added trailing wildcards to its API.Some OP3 visualisation tools are being worked on by Dave Jones, James Potter and others. An open user-agent list, including bots, is freely available here; and here are our filtered logfile downloads from Sep 23 for comparison purposes. 

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
tripping balls.322 News for the near-dead

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 40:52


This week: OZZY! PUPPY! DOC! ADAM! NOT AS MUCH SHOUTING AS THESE CAPS WOULD SUGGEST! Also: the golden age of 30 second sketch comedy, reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated, fishing for a point, more fluid than Jeff Beck, lying snowblind in the sun, featuring nobody, post Post Malone, get off my lawn areas, recurring Siamese dreams, Vulgar Displays of Pantera, songs with bad ideas, ten internet points to anyone who guessed the track Doc was thinking of was Cherub Rock, Taco Bell explosions, Maroon 5 superfans, our contractual obligation album of 2022, remembering regional radio callsigns, as white as white whats?, Mike Brady drivebys, watching Hamilton > visiting Hamilton, the only person in the Venn intersect of the Gunners undercards, the same conclusion we always reach, the last Moore-ish Bond film, gritty reboots of Home Alone and ASMR corner. Next week: Beeso's back from lowering Northern Beaches property values to chat new albums by the Beths, Psychlona and King Stingray. Recent review albums can be found on our album review playlist on Spotify - our full 2022 review archive is also up there, along with our 2022 tripping balls mixtape, featuring our favourite tracks from new albums we've reviewed this year. The full list of all the albums we've ever featured on the show (including our top 5s from previous years) is available elsewhere on the internet. BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
BALLS.339 This is going to go very badly but I'm going to do it anyway

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 40:50


This week with Adam and the Doc: buying the Suns in order to fill it with players Beeso hates, ESPN's annual NBArank troll job, putting in that work at work, avoiding admin the Zach Lowe way, Ben Simmons talks, Covid Age fatigue, the real reason for the Celtics' midseason run, trade calls, juicing your own rebound stats, the poos-and-wees live up to their brand, scrotal fungicide, no pride in Brookie, Celtic pride, Baynes of the Bullets, John hits the Wall, CTE is coming for the NRL, Roger and out, self-flagellation, getting overtaken by a glacier, bone saw money, weird third acts, golfers are Tories and the limits to winning at all costs.  BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pixel Sift
WE ARE OFK is a band, a TV show, a visual novel and some of the best dialogue writing in games

Pixel Sift

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 34:17


WE ARE OFK is an episodic visual novel by Team OFK that pulls together a lot of really interesting elements. It's not only got it's own virtual band with an EP of great electronic pop, but contains some of the most genuinely written conversations you'd expect to overhear from that cool group of twenty somethings in the bar. Director/Writer, actor and OFK Vocalist Teddy Dief (HYPER LIGHT DRIFTER) and Co-Writer Claire Jia (Nora from Queens, Fresh Off The Boat) share the creative story of making this game, why you might be able to catch OFK on stage very soon and why making complicated queer characters is important. Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORE Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER.Support the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
tripping balls.321 Detroit rock city

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 19:22


This week: box-fresh 2022 releases from Kenny Beats, the Schizophonics and Dub War. Also: one direction, Cymru Hill, period pieces, straight to Netflix, odd one out, pointless pastiches, the whitest imaginable genre, travelling through time, live admin, Beth Rammstein, a bit sharky, edit shed interludes and magic 8-balls. Next week: new Ozzy and Puppy with Adamhfoto; Beeso's back in a couple of weeks with new Beths, Psychlona and King Stingray. Recent review albums can be found on our album review playlist on Spotify - our full 2022 review archive is also up there, along with our 2022 tripping balls mixtape, featuring our favourite tracks from new albums we've reviewed this year. The full list of all the albums we've ever featured on the show (including our top 5s from previous years) is available elsewhere on the internet. BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
BALLS.338 House of the Swamp Dragons

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 34:14


This week: Good news for people who love bad news, historical accuracy, coaches mic'd up, the VR46 of women's basketball, the owner of Beeso's NBA team is a reprehensible scumbag, Franz Wagner's time to shine, billionaires are bad, bad train analogies, RIP Tjarks, stoned shed convos, Late Night with Marco Tardelli, Todd Boehly disproves zero stereotypes, holidays from thinking, Royalist Ray, never go full AFL, a collection of failed openers, power ranKings and tweet of the night. BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
tripping balls.320 Straight Outta Coolum

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 25:16


This week: new albums from the Chats, Danger Mouse + Black Thought and Kasabian. Also: second verse same as the first, country Straya is fash, not for me Clive, the most unlikely Chats fangirls in all of music, born like this, surf cops, bedcasting, rank long hops, traditional marriage, impending doom, who produces the producers, eight seconds or less, answers to questions nobody asked, URL fails and 90s TMNTer or Red Bull athlete? Next week: Kenny Beats, the Schizophonics and Dub War. Recent review albums can be found on our album review playlist on Spotify - our full 2022 review archive is also up there, along with our 2022 tripping balls mixtape, featuring our favourite tracks from new albums we've reviewed this year. The full list of all the albums we've ever featured on the show (including our top 5s from previous years) is available elsewhere on the internet. BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pixel Sift
Chill narrative game WAYWARD STRAND has 20,000 lines of spoken dialogue

Pixel Sift

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 28:12


Starring legendary Australian actors Michael Caton, Anne Charleston and newcomer Nancy Curtis as lead character Casey, WAYWARD STRAND is a very Australian narrative indie game with as much voice acting as 18 feature films. Nancy Curtis who plays Casey and Maize Wallin sound designer, audio programmer and composer from developer Ghost Pattern share the process of recording these performances all across the world to put together this unique story of a young journalist.  Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORE Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER.Support the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pixel Sift
What happened to post-apocalyptic deer game WAY TO THE WOODS?

Pixel Sift

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 14:51


Do you remember WAY TO THE WOODS? The post apocalyptic game where you play as a magical deer moving through the ruins of humanity was revealed in 2019 as an Xbox exclusive but for mostly solo developer Ant Tan, it's been a long process of getting everything right. We sit down with Ant to find out some of the design inspirations, learn more about the game play, how Steven Universe and IKENFELL composers Aivi & Surrashu are making the soundtrack and when it's coming out.  Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORE Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER.Support the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
BALLS.337 Bringing gegenpressing to the under 8's

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 36:49


This week: counterattacking rabbit holes, Beeso's Coaching Corner, nothing stops football, por que no los dos, load up, the new SEXLAND, a brief detour into tripping balls areas, it's Davey Dum Dum's fault, really liking cricket, BBL draft why, breaking news, saving it for the group chat, inexplicably deciding to defend Danny effing Ainge, newsflash: man honours contract, the Nets having to invent new and bizarre ways to suck, doing not much well, 100% grain-fed beef, 2022's Breece Rude, Eurobasket cases, ex on the practice court, TB12 channels Danny Glover, Beeso knows how to party, Marky Mark's day on a plate, laughing at the All Blacks, the Springbok ethos, did rugby ever actually professionalise and the art of horizontal podcasting. BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mainstream
THE LAST OF US PART 1 will make you wish this was your very first playthrough

Mainstream

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 20:38


Playing THE LAST OF US PART 1, the PlayStation 5 remake of the original game makes me wish this was the very first time I was playing the series, taking my first steps into post apocalyptic cordyceps infected world. But this game is for better and worse the ultimate version of that 2013 title, which means if you've experienced Joel and Ellie's first story, you've played this excellent game. Read our written review on the SIFTER website: THE LAST OF US PART 1 will make you wish this was your very first playthrough Thanks to Edmond Tran of GamesHub for joining us on this episode A copy of THE LAST OF US PART 1 was provided to SIFTER for the purpose of this review. SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER. Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORESupport the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pixel Sift
CURSED TO GOLF is a roguelite golf platfomer that works way better than you'd think

Pixel Sift

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 27:04


CURSED TO GOLF is a rogue-like or as developer Liam Edwards likes to call it a "golf-like" platformer with some excellent tunes and beautiful pixel art graphics. We speak to Liam about the origins of the game as a small personal project, building up the team to polish it, design decisions and gameplay design as well has find out what tips he'd give to new players. There are also a few secrets and easter eggs hidden in the game as well, so learn where you should keep an eye out! Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORE Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER.Support the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
tripping balls.319 Rogue bungling and justifiable dragging

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 24:50


This week: new albums from Beyoncé, Black Midi and Nebula. Also: another brick in the wall, AI side projects, a man of many parts, voice of the Beyhive, Getty archive beats, putting the mid in midrange, Gizzard completists, Crow bars, our large round number soundtrack special (and its two sequels), yet another thing millennials killed, from beyond the grave, UP-UP-DOWN-DOWN-LEFT-RIGHT-LEFT-RIGHT-B-A, Happyland erosion, sucking the air out of the room, getting written out of history, DIY joker weeks, violent hatreds and the national anthem of drunk engineering students dropping trou. Next week we're reviewing new albums from the Chats, Danger Mouse + Black Thought and Kasabian. Recent review albums can be found on our album review playlist on Spotify - our full 2022 review archive is also up there, along with our 2022 tripping balls mixtape, featuring our favourite tracks from new albums we've reviewed this year. The full list of all the albums we've ever featured on the show (including our top 5s from previous years) is available elsewhere on the internet. BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso
BALLS.336 BAH GAWD, THAT'S THE BALLS PODCAST'S MUSIC

BALLS with Dr Yobbo and Beeso

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 31:28


We're… back? This week in sport: books bought solely to be in Zoom backgrounds, playing boring cricket slowly, Beezball, Big Baller Bron, this guy can Scoot, Deadfall vs the house of Saud, the Q Cup of the NFL, Christmas Day showdowns, making yourself scarce, the Ringer attempts to talk sokkah, a good year, benchmarking the general level of Argentine national team coaching, have Essendon sacked their coach yet, keep Walkering, shooting All Blanks, walking fridge magnets, tissue culture tips, England and then more England, the enemy of my enemy, forked in the road, and is this thing a thing. BALLS and tripping balls are available on their own RSS feeds, as well as being found together on Omny Studio, Spotify and Apple Podcasts (feel free to subscribe, rate and review) - and we welcome your reckons via Twitter, Facebook and email. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
Podcast Quarterly Earnings & 6 Other Stories

