Podcasts about reprocessing emdr

  • 189PODCASTS
  • 729EPISODES
  • 27mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 31, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about reprocessing emdr

Latest podcast episodes about reprocessing emdr

Enneagram+Yoga
The Wisdom of Brené Brown for Types 8 & 9 With Holly Wade, LCSW, Yoga Teacher, & Enneagram 7

Enneagram+Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 26:49


During today's episode we talk with Holly Wade, LCSW and Enneagram 7 about The Wisdom of Brené Brown & the Enneagram, particularly for Enneagram types 8 & 9. Holly is a licensed clinical social worker in Memphis, TN. She has worked across the spectrum of mental health levels of care and brings that experience with her into private practice. Holly specializes in helping people recover from difficult life experiences that some label as “trauma.” Trauma comes in many forms and we don't all know how to recognize it, but it shows up as anxiety, depression, substance abuse and other mental health problems. Trauma is often accompanied by shame and Holly has specialty training as a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator at building shame resiliency. The Daring Greatly™, Rising Strong™ and Gifts of Imperfection treatment models are based on the research of Dr. Brené Brown and fall under the umbrella of The Daring Way™. In addition to her Daring Way™ training Holly is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and has extensive experience with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) from her training at Four Winds Hospital in Katona, New York. Her training in DBT and yoga classes at the local gym inspired Holly to gain more education in mindfulness. On a chance retreat to Kripalu Yoga Center in the Berkshire Mountains, Holly was introduced to the work of Jack Kornfield, PhD and has continued to practice and study Insight Meditation for the past ten years. In 2018 she took her yoga practice to the next level with a 200 hour RYT training at Yoga Landing in Chattanooga. Along the yoga journey Holly was introduced to the power of Breathwork by Ashley Ludman in Costa Rica. Holly has since continued to train with Ashley and develop her own skills as a breathwork facilitator. In 2022 Holly and her husband relocated to Memphis and she is excited to return to private practice focusing on creating a safe place for those who are in transition (divorce, grief, empty-nesting, job change), supporting a loved one with a substance use disorder diagnosis/severe mental illness, or recovering from emotional abuse or trauma. She will use her expertise to guide you towards healing and resilience for optimal functioning. She has a love for working with adolescents and their families as they transition through this formative time. Her practice is LGBTQ affirming and she strives for cultural competency at work and in the world. As part of her social work legacy, Holly is a social justice warrior and will always advocate for safety and acceptance for all persons. Holly's website is: www.hollywadelcsw.com Instagram Holly.Wade.LCSW --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christy001/support

Enneagram+Yoga
The Wisdom of Brené Brown for Types 6 & 7 With Holly Wade, LCSW & Daring Way™ Facilitator

Enneagram+Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 25:23


During today's episode we talk with Holly Wade, LCSW and Enneagram 7 about The Wisdom of Brené Brown & the Enneagram. Holly is a licensed clinical social worker in Memphis, TN. She has worked across the spectrum of mental health levels of care and brings that experience with her into private practice. Holly specializes in helping people recover from difficult life experiences that some label as “trauma.” Trauma comes in many forms and we don't all know how to recognize it, but it shows up as anxiety, depression, substance abuse and other mental health problems. Trauma is often accompanied by shame and Holly has specialty training as a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator at building shame resiliency. The Daring Greatly™, Rising Strong™ and Gifts of Imperfection treatment models are based on the research of Dr. Brené Brown and fall under the umbrella of The Daring Way™. In addition to her Daring Way™ training Holly is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and has extensive experience with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) from her training at Four Winds Hospital in Katona, New York. Her training in DBT and yoga classes at the local gym inspired Holly to gain more education in mindfulness. On a chance retreat to Kripalu Yoga Center in the Berkshire Mountains, Holly was introduced to the work of Jack Kornfield, PhD and has continued to practice and study Insight Meditation for the past ten years. In 2018 she took her yoga practice to the next level with a 200 hour RYT training at Yoga Landing in Chattanooga. Along the yoga journey Holly was introduced to the power of Breathwork by Ashley Ludman in Costa Rica. Holly has since continued to train with Ashley and develop her own skills as a breathwork facilitator. In 2022 Holly and her husband relocated to Memphis and she is excited to return to private practice focusing on creating a safe place for those who are in transition (divorce, grief, empty-nesting, job change), supporting a loved one with a substance use disorder diagnosis/severe mental illness, or recovering from emotional abuse or trauma. She will use her expertise to guide you towards healing and resilience for optimal functioning. She has a love for working with adolescents and their families as they transition through this formative time. Her practice is LGBTQ affirming and she strives for cultural competency at work and in the world. As part of her social work legacy, Holly is a social justice warrior and will always advocate for safety and acceptance for all persons. Holly's website is: www.hollywadelcsw.com Instagram Holly.Wade.LCSW --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christy001/support

Enneagram+Yoga
The Wisdom of Brené Brown for Enneagram Types 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 With Holly Wade, LCSW & Enneatype 7

Enneagram+Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 57:31


During today's episode we talk with Holly Wade, LCSW and Enneagram 7 about The Wisdom of Brené Brown & the Enneagram. Holly is a licensed clinical social worker in Memphis, TN. She has worked across the spectrum of mental health levels of care and brings that experience with her into private practice. Holly specializes in helping people recover from difficult life experiences that some label as “trauma.” Trauma comes in many forms and we don't all know how to recognize it, but it shows up as anxiety, depression, substance abuse and other mental health problems. Trauma is often accompanied by shame and Holly has specialty training as a Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator at building shame resiliency. The Daring Greatly™, Rising Strong™ and Gifts of Imperfection treatment models are based on the research of Dr. Brené Brown and fall under the umbrella of The Daring Way™. In addition to her Daring Way™ training Holly is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and has extensive experience with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) from her training at Four Winds Hospital in Katona, New York. Her training in DBT and yoga classes at the local gym inspired Holly to gain more education in mindfulness. On a chance retreat to Kripalu Yoga Center in the Berkshire Mountains, Holly was introduced to the work of Jack Kornfield, PhD and has continued to practice and study Insight Meditation for the past ten years. In 2018 she took her yoga practice to the next level with a 200 hour RYT training at Yoga Landing in Chattanooga. Along the yoga journey Holly was introduced to the power of Breathwork by Ashley Ludman in Costa Rica. Holly has since continued to train with Ashley and develop her own skills as a breathwork facilitator. In 2022 Holly and her husband relocated to Memphis and she is excited to return to private practice focusing on creating a safe place for those who are in transition (divorce, grief, empty-nesting, job change), supporting a loved one with a substance use disorder diagnosis/severe mental illness, or recovering from emotional abuse or trauma. She will use her expertise to guide you towards healing and resilience for optimal functioning. She has a love for working with adolescents and their families as they transition through this formative time. Her practice is LGBTQ affirming and she strives for cultural competency at work and in the world. As part of her social work legacy, Holly is a social justice warrior and will always advocate for safety and acceptance for all persons. Holly's website is: www.hollywadelcsw.com Instagram Holly.Wade.LCSW --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christy001/support

A Quest for Well-Being
How To Bring Intentionality To Our Daily Lives

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 40:11


— You are experiencing an intentional life? Do you know what it really means to be intentional and what it is like to do think and act with intention? And most important, can we all live intentionally? Valeria interviews Kelsey Schad  — she is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Texas and holds a master's degree in psychology as well as master's in counseling from Houston Baptist University (HBU). During her time at HBU she completed a thesis on ‘Media Influence and Symptoms Associated with Eating Disorders, ‘ which led her to practice in both inpatient and outpatient hospital settings that focused on mental health and addiction related disorders. Through this work she found purpose in advocacy and helping populations that are deeply stigmatized as well as underserved. She took this passion to a Residential Treatment Facility (RTC) where she provided therapy services to adolescent females in Child Protective Services (CPS) who had significant trauma history as well as maladaptive behaviors.  Currently, Kelsey works at a Prosperity Counseling Services, which is a private practice in Katy, Texas. She specializes in trauma work and is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization's Reprocessing (EMDR) and Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). Kelsey's passion is rooted in trauma and how attachment styles are impacted. She finds significant value in understanding how we learn to love and how we integrate ourselves into relationships by exploring childhood unmet needs, lack of praise, emotional neglect, and high achievement expectations. To learn more about Kelsey Schad and her work, please visit: psychologytoday.com/us/therapists/kelsey-schad-katy-tx/937865 and prosperitycounseling.org/staff/kelsey-schad-lpc/               — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well. 

Just Go F Yourself
Ep. 68 - The Body Keeps Score

Just Go F Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 37:07


Our body remembers everything we've been through, even if it's not in our conscious mind.    This week, Lisa is joined by Licensed Masters Social Worker and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapist, Chelsey Valeri, for an episode on acknowledging and properly treating our trauma. Listen as they discuss the importance of stabilizing ourselves and recognizing what triggers our fight, flight, freeze, and collapse, so that we can navigate through our automatic responses, and learn to live a stress free life!   This episode is a reminder that we don't have to continue re-traumatizing ourselves by having one foot in the past and one in the present. Therapy can teach us what "safety" really feels like so that we can heal from the inside out.   To learn more about Lisa and Just Go F Yourself visit www.justgofyourself.com.

LET'S GO!
Dr. Ashley Massimino

LET'S GO!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 89:47


Dr. Ashley Massimino is a licensed clinical and forensic psychologist who works for the third largest law enforcement agency in the United States.  Dr. Massimino specializes in treating trauma, substance abuse, chronic pain and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and is trained to provide Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy.   Her private practice provides a confidential law-enforcement sensitive service for active-duty military, veterans, law enforcement, first responders, health care professionals, and their families.  Dr. Massimino is also the host of the Staff Assistant Podcast.  The Staff Assistant Podcast is designed to assist and educate law enforcement personnel about mental health issues and managing work related stress.  With the goal of normalizing therapy and trauma, the podcast explores each guest's history of trauma, personal and professional, while capturing the unique challenges law enforcement and first responders face each day. Listen in and enjoy, LET'S GO!!

History. Culture. Trauma
What is EMDR? Is it Right for You?

History. Culture. Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 60:00


Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapy treatment that was originally designed to alleviate the distress associated with traumatic memories. It is a well-studied and highly effective treatment for those who have experienced trauma or have been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder. In this week's episode, we will speak with Yunetta Smith, one of few African American EMDR certified therapist. Yunetta Smith is a thriving Therapreneur (Therapist + Entrepreneur) CEO and founder of Spring Forth Counseling and Ground Breakers Coaching and Consulting. Yunetta is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in the States of TN, KY, and ID, as well as a Nationally Certified Counselor, Clinical Trauma Professional, and EMDR Therapist/Approved Consultant. Yunetta specializes in helping black and brown folks navigate childhood trauma that manifests in adulthood, working exclusively with public figures, professionals, pastors, and practitioners. She works diligently to spread awareness through various media platforms including the weekly “Talk it out Tuesday” segment on the Rickey Smiley Morning Show, co-hosting the Deeper than the Diet Podcast, and self-publishing her self-care workbook, “Take the Struggle out of Self Care”. Yunetta is a groundbreaker, a stigma breaker, and a cycle breaker who cultivates spaces for healing, wholeness, compassion, and change. It is her hope that you will EMBRACE taking off your mask, EMBODY standing in your truth, and EXPERIENCE loving what you see.

