Podcasts about frankly

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Best podcasts about frankly

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Latest podcast episodes about frankly

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers
Carmelo Anthony Makes History, Anthony Davis Plays MVP Caliber Defense, and the Lakers Get Win #1

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 40:58


The 2021-22 season has been, to put it mildly, off to a rocky start for the Lakers. They went 0-fer the entire preseason, then dropped the opening pair of regular season games, the second a loss to the Phoenix Suns, featuring a variety of meltdowns over officiating and a timeout brouhaha between Anthony Davis and Dwight Howard. Frankly, the team really needed a win, and finally got one against the Memphis Grizzlies on Sunday, 121-118. It wasn't always pretty or textbook. Budding superstar guard Ja Morant (40 points, 10 assists) carved up the Lakers' defense. The ball still gets turned over way too often. Russell Westbrook remains very inefficient from the floor. And so on and so forth. However, there were also plenty of positives. Carmelo Anthony led the Lakers with 28 points off the bench, fueling a win that saw him pass Moses Malone to become number nine on the NBA's all-time scoring list. Anthony Davis played exceptional defense inside and along the perimeter. Russell Westbrook (who notched 13 assists, albeit against nine turnovers) and LeBron James displayed some periodic flash working in tandem. And the team looked on balance its best over three games, by a significant margin. To be certain, a lot of work remains ahead of the Lakers. Like... a LOT. But everyone knew going into this season that even a successful campaign would be spent as a work in progress. That's just the deal for this particular roster. Thus, it's important to play well and improve, but sometimes you also gotta just take the W and gratefully keep it moving. And on Sunday, the Lakers ultimately did both. HOSTS: Andy and Brian Kamenetzky SEGMENT ONE: Reaction to the win, and what stood out most to the Kamenetzkys. SEGMENT TWO: What's starting to work for Westbrook, and what's still eluding him. SEGMENT THREE: Thoughts on Melo's historic night, and how enjoyable his presence on the Lakers has been. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Gottesdienst Crowd
[Gottesblog] A Tale of Two Magazines — Larry Beane

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 9:17


A Tale of Two Magazines When I was in seminary (twenty years ago), we had a nickname for the Lutheran Witness. We called it the Witless. Frankly, it was not much of a witness and it was barely Lutheran. But then, something incredible happened. It got good. It may have been when Adrienne Heins took over. There were a series of editors who seemed to have a vision of making the magazine, well, a witness, and also Lutheran. Genuinely Lutheran. Authentically Lutheran. Intentionally Lutheran. Confessional, liturgical, Gnesio, and unapologetically Lutheran. Imagine that! It was also aesthetically pleasing. Not long thereafter, the souls from Dante's concentric circles (okay, not really, that is just literary license) began to weep and gnash their teeth. There were too many C's in the new and vastly improved Lutheran Witness, including, but not limited to the following “Seven C's” (with apologies to Ken Ham): Clergy Collars Chasubles Crucifixes Chalices Confessions Church Where are the pastors in ties and khakis and hipster tee shirts and silly hats? And why are there so many pastors anyway? Where are the feelgood fluff pieces? Where are the kinds of images that would appeal to non-Lutherans and progressives and opponents of the liturgy? And what's with all of this Book of Concord stuff? But weep no more, bronzies, boomers, church-growthers, imbibers of soy, and in the words of the late Reverend Professor Kurt Marquart: “little old ladies of both sexes.” For CPH has discontinued sending a free copy or two of LW to your congregation, but has started sending free bulk subscriptions of a new publication called Lutheran Life! That's Life not Lite. Gone are the pesky C's. Now we have articles and a color palette to appeal to women and older folks. Not that there's anything wrong with that. But the magazine title might be more descriptive if it were called Lutheran Lady or Boomer Lutheran. In both issues that I have looked at, the articles written by pastors feature their portraits without clericals. There isn't a single image of a crucifix, or the inside of a church, for that matter. The first issue had one brief quote from the Small Catechism - other than that, the confessions are just not there. The entire magazine seems to be a running self-serving ad campaign for various and sundry CPH books. The piece that really caught my eye was in the latest issue (221) called “The Virtual Church.” And if you look closely, it's not even an article. It says “advertisement” in the fine print. It's a slick ad masquerading as an article by a company called Vanco. Vanco is a company that benefits from “virtual church” by providing a means of making electronic payments. They are not an RSO. They have no loyalty to our Lutheran confession. But I don't believe in “virtual church.” My congregation did not have it, doesn't have it, and doesn't plan on having it. We do real church. Would you like God to virtually love you or really love you? Do you want the Lord to be virtually present, or really present. Do you want your spouse to be virtually faithful, or really faithful? Of course, the article sings the praises of “virtual” church and repeatedly orders us to “follow local laws.” They are promoting “church apps” - which, Vanco just so happens to provide. The article tells us to disinfect stuff and wear masks. Once again, the corporate suits are clueless. We pastors have been on the front lines of all of this nonsense since day one. Moreover, different states have different situations. Do these knuckleheads really think they're being helpful? And who at CPH thought this was something we need to read? Did this “article,” (read advertisement) - and does this magazine itself - go through doctrinal review? The person I spoke with at CPH didn't know. I played phone tag with a manager there and just gave up. Ultimately, it doesn't seem to matter. And what's with the stock photo of fake soldiers on page 18? No insignia, name-tapes, or any identifying mark. These are models wearing costumes. We have authentic, you know real (not virtual) military personnel in the LCMS. We have a chaplain corps. We could have authenticity. So why this fake picture? There are other criticisms I have as well, but I'll just stop now. Pastors, anything that gets put out for your church should pass the highest level of doctrinal review: the parochial level. You are the shepherd of your parish. You are the last gate of doctrinal review. I admit that I unthinkingly put the first issue out, being too trusting of the synod. I suspect I'm not the only one. The rest of these are going in the garbage. If CPH wants to be good stewards of their “free” magazine, they can take my congregation off the mailing list. Meanwhile, Lutheran Witness has vanished down the memory hole, no longer promoted by CPH (who now has its own competing magazine and incentive to hide LW under a bushel). And who is paying for this? They presumably can't eat the cost of sending a single LW to every parish, but they can print and mail bundles of 25 copies of this one? If CPH is footing the bill, maybe some of the salaries are too high. If advertisers are carrying the costs, doesn't the piper call the tune? Maybe they could work out better deals on shipping prices instead of sending us magazines that we don't want. I certainly never asked for this magazine. And while the church-growthers may excitedly promote Lutheran Life, the reality is that it is not what we need to grow the church. Even as our stale one-trick-pony Church Growth experts wend their way to the glue factory, they still keep pushing the same old tired line that the key to growing the church is to ditch the liturgy. Yawn. To use their own resource against them, a large demographic study identifies the crucial role played by fathers in the real, not virtual, growth of the church. The church needs her men to be men, to lead their families, to be their spiritual patriarchs, and to bring them to church. And so we need to start thinking about what appeals to men in the church. It's sure not pastel colors and touchy-feely articles about relationships. That has its place, but in church and society, anything and everything that could appeal to the masculine is being snuffed out. At least Lutheran Witness has a broader appeal to those who yearn for authenticity instead of just one more medium that is basically Oprah with a cross. I did find out that you can talk to your district office to get a price break on bulk orders of Lutheran Witness. It's not free, but it's not outrageously expensive either. And you can also order an affordable bulk subscription to Gottesdienst, as few as ten copies. Maybe the old saying is true: You get what you pay for.

Growth Amplifiers
Sharpen your Message & Make your Words Matter - Podcast

Growth Amplifiers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:50


Seeking more ways to Amplify Your Business? Take our free Amplified Assessment to see how your business stacks up and receive tips to improve your score at: https://growthamplifiers.com/amplified Joel Schwartzberg is a leadership communications coach whose clients include American Express, Blue Cross Blue Shield, State Farm Insurance, the Brennan Center for Justice, and Comedy Central. He is the senior director of strategic and executive communications for a major national nonprofit and previously held senior-level communication and editorial positions with Time Inc., PBS, and Nickelodeon. Schwartzberg's articles on effective communication have appeared in Fast Company, Harvard Business Review, and Toastmaster magazine, and he's a sought-after business and communications podcast guest and conference speaker. He is the author of Get to the Point! Sharpen Your Message and Make Your Words Matter, which Seth Godin calls “a manifesto for giving talks that make a difference,” and The Language of Leadership: How to Engage and Inspire Your Team (Berrett-Koehler Publishers; July 13, 2021), which Kevin Eikenberry says “will make your communication more purposeful, meaningful, and inspirational.” Learn more at joelschwartzberg.net. What You'll Learn: THE IDEA: If you're in a leadership role today, you surely didn't get there by accident. You have vision. You're confident. And you're ready to offer support and lightning-quick responses. But if you don't effectively communicate these qualities to your people, how will they know you embody them? Frankly, they won't. THE WHY: Despite leaders giving themselves gold stars in communication, only 13% of U.S. employees say their leaders communicate well, according to Gallup research. And that's a colossal problem: 93% of workers surveyed by the Brunswick Group report that “leadership that communicates directly and transparently” is what keeps them on the job, bested only by pay and the ability to move up. THE ACTION: You'll learn 3 simple words that quickly reveal if you're getting your point across Learn more at joelschwartzberg.net

Tough Girl Podcast
Jessie Stevens - Youth Climate Activist, outdoors enthusiast and founder of the movement People Pedal Power. Cycling 570 miles from Devon to Glasgow #ride2COP26

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:48


Jessie in her own words:   “It would be a lie to say that I have always been aware of the climate crisis, because I haven't. Frankly, that is the problem.   Whilst always enjoying spending time in nature whether that be up at our allotment or walking on the wilds of Dartmoor right on my doorstep, it was only a few years ago that I became aware of the dire straights our climate is in.   It was at this moment that like many youth activists, I began to realise that I really had no choice but to fight for it. This didn't mean that it necessarily was something I wanted to do, because most young people just want a care free experience as they grow and develop, and activism is certainly not these things. However, I felt a duty to do this, because the vast majority of adults around me and in society were choosing not to.   It was then that I decided to create People Pedal Power and cycle to COP26 both as a personal challenge and as a way to bring the many individuals concerned about the Climate Crisis together. As a way to highlight the power and joy that is created when people come together to create change.   I am a youth activist who cares deeply about the power of people to create change and this is exactly what I want People Pedal Power to do. The idea to start the movement came from my fears that more inaction would come from this upcoming COP. I knew that we didn't have time for this to occur, as this summit has to be the one where real change is created, if not by our leaders but by the power of individuals creating collective action. As can be seen from the youth climate movement across the world, individuals really do have the power to create change, and so I decided to harness this!   I also believe in the immense power that words and storytelling have in helping us as individual to learn, understand and ultimately engage in the climate crisis. I have been trying to do this for the past 2 years with my monthly newspaper columns and other writing projects which discuss the climate crisis from the youth perspective.”   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Who is Jessie Being interested in the environment  Being aware of the climate emergency  Wanting to make a difference  Being on a learning journey  Delaying with climate anxiety and climate grief Is the climate a concern for young people Why it's a split issue Wanting to find your tribe Growing up and being supported by her family Studying for A'Levels at 6th fort What does being a Youth Climate Activist mean How Jessie is driving change Being passionate about writing Hearing from the youth Growing up in the 2000s What is - People Pedal Power What is COP (Conference of the Parties) COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland  Adults putting profits before people. Wanting to get the youth voice into the political sphere.  Partnering with the Adventure Syndicate How the partnership is going to work Creating a cargo bike relay  Why it's not just shouting about what's wrong Why the moment is going to be joyful and highlighting the issues and the way forward How the movement has evolved Getting into cycling and loving the journey  The route and the logistics of cycling from Devon to Glasgow Making sure to factor in mental rest  Riding 570 miles and hoping the training has paid off Concerns about the journey and thinking about the impact of the weather Dealing with all of the unknowns about the challenge  How it's going to work once she's arrived in Glasgow  Working with Eco-Schools  Wanting to bring more of a youth perspective to the summit Tough Girl Podcast Extra episode coming on the 13th November to follow up with Jessie and her journey. What does Jessie want to happen over the next few weeks. Good luck to Jessie!   Social Media   People Pedal Power - Demanding Climate action and greener more accessible transport.   Website: httpspeoplepeddlepower.wordpress.com/   Instagram: @people_pedal_power     The Adventure Syndicate is a collective of extraordinary cyclists who happen to be women and who aim to challenge what others think they are capable of.   Website - theadventuresyndicate.com    Instagram: @adventuresynd  

The Business Journey Podcast
38. Avoiding Burn-out: Tips For Tackling Busy Season

The Business Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 18:03


Welcome back to another episode of the Business Journey Podcast. Today's episode is really important to me because it's something I did wrong my entire first year of business.  I learned quickly afterwards that I didn't want my business running on a trajectory that put me in a space of exhaustion and burnout. So, today I want to share some tips that are super practical to help you avoid burnout and tackle your busy season. These tips will help you feel in control, fresh, and ready to keep working! Before we jump into those tips, I want to remind you that I do have my FREE Mini Sessions class running right now. In this class, you'll learn how to elevate your client experience - without more stress for you, and improve your marketing strategies so that you can become fully booked. If you're ready for those tips (and more!), sign up http://www.Rebeccaricephotography.com/minis-class (here). Now, onto those tips! Learning to work from a place of rest.I learned this from Ashlyn Carter. She's a copywriter and she's always helped me believe that it is possible to work from a place of rest and not hustle. It seems like so many people in our industry are always pushing and "hustling". The truth is that you don't have to work from that pace to be successful. Sure, working from a place of rest might take you a little longer, but it will be more fulfilling in the end. My first year in business, I photographed over 100 families. By the time the fall ended, I was burnt out. I wanted to sleep for a whole week and I couldn't. Life kept going on around me. And I decided in that moment, I couldn't do that again. The tips I'm about to share will help you find this margin and breathing room, too. It's such an amazing feeling! Write out your processes ahead of time.Anything you do for your clients from the session, editing, or post-processing, write it out. I know you think you know it and you have it all in your head, but when you're in the middle of a busy season... something is going to be forgotten. And even if it's not, you're going to just feel crazy overwhelmed. So these written processes are what you come to lean on when the crazy hits. Our checklists help make sure every single client is given the same experience, no matter how busy we are. Our team uses http://www.trello.com (Trello) and if you're in Behind the Lens, we actually talk about our exact system and process for this software (plus you'll get a template for our workflows!). Know your capacity and stick with it.One thing that's important in avoiding burnout is to know your capacity and to stick with it. It's one thing to know you've reached capacity, but it's another entirely to actually stick to it and tell people "no". Just because there's white space or margin in your calendar and life doesn't mean you need to fill it with bookings. Being completely overwhelmed because you can't say "no" doesn't help anyone. It leads directly to burn out and if you're running at 120% all the time, you're never going to have time to recover. Frankly, it's not sustainable or healthy for you or your business. Automate and outsource what you can.I probably sound like a broken record because we talk about outsourcing and automation a lot, but I truly believe and am passionate about both! Look through your client experience and see what you can automate in your CRM (like Dubsado). After you've done that, determine what you can outsource to someone else. I know it can be hard to let go of your editing or writing, but if it saves you time and someone can do it just as well - if not better - than you, why wouldn't you let them help? You can read about my experience with outsourcing my editing https://rebeccaricephoto.com/2021/08/09/a-conversation-with-my-private-editor-for-photographers/ (HERE). Plan your rest.I don't know about you, but if I don't write something down or put it on my calendar, it won't happen. So literally, plan your rest in. Block off certain days or weeks that you

Spiritual Underground Podcast
Episode 224 - Radhikesh Das - Vedic Astrology

Spiritual Underground Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 130:33


Dr. Radhikesh and I had a great conversation concerning traditional healing, and it's not traditional in the way you are probably thinking, traditional as Ayurvedic doctors and astrologers have been a tradition in his family for generations. Frankly what we are talking about is far from the tradition it should be, instead of pills, perhaps we should be employing more of this type of treatment. I know from my own experience that yoga is far more then exercise, it has powerful therapeutic value. I think you'll enjoy our conversation and I'll report back after my own birth chart reading! Thank you for allowing me to participate in my recovery in this manner today! More about Dr. Radhikesh: Dr. Radhikesh is an initiated disciple of HH Radhanath Swami. He completed his Doctorate of Medicine from Wright State University with a residency in Internal Medicine which he practiced for 20 years. For many generations, his family has been Ayurvedic doctors and astrologers. In 2012, he also began an extensive study of Vedic Astrology. This study enlivened his passion to care for and connect with people on a deeper level. His recent journey has led him to explore the Healy, which is a Microcurrent Frequency Therapy that harmonizes the Bioenergetic Field. This incredible innovation has allowed him to explore healing at a much more subtle and subconscious level. Through ancient wisdom and modern science, Dr. Radhikesh offers innovative insights to support individuals in their growth and healing on physical, mental, and emotional levels. With his knowledge of Bhakti Yoga, Vedic Astrology, and Medicine, he is assisting people in their journey to health and prosperity as a Life Coach through Astrology and as a consultant for bioenergetic healing. Email - yourdestiny108@gmail.com Website - https://radhikeshdas.com https://www.facebook.com/radikesh.das https://www.instagram.com/radhikesh_das --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dan-reeves8/support

Welcome to the World of Pokémon

Hello there! Welcome to Professor Jacob's sixty-fourth lesson on Pokémon biology. Today, we are learning about Kadabra: the Psi Pokémon and evolved form of Abra. Ever seen a Kadabra and had your head start hurting? Well, that's because this psychic type Pokémon emits headache-inducing alpha waves. These same waves also cause machinery to go crazy. Is your clock spinning out of control? That's a Kadabra... or a broken clock. Is the toaster catching fire? Probably a Kadabra... or you overcooked your toast. Either way, Kadabra make for absolutely terrible IT support. Kadabra is also rumored to have originally formed from a "transformed child with psychic abilities." Frankly, that's just asinine - probably the most outlandish Pokédex entry we've seen yet. And it's grounded in no scientific research at all. Who allowed this nonsense to be documented!? But there are more actual facts to learn about Kadabra, so take detailed notes! Welcome to the World of Pokémon is part of the Poke Casters Network.

TALKING FUSSBALL PODCAST
Talking Fussball Extra Deep Dive - The slow, steady (and frankly charming) rise of SC Freiburg w/ Analytics FC's Jon Mackenzie

TALKING FUSSBALL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:42


An episode where we ponder a few questions with one of football media's great ponderers. What's driven little SC Freiburg to the top four this season? Will the club start thinking bigger now that they've moved into a brnd new stadium? What makes the club so preternaturally steady? Matt and Jon Mackenzie mull over these questions and more, as well as get to the bottom of what make Jon fall so hard for the club and the city. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Axelbank Reports History and Today
#61: Michael Bender - "Frankly, We Did Win This Election"

Axelbank Reports History and Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:28


The President of the United States had been preparing for the moment for months, to claim he had won an election he actually lost. Early in the morning of November 4th, Donald Trump took to the TV cameras at the White House and said that despite early projections that Joe Biden had a chance to pull ahead in key states, he had indeed won reelection. With the now-famous phrase, "Frankly, we did win this election," Trump became the first president in history to claim that votes cast and the count itself was wrong. As soon as Wall Street Journal White House correspondent Michael Bender heard that phrase, he knew it had at least an outside chance of becoming the title of his account of the 2020 campaign.Bender's book, "Frankly, We Did Win This Election: The Inside Story of How Trump Lost," describes behind-the-scenes moments as the president goes from seeming to have an advantage in the 2020 race to again playing catch-up. Bender describes Trump's responses to a global pandemic, the death of George Floyd, social justice marches and to fighting for his own life. Unlike the 2016 election, when much seemed to go Donald Trump's way, 2020 sees almost every political hit come against him. Bender also recaps the surreal experience of being summoned to the White House for a one-on-one interview with the president.Michael Bender is on Twitter at twitter.com/michaelcbenderHis book is published by Twelve Books: https://www.twelvebooks.com/titles/michael-c-bender/frankly-we-did-win-this-election/9781538734803/Support our show at patreon.com/axelbankhistory**A portion of every contribution is given to a charity for children's literacy**"Axelbank Reports History and Today" can be found on social media at twitter.com/axelbankhistoryinstagram.com/axelbankhistoryfacebook.com/axelbankhistory

Equity
Community is the new AI

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:59


Natasha and Mary Ann and Alex were all aboard this week with Grace on the dials, which meant that we had a flat lovely time recording Equity for you. Of course, Equity is TechCrunch's venture capital focused podcast where we dig into the most critical funding rounds, and natter about the key news items impacting startups.Before we hop into this week's topics, you can follow the show on Twitter, where we rather often host impromptu Twitter spaces that sometimes become episodes. Come hang!Here's the rundown for this week:Chalo raises $40M to improve bus transit in India: This startup wins name (and startup) of the week. Chalo wants to tackle inefficiencies in India's bus system, so we noodle over why that makes sense and what challenges could be ahead.Masterworks raises $110M for fractional art ownership: Call it a Series A if you must, but the megaround that Masterworks just raised helps underscore the global shift towards alternative investing, and fractional ownership. How long until we get Masterworks on the blockchain? That would be the real IRL-NFT crossover we are kinda waiting for.CostCertified wants to save your next home reno project:  CostCertified, which just participated in Y Combinator's summer cohort, raised $8.45M in seed funding. The Canadian company's end goal is to build the “Amazon for construction.” CostCertified allows contractors to send a shoppable interactive estimate to homeowners so that they can choose their selections during a project, and see the effect on price instantly.All about community: Community has been watered down, there's no doubt about it. But, there is still arguments for why it works - and we make them (often).Google invests in Africa: American tech giant Google is putting capital to work in Africa, but in the form of infra investment and early-stage investing. Frankly both make good sense given the advertising giant's business model.Edtech goes B2B: Udemy is going public! We have dug through the numbers already, but thankfully with Natasha on the show we got to go a level deeper on where edtech revenues may come from next.And that's our show! We are back bright and early on Monday!