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:24


This week on The Download:  Quarterly earnings, more quarterly earnings, Audio is getting its own track at Advertising Week, and Spotify is giving podcasts their own space in its app.  Arielle: Hope you're ready for some earnings reports, because we've got two segments worth of second quarter earnings to go over. First up: the big platforms. Last Wednesday Alyssa Meyers of Marketing Brew posted a roundup of Spotify, SiriusXM and Acast. Things kick off with a silver lining:  “Call it what you want, the ad biz is not looking its best right now. But according to these execs, the growing podcast segment is keeping its head above water.”  Economic uncertainty is undeniably impacting the ad industry. The CEOs of Spotify and SiriusXM both cite ‘macro' trends as being notably dire but not to podcast ads sales. SiriusXM's Q2 ad revenue for Pandora and associated platforms reports a 5% year over year increase, reaching 403 million. Spotify posted a 31% year over year gain, earning around 366 million. This time around they neglected to isolate their podcast ad revenue as its own statistic.  Meyers quotes Spotify CFO Paul Vogel as saying they're experiencing “strong growth on the podcasting side.” Hosting service Acast has been busy this second quarter, citing new features, a massive increase of podcasts on the platform, and their acquisition of Podchaser as driving factors of their 39% net sales growth. A figure that calculates out to 31 million USD.  While the macro trends are concerning, The Download will never pass up an opportunity to report numbers going up in podcasting. Big or small, names in the industry are increasing ad revenue, and that's a good thing.  Shreya: Now to cover the Q2 numbers from three large broadcasters: iHeartMedia, Cumulus Media, and Audacy. There's a few dark spots throughout but, interestingly, their podcast numbers are shining beacons of hope in all three reports.  Overall iHeartMedia reports an 11% year over year increase, despite, in the words of company president Rich Bressler: “the uncertain economic environment.” Podcast revenue is up to 86 million, a 60% year over year increase.  Meanwhile, Cumulus Media joined the macro club during president Mary Berner's opening statement:  “Despite the challenging macro environment, we increased revenue in the quarter by more than 5%, driven by our digital businesses whose growth accelerated in Q2 to 20% year-over-year.” Podcasting made Cumulus around 15 million this last quarter, up 27% year over year. All told, podcasting accounts for 6% of the company's revenue. Not too shabby.  Finally, Audacy's president David J Field brings us a final use of the term ‘macro' for this episode:  “After a very strong first quarter in which we grew revenues by 14% and significantly increased margin, our second quarter results were adversely impacted by declining macroeconomic conditions and ad market headwinds which reduced our top line growth to 5%.”  The company made a nice $69m from “digital,” which includes podcasting, and is up 18% year over year. Podcast downloads grew 40% year-over-year. Revenue from podcasts is supposedly in the upper teens of percentage growth, but Audacy didn't give specifics. Even with the ad market headwinds it seems podcasting is doing well for them.  Arielle: Wednesday of last week was a busy day for Alyssa Meyers, as we cover her second article of the day: “Audio gets its own track at this year's Advertising Week.”  Advertising Week's head of podcasting Richard Larsson told Marketing Brew,  “The rise of audio throughout the pandemic, coupled with Advertising Week's efforts to build its own podcast network, culminated in the decision to give audio a more official spot on the agenda this October.” Audio representation continues with one of - if not the - longest-running podcast awards ceremony. Yesterday the People's Choice Podcast Awards announced the nominees for their 17th annual session. The substantive list of nominees can be found on the Podcast Awards website.  Continuing the award theme with one more bit of news: on Monday the newest issue of Adweek dropped with the winners to the 2022 Adweek Podcast of the Year Awards. The full list of winners can be found in the official Adweek post by Kennyatta Collins. Shreya: Podcasts and music are taking a break from each other soon on Spotify, according to David Pierce's article for The Verge, posted this Tuesday.  “Spotify has been working on a new design for its home tab that will create separate feeds for your music and your podcasts. The company says it's part of an effort to give you more and better recommendations, but it also addresses a common criticism of the Spotify experience: with every kind of audio smushed together in the app, it can sometimes be hard to figure out.”  The new layout creates a bar at the top of the app delineating whether the user is in the Music area or one called Podcasts & Shows. Music will continue to feature new suggestions for songs and albums along with recently-listened tracks while Podcasts & Shows gets rid of music and purely focuses on new episodes of subscribed podcasts and recommendations for shows Spotify believes the user will enjoy.  Pierce offers the comparison:  “They're not so much new home screens as new filters for your home screen. (I'd rather just have them be separate tabs altogether, but I'll take what I can get.)” An app redesign with a dedicated area for podcasting provides more opportunities for promotion. Podcast promotion and growth of audience is one of the hottest topics in podcasting.   Spotify providing more of those opportunities for ads in a way that doesn't step on music-based ads is a big deal. Promotion opportunities are a big enough deal that Dan Misener and Jonas Woost of Pacific Content have left to form Bumper, an agency dedicated solely to promotion.  Arielle: Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's three great reads are:  Fundamentals of Programmatic Advertising by Evelyn Mitchell. A quick read with a helpful infographic that makes a great introduction for those not familiar with programmatic, as well as those in need of a refresher.  DoubleVerify Grows Q2 Revenue By Expanding Brand Safety To Retail Media, TikTok And Gaming by Alyssa Boyle. Notable in its absence is any entrance into podcasting. Meanwhile IAS, a direct competitor of DoubleVerify, is the brand safety service for Spotify. DoubleVerify not expanding into audio over these other verticals suggests that the IAS and Spotify relationship is more driven by Spotify looking to tend their walled garden. Perhaps the move was more motivated by Spotify themselves rather than actual advertiser demand to have a brand safety partner. Finally, some self-promotion: Sounds Profitable's latest research project will debut Tuesday, August 23rd during the Sounds Profitable Business Summit. The Summit, as covered in a previous episode of The Download, will take place in Dallas, Texas during the opening day of Podcast Movement. The “After These Messages” study will present a definitive take on the impact of live host-read ads, scripted ads, and announcer-read spots. This study was designed by podcast and research industry veteran Tom Webster, in partnership with Edison Research, and will be seen as an important new resource for publishers and brands. Don't miss it.  Arielle: And that was The Download, from Sounds Profitable! I know we went through these fast, so be sure to check out the links to every article mentioned, right in your podcast listening app, or on SoundsProfitable.com/TheDownload. And thank you for sticking with us as we bring you the top stories you might have missed from the past week. I'm Arielle Nissenblatt. Shreya : And I'm Shreya Sharma. Our producers are Bryan Barletta and Tom Webster. Special thanks to Gavin Gaddis for writing today's script, and to Omny Studio for hosting The Download. And thanks to you for joining us.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Hear Things
Podcast Quarterly Earnings & 6 Other Stories

I Hear Things

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:24


This week on The Download:  Quarterly earnings, more quarterly earnings, Audio is getting its own track at Advertising Week, and Spotify is giving podcasts their own space in its app.  Arielle: Hope you're ready for some earnings reports, because we've got two segments worth of second quarter earnings to go over. First up: the big platforms. Last Wednesday Alyssa Meyers of Marketing Brew posted a roundup of Spotify, SiriusXM and Acast. Things kick off with a silver lining:  “Call it what you want, the ad biz is not looking its best right now. But according to these execs, the growing podcast segment is keeping its head above water.”  Economic uncertainty is undeniably impacting the ad industry. The CEOs of Spotify and SiriusXM both cite ‘macro' trends as being notably dire but not to podcast ads sales. SiriusXM's Q2 ad revenue for Pandora and associated platforms reports a 5% year over year increase, reaching 403 million. Spotify posted a 31% year over year gain, earning around 366 million. This time around they neglected to isolate their podcast ad revenue as its own statistic.  Meyers quotes Spotify CFO Paul Vogel as saying they're experiencing “strong growth on the podcasting side.” Hosting service Acast has been busy this second quarter, citing new features, a massive increase of podcasts on the platform, and their acquisition of Podchaser as driving factors of their 39% net sales growth. A figure that calculates out to 31 million USD.  While the macro trends are concerning, The Download will never pass up an opportunity to report numbers going up in podcasting. Big or small, names in the industry are increasing ad revenue, and that's a good thing.  Shreya: Now to cover the Q2 numbers from three large broadcasters: iHeartMedia, Cumulus Media, and Audacy. There's a few dark spots throughout but, interestingly, their podcast numbers are shining beacons of hope in all three reports.  Overall iHeartMedia reports an 11% year over year increase, despite, in the words of company president Rich Bressler: “the uncertain economic environment.” Podcast revenue is up to 86 million, a 60% year over year increase.  Meanwhile, Cumulus Media joined the macro club during president Mary Berner's opening statement:  “Despite the challenging macro environment, we increased revenue in the quarter by more than 5%, driven by our digital businesses whose growth accelerated in Q2 to 20% year-over-year.” Podcasting made Cumulus around 15 million this last quarter, up 27% year over year. All told, podcasting accounts for 6% of the company's revenue. Not too shabby.  Finally, Audacy's president David J Field brings us a final use of the term ‘macro' for this episode:  “After a very strong first quarter in which we grew revenues by 14% and significantly increased margin, our second quarter results were adversely impacted by declining macroeconomic conditions and ad market headwinds which reduced our top line growth to 5%.”  The company made a nice $69m from “digital,” which includes podcasting, and is up 18% year over year. Podcast downloads grew 40% year-over-year. Revenue from podcasts is supposedly in the upper teens of percentage growth, but Audacy didn't give specifics. Even with the ad market headwinds it seems podcasting is doing well for them.  Arielle: Wednesday of last week was a busy day for Alyssa Meyers, as we cover her second article of the day: “Audio gets its own track at this year's Advertising Week.”  Advertising Week's head of podcasting Richard Larsson told Marketing Brew,  “The rise of audio throughout the pandemic, coupled with Advertising Week's efforts to build its own podcast network, culminated in the decision to give audio a more official spot on the agenda this October.” Audio representation continues with one of - if not the - longest-running podcast awards ceremony. Yesterday the People's Choice Podcast Awards announced the nominees for their 17th annual session. The substantive list of nominees can be found on the Podcast Awards website.  Continuing the award theme with one more bit of news: on Monday the newest issue of Adweek dropped with the winners to the 2022 Adweek Podcast of the Year Awards. The full list of winners can be found in the official Adweek post by Kennyatta Collins. Shreya: Podcasts and music are taking a break from each other soon on Spotify, according to David Pierce's article for The Verge, posted this Tuesday.  “Spotify has been working on a new design for its home tab that will create separate feeds for your music and your podcasts. The company says it's part of an effort to give you more and better recommendations, but it also addresses a common criticism of the Spotify experience: with every kind of audio smushed together in the app, it can sometimes be hard to figure out.”  The new layout creates a bar at the top of the app delineating whether the user is in the Music area or one called Podcasts & Shows. Music will continue to feature new suggestions for songs and albums along with recently-listened tracks while Podcasts & Shows gets rid of music and purely focuses on new episodes of subscribed podcasts and recommendations for shows Spotify believes the user will enjoy.  Pierce offers the comparison:  “They're not so much new home screens as new filters for your home screen. (I'd rather just have them be separate tabs altogether, but I'll take what I can get.)” An app redesign with a dedicated area for podcasting provides more opportunities for promotion. Podcast promotion and growth of audience is one of the hottest topics in podcasting.   Spotify providing more of those opportunities for ads in a way that doesn't step on music-based ads is a big deal. Promotion opportunities are a big enough deal that Dan Misener and Jonas Woost of Pacific Content have left to form Bumper, an agency dedicated solely to promotion.  Arielle: Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's three great reads are:  Fundamentals of Programmatic Advertising by Evelyn Mitchell. A quick read with a helpful infographic that makes a great introduction for those not familiar with programmatic, as well as those in need of a refresher.  DoubleVerify Grows Q2 Revenue By Expanding Brand Safety To Retail Media, TikTok And Gaming by Alyssa Boyle. Notable in its absence is any entrance into podcasting. Meanwhile IAS, a direct competitor of DoubleVerify, is the brand safety service for Spotify. DoubleVerify not expanding into audio over these other verticals suggests that the IAS and Spotify relationship is more driven by Spotify looking to tend their walled garden. Perhaps the move was more motivated by Spotify themselves rather than actual advertiser demand to have a brand safety partner. Finally, some self-promotion: Sounds Profitable's latest research project will debut Tuesday, August 23rd during the Sounds Profitable Business Summit. The Summit, as covered in a previous episode of The Download, will take place in Dallas, Texas during the opening day of Podcast Movement. The “After These Messages” study will present a definitive take on the impact of live host-read ads, scripted ads, and announcer-read spots. This study was designed by podcast and research industry veteran Tom Webster, in partnership with Edison Research, and will be seen as an important new resource for publishers and brands. Don't miss it.  Arielle: And that was The Download, from Sounds Profitable! I know we went through these fast, so be sure to check out the links to every article mentioned, right in your podcast listening app, or on SoundsProfitable.com/TheDownload. And thank you for sticking with us as we bring you the top stories you might have missed from the past week. I'm Arielle Nissenblatt. Shreya : And I'm Shreya Sharma. Our producers are Bryan Barletta and Tom Webster. Special thanks to Gavin Gaddis for writing today's script, and to Omny Studio for hosting The Download. And thanks to you for joining us.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pixel Sift
CULT OF THE LAMB developers Julian & Will share the secrets of building their roguelite cult simulator

Pixel Sift

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 31:53


CULT OF THE LAMB is really two different games in one, a town builder and a dungeon crawler, but they've been welded together using arcane magics by the creative team at Massive Monster (THE ADVENTURE PALS, NEVER GIVE UP) into an experience that keeps you busy. Julian Wilton, Creative Director and Will Mesilane, UI Developer share the secrets hidden in this world, what it took to build this cult management game and what they are most proud of in this exclusive interview. SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER. Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORESupport the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Hear Things
TikTok Eyes Podcasting? & 6 Other Stories for August 4th 2022