Giving You Something To Talk About
Healing Your Trauma

Giving You Something To Talk About

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 44:35


Healing Your Trauma Melissa Krechler and Mary Herd discuss her journey through PTSD and what it means to actually heal your trauma. No more hype, no more hiding, just no more! Sponsored By: A Phoenix Identity Are you desperate to feel like yourself again but you don't even know what that looks like? Let us help you reconnect to who you are, what you love and a life you feel blessed to be living. Our 3 Month Life Crisis Package is our most popular package for our clients who want to get rid of the weight of their troubles, reconnect to themselves and feel in control of their lives once more. Use Coupon Code 911 to get 25% off the price! Payment Plan Available https://bit.ly/apilifecrisis https://bit.ly/apilifecrisispp https://bit.ly/apiclaritysession Like, Follow and Subscribe to GYSTTALIVETV on your favorite social media and podcasting platforms. Join our newsletter and let us know if you want to be a guest speaker/blogger or if you want to see a topic featured on the show! www.gysttalivetv.com Guest Speaker is Mary Herd For 11 years, Mary suffered from debilitating seizures that left her spending most of her time at home. She was unable to find the cause, despite consulting with physicians, neurologists, and psychiatrists. Finally, a friend recommended Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. She found an EMDR therapist and started work. Through EMDR she discovered that her seizures were caused by PTSD. Four months later, she was almost totally free from seizures and living a life she describes as “full of joy.” Mary wrote about each session and what happened to her between sessions. Her journal, supplemented by her therapist's comments on each session, became a book, “Unfreezing Trauma: My Personal Journal of EMDR Recovery.” Now Mary is dedicated to talking about her story, the book, and EMDR in general. Her goal is to make sure everyone who suffers from PTSD knows about EMDR. Website: unfreeezingtrauma.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/unfreezingtrauma Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/maryjudithheld Host is Melissa Krechler Identity Coach, Spiritual Teacher, Business Mentor Website: www.melissakrechler.com #gysttamini #talkshow #selfhelp #melissakrechler #maryherd #unfreezingtrauma #trauma #traumahealing #traumatic #ptsd #healingtrauma #healingyourtrauma #traumainformed #mentalhealth #alifeyourblessedtobeliving

Thriving Adoptees - Inspiration For Adoptive Parents & Adoptees
How Adoptees Change - Safety, Addiction & More With Dr Brett Furst

Thriving Adoptees - Inspiration For Adoptive Parents & Adoptees

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 56:29


Adoptee & therapist Brett dives deep into how we change. We want to change and yet the work involved seems daunting. Why is that? How does safety keep us stuck? How does adoption impact safety? Where's the freedom from this for adoptees? It's an empowering and uplifting conversation. Here's some info on Brett and the Center he works at from their website.Dr. Brett Furst holds a B.S. in Child and Adolescent Development from The University of California, Davis, an M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy from Chapman University, and is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He has his Doctorate in Psychology from Alliant International University. Dr. Furst is a fully trained, EMDRIA approved, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapist. Dr. Furst, in addition to his focus on the underlying causes of addiction, specializes in academic and educational difficulties, and provides supportive services to those clients pursuing continuing education at PACE, including managing ADHD symptoms, proper study habits, and processing difficulties, from a therapeutic lens. Therapeutically, Brett comes from a Gestalt perspective, placing emphasis on the exploration of the authentic self and how inauthenticity and the negative personas clients create contribute to their unhealthy habits and the disconnection from themselves through substance. Dr. Furst has worked at several local treatment facilities where he has customized several young adult curriculums. Brett has also developed one of the first experiential poetry groups, and finds group work to be some of the most rewarding he has done. He enjoys spending time with his family and dog, and exploring new parts of his native Orange County.https://www.linkedin.com/in/brettfurst/https://fursttherapy.com/At PACE Recovery Center, we believe in empowering our clients to fulfill their own particular dreams. We believe that Positive Attitudes Change Everything. Our trained addiction treatment staff will help our clients identify their specific recovery goals, and help them achieve them. From our home base in Orange County, we also provide in-depth mental health services that address the root issues driving addiction and mental illness. Once men leave our program, they have all the tools they need to thrive in recovery.Giving Men the Skills for SobrietyLong-term sobriety is more than simply not using alcohol or drugs, it is about living life. Helping our clients develop life skills, educational aims, or vocational goals not only teaches them about responsibility and accountability, but also helps improve their self-esteem.https://www.instagram.com/pacerecovery/https://www.facebook.com/PaceRecoveryCenterLLChttps://www.pacerecoverycenter.com/

Where Do We Go From Here
109: Therapy After Purity Culture (part 1)

Where Do We Go From Here

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 56:47


Therapy after Purity Culture - have you been on the fence about it? We're here to convince you to give it a try. We know that purity culture can be experienced as a trauma, and therapist Jamie Williams is here to talk to us about: the impact of rigid thinking on our minds what happens when our bodies feel unsafe in religious spaces how to spot dysfunctional relationship patterns trauma re-enactments in dating EMDR and future templating On Instagram and Twitter this week, we'll be sharing tips as well. Full show notes here Join us as a partner to hear this week's conversation between Jess & Devi about some feel-good views and the heresies evangelicals in the US believe. For $3/month (USD) you'll get three exclusive episodes a month, and a ticket to the Green Room at the end of the month.   Jamie Williams is a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor and the founder of Prosperity Counseling Services. With over 10 years of experience in helping others thrive through adversity, she has witnessed, professionally and personally, the growth we can all make with the right support and tools. Jamie has worked with clients with a wide range of concerns including anxiety, depression, mood swings, anger, relationship issues, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, mood disorders, postpartum symptoms, parenting problems, self-esteem and those who have experienced trauma in many forms. Her therapeutic approach combines Gestalt, Narrative, Jungian Analysis, Experiential, and trauma-focused counseling modalities such as Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). Jamie is also certified in and utilizes Integrative Somatic Parts Work and Neurofeedback. Jamie holds a Bachelors degree in Psychology and Child and Family studies from Arizona State University and a Masters degree in Mental Health Counseling.She is also currently pursuing a PhD in Clinical Psychology at Saybrook University. Jamie is a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor (LPC-S) in the state of Texas (#69979). Connect with her on Instagram.

Behind The Line
Alternative Approaches to Healing: OEI & EMDR

Behind The Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 22:43


Show Notes:As we continue in our series on alternative approached to healing, today I am sharing about my background in using Observed Experiential Integration (OEI) as well as a related therapeutic approach called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). Both of these therapies integrate neurological understandings of trauma/high stress experiences and the ways these experiences map themselves out into the brain and body. Both approaches rely very little on talking and much more of visual processing. Listen in to hear how they work and how they can be of tremendous benefit to First Responders and Front Line Workers struggling with posttraumatic stress, burnout, compassion fatigue, anxiety, panic, and other occupational stress injuries. For Further Reading…OEI:https://sightpsych.com/https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232561961_Observed_Experiential_Integration_OEI_Discovery_and_Development_of_a_New_Set_of_Trauma_Therapy_Techniqueshttps://thrive-life.ca/innovation-in-trauma-therapy-oei/EMDR:https://www.emdria.org/about-emdr-therapy/https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/treatments/eye-movement-reprocessingEpisode Challenge:Reflect on where you're at and what you might need by using our free Beating the Breaking Point Indicators Checklist & Triage Guide. Complete our listener feedback survey and be entered to win a $50 Amazon gift card as a thank you for helping us make Behind the Line even better! Jump here to complete the survey now.Additional Resources:Don't forget to complete our listener feedback survey and be entered to win a $50 Amazon gift card as a thank you for helping us make Behind the Line even better! Jump here to complete the survey now.Connect, Rate, Review, Subscribe & Share!Connect with me on Facebook and Instagram, or email me at support@thrive-life.ca. I love hearing from you! Subscribe and share this podcast with those you know. I appreciate every like, rating and review – every single one helps this podcast to be seen by other First Responders & Front Line Workers out there. Help me on my mission to help others just like you to not only survive, but to thrive – both on the job and off.

Be Whole. Be Well. Be Wise.
Identifying Trauma and What to Do With It

Be Whole. Be Well. Be Wise.

Play Episode Play 40 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 64:20


Come nerd out with Sarah and I today as we talk through the basics of trauma, neuroscience, and grounding techniques to get your brain back to baseline during a triggering event. Learn about your survival, emotional, and logical sides of your brain and their responses to trauma, AND what you can do about it!If you don't think you have experienced trauma, listen for a friend. If you have, know that you are not alone, and you are not broken. Your brain has just been responding the best way that it knows how. Until now!Sarah R DeLoach, MSW, LCSW is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who practices Clinical Counseling and other Therapeutic Supports in private practice in Owensboro, KY. Sarah has extensive training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy(DBT), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy(CBT), and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing(EMDR). She is passionate about helping others grow, heal, and create a life worth living. Aside from her role as Therapist, Sarah is a wife to Stephen and a mother to her three kiddos Everett, James Shepherd & Willow. In her spare time she is an avid DIYer who thrives on designing spaces in her home to be beautiful to look at and functional to use for her family.

Paychecks & Balances
EMDR and the Power of Processing Trauma ft. Diania Merriam - TMWS10

Paychecks & Balances

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 55:19


It's been over a month since my last update. I catch folks up on what happened at track nationals and my journey over the past couple years. I'm  also joined by EconoMe Conference founder, Diania Merriam, who candidly shares her mental health journey and experience with the therapy modality that's helped her most: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). If you've ever heard of or wondered about EMDR, this episode is for you. Jump to 10:20 to go directly to the interview. Trigger Warning: discussion of death/lossAs always, talk to a professional before doing anything you heard on a podcast! This is for informational and entertainment purposes only.

The Creative Psychotherapist
VFTS 2022 7 | Peggy Kolodny & Salicia Mazero | Integrating EMDR, IFS & Art Therapy

The Creative Psychotherapist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 58:09


FEATURED GUESTS: Peggy Kolodny MA ATR-BC LCPAT, is a Board Certified, Registered and Licensed Art Therapist with level 2 certificates in IFS and in EMDR, specializing in trauma treatment across the life span. She is the founder of the group private practice, Art Therapy Collective of Owings Mills.Currently, Peggy is adjunct faculty with George Washington University's Art Therapy Graduate Program as well as multiple professional training faculties. (Chesapeake Beach Play Therapy Seminars; The Ferentz Institute; and The Expressive Therapies Summits). She is on the Board of the Maryland Art Therapy Association, is a past president, and is their delegate to the American Art Therapy Association. Peggy is the current Chair of the International Society on the Study of Trauma and Dissociation's (ISSTD) Creative Arts Therapies Special Interest Group. Past faculties include University of Maryland, School of Social Work, Goucher College, and Maryland Institute, College of Art. Recent publications include 2 chapters in Art Therapy in the Treatment of Addictions and Trauma (Quinn, 2021) ; and a co-authored chapter with Salicia Mazero "The Interweave of Internal Family Systems, EMDR and Art Therapy" in “EMDR and Creative Arts Therapies” (Davis, Fitzgerald, Jacobs and Marchand, Routledge release October 2022). Past positions, back in the 1980's to the 1990's, include Chair of the Central Maryland Sexual Abuse Treatment Task Force, Vice Chair of the Maryland Chapter of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, and Director of a nonprofit clinical trauma treatment agency, The Family Connection. She truly has been working as an art therapist with trauma populations for 40 years since her graduation from George Washington University's Art Therapy Program. Salicia Mazero, MA, LPC, ATR, CEDS-S, is a licensed professional counselor, registered art therapist and a certified eating disorder specialist and supervisor practicing in St Louis, MO. Salicia is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and Internal Family Systems (IFS). Over the past 10 years, Salicia has worked in two treatment centers focusing on treating eating disorders before transitioning to private practice. Salicia serves as the president of the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals St. Louis chapter. She is also on the board of directors of the Missouri Eating Disorder Association and a presenter for their Feed the Facts program educating students and teachers about eating disorders and prevention in the school system. She presents nationwide annually on art therapy, IFS, and eating disorder treatment. Salicia recently co-authored a chapter on Art Therapy, IFS and EMDR in the book EMDR and Creative Arts Therapies. LISTEN & LEARN: A general overview of Internal Family Systems Therapy created by Richard Schwartz. The three main parts and the roles they play. How EMDR, IFS and art therapy can effectively by integrated. The 8 C's of self. Role of Self Energy. How presenting professionally lead to collaboration and opportunities for publishing. RESOURCES MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: Peggy Kolodny's practice Art Therapy Collective of Owings Mills www.arttherapycollective.vpweb.com Email Peggy at pkolodny@yahoo.com Art Therapy Collective of Owings Mills Facebook Page Salicia Mazero's practice Creating Your Journey, LLC creatingyourjourneyllc.com Visit our website for resources & summit session

Chicana Moms
Season 6. Ep. 19: Parenting While Hurting with Georgina Garay, Lozano, MFT

Chicana Moms

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 32:16


Georgina Garay-Lozano is a Latina therapist and life coach. Georgina understands that early childhood impacts the way we live our lives today and holds space for healing our inner child. Working with Georgina means diving deep and sometimes exploring hurt that happened in our family in prior generations. Holding space for past hurt and resiliency helps with being more present. Georgina is a trauma trained therapist and uses Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) for relief of symptoms. Georgina is also a mom and recovering parentified child who is discovering new interests. https://www.instagram.com/georginagaraylozano/ https://www.tiktok.com/@georgigaray

Bowel Moments
Meet Courtney Robert, LCSW!