Real Estate Marketing Dude
$600,000 in closed GCU from YouTube Organically

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:42


These days there are so many social media platforms it is hard to keep up and easy to fall behind your competition. There's one platform you should not be overlooking and that is YouTube. You can spend all your money on ads and still not see a return and today's episode is going to change that. We're going to be talking to a 28 year old named Cody Steck who in just two years is on track to close near $600,000 and close GCI 100% from YouTube. More impressively, he did this 100% organically and free.Covering everything from strategy to keywords and SEO, this episode will be one for the books. As a long time Realtor, and real estate investor, Cody has a strong understanding of the real estate market for the Salt Lake Metro area and the entire Wasatch Front. Born and raised here in Utah, Cody knows the ins and outs of each city and neighborhood and has become a local celebrity on YouTube.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeThe importance of finding your nicheHow to make videos pertaining to topics people will actually search forAmount of content to put out a monthResourcesCody's YouTube ChannelReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas in real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know like trust most importantly refer but remember it is not their job to remember what you do for a living it's your job to remind them let's get started what's up ladies and gentlemen welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast What is up everybody? What we're going to do today is bring you live individual agent actually doing the shit we talk about every fucking week on this damn show. So she knows there's people out there doing it we're not doing his his stuff but he's doing you know basically what we do for a lot of people so this is like every PP there's a lot of people doing this exact same strategy and we're gonna focus today specifically on YouTube. How the hell did he get in the business two years ago 28 years old and he's gonna close near $600,000 and close GCI 100% from YouTube Well, he knew the strategy he knew how to get found he created content he started doing it consistently and guess what people started knocking on his damn door and he did it without spending $1 in ADS I think we're gonna find out though because this is what an interview is so without further ado, we're gonna go ahead and introduce our guest His name is Mr. Cody stack what's up Cody?What's going on guys happy to be here. Can't wait to jump into thisYeah, dude, we appreciate having you on the show here Why don't you go ahead and tell everybody a quick rundown Who are you what market are you in and then we'll get on into the interview.Yeah, sure. So Cody stack I've been in the business for six years but just been on YouTube for only two years now so everything I do is almost exclusively YouTube at this point it's all 100% organic and free like you said i've you know I'm on track by the end of 2021 over the last two years I will have closed about $600,000 in gross commission just from youtube so in addition to that I'm doing you know friends and family and investors and all these other people I still have my market still so but as far as just lead generation new business coming in 100% YouTube right now and absolutely love it you know this stuff works and you know if you're thinking about doing it you got to do it you know now's the timeyeah and because like you know, you're in Salt Lake City I was checking out your channels pretty impressive. So if you go to his channel we'll give you the link later but just look up living in Salt Lake City I mean the dude owns every single search term out there and then you can see what his view counts are and you know he's gonna own that probably forever which is the best part about it and there are still some markets you could actually still penetrate and get in there some major cities as a matter of fact where people really haven't done the done the videos I've done that the content yet but it's limited I give it another 12 maybe 18 months maybe in the country and then all these search terms all this content I think you're starting to be so well that would be something else with YouTube because there is a specific strategy that for whatever reason, I don't know why. But I sort of know why like that people search for and why these videos get so much views and attention organically which is the key and what is the percentage of buyer or people that come through Is this how many percentages or relocations coming into the market versus let's talk about types of leads and get off YouTube that will go into types of content?Yeah, sure. So it's probably 90% relocation a lot of people move in from out of state it was kind of fortunate that I started my channel about six months before the whole COVID pandemic shit came about and I you know business was the YouTube channel was just kind of getting started I was starting to get traction and then that hit and you know it kind of was a blessing in disguise that I already had six months of content out there because I picked up on a lot of people trying to escape from the northeast from California from the northwest all these different places trying to get to Utah to you know because now they're working remote they can work anywhere or they're coming here for the jobs that we have you know Utah's growing like crazy we've got a big tech and healthcare scene so a lot of high paying jobs coming in and people are getting you know new jobs here in the area or just working remote and want to you know have access to the outdoors so tons of people coming in probably 90% relocation I do get the occasional lead that already lives here in Utah and they're just kind of doing research and they find me and say hey, I just came across you on YouTube love your stuff you know we'd love to help get your help with buying a place but you know and then I also do get a probably you know I've probably had three or four investors reach out as well I do a little bit of investing content on my channel as well talking about how to invest you know what to look for I'm an I'm a real estate investor myself that's how I got in the business but anyway made some content about that so you can you can really attack that angle as well if that's your your niche. I mean, you can go after that. So there's tons of different niches you can go after, but for me it's been mostly relocation.Yeah, and that's the key niche. A lot of times people will be like, Hey, we get the question all the time. Like, just if you start just creating like just real estate content, like hey, how to buy and sell the same Timer? blank, the home selling process, like it's very, you're not going to get any views on YouTube or you like or you're gonna lose a lot of people are going to search out that type of content. Yeah, it's bad content. Yeah.It's just, uh, nobody's searching it right? I mean, there's been 1000s of agents who have done those types of videos, and nobody's searching for that type of content. That's why, you know, when they're when somebody's looking at buying a house, and they want to learn about the escrow process, or inspections or appraisals, most people I found don't really care about that stuff. They're relying on you to just tell them what they need to know, handle it, make sure they don't get in a bad spot, take care of the rest, right? They don't really care about the details of how an appraisal is valued. They just care that their home appraises so people aren't searching for that they want to know more about the area and more about your expertise as the agent who knows that area and can get the job done.100% when I moved here you guys in the California I say this often on the show, but you know I went to YouTube to look up and see I'm like what the fuck is Encinitas look like? What are the housing look like? What is the strip look like? Like where am I gonna go get beer at where am I going to go take my kids to the park I just wanted to see what it looked like you know and oftentimes the reason why this is theory but I think it's accurate I'm appreciate your opinion on it. But the reason why I think so many reloads come in the market is twofold one they're doing what I was doing visually looking to see what the area is and then when they see someone there it's that know like trust factor and that's what video does 90% of it's based upon the body language and the tonality we're expressing it's not the fucking content. So like if you're if you're approachable on video, they like your personality, which is why they call you it's not because of the content you're spitting out most of the content is so damn boring to be honest with you. It's how you're saying it that people are actually interested in and they're like I can like this guy and then they call because they just want those boots on the ground. Whereas if you look at local business and how local businesses transacted over 80 85% of its gonna come from someone you already know used in the past or personally met or bumped into so when you look at that someone relocating and doesn't have that referral base they don't have that that network which is why a lot of online lead generation which is why everything on YouTube comes in so much relocation is because they're simply just not being referred to the people that they normally would if they're making a local transactionYeah, exactly. Like you said, I mean you hit it right on the content is as an agent the content seems boring and repetitive but for the person who's never been to your area, they gobble that stuff up I can't tell you how many texts and emails and phone calls I've had where people contact me and say I watch your videos I can't believe you know I'm talking to you your videos like a celebrity right?Yeah already status Yeah,I've had people like you know basically say that to me that you're like I can't believe I'm talking to you and it's a little weird you know, but it's like they know me because they've watched hours upon hours of my content. I have no idea who they are but they already know me like me and trust me like you said and that's the most important part of business right when it comes to real estate this some I preach all the time to especially newer agents or agents who aren't doing a lot of business it comes down to people it comes down to how you present yourself the body language and the confidence that you have to be the person that they need to trust in order to get that job done it doesn't come down to how well you know real estate or how good your YouTube videos are. I mean, yes, that will help right? You want to have high quality videos, but my first videos were absolute garbage I mean, audio sucked you know, the video sucked. I was stuttering the editing was bad everything was bad about it. And yet I've got I don't know 10,000 20,000 views on some of those first videos and they still consistently put out 100 you know 50 to 100 views every couple days so it doesn't matter right the content the quality doesn't really matter it's how you present yourself indentistry dude yeah authentic Yeah, my daughter watches like YouTube all the time. So I get all these like YouTube celebrities from Mr. Beast to like you know, you know, you name it. Yeah, you watch their content and the reason why it's like reality TV like people perfection doesn't exist a second you try to be perfect as a second you start turning everybody off. But let's go back to why the look at the positioning on this and this isn't just like this is on YouTube, like people who are just farming their local market with video to our attracting local market. a client's exact same way because you put the personality with the name, and people just want to feel like that know, like and trust. So we did a podcast with a dude named grant wise I forget what episode is it's been a while. But anyways, he's done a study on this or he researched a lot of this and what he came up with was like, hey, on you when people are on video, it's like, ingrained into our brains because as kids, it's like, why do you think your kid runs up to Mickey Mouse and like gives him a hug and thinks a superhero? It's just some drunk dude in a costume. And yet your kid thinks that this Mickey Mouse a superhero? Well, because the kid was seen him on television and TV growing up so when they see him in person, you get like this celebrity status. There's actually a study done. I wish I knew the name of it, but it's very interesting. You're exactly right people are like feel like you're a celebrity doing it and the positioning is crazy on that yeah. Okay so let's go through a couple other things because you're mentioning YouTube content What do you do for editing now and content creation a lot of people overthink these like scripts but it's really just like keep them conversational is what I tell people it's one on one you're just telling people what you already know and you don't need to be an expert in buying or selling real estate you need to be an expert in your community.Yeah, exactly. I rarely talked about buying or selling real estate in my videos like the specific details of that process. It's almost entirely about what's my area What does it look like? What are the pros and cons? How much does it cost to live there all those you know different types of things on the video that's what's most important that people actually care about so you know, when it comes to making content that's that's what you really got to focus on.How much content you put out, I mean videos a month, what your schedule like what's your frequency?Yeah, so right now I'm about one per week I've been trying some different types of videos I've been doing some home tours and stuff just try and test that out see how the you know what the feedback is. So I'm gonna I'm kind of somewhere between one and two videos per week. If you were just getting started if you don't have that backlog of videos you know on your channel already I'd say you absolutely need to be two if not three videos per week in my opinion, to build up that base of videos that people can go watch at least until you've got 10 to 20 videos out there. So yeah, I'm about one per week right now. And most of them are in the office or out vlogging so you know it might be just a sit down video like this where I talk about my area show some stuff on the screen and that's it or I'll be out in my area filming the sidewalks the houses the businesses everything that people want to see. And you know those are the two types of videos I do and then you asked about editing. In the beginning I edited everything myself I wanted to kind of understand the process and figure it out but I've since moved on and I've got a virtual assistant who edits everything for me at this point.What kind of performance difference you've seen on talking head stuff when you're sitting down as opposed to being out on the street on the beach showcasing the demonstrating area?Yeah, that's that's a great point. Um, I would say that a lot of people I think people really get attached to my videos on the vlog type videos where I'm actually out and about doing stuff that those are the videos where people are like Yeah, I saw your video on this on this city and it was great because I got to see how many trees there were you know, was there dirt was there a sidewalk was it paved you know, like all that stuff, whatever just kind of how it visually looks so people get attached to that. You know, which is nice, but at the same time I think people appreciate the talking head stuff because they can just throw it on while they're driving. They don't have to watch me or anything necessarily they just listened to it kind of like you would a podcast or whatever. So they both do well i think i do think you need both in order to be successful.Yeah, that's a good point. There's you got informational, like community informational content, and you have community demonstrated demonstratable content, like the tours, the downtown areas, that's what people want to see. And those do really well. And you're right, it's sort of like, like the vlog stuff, people overthink the formatting of it. But scripting is like very simple when you just break down storytelling, and essay writing and how your book reports when you're in second grade, it's the same shit. attention getter, Introduction body outro. attention getter, Introduction body outro. So you guys follow y'all have y'all have the skill set to do this. It's not very difficult just that for whatever reason. I don't know why Cody, but people buckle at the knees when the record button goes on. And I'm always like, Dude, why are you buckling at the knees? Bro? You're a grown ass man. Like, you just sold a $20 million property and just made like $200,000 you're gonna let the red light make you buckle at the knees? Like Come on, bro. Like you're tougher than that. Why is that? Why do people hesitate?So I don't know. I haven't figured it out.When you started were you sort of like hey, this feels weird or Yeah,I mean it's definitely weird to like talk to a camera. I'm not generally that type of person. I mean I've gotten too used to it now and now I don't even have an issue I just click it on and I just go and I you know, I stumble through it and I can edit it out and redo it and you kind of learn that stuff. I think a lot of people get hung up at the very beginning they think has to be perfect right? They have to say the right thing they can't stutter. They have to you know, have a smile on their face whatever like all that all that shit that doesn't really matter. I mean, it does matter, right? Like you want to do your best but like don't overthink it. Just hit record and just get a video out. That's the biggest thing. It's not the scripting. It's not the content. It's not anything else. It's simply just hitting record, getting a video done looking at it saying oh yeah, I could have done this better and fix it next time and release the video and you know, get on with it.Yeah, I mean, I can tell you firsthand we just some people overthink the first video. I'm like, dude, like it no one cares. Frankly, no one cares what the hell you do, but like the more imperfect it is. in its own way, oftentimes the better it performs Yeah, well isn'tthat Vanya? Maybe because it's authentic its authentic right and the thing is you put that first video out you might get 12 views anyway right like that very first video over time it might give us but at the beginning you're only gonna get 10 1215 views maybe you know so it's not like the whole world is watching this it's not like you're on CNN or something you know what tons of exposure right off the bat you know, so don't overthink it And the beautiful thing about YouTube is look you know some of those first videos I've gone back and remade them and they do great you know, now that my audio quality is better my video quality is better I'm better on camera, Christmas better whatever, all that stuff you can just remake the video nobody even sees the first one anymore you know so it's not the end of the world if it's not perfect.Makes a lot of sense. What else do you see coming out on on with YouTube? You know, I know that a lot of a lot of people are familiar now with the you know, 18 months ago says like the hidden strategy, right? And I'm like, wow, YouTube. But now you know, you see a lot of people doing the pros and cons videos and all that. Yeah. Are you seeing any other avenues open up? Beyond the tours beyond the pros and cons of time neighborhoods? The cost of livings all that stuff? Are you seeing any other avenues coming down the pipe for different areas of content creation that people haven't quite seen yet?Yeah, that's a that's a great question. Um, I think that you I think that YouTube will still be the number one platform in my opinion, or at least for the next three to five years so it's going to be video content number one. Number two, you know, it's going to have to go beyond pros and cons and cost of living and all that stuff it's going to have to go into more vlogs I think that's going to be more important showing the area especially for relocation and also once you've built up an audience I think it's easier to niche down a little bit and start talking about commercial real estate start talking about investors start talking about these you know new construction, whatever it might be, if you want to go into new construction I mean you can build up a portfolio of home tours and talking about new construction and how the framing process works and whatever and who knows maybe you pick up a builder client they give you 50 listings right because they know like hey Cody can sell he's good on video he knows how to market and he knows the construction process this is gonna be huge you can use that once you've got you know a repertoire of videos and you know the confidence to display that on video that can be really helpful so I think that's going to be you know, niching down is going to be another thing that gets more important you know, I've seen some agents on YouTube who do only investment type stuff and absolutely crush it for people in their local market. Going beyond that, I think that you know, increasing the quality is going to be extremely important you know, going forward, I've seen a couple agent start to pop up that have really figured out how to be charismatic, how to entertain how to joke how to you know, really kind of be a performer when it comes to YouTube and I think that's going to make the difference right if I just sit here you know, cold if I just sit here like a cold statue, nobody's going to really relate to that but if I can be charismatic, I'm moving my hands are moving you know whatever. People are going to attach to that and I think that's going to give you a leg up so doing higher quality content, you know, maybe going the professional videographer route all those I'm just kind of you know, shooting off the hip here some different ideas that I'm exploring and kind of the direction that I want to take my channel to continue to maintain that top spot in my market.It's good to evolve though that I remember like 20 years ago was at 2010 I remember riding around in Chicago on a scooter thinking I was so cool. And with a flip camera doing a selfie video like yeah with the sunglasses on I was probably the cheesiest thing I ever did in my life but just like but I mean videos evolved that I remember back then you didn't have to do anything just like Facebook Live came out he didn't have to do anything yeah he just got on Facebook Live it was a call it was he alive is he live and that got a lot of attention but yeah, you're seeing the need for added content versus the talking heads because the talking head stuff everybody's doing it when everyone's doing something you have to Zig or zag or do different direction because you lose attention. Tell me how you're multipurpose seeing the content beyond YouTube. Are you just putting the content on YouTube or what else are you doing with it beyond Yeah, posted on YouTube?Yeah, it's 100% YouTube I've thought about repurposing into a podcast format but you know just they've never gone that route. I don't know if it's just because viewership would be low or or whatever. But I've just had so much so much success with YouTube that I've just stuck with that so I do a little bit of repurposing and my again, my virtual assistant helps with this. He'll take the video and just kind of cut it up and occasionally we do something on Facebook or Instagram just a short video. It doesn't actually it's not actually a link to the direct video. It's just kind of a short clip. But that's basically it. I mean, it's 100% YouTube, postthem to Facebook, you send them your database, video, email, modern anything.Nope. We don't do anything like that we just you know, we basically just let YouTube do its thingcool cool cool any other tips that you taken anything else you want to shareand you just got to get started like that's that's the biggest thing just get started if you're in your market I mean the space now I've been doing some research on how many other agents are in the market you know just in different markets trying to do this and you go to one city and there might be five or 10 agents trying to do this right so five or 10 is still not very much compared to how many agents are out there door knocking or cold calling you're trying to do Facebook ads right everybody's on Facebook ads or at least was you know I've been out of that world for a couple years now but like two years ago, Facebook everybody was doing Facebook right people were signing up for these these you know websites and you know generating these leads and they're getting 50 calls a day right from these people from these different agents so although there might be five or 10 agents on YouTube in your you know market if you're better at video if you're more confident you're more consistent and you put out higher quality you know content, you will get business from it. The thing I love about YouTube as well that I think people don't realize is the closing ratio is extremely high. I'm probably at about a seven to 8% closing ratio for leads who reach out and then eventually actually end up buying or selling with me And the beautiful thing is that the people who do reach out want to work with me right if they didn't want to work with me they wouldn't be contacting me they wouldn't call me they wouldn't email me they wouldn't text me because they maybe they don't like my personality maybe they don't like how I presented something maybe I piss them off because it's something I said whatever. And that's fine I'll never know if they don't reach out you know, because they're just some random view on YouTube. But the people who do reach out respect me as an agent they respect what I do and they want to work with me which is uh would yousay seven to 8% of conversations you have with people that initially like comment on a video and say like hey, I'm interested in moving in when you talk to him like first time on a phone call or something off of YouTube like that would be what you consider seven eight, just you guys know like one to 3% of the national average like for Zillow or or other type of lead gen so he's saying it's three times as much in conversionYeah, yeah, exactly. So I'm considering a lead anybody who reaches out to me so it's not even a comment on a video. Most people who are interested will actually reach out as of right now I've probably got i don't know i'm probably at about 450 I don't know let me just check real quick Yeah, but 466 466 leads over the last two years so that's that's less than one per day, but that's how I get a closing ratio that's so high somewhere in that seven to 8% range from last time I checked. So these are people who have reached out either via a phone call a text or an email said hey, I'm thinking about moving to Utah and then they eventually doand it's not this is the difference guys between lead generation attraction like when they reach out you like put them in some kind of weird drip autoresponder Are you just being human and following up to human way?Yeah, I just do it 100% human I mean, again, I I have that first initial conversation with them if they're in a position where they're moving in the next I don't know maybe four to five months I keep in constant contact with them I'll check in every you know, a couple weeks or whatever. But to be totally honest, a lot of the people check in with me right? They're like, Hey, I'm coming into town like are you still available to show me some houses so they honestly do a lot of the check in for me if they're out more than five, six months you know, I just I I've got a system set up with a virtual assistant of mine and they kind of check in every two months or so with a with an email just Hey, how are your plans progressing, anything we can do for you? And that's it, you know, nothing fancy I I use an Excel spreadsheet to keep track of my leads. Like I know people are like all about the CRM and whatever. I keep it super simple. And it works.Yeah. That's it. Everyone's like, what do you need, you need some super duper honors. But this is not online lead generation. This is called online attraction. That's what video is video doesn't generate leads and attracts attention and then your personality generates a damn lead. It just allows you to basically give your sales pitch without you really giving your sales pitch because that's all people really hire when they hire a real estate agent. They're not hiring. The fact you have a real estate license or hiring What the fuck you can do with it. And whether they trust you That's it. Moving is a big deal. People are like shit, I'm scared. I don't know who to trust where to go. Like, you know, that's a big deal. And that's what that conversion has taken place during the consumption of the content. You're creating no other thing other than that, guys, don't overthink this stuff. This isn't as a giant popularity contest. And the more content you have, the more popular you become, the more conversations you create. Just like if you bought a lot of leads from Zillow, you'd have a lot of conversations, they just be different types. These conversations come to you it's totally it's attraction. So there's a major difference between marketing and advertising. It's, we're talking about marketing, and if everyone should do a little bit of both, I'm sure Cody does Some sort of lead generation stuff probably on his investment side what else you doing with lead generation? I mean no this has taken off but are you doing any geven need toYeah. So yes and no I mean I do postcards and keep in touch with my soI and past clients and stuff I'd send them a monthly mailer.Yeah I love that marketing it's not even lead gen you just yeahyeah just marketing so I mean as far as like lead generation I don't do anything you know, I the way that I look at it is I can go out there and I can you know call Facebook leads or cold call for three hours or I can just put together a video together in three hours and that video keeps on working for me you know, I it takes me three hours I spend you know 50 bucks to get it edited. And I put it out there and it works for me 20 473 65 and so that's kind of the passive income of YouTube and lead generation in real estate is you know, making a video is a way better use of my time than trying to go out there and cold call or lead generate for three or four hours a day.I 100% agree well put dude. Cody wants to tell everybody how they can find you. I'm sure they want to check out your stuff and see how you're doing it.Yeah, for sure. Yeah, so you can find me as we mentioned before living in Salt Lake City, Utah. Just type that into YouTube and hopefully I should pop up as number one at least for the first I don't know probably eight out of 10 videos I hope you can find my channel there Feel free to jump on there copy it steal you know whatever you want to do take the video and just make it your own right Feel free to copy the content for your own local city so that's where you can find my my actual YouTube channel and then I've got another one called the YouTube realtor where I talk I make videos just like this you know kind of talking about how to be successful on YouTube how to be successful as a real estate agent you know just all general real estate agent stuff so just just look up the YouTube realtor on YouTube and you should find itappreciate you man thanks for sharing all the stuff and congrats on all your success it's awesome to keep going like folks if you actually take action things can happen it's not rocket science there's a check out his channel listen to what he's doing and then just take action and do it you either have two ways of doing this you can either do it yourself and figure it all out or if you want someone to do it for you contact a real estate marketing dude it's what we do we'll script that and distribute real estate content. If you choose part of your strategy that's what we do or maybe you're not into blown up your channel maybe just want to build a local celebrity brand he just hit in your database, that's fine too. But either way is there's not a shortage of people that can help you whether you learn from a guy like Cody or you contact us so if you'd like to explore more what that looks like please visit us on our website at Real Estate marketing.com it's real estate marketing.com and thank you very much for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude calm podcast follow us on social Subscribe, subscribe to our channel i G and Facebook and I swear to God and to get to tick tock channel as soon as I get a damn minute. But appreciate you guys and we'll talk to you guys later and see you next week. Bye bye. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at www dot real estate marketing dude calm. We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training and then scheduled time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

Art of Money Podcast
Let's Talk about Earning More Income

Art of Money Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:48


The work you do, the paycheck you earn, your bank account balance - none of these has anything to do with your intricate worth. You are priceless beyond measure. Yet, we live in a world where most of us need to work to earn money to support ourselves, our families, and, as small business owners, our team as well. We don't like to talk about making money, though, it feels uncomfortable, shallow, and vulnerable. Even more so when we're in a position where we want or need to be making more money. But these silent taboos don't serve us. Frankly, they never have. So it's time to bring some loving honesty to break them down. I recently had the opportunity to interview a dear friend and colleague of mine, Money Coach and author of “Why Women Earn Less: How to Make What You're Really Worth,” Mikelann Valterra. Find out more on the podcast: https://baritessler.com/podcast

The Sweaty Startup
253. Why entrepreneurship culture sucks

The Sweaty Startup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 12:46


A little quick episode about what sucks in entrepreneurship culture. I've been trying to be positive and avoid being negative. So, let me rant for a bit. I notice lately how the media are romanticizing the idea of building a “start-up” business and gaining hype around starting a business with these “new” ideas. Frankly, I call BS. Find out more on why Entrepreneurship Culture Sucks in this episode!   Check the show notes here! https://sweatystartup.com/the-sweaty-startup/   We have a reddit community: https://www.reddit.com/r/sweatystartup/ Special thanks to the sponsor: https://launchkits.com/sweaty

The Michael Berry Show
Lt General Joins The Show, Speaks Frankly On All Things | AM Show Hr 2

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 34:29


The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
In the Dirt 24: Part One - Questions and Answers