I Hear Things

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 9:54


This week on The Download: New TikTok Trademark Could mean new streaming service, third-party cookies get a stay of execution from Google, Apple App Store ads could signal Apple Podcasts' future, and two perspectives on the downturn ad economy.  New TikTok App Trademark Manuela: Last Thursday Dan Whateley and Amanda Perelli, writing for Business Insider, covered a new trademark application for a service called TikTok Music. As the simplistic name suggests, TikTok parent company ByteDance could be looking to branch the TikTok brand out beyond its current relationship to music and create a fully-fledged streaming platform.  “The idea that ByteDance would launch a standalone "TikTok Music" streaming service in the US to compete with players like Spotify and Apple Music isn't unfounded. It already runs a streaming app called Resso in three markets — India, Brazil, and Indonesia — that has been grabbing market share from other streamers in the past year.” While nothing has been formally announced or set in stone, the sources Perelli and Whateley contacted for their story suggest it's highly unlikely ByteDance would file such a trademark. Filing in the US and Australia wouldn't happen without a strong chance the company meant for it to come to fruition. Then there's the matter of this move making perfect sense for TikTok.  Why cover this on The Download? Well, in addition to the general fact TikTok is slowly devouring the online world, it's coming for audio specifically and the trademark application lists, among other things, the proposed new app's ability to stream: “downloadable mobile applications providing podcast and radio broadcast content.” What remains to be seen is what the TikTok version of ‘a podcast' will be. Google Delays Cookie Death Again Shreya: Once again we won't be seeing the death of third-party cookies, as Google has delayed their death blow for another year. Last Wednesday The Verge's Richard Lawler covered the story in the article “Google delays blocking third-party cookies again, now targeting late 2024.”  “The plan is to expand the group of Chrome users who have Privacy Sandbox APIs enabled to “millions of users globally” starting in August, then gradually opt more people in throughout the rest of the year and into 2023, giving the publishers and developers of these sites time to find out how the technology works before the APIs are “generally available” by Q3 of 2023.”  With this second delay third-party cookies are becoming the shoe that refuses to drop in advertising. While podcasting doesn't depend on cookies per se, the ability to track individual consumers remains an expectation of digital marketers who don't want to see the genie go back into the bottle. If it does, podcasts are on equal footing with mobile and web ads, and all will have to do the work to target the right consumers. Apple App Store Ad Offerings Signal Podcast Future Manuela: This Tuesday's issue of Stratechery covers many sections of the Apple earnings call, but one particular section stuck out to The Download: Apple's new advertising slots. The new slots are detailed by 9to5Mac's Chance Miller. “Apple is expanding its advertising business and adding two new ad slots to the App Store. Currently, the App Store has two ad slots: one on the main ‘Search' tab and one in the Search results. The two new App Store ads announced today will bring advertisements to the App Store ‘Today' homepage, as well as to individual app pages.”  While the App Store and Apple Podcasts are different services, this change could signal a shift in the winds over in the podcasting world. Currently there are no ads in Apple Podcasts. Apple also puts considerable time into featuring podcasts in places ads would normally appear at no charge. Years of careful curation and optimal placement have caused those spots to become incredibly coveted. By making some of those spaces available for purchase - through search or the home page, or even on pages for OTHER podcasts - Apple would unlock a large revenue opportunity for themselves outside of subscriptions, and provide a new for-pay opportunity for podcast promotion. Ad Economy Downturn Dual Perspectives Shreya: On Monday Digiday's Seb Joseph posted “The downturn ad economy: A tale of two narratives.”  “There are two competing narratives on advertising at the moment. They sit uneasily with each other. But both are correct. Ad dollars are being spent, but they're also being cut. Yes, these two things can be true at the same time. No, the latter perspective doesn't make the former any less valid or vice versa. Really, it's a matter of perspective.”  The two warring perspectives in Joseph's piece are that of the big holding companies and agencies versus the platforms. Both are staring down the barrel of a recession and have different reactions.  “It's no surprise that the marketers who can afford to advertise now are trying to make the most of it.  They're spending ad dollars, rather than looking to pull them. Indeed, economic slumps are usually the best chance to buy share of voice cheaply at the same time rivals reduce their own. It's a cliche for a reason.   Otherwise, Unilever wouldn't have splurged £169.73 million ($206.7 million) on advertising in the first half of the year alone. Coca-Cola did so mething similar, as did McDonald's. The largest advertisers will try and advertise their way through the downturn — to a point, at least.”  Podcasting is platform-heavy, working diligently to get the big advertisers to shift their spending into podcasting. Yet those platform peers are the ones getting the short end of the stick when it comes to ad cuts.  “To survive, companies are cutting costs, including advertising. When these companies advertise, they tend to do so online first and foremost. SMEs and DTCs are nothing but digital-first in many respects. So when these businesses feel the effects of adverse conditions, so do the platforms they advertise on.” When those in the podcasting industry talk about the push for bigger advertisers in our space, it's not only for growth: it's to weather the storm. If some of those spend-through-the-storm big fish can be directed to our corner of the world, they'll keep multiple industries afloat. Quick Hits Section Manuela: Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's four great reads are:  First: Google Begins Interest Group-Based Ad Experiment by Laurie Sullivan. Google is testing grouping users into interest groups (the article gives “custom bikes” as an example).This has implications for podcasting. What would be a great way to reach custom bike fans? A custom bike podcast.  Podcasting has a window to figure this stuff out.  Clear your calendar for the afternoon of August 16th as the Latino Podcast Listener Report 2022 is coming your way. The presentation, co-hosted by Gabriel Soto, Edison Research Senior Director of Research, and my co-host on La Descarga, as well as She Podcasts cofounder Elsie Escobar. Registration is open now.  Also: Podcasts are testing out-of-home ads to reach broader audiences by Alyssa Meyers. In a previous episode we touched on the story of Slow Burn buying a billboard to promote their season on Shirley Wheeler in Roe v. Wade battleground states. This covers the wider trend of podcasts dipping their toes in out-of-home advertising, first highlighted by James Cridland over in Podnews. The habit is growing and catching more attention, though it comes with - ironically - less metrics than the already small amount of fingerprinting traditional podcast advertising comes with.  Finally: How Slate's Charlie Kammerer is prioritizing frequency to boost podcast revenue by Kayleigh Barber. In a piece that rarely happens in mainstream podcast coverage, Slate's Charlie Kammerer talks through the outlet's podcasting strategy. Of note is the approach that shows integrated value, using podcast paywalls to drive subscriptions of Slate overall.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Tom Webster are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
TikTok Eyes Podcasting? & 6 Other Stories for August 4th 2022

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 9:54


This week on The Download: New TikTok Trademark Could mean new streaming service, third-party cookies get a stay of execution from Google, Apple App Store ads could signal Apple Podcasts' future, and two perspectives on the downturn ad economy.  New TikTok App Trademark Manuela: Last Thursday Dan Whateley and Amanda Perelli, writing for Business Insider, covered a new trademark application for a service called TikTok Music. As the simplistic name suggests, TikTok parent company ByteDance could be looking to branch the TikTok brand out beyond its current relationship to music and create a fully-fledged streaming platform.  “The idea that ByteDance would launch a standalone "TikTok Music" streaming service in the US to compete with players like Spotify and Apple Music isn't unfounded. It already runs a streaming app called Resso in three markets — India, Brazil, and Indonesia — that has been grabbing market share from other streamers in the past year.” While nothing has been formally announced or set in stone, the sources Perelli and Whateley contacted for their story suggest it's highly unlikely ByteDance would file such a trademark. Filing in the US and Australia wouldn't happen without a strong chance the company meant for it to come to fruition. Then there's the matter of this move making perfect sense for TikTok.  Why cover this on The Download? Well, in addition to the general fact TikTok is slowly devouring the online world, it's coming for audio specifically and the trademark application lists, among other things, the proposed new app's ability to stream: “downloadable mobile applications providing podcast and radio broadcast content.” What remains to be seen is what the TikTok version of ‘a podcast' will be. Google Delays Cookie Death Again Shreya: Once again we won't be seeing the death of third-party cookies, as Google has delayed their death blow for another year. Last Wednesday The Verge's Richard Lawler covered the story in the article “Google delays blocking third-party cookies again, now targeting late 2024.”  “The plan is to expand the group of Chrome users who have Privacy Sandbox APIs enabled to “millions of users globally” starting in August, then gradually opt more people in throughout the rest of the year and into 2023, giving the publishers and developers of these sites time to find out how the technology works before the APIs are “generally available” by Q3 of 2023.”  With this second delay third-party cookies are becoming the shoe that refuses to drop in advertising. While podcasting doesn't depend on cookies per se, the ability to track individual consumers remains an expectation of digital marketers who don't want to see the genie go back into the bottle. If it does, podcasts are on equal footing with mobile and web ads, and all will have to do the work to target the right consumers. Apple App Store Ad Offerings Signal Podcast Future Manuela: This Tuesday's issue of Stratechery covers many sections of the Apple earnings call, but one particular section stuck out to The Download: Apple's new advertising slots. The new slots are detailed by 9to5Mac's Chance Miller. “Apple is expanding its advertising business and adding two new ad slots to the App Store. Currently, the App Store has two ad slots: one on the main ‘Search' tab and one in the Search results. The two new App Store ads announced today will bring advertisements to the App Store ‘Today' homepage, as well as to individual app pages.”  While the App Store and Apple Podcasts are different services, this change could signal a shift in the winds over in the podcasting world. Currently there are no ads in Apple Podcasts. Apple also puts considerable time into featuring podcasts in places ads would normally appear at no charge. Years of careful curation and optimal placement have caused those spots to become incredibly coveted. By making some of those spaces available for purchase - through search or the home page, or even on pages for OTHER podcasts - Apple would unlock a large revenue opportunity for themselves outside of subscriptions, and provide a new for-pay opportunity for podcast promotion. Ad Economy Downturn Dual Perspectives Shreya: On Monday Digiday's Seb Joseph posted “The downturn ad economy: A tale of two narratives.”  “There are two competing narratives on advertising at the moment. They sit uneasily with each other. But both are correct. Ad dollars are being spent, but they're also being cut. Yes, these two things can be true at the same time. No, the latter perspective doesn't make the former any less valid or vice versa. Really, it's a matter of perspective.”  The two warring perspectives in Joseph's piece are that of the big holding companies and agencies versus the platforms. Both are staring down the barrel of a recession and have different reactions.  “It's no surprise that the marketers who can afford to advertise now are trying to make the most of it.  They're spending ad dollars, rather than looking to pull them. Indeed, economic slumps are usually the best chance to buy share of voice cheaply at the same time rivals reduce their own. It's a cliche for a reason.   Otherwise, Unilever wouldn't have splurged £169.73 million ($206.7 million) on advertising in the first half of the year alone. Coca-Cola did so mething similar, as did McDonald's. The largest advertisers will try and advertise their way through the downturn — to a point, at least.”  Podcasting is platform-heavy, working diligently to get the big advertisers to shift their spending into podcasting. Yet those platform peers are the ones getting the short end of the stick when it comes to ad cuts.  “To survive, companies are cutting costs, including advertising. When these companies advertise, they tend to do so online first and foremost. SMEs and DTCs are nothing but digital-first in many respects. So when these businesses feel the effects of adverse conditions, so do the platforms they advertise on.” When those in the podcasting industry talk about the push for bigger advertisers in our space, it's not only for growth: it's to weather the storm. If some of those spend-through-the-storm big fish can be directed to our corner of the world, they'll keep multiple industries afloat. Quick Hits Section Manuela: Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's four great reads are:  First: Google Begins Interest Group-Based Ad Experiment by Laurie Sullivan. Google is testing grouping users into interest groups (the article gives “custom bikes” as an example).This has implications for podcasting. What would be a great way to reach custom bike fans? A custom bike podcast.  Podcasting has a window to figure this stuff out.  Clear your calendar for the afternoon of August 16th as the Latino Podcast Listener Report 2022 is coming your way. The presentation, co-hosted by Gabriel Soto, Edison Research Senior Director of Research, and my co-host on La Descarga, as well as She Podcasts cofounder Elsie Escobar. Registration is open now.  Also: Podcasts are testing out-of-home ads to reach broader audiences by Alyssa Meyers. In a previous episode we touched on the story of Slow Burn buying a billboard to promote their season on Shirley Wheeler in Roe v. Wade battleground states. This covers the wider trend of podcasts dipping their toes in out-of-home advertising, first highlighted by James Cridland over in Podnews. The habit is growing and catching more attention, though it comes with - ironically - less metrics than the already small amount of fingerprinting traditional podcast advertising comes with.  Finally: How Slate's Charlie Kammerer is prioritizing frequency to boost podcast revenue by Kayleigh Barber. In a piece that rarely happens in mainstream podcast coverage, Slate's Charlie Kammerer talks through the outlet's podcasting strategy. Of note is the approach that shows integrated value, using podcast paywalls to drive subscriptions of Slate overall.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Tom Webster are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pixel Sift
Every piece of art in CARD SHARK was hand printed, here's how it was made