Bowel Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 53:52


This week we talk to Courtney Robert, LCSW! Courtney is a licensed clinical social worker and therapist for the IBD Center at GI Alliance in Baton Rouge, LA! We talked to her about the IBD Center that they're building that provides a holistic approach to IBD care. We discuss trauma in IBD and the therapeutic technique called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). It's a really fascinating and really effective technique to help people with trauma and post traumatic stress. We also talked about gut-directed hypnotherapy and guided imagery. We learned a lot from Courtney and we know you will too!Thanks to our sponsor- Romanwell!Follow us on Instagram!Follow us on Facebook!Follow us on Twitter!  Links: - Info from the EMDR Institute, Inc. - An article about gut-directed hypnosis and IBD- U of Michigan featuring Dr. Megan Riehl- Yoga, Breathing, and Meditation examples- GI Research Foundation- UChicago Medicine- Mindfulness in IBD video- Crohn's and Colitis Canada- Coping Strategies to Improve Mental Health- Crohn's & Colitis Foundation 

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul
Relational Programming with Dr. Elizabeth Fedrick

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 48:59


To sign up for my Navigating Grief and Loss Course for $50 off during the pre-sale go here https://www.nicobarraza.com/grieflosscourseIf you are interested in working together one one one, either as an individual or couple go here https://www.nicobarraza.com/Dr. Elizabeth Fedrick, PhD, LPC, is the guest this week and we talk all things relational programing, specifically how to become aware of your emotional inheritance to not only understand your patterned behavior in relationships, but change the undesirable parts that may be causing damage and division within your dating and partnering. You can find Dr. Liz on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/drelizabethfedrick/And see her work via her company https://www.evolvecounselingaz.com/BioDr. Elizabeth Fedrick a Licensed Professional Counselor in the state of Arizona and is trained in various therapeutic modalities, including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Child-Parent Psychotherapy, and Motivational Interviewing. She has a doctoral degree in Psychology, as well as a master's degree in Professional Counseling. Dr. Fedrick specializes in working with depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship issues, attachment, grief and loss, life transitions, and personal improvement (including motivation & self-esteem). She provides an integrated approach to treatment and believes that counseling should be individualized to the specific needs of each client. Dr. Fedrick believes in providing her clients with the essential tools and resources needed in order to obtain the healing and change they are seeking, as well as to maintain this transformation long-term. She finds it extremely important to provide a safe, supportive, and nonjudgmental environment for all of her clients. ​Dr. Fedrick is also a professor at Grand Canyon University, where she teaches behavioral health and psychology courses. She also co-hosts a YouTube and podcast channel, Evolve Counseling, geared towards parenting and other various mental health topics. Dr. Fedrick presents mental health talks throughout her community, as well as authors mental health articles for various media outlets. 

The Other Autism
Autism and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

The Other Autism

Play Episode Play 16 sec Highlight Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 19:55


Autism and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (EMDR) — are they a good match? Recent findings suggest that EMDR might be particularly helpful for autistic individuals in relieving PTSD symptoms and addressing multiple mental health concerns.Topics discussed also include:an imaginary autism island and what this has to do with diagnostic overshadowingwhat EMDR therapy entails and the proposed theories to explain how it worksthe challenges that many autistic people have with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)Theme music for this podcast: "Everything Feels New" by Evgeny Bardyuzha. All episodes are written and edited by Kristen Hovet. If you would like to submit a question to possibly be answered in a future episode, please email kristen.hovet@gmail.com

Mindfully Integrative Show
Mindful Resources - EMDR Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

Mindfully Integrative Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 4:40


SIGN UP FOR  Limited SPOTS In Mindfully Integrative CommunityEnjoy some of Our FREE Resources HereJoin Our Mindfully Integrative Private Facebook CommunityGet 15% off Pharmaceutical Grade Full Script   Vitamins & Supplements Support the show

The Multidimensional Journey Podcast
EP 212: 4 Powerful Techniques For Ayahuasca Preparation & Integration

The Multidimensional Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 24:03


Hello everyone, welcome back to The Multidimensional Journey! Today we are talking about 4 Powerful Tools For Ayahuasca Preparation & Integration. I discuss how 1. Mindfulness 2. Breathwork 3. Inner Child & Re-parenting Work + Internal Family Systems and 4. Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR) are deeply powerful for the Ayahuasca Continuum (preparation, the ceremony, & integration). All of these tools allow us to ground, soothe, regulate, open, and go deeper into our subconscious programming so that we can release and integrate what is no longer serving us so we can manifest our deepest desires and intentions on the Ayahuasca path. 0.00 Introduction 1:40 The power of mindfulness 3:44 The power of functional breathwork (like deep diaphragmatic breathing, WIM HOF, ect) and transformational breathwork (the kind that assists us in accessing a non-ordinary state of consciousness to assist in releasing, healing, and connecting deeper with inner wisdom). 8:10 Inner Child & Re-parenting work + Internal Family Systems 24:05 Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR) 22:11 Closing & Thank you 22:33 Information on the 3 Month Self Empowerment & Transformation Ayahuasca Preparation & Integration Intensive Books/Resources That I Highly Recommend Wherever You Go There You Are by John Kabat Zinn (For Mindfulness Education) https://www.amazon.com/Wherever-You-There-Are-Mindfulness-ebook/dp/B0037B6QSY/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3UM9BP6Z31Q25&keywords=wherever+you+go+there+you+are+by+jon+kabat-zinn&qid=1660508021&sprefix=wherever+you+go+there%2Caps%2C150&sr=8-1 The Calm App For Consistent Mood Tracking, Mindfulness Motivation & Breathwork https://www.calm.com/ Self Parenting by John Pollard https://www.amazon.com/s?k=self+parenting+john+pollard&crid=17OS8J8R3ZBR2&sprefix=self+parenting%2Caps%2C160&ref=nb_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_3_14 Getting Past Your Past by Francine Shapiro https://www.amazon.com/Getting-Past-Your-Self-Help-Techniques-ebook/dp/B00758AT24/ref=sr_1_1?crid=84R8PPWK4UTP&keywords=getting+past+your+past&qid=1660508264&sprefix=getting+past+your+past%2Caps%2C146&sr=8-1 Want to Apply to the 3 Month Self Empowerment & Transformation Ayahuasca Preparation & Integration Intensive? Information and apply at https://themultidimensionaljourney.info Connect with me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themultidimensionaljourney/ Connect with me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aya.kaur.378/ Email me at themultidimensionaljourney@gmail.com for topic requests, questions, reach out, and more --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ayahuascakaur/support

SSP Podcast- A Polyvagal Theory Informed Therapy
Episode 22- Polyvagal Theory and Yoga for Trauma with Dr Arielle Schwartz

SSP Podcast- A Polyvagal Theory Informed Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 55:35


Welcome to episode 22. I have the utmost pleasure of speaking with Dr Arielle Schwartz, a licensed clinical psychologist located in Boulder, CO. Arielle offers training for therapists, maintains a private practice, and has passions for the outdoors, yoga, and writing. She is the developer of Resilience-Informed Therapy which applies research on trauma recovery to form a strength-based, trauma treatment model that includes Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), somatic (body-centered) psychology, mindfulness-based therapies, and time-tested relational psychotherapy. Arielle has authored a number of books, but today we are focusing our discussion on her work connecting Polyvagal Theory with yoga practice.Some of the topics or points you will hear in our discussion include:Arielle's collaboration with  Dr Porges Applied Polyvagal Theory and Yoga Course available via the Polyvagal Institute Arielle's personal experience with the iLs Focus SystemNeuromodulation and yoga practice"Less is More" the gentle input of yoga- felt sense of opening up and softeningCervical tightness and forward positioning due to looking down at devices and screen time- impact vagal tonePolyvagal speaks of the importance of co-regulation with a safe other but we need to be connected to our body...yoga provides that connectionTrauma and stress often create less flexible thinking- yoga facilitates flexibility in the body that fosters flexibility in the mind Trauma and related conditions such as POTS and Dysautonomia- how yoga can helpResearcher- Jo Miller - facia release and vagal toneLearn about the importance of our facial system connecting all internal organs, immune and endocrine systemsPsoas muscle= fight/flight muscle - often holds tension from traumaTherapeutic yoga for trauma- release and unwind  held defensive tension with safety Therapeutic Yoga for Trauma Recovery: Applying the Principles of Polyvagal Theory for Self-Discovery, Embodied Healing, and Meaningful ChangeNew book by Arielle EMDR Therapy and Somatic Psychology: Interventions to Enhance Embodiment in Trauma TreatmentI hope everyone enjoyed this lovely discussion with Arielle. I feel even more inspired to hit the mat!To find out more about Arielle's work I will include links to her website in the show notes and our Safe and Sound Protocol Podcast FB page. You can find a link to order her book Therapeutic Yoga for Trauma Recovery: Applying the Principles of Polyvagal Theory for Self-Discovery, Embodied Healing, and Meaningful Change on the Safe and Sound Protocol FB page too.If you liked this episode please share it with a friend, family member, or colleague.Link to Arielle's Website- https://drarielleschwartz.com/Breathe slow and low,Joanne

Therapy with my Mom
EMDR and Trauma Therapy Ft. Dr. Brian Rooney

Therapy with my Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 47:28


Another amazing guest joins us this week, Dr. Brian Rooney is welcomed by Ryan and Julee to talk about Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. Brian reflects on the origins of EMDR and shares some of the amazing results it has shown in many trauma patients. Ryan and Julee also ask him about the pros and cons of administering therapy remotely, as well as what we can do when we want to encourage a loved one to seek their own therapy. 