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:11


This week we tackle our first Q & A episode from The Ridership Community. Randall and Craig tackle your questions in part 1 of 2 fun filled episodes. The Ridership Support the Podcast Book your free Thesis Bike Consult Automated transcription (Please excuses the errors): Episode 24 [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to in the dirt from the gravel. The ride podcast. I'm your host, Craig Dalton. And i'll be joined shortly by my co-host rental jacobs In this week's episode, we're tackling our first Q and a episode.  [00:00:14] We've mentioned the ridership community on a number of occasions on this podcast. It's a community that's full of vibrant questions all the time. So we thought we'd put out an ask to say, what are the things you want to learn about what should Randall an IB discussing? And we were overwhelmed by. By the number of questions we received.  [00:00:34] So much. So in fact that we're going to break this episode down into two parts. So today we'll focus on part one. And in the coming weeks we're released part two. [00:00:44] Before we jump into this week's episode, I'd like to thank this week. Sponsor Thesis bikes. As you know, Randall Jacob's my co-host in these, in the dirt episodes is the founder of Thesis bikes. Which you might not know is it's the bicycle I've been riding for the last let's say year and a half.  [00:01:01] Over the course of this podcast, I've had the opportunity to ride many bicycles and I keep coming back to my Thesis. As my number one bike in the garage, it really does deliver on the promise of a bike that can do anything. As many of, you know, I operate with two wheel sets in the garage. So I've got a 700 C wheel set with road tires on, and my go-to six 50 B wheel set for all my off-road adventures.  [00:01:26] In the many, many hours of conversation I've had with Randall, I've really come to appreciate how thoughtful he was in designing this bike and everything that goes in the Thesis community. Randall and the team are available for personal consults, which I highly recommend you take advantage of. If you're interested in learning more about the brand and figuring out how to get the right fit for your Thesis bicycle.  [00:01:49] In a shocking statement. I can actually express that Thesis has bikes in stock. It's something we haven't been able to say about a lot of bike brands these days during the pandemic. It's October as we're releasing this episode and they have bikes available for November delivery with the SRAM access builds. They also have frame sets available.  [00:02:10] So I encourage you to head on over to Thesis.bike, to check out more about the brand, the story. Cory and the product and book one of those free consultations with a member of the Thesis team. With that said, let's dive right into this. Week's. Q and a episode [00:02:25] Craig: Randall, how are you today? [00:02:26] Randall: I am doing well, Craig, how are you my friend?  [00:02:30] Craig: I am doing good. I'm particularly excited for this episode because it essentially came entirely from the Ridership community. We're doing our first ever Q&A episode.  [00:02:42] Randall: Yeah, people have a lot of trust in us, maybe too much in terms of our knowledge here. So we'll try not to get over our heads in terms of uh what we claim to know, but a lot of good questions here and hopefully we can answer most of them.  [00:02:54] Craig: Yeah, I think that's been one of the cool things about the ridership is I see these questions going on all the time and I quite regularly. See them answered by people Smarter than you and I in a specific area of the sport. They have particular knowledge about a specific region. So it's really cool to see those happening in real time, every day for the members of that community. [00:03:17] Randall: Yeah, everything from fit related questions where we have some experts in there. Professional fitters like Patrick Carey, who I just did the episode with just before this one, I was in there answering questions, but then also if you've got a question about tires, nobody's going to have ridden all of them, but somehow every one has been written by someone in the forum there. And it's one of our most popular topics.  [00:03:38] Craig: Yeah. And I've seen some really detailed, help transpire between members as well, just like random disc bait break problems or compatibility problems. And I'm always shocked when someone raises their hand digitally and start to answering a question saying, no, I experienced that exact same weird problem in combination of things. [00:03:57] Randall: Yeah, it really fits into the spirit of The Ridership in which embodied in that word was this idea of fellowship, like writers, helping writers. So it's been super cool to see that community develop organically. And so thank you all members who are listening, and to those who aren't in there yet, we hope you'll join us.  [00:04:15] Craig: Yeah. just head over to www.theridership.com and you can get right in and start interacting as much, or as little as you want. I think the uniqueness of the platform is it is designed inherently to be asynchronous. So you can put a question in there give it a little time to marinate and a couple of days later Get lots of answers. [00:04:35] This is pretty cool.  [00:04:36] Randall: And in addition to that, there's also rides being coordinated. So myself and another writer here in the new England area or leading a ride. And we have about 10 or 15 people who chimed in wanting to join. And we've seen quite a bit of that in the bay area as well. So that's another use case for this in addition to sharing routes and general bicycle nerdery.  [00:04:54] Craig: Yeah, it's super cool. [00:04:55] So this episode, we're clearly going to jump around a bunch. We've tried to organize the questions, so there's, there's some pairing around them, but these are questions that all came in from subset of individuals. So They are what they are and we wanted to jump on them. So with that, let's let's dive right in. Okay.  [00:05:12] Randall: All right, let's do it.  [00:05:14] Craig: Cool. So the first question comes from Keith P E. And he says, every time I go out for a gravel ride, I think why is this roadie where I'm like Rhonda trails when there's no podium to win or anybody watching. What is this obsession with wearing skin tight clothing in a sport that resides in the dirt.  [00:05:31] Randall: I don't know about you, but I'm just showing off.  [00:05:34] Craig: Your physique.  [00:05:35] Randall: My, my Adonis like physique, sure. It's just more comfortable for me. And I like to go pretty hard and I'm sweating a lot. And if I had baggier gear on, I would tend to have, potential issues with chafing and the like so for intensity I definitely find that the Lycra is a lot more comfortable.  [00:05:54] Craig: Yeah, I'm sorta with you. Like I do I desire to be that guy in baggy shorts and a t-shirt, but every time it comes down to it, I'm grabbing the Lycra. I think for me, there's a couple of performance things, definitely on the lower body. I appreciate the Lycra just cause I don't get any binding and less potential for chafing. So I'm like, I'm all about a big short for riding, unless it's a super, super casual outing for me.  [00:06:21] And then up top. I think it comes down to, I do having the pockets in the Jersey. So that sort of makes me tend towards wearing a Jersey, even if it's just solely to carry my phone in my pocket.  [00:06:34] Randall: And if you really want to be pro show up to an elite race and like a led Zeppelin t-shirt and some cutoff jorts, and hairy legs and just rip everyone's legs off that would be super impressive. But for the rest of us,  [00:06:45] If you ha, if you have those sorts of legs,  [00:06:47] Yeah, it would be very impressed. Send pictures in to the ridership. If you actually do that .  [00:06:50] Craig: Yeah. So you'll see me. You'll see me. Rock a t-shirt you. As a performance t-shirt instead of a cycling Jersey on occasion. And I just jam stuff into bags, but yeah, nine times out of 10, unfortunately I'm that Lycra. Reclad. Gravel cyclists. [00:07:06] Randall: MAMIL, I think right.  [00:07:08] Middle aged man in Lycra.  [00:07:11] I'm right behind in the age category.  [00:07:13] Craig: Second question comes from Tom Schiele. And forgive me if I mispronounced your last name, he'd love to get our insights into winter riding, especially tips for those of us in new England who go out on cold dark mornings.  [00:07:29] I'm going to, I'm going to go out on a limb here and Randall and say, it's probably not the guy. [00:07:32] from California that should be offering this advice.  [00:07:34] Randall: Let's have you go first for that reason.  [00:07:38] Craig: Look. I mean you, new Englanders will throw hay bales at me and make fun of me, but I do find it cold here. And it's all about layers.  [00:07:48] Randall: Okay. [00:07:48] Carry  [00:07:48] Craig: all about layers.  [00:07:49] Actually, in fact, I just got some great gear from gore and I was Scratching my head because it's really designed for way cooler Temperatures. [00:07:58] than I have available to me. So a fleece lined tight is something that's just outside of the weather that I'm going to experience as much as I'll complain about it being cold. But I do appreciate a thermal Jersey for the Dawn patrol rides and things like that.  [00:08:12] But for me, it's always come down to layering. And as someone who's Been around. [00:08:16] the sport for a while, what I really do like about my wardrobe today is I think I have a really good understanding about what to layer on for what temperature And having been in the sport long enough. I've just acquired a lot of clothing along the way. So I even go down to having.  [00:08:32] Like a thicker vest. Than just a standard thin, vast, and they're very nuanced and it's only because of, I had decades worth of clothing kicking around that I've really started to understand and embrace how each garment is for a particular degree temperature. And the layers will get me to a certain point.  [00:08:51] Randall: Yeah. I'm a hundred percent with you on layers. I like to go like Jersey and then maybe a base layer or older Jersey underneath add to that thermal sleeves a vest that has a wind breaking layer on the front. A balaklava. Is also a great thing to have when the weather gets a bit colder, one to keep your head warm and your ears warm, and to keep the wind off your face, but then also you can breathe through it. So you're preheating the air and when it gets bitingly cold, which I don't know, you may not have experienced this, but I've definitely written around the Boston area and five degree temperatures and you got, ice crystals forming on the front of it, but at least you're getting a little bit of that preheating first.  [00:09:29] Definitely wants some wind breaking booties. Wind breaking layers on the front of the body. Generally when it gets really cold. If you must, you could do like heat packs on the backs of your hands. So over your arteries, delivering blood. If you're in real extreme conditions,  [00:09:44] Let's see, Tom also mentioned riding cold dark mornings, which means low pressures for grip. And then also lots of lots of lights, lots of reflectivity. You definitely don't want to be caught out and that's a good general rule, but especially riding in dark conditions when people might be tired.  [00:10:00] And then what else?  [00:10:02] Craig: Going to add the other big thing that I really enjoy is a thermal cap with the little flaps over the years, I find that really just, keeps the heat in there.  [00:10:11] Randall: Yeah, that's a nice intermediate solution before it's too cold to expose your face.  [00:10:16] Going that route. Other things pit stops with hand dryers. So I knew where all the Dunkin donuts were along my routes. I could just go in there on a really cool day and just dry off and heat up. People around here sometimes like in embrocation, gives you like a Burnie tingling sensation on the skin.  [00:10:30] Vaseline. It's actually a big one. It helps with insulation on exposed skin and helps it from getting dried and raw and so on. So I'll put Vaseline on my face and that actually makes a big difference in keeping me warm. And I don't find that it has any negative effects on my skin, my pores and things like that.  [00:10:48] I'm trying to think. Did we miss anything? Oh, tape the vent holes on your shoes. That's a big one. 'cause even with booties sometimes the holes will still, oftentimes the holes will still be exposed. And so close that up. Otherwise you just going to get air flow into the shoe and you'll know exactly where it's coming from. Once you get on the road.  [00:11:08] Craig: Yeah. And I remember. When all hell broke loose. I would even stick my foot in a plastic bag and then put it in the shoe.  [00:11:16] To get a little extra warmth. I don't necessarily recommend that. And I do know and aware em, aware that, you can get like Russ socks now in different kind of obviously wool is a great material to have underneath your shoe. It, yeah. [00:11:28] Randall: I love wool and I'll take like old wool sweaters and stuff and cut the sleeves and then put it in the dryer to shrink. So it's tight against the body and that'll be a base layer. Cause it's just great for loft and for wicking. So if you're trying to be cheap, that can be a way to go about it.  [00:11:43] Craig: I'm Now like off in my head, imagining sleeveless Randall in a tight fitting wool sweater. And it's more reading burning man then cycling performance.  [00:11:54] Randall: with the jorts, I might show up at a race near you.  [00:11:56] Craig: Our next couple of questions are from Alan Collins and the first one's around everyday carry. What do you always carry with you on every ride tools, parts, spares, pumps, hydration, snacks, gels, et cetera. Are you traveling light or packing an RV?  [00:12:14] Randall: So I'm now back in new England, so I'm often relatively near civilization, so I'm not as comprehensive as I would be say, like riding in Marine where I might be a good five, six mile walk over some mountains to get to anywhere. But critical things. I bring plugs like tire plugs. In my case, dynaplugs bacon strips, same deal.  [00:12:36] Spare tube. A tool that has all the critical things I need. If you're one of our riders, make sure you got a six mil on your tool because that's what you need for your through axles. What else? If there's any risk whatsoever. Me getting caught out in the dark. I'll have lights front and rear might as well.  [00:12:54] I'm trying to think of anything else that I always bring along. That's the key stuff. How about you?  [00:12:59] Craig: Yeah, I'm a mid-weight packer. Like I've really embraced that quarter frame bag. So I just tend to be ready for most eventualities that I expect. And obviously I gear up depending on the amount of hours I plan on being out. I tend to bring one nutritional item per hour that I'm going to be out. Obviously if I'm going out for an hour, I tend to be forgetful about hydration and nutrition. I don't really think too much about it.  [00:13:26] But I do think about it in terms of the number of hours I'm going to be out and then building Certainly my nutrition and hydration on top of that.  [00:13:33] my basic everyday carry same with you. I just want to make sure I can handle. [00:13:37] the most likely kind of repair scenarios out there on the trail. And I don't go overboard with it. There's probably many more things I would bring on a bike packing trip than I do on a five-hour ride.  [00:13:50] Randall: Yeah.  [00:13:51] And one thing I forgot to mention.  [00:13:53] Yeah, we did the everyday carry in the dirt episode nine. So listen there. That's where we go. Deep nerd on all the things. If you want a comprehensive list of what you might bring. The other thing, I don't know if I mentioned a pump. Duh. So I forgot that one there.  [00:14:06] Craig: Pump and CO2 for sure. [00:14:07] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:14:08] But otherwise it really depends on the ride. These days, I'm doing mostly like hour and a half, two hour higher intensity rides actually oftentimes even shorter, lower intensity rides. So I don't need to bring as much. But I'll where you are, you have micro-climates all over the place on Mount Tam.  [00:14:23] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. So. I'm always rocking like a full spare jacket in there, unless I'm going out mid day, which is rare these days. I just figure if I'm going downhill, I might as well be warm and it just makes it more pleasant. So that's why, again, like I have that quarter frame bag and I just jam it full of stuff.  [00:14:40] After our everyday carry episode, I did get a magic link. Cause it's it's nothing like this. Obviously no weight. And I just threw it in there. [00:14:48] Fortunately, I haven't had to use it, but it's there. If I ever did need it. [00:14:51] Randall: Oh, you don't have the technique for breaking the chain and being able to piece it back together without the magic link.  [00:14:57] Craig: I'm fairly skilled at that, But I don't have a chain breaker that I bring with me.  [00:15:01] Randall: Got it. Okay.  [00:15:02] Craig: Yeah.  [00:15:04] Alan's next question was, do you have any tips for prepping a gravel bike for competition in road, gravel mix or cyclocross?  [00:15:11] Randall: Don't do it the night before.  [00:15:14] Craig: Yeah. I I think there's a couple of different ways to go with this question, right? Obviously if you're a cross specialist, there's going to be lots of things you're going to do. For me, if I got the courage to raise cross again, I would just show up with what I got and I wouldn't really mess with it too much.  [00:15:29] Randall: Yeah, I would do basic checks. A couple of weeks out, I would just be making sure that I don't have anything that's about to fail because especially now parts are a challenge to find in many cases, even brake pads. And in fact, if you don't already have a set, get some extra brake pads, just have them around just in case.  [00:15:47] But otherwise checking chain lengthen and the lubrication making sure the sealant and the tires. I'm having all my gear and kit and nutritional stuff laid out, making sure the brake pads have have enough life in them. This sort of thing would be the basics. And I would do this several days in advance and I would make sure to get a ride in before I actually did the race, just to make sure that I didn't mess up anything that's going to bite me later. Like the worst thing you can do is be working on your bike the night before, or the morning of, and then, potentially miss something or break something or have to replace something.  [00:16:18] Craig: Yeah, I forget who I was listening to. It might've even been kate Courtney or perhaps a professional female gravel rider who was saying they arrived at actually the Sarah Sturm. Sorry. She arrived at the start line of an event and realized that her brake pads were totally thrashed. And her mechanic slash partner said. [00:16:39] I'm going to change them right now. And that would stress me the heck out.  [00:16:43] But he did add new successful. She's Thank God. because I never would have been able to stop on the way downhill. I was swapping bikes from one, the one I had written the other day and just didn't think about it.  [00:16:54] Randall: All right, everyone you've been warned.  [00:16:57] What have we got  [00:16:58] Craig: reminds me, I need to get an order in for some brake pads, because I'm definitely reaching the end of the life of the current ones.  [00:17:06] All right. So the next couple of questions are from Ivo Hackman, and he's asking thoughts on red bull entering gravel with a race in Texas. I don't know if you caught this Randall, but it was calling strict Lynn and pacing pace and McKell then. I have bonded together and are doing a race out of Marfa, Texas that red bull is sponsoring, which is, I a natural because both of those athletes are red bull sponsored.  [00:17:31] Randall: So I'm assuming like extreme gravel jumps, flips things like this. It's just the evolution of the sport.  [00:17:38] Craig: Exactly. I think, both those two guys are so grounded in the culture of gravel racing And in my opinion have been good stewards of conversation as we bring these mass star gravel events forward. I think it's great. I think the bigger question probably within this question is about is red bull coming in as an, as a quote unquote, an Advertiser and sponsor of the event. Is that somehow changing the Experience, is it becoming more corporate? Is it something other than the community wants to see? Again, with those two people involved. I think it's a positive thing.  [00:18:12] Randall: Yeah, I don't see it as a problem, even if it's not not any, my personal thing, for me, I love the really local. Really community oriented events that are much more like mullet rides and yeah, this is a little bit of a competition going on upfront, but it's not a huge deal.  [00:18:27] And, we definitely do see more of a professionalization of gravel. There's a space for everyone and there's a space for different types of events. So I don't see them displacing the events that are even more kind of grassrootsy. So yeah, I don't have a problem with it, especially if they end up doing flips.  [00:18:45] Red bull.  [00:18:47] Craig: The next question from Ivo is how to transition from weekend warrior to competitive rider.  [00:18:54] I feel like I'm better suited to answer the reverse question, to move from a competitive rider to weekend warrior. That one is easy.  [00:19:02] Randall: Yeah. Let's see. Step one. Have a kid.  [00:19:06] Craig: Yeah.  [00:19:07] Randall: That'll That'll take care of that in a hurry.  [00:19:09] Craig: Yeah. For me, this trend, it's all about structure.  [00:19:13] Like I, and I don't have any or much in My writing anymore, but I recognize in listening to coaches and Talking to them, it really is all about structure. And Even if that structure just means. You have one specific interval training session a week, and then your long endurance rides on the weekend to me, by my likes, I think you'll see a lot of progression. And as you progress, I think then you start to see the potential for coaching, more multi-day structured program in your week, If you're willing to go down that route. But to me, from what I've seen first stop is intervals.  [00:19:50] Randall: Yeah. Structure. Intervals is. Is one. And then within the context of a period iodized training program, Which is to say you do different types of training at different times during the season, based on the amount of training time you have available and the events that you're preparing for, because there's no sense in doing a lot of intensity several months out from a race and then, be firing on all cylinders, say, three months out and then just be totally kicked by the time your van comes around, you have that build, you do base training, and then you're doing more tempo. And then towards the events, your hours are going down and your intensity is going up and you're really trying to peak for that specific event.  [00:20:33] The book that was one of the Bibles when I was racing some time ago was Joe Freels I think it was called like the training and racing Bible or the mountain bikers, Bible or something. A book like that would be a good starting point. And then if you have the budget working with the coach, especially early on to really just accelerate your learning and to get someone to bounce ideas off of, and to use them as a way of learning your body. And that last part I would add at the very least heart rate monitor, learn how your body responds to stress, but then a power meter as well It's just a tremendously helpful tool and they're cheap. Now you need a four I power meter bonded onto a lot of cranks for 300 bucks. So there's really no reason not to make that investment if you're spending all this time to train and to, go to events, 300 bucks is pretty low lying fruit.  [00:21:25] Craig: Yeah, it is a great source of truth. Having a power meter. [00:21:29] For sure.  [00:21:29] Randall: yeah. One last thing would be a bike fit, actually if you haven't done it already, I think everyone should invest in a bike fit if you're doing any reasonable amount of riding, but if you're gonna be racing and training and trying to squeeze out every last bit and not get injured go get yourself a bike fit.  [00:21:44] Craig: Next question, moving on to what we've deemed at components category. JC Levesque probably pronounced that wrong. Sorry jC, appreciate the question he's asking. What about handlebars? There's a move towards wider flared bars and gravel and a few odd ones out there. There's the kitchen sink candle bar from our friends at red shift. The coefficient bar. From our friend, Rick Sutton. Obviously he's mentioned the canyon hover bar, although that isn't an add on it's integrated into that bike.  [00:22:14] But he asked him maybe worth going over the different expectations are for drop bar bikes that is tackling. Gravel versus pavement versus term.  [00:22:22] Randall: Sure you want to. Take a stab at this first.  [00:22:26] Craig: So for me, I think we're going to continue to see more and more riders explore Wider and flared bars. Like when I jumped on that trend and went out to a 48 millimeter with a 20 degree flare, I immediately felt more comfortable. My orientation as a gravel cyclist is towards rougher terrain, More like pure off roady kind of stuff. So I really appreciate. Appreciated that with.  [00:22:52] It is a pretty easy component to you forget about when you get a bike, right? So many things are going through your mind when you're buying a bike. The handlebars just the handlebar it comes with. If you're working with a good shop from a good direct manufacturer, they're going to ask you appropriate questions about what width you should get. But I do think there's going to be this continued trend towards exploring these different types of bars as the gravel market continues to see people ride these bikes in different ways.  [00:23:21] Randall: Yeah, I generally agree. And I think it's a good thing. I'm not sold on the extremes of flare. I just don't see it as necessary. There's not so much torque being delivered through the steering column when I'm riding, even on technical terrain that I'm finding myself needing more control. With a dropper post of course that's the big caveat, right? Cause that's lightening up the front wheel taking, mass off of that front wheel, putting it on the back, allowing the body to access suspension more. So that helps a lot in reducing the need for leverage. We do a 10 degree flare and I find that for me, that's the max I can do with a traditional flare and I was still having my hands in a comfortable position. And I actually find that flair is helpful in terms of my risk comfort in hand comfort.  [00:24:06] And you see this as a trend, actually on road bars to, four to six degrees of flare on road bars starting to happen. You also see a trend towards leavers coming standard with a bit of kick out a bit of flair at the lever itself which goes along with these trends. The thing that I'm actually really interested in is bars like the 3T Aero Ghiaia. I think that's how it's pronounced.  [00:24:26] This bar has a pretty compound bend. So it's relatively standard on the hoods, but then flares out below the hoods and gives you that extra leverage while at the same time giving you more of a roadie position on top. And I really like. Sticking with this one bike trend and making, keeping these bikes as versatile as possible, just because they can be. And in the case of that bar, it's also that arrow profile, I don't think is super important. Frankly, people overblow the value of arrow and we can talk about that. But, it's certainly not a problem. And that arrow profile probably gives it some more vertical flex.  [00:25:02] And I think that's actually a great way to get some additional compliance on gravel bikes is to have some flare in the wings of the bar.  [00:25:10] Craig: Yeah, I think you're right. I think people are going to continue to explore that. It's a market that I think is tricky for manufacturers to play in because people are so entrenched with what they know and have, and exploring some of these new trends can often be costly. It might be $100 to $300 to get a handlebar and try it out. [00:25:31] Randall: Yeah. For. $400 plus in some cases you can spend a lot of money on a carbon bar.  [00:25:36] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. A related question comes from east bay grants. Just question on Aero bars and gravel.  [00:25:42] Randall: Yeah. Pretty trivial gains. All in all. If you're going to be spending money on, even just on arrow, get an Aero helmet. I think that would be a bigger impact. Then arrow, handlebars. These are just very marginal gains and I wouldn't at all compromise ergonomics or control in order to go arrow. So if you're already getting a new bar and there's an arrow version and a non arrow version that you like. And there aren't any other compromises sure. Go with the arrow version, but I don't think that this is where your low lying fruit is.  [00:26:17] Craig: Yeah. I was reading it as arrow bar extensions on the handlebar and my perspective is it just depends on what you're doing at the end of the day. If you're hauling across the Plains for 200 miles, I understand having a variety of hand and body positions is required and useful, and I'm all for it. If you're ripping around Marin I think you're going to find that you never.  [00:26:39] You never set your arms in a gravel bar if you're actually in the dirt, but that's just where I live.  [00:26:44] Randall: Without, now that you've reframed the question. Yeah, they definitely has their place. And in addition to offering another hand position that's particularly useful if you're just bombing down a really straight road and into a headwind it can be a real aerodynamic advantage there. It also gives you another place to secure gear too. So if you're doing extended bike packing tour. It has that added benefit. There's a place for it, for sure.  [00:27:08] Craig: Yeah. Next question comes from our friend, Tom boss from Marine county bike coalition. He was out riding and he mentioned that he was thinking about how things get named in the cycling world. And how his gravel bike. If he thinks of as an adventure bike effectively, the way he rides it. And then he had a funny note is just about why clipless pedals are called clipless when there's actually no clip.  [00:27:32] Randall: Yeah.  [00:27:33] Craig: Actually. Yeah. So anyway. I think this is something you've been on about the naming convention in cycling, just about these bikes being adventure, bikes, more than anything else. [00:27:42] Randall: Yeah, it's really like adventure is what we're doing with it. Gravel is one type of surface that we're riding. And I like the idea, granted not only a subset of bikes fall into this category, but we call our bike a onebike. And I think bikes like the the allied echo, the servo, a Sparrow, and a few others fall into this category of being, an endurance road or even in the case of the echo,  [00:28:07] borderline, crit type geometry that you can achieve. While at the same time being very capable for adventure riding. And for that type of bike, you could call it a one bike, but then otherwise, what is being called a gravel bike on the more off-road technical end of the spectrum. I think it's an adventure bike.  [00:28:23] And in fact even if it doesn't has have bosses and other accommodations for bags and bike packing. A lot of these bags and so on, or you can strap on or mountain other ways. So you could go and do some adventuring with it.  [00:28:36] Craig: Yeah, I think they, these names. Of category starts to take hold at the grassroots level and then manufacturers just get behind them. And certainly in the early days of the quote unquote gravel market, It was just easy to call it gravel as opposed to road or mountain.  [00:28:54] Presently, obviously we can acknowledge there's so many, there's so many nuances there and there's this spectrum of what gravel means. So yeah, they are adventure, bikes, plain and simple. But I guess I understand where gravel came from.  [00:29:06] Randall: What's good though, is we have another category, right? So we can get you to buy an adventure bike and a gravel bike and endurance road bike, and a crit bike and a cyclocross bike. And even if all these bikes could be the same bikes. Let's not tell anyone because that gets them to buy more bikes. I think that's the marketing perspective on some of the naming conventions.  [00:29:26] Craig: Next up comes a series of questions from Kim ponders. And we should give a shout out to Kim because she's the one who really set this off. She actually recommended and suggested in the ridership forum that, Hey, why don't you guys do a Q and a episode? And I immediately thought that great idea, Kim, I'm all about it. [00:29:44] Randall: Yeah. Thanks, Kim.  [00:29:46] Craig: So our first question is what should I do not do to avoid damaging a carbon frame?  [00:29:52] Randall: So I'll jump in on this one. Carbon is strong intention, but not in compression, so never clamp it in a stand or sit on the top tube, use a torque wrench, always. And avoid extreme heat sources like car exhausts, which generally isn't a problem with frames because they don't end up in the main stream of the exhaust, but is definitely a problem with carbon rims.  [00:30:13] We've seen a number of molten rims. And it's usually they fail at the spoke holes first. Cause there's just so much tension on those spokes that as soon as the resin starts to transition. Into more of a liquid glass it immediately starts to crack at the rims that'd be my main guidance for carbon generally.  [00:30:32] Craig: And as we've talked about it a little bit before on the podcast, I think as a frame designer, You're layering in carbon, in greater, greater levels of material in more sensitive areas.  [00:30:44] But you are. Yeah. [00:30:45] So like your, your down tube and by your bottom bracket. They can take a ding from a rock and they're going to survive. [00:30:52] Randall: Generally. Yes. So if you're kicking up a lot of rocks, adding a layer of thicker film is definitely a good idea. We put a very thin film on ours. It's mostly to protect the paint. And then film on the insides of the fork plates seat stays and chain stays where the tire passes through.  [00:31:08] I can save you a lot of grief. If you end up with mud caked on your tires. Cause that'll just grind right through the paint and potentially to layers of carbon. So we do that stock for that reason. And it's a good idea. If you don't already have it, get yourself some 3m protective film.  [00:31:22] Craig: Yeah, and for me, I actually run it's essentially a sort of protective sticker layer from a company called the all mountain style and they just, in my opinion, do great visual designs. And check them out because personally, I love when you look underneath my, down to that, you see this. Digital cammo kind of thing on my nice pink bike.  [00:31:43] Randall: Yeah, it's rad. It's definitely a way to pretty things up.  [00:31:47] Craig: Next question from Kim is their basic regular maintenance checklists that I should be aware of. You things I should check every ride every month, every season, every year.  [00:31:57] Randall: Yeah. When you got.  [00:31:59] Craig: I think there's a lot there, obviously, we've talked about the importance of making sure your chain is lubed your tire pressure. Those are the things I check every single ride. Be aware of how your brakes are changing and performance. So keep an mental eye on.  [00:32:14] Your brake pads and how they're wearing, I'm not going around tightening bolts at all. Unless I've removed something, I'm not really messing with Any of that. I do find my Thesis to be pretty much ready to go. As long as I'm paying attention to the tire and the chain lube. [00:32:31] Randall: Yeah. Yeah, that's that's about right. I would add to that, check the chain length every so often. And there's a question in here about how to do that. Get one of these go-no-go gauges. I've got the the park tools, CC three.  [00:32:44] There's a bunch of good ones out there. And if it has multiple settings to check, go with the most conservative one. Swap your chains early and often, because it will save you a lot of money on your expensive cogs and cassettes.  [00:32:58] And it'll just make everything perform better. And then every so often, if you feel any looseness in your headset, that's a common thing that will come up over time, potentially just, just check that every so often. If you feel any looseness, you want to tighten it up early. So it doesn't start to wear down the cups or things like that.  [00:33:14] Craig: Yeah. And if you can afford it and you don't have the skills in your own garage, definitely bring it in for an annual tune-up. I think the bikes are going to come back working great and you've got some professionalize on them. [00:33:26] Randall: Yeah.  [00:33:26] Craig: Next question. Kim asked was what's the best way to pack a bike for air travel.  [00:33:31] Randall: So if you try to be. The cheapest option for the packaging. Cardboard box. And if you're not doing it frequently, that's a good way to go.  [00:33:41] Craig: Yeah, agreed. There's a reason why every bike manufacturer in The world is shipping with a cardboard box. As long as you protect the bike. Inside the box with some bubble wrap or some additional cardboard, they generally arrive where they need to go intact and safe. And I've had multiple occasions where I've used the cardboard box on an outbound trip and the box is Perfectly intact for the return trip. [00:34:05] Randall: And we should say specifically. Carbo box that a bike would have come in. Cause generally this'll be a five layer corrugated box. It'll be a thicker material. And if you need to reinforce it with some tape, At the corners and so on. And if you get, if it gets a hole in it, patch up the hole, but you can go pretty far with the cardboard box.  [00:34:24] I have a post carry transfer case, which I love, it's a bit more involved. I got to pull the fork and it takes me usually about 15 minutes or so. 20 minutes to pack it up, and to squeeze some gear in between the wheels and the frame and things like that.  [00:34:38] But I generally get past any sort of oversize baggage fees and I have the bigger of the two bags too. So oftentimes I don't even get asked what it is and if I get asked, it's oh yeah, it's a sports gear. Massage table. Yeah, whatever.  [00:34:50] Craig: That's the key for me that post carry bag or or, okay. This is another company that makes one of these bags where as you said, you've got to do a little bit more disassembly, whereas typically it might've been take the handle Bazaar off the pedals and your wheels, and you can get into a cardboard box. Would these particular smaller bags, you do need to pull the fork, which seems incredibly intimidating. When you first talk about it, but in practice, it's actually not. [00:35:15] Randall: It's not too bad. Probably the biggest issue is if you have a bike with integrated cabling, Then it can be a real nightmare. And in fact I might even go as far as to say, if you don't know what you're doing, don't mess with it. A bike with external cabling, or at least partially external, like our bike, you just have to be careful not to kink the hoses. That's the big, probably the biggest city issue, kinking the hoses, or bending the housings and cables in a way that affects the breaking or the shifting.  [00:35:44] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. If you've, if your cables are particularly tight, It then becomes a problem. I think my routing is just on the edge. I do feel like I'm putting a little bit of stress. On the cables when I'm disassembling in that bag, but so far so good. [00:35:58] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:35:59] And then of course you have the full sized bags where if you don't care about paying the airline fees, then get one of these was it Evoque I think makes a really nice one that has good protection there's a bunch of companies that make good ones where you just  [00:36:11] Craig: Yeah, I've.  [00:36:12] Randall: the front wheel and throw it in.  [00:36:14] Craig: I've got a Tulay one that is like bomber. It's got like a through axle slots, but one it's hard as hell to move it around. And two, I got dinged on both weight and access size on my trip to Africa. It's out. I was pretty ticked. [00:36:31] Randall: Yeah. And then the other thing is on the other end can you get it into the trunk of a cab. And so that's actually another advantage of bags like the post transfer case in the oral case ones is you can. I think I know the post one has backpack straps, and then you can fit it in the boot of pretty much any vehicle.  [00:36:49] Craig: Yeah, totally under emphasized attribute and benefit of those types of bags. Totally agree. [00:36:54] Like you can get into a sedan. With a, a Prius, Uber Lyft driver and make it in. No problem. [00:37:00] Randall: Oh, yeah.  [00:37:01]  [00:37:01] Craig Dalton: Pardon the segue that's going to do it for part one of our Q and a episode. I thought that was a great time to break and we'll jump into another half hour of questions and answers in our next episode of, in the dirt, which we'll release in the coming weeks. As always, if you're interested in communicating with myself or Randall,  [00:37:20] Please join the ridership www.theridership.com. If you're able to support the podcast, your contributions are greatly appreciated. You can visit, www.buymeacoffee.com/thegravelride to contribute in any way you can to support the financial wellbeing of the podcast. If you're unable to support in that way, ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated.  [00:37:46] On any of your favorite podcast platforms. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt under your wheels. 

Star Wars Theory
KENOBI RELEASE DATE LEAK! RUMOR OR TRUE? - LET'S TALK ABOUT IT - NT IRL

Star Wars Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 66:06


NERD THEORY IRL - Today Josh and I are discussing the new rumor that has been circulated on the internet regarding the release date for The Kenobi Show. Some are saying that the rumor is true. Is this true or a rumor? Frankly we don't know - we will break it down. We give you our thoughts and theories on this plus our take on all the new Star Wars News from this week.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Masters of Product Management
What's Wrong with Being Timeline Focused? Everything! Now, Let's Fix It. - a conversation with Janna Bastow

Masters of Product Management

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 34:34


Anyone who has been in product management knows that a timeline is part of everyday life. Frankly, it's hard for a lot of people to imagine not living in this timeline-driven world. But why are timelines so important? More often than not, they are arbitrary and not tied to any real customer or market need. It's not to say we should just take our sweet time and be lackadaisical, we still need to meet customer needs in a timely manner and beat the competition in providing value. But are timelines in their traditional sense the proper means to that end?  In this episode, Janna Bastow, co-founder of Mind the Product and CEO of ProdPad, shares her wisdom on how organizations can move away from timeline driven focus and create more value along the way.  

The Daily Boost | Coaching You Need. Success You Deserve.
Are You Self-Sabotaging Your Success

The Daily Boost | Coaching You Need. Success You Deserve.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 10:41


Get the Daily Boost FIVE days a week at MotivationToMove.com. Are You Self-Sabotaging Your Success When I started my first real business 20 years ago, I found myself stressed, working long hours, missing workouts, sleep, and family. I was determined to be a success - even if it killed me.  I'm not sure it would have done that, but I was a least on my way to wearing myself out since I was in my office at 2 AM on a Saturday, with a big bottle of wine. Frankly, I was mad that day and was thinking bad things about myself. Feeling a little lost, as well, and a bladder full of wine, I stumbled to the restroom. That's when my reflection in the mirror stopped me in my tracks. The man looking back was not the man I was on the inside. I could tell by the look in his eyes that he wasn't mad. He was sad. Success was proving harder than he thought it would be, and he was lying to himself about why. No. I was lying to myself. In a surreal moment, I realized that I was questioning my commitment. How could I get up every day and say that I was committed and yet allow myself to self-sabotage? How could I commit to taking on a difficult challenge and complain that it was difficult? How could I ever get what I wanted if my commitment was a big lie I was telling myself. Either I was committed to my goals, or I wasn't. I looked into the eyes of the stranger in the mirror and saw a glimmer of my old self. I realized that everything I was doing was self-inflicted, and I was ready to stop blaming my challenges.  It was a moment of reckoning, and I could see my commitment returning as a sparkle emerged from my eyes, and relief appeared in my shoulders.  My inner Yoda also spoke to me - "Succeed or do not succeed. Both are self-inflicted. There is no try. There is only commitment." After that, I had a very good night's sleep.

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family
46. How You Can Show Up For Others In Times Of Grief with Taylor and Chris Pierce

Family Brand: Take Back Your Family

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 99:46


Hey guys! Chris and Melissa here, since moving to Hawaii we have had the chance to meet so many amazing people and hear their incredible stories. One couple in particular, who live right down the street from us, Chris and Taylor Pierce, have a story that has been particularly impactful. They have experienced a tremendous amount of loss and grief throughout their marriage. Frankly, a lot more grief than anyone should have to go through in life. Through miscarriages, a lost baby, and just last year the passing of their 8-year-old son, Griff.  In today's episode, we have a deep and honest conversation about grief and how you can support those who may be going through a difficult time. One of our mottos is “Smith's show up for people”, but when it comes to loss and grief it's hard to say what that looks like. We loved learning how to better do that from the Pierces!  Join us as we discuss Chris and Taylor's everlasting courage and their journey navigating loss through difficult pregnancies and miscarriages to the joy of adopting and growing their family. You'll hear the inspiring story of Griff, an 8-year-old who lived life to the fullest and always wore his heart on his sleeve.   You'll hear their advice on how you can best show up for those who are grieving as well as the different ways that people supported them through their loss. Grieving is a complex process that shows up differently for everyone, and Chris and Taylor talk about how they work through this together as a team, and a family.  They share many specific ideas, including how one of the most impactful things you can do is listen.   We are so thankful and honored that Chris and Taylor were willing to tell us their story and we are so inspired by the bright and lasting legacy of light who is Griff. Our hope for today's episode is that you are able to better support the ones you love through any grieving process.  To follow more of our journey, check out the links below! More Of What's Inside: Showing up for others in a time of grief Miscarriages, adoptions, and pregnancy Dealing with a year of hospital visits The moment they realized they needed a change How showing up manifests differently for everyone The power of just showing up Helping children through grief Sayings that are not helpful Why you shouldn't assume, but ask Listening to their stories of loved ones lost Understanding the longevity of grief Giving yourself grace under grief And much more!  LINKS Website:   familybrand.com Social:   Facebook: www.facebook.com/FamilyBrandOfficial Instagram: www.instagram.com/ourfamilybrand YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCGu-7odB6gkPbyXpUIQLkrg Twitter: https://twitter.com/OurFamilyBrand   Free course:   familybrand.com/10steps   Episode Minute By Minute: 0:02 - What we cover today 1:57 - Introducing Chris and Taylor 6:56 - Why we wanted to tell this story 9:26 - Taylor and Chris' journey with pregnancy 14:56 - The first sign of issues with Griff 20:17 - Taking advantage of the time they had left 24:53 - Finding the courage to take back their family 29:07 - Creating a good life for Griff 34:43 - Remembering Griff 39:01 - The time before Griff passed away 44:49 - Taking him to the hospital for the last time 49:36 - Knowing that this time would be different 54:02 - The blessing of spirituality  58:41 - Dealing with grief during a pandemic 1:03:06 - The small things that mattered 1:07:56 - What not to do in times of grief 1:11:37 - What you can/should ask people in need 1:15:43 - Showing up is longterm 1:20:14 - Taylor and Chris' advice to those in grief 1:25:03 - Giving space to family and grieve how they need 1:29:57 - Working through grief with your spouse 1:33:20 - Grieving as a family 1:38:18 - Closing thoughts and advice

If These Heels Could Talk
Nurturing Partnerships

If These Heels Could Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 25:47


You've networked. You've been introduced. Lots of people know who you are and that you're in business.    While networking is an ongoing activity, part of the process is nurturing relationships for the long-term. But how?   Frankly, the same way you would nurture any relationship. Show up. Be present. Be interested and engaged. Enthusiastically cheer on the other business's success and be supportive in more challenging times. Listen to what is important to the other business owner and then act on it in conjunction with them. Look for opportunities to work together on special projects or promotions.   JoyGenea and Michelle discuss nurturing relationships in their business lives, including the most important step - choosing which relationship to nurture.   

MichaelKushner
#53 - Ben Fankhauser: It Always Works Out

MichaelKushner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 56:13


What's it like to open the first new musical post Broadway shut down? Ben Fankhauser and Alex Wyse have come together to create A Commercial Jingle for Regina Comet, a new musical playing Off-Broadway at the DR2 Theatre in NYC.  “The amount of time that you have is the correct amount of time,” Fankhauser says. “That idea that like, ‘Ugh -- if I only had another week' it's like that took me a long amount of time to grow out of that idea because you have exactly the amount of time that you need.” This is the mentality that helped Frankhauser and Wyse open up a new, in person, musical Off Broadway. In this episode, we go on the journey of Ben discovering his multi-hyphenate identity, and like so many of us -- we are all multi-hyphenates… we may just call it something different.  “It took me a while to realize what I was all about, however looking back I think I was always a multi-hyphenate. I was always a musician, an actor, a wannabe writer, a storyteller, a producer. But I never really had considered… it was more an innate knowledge of the kind of things I want to do with my life. Frankly, it wasn't until I heard of your program years ago when I was like, “Oh that's a genius name for it.” There's a crossover -- for me the crossover always existed, it just hadn't really registered that it was a thing or that you could be a person who didn't crossover. To me, we all crossover whether you want to or not.”  Waiting is the most exhausting part of being an actor -- and after a phone call between Wyse and Fankhauser, they decided they don't need to wait for permission. They didn't know what their journey would be but they went on it. Finding success in this industry is attributed to what makes one happy -- so how does one find happiness? It's about sharing a specific story. Everyone has one and there's room for everybody.  “We are the first new, original musical that is opening up post pandemic. A lot of the things we're seeing open have been open pre-pandemic. We are a brand spankin' new original musical and it is the best feeling to offer up something that no one has ever seen before. It's not based on anything. It's our creative brainchild and we hope it gives people the chance to come in and laugh and experience some joy and experience some music they've never heard before and all those things that we go to the theatre for -- we go to see musicals for -- it just feels a little sparklier and more special.”  In this episode Ben and Michael discuss comparing themselves in their journey, what makes someone write a new musical, building the ideal version of one's career, tips to staying healthy while working on a musical during the pandemic, how to successfully multitask or switch between hyphens when writing and starring in a new musical, and the flexibility with change.  The hysterical and zany A Commercial Jingle for Regina Comet is running from September 27th through November 14th at DR2 Theater in Union Square, New York City. For tickets, visit www.reginacomet.com Ben Fankhauser is best known for playing Davey in Newsies (Original Broadway Cast & Movie). Other New York: Mack & Mabel (Encores!), Saturday Night and Bar-mitzvah Boy (York Theatre). First national tours: Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, and Spring Awakening. Regionally Ben has been seen in Flamingo Kid (Hartford Stage), American In Paris (MTW) Big River (Sacramento Music Circus), I Hate Hamlet (Bucks County Playhouse) Next To Normal (North Carolina Theatre), Television: The Deuce, Indoor Boys, Tony Awards. Ben is a frequent guest performer at many cabaret venues in New York City including Feinsteins/54 Below where his solo concert Ben's Fank'd Up Broadway had a sold out run. Hear more on Spotify/Itunes/Youtube BFA: Ithaca College. Cleveland Native. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TurfNet RADIO
Some Love for Labor! Frankly Speaking with Tyler Bloom and Lee Butler

TurfNet RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 48:00


Some Love for Labor! Frank speaks unusually Frankly with Tyler Bloom, a former golf course superintendent currently specializing in workforce development. A far-reaching conversation about the woes, wins and opportunities that lie ahead for the labor needs in the golf and sports turf industries. Aligning labor and business goals in a golf course operation requires some progressive thinking. Tyler provides some useful tips. Frank ends the episode checking in with the official SE Diagnostician of the Frankly Speaking Podcast, Lee Butler at NC State University. Frank-Lee speaking about above and below ground issues from the growing season and how to prep for next year's disease pressure now!