Pixel Sift

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 39:46


CARD SHARK is a beautiful picture book styled video game where you cheat your way through 18th century France and every single graphic you see was hand printed and then scanned into the game. Lead artist and animator Nicolai Troshinsky was inspired by a love of card magic and sleight of hand, as well as a 1975 Stanley Kubrick film to build this amazing and unique game and joins SIFTER for an in depth conversation about the process of design. SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER. Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORESupport the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Download from Sounds Profitable
Acast Buys Podchaser & 6 other stories for July 21, 2022

The Download from Sounds Profitable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 11:56


This week on The Download: Acast buys Podchaser, PodcastOne strikes out on their own, SiriusXM and Comscore expand their deal, Disney's integrating with The Trade Desk , and Podnews caught 240 spam emails. This Monday Podnews started off the work week with a big announcement: Acast is acquiring Podchaser in a $34 million dollar deal.  “Podchaser, which will continue to operate as a separate brand and independent business, was founded in 2016 and is home to the leading global podcast database, covering more than 4.5 million podcasts and more than 1.7 billion data points — including hundreds of thousands of ratings and reviews, and the advertisers of the world's top 5,000 podcasts. This unique, proprietary data — which will also remain open to all — spans and powers the entire open podcast ecosystem, and is used by listeners, podcasters, advertisers and industry professionals.” Podchaser has created strong integrations with hosting platforms to receive data, exported data to podcast apps and hosting platforms, and has a competitive intelligence tool built to enable publishers and buyers alike to improve their revenue streams.  General industry sentiment of Acast currently is a bit lukewarm unless you're actively working with them as a publisher or a buyer. As previously reported, Acast has—or at least had— a marketing strategy involving unrelenting spam emails encouraging podcasters to switch to their services. With mass emails to RadioPublic users and their siloed relationships with partners like Patreon, it's hard for some podcasters to give this deal the benefit of the doubt.  We're very happy for our sponsor Podchaser, and the entire team there, and truly hope the independent nature is maintained. We still question the comfort of existing and new integrated partners providing data to a competitor. Last Friday LiveOne issued a press release announcing that their company PodcastOne, having just raised 8.1 million in funding, is looking to separate and become an independent company. “PodcastOne is the leading advertiser-supported on-demand digital podcast company, offering a 360-degree solution for both content creators and advertisers, including content development, brand integration and distribution. Acquired by LiveOne in 2020, PodcastOne has had more than 2.1 billion downloads a year since its acquisition, across the more than 350 weekly episodes it distributes.” Their talent stable includes names like Jordan Harbinger, Adam Carolla, and T-Pain. In the press release PodcastOne president Kit Gray said:  “The podcasting business has exploded over the past five years and PodcastOne is one of the largest independent podcast companies in the world. The company is one of only two independent podcasting publishers in the top 10 of Podtrac's list of Top Publishers. We believe that by trading as a separate public company, PodcastOne will have the opportunity to access the public capital markets as well as be better positioned to both acquire podcast platforms and attract significant podcast talent.”  PodcastOne offers its own self-built platform and operates as an ad sales network for its publishers. It's weathered a lot of storms in podcasting and investment like this during a recession shows confidence in the ability for them to stand on their own. It will be interesting to see how their products and services come to market faster, and who they cater toward. Much like the acquisition last story, this announcement shows podcasting deals aren't going stale. Last Thursday SiriusXM and Comscore announced the expansion of their collaborative agreement to bring predictive audience targeting to podcasts. This new expanded agreement will bring Comscore Predictive Audiences to both AdzWizz and SXM Media clients. General Manager of Comscore activation services Rachel Grant said:  “With podcast consumption skyrocketing and the regulatory environment still very fluid, it's critical to give advertisers the ability to develop privacy-forward and future-proof audience targeting on podcasts”  Prior to this AdsWizz was already working with Comscore for their contextual targeting based off of keywords for the Podscribe tool (not to be confused with the company Podscribe). The new deal expands into a targetable dataset for those buying through Adswizz programmatic offerings, either as a buyer using their demand side platform to buy anywhere in podcast programmatic, or buying directly into their open marketplace Podwave.  The continued highlighting of it being privacy-first is a bit misleading. AdsWizz is still providing the IP address to match off of, which we at Sounds Profitable do not find to be an issue. That Comscore has built a new dataset not built on cookies is a step towards the aforementioned future-proofing. The dataset looks to come from Comscore opted-in panels, which is different from universal ID solutions looking to match first party data. While podcasting is always probabilistic matching - as it's based on IP address - this is also probabilistic targeting.  It's neat to see Comscore focusing a bit more on podcasting while many other major data partners are snoozing on it. In a rare twist we only have one article posted on a Tuesday for you this week. Last Tuesday AdExchanger's James Hercher published “Disney Integrates With The Trade Desk And UID2 In Pursuit Of Better Addressability.” “This new integration with The Trade Desk, which was born from recent meetings in Cannes, will accelerate Disney's ambition to automate and target more of its overall pool of data, Barnes said. Advertisers will be able to more effectively find their audiences across Disney inventory and the added precision should help improve ROI and post-campaign results.” Disney is a major player in podcasting, both directly and through partnerships. So much of what Disney does today uses programmatic for efficiency's sake. A company of that size can't easily do manual IO's for every cookie-cutter campaign. As Disney continues to invest and grow their podcast offerings creates synergy with the majority of podcast SSPs being configured to purchase from The Trade Desk. There's  real potential for further increase in podcasting programmatic as the industry takes care of the small discrepancies and differences that stand in the way of podcasting as a main advertising channel.  While the article is worth engaging with on its own merits, script writer Gavin Gaddis wishes to spotlight the piece's cartoon of Toy Story stars Buzz and Woody selling ads with the caption ‘to automation and beyond.' Three months ago Podnews editor James Cridland laid a trap to learn more about the methods and companies using shady tactics to cold-call podcasters via email. On Wednesday he published the results in “the podcast industry's biggest spammer.”  “In May 2022, we amended Podnews's podcast RSS feed to produce a near infinite amount of trackable email addresses as a kind of spamtrap. We wanted to discover who was scraping our RSS feed for emails; what user agent they were using, when they scraped it, what tag they scraped it from, and whether the messages were legal under the FCC's rules (the so-called CAN-SPAM Act).”  Cridland's honeypot strategy attracted 240 emails over the three month period. Some fall within the boundaries of CAN-SPAM, some seem pointed in their lack of transparency.  The specific companies involved are not necessarily important to the overall story. Podcasting needs good governance as growth continues and the industry constantly redefines what constitutes ‘normal' business practices. It's on those within the industry to make podcasting better through what's considered an acceptable marketing strategy. It's perfectly legal to scrape email addresses from RSS feed tags and send them unsolicited emails as long as they follow loose FCC and other governmental regulatory rules. In an industry growing as fast and consistently as podcasting one has to question if it has a place for an antiquated cold-calling strategy perfected in the late 90s.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's two Quick Hits are  The Most Important Things We've Learned About Making Successful Podcasts with Brands by Dan Misener. Misener, formerly Director of Audience Development at Pacific Content, provides a great list of learnings on his way out the door. One of the greatest minds at Pacific, Misener has been skilled at breaking down complex data and making it accessible to the masses. His heart has always been focused on growing all of podcasting and Sounds Profitable fully supports him in whatever he's doing next. We know it'll have an impact.  And secondly: a press release from Pushkin media: Pushkin Industries Expands Production Capacity With Acquisition of Creative Podcast Company Transmitter Media. Here we have yet another example of a podcast production company growing to the point they need to buy another podcast production company.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Hear Things
Acast Buys Podchaser & 6 other stories for July 21, 2022

I Hear Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 11:56


This week on The Download: Acast buys Podchaser, PodcastOne strikes out on their own, SiriusXM and Comscore expand their deal, Disney's integrating with The Trade Desk , and Podnews caught 240 spam emails. This Monday Podnews started off the work week with a big announcement: Acast is acquiring Podchaser in a $34 million dollar deal.  “Podchaser, which will continue to operate as a separate brand and independent business, was founded in 2016 and is home to the leading global podcast database, covering more than 4.5 million podcasts and more than 1.7 billion data points — including hundreds of thousands of ratings and reviews, and the advertisers of the world's top 5,000 podcasts. This unique, proprietary data — which will also remain open to all — spans and powers the entire open podcast ecosystem, and is used by listeners, podcasters, advertisers and industry professionals.” Podchaser has created strong integrations with hosting platforms to receive data, exported data to podcast apps and hosting platforms, and has a competitive intelligence tool built to enable publishers and buyers alike to improve their revenue streams.  General industry sentiment of Acast currently is a bit lukewarm unless you're actively working with them as a publisher or a buyer. As previously reported, Acast has—or at least had— a marketing strategy involving unrelenting spam emails encouraging podcasters to switch to their services. With mass emails to RadioPublic users and their siloed relationships with partners like Patreon, it's hard for some podcasters to give this deal the benefit of the doubt.  We're very happy for our sponsor Podchaser, and the entire team there, and truly hope the independent nature is maintained. We still question the comfort of existing and new integrated partners providing data to a competitor. Last Friday LiveOne issued a press release announcing that their company PodcastOne, having just raised 8.1 million in funding, is looking to separate and become an independent company.  “PodcastOne is the leading advertiser-supported on-demand digital podcast company, offering a 360-degree solution for both content creators and advertisers, including content development, brand integration and distribution. Acquired by LiveOne in 2020, PodcastOne has had more than 2.1 billion downloads a year since its acquisition, across the more than 350 weekly episodes it distributes.” Their talent stable includes names like Jordan Harbinger, Adam Carolla, and T-Pain. In the press release PodcastOne president Kit Gray said:  “The podcasting business has exploded over the past five years and PodcastOne is one of the largest independent podcast companies in the world. The company is one of only two independent podcasting publishers in the top 10 of Podtrac's list of Top Publishers. We believe that by trading as a separate public company, PodcastOne will have the opportunity to access the public capital markets as well as be better positioned to both acquire podcast platforms and attract significant podcast talent.”  PodcastOne offers its own self-built platform and operates as an ad sales network for its publishers. It's weathered a lot of storms in podcasting and investment like this during a recession shows confidence in the ability for them to stand on their own. It will be interesting to see how their products and services come to market faster, and who they cater toward. Much like the acquisition last story, this announcement shows podcasting deals aren't going stale. Last Thursday SiriusXM and Comscore announced the expansion of their collaborative agreement to bring predictive audience targeting to podcasts. This new expanded agreement will bring Comscore Predictive Audiences to both AdzWizz and SXM Media clients. General Manager of Comscore activation services Rachel Grant said:  “With podcast consumption skyrocketing and the regulatory environment still very fluid, it's critical to give advertisers the ability to develop privacy-forward and future-proof audience targeting on podcasts”  Prior to this AdsWizz was already working with Comscore for their contextual targeting based off of keywords for the Podscribe tool (not to be confused with the company Podscribe). The new deal expands into a targetable dataset for those buying through Adswizz programmatic offerings, either as a buyer using their demand side platform to buy anywhere in podcast programmatic, or buying directly into their open marketplace Podwave.  The continued highlighting of it being privacy-first is a bit misleading. AdsWizz is still providing the IP address to match off of, which we at Sounds Profitable do not find to be an issue. That Comscore has built a new dataset not built on cookies is a step towards the aforementioned future-proofing. The dataset looks to come from Comscore opted-in panels, which is different from universal ID solutions looking to match first party data. While podcasting is always probabilistic matching - as it's based on IP address - this is also probabilistic targeting.  It's neat to see Comscore focusing a bit more on podcasting while many other major data partners are snoozing on it. In a rare twist we only have one article posted on a Tuesday for you this week. Last Tuesday AdExchanger's James Hercher published “Disney Integrates With The Trade Desk And UID2 In Pursuit Of Better Addressability.” “This new integration with The Trade Desk, which was born from recent meetings in Cannes, will accelerate Disney's ambition to automate and target more of its overall pool of data, Barnes said. Advertisers will be able to more effectively find their audiences across Disney inventory and the added precision should help improve ROI and post-campaign results.” Disney is a major player in podcasting, both directly and through partnerships. So much of what Disney does today uses programmatic for efficiency's sake. A company of that size can't easily do manual IO's for every cookie-cutter campaign. As Disney continues to invest and grow their podcast offerings creates synergy with the majority of podcast SSPs being configured to purchase from The Trade Desk. There's  real potential for further increase in podcasting programmatic as the industry takes care of the small discrepancies and differences that stand in the way of podcasting as a main advertising channel.  While the article is worth engaging with on its own merits, script writer Gavin Gaddis wishes to spotlight the piece's cartoon of Toy Story stars Buzz and Woody selling ads with the caption ‘to automation and beyond.' Three months ago Podnews editor James Cridland laid a trap to learn more about the methods and companies using shady tactics to cold-call podcasters via email. On Wednesday he published the results in “the podcast industry's biggest spammer.”  “In May 2022, we amended Podnews's podcast RSS feed to produce a near infinite amount of trackable email addresses as a kind of spamtrap. We wanted to discover who was scraping our RSS feed for emails; what user agent they were using, when they scraped it, what tag they scraped it from, and whether the messages were legal under the FCC's rules (the so-called CAN-SPAM Act).”  Cridland's honeypot strategy attracted 240 emails over the three month period. Some fall within the boundaries of CAN-SPAM, some seem pointed in their lack of transparency.  The specific companies involved are not necessarily important to the overall story. Podcasting needs good governance as growth continues and the industry constantly redefines what constitutes ‘normal' business practices. It's on those within the industry to make podcasting better through what's considered an acceptable marketing strategy. It's perfectly legal to scrape email addresses from RSS feed tags and send them unsolicited emails as long as they follow loose FCC and other governmental regulatory rules. In an industry growing as fast and consistently as podcasting one has to question if it has a place for an antiquated cold-calling strategy perfected in the late 90s.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's two Quick Hits are  The Most Important Things We've Learned About Making Successful Podcasts with Brands by Dan Misener. Misener, formerly Director of Audience Development at Pacific Content, provides a great list of learnings on his way out the door. One of the greatest minds at Pacific, Misener has been skilled at breaking down complex data and making it accessible to the masses. His heart has always been focused on growing all of podcasting and Sounds Profitable fully supports him in whatever he's doing next. We know it'll have an impact.  And secondly: a press release from Pushkin media: Pushkin Industries Expands Production Capacity With Acquisition of Creative Podcast Company Transmitter Media. Here we have yet another example of a podcast production company growing to the point they need to buy another podcast production company.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
Acast Buys Podchaser & 6 other stories for July 21, 2022