Therapy Talks
Let's Talk About Personality Disorders - YouTube Live (Audio Only)

Therapy Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 51:25


This is an audio only recording of our June 30th YouTube Live You can watch our live streams on YouTube here!Listen in on this stream,  as our partner therapist Hailey Kanigan discusses personality disorders and how we can identify them in ourselves. Hailey holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology, a Masters of Arts in Counselling Psychology, and is a EMDR Therapist. Hailey is a goal orientated Registered Clinical Counsellor (RCC) looking to welcome you to a balanced, healthy, and enjoyable lifestyle. Hailey's experience is specialized in anxiety, trauma, depression, relationship strain, and self-development. Collaboratively, the best therapies are chosen from to meet your specific needs such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR), Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT), Narrative Therapy (NT), Mindfulness and Emotion Freedom Technique (EFT). Connect with Hailey:@haileykanigancounsellinghaileykanigancounselling.com

KOLOT with Rabbi Hillel Kapenstein
“Trauma and Triumph 2.0” with Zipa Leah Scheinberg

KOLOT with Rabbi Hillel Kapenstein

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 44:48


'Trauma and Triumph 2.0' is dedicated in loving memory to my great uncle, and our guest's father-in-law, Harav Meyer Scheinberg zt'l, Meyer ben Shmuel. In this episode, we discuss why is it that people hold on to trauma for so long and how to get rid of it utilizing EMDR. We also discuss Prince Harry and his going public how EMDR was a game changer in his own personal struggles. Towards the end, we have a special tribute to my Uncle Meyer where Zipa Leah talks about how her father-in- law showerd his children and grandchildren with intense love and affection. Zipa Leah then explains the effects in clinical terms, 'attachment theory'. It's a must listen to all parents and future parents! ZIPA LEAH SCHEINBERG BIO: I am a registered Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Certified EMDR Therapist, EMDR Approved Consultant, and Certified Clincial Trauma Professional. I specialize in providing individual therapy for women who struggle with developmental and relational trauma (Complex PTSD), grief, and dissociation. I utilize an evidence-based technique called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), as well as extensive training in Mindfulness-Based Self Compassion, Ego State Work (Inner Child), attachment-repair work (AEDP), polyvagal theory, and somatic work to help my clients find safety and healing from within and transform with empowerment from victim to thriver. My passion is working with women survivors who are recovering from abuse and trauma. I am currently writing my first book demystifying specialized trauma therapy for the public. KOLOT is a project of the colum Community Kollel, a full time Jewish learning center in Bexley. Ever since 1995, boys and girls, men and women have found ways to connect to Torah and Mitzvos at the Kollel. To learn more about the Kollel, visit www.thekollel.org and forever be inspired!

Take Your Pills, Psychopath!
Ep. 32 Unstable Sense of Self and Having a Narcissist Father w/ Andrea Allan

Take Your Pills, Psychopath!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 89:35


Comedian and podcaster, Andrea Allan, opens up about her severe abandonment issues, her unstable sense of self, and her narcissist father. She also explains Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy. There's lots of vulnerability and laughs in this great episode. Follow Andrea Allan on IG: @andreacomedy69. Listen to Andrea's podcast: Hot Mess Comedy Hour. Join John's patreon: patreon.com/JFOD. Join John's newsletter: jfodnews.com.

The Weekend University
Healing Trauma With EMDR Therapy - Linda Curran

The Weekend University

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 231:16


Get early access to our latest psychology lectures: http://bit.ly/new-talks5 Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR) is a late-stage trauma resolution modality that currently has more scientific research as a treatment for trauma than any other non-pharmaceutical intervention. Based on empirical evidence, as well as thousands of client and clinician testimonials, EMDR has proven an efficacious and rapid method of reprocessing traumatic material. It appears to assist in processing of traumatic information, resulting in enhanced integration and a more adaptive perspective of the traumatic material. Through live and video presentation, this talk will define, discuss and demonstrate the trauma processing modality, Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR). -- Linda A. Curran, BCPC, LPC, CAADC, CCDP International speaker on the treatment of trauma, author of both Trauma Competency: A Clinicians Guide and 101 Trauma-Informed Interventions. Linda has developed, produced, and presents multi-media workshops on all aspects of psychological trauma. With advanced degrees in both clinical psychology and public health, Linda is a Board Certified, Licensed Professional Counselor, Certified Addiction Counselor Diplomate, Certified Co-Occurring Professional Diplomate, Certified Gestalt Therapist, Certified Neurofeedback Practitioner, Certified Hypnotherapist, and Level II EMDR practitioner. You can learn more about Linda's work at https://trauma101.com -- This episode is sponsored by our upcoming Day on Changing Consciousness, taking place at the University of Greenwich on 26th June, 2022. This will be The Weekend University's first ‘in person' event in over two years, and it's shaping up to be a special occasion. The lectures will focus on consciousness paradigms that go beyond the brain, how they work, why they matter, and how understanding them can enhance your everyday experience of reality, with talks on: — Panpsychism: Is Everything Conscious? - Dr Philip Goff, PhD — From Ego-Centric to Eco-Centric: Changing Consciousness through Psychedelics - Dr Sam Gandy, PhD — Is Reality an Illusion? - Professor Donald Hoffman, PhD (via live video link) By attending live, you can interact with the speakers in the Q&A sessions, connect with like-minded participants during the conference, and get CPD certification. Should you be unable to attend in person, you'll also be able to tune in from the comfort of home with a "Livestream Pass". As a listener of this podcast, you can get a discount on your ticket, if you go to https://bit.ly/ccj-twu, and use the discount code: POD when registering. -- Links: - Check out our next event: http://theweekenduniversity.com/events - Linda's website: https://trauma101.com - Linda's books: https://amzn.to/3AVhMKP

Sexual Addiction:Strength/Hope/Recovery
Is Trauma Getting in the Way of Your Recovery with Carol the Coach

Sexual Addiction:Strength/Hope/Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 46:00


Healing trauma using somatic experiencing (SE), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and Internal Family Systems (IFS). When is it addiction and when is it trauma? Many people who accept their sex addiction issues embrace that their focus must be on recovery. What if you're in recovery and working your program, but life isn't improving? What if old behaviors keep creeping up or your relationships are still suffering. What if relapses, near slips, and shame start to tank recovery? Sometimes your problem isn't a lack of recovery dedication, sometimes it's trauma. Unfortunately, when people hear the word trauma, they think of voyaging through the dark night of a soul. This can lead to fears of further relapses, fear of digging through the past, and worse, fear of yet another bad experience with a therapist who insists on treating the “T” word without knowing how. In this episode, Carol the Coach will talk with Rebecca Stokes about the treatment modalities that work best for treating trauma, and how to navigate the alphabet soup of terms you might encounter like EMDR, SE, and IFS. We'll also explore when to add trauma treatment to your recovery, how to decide which program might work best for you, and how to find and interview the right treatment provider.  

The Vital Goddess
How We Heal Trauma and Reclaim Our Pleasure

The Vital Goddess

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 32:14


Trauma is a very complex and multi-layered topic. Although there are obviously many different levels of trauma we all carry it in our bodies. That's the human condition. And it's the number one thing that blocks our sensual pleasure and multi-orgasmic power.What I've found to be true is that healing trauma is not a straight and narrow path. It's as complex as we are and everyone's journey is unique.This journey is more art than science. And requires patience, courage, curiosity and time. It's an ongoing process, like yoga. There's always more to unfold. And we're not meant to go it alone.In this episode I go into the specific body-based tools/healing arts that I use as a trauma-informed coach. I riff on:Why we need to relax the scientific approach to sensual healing and embrace the healing artsRedefining orgasm and tapping into sustainable multi-orgasmic powerYin power orgasmHow we nourish the libido via cultivationHow stress and trauma wreak havoc on our libidoTrauma Release Exercises (TRE)The physical, energetic and emotional aspects of traumaThe four pillars of sensual healingSacred Sensual MovementThe 5 Key Moves of Vaginal MasterySensual BreathworkThe healing power of pleasureSome resources for you:Learn more about Trauma Release Exercises (TRE) here.Learn more about Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) here.Learn more about Somatic Experiencing here.Check out Sacred Sensual Movement hereCheck out Sensual Breathwork here.Book your free Pleasure Queen Activation Session hereAccess the Vital Goddess Masterclass here

Threads of Enlightenment
My Interview with Mary J Held

Threads of Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 32:58


I interviewed Mary J. Held. Mary's life was almost totally shut down due to seizures. She didn't know she had complex PTSD, mainly from sexual assaults. She was misdiagnosed with stress, epilepsy, and finally conversion disorder. The talk therapy for conversion disorder helped her some, and she went from five years of being unable to work to working nine hours a week, with a few additional forays out into the world After five years of the half-life and 10 total years with seizures, she knew she wanted more. Someone suggested she try a therapy called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).  After 16 EMDR sessions, she processed numerous traumas and regained her joy in living. Her book, Unfreezing Trauma: My Personal Journal of EMDR Recovery tells the story of her journey out of the darkness Mary was born and raised in southern Ohio in a very Catholic family. She went to Michigan State University and upon graduation, went into social work. Although those were happy, productive years, alcohol was beginning to cause problems in her life. After a few years in social work, she developed into an alcoholic and that addiction became her life.  When she finally got sober, she went back to MSU for a degree in physics but changed her major to mathematics. She found her passion in teaching remedial mathematics. For years her life went well, but both her childhood and adult traumas were still there. There came a day when, as she later described, ” a wall in my mind started to crack”. She began having seizures, which gradually became worse until she basically stayed at home most of the time. Then came the recommendation that she try EMDR. She read about it, and found a great therapist—and after four months of therapy, she regained her life. Part of her therapy was keeping a journal. When she finished the therapy, she wanted to use her journal to tell the world about EMDR and ensure that others consumed with trauma would know there was a way out. Her therapist agreed and contributed her comments to the sessions. But Mary was overwhelmed by the thought of publishing her private thoughts and the whole mechanics of getting published. She went on in her life, teaching math, staying sober, and enjoying friends and family, but the book was still in the back of her mind. Then fifteen years later, she witnessed the heroic testimony of Christine Blasey Ford and the #MeToo movement. Inspired by the bravery of women going public with their stories, she finally pushed herself to finish her book. She is publishing it to give hope to all the people who suffer from PTSD as well as their family members, friends, and therapists. After finishing the therapy sessions presented in her book, Mary earned her Master's degree at Michigan State University in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education received a post-graduate certification as a Developmental Educator and developed a nationally recognized program to help students upgrade their math skills for college. I encourage everyone to buy her book follow her and be transformed through her insights. Everyone has a story, and this is her story. Below are the sites that house her work. https://unfreezingtrauma.com/ (https://unfreezingtrauma.com/) https://www.linkedin.com/in/mary-judith-held-5aa31966/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/mary-judith-held-5aa31966/) https://www.facebook.com/unfreezingtrauma/ (https://www.facebook.com/unfreezingtrauma/) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nnPM3k0PoQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nnPM3k0PoQ) Visit our Threads of Enlightenment store: https://threads-of-enlightenment.myshopify.com/ (https://threads-of-enlightenment.myshopify.com/) We shop worldwide to find some of the highest-quality and some limited hard-to-find products online for you. We work closely with many suppliers to get the lowest prices....

The Sobriety Diaries
At Least I'm Not The Frog with Charlie Gray

The Sobriety Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 33:02


UNQUALIFIED OPINIONS WITH CHELSEA & NATE Charlie Gray is a recovering alcoholic sharing the experience of addiction, relapse, and recovery in his debut memoir, At Least I'm Not The Frog: A Zany Memoir of Alcoholism & Recovery. Living eleven long years as a high-functioning alcoholic, he attended a plethora of treatment centers, detox facilities, psychiatric wards, and hospitals across the United States. Through these visits, he was exposed to multiple forms of therapy surrounding addiction, including Twelve-Step Programs, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), equine therapy, music/art therapy, S.M.A.R.T. Recovery, holistic/wellness healing, and medical treatment for alcohol dependence (Vivitrol and Campral). His story offers unique insight into the method and mind of a chronically relapsing alcoholic, and the tools necessary to combat such an affliction Connect with Charlie @hismajestycharles3rd Get your TSD merch at www.thesobrietydiaries.com The Sobriety Diaries is a video podcast where we share powerful stories of recovery told by those who lived them. You can find us wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts with new episodes every Wednesday, subscribe now! Please share our show with just 1 person in your life who may be struggling, you just never know what they may need to hear today. Also, please consider donating to The Sobriety Diaries here: https://www.thesobrietydiaries.com/support/ Your donations help us to source the best stories from around the world and keep the show going! Follow us on Instagram @thesobrietydiariespod Find all things TSD related and join our insiders list at www.thesobrietydiaries.com Exact Nature- Use code “TSD20” for 20% off your order at www.exactnature.com Music: www.bensound.com Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-sobriety-diaries/id1570033658?uo=4 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0aKbMuMUb2jjTkBBD41Mhm Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy81YjYzNDVkOC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== Anchor: https://anchor.fm/sobrietydiaries Radio Public: https://radiopublic.com/the-sobriety-diaries-Wa0nBA PocketCasts: https://pca.st/6i505fmy Try your best not to drink, and be good to yourself! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sobrietydiaries/support

ShrinksChat
Mental Health with Dr. Anna Lisa

ShrinksChat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 36:14


Following a series of mass shootings in the United States, Annette and Monica meet Dr. Anna Lisa De Lima, Ph.D., LMHC, NCC, to talk about the mental health impact on children, families, and first responders who are either directly involved, or impacted by watching the media coverage.  Dr. De Lima is the Clinical Director at the Hanley Center at Origins, based in West Palm Beach, Florida. She brings a wealth of clinical expertise and well-rounded specialization in trauma and crisis.  Dr. De Lima completed her Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision with a specialization in trauma and crisis. She is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in the state of Florida as well as a National Certified Counselor (NCC). In her work as a clinician, Dr. De Lima utilizes a variety of evidenced based protocols in the treatment of mental health disorders, SUDs, and trauma. These protocols include Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and other trauma-informed interventions. Dr. De Lima has worked with first responders from a variety of backgrounds and specialties in her work as a clinician. Having worked closely with first responders in a variety of roles, and through her years of research on this population, Dr. De Lima is well-versed in the unique concerns that this population faces. Dr. De Lima has also presented extensively on this topic around the country.

JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast
Healing Trauma Through EMDR and IFS/Elyan Rosenbaum

JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 56:17


Elyan Rosenbaum, LMHC, NCC, is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor in private practice. She specializes in working with women of all ages struggling with anxiety or trauma. Elyan is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and Internal Family Systems (IFS), two cutting edge, deeply transformative therapy modalities. Her practice, Rosenbaum Therapy, is currently providing online therapy via telehealth to all residents of New York and New Jersey. Visit rosenbaumtherapy.com to learn more. Follow Elyan on Instagram at @rosenbaumtherapy for all things mental health.

The Feel Better Naked Podcast
It's Ok to Not Be Ok

The Feel Better Naked Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 30:11


In this episode, we chat about our mental health experiences, and how the stigmas against getting help from someone. We talk about concepts like Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), and how generational trauma can affect us trying to find help. If anyone you know is struggling with mental health, please reach out to those who can help. You're not alone. https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helplineRemember: "No is an answer." Real talk, real women. No shame. Come follow us at:  IG Dr. Latisha- @bloodsugarbae  IG Dr. Jennifer - @regenerate.physio    For more information about: FB Group: Black Dolla Indyhttps://www.emdria.org/about-emdr-therapy/

Forty Thrive
Is EMDR Right for Me?

Forty Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 49:59


If you heard last week's episode, you know it's possible to heal our brains in a variety of different ways. One of those ways is through Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy, a powerful tool to help patients move forward, or as Dr Lili Wagner so perfectly stated "move past our past." In this episode, we dive deeper into EMDR, discuss the benefits, who it may be good for, and who it might not find it a great fit. About: Dr. Lili Wagner is a Licensed Psychologist in California with over 20 years of experience.  She works with adults and the elderly, specializing in trauma as well as the psychological ramifications of having a chronic illness or autoimmune disease.  She is certified in EMDR, CBT, and has several health coaching certifications.  Due to her own chronic health issues, Dr. Wagner uses a holistic mind, body, and soul approach to therapy.  During her spare time, she loves to cuddle with her dog, enjoys movies, music, dancing, and spending time with her family.  Support the show

The Menopause Movement Podcast
The Power of Story : How To Change Your Life NOW. (The Best of The Menopause Movement Podcast Episode 40)

The Menopause Movement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 63:54


We often don't realize this, but we have a bully inside our heads. It's important to pay attention to how we're telling ourselves stories, what those stories actually mean, and whether they're valid. A quick example: If I tell myself that someone hates me because I'm wearing scrubs, then we're going to have tension because this is the story that I've told myself, regardless of whether it's true. Mindset really comes down to the story we are telling ourselves more than anything else. And a lot of times, the stories that we believe came from what we learned when we were children. For me, it's the memory of my mother saying that my uncles were rich because they were doctors. At that moment, my little five-year-old brain said, “I have to be a doctor or I won't be able to make money.” That decision and belief served me. My subconscious mind took me from being a music major, to taking one class in Trigonometry and high scoring that class, to going into science to one of the most difficult colleges in the country called, Harvey Mudd, to medical school. We are being programmed from such a young age, and if we don't pay attention to how we're speaking to ourselves and what beliefs are driving our current actions… We get stuck in a box. Our beliefs create our future. And we need to step out of the box to create a life we love. In today's episode of The Best of The Menopause Movement Podcast, I'm with Jill Romig who is passionate about helping women make peace with their pasts to step into their own and become more confident and comfortable in their skin through her Living Boldly Coaching Program. At 53, she finally figured a few things out and is excited to share what she's learned with other women that struggle with aging, fitness, nutrition, intimacy, and fashion. During the interview, we discuss healing from the past, her experience with eye movement, desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) PLUS:   How important we speak to ourselves is How the book, The Four Agreements changed her life Introverts and extroverts How our thoughts create a reality What fear is and why failure is a door to possibility The importance of affirmations done the right way in success   This episode will help you make peace with your past and understand the importance of positive affirmations.   Tune in today!   What's Discussed in This Episode: [03:51] How did Jill get started helping women heal from their past? [07:09] How Jill was helped by Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) [13:06] How to speak to ourselves and why that's important [20:55] How the book, The Four Agreements, changed her life [26:34] Introverts and extroverts [32:20] Reconnecting with our sexuality and dealing with trauma [40:36] How our thoughts create our reality [44:07] What fear is and why failure is a door to possibility [51:09] The importance of affirmations done the right way for success [55:12] Finding God   About Our Guest Jill Romig is passionate about helping women make peace with their past, step into their own, and become more comfortable and confident in their skin through her Living Boldly coaching program. At 53, she finally figured a few things out and is excited to share with women struggling with aging, fitness, nutrition, intimacy, and fashion. Despite being an accomplished CPA and a fitness instructor for 25 years, she struggled for many years over her weight, self-image, self-worth, and self-esteem. She made a shift in her mid-40s as she immersed herself into self-help and learned about the law of attraction, vibrations, source energy, and positive affirmations to become the best version of herself. All of what she has learned she then applied to her coaching program, Living Boldly.   Resources: Check my latest podcast or listen to the previous ones (https://www.menopausemovement.com/podcast) Connect with me on Instagram (@drmichellegordon) Follow me on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/drmichellegordon) Check out my LinkedIn posts (https://www.linkedin.com/in/drmichellegordon/) Check out Jill Romig's website to get your 5 Tips to create your own personalized affirmations download https://www.jillmromig.com/   Books mentioned in this episode: The Untethered Soul https://amzn.to/2O0nPbe The Four Agreements The Success Principles https://amzn.to/3MUj1jl True Meditation https://amzn.to/3KSrGRX   Amazon pays me a small fee when you buy using these links.   For more podcast episodes, you may also visit my website. Tune in and subscribe to The Menopause Movement Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher.   Thank you for tuning in! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The MINDset Game® Podcast
093 Overcome Barriers with EMDR Therapy: Interview with Megan McQuary

The MINDset Game® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 38:57


Have you ever felt like there were invisible barriers preventing you from achieving your goals or getting to where you wanted to be in life? For many of us, these barriers are the result of traumatic experiences that have negatively impacted the way we view ourselves, others, and the world around us.  While various therapeutic modalities seek to help individuals overcome trauma, a technique called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) may deliver powerful and efficient results. In Episode 93 of The MINDSet Game® podcast, Megan McQuary – a Certified EMDR Clinician and Trainer, as well as a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional and an Advanced Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor – shares the following: The goals of EMDR and an overview of how it works, including the key things that Megan focuses on when conducting an EMDR session A metaphor to help understand how your brain operates, and why it can be difficult to think logically or make decisions effectively when you are overwhelmed by stress or other negative emotions  The power of bilateral stimulation and how it is used in EMDR At the end of the episode, Megan guides us through a guided visualization using bilateral stimulation. This empowering session is designed to help you reflect on how far you've come in life and discover where you are in relation to the achievement of your goals.  Megan McQuary formerly owned and operated one of the largest treatment centers for substance abuse and trauma in Southeast Idaho, which was voted best in practice for 2019. Her trainings have helped thousands of clinicians across the U.S. get the most out of EMDR, trauma and addiction based skills and practices. She has been invited to train internationally at the International Society of Addiction Medicine in India, the International Conference on Addiction Research and Therapy in Amsterdam and at the Psicologia Institute of Italy. Megan has extensively been trained on the use of EMDR as a treatment protocol and uses EMDR in her practice to achieve improved outcomes with a broad spectrum of clients in the areas of trauma, abuse, attachment and substance abuse. She is an expert witness at the State and Federal level for her expertise in areas surrounding trauma. Megan is the author of EMDR Workbook for Trauma and PTSD: Skills to Manage Triggers, Move Beyond Traumatic Memories, and Take Back Your Life set to be released by New Harbinger Publications in late 2022. She earned her master's in Clinical Social Work from Northwest Nazarene University in 2011 and is an active member of the International Society of Addiction Medicine and the National Association of Social Workers. She currently owns and operates her own Counseling, Consulting and Training Business and is passionate about genuinely changing the landscape of trauma treatment through an authentic, hands on perspective, that she has uniquely made her own.   To learn more about Megan and EMDR, visit her website at https://thementalsurvivalist.com.  To subscribe to The MINDset Game® podcast, visit www.TheMINDsetGame.com.

Thee Amateur Expert Podcast
Tiffany Green | Be Brave | Episode 122

Thee Amateur Expert Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 35:46


Happy #talktuesday! Today @theeamateurexpert is going LIVE with Tiffany Green (@tiff_tastic1)! Tiffany is a licensed psychotherapist, a world traveler and true adventurer, as well as the founder of Uprooted Academy™ @theuprootedacademy, a national program known for its signature offering, "College Apps: 12 Steps to Finding Your Match©," and the creator of "The Uprooted Approach©," a 5-phase multicultural approach to supporting students to design and execute their dreams while understanding a students' nervous system. We will be discussing her career path, her ideas of success and the tips & motivators she used along the way. Contact Info: • • Email: admin@uprootedacademy.org • Websites: www.uprootedacademy.org • www.liveuprootednow.com • Instagram: www.instagram.com/theuprootedacademy • Youtube: www.youtube.com/uprootedacademy Guest bio: Tiffany Green is the founder of Uprooted Academy™, a national program known for its signature offering, "College Apps: 12 Steps to Finding Your Match©," and the creator of "The Uprooted Approach©," a 5-phase multicultural approach to supporting students to design and execute their dreams while understanding a students' nervous system.Focusing on her passion for understanding and helping alleviate educational anxiety for students and the burdensome memories of her challenging college application process sparked the idea that created and built the curriculum of what Uprooted Academy is today. Tiffany realized that having a curriculum designed and taught by marginalized people who could speak to the existing systems and structures incorporate mental well-being and social-emotional learning while affirming different parts of their identity. In addition, providing the "cheat code" hidden from low-income, first-generation applicants could be vital in minimizing the social capital gap.As a first-generation college graduate, Tiffany attended the University of Connecticut. She then received her graduate degree in counseling psychology from Howard University and became a licensed psychotherapist. Tiffany is trained in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Brainspotting, Ego Parts Work, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Safe and Sound Protocol, Emotion-Focused Individual Therapy, and Yoga. Combining these modalities along with providing psychoeducation during sessions, she believes clients can address wounds, remove the sting of past hurt and trauma that causes present-day triggers and feel free!Tiffany has traveled to over 60 countries and is a true adventurer who enjoys cycling, surfing, snowboarding, and cultural activities with friends and family. Audio Engineer: b_cuz Originally recorded April 19, 2022 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theeamateurexpert/support

No Pix After Dark Podcast
EP 176: Relationships with Dr Elizabeth Fedrick founder of Evolve Counseling