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast
Vibes - Only the wrong ones

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 93:30


Cyndi Lauper has psychic powers. Jeff Goldblum is tall and is Jeff Goldblum. Are they a match made in Hollywood for the 80s? Obviously not. Hope you like everyone being at an 11! So Vibes is part of this weird genre that only really happened in the 80's. The closest the men in ties will call it is a rom-com, but there's a x-factor with this type of 80's flicks. There's always a BS gimmick such as what we have here - psychic powers. These are more of screwball comedies but with a love interest penciled in because "Oh I guess we have to". So the romance is an afterthought which means that its shouldn't even be a rom-com at all since the rom is so far down on the list of priorities in the writing. It's unfortunate for a lot of these films as the masses tend to stay away from rom-coms. Aside from the teenage girls. But why are we catering our films around selling to this very small niche? I guess I digress. None of this is to say that we've got a good one here. Frankly, Vibes is a mix of cringe and tedium. While there is a sprinkle of good occasionally, most of the jokes are pulled or the ones that aren't are awkward and weird. I guess if you're only wanting to come into a movie for Cyndi Lauper, then you'll like it. For the rest of us that could go either way - its a skipper.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
In the News... Implantable insulin pump, Doctors (not parents) miss T1D symptoms, Dexcom shelf-life extension and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:41


It's "In the News..." the only diabetes newscast! Top stories this week: Medtronic moves on implantable insulin pump, study: doctors - but not parents - are missing symptoms of T1D in kids, Dexcom "shelf-life extension" explained, news about whether COVID is causing a surge of diabetes in children and what happened with the Apple watch BG monitoring news? -- Join us each Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT! Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Transcription Below:    Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I'm Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule. XX In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their Entrée Bowls and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco. XX Our top story.. What helps people with diabetes gain better glucose control? Expansion of Medicaid. As part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act or Obamacare, U.S. states were given the option of expanding Medicaid coverage to more people as a means of reducing the number of people without health insurance. As of today, only 12 states have not taken advantage. A new study finds that blood pressure and glucose control measures have improved in states that have. The researchers behind the study say it may take a while to show up but that, over the longer run, expanding Medicaid eligibility may improve key chronic disease health outcomes for low-income, marginalized populations. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/medicaid-expansion-improves-hypertension-and-diabetes-control XX Medtronic takes over the intellectual property rights to an implanted infusion pump. This is technology developed by the Alfred E Mann foundation. 25 years ago, there was a lot of buzz about implantable insulin pumps, but it hasn't panned out. The tech is just what it sounds like – a small insulin pump that goes under the skin and holds enough insulin for a few months. Medtronic had one on the market but pulled it almost 15 years ago. One of the drawbacks is that you have to go to the doctor every time you need to fil the pump and there's other upkeep – but the upside is said to be better control and a lot less thinking about diabetes. Interesting to follow this one. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/medtronic-buys-implanted-infusion-pump-tech-to-develop-new-type-1-diabetes-treatment XX A story familiar to way too many parents.. symptoms of type 1 diabetes are not always immediately recognized by primary care providers. This was a study of about 240 kids under 18.. published in Pediatric Diabetes These researchers found that 39% of parents had suspicions of new-onset diabetes before they brought their child in for care. Of those, the majority of parents first brought their child to the doctor with symptoms.. and then ended up bringing the same child to the emergency room within the next four weeks. This was a Swedish study, but research shows especially during COVID, diagnosis during DKA is increasing in children in many countries, showing the greater need for better education all around. https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-09-21/doctors-often-miss-signs-of-type-1-diabetes-in-kids XX We've heard a lot during this pandemic about an increase in new diabetes diagnoses. A new report from Mississippi, where providers are reporting a -quote – massive increase. One pediatric endocrinologist is says they've seen up to a 40% increase this year, compared to 2019. That's both type 1 and type 2. So what's going on? Lots of theories including indirect effects of quarantines, closures, and unemployment. It might sound odd to some, but severe emotional stress is thought to be a trigger for diabetes, especially in type 1. Additional studies show that COVID targets the insulin making pancreatic beta cells. A full understanding may be some time away, but these endos say the surge is real. XX Interesting listener question about Dexom sensors.. thanks for sending in this photo – seems that some customers are getting these G6 inserters – brand new in the original packaging – with a label that says “this product meets shelf life extension requirements.” I reached out to Dexcom and they told me: the stickers are legit and there are updated expirations dates. I've asked for a bit more information as to why they'd do something like this and if it means that all G6 sensors could have extended shelf life. They responded that they aren't going through all the sensors, so only the ones labeled can be considered extended.. no answer as to why now or to which part of the sensor or inserter actually expires. I'll follow up next time we talk for the podcast, but if you get one of these labeled sensors – the company says it's legit and safe. XX More to come, But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible. Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—the new Entrée bowls are great. They have a chicken burrito, a cauliflower mash and braised beef bowl.. the lemon chicken I've told you about and more! They keep adding to the menu line! You can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com. Back to the news… Big news for a great children's book. JDRF has put Shia Learns About Insulin into the Bag of Hope. We had the author on the show last year... I'll link that episode up so you can hear the whole story. Shaina (SHAY-ahn-uh) Hatchell is a Registered Nurse, Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist, and Nurse Manager at the Howard University Diabetes Treatment Center. The story was inspired by her brother, who lives with T1D. The JDRF Bag of Hope is given to newly diagnosed children age 11 and under. Frankly, it's pretty hard to get new products in there – it's nice to see some more diverse representation. https://www.jdrf.org/press-releases/jdrf-announces-the-addition-of-shia-learns-about-insulin-book-into-the-bag-of-hope/ -- Last bit of news is note worthy for what didn't happen. Big apple news conference this month with absolutely no mention of blood glucose monitoring. You'll recall there was a ton of speculation about this all year long.. with many tech websites breathlessly reporting this was going to be happen. Look – I do think it will.. but there is really no hard evidence that anyone has come close to cracking this. Non invasive remotely accurate glucose monitoring is really hard. And, as I've said all along, we'll know it's for real when we see some clinical trials. -- Please join me wherever you get podcasts for our next episode - The episode out right now is with American Idol contestant turned actor Kevin Covais – he's in a new Netflix show out this month and he spent some time this summer mentoring teens. Fun guy with great behind the scenes Idol stories, too. That's In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

The Next 100 Days Podcast
#292 – Nigel Codman – Saving Water

The Next 100 Days Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 42:08


Saving Water with Nigel Codman from Novaloo Saving water is Nigel Codman's mission. Not long back, Nigel was in a conversation with a 35 year head of purchasing veteran for a multi-national company who declared she'd never had a conversation about toilets. Nor had she ever been as excited about toilets. Frankly, Nigel could sell anything. But, he decided to save the world by saving water one flush at a time. SCHOOLBOY JOKE ALERT Who invented the toilet? Answer, Thomas Crapper. His design, 140 years ago, was to put enough water in a cistern, high enough up, and let that water fall down into a bowl and it would clean that bowl. Since then, people have been trying to reduce the amount of water used by toilets. Currently, toilets use 9 litres per flush. Nigel cautions people NOT to fill up a plastic milk bottle, stick it in the cistern to try reduce water usage. All you'd be doing is impairing the design of the toilet. If it was designed for 9 litres, then 7 litres won't do the job. Introducing Nigel's Saving Water Toilet http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Nigel-Codman-Saving-Water.mp4 His toilets save as much as 85% of the typical 9 litre flush that legacy toilets use. Check out the Propelair Toilet. You have probably stopped at one of the service stations that have installed these types of toilet. Imagine their saving, when they are being used round the clock with 60 cubicles between male and female toilets. Each toilet will see 240 flushes per day. THE MATHS - Save 7.5 litres per flush. 60 toilets. 240 flushes per day. That saves 39.4 MILLION litres per year. And that's just one service station. The Last Bastion of Corporate Social Responsibility is SAVING WATER Payback within 2 years or even 10 months - surely that will excite a CFO. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Saving-Water-CSR-ROI.mp4 Other Benefits Nigel makes the point that it is not just about saving water. That's the main thing, save water, save money. However, you are also saving carbon. A much lesser amount of water is going down to the water treatment plants, so they save carbon on how they treat the water. In the last 18 months, hygiene has come to the fore. When SARS hit us in 2003, scientists discovered that transmission came from toilets. By using the toilet, the virus was off-loaded so to speak. That's fine, providing you SHUT THE LID. But the contents of the bowl get agitated when the toilet is flushed. The Propelair toilet will not flush until the seat is firmly down. This prevents airborne viruses spreading on flush. Not so much in regular toilets. You've been warned. Shut the damn lid!         A plume of air from a flushed toilet will rise 1.5 metres. It contains micro-molecules of water. All will contain bacteria and viruses in the droplets. They hit the walls of the cubicle/WC. Worse, they stay there for about 48 hours. Good God, run for your lives! You'd think for purchasing managers, this is an easy decision. So what is stopping them? Objections http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Saving-Water-Handling-Objections.mp4 The Propelair toilet blows our and water down into the bowl. The air is vented off so it's prevented from going into the drainage system. An alternative solution is the suck principle. They are complex to engineer into a commercial property. Propelair is about twice the cost of a standard commercial toilet. Some hospitals have toilets without lids! Who's to say that toilets aren't the root of the circulation of viruses in hospitals. Nigel works with David Emslie, a previous podcast guest who spoke about saving costs through lighting. Contact Nigel Codman at Novaloo Get in touch with The Next 100 Days hosts… Want to know more about Graham Arrowsmith? Finely Fettled – If you want more affluent and high net worth customers, investors or patients, Talk to Graham at Finely Fettled.

Kenneth Frankly
63: Extra Frankly - Baby On Board!

Kenneth Frankly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 18:03


Hi Friends! Well well well, if it isn't your favorite bi-annual podcast. This is actually just a little extra morsel from the archives of our failed quarantine-era recording attempts in August of 2020. But! This is the moment that Kenneth Frank found out that Rory was with child! Yes, Rory has a baby! His name is Harrison (Harry) and he's so sweet.  So yeah, we're sharing to get it out of our drafts. Sorry for the audio quality. Stay safe and well, see you in 2023!

Here & Now
Why The 'Big Lie' Persists; Phoenix Schools Struggle With Bus Driver Shortage

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 40:59


False claims of rampant election fraud and a stolen 2020 presidential election persist despite the fact that there is no evidence that it's true. What gives these lies so much staying power? "Frankly, We Did Win This Election: The Inside Story of How Trump Lost" author Michael Bender joins us to explain. And, in Phoenix, Arizona, many school bus drivers are doubling or tripling up on routes. Brandon George, transportation director for PVUSD, talks about the shortage.

Social Capital
335: Telling Your Story To Build Your Brand - with KJ Eichstaedt

Social Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 33:32


KJ Eichstaedt KJ is the Co-Founder of Ike Media, the international sports brand started in Wisconsin and is now found in 90 plus countries across the world. He's a designer, dealmaker, consultant, podcast host, video producer, and graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with degrees in International Business and Marketing. Words that describe KJ are optimist, bold, creative, and driven. KJ currently lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he helps athletes, businesses, and individuals grow their brand. Could you tell me about the origin of IKE and what you do?  IKE is an international brand that helps individuals, athletes, and businesses position and grows their brands through creative media vehicles and podcasting. We have an international reach, but we have local roots. On Twitter, there are a lot of people who follow IKE specifically for the IKE Packers podcast, or IKE badgers podcast, or our Brewers and Bucks podcasts which allows us to have a very strong local footprint because that's what we're all about. Home and family are some of our biggest values, but also having international backgrounds we work with anyone throughout the world. We enjoy being creative, we model and position all of our work after some of the highest brands in the world. We love helping anyone grow, helping them grow their business, helping them grow their brand, helping them bring their dream to life. They say the best companies have a story and we like to think of ourselves as the pen and paper to help them write that story. Why do you think people in companies need that strong brand? Frankly, people are starting to see through the BS. They're seeing that these companies aren't as sincere as they portray themselves as, and they aren't sure if these big Fortune 500 companies really care about them. People are getting smarter, they're getting smarter with their emotional intelligence, they're getting smarter with their actual intelligence and I think people in today's world which is so run with media and technology, crave a genuine connection which is why we're seeing a lot of local brands, regional media networks really rising up. The big fortune 500 companies really having to do a lot of whether it's donations, whether it's PR, they have to kind of prove to the world that they are actually good for the world. It just allows people to connect with the little guy, the local person down the street, the woman with the flower shop, the athlete who is going to Wisconsin who wants to take his dreams to the NFL. Everyone has a story and it's really hard to stand out in this digital landscape without one because there's just so much media. People have no shortage of it and the story is one of those things that cuts through the noise. It's really something you have to have and if you don't have one, you're behind the game. What would you recommend are some of the best ways to build a brand in 2021? At IKE we take an approach that's all about deeper connection. What I mean by that is, there are certain crazes going around, whether it's tik tok or Instagram. An overall trend is that video keeps getting shorter and shorter and shorter and shorter. We love data as a society, companies love data because it tells a story. What we try and cut through the noise of is that maybe you get a million views on a tik tok video, but maybe someone only watches it for seven seconds. How many of those people can you actually make a genuine connection and in seven seconds? How many of them are just going to scroll past and go and laugh at the next thing? We take the approach where in a world where long-form content seems to be getting pushed more and more to the back burner, we don't even care. We'd rather make 10 deep, meaningful connections with people we can help, form a relationship with, help them grow their dreams, help them follow their dreams, help them grow their business, their finances, whatever it might be, help them get in touch with a certain individual who they thought there's no way they would ever be able to get in a conversation with. We produce results and it really starts with that long-form approach in actually getting a connection. So if someone even has 100 listens on a podcast episode, for example, those people are essentially spending 30 minutes in the room with you. If you spend 30 minutes in a room with someone, you can really connect with them and then you might have a relationship, you might have something that can benefit you both whether it's, a mutual friend, or maybe it's something like a business deal. It could be all of those things, but we take a quality over quantity approach and we're really not afraid to show it because we've worked with some of the most incredible athletes in the world, frankly, and that helps us gain credibility. Can you share one of your most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had? Growing up, I would wake up in the mornings on Saturdays and I remember as a family we would watch the Badger game. Sometimes we would even be able to go to the Badger football game in Madison. They were 11 o'clock games and you would have to get up super early and get on the road. At that age, I probably wasn't very enthusiastic about it, but I would go to these games and it had an impact on me early on, whether I realized it or not. It all started with one connection. We met someone, we formed a genuine connection and he happened to be a player on the team. Instead of making relationships transactional, Brian Anderson emphasizes making relationships, not transactional. You can't approach relationships transactionally because it'll just never work. But basically, we ended up meeting this one guy and he ended up being the first athlete guest to come on our show. We've since turned it into dozens and dozens of athletes by producing high-quality content, providing value, leveraging opportunities of a brand, leveraging connections and now we work with athletes all across the board and are able to tell their stories on our podcasts, which help us gain credibility in the eyes of people in business, you know, people with their own companies, people with their own practices, such as the real estate market. We've actually had clients of ours have the Top Producing real estate agents, and also the Top Producing real estate team, that leader on his podcast. So it doesn't really matter what field it's in, if you apply the appropriate tactics, if you lead with value, if you do a good job, if you form a genuine connection if you actually try and help people and show them what they can gain the sky's the limit. If I were to go back when I was a kid and tell myself, "Hey, you'd be talking to these guys pretty frequently," I would have said, "No way you're lying!" It's really opened my eyes to just the possibilities of it all. Networking can change someone's life, whether it's a job or something else. You might apply to 100 jobs, but you might have a phone call with someone you know and that might be the door opening that actually leads you to an opportunity that is worthwhile, and you follow up on. We've seen podcasts turn into this vehicle that allows people to both benefit while also connect. It's just been this unbelievable experience and cultivated in front of our own eyes, whether it's the IKE Podcast Network, or whether it's even podcasting in general. Over 200 million Americans are familiar with podcasting and over half of Americans have listened to a podcast increasing exponentially each year. Really, the key is starting. It doesn't matter if you have 10 people listen. If you have 10 people in your podcast, that's still like you doing 10 meetings a day and that's pretty impressive. But once you start to work at it, and you get up to 100 listeners, you get up to 1000 listeners, that's when the benefits are really unbelievable. It's almost like you don't know what the possibilities are until you jump into the arena. I encourage everyone if they're a little worried about if it will actually work, if you stick with it it's going to create a lot of positive opportunities. What advice would you offer that business professional who's really looking to grow their network? I think you have to be willing to do it. Podcasting is one of these ways to do it that applies to today's world, in regards to someone looking to grow their network. A lot of the people, whether it's a kid, whether it's a CEO, are afraid to put their image out there. They see what goes on online, they know they have to network online, they know if they just network in person they might be missing out on valuable opportunities. But really, for better, for worse, most likely for worse, online isn't always the nicest place to be. There might be cyberbullying there might be whatever going on. I find that a lot of business leaders, a lot of professionals, love podcasting as this opportunity because they don't necessarily have to put their face out there. They can still give themselves to an audience in a deep, long-form, meaningful way, without having to be in the camera. Some CEOs are like, "Hey, I'm a great business person, but I'm not an actor, I'm not a movie star," well, they love podcasting because it allows them to thrive in that role. I think was LeBron James who said, "Be a star in your role," and some people are meant to be stars in podcasts, some people are meant to be on TV, some people are meant to be on the radio, some people are meant to, and people are meant to connect online in person. This is one of those ways that really allows people to touch on all those points. If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less than or differently with regards to your professional career? I think you can always tell yourself to be patient. I think you can always tell yourself that you're going to maybe have to reinvent a few things. IKE originally started off as a sports website. I was seeing all the fake news being spewed by ESPN, I was seeing how they were covering the Oscar Pistorius trial and it wasn't really about the sports. So I saw an opportunity to cover this in a blog format, more like an article format to be accurate. We made this beautiful website we modeled after Apple and Tesla and ended up being called IKEsportreport and we put all these beautiful articles on the site in various categories, but we didn't really have an audience yet to read these articles. So from there, we had to reinvent in a sense, and we started working at building a following. We found that sportspeople who love what we're offering existed a lot on Twitter. What that meant was a reinvention of what the original concept of IKE was. What ended up happening from there is these Twitter accounts gained a lot of popularity, but even then, we didn't want to just be a popular Twitter account, we had to be more so we evolved into podcasts. If I were to go back and tell myself anything, I think I would preach patience. I think I would preach being open to adapting and evolving. I think I would tell myself that it's going to work out and you're not going to regret this when you're 90. As I go back to that story about watching the Badgers going up and now talking to them, and potentially unveiling something special with some of them, potentially, in the future, it's all just like, pinch me moments, and I definitely don't consider myself someone who has made it by any means. I've got a long way to go, but I don't think I'm going to regret that I didn't try and follow my passion when I'm older.  I understand you have an offer for our listeners today? We have some really cool things we're doing in the podcast world. We're actually going into this phase in our business where we're able to take on more clients. No matter what size your business is, whether you want a basic package, we're actually offering some specials right now, where if you want to pay in bulk, we offer some pretty hefty discounts, to say the least. I think one thing that's also becoming more and more relevant in today's world is a subject matter expert's time, right? So it's not even just the act of getting a podcast or getting a brand, it's the act of you know, really working with people who have cultivated brands and are doing it at a level that makes them proud and something that you can truly own and be proud to show off because that sometimes doesn't show up in the value proposition. I love working with people from all different backgrounds and I'm excited to keep work with some new people. You need a story to connect with someone, you need a story to grow your business, you just a story to sell products or just a story to meet people. I would encourage everybody just to start. We've been doing podcasts for a long time and we have cultivated some great audiences, we've charted top 40 multiple times, we've been listened to in over 90 different countries, we've had professional athletes, collegiate athletes, CEOs, entrepreneurs, you name it, and we'd love to help anyone listening today who might be saying, "Hey, maybe video isn't my bread and butter, but I do have an incredible story and I'm ready to tell that story in a certain way. I'm ready to work with someone to do that." I'd love to help.   Connect with KJ   Website: https://www.ikepodcastnetwork.com/  Email: kjeichstaedt@gmail.com  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenneth-john-eichstaedt/

The Mad Scientist Podcast
Advertising Part 2: Moving to the Woods

The Mad Scientist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 52:21


This episode we dig into the philosophy behind advertising. Frankly, we should all just move to the woods.

Footballistically Arsenal
Who The Falk Knows?

Footballistically Arsenal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 53:33


Boyd and Josh were joined by friend of the podcast, PR aficionado Max Goodbourn to reflect on successive wins for the Gunners that are starting to make the so called crisis move a little ever further away. We all enjoyed a gritty 1-0 win to the Arsenal, a thing of beauty so associated with the club during a successful period in the 1990s, was just what was needed in a must win fixture as Arsenal start climbing the table. We look ahead to a big week, where Arsenal will seek more success, with AFC Wimbledon first visiting in the Carabao Cup, before Spurs arrive next Sunday at the Emirates looking for their first North London Derby away League win since 2010. But who will be in goal. The assured Ramsdale or is Mr Falk right that Leno is heading back between the sticks? Frankly, who the Falk knows. Thanks for listening and we'll be back next Monday. Check out Review From The Terrace that kicks off with distinctly Scottish view of Braveheart. You'll love it! arsenalpodcast.net @arsenalpodcast Produced by Josh Landy A Playback Media Production playbackmedia.co.uk Copyright 2021 Playback Media Ltd - playbackmedia.co.uk/copyright

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers
Steve Ballmer takes shots at Lakers fans while celebrating his future arena. Plus, Kareem talks!

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 40:10


Last Friday, the Clippers officially broke ground on their future arena (the Intuit Dome), set to debut in Inglewood during the 2024-2025 NBA season. As to be expected, their insanely rich, insanely hyper, and occasionally insanely "I said too much" owner Steve Ballmer was at the center of the action. As such, the ceremony was predictably huge on spectacle, and social media wasn't shy about pointing out how bored Kawhi Leonard and Paul George looked while watching much of the pageantry. Then again, that's how Ballmer rolls, and as long as Clipper fans enjoyed it (which they probably did) and the building's great (which it undoubtedly will), these kinda silly aesthetics are irrelevant. The bottom line is the Clippers will have a new home enhancing their identity in L.A. However, Ballmer also took a few unsolicited shots at Laker fans feeling insecure about the Clippers boldly planting their new flag, which feels like a potential repeat of past mistakes poking the bear. Ballmer's not entirely wrong that some Laker fans shouting "I don't care about the Clippers!!!" feels "protest too much." Frankly, Laker fans should care. This team is good, well run and finally has an owner who wants to win. This franchise is no longer a laughingstock walkover. But until the Clippers have WAY more accomplishments to their name, better to just leave the Lakers alone, rather than risk another "Streetlights over Spotlights" embarrassment. And finally, during a great interview with Marc Stein, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar gave his blessing to LeBron James to eventually pass him on the NBA all-time scoring list. The Kamenetzkys discuss what this says about Kareem as a person and a basketball legend, and what people can learn from this attitude. (In the meantime, the entire interview provides another reminder that Kareem is the GOAT of Impressive people.) Hosts: Andy and Brian Kamenetzky SEGMENT 1: The Clippers broke ground on a new arena and holy crap, was the ceremony Ballmer-esque!!! SEGMENT 2: Ballmer took a few shots at insecure Laker fans. Not a wise idea. SEGMENT 3: Kareem's comments about LeBron. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Wake Up Warchant
(9/16/21): A YouTube Show - what's going on at QB and frankly, the offense

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 74:57


(6:00) Brownlee faces the music (9:00) Spill the beans about the QBs! (19:00) The Wildcat (23:00) Scrutinizing the WRs (26:00) What changed at QB between ND and JSU to go with Milton (36:00) Chubba? (45:00) Stop using ND as a barometer(?) (49:30) Alums sniping FSU (52:00) Jordan Travis thoughts (59:00) WR most likely to break out Music: Hot Rod Circuit - Two Hand Touch Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Screaming in the Cloud
Security in the New Normal with Ev Kontsevoy