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 11:56


This week on The Download: Acast buys Podchaser, PodcastOne strikes out on their own, SiriusXM and Comscore expand their deal, Disney's integrating with The Trade Desk , and Podnews caught 240 spam emails. This Monday Podnews started off the work week with a big announcement: Acast is acquiring Podchaser in a $34 million dollar deal.  “Podchaser, which will continue to operate as a separate brand and independent business, was founded in 2016 and is home to the leading global podcast database, covering more than 4.5 million podcasts and more than 1.7 billion data points — including hundreds of thousands of ratings and reviews, and the advertisers of the world's top 5,000 podcasts. This unique, proprietary data — which will also remain open to all — spans and powers the entire open podcast ecosystem, and is used by listeners, podcasters, advertisers and industry professionals.” Podchaser has created strong integrations with hosting platforms to receive data, exported data to podcast apps and hosting platforms, and has a competitive intelligence tool built to enable publishers and buyers alike to improve their revenue streams.  General industry sentiment of Acast currently is a bit lukewarm unless you're actively working with them as a publisher or a buyer. As previously reported, Acast has—or at least had— a marketing strategy involving unrelenting spam emails encouraging podcasters to switch to their services. With mass emails to RadioPublic users and their siloed relationships with partners like Patreon, it's hard for some podcasters to give this deal the benefit of the doubt.  We're very happy for our sponsor Podchaser, and the entire team there, and truly hope the independent nature is maintained. We still question the comfort of existing and new integrated partners providing data to a competitor. Last Friday LiveOne issued a press release announcing that their company PodcastOne, having just raised 8.1 million in funding, is looking to separate and become an independent company.  “PodcastOne is the leading advertiser-supported on-demand digital podcast company, offering a 360-degree solution for both content creators and advertisers, including content development, brand integration and distribution. Acquired by LiveOne in 2020, PodcastOne has had more than 2.1 billion downloads a year since its acquisition, across the more than 350 weekly episodes it distributes.” Their talent stable includes names like Jordan Harbinger, Adam Carolla, and T-Pain. In the press release PodcastOne president Kit Gray said:  “The podcasting business has exploded over the past five years and PodcastOne is one of the largest independent podcast companies in the world. The company is one of only two independent podcasting publishers in the top 10 of Podtrac's list of Top Publishers. We believe that by trading as a separate public company, PodcastOne will have the opportunity to access the public capital markets as well as be better positioned to both acquire podcast platforms and attract significant podcast talent.”  PodcastOne offers its own self-built platform and operates as an ad sales network for its publishers. It's weathered a lot of storms in podcasting and investment like this during a recession shows confidence in the ability for them to stand on their own. It will be interesting to see how their products and services come to market faster, and who they cater toward. Much like the acquisition last story, this announcement shows podcasting deals aren't going stale. Last Thursday SiriusXM and Comscore announced the expansion of their collaborative agreement to bring predictive audience targeting to podcasts. This new expanded agreement will bring Comscore Predictive Audiences to both AdzWizz and SXM Media clients. General Manager of Comscore activation services Rachel Grant said:  “With podcast consumption skyrocketing and the regulatory environment still very fluid, it's critical to give advertisers the ability to develop privacy-forward and future-proof audience targeting on podcasts”  Prior to this AdsWizz was already working with Comscore for their contextual targeting based off of keywords for the Podscribe tool (not to be confused with the company Podscribe). The new deal expands into a targetable dataset for those buying through Adswizz programmatic offerings, either as a buyer using their demand side platform to buy anywhere in podcast programmatic, or buying directly into their open marketplace Podwave.  The continued highlighting of it being privacy-first is a bit misleading. AdsWizz is still providing the IP address to match off of, which we at Sounds Profitable do not find to be an issue. That Comscore has built a new dataset not built on cookies is a step towards the aforementioned future-proofing. The dataset looks to come from Comscore opted-in panels, which is different from universal ID solutions looking to match first party data. While podcasting is always probabilistic matching - as it's based on IP address - this is also probabilistic targeting.  It's neat to see Comscore focusing a bit more on podcasting while many other major data partners are snoozing on it. In a rare twist we only have one article posted on a Tuesday for you this week. Last Tuesday AdExchanger's James Hercher published “Disney Integrates With The Trade Desk And UID2 In Pursuit Of Better Addressability.” “This new integration with The Trade Desk, which was born from recent meetings in Cannes, will accelerate Disney's ambition to automate and target more of its overall pool of data, Barnes said. Advertisers will be able to more effectively find their audiences across Disney inventory and the added precision should help improve ROI and post-campaign results.” Disney is a major player in podcasting, both directly and through partnerships. So much of what Disney does today uses programmatic for efficiency's sake. A company of that size can't easily do manual IO's for every cookie-cutter campaign. As Disney continues to invest and grow their podcast offerings creates synergy with the majority of podcast SSPs being configured to purchase from The Trade Desk. There's  real potential for further increase in podcasting programmatic as the industry takes care of the small discrepancies and differences that stand in the way of podcasting as a main advertising channel.  While the article is worth engaging with on its own merits, script writer Gavin Gaddis wishes to spotlight the piece's cartoon of Toy Story stars Buzz and Woody selling ads with the caption ‘to automation and beyond.' Three months ago Podnews editor James Cridland laid a trap to learn more about the methods and companies using shady tactics to cold-call podcasters via email. On Wednesday he published the results in “the podcast industry's biggest spammer.”  “In May 2022, we amended Podnews's podcast RSS feed to produce a near infinite amount of trackable email addresses as a kind of spamtrap. We wanted to discover who was scraping our RSS feed for emails; what user agent they were using, when they scraped it, what tag they scraped it from, and whether the messages were legal under the FCC's rules (the so-called CAN-SPAM Act).”  Cridland's honeypot strategy attracted 240 emails over the three month period. Some fall within the boundaries of CAN-SPAM, some seem pointed in their lack of transparency.  The specific companies involved are not necessarily important to the overall story. Podcasting needs good governance as growth continues and the industry constantly redefines what constitutes ‘normal' business practices. It's on those within the industry to make podcasting better through what's considered an acceptable marketing strategy. It's perfectly legal to scrape email addresses from RSS feed tags and send them unsolicited emails as long as they follow loose FCC and other governmental regulatory rules. In an industry growing as fast and consistently as podcasting one has to question if it has a place for an antiquated cold-calling strategy perfected in the late 90s.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's two Quick Hits are  The Most Important Things We've Learned About Making Successful Podcasts with Brands by Dan Misener. Misener, formerly Director of Audience Development at Pacific Content, provides a great list of learnings on his way out the door. One of the greatest minds at Pacific, Misener has been skilled at breaking down complex data and making it accessible to the masses. His heart has always been focused on growing all of podcasting and Sounds Profitable fully supports him in whatever he's doing next. We know it'll have an impact.  And secondly: a press release from Pushkin media: Pushkin Industries Expands Production Capacity With Acquisition of Creative Podcast Company Transmitter Media. Here we have yet another example of a podcast production company growing to the point they need to buy another podcast production company.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Hear Things
Blubrry Brings A New Spin To Media Kits & 6 more stories for July 14, 2022

I Hear Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 11:26


This week on The Download: Blubrry brings a new spin to media kits, Twitter's building a podcast player, TargetSpot expands into Latin American audiences, Overcast's creator has beef with how podcasters use DAI, and Anchor's co-founder finds RSS standards restrictive to innovation.  While a significant portion of the United States was recovering from an excessive amount of explosive devices used over the holiday weekend, Blubrry announced a new way for podcasters to present themselves to potential sponsors and partners.  “Blubrry is introducing a podcasting industry first by providing all Blubrry paid customers a podcast media kit that updates daily with information you choose to include. The kit includes data you provide, podcast statistics and audience survey results.” Data points that can be included in the kit range from simple unchanging data points like website or show start date to granular things like social media follower counts, average monthly downloads per episode, and Blubrry audience survey results.  While not technically a media kit, this is a great step forward in helping arm podcasters with useful information they can give advertisers interested in evaluating their show. While lacking in the usual collection of logos and information ephemera a true media kit designed to be attractive to press, this sort of media kit 2.0 cuts down on a fair amount of repeat labor. To The Download's knowledge this is the first time a hosting company has automated this process and included actual download statistics in the package. Usually the process is a tedious manual one that requires regular updates by either the show runner or their representation to pull each data point.  Kudos to Blubrry for being the first to market with this dreamed-of feature.  Once again we bring news of a social media platform showing interest in podcast integration, but this time it feels more legitimate. Frontend engineer and code researcher Jane Manchun Wong did some digging. In her to-the-point tweet she announced:  “Twitter is working on in-app Podcast player.”  Attached to the tweet is a screen recording of the new player in action, showing Wong clicking on show art for Office Ladies, which prompts a new podcast player overlay.  For the younger folk in the room, it's worth noting that Twitter didn't spring forth fully formed into the world. In its primordial form the service was originally Odeo, a 2005 attempt at what we'd call a podcast social media network today. Podcasting is literally in Twitter's DNA.  This Monday Podnews shared an announcement from TargetSpot concerning a promising step towards diversifying podcasting further. The adtech company is opening a Latin American-focused office in Miami, Florida under the leadership of Angelica Potes. Chief Revenue Officer Alexandre Ouhadi said: “We are glad to finally be physically present in the Latin American Market. We have created amazing partnerships with big name publishers. This is the right moment to officially go live. Audio is growing rapidly, so it's a great opportunity for advertisers to leverage their digital media budget through this engaging medium.”  Diversity in language, ethnicity, and geographical location is how the podcast industry expands. Hispanic/Latino creators are incredibly well represented in podcasting in comparison to the overall US population. Providing revenue opportunities for those audiences provides the ability for new businesses to be built to capture that revenue. This is good growth for the industry. On Tuesday Marco Arment, creator of podcatcher Overcast, took to Twitter to address a trend in negative reviews for his app. In four screenshots provided four different anonymous users cite an abundance of jarring advertisements. Some complain about the amount and quantity of ads, one claims the ads were so poorly-optimized the volume shift was enough to burst their eardrum.  While the last review's threat of legal action might be hyperbolic, Arment is still concerned.  “Cheap, sloppy dynamic ad insertion (DAI) in podcasts continues to degrade the experience for listeners. They blame the app, and that's my problem to deal with.”  He goes on to ask podcasters who poorly implement DAI “what are you doing” in all capital letters.  Sounds Profitable's Bryan Barletta took issue with this in a quote-tweet of Arment, citing issues like frequency capping, comp separation, and other features related to poor-quality ad placement:  “...are not tech issues, they're business decisions. Your host doesn't offer it? Switch hosts. And don't buy inventory that doesn't support your needs.”  Sloppy implementation of DAI is a recipe for disaster, and there's plenty of evidence of podcasters falling for that trap. Too often that sloppiness is built in under the guise of 'automation', which often leads to odd ad breaks added by the hosting company filled with even odder ads. So what's the solution? Bad ads—ads that don't fit the context of the episode, ads that are recorded at wildly different volumes than the rest of the episode, or an overabundance of ads in an episode—are predominant in dynamically inserted programmatic ads as well as baked-in host-read ads. And solid DAI implementation can power highly relevant host-read ads that sound like they belong in the episode. In the end, it comes to having an ad strategy as well as tactics that are acceptable to the podcaster, the advertiser, and the audience as well. And it'll make it less likely for listeners to blame their listening app for something that's not their problem. We got you, Marco. On Tuesday Anchor co-founder Michael Mignano posted a Medium blog titled “The Standards Innovation Paradox.” In it, he proposes the theory that standards like RSS were useful in helping podcasting grow in the beginning, but have become restrictive over time as services all adapt the same standards and any new additions come with all previous updates as well.  “If you've ever searched the App Store or the Google Play store for a podcast app, you've likely come across a tidal wave of search results. In some ways, this fragmentation is great for users, because it means they have a ton of choice and flexibility in what product to use for their podcast listening. But at the same time, this fragmentation is bad for innovation, and makes it nearly impossible to innovate on experiences that are based on RSS, meaning the podcast listening experience has remained stale and largely unchanged for almost the entirety of podcasting.” On Wednesday James Cridland published a rebuttal in the form of “The Standards Innovation Paradox: is it real?” The piece takes Mignano's to task and seeks to add outside context to his thought process, namely the fact Mignano worked at Spotify after they bought out Anchor. During that tenure the company threw itself into reinventing podcasting without RSS, instead using the proprietary method that follows Mignano's proposal that proprietary tech is required due to the difficulty of forcing a standard to evolve.  “Yet, Spotify absolutely could evolve the standard: because by April 2022, they were big enough, with at least 30% market share, to have set the standard themselves. They could have said “here's how to signal the video asset in your RSS feed, and if you do this, you'll get video podcasts in Spotify too.” They could have looked at the currently existing solution to this, the podcast namespace's alternateEnclosure tag, and adopted that (and, possibly, molded it to their needs). But, they didn't.” Cridland goes on to point out decisions to stick with black box proprietary tech conveniently also mean any user who wishes to take advantage of that new tech is permanently locked into using Anchor as a hosting service.  The risk of an open ecosystem is the ability for aggregators to control and separate the industry. For all the dour news about a lack of profits, Spotify is currently succeeding at this to some degree. RSS is capable of doing everything Mignano's piece takes issue with; issues he has historically complained about even prior to the buyout.  Innovation is stifled not by standards, but by people and businesses with the necessary power to adopt new standards instead choosing to whine about having to share space and leverage that to release new impenetrable black boxes.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're tentatively calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's Quick Hits are  Spotify acquires music trivia game Heardle by Ariel Shapiro. Podcasting: True or False? By Fred Jacobs.  As usual, links to everything mentioned can be found in the episode notes.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Download from Sounds Profitable
Blubrry Brings A New Spin To Media Kits & 6 more stories for July 14, 2022