No Pix After Dark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 36:35


EP 176: Aaron spoke with Dr. Elizabeth Fedrick, PhD, LPC the founder of Evolve Counseling & Behavioral Health Services from Gilbert AZ.Every year Nopixafterdark podcast likes to speak with a different types of Therapist. This year I wanted to talk about Relationship Therapist and how things went during pandemic dating, warning signs, Toxic traits, dating apps and cuffing season. My listeners and I had many questions for Dr Elizebeth and she had the answers. Dr Elizbeth dropped many jewels and gems in this episode Dr Elizabeth also has a podcast called Cool Calm Connected Podcast I recommend. Thank Dr.   www.evolvecounselingaz.com IG. EvolveCounseling_AZ IG: Cool _calm_connected podcast     Dr. Elizabeth Fedrick a Licensed Professional Counselor in the state of Arizona and is trained in various therapeutic modalities, including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Child-Parent Psychotherapy, and Motivational Interviewing. She has a doctoral degree in Psychology, as well as a master's degree in Professional Counseling. Dr. Fedrick specializes in working with depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship issues, attachment, grief and loss, life transitions, and personal improvement (including motivation & self-esteem). She provides an integrated approach to treatment and believes that counseling should be individualized to the specific needs of each client. Dr. Fedrick believes in providing her clients with the essential tools and resources needed in order to obtain the healing and change they are seeking, as well as to maintain this transformation long-term. She finds it extremely important to provide a safe, supportive, and nonjudgmental environment for all of her clients. ​ Dr. Fedrick is also a professor at Grand Canyon University, where she teaches behavioral health and psychology courses. She also co-hosts a YouTube and podcast channel, Evolve Counseling, geared towards parenting and other various mental health topics. Dr. Fedrick presents mental health talks throughout her community, as well as authors mental health articles for various media outlets

Women's Health, Wisdom, and. . . WINE!
#46 - Healthy Self, HEAL Thy Self | Tanesha Mayo

Women's Health, Wisdom, and. . . WINE!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 49:26


Women's Health, Wisdom, and. . . WINE!  is a weekly conversation with practitioners, providers, patients, and healers about complex reproductive medicine and women's health challenges, the value of an integrative approach to these challenges, many of the women's health topics you're already thinking about but uncomfortable talking about, and my personal favorite. . . WINE!Primum cura te ipsum: First, heal thyself.During this time of (endemic) pandemic, racial trauma, and social injustice, there is a growing emphasis on clinician well-being and self-care. As a therapist, the goal is bigger than just being OK enough to work. Avoiding burnout is not enough. A good therapist sets the bar higher to competently render care. This is an ethical issue.Clinicians (not just mental health therapists and social workers) MUST to “do their own work.” Therapists need to healing, too. Whether it is through traditional talk therapy or other means, therapists need to attend to their own trauma, developmental journeys, and growth. While the phrase “primum non nocere” (first, do no harm) is a vitally important doctrine in mental health, there is an overlooked and more sequentially vital step in terms of primacy required to avoid doing harm: therapists confront and deal with their own issues FIRST.The therapist's job is to ensure a helpful clinical relationship, and the relationship itself is the greatest clinical tool that she has. Ensuring that this primary tool is going to be functional, let alone optimal, requires time, effort and a willingness to endure the discomfort necessary for growth. Basic, day-to-day self-care is important for fighting burnout and for resourcing one's self, especially when tasked with taking care of others and especially during times in which nobody seems to be OK. The invitation, the challenge, the mandate, is to not stop at “resourced.” Aim higher. Get comfortable with discomfort when it means a potential breakthrough. A good therapist does it for you, does it for herself, and does it because it's her job.About Tanesha:As a Mental Health Therapist, Tanesha is particularly passionate about working with women who find it difficult to navigate life's challenges while managing the responsibilities of work and family. She addresses a wide range of emotional concerns including depression, anxiety, stress management, life/adjustment issues, and past trauma. She is a Certified Trauma Professional with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) training. Tanesha also addresses issues that specifically affect the mental health of women of color. However, all women are welcome!Resources Mentioned:Therapy for Black GirlsTherapy for Black MenConnect with Tanesha:FacebookWebsiteInstagramThe podcast's hashtag is #nourishyourflourish. You can also find our practice on the following social media outlets:Facebook: The Eudaimonia CenterInstagram: theeudaimoniacenterTwitter: eu_daimonismFor more reproductive medicine and women's health information and other valuable resources, make sure to visit our website.Have a question, comment, guest suggestion, or want to share your story? Email us at info@laur

Rewriting [Her]Story
What is EMDR???

Rewriting [Her]Story

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 28:38


Today's episode is near and dear to Mari's heart! We discuss what Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is, how it works, what it does, as well as the benefits from participating in this modality of treatment! It really does sound like magic y'all! Like, share, subscribe, rate and review!! We love you all so much! Subscribe Here https://anchor.fm/rewritingherstory/subscribe Follow us on Instagram @rewritingherstorypodcast @spookyfitmom13 @bea_xo11 Email Us rewritingherstorypodcast@gmail.com Check out the services we offer! https://m.facebook.com/Beathechangenow/ www.iamredefiningme.com

Growing Careers and Companies
Cultivating Resilience, with Melissa Wasserman

Growing Careers and Companies

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 50:20


We're back after a short break! Our guest today is Melissa Wasserman, psychologist, speaker, consultant, and trauma expert. In this wide-ranging episode, we talk about her untraditional career journey and how the pandemic has caused a lot of chaos in our personal and work lives. Melissa also shares her best piece of advice about navigating challenges, cultivating resilience, and some tools that you can use to implement in your daily life.  Learn more about Melissa and her story at: www.growingcareersandcompanies.com. “One of my biggest values and such a big part of my identity is being relational and being human.”    03:52 Melissa grew up in a Jewish family and her parents both worked in the real estate industry. She was always very active as a child and valued meaningful relationships. She attended religious school growing up and attended religious studies in college.   During her years in college, Melissa had a class about American religion and its impact on the Vietnam War. She learned about family traumas in military families and realized that this was her calling in life. She became a licensed psychologist and a trauma expert. “Communication is a mega resilience factor in systems to buffer the impact of mental health symptoms.”   16:47 Melissa shares some advice on how to navigate through challenges.  Reflect on previous challenges that have already passed. How did you go through those? What have you learned? Identify some strategies that you already used successfully in the past and think about how could you use those in your current situation. Be aware of the warning signs of burnout. Don't wait until you feel completely burnt out, practice self-preservation and self-care continously.   Melissa is a trauma expert and specializes in generational family traumas. In her experience, family traumas are stronger in families where they don't have good communication with each other. Communication is key and it is a huge resilience factor, so it's important to learn how to communicate well and listen to each other.   Melissa started her business just a few months before the global pandemic. This presented a lot of challenges for her, but she loves the dynamic work environment and wearing many hats as a business owner.  The Final 3 Questions     What is the lesson that has taken you the longest to learn?   Patience - not just with others but mostly with herself. Making mistakes is part of the human experience, so we need to be kind to ourselves and learn from them.     What are the 2 principles from the Growing Careers & Companies Framework that resonate the most with you?   Purpose and Community. These two words are greatly interconnected to Melissa as she finds purpose in community and through connectivity.      What do you hope others take away from your story?   That we are all human and we are all resilient. Be gentle and kind to yourself and others.  About Our Guest, Melissa Wasserman Dr. Melissa Wasserman (AKA Dr. Meli) is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist (PSY30983).   She has specialty in traumatic stress, particularly how trauma-related challenges impact interpersonal relationships (e.g., couples, families, social, work relationships). While trauma can include a wide variety of experiences and challenges, her expertise includes working with individuals who have experienced interpersonal/relational trauma, war-related trauma and violence, civilian and military sexual trauma, and traumatic loss.  She is trained in evidence-based and trauma-informed interventions including Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), and Families Overcoming Under Stress (FOCUS). She is also trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).   Along with her clinical work, she is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Pepperdine University's Graduate School of Education & Psychology where she teaches master's and doctoral level psychology students.  Additionally, Dr. Meli is the Co-Director of the Pepperdine Union Rescue Mission Counseling Center, a collaboration between Pepperdine University's Graduate School of Education & Psychology and the Union Rescue Mission, a faith-based mission located on Los Angeles' skid row.  Dr. Meli is a member of the American Psychological Association, Society of Indian Psychologists, the International Society for the Study of Traumatic Stress, and Psi Chi Psychological Honors Society. A warm thanks to Melissa Wasserman for taking the time to share his unique insights and experiences with us. Resources from the show:   https://www.drmeli.com/ Her LinkedIn https://www.growingcareersandcompanies.com/ https://www.crerecruiting.com/ https://www.creatwork.co/ The Growing Careers and Companies Framework Allison's LinkedIn     Thank you for joining us on this episode of the Growing Careers and Companies Podcast.   If you enjoyed the show, there are a few things we would love you to do right now:  SUBSCRIBE to the Growing Careers and Companies Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts  Please RATE & REVIEW and let us know what you'd like to hear next Finally, we invite you to JOIN our mailing list for news you can use   Please share this episode with someone you think would inspire.    Until the next time, we appreciate you being here.

Light After Trauma
87: Redux - How EMDR Can Help You Heal with Melissa Parks, LCSW