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 44:18


About EvEv Kontsevoy is Co-Founder and CEO of Teleport. An engineer by training, Kontsevoy launched Teleport in 2015 to provide other engineers solutions that allow them to quickly access and run any computing resource anywhere on the planet without having to worry about security and compliance issues. A serial entrepreneur, Ev was CEO and co-founder of Mailgun, which he successfully sold to Rackspace. Prior to Mailgun, Ev has had a variety of engineering roles. He holds a BS degree in Mathematics from Siberian Federal University, and has a passion for trains and vintage-film cameras.Links: Teleport: https://goteleport.com Teleport GitHub: https://github.com/gravitational/teleport Teleport Slack: https://goteleport.slack.com/join/shared_invite/zt-midnn9bn-AQKcq5NNDs9ojELKlgwJUA Previous episode with Ev Kontsevoy: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/the-gravitational-pull-of-simplicity-with-ev-kontsevoy/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimizeapplications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: vmware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Roughly a year ago, I had a promoted guest episode featuring Ev Kontsevoy, the co-founder and CEO of Teleport.A year has passed and what a year it's been. Ev is back to tell us more about what they've been up to for the past year and, ideally, how things may have changed over in the security space. Ev, thank you for coming back to suffer the slings and arrows I will no doubt be hurling your way almost immediately.Ev: Thanks for having me back, Corey.Corey: So, it's been a heck of a year. We were basically settling into the pandemic when last we recorded, and people's security requirements when everyone is remote were dramatically changing. A year later, what's changed? It seems like the frantic, grab a bucket and start bailing philosophy has largely been accepted with something that feels almost like a new normal, ish. What are you seeing?Ev: Yes, we're seeing exact same thing, that it's really hard to tell what is normal. So, at the beginning of the pandemic, our company, Teleport was, so we were about 25 people. And then once we got the vaccines, and the government restrictions started to, kind of, disappear, people started to ask, “So, when are we going to go back to normal?” But the thing is, we're 100 employees now, which means that three-quarters of the company, they joined us during the pandemic, so we have no normal to go back to. So, now we have to redefine—not redefined, we just basically need to get comfortable with this new, fully remote culture with fully remote identity that we have, and become comfortable with it. And that's what we're doing.Corey: Beyond what, I guess, you're seeing, as far as the culture goes, internally as well, it feels like there's been a distinct shift in the past year or so, the entire security industry. I mean, I can sit here and talk about what I've seen, but again, I'm all over the place and I deal with a very select series of conversations. And I try not to confuse anecdotes with data. Anecdata is not the most reliable thing. You're working in this space. That is the entire industry you're in. How has the conversation in the industry around security shifted? What's new? What trends are emerging?Ev: So, there are several things actually happening. So, first of all, I wouldn't call ourselves, like, we do all of security. So, we're experts in access; like, how do you act this everything that you have in your cloud or in your data centers? And that space has been going through one transformation after another. It's been basically under the same scaling stress as the rest of cloud computing industry.And we can talk about historical changes that have been happening, and then we can talk a little bit about, kind of, latest and greatest. And in terms of what challenges companies have with secure access, maybe it helps if I just quickly describe what ‘access' actually means.Corey: Please, by all means. It's one of those words that everyone knows, but if you ask three people to define it, you'll get five definitions—Ev: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: —and they don't really align. So please, you're the expert on this; I am here to listen because I guarantee you I am guilty of misusing the term at least once so far, today.Ev: Can't blame you. Can't blame you. We are—I was same way until I got into this space. So, access basically means four things. So, if you want to have access done properly into your cloud resources, you need to think about four things.First is connectivity. That's basically a physical ability to deliver an encrypted packet from a client to destination, to a resource whatever that is, could be database, could be, like, SSH machine, or whatever it is you're connecting to. So, connectivity is number one. So, then you need to authenticate. Authentication, that's when the resource decides if you should have access or not, based on who you are, hopefully.So, then authorization, that's the third component. Authorization, the difference—like, sometimes people confuse the two—the difference between authentication and authorization is that authorization is when you already authenticated, but the resource decides what actions you are allowed to perform. The typical example is, like, is it read-only or read-write access? So, that's authorization, deciding on which actions you're allowed to perform. And the final component of having access properly is having audit or visibility which is, again, it could be real-time and historical.So ideally, you need to have both. So, once you have those two solved, then you solved your access problem. And historically, if you look at how access has been done—so we had these giant machines, then we had microcomputers, then we had PCs, and they all have these things. So, you login into your Mac, and then if you try to delete certain file, you might get access denied. So, you see there is connectivity—in this case, it's physical, a keyboard is physically connected to the [laugh] actual machine; so then you have authentication that you log in in the beginning; then authorization, if you can or cannot do certain things in your machine; and finally, your Mac keeps an audit log.But then once the industry, we got the internet, we got all these clouds, so amount of these components that we're now operating on, we have hundreds of thousands of servers, and load-balancers, and databases, and Kubernetes clusters, and dashboards, all of these things, all of them implement these four things: connectivity, authentication, authorization, audit.Corey: Let me drive into that for a minute first, to make sure I'm clear on something. Connectivity makes sense. The network is the computer, et cetera. When you don't have a network to something, it may as well not exist. I get that.And the last one you mentioned, audit of a trail of who done it and who did what, when, that makes sense to me. But authentication and authorization are the two slippery ones in my mind that tend to converge a fair bit. Can you dive a little bit in delineate what the difference is between those two, please?Ev: So authentication, if you try to authenticate into a database, database needs to check if you are on the list of people who should be allowed to access. That's authentication, you need to prove that you are who you claim you are.Corey: Do you have an account and credentials to get into that account?Ev: Correct. And they're good ways to do authentication and bad ways to do authentication. So, bad way to do authentication—and a lot of companies actually guilty of that—if you're using shared credentials. Let's say you have a user called ‘admin' and that user has a password, and those are stored in some kind of stored—in, like 1Password, or something like Vault, some kind of encrypted Vault, and then when someone needs to access a database, they go and borrow this credentials and they go and do that. So, that is an awful way to do authentication.Corey: Now, another way I've seen that's terrible as been also, “Oh, if you're connecting from this network, you must be allowed in,” which is just… yeee.Ev: Oh, yeah. That's a different sin. And that's a perimeter security sin. But a much better way to do authentication is what is called identity-based authentication. Identity means that you always use your identity of who you are within the company.So, you would go in through corporate SSO, something like Okta, or Active Directory, or even Google, or GitHub, and then based on that information, you're given access. So, the resource in this case database, [unintelligible 00:07:39] say, “Oh, it's Corey. And Corey is a member of this group, and also a member of that group.” And based on that it allows you to get in, but that's where authentication ends. And now, if you want to do something, like let's say you want to delete some data, now a database needs to check, ah, can you actually perform that action? That is the authorization process.And to do that, usually, we use some mechanism like role-based access control. It will look into which group are you in. Oh, you are an admin, so admins have more privileges than regular people. So, then that's the process of authorization.And the importance of separating the two, and important to use identity because remember, audit is another important component of implementing access properly. So, if you're sharing credentials, for example, you will see in your audit log, “Admin did this. Admin did that.” It's exact same admin, but you don't know who actually was behind that action. So, by sharing credentials, you're also obscuring your own audit which is why it's not really a good thing.And going back to this industry trends is that because the amount of these resources, like databases and servers and so on, in the cloud has gotten so huge, so we now have this hardware pain, we just have too many things that need access. And all of these things, the software itself is getting more complicated, so now we have a software pain as well, that you have so many different layers in your stack that they need to access. That's another dimension for introducing access pain. And also, we just have more developers, and the development teams are getting bigger and bigger, the software is eating the world, so there is a people-ware pain. So, on the one hand, you have these four problems you need to solve—connectivity, authentication, authorization, access—and on the other hand, you have more hardware, more software, more people, these pain points.And so you need to consolidate, and that's really what we do is that we allow you to have a single place where you can do connectivity, authentication, authorization, and audit, for everything that you have in the cloud. We basically believe that the future is going to be like metaverse, like in those books. So, all of these cloud resources are slowly converging into this one giant planetary-scale computer.Corey: Suddenly, “I live on Twitter,” is no longer going to be quite as much of a metaphor as it is today.Ev: [laugh]. No, no. Yeah, I think we're getting better. If you look into what is actually happening on our computing devices that we buy, the answer is not the lot, so everything is running in data centers, the paradigm of thin client seems to be winning. Let's just embrace that.Corey: Yeah. You're never going to be able to shove data centers worth compute into a phone. By the time you can get there, data centers will have gotten better. It's the constant question of where do you want things to live? How do you want that to interact?I talk periodically about multi-cloud, I talk about lock-in, everyone is concerned about vendor lock-in, but the thing that people tend to mostly ignore is that you're already locked in throught a variety of different ways. And one way is both the networking side of it as well as the identity management piece because every cloud handles that differently and equating those same things between different providers that work different ways is monstrous. Is that the story of what you're approaching from a Teleport perspective? Is that the primary use case, is that an ancillary use case, or are we thinking about this in too small a term?Ev: So, you're absolutely right, being locked in, in and—like, by itself is not a bad thing. It's a trade-off. So, if you lack expertise in something and you outsourcing certain capability to a provider, then you're developing that dependency, you may call it lock-in or not, but that needs to be a conscious decision. Like, well, you didn't know how to do it, then someone else was doing it for you, so you should be okay with the lock-in. However, there is a danger, that, kind of, industry-wide danger about everyone relying on one single provider.So, that is really what we all try to avoid. And with identity specifically, I feel like we're in a really good spot that fairly early, I don't see a single provider emerging as owning everyone's identity. You know, some people use Okta; others totally happy tying everything to Google Apps. So, then you have people that rely on Amazon AWS native credentials, then plenty of smaller companies, they totally happy having all of their engineers authenticate through GitHub, so they use GitHub as a source of identity. And the fact that all of these providers are more or less compatible with each other—so we have protocols like OpenID Connect and SAML, so I'm not that concerned that identity itself is getting captured by a single player.And Teleport is not even playing in that space; we don't keep your identity. We integrate with everybody because, at the end of the day, we want to be the solution of choice for a company, regardless of which identity platform they're using. And some of them using several, like all of the developers might be authenticating via GitHub, but everyone else goes through Google Apps, for example.Corey: And the different product problem. Oh, my stars, I was at a relatively small startup going through an acquisition at one point in my career, and, “All right. Let's list all of the SaaS vendors that we use.” And the answer was something on an average of five per employee by the time you did the numbers out, and—there were hundreds of them—and most of them because it started off small, and great, everyone has their own individual account, we set it up there. I mean, my identity management system here for what most of what I do is LastPass.I have individual accounts there, two-factor auth enabled for anything that supports it, and that is it. Some vendors don't support that: we have to use shared accounts, which is just terrifying. We make sure that we don't use those for anything that's important. But it comes down to, from our perspective, that everyone has their own ridiculous series of approaches, and even if we were to, “All right, it's time to grow up and be a responsible business, and go for a single-sign-on approach.” Which is inevitable as companies scale, and there's nothing wrong with that—but there's still so many of these edge cases and corner case stories that don't integrate.So, it makes the problem smaller, but it's still there rather persistently. And that doesn't even get into the fact that for a lot of these tools, “Oh, you want SAML integration? Smells like enterprise to us.” And suddenly they wind up having an additional surcharge on top of that for accessing it via a federated source of identity, which means there are active incentives early on to not do that. So it's—Ev: It's absolutely insane. Yeah, you're right. You're right. It's almost like you get penalized for being small, like, in the early days. It's not that easy if you have a small project you're working on. Say it's a company of three people and they're just cranking in the garage, and it's just so easy to default to using shared credentials and storing them in LastPass or 1Password. And then the interesting way—like, the longer you wait, the harder it is to go back to use a proper SSO for everything. Yeah.Corey: I do want to call out that Teleport has a free and open-source community edition that supports GitHub SSO, and in order to support enterprise SSO, you have to go to your paid offering. I have no problem with this, to be clear, that you have to at least be our customer before we'll integrate with your SSO solution makes perfect sense, but you don't have a tiering system where, “Oh, you want to add that other SSO thing? And well, then it's going to go from X dollars per employee to Y dollars.” Which is the path that I don't like. I think it's very reasonable to say that their features flat-out you don't get as a free user. And even then you do offer SSO just not the one that some people will want to pick.Ev: Correct. So, the open-source version of Teleport supports SSO that smaller companies use, versus our enterprise offering, we shaped it to be more appealing for companies at certain scale.Corey: Yeah. And you've absolutely nailed it. There are a number of companies in the security space who enraged people about how they wind up doing their differentiation around things like SSO or, God forbid, two-factor auth, or once upon a time, SSL. This is not that problem. I just want to be explicitly clear on that, that is not what I'm talking about. But please, continue.Ev: Look, we see it the same way. We sometimes say that we do not charge for security, like, top-level security you get, is available even in the open-source. And look, it's a common problem for most startups who, when you have an open-source offering, where do you draw the line? And sometimes you can find answers in very unexpected places. For example, let's look into security space.One common reason that companies get compromised is, unfortunately, human factor. You could use the best tool in the world, but if you just by mistake, like, just put a comma in the wrong place and one of your config files just suddenly is out of shape, right, so—Corey: People make mistakes and you can't say, “Never make a mistake.” If you can get your entire company compromised by someone in your office clicking on the wrong link, the solution is not to teach people not to click on links; it's to mitigate the damage and blast radius of someone clicking on a link that they shouldn't. That is resilience that understand their human factors at play.Ev: Yep, exactly. And here's an enterprise feature that was basically given to us by customer requests. So, they would say we want to have FedRAMP compliance because we want to work with federal government, or maybe because we want to work with financial institutions who require us to have that level of compliance. And we tell them, “Yeah, sure. You can configure Teleport to be compliant. Look, here's all the different things that you need to tweak in the config file.”And the answer is, “Well, what if we make a mistake? It's just too costly. Can we have Teleport just automatically works in that mode?” In other words, if you feed it the config file with an error, it will just refuse to work. So basically, you take your product, and you chop off things that are not compliant, which means that it's impossible to feed an incorrect config file into it, and here you got an enterprise edition.It's a version that we call its FIPS mode. So, when it runs FIPS mode, it has different runtime inside, it basically doesn't even have a crypto that is not approved, which you can turn on by mistake. It will just not work.Corey: By the time we're talking about different levels of regulatory compliance, yeah, we are long past the point where I'm going to have any comments in the slightest is about differentiation of pricing tiers and the rest. Yeah, your free tier doesn't support FedRAMP is one of those ludicrous things that—who would say that [laugh] actually be sincere [insane 00:18:28]?Ev: [laugh].Corey: That's just mind-boggling to me.Ev: Hold on a second. I don't want anyone to be misinformed. You can be FedRAMP compliant with the free tier; you just need to configure it properly. Like the enterprise feature, in this case, we give you a thing that only works in this mode; it is impossible to misconfigure it.Corey: It's an attestation and it's a control that you need—Ev: Yep. Yep.Corey: —in order to demonstrate compliance because half the joy of regulatory compliance is not doing the thing, it's proving you do the thing. That is a joy, and those of you who've worked in regulated environments know exactly what I'm talking about. And those of you who have not, are happy but please—Ev: Frankly, I think anyone can do it using some other open-source tools. You can even take, like, OpenSSH, sshd, and then you can probably build a different makefile for just the build pipeline that changes the linking, that it doesn't even have the crypto that is not on the approved list. So, then if someone feeds a config file into it that has, like, a hashing function that is not approved, it will simply refuse to work. So, maybe you can even turn it into something that you could say here's a hardened version of sshd, or whatever. So, same thing.Corey: I see now you're talking about the four aspects of this, the connectivity, the authentication, the authorization, and the audit components of access. How does that map to a software product, if that makes sense? Because it sounds like a series of principles, great, it's good to understand and hold those in your head both, separately and distinct, but also combining to mean access both [technical 00:19:51] and the common parlance. How do you express that in Teleport?Ev: So, Teleport doesn't really add authorization, for example, to something that doesn't have it natively. The problem that we have is just the overall increasing complexity of computing environments. So, when you're deploying something into, let's say, AWS East region, so what is it that you have there? You have some virtual machines, then you have something like Kubernetes on top, then you have Docker registry, so you have these containers running inside, then you have maybe MongoDB, then you might have some web UI to manage MongoDB and Grafana dashboard. So, all of that is software; we're only consuming more and more of it so that our own code that we're deploying, it's icing on a really, really tall cake.And every layer in that layer cake is listening on a socket; it needs encryption; it has a login, so it has authentication; it has its own idea of role-based access control; it has its own config file. So, if you want to do cloud computing properly, so you got to have this expertise on your team, how to configure those four pillars of access for every layer in your stack. That is really the pain. And the Teleport value is that we're letting you do it in one place. We're saying, consolidate all of this four-axis pillars in one location.That's really what we do. It's not like we invented a better way to authorize, or authenticate; no, we natively integrate with the cake, with all of these different layers. But consolidation, that is the key value of Teleport because we simply remove so much pain associated with configuring all of these things. Like, think of someone like—I'm trying not to disclose any names or customers, but let's pick, uh, I don't know, something like Tesla. So, Tesla has compute all over the world.So, how can you implement authentication, authorization, audit log, and connectivity, too, for every vehicle that's on the road? Because all of these things need software updates, they're all components of a giant machine—Corey: They're all intermittent. You can't say, “Oh, at this time of the day, we should absolutely make sure everything in the world is connected to the internet and ready to grab the update.” It doesn't work that way; you've got to be… understand that connectivity is fickle.Ev: So, most—and because computers growing generally, you could expect most companies in the future to be more like Tesla, so companies like that will probably want to look into Teleport technology.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: If we take a look at the four tenets that you've identified—connectivity, authentication, authorization, and audit—it makes perfect sense. It is something that goes back to the days when computers were basically glorified pocket calculators as opposed to my pocket calculator now being basically a supercomputer. Does that change as you hit cloud-scale where we have companies that are doing what seem to be relatively pedestrian things, but also having 100,000 EC2 instances hanging out in AWS? Does this add additional levels of complexity on top of those four things?Ev: Yes. So, there is one that I should have mentioned earlier. So, in addition to software, hardware, and people-ware—so those are three things that are exploding, more compute, more software, more engineers needing access—there is one more dimension that is kind of unique, now, at the scale that we're in today, and that's time. So, let's just say that you are a member of really privileged group like you're a DBA, or maybe you are a chief security officer, so you should have access to a certain privileged database. But do you really use that access 24/7, all the time? No, but you have it.So, your laptop has an ability, if you type certain things into it, to actually receive credentials, like, certificates to go and talk to this database all the time. It's an anti-pattern that is now getting noticed. So, the new approach to access is to make a tie to an intent. So, by default, no one in an organization has access to anything. So, if you want to access a database, or a server, or Kubernetes cluster, you need to issue what's called ‘access request.'It's similar to pull request if you're trying to commit code into Git. So, you send an access request—using Teleport for example; you could probably do it some other way—and it will go into something like Slack or PagerDuty, so your team members will see that, “Oh, Corey is trying to access that database, and he listed a ticket number, like, some issue he is trying to troubleshoot with that particular database instance. Yeah, we'll approve access for 30 minutes.” So, then you go and do that, and the access is revoked automatically after 30 minutes. So, that is this new trend that's happening in our space, and it makes you feel nice, too, it means that if someone hacks into your laptop at this very second, right after you finished authenticating and authorization, you're still okay because there is no access; access will be created for you if you request it based on the intent, so it dramatically reduces the attack surface, using time as additional dimension.Corey: The minimum viable permission to do a thing. In principle, least-access is important in these areas. It's like, “Oh, yeah, my user account, you mean root?” “Yeah, I guess that works in a developer environment,” looks like a Docker container that will be done as soon as you're finished, but for most use cases—and probably even that one—that's not the direction to go in. Having things scoped down and—Ev: Exactly.Corey: —not just by what the permission is, but by time.Ev: Exactly.Corey: Yeah.Ev: This system basically allows you to move away from root-type accounts completely, for everything. So, which means that there is no root to attack anymore.Corey: What really strikes me is how, I guess, different aspects of technology that this winds up getting to. And to illustrate that in the form of question, let me go back to my own history because, you know, let's make it about me here. I've mentioned it before on the show, but I started off my technical career as someone who specialized in large-scale email systems. That was a niche I found really interesting, and I got into it. So did you.I worked on running email servers, and you were the CEO and co-founder of Mailgun, which later you sold the Rackspace. You're a slightly bigger scale than I am, but it was clear to me that even then, in the 2006 era when I was doing this, that there was not going to be the same need going forward for an email admin at every company; the cloudification of email had begun, and I realized I could either dig my heels in and fight the tide, or I could find other things to specialize in. And I've told that part of the story, but what I haven't told is that it was challenging at first as I tried to do that because all the jobs I talked to looked at my resume and said, “Ah, you're the email admin. Great. We don't need one of those.”It was a matter of almost being pigeonholed or boxed into the idea of being the email person. I would argue that Teleport is not synonymous with email in any meaningful sense as far as how it is perceived in the industry; you are very clearly no longer the email guy. Does the idea being boxed in, I guess—Ev: [laugh].Corey: —[unintelligible 00:27:05] resonate at all with you? And if so, how did you get past it?Ev: Absolutely. The interesting thing is, before starting the Mailgun, I was not an email person. I would just say that I was just general-purpose technologist, and I always enjoyed building infrastructure frameworks. Basically, I always enjoyed building tools for other engineers. But then gotten into this email space, and even though Mailgun was a software product, which actually had surprisingly huge, kind of, scalability requirements early on because email is much heavier than HTTP traffic; people just send a lot of data via emails.So, we were solving interesting technical challenges, but when I would meet other engineers, I would experience the exact same thing you did. They would put me into this box of, “That's an email guy. He knows email technology, but seemingly doesn't know much about scaling web apps.” Which was totally not true. And it bothered me a little bit.Frankly, it was one of the reasons we decided to get acquired by Rackspace because they effectively said, “Why don't you come join us and we'll continue to operate as independent company, but you can join our cloud team and help us reinvent cloud computing.” It was really appealing. So, I actually moved to Texas after acquisition; I worked on the Rackspace cloud team for a while. So, that's how my transition from this being in the email box happened. So, I went from an email expert to just generally cloud computing expert. And cloud computing expert sounds awesome, and it allows me to work—Corey: I promise, it's not awesome—Ev: [laugh].Corey: —for people listening to this. Also, it's one of those, are you a cloud expert? Everyone says no to that because who in the world would claim that? It's so broad in so many different expressions of it. Because you know the follow-up question to anyone who says, “Yeah,” is going to be some esoteric thing about a system you've never heard of before because there's so many ridiculous services across totally different providers, of course, it's probably a thing. Maybe it's actually a Pokemon, we don't know. But it's hard to consider yourself an expert in this. It's like, “Well, I have some damage from [laugh] getting smacked around by clouds and, yeah, we'll call that expertise; why not?”Ev: Exactly. And also how frequently people mispronounce, like, cloud with clown. And it's like, “Oh, I'm clown computing expert.” [laugh].Corey: People mostly call me a loud computing expert. But that's a separate problem.Ev: But the point is that if you work on a product that's called cloud, so you definitely get to claim expertise of that. And the interesting thing that Mailgun being, effectively, an infrastructure-level product—so it's part of the platform—every company builds their own cloud platform and runs it, and so Teleport is part of that. So, that allowed us to get out of the box. So, if you working on, right now we're in the access space, so we're working closely with Kubernetes community, with Linux kernel community, with databases, so by extension, we have expertise in all of these different areas, and it actually feels much nicer. So, if you are computing security access company, people tend to look at you, it's like, “Yeah, you know, a little bit of everything.” So, that feels pretty nice.Corey: It's of those cross-functional things—Ev: Yeah, yeah.Corey: —whereas on some level, you just assume, well, email isn't either, but let's face it: email is the default API that everything, there's very little that you cannot configure to send email. The hard part is how to get them to stop emailing you. But it started off as far—from my world at least—the idea that all roads lead to email. In fact, we want to talk security, a long time ago the internet collectively decided one day that our email inbox was the entire cornerstone of our online identity. Give me access to your email, I, for all intents and purposes, can become you on the internet without some serious controls around this.So, those conversations, I feel like they were heading in that direction by the time I left email world, but it's very clear to me that what you're doing now at Teleport is a much clearer ability to cross boundaries into other areas where you have to touch an awful lot of different things because security touches everything, and I still maintain it has to be baked-in and an intentional thing, rather than, “Oh yeah, we're going to bolt security on after the fact.” It's, yeah, you hear about companies that do that, usually in headlines about data breaches, or worse. It's a hard problem.Ev: Actually, it's an interesting dilemma you're talking about. Is security built-in into everything or is it an add-on? And logically—talk to anyone, and most people say, “Yeah, it needs to be a core component of whatever it is you're building; making security as an add-on is not possible.” But then reality hits in, and the reality is that we're running on—we're standing on the shoulder of giants.There is so much legacy technologies that we built this cloud monster on top of… no, nothing was built in, so we actually need to be very crafty at adding security on top of what we already have, if we want to take advantage of all this pre-existing things that we've built for decades. So, that's really what's happening, I think, with security and access. So, if you ask me if Teleport is a bolt-on security, I say, “Yes, we are, but it works really well.” And it's extremely pragmatic and reasonable, and it gives you security compliance, but most of all, very, very good user experience out of the box.Corey: It's amazing to me how few security products focus on user experience out of the box, but they have to. You cannot launch or maintain a security product successfully—to my mind—without making it non-adversarial to the user. The [days of security is no 00:32:26] are gone.Ev: Because of that human element insecurity. If you make something complicated, if you make something that's hard to reason about, then it will never be secure.Corey: Yeah.Ev: Don't copy-paste IP table rules without understanding what they do. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I think we all have been around long enough in data center universes remember those middle of the night drives to the data center for exactly that sort of thing. Yeah, it's one of those hindsight things of, set a cron job to reset the IP table rules for, you know, ten minutes from now in case you get this hilariously wrong. It's the sort of thing that you learn right after you really could have used that knowledge. Same story. But those are the easy, safe examples of I screwed up on a security thing. The worst ones can be company-ending.Ev: Exactly, yeah. So, in this sense, when it comes to security, and access specifically, so this old Python rule that there is only one way to do something, it's the most important thing you can do. So, when it comes to security and access, we basically—it's one of the things that Teleport is designed around, that for all protocols, for all different resources, from SSH to Kubernetes to web apps to databases; we never support passwords. It's not even in the codebase. No, you cannot configure Teleport to use passwords.We never support things like public keys, for example, because it's just another form of a password. It's just extremely long password. So, we have this approach that certificates, it's the best method because it supports both authentication and authorization, and then you have to do it for everything, just one way of doing everything. And then you apply this to connectivity: so there is a single proxy that speaks all protocols and everyone goes to that proxy. Then you apply the same principle to audit: there is one audit where everything goes into.So, that's how this consolidation, that's where the simplicity comes down to. So, one way of doing something; one way of configuring everything. So, that's where you get both ease of use and security at the same time.Corey: One last question that I want to ask you before we wind up calling this an episode is that I've been using Teleport as a reference for a while when I talk to companies, generally in the security space, as an example of what you can do to tell a story about a product that isn't built on fear, uncertainty, and doubt. And for those who are listening who don't know what I'm referring specifically, I'm talking about pick any random security company and pull up their website and see what it is that they talk about and how they talk about themselves. Very often, you'll see stories where, “Data breaches will cost you extraordinary piles of money,” or they'll play into the shame of what will happen to your career if you're named in the New York Times for being the CSO when the data gets breached, and whatnot. But everything that I've seen from Teleport to date has instead not even gone slightly in that direction; it talks again and again, in what I see on your site, about how quickly it is to access things, access that doesn't get in the way, easily implement security and compliance, visibility into access and behavior. It's all about user experience and smoothing the way and not explaining to people what the dire problems that they're going to face are if they don't care about security in general and buy your product specifically. It is such a refreshing way of viewing storytelling around a security product. How did you get there? And how do I make other people do it, too?Ev: I think it just happened organically. Teleport originally—the interesting story of Teleport, it was not built to be sold. Teleport was built as a side project that we started for another system that we were working on at the time. So, there was a autonomous Kubernetes platform called Grá—it doesn't really matter in this context, but we had this problem that we had a lot of remote sites with a lot of infrastructure on them, with extremely strict security and compliance requirements, and we needed to access those sites or build tools to access those sites. So, Teleport was built like, okay, it's way better than just stitching a bunch of open-source components together because it's faster and easier to use, so we're optimizing for that.And as a side effect of that simplification, consolidation, and better user experience is a security compliance. And then the interesting thing that happened is that people who we're trying to sell the big platform to, they started to notice about, “Oh, this access thing you have is actually pretty awesome. Can we just use that separately?” And that's how it turned into a product. So, we built an amazing secure access solution almost by accident because there was only one customer in mind, and that was us, in the early days. So yeah, that's how you do it, [laugh] basically. But it's surprisingly similar to Slack, right? Why is Slack awesome? Because the team behind it was a gaming company in the beginning.Corey: They were trying to build a game. Yeah.Ev: Yeah, they built for themselves. They—[laugh] I guess that's the trick: make yourself happy.Corey: I think the team founded Flickr before that, and they were trying to build a game. And like, the joke I heard is, like, “All right, the year is 2040. Stuart and his team have now raised $8 billion trying to build a game, and yet again it fails upward into another productivity tool company, or something else entirely that”—but it's a recurring pattern. Someday they'll get their game made; I have faith in them. But yeah, building a tool that scratches your own itch is either a great path or a terrible mistake, depending entirely upon whether you first check and see if there's an existing solution that solves the problem for you. The failure mode of this is, “Ah, we're going to build our own database engine,” in almost every case.Ev: Yeah. So just, kind of like, interesting story about the two, people will [unintelligible 00:38:07] surprised that Teleport is a single binary. It's basically a drop-in replacement that you put on a box, and it runs instead of sshd. But it wasn't initially this way. Initially, it was [unintelligible 00:38:16], like, few files in different parts of a file system. But because internally, I really wanted to run it on a bunch of Raspberry Pi's at home, and it would have been a lot easier if it was just a single file because then I just could quickly update them all. So, it just took a little bit of effort to compress it down to a single binary that can run in different modes depending on the key. And now look at that; it's a major benefit that a lot of people who deploy Teleport on hundreds of thousands of pieces of infrastructure, they definitely taking advantage of the fact that it's that simple.Corey: Simplicity is the only thing that scales. As soon as it gets complex, it's more things to break. Ev, thank you so much for taking the time to sit with me, yet again, to talk about Teleport and how you're approaching things. If people want to learn more about you, about the company, about the product in all likelihood, where can they go?Ev: The easiest place to go would be goteleport.com where you can find everything, but we're also on GitHub. If you search for Teleport in GitHub, you'll find this there. So, join our Slack channel, join our community mailing list and most importantly, download Teleport, put it on your Raspberry Pi, play with it and see how awesome it is to have the best industry, best security practice, that don't get in the way.Corey: I love the tagline. Thank you so much, once again. Ev Kontsevoy, co-founder and CEO of Teleport. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment that goes into a deranged rant about how I'm completely wrong, and the only way to sell security products—specifically yours—is by threatening me with the New York Times data breach story.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Your Daily Writing Habit
Your Daily Writing Habit - Episode 883: Writing About Insane Times

Your Daily Writing Habit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 3:28


“Everyone in my book accuses everyone else of being crazy. Frankly, I think the whole society is nuts — and the question is: What does a sane man do in an insane society?” -Joseph Heller. This week's #WriterWednesday quote and how it applies to your work... or life... as an author. Join the author conversation: https://www.facebook.com/groups/inkauthors/ Learn more about YDWH and catch up on old episodes: www.yourdailywritinghabit.com

Acquisition Talk
Commercial item acquisition with Phil Jasper

Acquisition Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 49:10


I was pleased to have Phil Jasper, Mission Systems President at Collins Aerospace, join me on the Acquisition Talk podcast to discuss commercial item acquisition. In the early 1990s, there was a recognition that DoD needed to streamline its business processes in order to attract commercial companies. The Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 led to FAR Part 12 procedures, which exempted items determined to be commercial from various regulations such as certified cost or pricing data, cost accounting standards, and business system administration. The past several NDAAs strengthened the preference and opportunities for commercial, including the creation of the DCMA commercial items group (FY13 Sec. 831), treatment of nontraditional contractors as commercial (FY16 Sec. 857), and reduced contract clauses and flowdowns (FY17 Sec. 874). Jasper argues that commercial procedures have important benefits to DoD. First, it allows companies to bring their internal R&D for commercial customers to bear, including open systems architectures. A common avionics system, for example, was tailored for UH-60 and CH-47 helicopters saving the government over $160 million. Moreover it was delivered in just 13 months compared to a normal defense cycle time of three years or more. Similar examples in the aircraft world are found in fuel systems, heads up displays, fire protection systems, and landing gears. These commercial items have lasting benefits in terms of continued private investment throughout the lifecycle that generate capability enhancements. This helps offload obsolescence management from the government and allows it to be handled by industry. Jasper argues that commercial procedures have important benefits to DoD. First, it allows companies to bring their internal R&D for commercial customers to bear, including open systems architectures. A common avionics system, for example, was tailored for UH-60 and CH-47 helicopters saving the government over $160 million. Moreover it was delivered in just 13 months compared to a normal defense cycle time of three years or more. Similar examples in the aircraft world are found in fuel systems, heads up displays, fire protection systems, and landing gears. These commercial items have lasting benefits in terms of continued private investment that generate capability enhancements throughout the lifecycle. This helps offload obsolescence management from the government and allows military systems to be upgraded on much faster cycle times. Despite these challenges, Jasper is hopeful about continued progress in commercial item adoption. "Frankly, at the end of the day, that's what this is all about -- industry and government are aligned in common purpose and that is to get the best technology to the warfighters as fast as possible at the most affordable price and best value for the taxpayer." Amen to that. This podcast was produced by Eric Lofgren. You can follow us on Twitter @AcqTalk and find more information at AcquisitionTalk.com.