The Download from Sounds Profitable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 11:25


This week on The Download: Blubrry brings a new spin to media kits, Twitter's building a podcast player, TargetSpot expands into Latin American audiences, Overcast's creator has beef with how podcasters use DAI, and Anchor's co-founder finds RSS standards restrictive to innovation.  While a significant portion of the United States was recovering from an excessive amount of explosive devices used over the holiday weekend, Blubrry announced a new way for podcasters to present themselves to potential sponsors and partners.  “Blubrry is introducing a podcasting industry first by providing all Blubrry paid customers a podcast media kit that updates daily with information you choose to include. The kit includes data you provide, podcast statistics and audience survey results.” Data points that can be included in the kit range from simple unchanging data points like website or show start date to granular things like social media follower counts, average monthly downloads per episode, and Blubrry audience survey results.  While not technically a media kit, this is a great step forward in helping arm podcasters with useful information they can give advertisers interested in evaluating their show. While lacking in the usual collection of logos and information ephemera a true media kit designed to be attractive to press, this sort of media kit 2.0 cuts down on a fair amount of repeat labor. To The Download's knowledge this is the first time a hosting company has automated this process and included actual download statistics in the package. Usually the process is a tedious manual one that requires regular updates by either the show runner or their representation to pull each data point.  Kudos to Blubrry for being the first to market with this dreamed-of feature.  Once again we bring news of a social media platform showing interest in podcast integration, but this time it feels more legitimate. Frontend engineer and code researcher Jane Manchun Wong did some digging. In her to-the-point tweet she announced:  “Twitter is working on in-app Podcast player.”  Attached to the tweet is a screen recording of the new player in action, showing Wong clicking on show art for Office Ladies, which prompts a new podcast player overlay.  For the younger folk in the room, it's worth noting that Twitter didn't spring forth fully formed into the world. In its primordial form the service was originally Odeo, a 2005 attempt at what we'd call a podcast social media network today. Podcasting is literally in Twitter's DNA.  This Monday Podnews shared an announcement from TargetSpot concerning a promising step towards diversifying podcasting further. The adtech company is opening a Latin American-focused office in Miami, Florida under the leadership of Angelica Potes. Chief Revenue Officer Alexandre Ouhadi said: “We are glad to finally be physically present in the Latin American Market. We have created amazing partnerships with big name publishers. This is the right moment to officially go live. Audio is growing rapidly, so it's a great opportunity for advertisers to leverage their digital media budget through this engaging medium.”  Diversity in language, ethnicity, and geographical location is how the podcast industry expands. Hispanic/Latino creators are incredibly well represented in podcasting in comparison to the overall US population. Providing revenue opportunities for those audiences provides the ability for new businesses to be built to capture that revenue. This is good growth for the industry. On Tuesday Marco Arment, creator of podcatcher Overcast, took to Twitter to address a trend in negative reviews for his app. In four screenshots provided four different anonymous users cite an abundance of jarring advertisements. Some complain about the amount and quantity of ads, one claims the ads were so poorly-optimized the volume shift was enough to burst their eardrum.  While the last review's threat of legal action might be hyperbolic, Arment is still concerned.  “Cheap, sloppy dynamic ad insertion (DAI) in podcasts continues to degrade the experience for listeners. They blame the app, and that's my problem to deal with.”  He goes on to ask podcasters who poorly implement DAI “what are you doing” in all capital letters.  Sounds Profitable's Bryan Barletta took issue with this in a quote-tweet of Arment, citing issues like frequency capping, comp separation, and other features related to poor-quality ad placement:  “...are not tech issues, they're business decisions. Your host doesn't offer it? Switch hosts. And don't buy inventory that doesn't support your needs.”  Sloppy implementation of DAI is a recipe for disaster, and there's plenty of evidence of podcasters falling for that trap. Too often that sloppiness is built in under the guise of 'automation', which often leads to odd ad breaks added by the hosting company filled with even odder ads. So what's the solution? Bad ads—ads that don't fit the context of the episode, ads that are recorded at wildly different volumes than the rest of the episode, or an overabundance of ads in an episode—are predominant in dynamically inserted programmatic ads as well as baked-in host-read ads. And solid DAI implementation can power highly relevant host-read ads that sound like they belong in the episode. In the end, it comes to having an ad strategy as well as tactics that are acceptable to the podcaster, the advertiser, and the audience as well. And it'll make it less likely for listeners to blame their listening app for something that's not their problem. We got you, Marco. On Tuesday Anchor co-founder Michael Mignano posted a Medium blog titled “The Standards Innovation Paradox.” In it, he proposes the theory that standards like RSS were useful in helping podcasting grow in the beginning, but have become restrictive over time as services all adapt the same standards and any new additions come with all previous updates as well.  “If you've ever searched the App Store or the Google Play store for a podcast app, you've likely come across a tidal wave of search results. In some ways, this fragmentation is great for users, because it means they have a ton of choice and flexibility in what product to use for their podcast listening. But at the same time, this fragmentation is bad for innovation, and makes it nearly impossible to innovate on experiences that are based on RSS, meaning the podcast listening experience has remained stale and largely unchanged for almost the entirety of podcasting.” On Wednesday James Cridland published a rebuttal in the form of “The Standards Innovation Paradox: is it real?” The piece takes Mignano's to task and seeks to add outside context to his thought process, namely the fact Mignano worked at Spotify after they bought out Anchor. During that tenure the company threw itself into reinventing podcasting without RSS, instead using the proprietary method that follows Mignano's proposal that proprietary tech is required due to the difficulty of forcing a standard to evolve.  “Yet, Spotify absolutely could evolve the standard: because by April 2022, they were big enough, with at least 30% market share, to have set the standard themselves. They could have said “here's how to signal the video asset in your RSS feed, and if you do this, you'll get video podcasts in Spotify too.” They could have looked at the currently existing solution to this, the podcast namespace's alternateEnclosure tag, and adopted that (and, possibly, molded it to their needs). But, they didn't.” Cridland goes on to point out decisions to stick with black box proprietary tech conveniently also mean any user who wishes to take advantage of that new tech is permanently locked into using Anchor as a hosting service.  The risk of an open ecosystem is the ability for aggregators to control and separate the industry. For all the dour news about a lack of profits, Spotify is currently succeeding at this to some degree. RSS is capable of doing everything Mignano's piece takes issue with; issues he has historically complained about even prior to the buyout.  Innovation is stifled not by standards, but by people and businesses with the necessary power to adopt new standards instead choosing to whine about having to share space and leverage that to release new impenetrable black boxes.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're tentatively calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's Quick Hits are  Spotify acquires music trivia game Heardle by Ariel Shapiro. Podcasting: True or False? By Fred Jacobs.  As usual, links to everything mentioned can be found in the episode notes.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
Blubrry Brings A New Spin To Media Kits & 6 more stories for July 14, 2022