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 50:43


REDUX: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is one of the leading treatments for PTSD. Melissa Parks breaks down how this therapy can help you recover and why it is so highly effective. NEW: Alyssa also shares her personal journey with starting this type of treatment.   **Every donation to Patreon for the month of March will go to Doctors Without Borders to help support those injured in Ukraine. Alyssa will personally match your donation. See the podcast Patreon and learn more about Doctors Without Borders below!** Patreon Learn more about Doctors Without Borders   Check out the Light After Trauma website for transcripts, other episodes, Alyssa's guest appearances, and more at: www.lightaftertrauma.com Want to get more great content and interact with the show? Check us out on Instagram: @lightaftertrauma   Transcript Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hey everybody, what's up? Welcome back to another episode of the Light After Trauma Podcast. I'm your host, Alyssa Scolari, and I am recording this episode on a gorgeous Friday morning. I am in a good mood. But it has honestly been a rough week, or I should say like a rough couple of weeks. I don't know what is going on or what is in the air, but man, I just feel like things have been so hard. It's just, I think there's a lot going on between people trying to get back to living a semi-normal life or a new normal and everybody is having parties and hosting things. And it's really exciting, but as somebody who is like an introvert inside and somebody who has really spent a lot of time indoors over the last two years for the pandemic, it causes me kind of a lot of anxiety to suddenly go from not being invited anywhere to being invited to all of these places every single weekend. Alyssa Scolari [01:31]: And just things with my practice, like my private practice have been, I don't want to say difficult, but not the easiest or the happiest I should say. Not that I'm unhappy in my job, I love what I do, but there are times where this job is really hard and I have had to set a lot of firm boundaries the last couple of weeks. And setting boundaries is really, really hard for me, it's extremely triggering. Because when I set a boundary, I have this massive fear that something bad is going to happen. So, it's just been a week for me filled with a lot of anxiety, still recovering from surgery, still going to physical therapy. So, whatever, it's really neither here nor there. Alyssa Scolari [02:21]: All of that is to say that it's been difficult. I'm in a good mood today, the sun is shining, but the last few weeks have been a little bit rough for me. And with that being said, this week's episode is an episode that was recorded and that went live a year, a little more than a year ago, so early March of 2021. And I am replaying it today because it is very fitting and it's one of our most popular episodes. But it came out when the podcast was very, very new. So, for everybody who is new, this episode might be brand new for you. And even if it's not, it's something that's important to listen to even again and something that you may or may not want to consider. Alyssa Scolari [03:10]: And so, basically, what we're doing today is I am reposting the EMDR episode. So, EMDR is this specific type of trauma therapy that is used to treat both standard PTSD and complex PTSD, and it has a ton of research backing its effectiveness. And it really works on rewiring the brain. Because trauma is rooted in the brain, it sometimes makes talk therapy, which sometimes makes talk therapy not enough. Some people do great with talk therapy, and for some people, it truly isn't enough. I find that with some folks with complex PTSD, talk therapy is not always sufficient. It's definitely necessary, of course, but sometimes we need a little bit more. Alyssa Scolari [03:59]: And that has been the case that I have been finding with myself. Last week, we talked about cultivating safety in order to be able to do the trauma work. And the thing about EMDR is that is crucial. You need a sense of safety, because EMDR is intensive and it's very difficult. And that being said, it's also very short-term so it's not something where you're doing for years and years and years. But it's an intensive process. So, I've just been feeling lately like I want to do more to help my nervous system because I've come very far and I'm doing extremely well, but I still have all of these triggers that are just causing my nervous system to go haywire. Alyssa Scolari [04:49]: And it is becoming just a really big inconvenience for me to get triggered over a sound, over a site and then have flashbacks. And as much work as I've done, I feel like my brain is still on fire sometimes. So, I have really been feeling like over the last couple of months that now that I'm through my surgery and I'm recovering, I am ready to take my healing to a different level and to try this out. I also really want to try it because if it's something that I find is very effective, I am considering getting trained in it so I can help my clients. So, I am going to be starting EMDR this week and I'm really excited. I am going to be staying with the therapist that I currently have. Alyssa Scolari [05:43]: Now, the therapist I currently have is not trained in EMDR, but I am actually bringing on a second therapist and he's going to be more of a short-term therapist because he's the EMDR specialist. So, my first appointment is this week and I'm really excited and also really nervous, and I'm looking forward to bringing you all along on this journey. So, I will, of course, keep you all posted. We will see how it goes. I feel ready for it, I feel ready for this next step in my healing. Not that this step is any better or any worse than any of the other steps, if EMDR is not for you, that is totally fine. But I just think it's interesting to try to explore this option for healing. Why not? I'm in a place where I feel good and ready for it. Alyssa Scolari [06:37]: So, that is what is up for this week. I am excitedly and anxiously anticipating it and I thought that it would be helpful for both myself and everybody to relisten to this episode with Melissa, who is the EMDR specialist. She also is on TikTok. She's hysterical, but you will hear all about that in the episode. So, I hope you enjoy. I have found this episode fascinating. EMDR was a very convoluted topic for me and a very seemingly overwhelming type of therapy that I always stayed away from, I never really wanted to look at because it just seemed like too difficult or complex for me. But I think that this episode is really great because Melissa breaks it down and makes it more digestible. Alyssa Scolari [07:29]: So, I will stop talking now. Oh, no, I will not stop talking actually, because just a few housekeeping things. Please remember that for the entire month of March, we are donating to Ukraine. So, if you sign up to become a member on Patreon, whatever money that you donate for the first, for the month of March, is going to go directly to Doctors Without Borders to help with the efforts in Ukraine. I have my Patreon linked in the show notes and also of the Doctors Without Borders linked in the show notes so that you can check it out and see if it's something that you're interested in. Thank you so much to people who have already donated. This is so exciting. Alyssa Scolari [08:09]: I know that we're a pretty small platform so we're not going to be raising thousands and thousands of dollars, but honestly, any little bit helps and counts and is going to help people in Ukraine so much. So, I'm really excited about this. If you want to be a part of it and you want to donate, please go to the show notes. Again, if you become a Patreon member for the month of March, your first month's donations are going directly to Doctors Without Borders and I am also matching your donation. So, now, I will stop and I will let you get on with the episode where Melissa and I talk about EMDR. I have so much love for you all and I am holding you all on the light, and I'll be back again next week. intro music Alyssa Scolari:  Hey all what's up. Welcome to another episode of the Light After Trauma podcast. I'm your host, Alyssa Scolari. And we have here with us today, Melissa Parks. So you have Melissa and Alyssa, so it's going to be a good time. Melissa is an EMDR therapist, as well as a couples therapist. She is devoted to helping you stop the cycle of conflict in your relationships and to understand your nervous system in order to experience more joy, she has been using her expertise and her humor on social media to de-stigmatize mental health, you will often hear her use the phrase you make sense. So just a quick side note, I found Melissa on Tik-Tok. She is a bomb Tik-Tok maker. I thoroughly enjoy watching all of your Tik-Tok. So when she says that she uses humor as part of her therapy, she is not kidding. Her Tik-Toks are really funny and I really appreciate them. So, hi, Melissa. Welcome. And thank you for all that you do. Melissa Parks: Hey, I'm so glad to be here. Thank you so much for having me. It's a true honor. I'm excited. Alyssa Scolari:  I'm so excited for you to be here and to talk about a topic that quite honestly, I don't really know a whole lot about. So this is going to be a major learning experience for me as well as a lot of the listeners. So would you be able to share a little bit more on like what you do, who you are and could you break down that like gigantic acronym? That is EMDR. Melissa Parks:  Yes. Yes, absolutely. Well, like you so beautifully said, I am a therapist, a couples therapists, EMDR therapist. I do coaching. I do consultation. I do lots of things, but I treat clients in the state of South Carolina and I am so passionate about that. I came into the field and have been licensed for 17 years, and I still feel just as passionate, if not, even more passionate than I was when I first started, I really am on fire for all this stuff. In terms of EMDR trauma-focused stuff, attachment focused stuff. It's just my favorite. It's just one of my favorite things. So I'm excited to be able to talk about this today to maybe help bridge the understanding for folks because you know, it can be kind of, you know, intimidating when you just, the acronym, like you said, is a little intimidating: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. That's a mouthful. Alyssa Scolari:  Yes, it is. Melissa Parks:  It's like what is Well I'd love to take some time to explain some about it and then. Open up for questions. Definitely. But Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is an evidence-based treatment model, which just means that it has extensive research and it's been proven .It has proven outcomes and way back when it was only used to treat trauma, but now we know that it can treat trauma, it can treat complex trauma, it can treat a myriad of issues, including distressing symptoms, like chronic depression, anxiety, just a whole host of things. So it's not just trauma. And it's based on a model that theorizes that our current symptoms are a result of unprocessed memories from our past that are showing up in our present. So for example, the brain may have had an experience from the past and it was unable to integrate all the components of that experience. And so what happens is our amazing nervous system comes up for us to protect us, to keep us sane and it fragments that experience into pieces. And that's what we see in our current day are those fragments of the experience as our symptoms. Overwhelming feelings, body sensations, whatever they are. That's what our symptoms are. That's what this EMDR model is based on. It's basically saying our past is in our present. Alyssa Scolari:  I gotcha. And when you say just to, and I don't mean to interrupt, I just had a quick thought, when you say unprocessed memories, do you mean repressed memories that are stored in our subconscious that haven't come to conscious, or could it be both, both repressed memories and suppressed memory. So things that we can recall, but just haven't really digested or integrated. Melissa Parks:  Right, right, right. I would say all the above, I would say all the above and when we're talking, you know, cause I would say all of us have unprocessed memories. So, I mean, we all do, but when it comes to trauma, that's a different story. When it comes to trauma, that's a little bit more in depth, a little bit more intense because with a trauma experience we have an experience that's too much, too soon, too much for too long or too little, for too long. So think like neglect. And in those situations, the signals from the amygdala, the fear center of the brain are so much, are so intense that the top part of our brain, which usually down-regulates and helps soothe that fear is gone. And this experience causes the integrative functions in the brain to fail. And so that's where we have that fragmenting that happens. So this is more of what, where I'm talking about the fragmented pieces as it relates to trauma. But yes, I think we all have unprocessed memories. The research talks about this and we learn about this when we're initially being trained in EMDR. Alyssa Scolari:  Wow. So, so what does that look like in practice? From what I understand, there's lots of, and this could just be one of my own myths or beliefs, there's lots of tapping that happens. Am I right on that one? Melissa Parks:  Yes, that's what EMDR is known for. But so before I go into that, which is really helpful. So with all that, I just said that, you know, we have these fragmented parts, these assimilated parts of a memory that are showing up in our present. This is why EMDR is so awesome because EMDR is a bottom up brain approach. It's a treatment of association. So it helps us associate those dissociated parts. And when, I mean, by bottom up, so a lot of treatments out there spend a lot of time in that top part of our brain, which is our more sophisticated part of our brain, which holds more of our thinking stuff, the way that we rationalize. And we think about things and those are helpful too. But if we have trauma. And if we have all these fragmented pieces that are coming up from our past, we can't think those away. Our body is taking over. And so EMDR comes to help us from the bottom part of the brain to help us associate those things and assimilate those things. And this is why, you know, it's really important to just put that out there and recognize the impact of EMDR from that perspective, how it treats the brain and how we integrate in that way. But that's what EMDR is known for is the tapping, right. Or the eye movements. Alyssa Scolari:  That's what I've always heard. Yeah, I'm sure that's only part of it. Yeah. I do want to just say for the listeners out there, you all won't be able to see this, but as Melissa was saying that, you know, talking about bringing these essentially disassociated or disconnected parts and connecting them, she was almost interlacing her fingers, which I think is a really great portrayal of what you're trying to say, which is we're taking all of these pieces and we're integrating them. It is like the full integration of the brain from a bottom up approach instead of surface level down approach. If I'm understanding that correctly. Melissa Parks:  Yes, you are 100%. And I think it's important to also note here is that EMDR is like a resilience model, which means it believes that we have everything that we need to heal. The clinician is just sort of the conductor and whatnot, but it believes that we are all wired with resilience and that something got in the way, right. Trauma, for example, got in the way and sort of rewired ourselves towards self protection instead of connection or these other things. But EMDR really operates out of this stance that you have what you need, and that resiliency is there and you are adaptive and we're going to work with all that, which is beautiful. And why I particularly love this model and that it's so trauma-informed and resilience based. Alyssa Scolari:  Yeah, that's very empowering. Very empowering. Melissa Parks:  It is very much though. So with the bilateral stimulation is what you're talking about. So the tapping or the eye movements, that's only, you know, that's not an all eight phases of EMDR because this is an eight phase model. So we're doing. Yes. Yes. And some clients come in, when are we going to do EMDR? And I'll say, well, we've been doing it ever since you came in because you know, part of EMDR also involves case conceptualization, taking a history, doing a treatment plan, which we're not doing tapping or bilateral stimulation through that. But that is typically what people think EMDR is moving the eyes and the tapping. And so I'm happy to talk about that piece because it is a pretty important piece. And it's probably what sort of separates EMDR from many of these other