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Lynn Harris Is Bringing the Power of Comedy to Women and Non-Binary People

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 37:37


Lynn Harris is the CEO and founder of GOLD Comedy — the online comedy world for young women and non-binary folks who want to nerd out about comedy together. Lynn is also a creative partner to select brands, organizations and individuals, blending her experience in writing, communications, advocacy and entertainment to create strategic content that brings maximum fun to serious issues, for maximum impact. Read more about Lynn Harris. Learn more about The Passionistas Project. Full Transcript: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to the Passionistas Project podcast, where we talk with women who are following their passions to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington. And today we're talking with Lynn Harris, the CEO and founder of Gold Comedy, the online comedy worlds for young women and nonbinary folks who want to nerd out about comedy together, but is also a creative partner to select brands, organizations, and industry. Blending her experience in writing communications, advocacy, and entertainment to create strategic content that brings maximum fun to serious issues for maximum impact. So please welcome to the show. Lynn Harris. Lynn: Thank you. Passionistas: What's the one thing you're most passionate about? Lynn: Besides salt? I'm into salt and I'm into comedy is power. I'm passionate about a lot of things. I'm passionate about a lot of things. I think the most on-brand thing for me to say right now is comedy is power and comedy, as I'm passionate about comedy as power. And that's why it matters to me. Who's got the mic so to speak. Passionistas: So what does that mean? What, what does comedy as power mean and why is it so important who has the mic? Lynn: It's certainly at an individual level and to the cultural level. When you make people laugh, you make people listen. And comedy really has been, as you know, at this sort of level of joke and at the level of industry and at the level of culture has really been defined by a kind of a small narrow group of people since the beginning, which is. Because if you think about it, comedy, everyone thinks of comedy as this outsider, art that you get into comedy. Cause like the underdog and you're punching up at power. And why are white dudes running the whole thing? It makes no sense. I'm working to try to change that. How are you changing? The more women do comedy. The more women define comedy. And that's true, not just for women, but for anybody who is not a straight white dude, many of whom are very funny, but I think that comedy will be funnier if it is defined by more types of voices. And if comedy is funnier, the world's a better place, honestly. Not just because laughter is the best medicine, which it's like the second best the COVID vaccine is the best, but also because comedy affirms connections. When you laugh at a joke, that means you get the joke. And when you get the joke, that means you're in on something you like, you got the reference, you follow the comic on there. On their bait and switch. And a lot of people say that, you know, that's, that's the reason that comedy brings people together. I'm not super convinced that it does because for better and for worse, I think it's sort of affirms who we are. Not that it doesn't have something to teach us, which I can circle back to, but I think, you know, comedy does affirm who we are and what we think is funny and, uh, what we think is important. And it can also change that to some degree it can, um, cause as comedy, you know, comedy kind of is sort of a fun house mirror for color. And what we're allowed to laugh at can change for better and for worse, usually for better the arc of a let's see, how can I destroy that? Quote, the, you know, the arc of, of comedy? What is it? They have bends toward justice, right? As things become okay to say not okay to say, I think that's a, both a driver and a reflection of culture evolving, and that's why it's important to have. For a lot of us to be in charge of how that culture is evolving. Passionistas: So let's take this back. Tell us a little bit about your childhood and when was the first time you remember that you were funny? Lynn: Okay. This is so dumb, but I remember I was, I don't know, six, seven, I don't know. And my mother was kind of the kind of person who, like, if you sneezed, she would be like, what's wrong. And I remember I was little five or six whenever and she said, Are you and she heard me cough, or like I said something, I don't know what, and she said, are you okay? You're a little horse. And I said, no, I'm not. I'm a little, child's obviously my parents thought that was side splitting and I got a big laugh and I was like, oh, I can let them getting last as fun. That's the first one. I remember, by the way I moved away from puns. Another time they were building. They were building like a new bath or renovating our bathroom, the house I grew up in. And so there was like the frame for a closet, but there was nothing in it yet. It was just like, the space was defined. And so I went into the closet and I said, look, it's a Lynn in closet. That's where it all began. Folks Passionistas: Was humor, always a part of your household? Like where your parents funny? Lynn: Yeah. My parents are funny, white parents in very different ways. And they also, but in very different ways, but they definitely both of their families or also super funny in very different ways. But at the end of the day, they really just, they just, they liked a good joke. They just really liked a good joke. A funny movie, funny TV show. It was, there was, it was definitely. But like a high-value currency. Passionistas: What sparked your interest in comedy? And did you immediately want to pursue a career in it? Lynn: Maybe the career part came when I was a little older and wanted to find ways to upset my parents as opposed to delight them. But I just, I always just gravitated toward, I never defined or pursued a career in a certain kind of comedy, a certain kind of. Like my, I did stand up for a long time, but my goal in doing standup was to do stand up. So I didn't, which is nice because it kind of took the pressure off. I worked at it, but I didn't, I didn't attach not that this is a bad thing, by the way, this is a completely legitimate and great thing. My goal at the time, wasn't to like, get on a show or get to, or, you know, get an agent and move to LA or whatever it was. So either it just means I had, I was just content or just that I was really not at all. I just really liked standup. I just like it as an art form. I just, I just like it. I never attached it to a next level dream. And then I just kind of stopped doing it when I just got tired when I just couldn't stay up past 10 anymore. Basically I used to host shows that started at 10 and now I'm, I don't know. And I'm not a napper, so I don't, I just powered through, I just always gravitated toward basically like the wacky red head, not the lead, but the leads weird from. Like the Janeane Garofalo character in the truth about cats and dogs, not to directly compare myself to her majesty, but, um, Jimmy grew up a little, but, um, but that idea was always my jam, I think in high school. I went to, I had a pretty good experience overall, but I went to a very preppy high school and I had very preppy. They were very nice, but very preppy classmates who were sort of all tall and live and blonde. Um, none of which describes me. And they could like burst into lacrosse the way that I like the fame kids burst into song. And so it just wasn't, I wasn't like miserable. It just was not, that was the central culture and I was not in that. And so I think I defined myself against it even harder by being like the theater kid played the goofy roles. That was just, I think it, I probably would have been that anyway, but I think I probably kind of defined myself against the lacrosse team. And now. When I was in high school, um, I went on a ski trip. It was like a Jewish youth group ski trip up to this winter Wonderland. Um, that was called every year. It's still going on, still going on. This is the eighties it's still happening. And we all went up to Manchester, New Hampshire to ski and do other stuff for the weekend. And on the Saturday night, um, a bunch of dudes. Somehow got ahold of like some grapefruits and some borrowed nightgowns and went and did this completely made up impromptu improvise, drag skit in the social hall that brought the house down. And my, it was sloppy. It was made up. It was, there's nothing inherently funny about dudes dressing as women, but it brought the house down and I, my first thought was okay, what are the girls going to do? And my next thought was. Because I knew even then that wit girls would not be received the same way we could not be equally slept. And, and bring the house down. Not because we're not funny, but because that's not the way people view women as funny, or, you know, it's just women don't have that kind of audience. Um, we didn't in the end, we maybe more now, definitely not back then. And so, like I just kind of, you know, my my third thought, you know, my first thought was, what are we doing second thought? And my third thought was. And so we didn't, I didn't say con let's come on, Debbie and Jenny let's go. So I didn't say anything. And, um, I don't regret that because I think my instincts were correct, but I was bummed out out of, I was bummed out about it for years and I, that really, really stuck with me. It really, really stuck with me. I had this real sense that. That was not cool and not fair. And, uh, something would have to change. Uh, and so I I'm, who knows, but that may be, oh, and fun fact, one of those dudes may or may not have been Adam Sandler who was there. So, um, I, as a civilian, it was his high school. So I have Adam Sandler to thank for Gold Comedy. And what I'm doing now is. Passionistas: So that was high school. Where did you go to college? And, and what did you decide to focus on when you were in college? Lynn: I went to, as we all like to say, I went to college in new Haven and, and very much enjoyed the pizza by the way, in new Haven, as the New York pizza snob, I will say that navens even better. So yeah, I went to, so I went to college at Frank Pepys and. I did there wasn't any, there was improv. This is, this is the eighties. There was improv. I believe there was maybe a sketch group, but there was no awareness. There's no standup. Like now I hear they have stand up groups and I'll get back to that, but I didn't do it. So I didn't do like straight up comedy in college. What I did do was I was in an acapella singing group once again, continuing on my nerd track. And I became, I was, I am not a great singer. What came naturally for me was doing the, like the shtick in between the songs. And so I became the ringleader of those things and that's where I kind of scratch the scratch to the comedy itch. What did you do after college? Did you pursue a career in comedy or did you do some. I was always drawn to being a writer. That was always just what I was. I never decided that was what I was going to do. I just kind of knew that I was going to do something where I had to write. And I just had this tractor beam of wanting to be some form of writer, not in the way that, like I thought about it. I didn't think about it. I w I didn't like journal about what dreaming of being a writer. And I didn't watch movies about thoughtful writers that I didn't, I just do it. And so after college, so I did a lot of journalism in college. And after college, that's really where I focused in terms of it didn't occur to me. I could really make money as doing comedy. I loved theater and I was always, I loved being on stage, but I knew that I didn't have the gumption or that Moxie or the, I just didn't think I wanted to go to LA and compete with anybody. In that world. And I just didn't see myself as really an actor. I saw myself as more of a I cam then, or just a wise ass than a serious actor. So I didn't really occur to me to head to the head, to the, to Hollywood or even New York for a few years. I went back to Boston for a little while and then, but I started doing, I started taking stand-up classes when I lived in Boston, when I lived. Laundry distance from home. Basically, I actually sort of freelancing as a journalist and I took a stand up class and I also had a day job. My dad is a retired MIT professor. He, my dad's actually a very famous phenologist, which means that about seven people know who he is and that he's a heartbeat away from Noam Chomsky, which made me very popular. And I did. I had an office job at MIT that I'm sure was pure nepotism. So I called myself the rejectionist. So I sat at a desk and told students that they had the wrong forms. And, but then more and more as I was able to get paid more and more for journalism, I phased out. My night job became my day job. And then I also did, started doing standup in Boston and Cambridge. Passionistas: Tell us about your work as a journalist. Because I, uh, we saw that you like wrote like the first national mainstream article about dating violence and what kind of, uh, topics were you writing about and what drew you to those topics? Lynn: That is a true story about you. Remember, you know, Parade Magazine, they insert. Frankly, if you want to get an issue out there, I think it has the pattern or had I'm going to get this wrong, but either the first or first, second, or third largest circulation of anything. And so I, I did make a choice back then based on two things, I always cared a lot about various social justice issues. Influenced by my parents, especially my mom. And especially I, I wound up carrying the most about gender, gender justice, and related, um, you know, feminist stuff back then, we were not as nuanced about what we meant by gender justice. It was, it was much more narrow focus on, on women's rights and probably white women's rights. I'm sure. But, you know, I thank my mom for, you know, making, being a feminist, not rebellion. So I, I gravitated toward social issues. Social justice issues, especially I was always really interested in how pop culture reflects or shapes culture. As before. When I was talking about comedy, I was, I've always been interested in that in any culture, in any forum when Ellen came out. And culture had led it to be okay for that to happen. But then when she did it, it also changed culture. Like it's back and forth. And I just cared about it mainly because I really love television. And, and in all seriousness, I do think, I think it matters. And it was always, there was always some combination of what gets me out of bed in the morning is social justice. And what keeps me up at night is till. Burning the candle at both ends. And so at that somehow first, it just kind of happened. But then I evolved into making a real choice about choosing to write for the most mainstream possible publications about issues that would kind of push them a little bit, push things a little bit, maybe not push the publication, but push people a little bit. And, um, and even if I had to do a little bit more, more like both sides or whatever, To appear balanced or whatever. And maybe I wouldn't write it quite the same way as aggressively as I would write it for, um, uh, you know, a real, like a lefty. We didn't have blogs then, but blog, I made the choice also financial, you know, because they paid more to, I'm not, I wasn't that noble to write for. Um, I kind of got lucky with Parade, but, um, no. Okay. I worked hard on that, but I wound up gravitating toward women's magazines also, which were. Terrible in many ways, but way more feminist than people ever thought. I'm way more aware, like anyone who didn't think Cosmo was performance art and God, I just, nobody should have any, should waste any time being angry at Cosmo it's it was, I just don't. I never understood that. And so I wrote a lot for Glamor and Glamor was way ahead of a lot of those. They went back and forth a little bit after. With Whitney, but under Ruth, they had a Glamor had this column about all the female senators, all of them, the definitive legions, a female senators that reported on exactly what they were doing. Exactly what they were. And weren't doing for Glamour readers. You're not gonna find that elsewhere. Um, no one else has wrote about the women's senators. Nobody cared and. And so in Glamour, would you way back then would write about abortion and all those things. And sure. Their audience was huge and included people who were anti-abortion, but I, but then when I got to write about it, I wasn't preaching to the choir necessarily, and you can humanize the issue and you can really actually change hearts and minds a little. And so I that's what I, that's what I gravitated toward. And I was able to eventually. I worked so hard at writing for so many different types of publications. I wrote for a sewing newsletter. I wrote for obviously Glamour tons of different publications each with their own style. And the most important thing I learned was aside from feeling that I was, in some cases, doing something important, the most important, important skill I learned was to be able to write in the publications voice and not be fancy about that. Cause I wasn't ready to express myself. I was running cause I liked writing and it was, I mean, I just, wasn't all precious about that. I, it was a fun game to be like, okay, how do I write about this thing in that voice? And how do I channel that voice? It's really, it's interesting. It's a project. It's a puzzle. It's not. Like, that's what you do in your journey. For those of you watching the podcast, I'm miming, I'm listening to the podcast, I'm miming some sort of like, kind of BS self-expression, but like you wouldn't have to deliver a product and it's, it's fun only after you learn how to do that. Do you really get to a place? I think where you then get you get assignments from people who are asking you to write in your voice. Um, so that eventually after I worked and worked and worked for years and years and wrote. Uh, probably thousands of articles. I can't even remember. Then I was able to do things like for Salon and other publications where they'd be like, no, please, you do you. And, and, and really have my own voice. I had a bunch of different columns in my ear that were supposed to be Edward a column for the DailyToominNews. Like things that we're supposed to be sound like me, not sound like them, but that is not where you start. And, and, and, and it's, it's so much the better, you know, the better for it. It's like TV, it's like TV. Our usual friend, Amy Toomin Strauss was, um, is teaching for Gold Comedy now. We were talking to her about what to teach and when, or what are the different things that she could teach. And, and, you know, I do sort of hear and feel out there that everyone's like, well, I've got a great idea for a show, um, because, because rightly things have been, so, um, the platforms have been so democratized now that like, sure you could do, you, you could write your, you know, put your show on YouTube and maybe. You know, maybe it'll get picked up or maybe, you know, that it's not that that doesn't happen now, but Amy's point was. Yeah, but I don't want to teach how to write your own show. First. I want to teach how to write someone else's show and it's the same thing. Learning how it show you needing to be able to show a show runner that you understand, obviously the basics that apply anywhere and everywhere, but also how to write for that show, how to channel those characters, those voices, those situations. How to replicate that world. And so it's definitely analog that I really learned in journalism. I've learning how to write the other stuff first. Then you get to do your own thing. It works the same way on stand up. I'm not that you should go around telling other people's jokes or writing other people's jokes for them. It doesn't really start that way unless you're Ava on PACS, which we love. And she didn't start that way either. But anyway, 2, 0 1 almost comedians. I know. Or people who either teach or mentor comedians always say, find the comedians that you like and learn them, know them, live them, and even go ahead and do the exercise of writing jokes. Like there's obviously you can't go and do that and get paid for that. Or, or, you know, there's a point past which that's stealing, but just that the imitation. The imitation and the practice and the imitation and the practice is really helpful. And it helps you learn how any joke works. Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington, and you're listening to the Passionistas Project Podcast and our interview with Lynn Harris. If you're a young woman or identify as nonbinary and want to turn your sense of humor into your superpower, visit GoldComedy.com. If you're enjoying this interview and would like to help us to continue creating inspiring content, please consider becoming a patron by visiting ThePassionistasProject.com/podcast and clicking on the Patron button. Even $1 a month can help us continue our mission of inspiring women to follow their passions. Now here's more of our interview with Lynn. So in 1997, you found your own voice and you created Breakup Girl. Lynn: Co-created. Passionistas: Co-created. Yes. So tell us about that character in the show and how it expanded as time and technology. Lynn: I co-created a Breakup Girl with Chris Cobb. So, so in '97 it was much, much easier to get a book contract. You didn't have to already have a blue check mark. You didn't already have to have a sub stack or whatever, like you, if you had an, you really just had to have a good idea. Seriously. I had an idea about writing a humor book about surviving a breakup and. I went to bat to have Chris who's a brilliant illustrator. And we had collaborated before I went to bat to have Chris have us be a package deal. It'd be the designer and illustrator of the book, which also would never happen now. So we actually, literally, we actually realized we were roommates in a different block and you were sitting there figuring out all the real estate and what we had written and what he had designed. And we realized we had like a few more, like we had like. You know, 16 more pages to fill in. We were like, ah, and then Chris was like, you know, I was just kind of thinking that we, that, I don't know if there should be like a superhero character. And I was like, oh my God, we should've done that from the beginning. And so we created this, it was originally Chris's idea. But, but from that moment, we collaborated and came up with the idea of this, the superhero who helps people with romantic emergencies. We have superheroes who can bend steel bars, but how about one that it can mend broken heart? And so that we invented this kind of classic, like kind of a winking version of a classic superhero who had like a utility Fanny pack. And who's really, but actually really smart and thoughtful character who had her own problems, but was able to help others. And so we added her origin story and all this other stuff in the book and added her as this voice and presence in the book. And then the book did. Okay. But then people were like, what? I liked that character. And so in actually that was in '91, whatever '96, I don't remember '96. And then in '97, Chris was like, there's this thing that mostly NASA uses, but it's called the worldwide web. And I think it would be super fun to make a page on the worldwide web about. And so we created a website in '97. That was literally an overnight success because no one else was doing anything remotely like it. And we just did it. We did the thing that does not happen now, which is we built it and they came and it hasn't happened yet. But the advice column, I decided to write an advice column. It got super popular. I think it was, you know, Chris's artwork is amazing, but I do think that, um, and this goes back to the idea of the intersection of pop culture and social change, what we were doing that was different. And this was intentional. We kind of wandered into this enterprise, but the part, once we kind of get our bearings, um, the part that was intentional was that it was not going to be a female superhero talking to women about related. Because that's stupid and it's reductive and in the world, at least of like binary, heterosexual people, half the people in relationships are dudes. So like, why is it thought of as like this lady thing that's so stupid. And, and we kept coming up against that because then people would assume that because Breakup Girl was female, because we were talking about relationships that it was a site for women. And it never was never, not even, it never was. We just, we made it it's about relationships and we wanted to change. This was, we were like intentional about this. We wanted to change the way people thought and talked about relationships. So from the very beginning, the letters that we would get online, we're not even close to all from women. So many from dudes. And we had no letters from people that we have different words for. Now, people would say, do your breakup girl, I'm a secret. Cross-dresser my wife doesn't have. And all these things that we talk to gay people and straight people, a trans people at all these things that no one else was doing, not because we were like brilliant, but because we, there was intentional that we really did think it was dumb that, that only half the people in relationships were talking about relationships or had a place to talk about relationships. I think that plus the combination of humor, she had a really specific style of nerdy, superhero comic book humor that people felt comfortable with. And was nice to everybody. It got really big. And then the property. Got we got acquired by Oxygen and, um, in a really kind of great deal because they hired us. They didn't buy it away from us. They ha they bought us with it. So we got hired to create it for Oxygen on an even bigger platform. Um, and that all went straight to hell a while ago, awhile, awhile later, but that's a story for a less jaunty podcast, but, but out now we actually are. We're playing around with it with a new version. A lot of the stuff that she talks and talked about is, is eternal. But a lot of it is like, we talked about like computer dating. Um, and so, you know, some of that stuff has to be updated. Passionistas: You have so many things that we could talk to you about, but let's focus a little bit on Gold Comedy. When and why did you start. Lynn: Well, that part goes kind of goes back to Adam Sandler and wanting to, and also having them stand up myself. And I didn't have a lot of people have a lot of women who worked a lot harder at it than I did and did a lot more of it than I did have much worse stories about, about everything from just garden variety, sexism to outright horrific. And not just the harassment itself, but would it having a law? I didn't really get into the whole world where I, that many other women did, where you have to actually make choices about jobs that you don't take and jobs that aren't even offered to you because they're cause you don't, you can't work with that guy or because that guy already has a woman or whatever. So even my mild experiences were exhausting and outrageous and. All paths lead to this idea of making sure that women, especially young women and anyone else outside the comedy norm, which is often a way to name norm had access to the fun of comedy and the power of comedy. And it matters. It matters because women are people and it matters because comedy is a job and it ma it matters because comedy is power. I just had this idea of how much better would the world be if we had an even broader idea of who's funny or, or who makes us think, or who helps us process that, that day's crazy news. And I thought, what if I just start building the farm? And so now it's gone through various forms in reality, and in my mind, but now what we have is the only, and this was by the way, just, we, I was envisioning this online long before anyone knew about any kind of COVID or a pandemic, because part of the vision for me was, first of all, nobody wants to, I don't recommend starting a brick and mortar place in New York City because it's. But also, I wanted to find the funny young people and not even young people who don't live in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, LA, Toronto, where can we find the Carrie Underwood of comedy? Let's like if they can Zoom in from Dakota and they're funny then. Great. So I always had this idea of creating an online school and community and online place of learning and social interaction, where, where you could find your comedy crew no matter where you live and get the learning and collaboration and interactivity interaction and helping each other out that I did get from my crew in New York and many people do, but it's hard to find. And again, what if you don't live in New York or what if you're not old enough to go to club? We opened again, went through lots of different ideas and permutations, but we opened our current members member, only members only club last fall. And so we now have this amazing online platform, which is powered by a company called mighty networks. Basically they built the bones of the app and we just bring our people in our stuff. And we have a place where. Women and young women and non binary folks come to, let's see Mondays, we have open mics with feedback. Like they're the nicest open mics in the world. Plus you get feedback from me and other and your peers Tuesdays and Thursdays usually are when we have our courses right now, we're in the middle of the standup course. We just finished improv. We posted on storytelling and sketch, which yes, you can do all of this online. Wednesdays, every Wednesday we have a Q and A with a comedy pro or celebrity. Writers who have toilet in the trenches whose names you don't know, but who shows, you know, to, uh, Rachel Dratch and Bloom, Ashley Nicole Black from A Black Lady Sketch Show, like an amazing range of people. And you just show up in the Zoom and ask them like you totally just fan girl out and ask them questions. We have monthly shows that are open to the public. We pay our own comics for. For performing because it's work and you want to set that tone set that precedent. We just did a pride show, which is amazing with Murray Hill and Sydney Washington. And so we basically just create the experiences that, that, that young or new, or not even new medium. We have a lot of comedians in the gang who have been doing comedy for a little while, but still want to find the people in the place to really nerd out and really like level up as fast as they can. And we have folks. I think our youngest is an eighth grade with a couple of eighth grade and then all the way up to people Myers. And then we just. Uh, a course that's outside the member's club. So like we had, so you get all that with a subscription, it's all inclusive with a subscription. Then we have a one-off course that we call gold label, which is being taught by your friend and mine, Amy Toomin Strauss, who is the one who wrote The One With the Embryos, um, on Friends. And she's teaching in a three series on about TV writing, con TV, comedy writing, and that's open to people inside and outside of the. It's really the place. It's the place to find your way to level up your work and find your crew. And it's great if you, you know, there's a lot of like improv for T-Mobile. And stuff like that, which is great. But we really present comedy as a path to comedy it's comedy for comedy. However, there are many people, we also attract a lot of people who may or may not want to be professional comedians in whatever capacity, standup writers, whatever, but who know that comedy skills are life skills and they like comedy. So they're like, well, that's perfect. I can learn to be, I can use this thing. I love. To learn how to, you know, write better sink faster, listen, better, get out of my head. Um, stop self-editing react more quickly. Um, all those things are, things are things you can do. And, you know, find your voice, which is, which sounds abstract and woo, but it's a thing. Um, understand your what's, your unique take on things. You can do all that. So we have a real mix of people. It's sort of varying levels of intensity around their comedy career goals, but there's room for everybody. Passionistas: How does the average person get involved? How do people become a part. Lynn: Funny, you should ask. Um, all you need to do is visit our website, which has a lot of free resources on it. Also, I believe that the, uh, irritating term for that is freemium. If lots of articles and, you know, useful, actionable snackable, actionable resources to, to help you just kind of learn. Basics of joke writing and you know how to make your PowerPoint funnier without being a group without being too much of a dork. So there's just a ton of ton of free resources. And then if, um, if folks are interested in joining what we call the, the club, the Gold Comedy club, um, Click right through from our website to there and learn more about that, frankly, the price is amazing. Um, and frankly, it's going to go up. Um, so one of these days, so, so it's $299. 99 a year for all of that stuff. Anything we do in the club, you get any course, um, any, all of our self-paced, we have a ton of one-off classes that are just an hour. With, you know, a writer from James Corden talking about topical jokes, you know, um, you could just nerd out without, and just inhale all of that stuff. You can take our, um, our lives, you know, live on Zoom classes, all those things. So that's all with that one price. Um, so, and then we, we, we record and archive everything that we do. So you also have active. That's why eventually the price is going to go up because our, our resource libraries is getting bigger literally every week. So, um, it's really, really fun. And the. As much as I'm proud of all the resources and I'm happy to like drop all the names of the famous people who have, you know, who swing by and answer questions. And I'm happy to talk about the quality of the, of the instruction and all that stuff. Really. The thing is the community, really the thing. And because you all these people who have literally never met, unless it's their friend that they brought in, um, are like this incredibly supportive. Like cheering section for each other and people will post like stuff they're working on and get feedback. Um, people will come to other classes, final shows just to cheer the others on. Um, people really have there's. We have a lot of 1, 2, 3, few people who have now done open mikes for the first time, because they felt, you know, got those skills and the confidence from us. And, um, and then, and now like people are going now that we can do this. People who live in the same city are like starting to go see the other people in your life. And it's a whole thing. So it's really, um, just it's that kind of, you know, safe, supportive ad-free, um, welcoming place that you can't, you can get. And, and most comedians say like the most important thing is to find your crews. You can do that, but this is. This is not, instead of, if you start doing comedy in some city and you meet your friends, it's not instead of that, but this is, this one is going to be there for you wherever you are, um, and all the time and it's on your phone. Um, so, uh, yeah, it's really, that's the most moving thing that I've seen. It was my goal. So I'm not surprised, but I'm delighted that it really has turned out that way. Passionistas: Listening to the Passionistas Project Podcast and our interview with Lynn Harris. If you're a young woman or identify as nonbinary and want to turn your sense of humor into your superpower, visit GoldComedy.com. Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women owned businesses and female artisans. To inspire you to follow your path. Use the code FALLMYSTERY to get a free mystery box with a one-year subscription. And be sure to subscribe to the Passionistas Project podcast, so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests until next time. Stay well and stay passionate.

More Movies Please!
The Royal Tenenbaums

More Movies Please!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 56:38


On the podcast this time, Stabby Steven and Sean are moving back home and dealing with some serious family issues in the 2001 film from Wes Anderson, The Royal Tenenbaums. I can't even begin to imagine what the Thanksgiving dinners at the Tenenbaums must have been like. The holidays are a stressful time for a normal family, much less one that's probably pictured next to the dictionary definition of “dysfunction.” Imagine what that must have been like: sullen children wishing they could be anywhere else, a mother weighed down by her husband's behavior, and a father who's critiquing how dry the turkey is even as he insists on cutting and serving it himself. That's not a holiday of which I would want to be a part. And yet, Owen Wilson's character, Eli Cash, wanted nothing more than to be a Tenenbaum. Different strokes, I guess. When you're brought up and heralded by the media as a child geniuses—nay, part of a trio of family geniuses—then there's bound to be something a little off with you. Speaking of which, dear listener of this podcast, if you were a child genius or savant of some sort, please write in and tell us about your life. We'd love to hear your tale. We imagine it's probably similar to what the Tenenbaum children—Richie, Chas, and the adopted daughter, Margot—had to endure. Talk about pressure! It's no wonder that all three of them cracked in their own ways. Frankly, I'd be surprised if any of them turned out to be “normal.” Now that would be worth some serious attention. None of this is helped by their asshole of a father, Royal. Ugh, that guy. It's a damn shame that it took some serious family tragedy for him to snap out of himself and appreciate what he has. He probably could have saved his marriage if he had done that sooner. All of this nonsense makes for a captivating, fun, and endlessly watchable film. It's something that keeps rewarding you. Your first viewing will be a unique and enviable experience. Your tenth viewing will be just as enjoyable. Maybe some of the surprises will be gone, but there's enough depth here to draw you in as few films can. (Recorded on July 19, 2021) Links to Stuff We Mentioned: The Royal Tenenbaums - IMDb The Royal Tenenbaums trailer - YouTube Gene Hackman - IMDb Bill Murray - IMDb Zombieland - IMDb Lost in Translation - IMDb Wes Anderson - IMDb Rushmore - IMDb The Grand Budapest Hotel - IMDb Danny Glover - IMDb Saw - IMDb Gwyneth Paltrow - IMDb Anjelica Huston - IMDb Ben Stiller - IMDb Luke Wilson - IMDb Owen Wilson - IMDb Kumar Pallana - IMDb Seymour Cassel - IMDb Colin Farrell - IMDb Scrubs - IMDb Charlie Rose - IMDb Charlie Rose - Wikipedia Larry King - Wikipedia Howard Stern - Wikipedia Elliott Smith - Wikipedia Needle In The Hay | Elliott Smith - YouTube Nico - Wikipedia These Days | Nico - YouTube Underdog - Wikipedia Alec Baldwin - IMDb Follow Us: Give us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! Our Libsyn site! Our Instagram profile! Our Twitter profile!