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 11:26


This week on The Download: Blubrry brings a new spin to media kits, Twitter's building a podcast player, TargetSpot expands into Latin American audiences, Overcast's creator has beef with how podcasters use DAI, and Anchor's co-founder finds RSS standards restrictive to innovation.  While a significant portion of the United States was recovering from an excessive amount of explosive devices used over the holiday weekend, Blubrry announced a new way for podcasters to present themselves to potential sponsors and partners.  “Blubrry is introducing a podcasting industry first by providing all Blubrry paid customers a podcast media kit that updates daily with information you choose to include. The kit includes data you provide, podcast statistics and audience survey results.” Data points that can be included in the kit range from simple unchanging data points like website or show start date to granular things like social media follower counts, average monthly downloads per episode, and Blubrry audience survey results.  While not technically a media kit, this is a great step forward in helping arm podcasters with useful information they can give advertisers interested in evaluating their show. While lacking in the usual collection of logos and information ephemera a true media kit designed to be attractive to press, this sort of media kit 2.0 cuts down on a fair amount of repeat labor. To The Download's knowledge this is the first time a hosting company has automated this process and included actual download statistics in the package. Usually the process is a tedious manual one that requires regular updates by either the show runner or their representation to pull each data point.  Kudos to Blubrry for being the first to market with this dreamed-of feature.  Once again we bring news of a social media platform showing interest in podcast integration, but this time it feels more legitimate. Frontend engineer and code researcher Jane Manchun Wong did some digging. In her to-the-point tweet she announced:  “Twitter is working on in-app Podcast player.”  Attached to the tweet is a screen recording of the new player in action, showing Wong clicking on show art for Office Ladies, which prompts a new podcast player overlay.  For the younger folk in the room, it's worth noting that Twitter didn't spring forth fully formed into the world. In its primordial form the service was originally Odeo, a 2005 attempt at what we'd call a podcast social media network today. Podcasting is literally in Twitter's DNA.  This Monday Podnews shared an announcement from TargetSpot concerning a promising step towards diversifying podcasting further. The adtech company is opening a Latin American-focused office in Miami, Florida under the leadership of Angelica Potes. Chief Revenue Officer Alexandre Ouhadi said: “We are glad to finally be physically present in the Latin American Market. We have created amazing partnerships with big name publishers. This is the right moment to officially go live. Audio is growing rapidly, so it's a great opportunity for advertisers to leverage their digital media budget through this engaging medium.”  Diversity in language, ethnicity, and geographical location is how the podcast industry expands. Hispanic/Latino creators are incredibly well represented in podcasting in comparison to the overall US population. Providing revenue opportunities for those audiences provides the ability for new businesses to be built to capture that revenue. This is good growth for the industry. On Tuesday Marco Arment, creator of podcatcher Overcast, took to Twitter to address a trend in negative reviews for his app. In four screenshots provided four different anonymous users cite an abundance of jarring advertisements. Some complain about the amount and quantity of ads, one claims the ads were so poorly-optimized the volume shift was enough to burst their eardrum.  While the last review's threat of legal action might be hyperbolic, Arment is still concerned.  “Cheap, sloppy dynamic ad insertion (DAI) in podcasts continues to degrade the experience for listeners. They blame the app, and that's my problem to deal with.”  He goes on to ask podcasters who poorly implement DAI “what are you doing” in all capital letters.  Sounds Profitable's Bryan Barletta took issue with this in a quote-tweet of Arment, citing issues like frequency capping, comp separation, and other features related to poor-quality ad placement:  “...are not tech issues, they're business decisions. Your host doesn't offer it? Switch hosts. And don't buy inventory that doesn't support your needs.”  Sloppy implementation of DAI is a recipe for disaster, and there's plenty of evidence of podcasters falling for that trap. Too often that sloppiness is built in under the guise of 'automation', which often leads to odd ad breaks added by the hosting company filled with even odder ads. So what's the solution? Bad ads—ads that don't fit the context of the episode, ads that are recorded at wildly different volumes than the rest of the episode, or an overabundance of ads in an episode—are predominant in dynamically inserted programmatic ads as well as baked-in host-read ads. And solid DAI implementation can power highly relevant host-read ads that sound like they belong in the episode. In the end, it comes to having an ad strategy as well as tactics that are acceptable to the podcaster, the advertiser, and the audience as well. And it'll make it less likely for listeners to blame their listening app for something that's not their problem. We got you, Marco. On Tuesday Anchor co-founder Michael Mignano posted a Medium blog titled “The Standards Innovation Paradox.” In it, he proposes the theory that standards like RSS were useful in helping podcasting grow in the beginning, but have become restrictive over time as services all adapt the same standards and any new additions come with all previous updates as well.  “If you've ever searched the App Store or the Google Play store for a podcast app, you've likely come across a tidal wave of search results. In some ways, this fragmentation is great for users, because it means they have a ton of choice and flexibility in what product to use for their podcast listening. But at the same time, this fragmentation is bad for innovation, and makes it nearly impossible to innovate on experiences that are based on RSS, meaning the podcast listening experience has remained stale and largely unchanged for almost the entirety of podcasting.” On Wednesday James Cridland published a rebuttal in the form of “The Standards Innovation Paradox: is it real?” The piece takes Mignano's to task and seeks to add outside context to his thought process, namely the fact Mignano worked at Spotify after they bought out Anchor. During that tenure the company threw itself into reinventing podcasting without RSS, instead using the proprietary method that follows Mignano's proposal that proprietary tech is required due to the difficulty of forcing a standard to evolve.  “Yet, Spotify absolutely could evolve the standard: because by April 2022, they were big enough, with at least 30% market share, to have set the standard themselves. They could have said “here's how to signal the video asset in your RSS feed, and if you do this, you'll get video podcasts in Spotify too.” They could have looked at the currently existing solution to this, the podcast namespace's alternateEnclosure tag, and adopted that (and, possibly, molded it to their needs). But, they didn't.” Cridland goes on to point out decisions to stick with black box proprietary tech conveniently also mean any user who wishes to take advantage of that new tech is permanently locked into using Anchor as a hosting service.  The risk of an open ecosystem is the ability for aggregators to control and separate the industry. For all the dour news about a lack of profits, Spotify is currently succeeding at this to some degree. RSS is capable of doing everything Mignano's piece takes issue with; issues he has historically complained about even prior to the buyout.  Innovation is stifled not by standards, but by people and businesses with the necessary power to adopt new standards instead choosing to whine about having to share space and leverage that to release new impenetrable black boxes.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're tentatively calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week's Quick Hits are  Spotify acquires music trivia game Heardle by Ariel Shapiro. Podcasting: True or False? By Fred Jacobs.  As usual, links to everything mentioned can be found in the episode notes.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pixel Sift
How Xalavier Nelson Jr realised WITCH STRANDINGS was the next "strand-type" game

Pixel Sift

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 32:44


WITCH STRANDINGS is a mouse controlled "strand-type" game, where you make connections and paths across a cursed world. Even though Hideo Kojima wanted to turn DEATH STRANDING into a genre, it was Xalavier Nelson Jr and the team at Strange Scaffold who did it first   Learn more about this open world adventure through a forest, how the game runs WOLFENSTEIN 3D every single frame, and the hope that can be found in connections   SIFTER is produced by Nicholas Kennedy, Kyle Pauletto, Fiona Bartholomaeus, Daniel Ang & Adam Christou. Mitch Loh is Senior Producer and Gianni Di Giovanni is our Executive Producer. Thanks to Omny Studio for their support of SIFTER. Join the SIFTER Discord to be part of the conversation Support SIFTER's independent gaming journalism by buying us a coffee on KoFi or some merch on the SIFTER STORESupport the show: https://sifter.storeSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I Hear Things
Edison Research Says Podcasting Is More Succession Than Yellowstone & 8 more stories for July 7, 2022

I Hear Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 11:22


This week on The Download: Edison Research says podcasting is more Succession than Yellowstone, Reddit launches new take on live podcasting, Google's Adtech is dropping IP, new data says podcast ads are overfishing popular ponds, and we spotlight #PodcastingSeriously.   Last Friday the Edison Research blog posted “Podcasting's Opportunity in Wide Open Spaces.” In addition to reminding readers of The Chicks' 1998 single from their fourth studio album, the post highlights a regional gulf in what counts as “popular” in podcasting.  The comparison used highlights how Succession and Yellowstone are comparably popular television series, but based on one's physical location in the country it's highly likely they won't see much advertisement or social media chatter for one over the other. More rural TV viewers will more likely to hear about and actively watch Yellowstone while Succession finds more attention in metro centers.  “New data from Edison Research's Infinite Dial study – sponsored by Wondery and Art19 – shows that as of today podcasting is more of a “Succession” story.” Consider this a tease from Edison Senior Director of Research (and, of course, my co-host on La Descarga) Gabriel Soto's talk at Podcast Movement Dallas this August.  “We in the podcasting space regularly remark that with four million titles, there's a podcast for everyone.  And while that's surely right in theory, that doesn't mean that enough of a match has yet happened to bring all the possible listeners to the space.  One might argue that indeed there are a lot more podcasts talking about Succession than Yellowstone, and that might be part of the issue.”   A lot of people got a three-day weekend in the US thanks to a national holiday, but this Monday Arielle Nissenblatt was on the podcasting streets breaking social audio news. In a Twitter thread Nissenblatt detailed the launch of social media platform Reddit's new Talk feature that shares some DNA with the social audio craze. The twist with Reddit Talk is those who use it get placement over any relevant subreddits that fit under a broad chosen topic.  “If you host a Talk from your Reddit profile and pick up to 3 topics, you'll appear at the top of Reddit to millions of users. e.g., if you pick "Finance" topic, everyone who follows r/wallstreetbets, r/personalfinance, etc will see your Talk.”  Currently, Talk is only available to those chosen by Reddit via an application form. Niche content gets niche listeners, and Reddit is the king of niche. While we've been burned as an industry before on social platforms diving into podcasting, this measured approach seems like a promising one.  Google has updated Universal Analytics and things aren't going so hot. On Tuesday Ad Exchanger's James Hercher posted “Marketers Have One Year to Migrate to the New Google Analytics - But It's Already a Mess.”  “When Google announced the expiration date on Universal Analytics earlier this year, it said it would also cease logging or storing IP address data – a crucial datapoint that qualifies as personally identifiable and thereby subjects Google Analytics to tough interpretations of GDPR. Removing IP addresses may not be enough for Google Analytics to stem the tide of GDPR suits. But privacy concerns do explain why Google will force a change across its customer base, rather than continue to offer multiple services.” While Google impression tracking pixels do work in podcasting, Google refuses to accept IP and any other client info forwarded to it, so attribution from Google was unlikely in podcasting. With IP going away on the website side, it's safe to say there will be no Google solution for podcast attribution as we know it today. However, the move by big companies like Google and Apple away from IP addresses will always be concerning for podcasting. There's evidence to suggest IP address tracking won't be outright removed from the industry, but it still will decline to the point one should expect methods of attribution to undergo a metamorphosis within the next 12 to 18 months.  This Tuesday Pierre Bouvard of Westwood One published findings that might seem easy to predict, but are important to acknowledge regardless. It seems some of the biggest spenders are potentially overfishing the pond that is podcasting.  “The number of times podcast listeners hear an ad campaign is soaring. According to Podsights, the leading podcast attribution measurement firm, average podcast ad frequency has doubled in the past year, reducing podcast conversions. In Q1 2022, the average podcast campaign ad frequency measured by Podsights was 6.32, a twofold increase from Q1 2021 [when it was] (2.97).“ Bouvard reports the Podsights data indicates this uptick in ad frequency is leading to knock-on effects, such as site visits driven by podcast ads hitting a record low in Q1 of this year. Luckily, it's not all bad news as he brings three solid strategies to encourage podcast reach growth. A consistent theme across all three is elegant in its simplicity: buy ads on podcasts beyond the same few dozen podcasts everyone is buying ad space on.  Frequency is no substitute for reach, and there are many podcasts waiting in the wings to run ads. Spreading those ads around instead of targeting the already-saturated big names in the market will quickly lead to results.  Now, if you'll indulge us in a little promotion, we'd like to take a moment to highlight Podcasting, Seriously from LWC Studios, shining the light on a forward-thinking company that continues to nurture the talent we need to make and keep a thriving podcast industry. This week, LWC Studios announced the expansion of its Podcasting, Seriously Awards Fund to include reimbursements for audio production education and training for BIPOC and LGBTQ+ independent audio creators. The company launched the Fund in early 2021 with partners AIR, Pacific Content, Acast, Triton Digital, and Sounds Profitable to “support independent BIPOC, Queer and Trans audio producers in submitting high-quality work to media and journalism awards.” More money going to diversifying podcasting is always a good thing, and Sounds Profitable is here for it. Our very own Bryan Barletta is on the Podcasting, Seriously advisory board and I'm on the fund team. You can learn more about the fund and apply, as with all stories covered on The Download, via the link provided in the description. In this penultimate segment I bring you a double-stuffed story. Two international editions of the Infinite Dial have been published by Edison Research: Canada and Australia.  There's plenty to learn in both but here's some standout observations from the Canada presentation:  “Forty-three percent of Canadians 18+ listen to podcasts monthly, up five percentage points from 2021, which means that Canadians now outpace Americans (38%) and Australians (40%) for monthly podcast listening.” In addition to that, 73% of Canadians listen to online audio. Spotify currently dominates that space with 40% of the audience, but YouTube is experiencing growth in the space and has caught up with 33% reporting listening to audio on YouTube in the past month. It seems Google's moves on the market are working. Eagle-eared listeners will recall The Download on March 11th covering a story in which YouTube made a paid audio-friendly feature free for all Canadian users.  Meanwhile in Australia, monthly podcast listening for people 18 and up continues to trend up, increasing to 40% from 37% last year.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles that didn't make it into today's episode, but are still worth working into your weekend reading.  First: Spotify, Netflix and Aggregation by Stratechery.  Also: Universal Music Makes Its Data-Driven Ad Platform Play by James Hercher. Finally: Mediatel's UK-focused podcast database Audioscape has launched. Usually we only recommend articles but there's not an abundance of IMDB-style podcast databases and it's good to keep abreast of newcomers.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Evo Terra edited today's episode. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Download from Sounds Profitable
Edison Research Says Podcasting Is More Succession Than Yellowstone & 8 more stories for July 7, 2022

The Download from Sounds Profitable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 11:21