Horse Hippie’s Morning Mantras

Morning Mantra: "You are not required to set yourself on fire to keep others warm."Boundaries are tough.  You will feel guilty, scared and apprehensive doing it. But the truth is the only people who get upset with you for setting them, are the people who benefited from you having none.Frankly, I'd rather feel uncomfortable saying "No" than resent saying "Yes".#BeWillingToSetBoundaries #BeHappy #BeHorsey #BeHippie #HorseHippie #MorningMantra #inspirationalQuotes #MorningMotivation #Equestrian #HorseLover #QuotesToInspire #HorseHippieBrand #HorseHippieBoutique

Chad the Podcast
Frankly Oz

Chad the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 21:05


Do YOU wanna live in a reality where legendary Frank Oz did an interview for The Guardian where he announced that he'd love to get back with the Muppets but Disney doesn't want him? Well ya do. Recorded LIVE at The Green Mill Lounge in Chicago for The Paper Machete September 4th 2021Brought to you by Jeppson's Mälort: Aiding in Social Distancing since the 1930's and Hero Power: Do you part to help keep the place clean by signing up today! Tell ‘em Chad the Bird sent ya and you'll get $25 off your next electricity bill! WATCH ME DO SCIENCE!!! Subscribe and follow for more and listen to The Climate Pod: We're doing what we can. The Patreon is LIVE and we need money. Come be a part of my first-ever Saturday morning comedy variety show, delivered hot and fresh to you. Featuring “Promises” by the Barrerracudas, a touch of the ol “"Colonel Bogey March" by Lieutenant F. J. Ricketts and a snippy of “SOLO ACOUSTIC GUITAR” by Jason Shaw http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jas... Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0Come play retro games with ChadthaBird on chicago4real's ‘H0T DR0P” every Wednesday 9pm on Twitch and get rekt! PLEASE RATE AND REVIEW, BLACK LIVES MATTER and WEAR A MASK!

Roll and Move
Episode 97: Pegleg!

Roll and Move

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 40:31


Land hooooo! We're back from the dead! As you know, we've been dealing with shipping issues and boardgame logistics the past couple of weeks. If you're curious check out our Kickstarter page for the slew of updates that we've churned out! But right now let's talk a little bit about pirating! No, we're not referring to Napster or Pirate Bay, or any other torrenting website. We're talking about setting sail on the seven seas and getting up to no good! Frankly, this is something we've never done, but thankfully there's a board game for that! Pegleg is a card game about crude solutions to amputations and also pirating... it's also really bad. Is it possible that this game has less going for it than Go Fish? You'll have to walk the plank with us to find out! Find out more at https://roll-and-move.pinecast.co

Black Women Heal Show
Black girl, you know you can‘t do that: a look into the overly critical views of Black women in America

Black Women Heal Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 75:35


Help us better serve you by taking our show survey, we promise it won't take more than five minutes! We appreciate you family Tap here Have you ever been told by parents and loved ones: girl you can't do that, people will think you're ghetto and have no home training! Black girls and boys spend their childhood learning how to behave and speak in public, school, work, and predominantly white spaces. As if who we are is tainted and not good enough. The history of America and its Black people is filled with images of promiscuous and angry Black women. For many of us, a few lessons on how NOT to be what the media portrays us is just as important as earning a college degree.  In this episode, the ladies of BWH discuss what contributes to or causes the overly critical views of Black women and girls. How these stereotypes affected them as children and adults. Why do White people refuse to "fix" what was created by their Ancestors, how Black men and women can heal and thrive as a collective. Articles mentioned: A.)  The Misunderstood Schema of the Strong Black Woman: Exploring Its Mental Health Consequences and Coping Responses Among African American Women   B.) Frankly, We Do Give a Damn: The Relationship Between Profanity and Honesty  C.)  Jim Crow Museum of racist memorabilia  D.) The Black Kings of Europe Time Stamps 00:00:00- Intro 00:01:30- Listener Reviews and the Top Countries & States for August. 00:07:51- Black girl, you know you can't do that. 00:13:04-Articles and studies about profanity and Black women. 00:15:38- What contributes to the negative imagery of Black women? 00:19:19- Negative stereotypes Black children/young adults experience. 00:25:30- Embarrassing me in front of all these white people. 00:28:46- Oversexualization of Black girls and Black women. 00:33:34- The Black woman is the most disrespected in America. 00:39:43- The Black community is powerful; they just don't know it. 00:42:55- Societal pressures and body image. 00:48:20- So tired of being told what I can't do. 00:51:14- Why don't white people want to fix/dismantle the racist systems that they benefit from? 00:52:56- Black women do not feel protected by Black men. 00:58:06- Can the Black community do better as a collective? 01:03:02- Even when we fuck up, we should work together to heal and cancel culture. ___________________________________________________________  Ways to support the show: -Follow on IG and tag us to let us know if you enjoyed today's episode! -Leave a five-star rating and review in Apple iTunes. Important Shit: -Write to us at blackwomenhealpod@gmail.com with your questions or anonymously for BWH-Two Cents with letters about your own life experiences for a possible feature on the show!!!  

The Bike Shed
307: Walking Contradictions

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 36:56


On this episode, Chris talks about testing external services and dissects a tweet on refinements for Result. Steph talks about thoughbot's recent improvement to their feature flag system. Links: refinements For Result (https://twitter.com/alassek/status/1430683412264857600) Faking External Services in Tests with Adapters by German Velasco (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/faking-external-services-in-tests-with-adapters) Testing Interaction with 3rd-party APIs (https://thoughtbot.com/upcase/videos/testing-interaction-with-3rd-party-apis) Transcript: CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new with you? STEPH: Hey, Chris. Well, today is Summit Day at thoughtbot, and it's the day where all the bots gather, and we hang out, and we chat, and we play games. And it's a lot of fun. We're actually taking more of a respite this year just because life has been taxing. And so we decided to give people more of the day off. So we still had some fun events, but most of it is everybody gets a chill day. Do something that brings you joy is the theme of the day. But we had Lightning Talks, which is my favorite thing that we do on Summit Day because I realize that I just work with the coolest people, and they have such interesting things to talk about. And we had such a variety of topics. So one of them, Alex Chen taught us acronyms in K-pop. And Sam Kapila, our resident foodie, taught us about a variety of spices. And one of my favorite talks was by Akshith Yellapragada, and it's the top 10 best limo entrances by The Bachelor, and it was phenomenal. And I really want to share some stuff that I learned with you. CHRIS: The Bachelor like the TV show? STEPH: Yeah, like the TV show. Are you familiar with it? Have you seen it before? CHRIS: I am familiar with it. I know it exists. I know that there's a spinoff, The Bachelorette. And I believe we have now exhausted my information on the matter. STEPH: [laughs] That's fair. For anyone that hasn't seen the show, the show revolves around a single person. For the bachelor, it's a single bachelor who dates a number of people over several weeks, and then they narrow down the people. There are elimination rounds, and the whole goal is for them to find their true love. So each week, someone is eliminated, and I think the show ends with a marriage proposal. So it's a wild show. It's something. [chuckles] And in Akshith's talk, I learned some really fun terminology. The first one is the Crown, and this is actually an important building block because we're going to get to the rest of the terminology that uses this word, so we got to start here. So the first one is the Crown, and this is the person that everyone's competing for. So they're the star of the show. They're the one that everybody is hoping to fall in love with or will fall in love with them so they get a marriage proposal. So then the other stuff that I've learned is all about the entrance because again, we're talking about the top 10 best entrances. And one of them is the sidecar entrance. So this is where the player, because yes, this is totally a game, has someone assist them in meeting the crown. So it could be like a family member, maybe it's like your grandma. And then there's TOT, T-O-T, which is short for Trick Or Treat. And this person exits the limo wearing a costume. So it's someone wearing a shark costume. There was someone wearing a sloth costume where they really dedicated to the role, and they climbed a tree and hung from a branch. I don't know for how long but for long enough to really vibe with the role. And then there's the Kringle, and this person brings a prop or a present to the Crown. And there's the Grandy, and this player arrives in something other than a limo. So the example that Akshith provided is someone arrived in a motorized cupcake. CHRIS: Was the cupcake edible? STEPH: I don't think so, fair question. [laughs] CHRIS: So really just like a go-kart that looked like a cupcake, not really a motorized cupcake, if I'm going to meet pedantic about the thing, [chuckles] which I think is my job. STEPH: Yes, it is a motorized non-edible cupcake, but that seems like something a next player should do. They should really up the game, and they should bring an edible motorized cupcake. CHRIS: Yeah, because you get the visual novelty, but then you layer on top of it that it's actually something that you can now eat, and it's a double win. STEPH: Ooh, and then you're a Grandy, and you're a Kringle because you arrived in something other than a limo, and it's a present. CHRIS: I love how you have so deeply internalized this now that you're like, ooh, okay. I can remix here. I'm going to bring together the pieces. Yeah, all right. Yeah, this all makes sense. STEPH: Yeah, it was a lot of fun. Those are most of my notes for today. I have some tech stuff too, but this felt like the most important thing to start the show with. CHRIS: We use the phrase tech talk and nonsense to describe the show often, but I think nonsense and tech talk is the correct orientation. STEPH: [chuckles] CHRIS: Correct in terms of importance and chronological order, and whatnot. But yeah. STEPH: I love that we start with a bit of nonsense. So I do have some tech stuff. But first, before I share any of that, what's going on in your world? CHRIS: I'm sure there's plenty of nonsense in my world, but at the top of my list is some tech stuff. So someone on Twitter, Adam Lassek, reached out and he suggested related to the conversation and the back and forth that I've been having with myself around some of the data structures within the app that I'm building…So I've talked about the dry-monads result object, and there's this success and failure. And I wanted to introduce this new method called bimap, but I wanted to do it in a reasonable way. So I wrapped, and then I wrapped, and I wrapped things. As an aside, former colleague and friend of the show, Joel Oliveira, sent a wonderful tweet which was a reference to the SNL video where they make a taco and put it inside of a pizza and put it inside of a bag. And that was his joke about it, which I really liked. That was an excellent reference. But in this case, Adam Lassek reached out and suggested if I'm that squeamish about monkey patching, which I am, have I considered refinements? And so he sent an image of a code sample, which is so kind of him to send that much detail over, but it was interesting because I know of refinements in Ruby. I know of that as an alternative to monkey patching, a more refined way, but a safer way, a more controlled way to alter code, but I've not actually used them. STEPH: I'm not familiar with refinements. What is that? CHRIS: Refinements are a way...so similar to monkey patching, where you say like, I'm going to reopen this class or this module and define a new method or redefine a method or do something like that, a refinement is a way to do that in a scoped manner. So I'll be honest, I'm not super familiar with them. I think I came into Ruby at a time where the community was moving away from monkey patching. And the dogmatic swing of the pendulum was like, that's a bad thing to do. And so even the refinements were introduced, as far as I understand it, to be a more controlled way to do it. So it's not just like, hey, cool. This module is redefined now in your app in a magical way that's really hard to figure out and hard for folks to debug refinements. You have to explicitly opt into within a certain lexical scope. I'll be honest; I know that at the headline level. I don't actually know the ramifications or where and when you can use them and how you can. But I know that that was the idea is refinements are a way to do monkey patching but in a more controlled, more understandable manner, and so the code sample that Adam shared does that. And it's very interesting. As I'm looking at it, I'm like, okay, that's cool because I think it'll be a little bit safer. But at the end of the day, my concern wasn't safety in this case because I was introducing a method that would be new, that would be additive to the API of this module that I'm working with, and so that I think of as a relatively safe operation. My hesitation was more around how does someone figure it out if they're working with this? And particularly, the name of the method that I was introducing was bimap so, B-I-M-A-P. And if someone sees that in our codebase and is like, "Bimap, where is this coming from?" Well, this is one of those dry-monad result objects. And they go to the code, and they try and look it up in the docs, and they're just not going to find anything. And I can imagine losing a lot of time to try and chase that down. There are ways to figure it out. There's the method in Ruby, which is a wonderful trick for chasing things down. Or if you grep the codebase, you'd find it. But I think I'm possibly over-indexed on worrying about that lost time, that moment. But I've lost that time so many times in my life where I'm like, I can't grep for this. I can't Google for this. And so I have so strongly moved in the direction of being like, everything should be grepable, everything should be googleable. Those are the two of the things that I believe about software. I think I believe a bunch of stuff. STEPH: I think we have a full episode that talks about what we believe in software. CHRIS: I believe we do. STEPH: Cool. Thanks. Yeah, I have not heard of refinements. That sounds really interesting. I really like that bit about everything should be grepable, and everything should be googleable, googling everything. I kind of agree with that one. We live in a world where we're always doing bespoke things so that one feels a little bit harder that we're always going to be able to Google it. But then that encourages people to constantly publish the bespoke work that they're doing so then others can benefit from that work. But the grepable, I absolutely agree with that one. It's so frustrating where I see a method, but I cannot find its definition. And then having the ways to figure out where that method is defined to then find its definition is crucial. CHRIS: Yeah, it's interesting. I definitely feel that way very strongly. And it's in such stark contrast to Rails. Rails is like, hey, don't worry. There's going to be a lot of methods. You don't need to worry about where they come from, or why they exist, or what they are, or what they do. Well, probably what they do. But all of the magic inflections on database tables,, and suddenly you have methods named after every column. That's both very magical and hard to grep for or impossible to grep for, but it also leaks the entire structure of your database into your application in a way that I've always felt a little bit complicated about. And so explicitness, grepability, those are things that I care about. There's another one, delegates in Rails, that I sometimes pause around using especially when it's like delegates 19 methods to user prefix user. And so you end up with methods that are like username. And that's a delegation to the user object to get the name method off of it, but it creates the method user_name. And you're never going to be able to grep for that. And it saves like a little bit of code, definitely, but it saves this very obvious, very knowable code. So this one I actually shy away from using delegates in most cases, and I'll just write out the methods manually because sometimes I like to hear the clackety of my keyboard. There's a reason I have a clackety keyboard. STEPH: You want to get your money's worth. You want to clackety as much as possible. Yeah, I'm also not a fan of delegates. This may be a lie, but I don't know that I've actually ever used it. I've worked with it, but I can't think of a time that I've implemented delegates. Maybe that's a lie, but I'm going to say it anyways because that feels true, at least in the last couple of years. CHRIS: I feel like that could be true for the last couple of years. I would be surprised if you have never even added to a delegates line. Because that's the thing, you can just keep shoveling stuff into them as well. So I would put money on you having used it at some point and then just forgotten about it. But who knows, maybe not. STEPH: This is where we play two truths and a lie and that one's my lie. [laughs] Yeah, that's also fair about adding to it because if that's already defined and it's easier to add to it, I don't know. Who knows what past Stephanie has done, probably some wild stuff. CHRIS: It's unknowable at this point. It's lost to the sands of time. But looping back to the core thing of this refinement and the module, I think I'm leaning in the direction of doing that and unwinding my wrapping and wrapping layer thing. Because obviously, as I talked about...I think it was the previous episode or maybe two episodes ago. There was conceptual complexity to the additional wrapping layer. Even as I was fully in the context of working on that, I was still getting myself confused in either triple wrapping or then unwrapping too much or whatever. And these are the concerns with this type of code. So moving away from that feels better, having just a single layer of context wrapping around a given value. And then the other thing it's actually just a lot less code, and it's less prone to error, I think. That's my hope. I have to look into exactly how refinements get used, but I noticed in a couple of places that sometimes we were wrapping with this local value object that gave us the bimap method, and sometimes we were forgetting to. And so, I could see that being a very subtle, easy way to introduce failures into the app that would be hard to catch just by looking at it. So I think having a more global refinement...although I think that's sort of a contradiction, a global refinement because I think refinements are meant to be local. But anyway, I'm going to look into it because it's a much more concise code sample than what I have. Yeah, I'm going to poke at that a little bit. But it was an interesting exploration of some different things. And then it forced me to consider why am I so resistant to monkey patching at this point, especially in this particular case where I think it's okay-ish? STEPH: That's a good question. Do you have any insights? I am also resistant to monkey patching. I feel that pain and also that timidness of diving into that space. But I'm curious, have you figured out any other reasons that you really prefer to avoid it? CHRIS: I think this one falls into that sort of...what's the word? Like tribal knowledge of we've been burned by it in the past and therefore we build almost a...religious is too strong of a word but that sort of cultural belief. This is a thing that we do not do because of the bad things that we've experienced in the past. And there are a lot of things that fall into that experiential negative space. So with monkey patching, things that I know we can run into is if I introduced this bimap method, but I introduce it subtly differently than the library will eventually, then they could eventually introduce it themselves. And suddenly, I have this fork of my code expects it to work this way, but you've now implemented it that way. I no longer can upgrade. This is a critical piece of infrastructure in my app. I've just painted myself into a corner by doing this. Whereas if I do this wrapping layer, that's my code. I own that. It's not going to be a problem in that same way. There's also the subtlety, the grepability that sort of thing is a concern in my mind. Like, is this our code? Is this their code? Is this an engine? Being able to find code within a codebase, I think, is a critical thing. And so that's a part of the hesitation. I also know longer ago prototypes...I want to say Prototype JS was the name of the project, but it was one that was just like, yeah, JavaScript doesn't have enough stuff in the standard library. So we're just going to override everything and add all of these wonderful methods sort of in the way that Active Support does, which is an interesting comparison. But the JavaScript community definitely moved away from Prototype. And now JavaScript is a language or the standard runtime that's available in most JavaScript engines. It has a lot of the methods, but there are conflicts, and stuff gets weird, and it's all complicated. But again, as I thought of it, Active Support is a complete contradiction to everything I'm saying. Active Support just adds whatever to anything, 2.days.ago. Why does the number 2 have a days method? Because it's great, that's why. But I'm just a walking contradiction, I guess. STEPH: Everything you said really resonates with me. And I'm just trying to reason with myself like yes, Active Support uses a lot of this, a lot of metaprogramming, and adds everything it wants to. So why does that feel okay? And I wonder if it comes down to one is more almost like an agreed standard. It's built by a team, and it's maintained by a team, and then it's used by a large number of people, and then you get that feedback. Or maybe it's not even just a team, but it's a larger community versus if it's internal to your software team, maybe that doesn't feel like a big enough group or if it just needs...Rails is also documented. So maybe that's part of it, too, is if you are going to dive into that space, it's easy to discover, and it's well-documented as if you are building an open-source project that other people are going to use. Like, you designed for the intent of people to use this pattern that you've introduced, then perhaps that's when it starts to feel okay. , But the experiences I have had is where people basically will add some dynamic programming or monkey patch an existing feature. And then that's very hard to find and has surprising results, or it gets outdated. So I guess it comes down to who are you designing for? Are you designing for more of an open-source community, or you're at least designing for the people behind you that are going to be using this? Or is this a one-off adventure that you have chosen for yourself and future developers to discover? [chuckles] CHRIS: Yeah, I think that's a good summary, although I'm open to the fact that I exist in a state of contradiction. I'm also fine with that, to be clear. [chuckles] But I think what you said is true, and I think there is subtlety and nuance and reasons that it's okay in one context and less okay in others. And that idea of just like, I don't know, this is one of those things that I got in my head that I've done the thinking a long time ago to decide this is a thing I don't do. So now, in order to override that, I would have to do so much thinking. I would have to be like, all right, well, my brain tells me, no, but I'm going to go reread everything about monkey patching right now to convince myself that it's okay or to fully get the context and the subtlety and the nuance. And so sometimes we have to rely on that heuristic knowledge of monkey patching, nope, don't do that. That's not a thing, but other stuff is fine. And well, Active Support is fine because it's Rails. But it is interesting to observe contradictions and be like, huh, look at me go. All right. Well, moving on. STEPH: It's our lizard brain that's saying, "Hey, there's danger here." [laughs] CHRIS: Exactly. STEPH: I rather like living in a world of contradictions, or at least I find it that I'm drawn to them. And maybe that's also one of the things that I really like about consulting is because then I join all these different teams, and I hear all these different opinions. So as I'm forming these opinions around something like tests are great, I really like tests, and then someone's like, "I really hate tests." I'm like, "Cool. Let's talk. I want to understand why you don't like this thing that I think is wonderful because then I'm really interested." So I find that I'm often really drawn to contradictions as I like hearing opinions that are very different than mine and finding out why people have a different opinion than mine. CHRIS: Yeah, the world is full of contradictions. So it's, I think, at least a useful way to exist in the world, to be open to them and to enjoy exploring them. But yeah, I'll update in future weeks if I do end up going the refinements route. I'll let you know if anything interesting falls out of that. And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. STEPH: So we made a recent improvement to our feature flag system, which I'm really excited about, that we have found a way to improve that workflow because it felt really great that we're...well, okay, I should say that with a caveat. It felt really great that we're using feature flags to ensure that the main branch is always in a deployable state. But it did not feel great around how tedious it was becoming to add all of the feature flags specifically because each time we're adding a feature flag, we're having to add a migration. So we're having to run a migration, add the feature flag column, and then we can interact with that feature flag. And that part's okay. It was more removing that feature flag once we're done with it, that that part was starting to feel tedious because then that's becoming a two-deploy process. So one change is to remove the code that's relying on that feature flag. And then the second deploy was to actually drop that column because we wanted it to be safe to make sure that the code wasn't trying to reference a database column that didn't exist anymore, which is what happened at one point at first when we weren't doing the two-deploy process. So the improvement that Chris White came up with is where we're now using a Postgres JSONB column. And it's here that we actually have a feature flag YAML file. And we can have the name of the feature flag. We have a description of the purpose of the feature flag. And we have an enabled property on there, so then we can turn it on and off. The benefit of this is now we don't have to do that two-deploy process. And we also don't have to run a migration for when we're adding a new feature flag. So we can add it to the feature flag file, we can load it in, and then we can set that property to say, "Yes, this is enabled," or "No, it's not." And that has just simplified our feature flag process. One tricky bit that I believe the team ran into is around enabling this with Active Admin because Active Admin was just relying on those database columns to then turn something on or off. But then we've added some methods that work well with Active Admin that then say, "Read from here when you're checking to see if something is enabled," or "Look at this list to see which feature flags can be turned on and off." So it's been a really nice improvement, and everybody on the team seems to be in favor of the ways that we've improved this. So it's been really nice. So I wanted to come back and bring an update on how we've simplified our feature flag system. CHRIS: That definitely sounds like a nice improvement, the ability to just more regularly iterate around that or taking away the pain, any pain associated with using feature flags. Because they are such a nice thing to have, but there's that overhead. Then you start to have that voice in your head that's like, do I really need a feature flag for this? Could I just sneak this one in? And we always regret that. I had a similar thing this week where I wrote some code. I didn't quite write as many tests as I should have. And it was wildly broken, just like all of the connection points through everything were broken. But then it pushed me in an interesting direction where I was like, well, what I'm going to do is write an integrated test. It was basically an event coming in from a webhook that then enqueued a job, which did a thing, which then spit out an email. But it was broken at like three layers, and I was very embarrassed, if we're being honest. But, I don't know, I was just having a low energy afternoon, and I did not write the test, which I know I'm supposed to do. So similarly, any pain that we can take out of these things that we're supposed to do, any way that we can pave the happy path, I'm all about those. I'm intrigued because I think we've talked about this before, but it sounds like you guys have a very home-grown feature flag system. Is that true? STEPH: We do. CHRIS: Is there something about it that makes it unique to your situation, or was it just like that's what happened? Someone early on was like, "We need feature flags. I can just do the simplest thing that works," and then that's where you're at now or? STEPH: You're asking a very good question. And I'm trying to recall what led us to the state that we're in because I feel like we had this same discussion several episodes back when we were introducing the home-grown feature flag system. And I was like, there are reasons, but I didn't really dive into those reasons because it felt very custom to the application. But now I've forgotten what those reasons were. So I think you ask a great question where it'd be worth revisiting to confirm that yes, there's a reason for this home-grown version versus using something like Flipper. CHRIS: I'm glad I'm at least consistent over time in the questions that I ask and the heuristics that I have. This does feel like one of those things. It's not quite like crypto where I'd be like, we can never write our own crypto. But a feature flag system, I would be really intrigued if there are things that they are just workflows or functionality that you really need that are not supported by any of the existing solutions that are out there. I think audit trails is an interesting one. I think Flipper has a hosted product at this point that does that, but the local version wouldn't necessarily. So maybe that's a thing that you want to get. Again, I'd just be really interested. It sounds like the current state of the world that you have is enabled or disabled; just broadly, that's it. Those are the two states for any given flag. Is that true? STEPH: It is. There's nothing complex with the flags in that nature. And then we use naming to indicate if something is more for beta, so if it's a change that we're making to the codebase, but it's a feature flag that we plan on removing, versus maybe it's a feature flag for enterprise customers. CHRIS: Oh, interesting. I wouldn't think of using a feature flag in that context where it's going to be like a persistent, long-lived; this is conditional logic around some state or some property of the viewer. I think of feature flags as a way to gate code conditionally based on a point in time. And the reason I asked about the enabled-disabled basically like the Boolean state for your flags is when I've worked with feature flags in the past, I've liked having the ability to say, for this user or these users, or this group of users, which we've named this is our beta list…and it's the ten people that just really love the product and are happy to bump into some rough edges. And so we'll put things on for them first or even like percentages, so roll it out to 10% and then 50% and so on. And I think the larger an application and user base gets, the more that sort of thing starts to feel right. STEPH: Yeah, we certainly have some complexity around where each customer can really specify which features that they want. And then the features also differ a bit for each customer. So we are in a world where we're pretty customized or configurable for different customers. And whether that's something that we could simplify, that would certainly be a good question or something to pursue. But part of this also feels like our decision may have been based around what the system was already doing, and we're looking for ways to make slow improvements versus trying to redesign the whole thing. Because initially, the way we were customizing all of these different features for customers was in a YAML file. And that part was painful because then, anytime we wanted to make a change, it required a deploy. So the introduction of feature flags is really to get away from having to deploy to then make a small change like that. But now that we're in the space that we can easily configure that change and do that on the fly and not have to issue a deploy, I think we're now in a good space to reassess. And the team may have some really good answers. Perhaps I'm just not recalling as to why we've chosen the more home-grown feature flags. But yeah, I'll visit that topic and report back. Because I've been coasting along on our new system and enjoying it, but you're asking some really good questions. CHRIS: I mean, as an aside, if you're coasting along and really enjoying it, then maybe you don't need to ask any questions. It's still interesting. I would be intrigued to know. But if it's not causing you any pain, then you probably shouldn't change it. Because frankly, changing out the feature flag system is going to be non-trivial, I'm pretty sure. You could feature flag the feature flag system, and then you can transition from one to the other. You need a third feature flag system for that. But anyway, I digress. [chuckles] STEPH: You referenced crypto earlier. So I think I like the feature flag, the feature flag system. We should have some crypto flags in there somewhere. I think that's a thing too. But I think the main goal if I'm looking into changing it would be, circling back to what we were talking about earlier, is discoverability, so having a home-grown feature flag system. How easy is it for…if nobody was around on the team and there was someone new working with it, how easy would it be for them to turn something on or off? And if that's easy, then that's great. Then I think we've got a great home-grown system. If that's challenging, then I definitely think it's worth reassessing. And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. 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CHRIS: One of the things that's been interesting working lately in the app that I'm building is thinking about testing. We have a number of interactions with third-party services. Frankly, a lot of the app is that at this point. We have a handful of different external data providers systems that we're interacting with, webhooks and flows and things like that. And so we had to make that decision that you always have to make in these sorts of situations which is, how are we going to test this? And there's a wonderful blog post on the thoughtbot blog called Faking External Services in Tests with Adapters. It's by the one and only German Velasco. And it is a beautiful summary of the different approaches that you can take, but it really dials into one, which is the adapter pattern. There's also a weekly iteration episode on Upcase with Joël Quenneville, which discusses a little bit more of an exploration of the different options. There are sort of a handful of different options that we can consider your whereas the blog post by German talks specifically about the adapters approach. But to talk about them briefly, there's one where you can go all the way outside your app, spin up a fake service. Typically, we would do this with Capybara Discoball, which is a wonderfully named project. But it allows you to spin up a little Sinatra app type thing such that your web application is still making quote, unquote "real HTTP requests." This external service is going to catch that and respond with whatever canned data or structured responses that you want. But you still have the ability in that to, say, tell it to create data beforehand or be in a certain state or respond with certain data or have any stateful persistence. So if you create a record in that external system, and then later you query for it, that system can do that. But it has the complexities of now, your test suite is running different systems. And do you have thread-safety or all that kind of stuff? So that's a particularly complex end of the spectrum. At the lowest end would be stubbing and mocking. You just take whatever external clients you have, and you're mocking the API calls in them. That's the lowest end. And that's the one, especially for feature specs, those I try and avoid. Then there's a middle ground of like WebMock or VCR, those sort of things where you're saying whenever you see an HTTP request that looks like this, respond in this way. You record the cassettes, all that kind of stuff. And then there's the one that we've settled on, which is the adapters. So the client that we've introduced in our local codebase to interact with any of these third-party systems internally has a class attribute, a cattr_accessor in the Rails parlance, I believe. And that allows us to switch out the backend. And so we have a real HTTP backend, and that's the one that actually runs in production and a test in-memory backend. And that in-memory backend can implement whatever logic. We're ending up with one of them almost recreating this external service, sort of re-coding some of their inconsistencies or oddities but also features and whatnot. But it feels like it has struck just the right balance, and it allows our feature specs to be very rich, very real. We start up the world, and we say, "Hey, external service be in this state." And then I'm going to go visit the page. I'm going to see the data. But we are almost making real HTTP requests. It's very close. It's always an interesting choice to make here. I'm very happy with the one that we've made, but it's still not perfect. There are always going to be trade-offs between the different options here. But it's always interesting revisiting this and being like, which one am I going to choose today? STEPH: I feel like my natural progression when testing external services; I always start with WebMock, and then I progress to using adapters. And then from there, I go to actually replacing the HTTP service that is receiving and then returning a response, like you mentioned to Capybara Discoball earlier. So I can certainly see what you like about the adapter pattern. You mentioned that you're coding some of the inconsistencies. That feels very real. I'm curious if you have an example of how you've had to manage that recently. CHRIS: A specific example would be the external API responds with certain error codes or error structures. So it's an error. It has a status of a number and then a reason, or sometimes instead of a key that is reason; it's the message. So it's like, oh, okay, I see that in this endpoint, you respond with reason, and then this endpoint you respond with message. So now, do I encode that into my fake? I guess I do. So my adapter now implements things like that. There are cases where it's inconsistency where I'm like, well, this is the way they behave. So I would like our test suite to exist in the context of that because then our app is getting exercise in a real way. But in some cases, it's like little bits of logic validation that an external system might do if that's an important part of the flow. The app that we're building has a lot of forms and a lot of data validation and things like that. And so, we want to make sure that we have robust handling around that robust messaging to the user so that it's very clear what they need to do and how they need to respond to things. And so putting in little bits of that like, oh, that's how you format a phone number, okay, cool. Our fake will also format phone numbers in that way, things like that. STEPH: Every time the topic of testing external services comes up, I really, really want VCR to be the answer. I really like the idea of being able to validate that...because you'd mentioned that we're programming the expected return from this other service. And it's very easy to get out of sync with those actual responses. And then we don't really have a great way to stay up to date other than we wait for production or staging environment to fail. And then we realize something has changed, and we have to go and update either our mock or our adapter. And maybe that doesn't happen often if you're working with an external service that is very good about broadcasting when they have a breaking change. But if you're working with a less stable endpoint, then I always want VCR to really work. But it's just one of those areas where I'm like, yes, that's the thing that I want. I want this idea where I can rerun my tests in a way that they actually hit that service and record the response. But then I have felt pain [chuckles] from working with VCR and how it's configured, and how people have used it. It's one of those where I don't blame the library. I like the library. But the way people have implemented it and test I have felt a lot of pain from that. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely agree with that. It feels like it's nice if you can push the mocking all the way out to that layer. Because like right now, our codebase has code in it that is subtly changing the behavior for a test, and I don't like that. It's only the swapping out of the adapter, so it's a very minimal thing. And we try and push all logic away from that such that the test adapter is as similar as possible to the real production situation. But it's enough difference that I agree I would like if VCR would just like, I catch the HTTP requests, and I respond with the same thing and sometimes we can pass through. I do think one of the fundamental limitations, or at least very hard to get right things, would be sequential requests. So I post to this endpoint in the external service, which creates some data. And then later, when I make a GET request to their endpoint, I should get back that data that I just created. That's, I guess, doable because you can have sequential requests, have cassettes that are first this request, then that request, then that request. And it knows that, like scope them to a given spec. But that feels extra difficult. And it does, again to your comment, the maintainers of that project do a wonderful job, but it's a really hard target to hit. STEPH: Well, and one of the other hard requirements with using a tool like VCR is then that external service really needs that sandbox staging environment that you can use. So that way you can create this data, you can rerun your test. So they're actually going to hit this real environment. They're going to create this data and that not have any harmful effects. And then you can record fetching that data. So it requires a lot of pieces to fall into place for it to work well. But then I was just thinking as you're talking about adapters, I'm like, yeah, I love the adapter pattern. I've really enjoyed that one for testing as well. But then I immediately start to think, oh, well, what happens when it gets out of sync, and how do we know that it got out of sync? And I don't have a great answer to that. CHRIS: Production blows up, obviously. STEPH: Production blows up, and then we go update our adapter. That's very calm. [laughs] CHRIS: It would be great if CI could more proactively catch that or...yeah, I agree. I would love if VCR would work because that facet of it is so attractive. But [chuckles] I've never gotten to walk exclusively the happy path with VCR. So here we are. This is a classic case of here's four options as to how we can think about this hard and important thing that we do in our codebases, and they all have trade-offs much like everything else in software. STEPH: I'm going to add this to my developer bucket list to live in a world where I can easily validate if an external API has changed or not and then also have tests that know when something has broken before production does. CHRIS: Ooph, dare to dream. I like it. STEPH: I'm a dreamer. CHRIS: I want to live in that world. Well, with that wonderful dream to take us out, should we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. CHRIS: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. STEPH: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or a review in iTunes as it helps other people find the show. CHRIS: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed on Twitter. And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: And I'm @SViccari. CHRIS: Or you can email us at hosts@bikeshed.fm. STEPH: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeee. Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Introversion
Introversion 43.0: Give and Take

Introversion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 39:47


Frankly, it's a peculiar phenomenon, this whole Generosity thing.  Because... the primary motivating factor when giving of yourself... should NOT be to receive (something in return). And yet... if time after time you're giving and giving and giving (often to the same entity) in a perpetual paradigm of... them taking your gift but offering you nothing in return... this is an unhealthy balance and you should identify it as such.

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst
Episode 93: The Ins and Outs of Chambers & Partners: How to Get Your Firm Ranked with Megan Braverman Principal at Berbay Marketing and Public Relations

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 29:54


What you'll learn in this episode: What types of firms benefit the most from being included in Chambers, and how to determine if the submission process is worth your time Why it's important to keep submitting to Chambers annually, even in quiet years Why the referee list is the most important part of your Chambers nomination, and how to choose the best referees How to use the B10 section to your advantage Which lawyers firms should put forth for nomination, and how to effectively nominate up-and-coming associates  About Megan Braverman: Megan Braverman, Principal at Berbay Marketing and Public Relations, has earned an exceptional reputation as a strategic asset for law firms and other professional service firms and is known for her ability to execute marketing programs that surpass business goals. Immersing herself in clients' operations enables Megan to identify what sets firms apart from their competition, and leverage this to create countless PR opportunities, generate awareness and reinforce credibility. As Principal, Megan plays an integral role with all of Berbay's clients, working closely with the Account Managers to ensure the successful execution of marketing plans. She makes it a priority to regularly revisit client objectives and assess if the current strategy is supporting those goals. This proactive approach results in a consistent marketing momentum for clients. Megan is a member of Women Lawyers Association of Los Angeles and ProVisors. She previously served as a cabinet member and executive committee member of the Jewish Federation. Megan has been a volunteer with School on Wheels, which provides tutoring services and other educational assistance to homeless children in Southern California, and CoachArt, which uses art and athletics to help kids impacted by chronic illness. Additional resources: LinkedIn Instagram Facebook Twitter Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast Transcript: Chambers & Partners is one of the most coveted legal rankings—and one of the most enigmatic. With an extensive nomination process and months-long research period, many lawyers and law firms are mystified when it comes to getting listed or moving up in the rankings. Megan Braverman, Principal of Berbay Marketing and Public Relations, has spent hundreds of hours completing successful nominations and gotten numerous clients ranked by Chambers. She joined the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast to talk about which firms should devote time to Chambers nominations, how to create a winning submission, and how to evaluate past nominations for future success. Read the episode transcript below.  Sharon: Welcome to the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast. Today, my guest is my colleague, Megan Braverman, Principal of Berbay Marketing and Public Relations. Megan has significant experience getting our lawyer clients ranked in Chambers as well as working with those already ranked to help them move up the rankings. Today's she'll share some of the ins and outs gleaned from her experience working with Chambers and partners. Megan, welcome to the program. Megan: Thank you, Sharon. Glad to be here. Sharon: Glad to be talking to you, especially in this remote world. Tell us a little about your background and how you came to work at Berbay. Megan: Coming to work at Berbay was very haphazard. I applied to a Craigslist application and got the job and really grew from there. The trajectory at Berbay was not what I imagined. I started about 12 years ago and am now the principal of Berbay, running the day-to-day of the agency and being a strategic asset for law firms, real estate companies and financial service firms. Sharon: I know how much our clients rely on you. A lot of listeners have heard about Chambers, but they're not sure what it is. Can you describe it and give us a little background? Megan: Sure. Chambers is a legal ranking. It uses an in-depth editorial and research team to assess lawyers and law firms globally. Many consider Chambers to be the leading directory in the legal profession, which is why it's so coveted. It began in the early 90s, and today it covers over 200 jurisdictions and over 100 practice areas, and it continues to expand. It's one of the toughest lists to get on. That's what they've built a reputation for a high degree of selectivity. In fact, 2% of U.S. firms are ranked and you cannot buy your way in. Sharon: Wow! You'll have to tell us more about why it's so difficult. I looked at the application and it seems daunting and time-consuming. Why should lawyers or law firms bother with it? What does it get them to get their firm or themselves ranked? Megan: You asked why it's so coveted, how it got to the place it is today, and if you look at the history when legal rankings or directories were first introduced, it was sort of like the Yellow Pages for lawyers. Most lawyers listening remember Martindale Hubbell, which is still relevant, but it was one of the first. It was practice-area-specific; you could easily find the kind of lawyer you needed, and many of these directories were comprehensive. They included every kind of lawyer, regardless of the caliber of work. Then you start to see an introduction of exclusive rankings, things like Chambers. They were much more exclusive, because they began to rank by quality and by caliber of work. Chambers, for example, they're looking for things like technical ability, client service. They're really drilling down into why this lawyer or law firm is so great.  The million-dollar question, the billion-dollar question, is who's using these directories? Should I do it? Do I bother with it? You're right; it's daunting; it's time-consuming. At every marketing conference I've ever been to, there's almost always a question directed to a panel of corporate or in-house counsel on whether they use Chambers. Frankly, the verdict is still out. It's very 50/50. I know most marketing professionals across the world would love if the Chambers of the world would go away, because it's so time-consuming and it can be very competitive and very difficult to get folks on the list even if they've tried year after year.  One of the commonly heard answers is that it helps you get on the short list if corporate counsel or in-house counsel are looking for lawyers in unfamiliar jurisdictions or practices. It's also a badge of credibility. A lot of people look at it as if you're not ranked on Chambers, then something's missing. It's different for different firms. Whether you answer the question “Should I be doing it?” as a lawyer or as a law firm, that really needs to fit into your larger marketing objectives. For example, if you are a consumer-facing firm like a plaintiff firm, you might not consider Chambers because it's not plaintiff-friendly. If you're a local firm—let's say you're only looking in the greater New York area or the greater southern California area. Chambers is a national ranking, so consider other rankings before you pursue Chambers. It's something you have to look at.  Keep in mind that Chambers is an every-year endeavor. If you're going to commit to it, you need to do it every year. I'll add this and close here, but we did an analysis several years ago on how much time Berbay spends on each submission. We found on average that we spend 40 to 60 hours per submission. You're looking at up to 180 hours if you work on three submissions. If it's your first time ever, then usually you're on the higher end, either 60 or sometimes 80. So, it is incredibly time-consuming. Sharon: And that doesn't include the time the lawyer has to put in to send us information and review the information, and the time the marketing person at the firm has to run around and chase someone, a lawyer or someone else, to get the answers. Megan: Yeah, absolutely. There's a lot these hours don't capture, so beyond the time investment, you have to make sure that it fits in your larger marketing and business development goals. That's the push that we make for a lot of firms; does it fit what you're trying to achieve? Sharon: I think that's an interesting point you raise, about how in-house counsel use it to market, if you want to attract the attention of in-house counsel. I know some lawyers are dismissive, like they don't use it. Some in-house counsel say, “Oh, I never use it,” but I've sat next to in-house counsel who say they at least, as you say, develop the short list starting with Chambers. It's almost as if there's an embarrassment factor, like, “Yeah, I've used Chambers,” like they don't want to admit it in a sense.  Megan: Yeah, absolutely. I think Chambers has done a really good job of developing the profiles they have on each lawyer and law firm. It gives a lot of insight into the kind of work the lawyer does beyond the bio. It's quoting clients and how integral they were to their legal services and what they really excel at. It's a good sales pitch for a lawyer. Sharon: That's a good point, too. I know Chambers dislikes a puff piece, like if you just copied over what's on the website. Megan: Right. Sharon: When you look at Chambers, it looks like it's only for big firms, but I know we've been successful with smaller firms. Can you give a couple of examples of when it might make sense for a smaller firm, or when we've been successful in getting a firm in? Megan: Sure. Chambers does not consider the size of the law firm in their rankings. They're very clear about this. It's obvious that larger law firms dominate Chambers lists, but they absolutely consider and rank smaller firms, and we've been very successful in getting several smaller firms and midsize firms in their rankings. They actually have an entire page on the Chambers website explaining their commitment to smaller firms. I think over the last eight to 10 years, Chambers has made a stronger commitment to accommodate small firms.  You really have to focus on highlighting the strengths of your practice and your firm. Again, it comes down how strong your submission is, so it may be that you see a lot of larger law firms on there. It could be a combination of things. It could be they have bigger deals, bigger matters, more to boast, but I think smaller law firms absolutely should consider this as part of their marketing strategy. We've worked with a number of folks that had a difficult time getting onto the Chambers list and they thought it was because of their size, but we've seen time and time again that Chambers does not consider size. Sharon: We've talked about this a lot. It's leveling the playing field. How many times do we hear a firm say, “We're a well-kept secret”? Well, get the word out and get on the same playing field with some of the bigger firms. That's where I think Chambers and a lot of these directories are so important. What if you don't see your practice area listed? What should you do? Megan: Good question. Chambers has well over a hundred different practice areas you can submit for. Keep in mind many of these practice areas have subcategories. For example, for litigation they've got five different options, sometimes more depending on the state you're in: litigation appellate, litigation general commercial, litigation securities and so on. They expand their practice areas every year. I think Chambers is well aware of adding new practices because when they first started, it was pretty limited and every year they add more. I think it was in 2020, don't quote me, but they added a nationwide cannabis practice area, for example. If you don't see something, when in doubt, you should ask Chambers. They're very open about which ranking you should pursue in terms of what you're looking for, and they can help navigate that for you. If you don't see something or if there's not something that stands out, I would ask Chambers. Sharon: You also mentioned that you have to do this annually. If you're in it one year, does that mean you'll automatically be in it the next, or do you have to be selected again? Megan: Yeah, I wish. You need to go after it year after year, even if you've been ranked. It's not to say that you'll automatically drop off the list, but Chambers hangs their hat on their research, and that starts with your submission. A lot of the things that are in your submission are not on your website. They do a lot of outside research, of course, but they need to see what you've been up to for the last 12 months. If you don't submit, you're hurting your chances. It's really important; you have to go after it year after year. Sharon: Yes, you can have a sigh of relief when you finish the submission, but it seems like the whole process starts in just a month or two again because it takes so long. You mentioned a really important point, I think. If somebody isn't familiar with Chambers, the difference between them and other rankings is that they ask for what they call “referees.” Can you tell us a little bit about that? Megan: Sure. You're going to start to see this in more nominations than just Chambers. I think we've seen it more in the last couple of years than before. Referees is their term for, essentially, client names or co-counsel that can talk about the caliber of your work. Chambers asks you to submit up to 20 names, and you need to take advantage of all those 20 spots. Essentially, Chambers will call these folks—they email them first and ask for either a call or written responses to specific questions about that lawyer or law firm. One of the challenges when it comes to referees is that Chambers researchers get a very low response rate; typically, it's less than 30%, which is very low. One of the most important qualities in your referees is that they're responsive. It's important that you don't include referees you know won't respond because they're busy. For example, it's amazing to have the general counsel of a Fortune 500 company, but if you know they're not going to respond, you shouldn't list them.  The second piece is that it's really important to work with your referees to ensure they know a Chambers email is coming. Sometimes if they don't know, they'll overlook it, or maybe it goes to spam or they're not aware of the process. If you're going to submit someone's name, you should prepare them for the process. This includes making sure they know who's going to reach out, what questions are going to be asked of them, what the process is.  You may even want to help the referee hone some communication points about you. Maybe they don't have it top of mind, or they could be putting it off because they don't feel prepared, so you just need to step them through the process. Our belief, based on years of experience doing this for so long, is that referees are the most weighted. They're more weighted than the actual submission itself, I think. So, this is the most important piece of the Chambers process. Sharon: Yeah, I think it's important to make the referee's job as easy as possible. Like you were saying, it's about developing communication points or letting them know at least that something's coming so they can keep their eyes open for it. I haven't seen the actual email, but I hear they're really easy to overlook. Very often lawyers will come to us and are frustrated because they've been fortunate to be ranked, but they feel they should be higher on the list. They want help moving up. Is it possible to move people up? Megan: Yeah, but there's no formula. You have to have realistic expectations. We see folks get ranked and they immediately want to move up a ranking the next year, and I don't think that's realistic. It's not that it's impossible, but it's the exception. You have to really demonstrate why you are moving up in the rankings and why you warrant that ranking bump. There are six ranking levels, one being the best. Sometimes firms get a little disappointed when they're ranked in band five, let's say, and they're like, “Well, that doesn't reflect well. We should be band one or band two.”  I think in addition to the referees, how important it is to get your referees to respond like I just talked about, I think the other piece of the nomination is your deals, your cases. You need to focus on the worthy cases over the last 12 months. The other thing is you have to remember that these—I feel bad for the researchers a little bit. They're reading thousands and thousands of submissions. I think it's important that you highlight what's so important about your matter, what was significant about it, what was the outcome, what was the impact it had. Maybe there were nuanced areas of law; maybe it's the first of its kind, precedent-setting. You want to try to underscore the important aspects of the matter and not just leave it as a basic description. But I want to go back to having realistic expectations. Think about it this way: stack your Chambers nominations next to each other. Let's say you were ranked in 2020 in band 4, but in 2021 you were still ranked in band 4 and you're wondering why. Well, do you think you really had a step-up in terms of the kinds and size and importance of your matters? If not, then that's probably why you didn't go up a band. If you had, let's say, the same referee response rate; it was 30% the year before and it was 30% again—and they will tell you how many people have responded. They won't tell you who; that's the struggle, but they will tell you five of your 20 responded or three of your 20 responded. If those haven't changed, then you have unrealistic expectations. If you can point out that your matters were much more significant and you've got that increase in referee rate, sometimes it takes a couple of years of that. It's a couple of years of a slow, steady rise.  There really isn't a formula, but that's the one thing I look at when we have law firms calling us and saying, “We really need some help moving up the bands.” I like to look at all their former submissions and compare them to each other and think about it logically. Do they warrant an increase in bands, and if they do, what's happening? What's going wrong with their submission or their referee response rate? If they don't move up, it's unfortunately having those conversations with law firms and setting better expectations and making sure you keep on keeping on. There are ways to highlight things, but I think realistic expectations is so important. Sharon: Let's say it's been a good year, but we haven't gone to the Supreme Court or whatever. We don't have anything more to say. Should we submit anyway? Should we do our best and submit anyway, or should we skip a year? Megan: You shouldn't skip. I think you're right. Not every year is your most amazing year, so again, it's about setting realistic expectations. If you didn't have a stellar year compared to other years, then don't expect to move up bands. I think there are other ways to sell yourself. There's a section in the Chambers nomination called the B10 section, and it's an opportunity to sell yourself. This is the only essay portion of Chambers. The rest is focused on basic information about the firm, bios of the attorneys and the matters and deals I mentioned. If you haven't had a stellar year and some of your matters or deal submissions are average or not as great as years prior, the B10 section is where you can really focus on other things. I do feel like many gloss over this section or use it as a generic description of your practice, but again, this is where you sell yourself.  What's important is that you should not duplicate anything in the form, meaning in the B10 section, you don't repeat the matters you already have listed. It should be other pieces of information that Chambers should know about, and you want to avoid marketing fluff. It should be substantive information. For example, don't call yourself an unparalleled attorney. Say that you've done more than $4 billion in deal transactions in the last couple of years. Maybe it's more impressive to take a look at the last few years together and quantify what you've done. Maybe you can talk about a new practice area that you've really started to gain traction in or that you've done something internally that was very unique. These are ways that you can highlight other parts of your practice and your skillset. That this section is great to showcase all of that, so I would focus on this. Your matters are still important, of course, but this is the section you want to focus on. Sharon: And it's the one that takes a lot of digging deep and having to stop and think about it. What haven't I asked you, Megan? What else should people know? Megan: Good question. A couple of things come to mind. One is that once you submit your submission, you should introduce yourself to the researcher. Let them know that you're available for questions. I think that this is important. They make this information known and available. Check in with them about referees. They will tell you when their research period is; it's a dedicated month. Check in with them, whether it's every week or every week-and-a-half or so, and see how your referees are responding. If they're not responding, then you need to do another push. That's important, and it's something we see a lot of firms don't do.  I think the other thing is there's something called Chambers Confidential. Those that know Chambers, this will be familiar to them. It's essentially a report that Chambers will issue which explains some of the feedback they've received in prior years. This is a paid piece. You have to pay Chambers to give you this report. If you're not making any progress in a certain practice area or with certain groups, you should request this. It gives you great feedback, and it can be insightful as to why you're not ranked and help ensure that your submissions are focusing on these issues.  If you're still not making any progress, this is really a sales pitch for ourselves, but hire an agency. There are a lot of pros to hiring an agency. First of all, it's time-consuming, but you've got a team of specialists at your disposal. In hiring an outside agency, it provides you with that bench strength not only to draft a compelling nomination, but to juggle all the moving parts, and you get the plus of years and years of Chambers experience. I will say there is some benefit for someone in-house to do it because that person has company familiarity, but there is a benefit to having fresh eyes from an outside agency that can help determine the points that will be the most impactful or elements that you wouldn't have thought through without outside input. If you haven't made inroads with Chambers for a few years in a row, I think you should consider hiring an agency. Sharon: Of course, we support hiring an agency, but you say there's also a case to be made for in-house lawyers to do it. What do you mean exactly? I'm not sure. Megan: I mean in-house marketing. It depends on the firm's structure. For most in-house marketing departments, this falls under their purview. They've got company familiarity, so they have the benefit of pulling different numbers they have access to and things that an outside agency wouldn't think of because it's not at their fingertips. There are a lot of firms whose lawyers do it themselves. I'm always shocked when I find out that a lawyer is doing it themselves. It's time-consuming, so most lawyers don't have the time to carve out 40 or 60+ hours to do a Chambers submission. But again, company familiarity. I think that's the one benefit of an in-house person doing it. Sharon: One question law firms face (and we face working with law firms) is how many lawyers in a firm should be submitted. We know everybody wants to be submitted. Megan: This is my favorite question because that's one thing we see people doing wrong. Firms are submitting everyone and, frankly, not everyone warrants inclusion. I think this is where managing expectations and letting people down comes in. Your nomination should focus on the best and the brightest and those that have the most worthy cases or the most activity in the last 12 months, and that doesn't necessarily coincide with who you want to put forth. Law firm politics; we get it. We've seen a lot of it and we know it exists. It exists in every firm, not just law firms. There are some folks that you have to put forward and that's that, but I think it's important to focus in on the people you think warrant inclusion and narrow this list down as much as you can.  I will say, too, recently Chambers has added an “up-and-coming” or “associates to watch” list. There are basically three additional bands for younger attorneys. A lot of times we'll see younger folks on this list because they're trying to push those younger folks. These up-and-coming lists are for those who haven't had an established reputation but are driving the firm's growth. This is something Chambers has recently added. I think that's Chambers seeing the trends. For senior associates or associates, they're starting to recognize them for their work and their role in these major deals and matters, so there is a place for younger folks as well.  Sharon: It makes a lot of sense. I didn't know about the associate list, so that's great to hear. I hear so often, “We have to submit Harry because we have to show him we support him and we appreciate all he's doing for the firm,” but Harry may not warrant inclusion on a regular list yet. Megan: Exactly. I think Chambers has been good about seeing this issue and the trends and creating new lists, new practice areas. That's opened up the likelihood of other folks and other levels of folks getting in the door. Sharon: Megan, this is fabulous information. Thank you very much. Unfortunately, we don't have a magic wand. It's a lot of work. It's a lot of talking to Chambers and talking to lawyers, but this is great information. Thank you so much for being here today and talking with us. Megan: Thank you so much for having me.

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart
The Jews in the Last Days

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 30:00


The world hates the Jews. The world has always and will continue to do so. So says David Mamet in his book, The Wicked Son: Anti-Semitism, Self-Hatred, and the Jews. I have had my reasons why I think this is true, and I have advanced them on this program before. At its roots, the hatred of the Jews is really the hatred of God. Various reviewers of the book focused on the perceived self-hatred of the Jews, but I wonder. Why on earth would self-hatred lead an American Jew to attack the very existence of Israel? After all, Israel is over there; an American Jew is over here. Why would Jewish self-hatred here have anything to do with that.I think I understand what is going on there. But it is not self-hatred. It is simply because the very existence of the State of Israel is hard evidence of the existence of God of Israel—a God who has made Israel a chosen people and who promised he would take them back there again. They don’t want to go there. And they don’t want to answer to that God. Frankly, the world’s obsession with the Jews and with Israel is fascinating and demands an explanation. What about the Jews in these latter days? What does God think about them? There is a very old prophecy that might help us understand. Here is how it begins:Thus speaketh the Lord God of Israel, saying, Write thee all the words that I have spoken unto thee in a book. For, lo, the days come, saith the Lord, that I will bring again the captivity of my people Israel and Judah, saith the Lord: and I will cause them to return to the land that I gave to their fathers, and they shall possess it.Jeremiah 30:2–3 KJV

Antiques Freaks
189 The Haunted Jarvee - Carnacki the Ghost-Finder, with Terrible Book Club!

Antiques Freaks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 71:52


Our friends Chris and Paris from the Terrible Book Club podcast join us once again for another thrilling adventure! Carnacki the Ghost-Finder, an Edwardian supernatural Sherlock Holmes, investigates a haunted ship in his most sensual escapade yet. Frankly, this episode isn't appropriate for anyone. Except, perhaps, the sea. Check out Chris's editing services for all your audio needs at oselkaaudio.com! (Or email him directly: Chris.Ramusiewicz@gmail.com)

The Daily Boost | Coaching You Need. Success You Deserve.

Daily Boost FIVE days a week will change your life! Get it at MotivationToMove.com. For most of the last two decades, I've made my living my passion - a dream most people have. That doesn't mean it's been easy, but it does mean that I've learned a few things about how to create what you want. Let me begin by saying that most folks have difficulty breaking free from past limiting beliefs and creativity, creating a compelling future. I believe that happens because all of us are thrust into being "common folks" who must fit into society. Abe Lincoln may have said— "God must have loved the common people, for he made so many of them." He was wrong. There is no "common man"—no standardized, common pattern. He would have been nearer the truth had he said, "God must have loved uncommon." If uncommon is your normal state, how do you create a different life from anybody else? While there are many behavioral subcategories and skillsets allow us to achieve our dreams, it all begins with deciding to script your success — just like we do in business. Now, if you're not in business, hang in there for a minute while I explain a simple strategy that can change your life. A business person will succeed or fail based on their ability to do business with a certain customer, with a certain product in a certain way. Certain meaning "free from doubt or reservation, confident, and sure. In other words, 1) They choose the perfect avatar for their perfect customer. 2) They select the perfect product and solution that would solve their customers' problems. 3) They fulfill their promise to their customer via a product, service, or plan. Just for grins and giggles, what if you did the same for your life? 1) Dig deep inside yourself and script the perfect avatar that reflects the real and future you? 2) What if you took the time to determine the exact solution that would create the life of your dreams? 3) What if you scripted a series of beliefs and actions that would lead you to your perfect life? Frankly, if you held yourself to the same return on investment standard as a business, your life would change instantly. That's what happens to a business when customers realize they must have the solution they offer.  Sales explode! The same thing will happen to you. Daily Boost FIVE days a week will change your life! Get it at MotivationToMove.com.

The Podcast by KevinMD
Scholarship tips for medical school

The Podcast by KevinMD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 14:18


"According to AAMC, the median debt for medical students in 2019 was $200,000. Unfortunately, fundraising for scholarships was difficult for many organizations due to the pandemic despite more students seeking out scholarships. Luckily, more anonymous generous donors have helped the next generations of physicians in recent years, but what happens if you are not as lucky to go to one of those tuition-free schools? Frankly, your options are limited. You can invest, work, apply for scholarships. While I am not an expert in the first two, I would consider myself knowledgeable on the last topic. I started undergraduate with only 25 percent of my tuition covered. Medical school offered me nothing. As a third-year medical student, I fully self-funded my undergraduate tuition and am steadily working towards funding my medical tuition through just scholarships. I wanted to share with you some tips on decreasing your debt." Trisha Chau is a medical student. She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, "8 scholarship tips for medical school." (https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2021/07/8-scholarship-tips-for-medical-school.html)

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside
GREG ELLIS | Fatherhood in the Crosshairs, Part I

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 85:40


Frankly, gents, I don't even know what to say about this conversation. It was a powerful discussion from a man who has been through hell and back to fight for not only who he is as a man but as a father of his children. His name is Greg Ellis and, although you may not recognize his name, you have definitely seen him on the Silver Screen. Today we talk about the true purpose of vulnerability, why social media should be called “anti-social media,” the crisis of meaning that modern society is facing, and why fatherhood is in the crosshairs.   SHOW HIGHLIGHTS:   Using social media as a tool Appreciating art, literature, and sports We are not entitled to success Drawing inspiration from challenge Society devaluing the “male” The importance of an earned merit system Competition versus cooperation The most influential person gets to establish and enforce the rules Don't count your victory while the game is still being played We have to let kids deal with their own hardship Boys raised with a dad tend to be more purpose driven The value of “empowerment feminism” The inequality of the equality movement We need to challenge moral hypocrisy Getting set for part 2 of the conversation   Want maximum health, wealth, relationships, and abundance in your life? Sign up for our free course, 30 Days to Battle Ready ⠀ Download the NEW Order of Man Twelve-Week Battle Planner App and maximize your week.

Mixergy - Startup Stories with 1000+ entrepreneurs and businesses

Nobody thought the old game of chess could turn into a real business in a world with internet. Frankly, there was a time when Erik Allebest, Chess.com's founder, didn't think it would and even tried turning his attention to a bigger, sexier market. But through constant cranking away, Chess.com became huge business. This is the shocking story of how that happened. Erik Allebest is the founder of Chess.com., the world’s largest chess community. Sponsored byHostGator – Ready to take your website to the next level? Whether you're a first-time blogger or an experienced web pro, HostGator has all the tools you need to create a great-looking website or online store. A wide range of options includes cloud-based web hosting, reseller hosting, VPS hosting and dedicated servers. Founded in 2002, HostGator is the perfect web partner for business owners and individuals seeking hands-on support. Visit www.hostgator.com/mixergy to see what HostGator can do for your website. Memberful – Memberful is membership software for independent creators, publishers, educators, podcasters, and more. You can create any kind of subscription plan, optimized your checkout and easily manage members. Memberful works with your existing technology so you retain full control and can stay focused on building your business, rather than re-building your technology from scratch. More interviews -> https://mixergy.com/moreint Rate this interview -> https://mixergy.com/rateint