This week on The Download: Edison Research says podcasting is more Succession than Yellowstone, Reddit launches new take on live podcasting, Google's Adtech is dropping IP, new data says podcast ads are overfishing popular ponds, and we spotlight #PodcastingSeriously.  Last Friday the Edison Research blog posted “Podcasting's Opportunity in Wide Open Spaces.” In addition to reminding readers of The Chicks' 1998 single from their fourth studio album, the post highlights a regional gulf in what counts as “popular” in podcasting.  The comparison used highlights how Succession and Yellowstone are comparably popular television series, but based on one's physical location in the country it's highly likely they won't see much advertisement or social media chatter for one over the other. More rural TV viewers will more likely to hear about and actively watch Yellowstone while Succession finds more attention in metro centers.  “New data from Edison Research's Infinite Dial study – sponsored by Wondery and Art19 – shows that as of today podcasting is more of a “Succession” story.” Consider this a tease from Edison Senior Director of Research (and, of course, my co-host on La Descarga) Gabriel Soto's talk at Podcast Movement Dallas this August.  “We in the podcasting space regularly remark that with four million titles, there's a podcast for everyone.  And while that's surely right in theory, that doesn't mean that enough of a match has yet happened to bring all the possible listeners to the space.  One might argue that indeed there are a lot more podcasts talking about Succession than Yellowstone, and that might be part of the issue.”  A lot of people got a three-day weekend in the US thanks to a national holiday, but this Monday Arielle Nissenblatt was on the podcasting streets breaking social audio news. In a Twitter thread Nissenblatt detailed the launch of social media platform Reddit's new Talk feature that shares some DNA with the social audio craze. The twist with Reddit Talk is those who use it get placement over any relevant subreddits that fit under a broad chosen topic.  “If you host a Talk from your Reddit profile and pick up to 3 topics, you'll appear at the top of Reddit to millions of users. e.g., if you pick "Finance" topic, everyone who follows r/wallstreetbets, r/personalfinance, etc will see your Talk.”  Currently, Talk is only available to those chosen by Reddit via an application form. Niche content gets niche listeners, and Reddit is the king of niche. While we've been burned as an industry before on social platforms diving into podcasting, this measured approach seems like a promising one.  Google has updated Universal Analytics and things aren't going so hot. On Tuesday Ad Exchanger's James Hercher posted “Marketers Have One Year to Migrate to the New Google Analytics - But It's Already a Mess.”  “When Google announced the expiration date on Universal Analytics earlier this year, it said it would also cease logging or storing IP address data – a crucial datapoint that qualifies as personally identifiable and thereby subjects Google Analytics to tough interpretations of GDPR. Removing IP addresses may not be enough for Google Analytics to stem the tide of GDPR suits. But privacy concerns do explain why Google will force a change across its customer base, rather than continue to offer multiple services.” While Google impression tracking pixels do work in podcasting, Google refuses to accept IP and any other client info forwarded to it, so attribution from Google was unlikely in podcasting. With IP going away on the website side, it's safe to say there will be no Google solution for podcast attribution as we know it today. However, the move by big companies like Google and Apple away from IP addresses will always be concerning for podcasting. There's evidence to suggest IP address tracking won't be outright removed from the industry, but it still will decline to the point one should expect methods of attribution to undergo a metamorphosis within the next 12 to 18 months.  This Tuesday Pierre Bouvard of Westwood One published findings that might seem easy to predict, but are important to acknowledge regardless. It seems some of the biggest spenders are potentially overfishing the pond that is podcasting.  “The number of times podcast listeners hear an ad campaign is soaring. According to Podsights, the leading podcast attribution measurement firm, average podcast ad frequency has doubled in the past year, reducing podcast conversions. In Q1 2022, the average podcast campaign ad frequency measured by Podsights was 6.32, a twofold increase from Q1 2021 [when it was] (2.97).“ Bouvard reports the Podsights data indicates this uptick in ad frequency is leading to knock-on effects, such as site visits driven by podcast ads hitting a record low in Q1 of this year. Luckily, it's not all bad news as he brings three solid strategies to encourage podcast reach growth. A consistent theme across all three is elegant in its simplicity: buy ads on podcasts beyond the same few dozen podcasts everyone is buying ad space on.  Frequency is no substitute for reach, and there are many podcasts waiting in the wings to run ads. Spreading those ads around instead of targeting the already-saturated big names in the market will quickly lead to results.  Now, if you'll indulge us in a little promotion, we'd like to take a moment to highlight Podcasting, Seriously from LWC Studios, shining the light on a forward-thinking company that continues to nurture the talent we need to make and keep a thriving podcast industry. This week, LWC Studios announced the expansion of its Podcasting, Seriously Awards Fund to include reimbursements for audio production education and training for BIPOC and LGBTQ+ independent audio creators. The company launched the Fund in early 2021 with partners AIR, Pacific Content, Acast, Triton Digital, and Sounds Profitable to “support independent BIPOC, Queer and Trans audio producers in submitting high-quality work to media and journalism awards.” More money going to diversifying podcasting is always a good thing, and Sounds Profitable is here for it. Our very own Bryan Barletta is on the Podcasting, Seriously advisory board and I'm on the fund team. You can learn more about the fund and apply, as with all stories covered on The Download, via the link provided in the description. In this penultimate segment I bring you a double-stuffed story. Two international editions of the Infinite Dial have been published by Edison Research: Canada and Australia.  There's plenty to learn in both but here's some standout observations from the Canada presentation:  “Forty-three percent of Canadians 18+ listen to podcasts monthly, up five percentage points from 2021, which means that Canadians now outpace Americans (38%) and Australians (40%) for monthly podcast listening.” In addition to that, 73% of Canadians listen to online audio. Spotify currently dominates that space with 40% of the audience, but YouTube is experiencing growth in the space and has caught up with 33% reporting listening to audio on YouTube in the past month. It seems Google's moves on the market are working. Eagle-eared listeners will recall The Download on March 11th covering a story in which YouTube made a paid audio-friendly feature free for all Canadian users.  Meanwhile in Australia, monthly podcast listening for people 18 and up continues to trend up, increasing to 40% from 37% last year.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles that didn't make it into today's episode, but are still worth working into your weekend reading.  First: Spotify, Netflix and Aggregation by Stratechery.  Also: Universal Music Makes Its Data-Driven Ad Platform Play by James Hercher. Finally: Mediatel's UK-focused podcast database Audioscape has launched. Usually we only recommend articles but there's not an abundance of IMDB-style podcast databases and it's good to keep abreast of newcomers.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Evo Terra edited today's episode. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
Edison Research Says Podcasting Is More Succession Than Yellowstone & 8 more stories for July 7, 2022

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 11:22


This week on The Download: Edison Research says podcasting is more Succession than Yellowstone, Reddit launches new take on live podcasting, Google's Adtech is dropping IP, new data says podcast ads are overfishing popular ponds, and we spotlight #PodcastingSeriously.   Last Friday the Edison Research blog posted “Podcasting's Opportunity in Wide Open Spaces.” In addition to reminding readers of The Chicks' 1998 single from their fourth studio album, the post highlights a regional gulf in what counts as “popular” in podcasting.  The comparison used highlights how Succession and Yellowstone are comparably popular television series, but based on one's physical location in the country it's highly likely they won't see much advertisement or social media chatter for one over the other. More rural TV viewers will more likely to hear about and actively watch Yellowstone while Succession finds more attention in metro centers.  “New data from Edison Research's Infinite Dial study – sponsored by Wondery and Art19 – shows that as of today podcasting is more of a “Succession” story.” Consider this a tease from Edison Senior Director of Research (and, of course, my co-host on La Descarga) Gabriel Soto's talk at Podcast Movement Dallas this August.  “We in the podcasting space regularly remark that with four million titles, there's a podcast for everyone.  And while that's surely right in theory, that doesn't mean that enough of a match has yet happened to bring all the possible listeners to the space.  One might argue that indeed there are a lot more podcasts talking about Succession than Yellowstone, and that might be part of the issue.”   A lot of people got a three-day weekend in the US thanks to a national holiday, but this Monday Arielle Nissenblatt was on the podcasting streets breaking social audio news. In a Twitter thread Nissenblatt detailed the launch of social media platform Reddit's new Talk feature that shares some DNA with the social audio craze. The twist with Reddit Talk is those who use it get placement over any relevant subreddits that fit under a broad chosen topic.  “If you host a Talk from your Reddit profile and pick up to 3 topics, you'll appear at the top of Reddit to millions of users. e.g., if you pick "Finance" topic, everyone who follows r/wallstreetbets, r/personalfinance, etc will see your Talk.”  Currently, Talk is only available to those chosen by Reddit via an application form. Niche content gets niche listeners, and Reddit is the king of niche. While we've been burned as an industry before on social platforms diving into podcasting, this measured approach seems like a promising one.  Google has updated Universal Analytics and things aren't going so hot. On Tuesday Ad Exchanger's James Hercher posted “Marketers Have One Year to Migrate to the New Google Analytics - But It's Already a Mess.”  “When Google announced the expiration date on Universal Analytics earlier this year, it said it would also cease logging or storing IP address data – a crucial datapoint that qualifies as personally identifiable and thereby subjects Google Analytics to tough interpretations of GDPR. Removing IP addresses may not be enough for Google Analytics to stem the tide of GDPR suits. But privacy concerns do explain why Google will force a change across its customer base, rather than continue to offer multiple services.” While Google impression tracking pixels do work in podcasting, Google refuses to accept IP and any other client info forwarded to it, so attribution from Google was unlikely in podcasting. With IP going away on the website side, it's safe to say there will be no Google solution for podcast attribution as we know it today. However, the move by big companies like Google and Apple away from IP addresses will always be concerning for podcasting. There's evidence to suggest IP address tracking won't be outright removed from the industry, but it still will decline to the point one should expect methods of attribution to undergo a metamorphosis within the next 12 to 18 months.  This Tuesday Pierre Bouvard of Westwood One published findings that might seem easy to predict, but are important to acknowledge regardless. It seems some of the biggest spenders are potentially overfishing the pond that is podcasting.  “The number of times podcast listeners hear an ad campaign is soaring. According to Podsights, the leading podcast attribution measurement firm, average podcast ad frequency has doubled in the past year, reducing podcast conversions. In Q1 2022, the average podcast campaign ad frequency measured by Podsights was 6.32, a twofold increase from Q1 2021 [when it was] (2.97).“ Bouvard reports the Podsights data indicates this uptick in ad frequency is leading to knock-on effects, such as site visits driven by podcast ads hitting a record low in Q1 of this year. Luckily, it's not all bad news as he brings three solid strategies to encourage podcast reach growth. A consistent theme across all three is elegant in its simplicity: buy ads on podcasts beyond the same few dozen podcasts everyone is buying ad space on.  Frequency is no substitute for reach, and there are many podcasts waiting in the wings to run ads. Spreading those ads around instead of targeting the already-saturated big names in the market will quickly lead to results.  Now, if you'll indulge us in a little promotion, we'd like to take a moment to highlight Podcasting, Seriously from LWC Studios, shining the light on a forward-thinking company that continues to nurture the talent we need to make and keep a thriving podcast industry. This week, LWC Studios announced the expansion of its Podcasting, Seriously Awards Fund to include reimbursements for audio production education and training for BIPOC and LGBTQ+ independent audio creators. The company launched the Fund in early 2021 with partners AIR, Pacific Content, Acast, Triton Digital, and Sounds Profitable to “support independent BIPOC, Queer and Trans audio producers in submitting high-quality work to media and journalism awards.” More money going to diversifying podcasting is always a good thing, and Sounds Profitable is here for it. Our very own Bryan Barletta is on the Podcasting, Seriously advisory board and I'm on the fund team. You can learn more about the fund and apply, as with all stories covered on The Download, via the link provided in the description. In this penultimate segment I bring you a double-stuffed story. Two international editions of the Infinite Dial have been published by Edison Research: Canada and Australia.  There's plenty to learn in both but here's some standout observations from the Canada presentation:  “Forty-three percent of Canadians 18+ listen to podcasts monthly, up five percentage points from 2021, which means that Canadians now outpace Americans (38%) and Australians (40%) for monthly podcast listening.” In addition to that, 73% of Canadians listen to online audio. Spotify currently dominates that space with 40% of the audience, but YouTube is experiencing growth in the space and has caught up with 33% reporting listening to audio on YouTube in the past month. It seems Google's moves on the market are working. Eagle-eared listeners will recall The Download on March 11th covering a story in which YouTube made a paid audio-friendly feature free for all Canadian users.  Meanwhile in Australia, monthly podcast listening for people 18 and up continues to trend up, increasing to 40% from 37% last year.  Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles that didn't make it into today's episode, but are still worth working into your weekend reading.  First: Spotify, Netflix and Aggregation by Stratechery.  Also: Universal Music Makes Its Data-Driven Ad Platform Play by James Hercher. Finally: Mediatel's UK-focused podcast database Audioscape has launched. Usually we only recommend articles but there's not an abundance of IMDB-style podcast databases and it's good to keep abreast of newcomers.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Evo Terra are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable. Evo Terra edited today's episode. Special thanks to our media host, Omny Studio.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.