therapies, Alyssa Scolari:  Right, right. Because another therapies it's just primarily talk therapy unless you were doing, you know, neurofeedback or something of that sort. But... Melissa Parks:  RIght. Alyssa Scolari:  is more of like a, I don't know, it's like tapping into the brain. It sounds like. Melissa Parks:  No pun intended, right? Alyssa Scolari:  Right. I was going to say no pun intended, but pun fully intended, definitely tapping into the brain. Melissa Parks:  Yes. So treatment of EMDR really involves some procedures where number one, we are activating these old memories. By way of sensations, images, beliefs, feelings. So we want to activate that. And part of that involves this dual attention because we don't want to activate something like that and retraumatize you. We don't want to activate that and get you back into the memory where you're fully immersed in it, and it is overwhelming and it takes you outside of your window of tolerance. That is not what we want to happen, but we want to activate that where we have one foot in that past issue. And then we also have one foot in the present day where you're in the office with the client and or with the clinician. So one foot in the past one foot in the present. So we're activating the memory with all of those components. And then this is where we bring in the bilateral stimulation. And this is rhythmic side to side stimulation. Left ,right, left, right. And this is, by way of eye movements. So the clinician can wave their fingers in front of the eyes of the client that the eyes will pass the midline. We can use hand tapping. I have little buzzers where they hold the little buzzers and it kind of buzzes back and forth. You can do tones in the ears, but either way it's stimulating left, right, left, right. And this activates and integrates information from both sides of the brain. And so we have full brain integration. So we're setting up a state for the system to do what we wanted it to do. Back during the trauma, we're setting up a state for the system to bring those dissociated pieces together, associate them again in a safe way, and sometimes in a titrated way. Meaning we only take a little bit at a time because we don't want to overwhelm the client. And as a result, the old memory ends up being stored properly. The components of the memory are now timestamped appropriately. Cause remember I said, our symptoms are the past and the present. Well now when we set up this state and we help the brain integrate. Those parts can say: "Oh, we belong back here when I was 10, we don't belong here when I'm 30 anymore." So those old parts are now integrated (and) oriented to the correct time. And our distress is reduced about the whole situation. And we also take what is useful in terms of our thoughts about a memory, for example, It's over or unsafe now, or I am good ,or something. And then we can take that into our future and move forward. The results of this are just quite amazing, but ultimately we set up this state and we let the nervous system do its thing. Alyssa Scolari:  That is absolutely fascinating. Melissa Parks:  I know I got chills when I talk about it, even though I've done it so many times. Cause it's just so cool. Alyssa Scolari:  Yes, your passion for it is palpable. And just, as I'm listening to you talk, I think it's such a beautiful description. I have had it explained to me so many times, and I have to be honest. I still am, like, after somebody explains it to me and I'm still like, okay, but I don't get it. The way that you're putting it is incredible because there are so many times that I will say to not only my patients who I treat, but also to myself when I'm triggered is "Okay, are these feelings about the past, or are these feelings about the present?" And what EMDR does is it sounds like it gives your brain and your nervous system, the ability to be like,"Nope, this belongs, you know, for the time that we were enduring the abuse. This is what belongs in the present. This is what we're going to take into the future." Melissa Parks:  That's right. That's right. Alyssa Scolari:  That is incredible. Melissa Parks:  Yes. Yes. And this is what our brain wanted to do at that time. Right. It really did, but it couldn't. It's wired to, because that's part of what the hippocampus does. The hippocampus is the integrating function of the brain, but it couldn't. Because things were too much, too soon, too fast, too little for too long. Alyssa Scolari:  Way too much to process. Melissa Parks:  All those too Yes Yes yes yes And so but how beautiful is it that for our survival and for our sanity it knew something else to do, to fragment these pieces. It's beautiful Like my gosh. Our brains are incredible. That's the part where I love too, is like, You know, instead of looking at it from the pathological lens, it's like, no, this is amazing that our nervous system protected us in this way. Just amazing. Alyssa Scolari:  I love that you are saying this because I have been on such a soap box lately about pathology and how much I loathe it entirely, which I understand, you know, we need the DSM for some things, which for the listeners out there, the DSM is the book with all of the mental health disorders. But I'm just right on board with you where so much of what we experience is a result of our brain, trying to protect us, which is actually so normal and not pathological. Melissa Parks:  That's right. Agreed. 100%. Alyssa Scolari:  I am so passionate, so passionate about that. I'll get off my soap box now. But I have to ask. So what sparked your passion to get into this field and specifically like the EMDR niche? Melissa Parks:  Well, I feel like, so I, you know, I'm thinking like way back when I, you know, went into school, but I feel like for a lot of us clinicians out there, there's some clinicians that go into it because it's in the family or that kind of thing. Like we know somebody close to us that is a therapist or... I went in it to become more self-aware and to search for healing, because of my own childhood experiences and my own difficulties and my own trauma. And so that's probably, if I were to go right back to the brass tacks of it, of why I even started my journey towards becoming a therapist, that's where I would say it began. And I can't discount....I feel like there's a spiritual component there because I went into college when I was an itty-bitty, you know, teenager. And so it's hard to imagine that my teenage brain was like, Oh, let's do all of this. And, you know, cause that's just not the case. My prefrontal cortex wasn't even completely developed. So I feel like there's a spiritual component there for me, at least that there was a pathway for this for me, but I definitely had that passion to want to learn about myself and why I was the way I was and what was happening there. And then turning that around to:I want to help others. I want to help others see, like we just said, this non-pathological lens that there is nothing wrong with you. In fact, you have done the best that you can. And so that's where a lot of my passion comes. And then probably in terms of, EMDR where I was first introduced to that. I was almost fresh out of grad school and my supervisor did EMDR. Now, of course, this was like almost 20 years ago and EMDR has changed a little bit over the years. And so back then it was kind of like this like woo-woo sorta thing, but she just amazed me and the way that she saw these results with her clients. And so my interest was sparked way back then and I started learning little bits and pieces along the way. And of course, once I had my own training and my certification and all that stuff, like, that was it. But I also have a love for attachment. So I'd also do couples therapy too. And that is why I also make attachment a huge part of my EMDR treatment as well. So I do a lot of attachment focused EMDR too. Alyssa Scolari:  You can incorporate EMDR in couples work as well? Melissa Parks:  Okay. I've not treated couples with both of them in the room with EMDR. I think there's probably, maybe some people that do that. But there have been times where I'm working with a couple and we realized that there are some things that are at play here that trace back to trauma that are really impeding our progress in order to create a secure bond. And so in that case, we may branch off and do a little bit of EMDR for each or one of the components of the couple and then return. Alyssa Scolari: Okay, that makes a lot of sense. Melissa Parks:  But when I say attachment focused EMDR, I'm talking a lot about people that have PTSD, so childhood trauma or developmental trauma, and we really need to bring in that attachment perspective to the EMDR work. Alyssa Scolari: Yes, because it's almost, you know, if you do have complex PTSD, it is almost impossible. Nothing's impossible, but it is extremely, extremely difficult to be able to have a functional relationship when you have not worked through... Melissa Parks:  yeah. Yeah, Alyssa Scolari:  ...the attachment. You know, even having been in my own treatment for... how many years now? I don't know. Well, multiple years at this point, I still have those triggers that come up about abandonment. And so I can only imagine. Melissa Parks:  Rection. Yeah absolutely. Yes. Alyssa Scolari:  Rejection in what I think other people might feel are just like the silliest ways. That's like, well, what do you mean you're going to go play video games with your friends? Melissa Parks:  And there it is the past and the present. Right? There it is. Alyssa Scolari:  So EMDR I have heard, and maybe you can speak a little bit on this. Somebody had mentioned it in one of my previous podcasts, and then I've had a couple of colleagues talk about this, that it can be a very, very exhausting process. So can you speak a little bit on that? Like how is it draining? Why so draining? What are your thoughts on that? Melissa Parks:  Yeah, I have plenty of clients that will say to me, I have to clear my schedule after our session and or creating our next appointment time, I want to make sure that I'm doing it where I have nothing for the rest of the day. I mean, this can be a common experience. And then often, you know, if I have somebody that comes in that has something to do in that afternoon, we might really talk about whether or not we want to go into that... ...Phase Four, which is the desensitization using the bilateral stimulation because yeah, it can be draining. I mean, I think just the thought of going back into an experience and going back into an experience that our body and our system tries so hard not to, I mean, that alone kind of like speaks to probably the reasons why you might feel so drained afterward. Alyssa Scolari:  Yes cause you are having to actively revisit your trauma. So I suppose that speaks to the importance that like the decision to pursue EMDR is not a decision that one should make sort of like Willy nilly. Like I have 95 other thousand things going on in my life right now. But I'm going to jump into EMDR. Like not a good idea. Melissa Parks:  Yes. Yes. And I would also say that sometimes can be par for the course, but also knowing that if we've spent a lot of time in Phase Two, which is the preparation phase, this is where we're setting ourselves up for how do we deal with the aftermath of this so that we're not pushed out of our window of tolerance after our session. We know. Okay,, I know some things that I can do to help regulate my nervous system. If I start to feel myself kind of getting amped up again or things I can do to help contain it, if I feel triggered and, or sort of distract myself in a healthy way, that's not dissociative or we're working with the parts that might come up and we have identified things that we can do in the event that afterward we do feel really drained or we do fear feel really triggered. And so that can make a huge difference. Alyssa Scolari:  Yes, setting up a before plan and after plan, making sure that the safety and all of the tools are put in place. Melissa Parks:  That's right. That's right. Cause you know, we really have to, we really have to recognize the importance of, and the nature of this work. We are treating very vulnerable parts within the client and we want to really focus on the importance of that and the sensitivity of that. We do not want to re-traumatize or we don't want to you know, so it's really important for the clinician to, you know, take a really good history to really assess the client for all of these things that could potentially be problematic and to empower the client to set up skills if needed, like all of this stuff should be done on the forefront. So it's not all up to the client to say, "Oh, well, I shouldn't choose this" because there are things that we can do together to make sure that in the event it is draining or it is triggering. You can still feel like you have agency over yourself and over the situation. Alyssa Scolari:  I think that what you're saying is so important because it also speaks to I think the significance of finding a therapist who is well equipped to be able to see you through this process. You know, this is not something that you want to walk in. Unfortunately, I do have two clients now who I've ended up seeing after walking into a therapist's office who is certified in EMDR and during the first session, they went into the bilateral stimulation, Melissa Parks:  That's Yeah. Yep. You got it. Alyssa Scolari: They did that the first session, the first time meeting this person, and as a result, were really, really unraveled is the word I'm lookin for. Melissa Parks:  Oh, sure. For sure. It's concerning to say the least. I'm so sorry that that happened for your client because essentially what that also does too, is the client is not sort of, I don't want to say shutdown, but if the session isn't closed down properly and or if they are pushed outside of their window of tolerance, It's not repaired. It's not corrected. What does that do? That confirms that old experience that you are not safe. And as a result, like I said, kind of an experience of retraumatization and that is really unfortunate. That's really unfortunate. Alyssa Scolari:  Yeah, I think that is very unfortunate and that is not the norm. You know, that is what I'm hearing you say. Melissa Parks:  I would hope so. I would hope so. Alyssa Scolari:  Right. We hope and pray that that's not the norm. It is important, what I hear you say, to be able to establish that rapport with the client, to be able to do a full assessment, to be able to create a sense of safety so that the vulnerability can be there so that the healing process and the integration can begin. Melissa Parks:  So there's things that the client can do, certainly. And when I'm hearing you kind of talk about...the client can ask the questions upfront. When searching for a therapist, the client can find someone that they feel comfortable with. Do like a consultation maybe, and ask the questions. What kind of clients do you treat? What is your specialty? I'm not going to go if I have attachment trauma and I'm an adult and I'm struggling with my current relationships. I might not go to somebody who does EMDR, specially only with maybe children. For example, I would want to know that they've worked with adults with PTSD. So, you know, finding out what are you specialize in. What are your advanced trainings? How long have you been doing this? Are you trained or are you certified? Asking those questions, but ultimately, you know, a lot of this lies on the clinician. And their expertise and their ability to, like I said, get a good assessment. Conceptualize the client's case, attunement t is huge because... Alyssa Scolari:  What do you mean by that? Melissa Parks:  I might come in as a client, gung-ho, saying, "I want to do this EMDR stuff." "I love it so much. I'm ready." And yet the next session, another part of them comes out that is terrified. And sort of step in the presence of the room and is terrified. And yet, instead of asserting, "Hey, I'm scared about this," sort of just uses people-pleasing behaviors with the therapist and the therapist is not attuned to these little shifts of maybe a client's presentation or body movements or tone of voice or anything like that, and just runs with it. Again, we're at the risk of retraumatization or creating an unsafe experience. The clinician's level of attunement is so key and being able to, like I said, taking that full history, Oh, you know what? This client has used fawning, for example, which is like extreme people-pleasing in their relationships in the past. I want to note that for myself, I want to make sure that I'm watching for this in our sessions in the future. Because even if I ask a question, "Would you like to talk about this? "They're going to say "Yeah" all the time, because they fawn and so attunement is so huge, huge, huge, and that's on the clinician and their ability to do that. That's not the client's responsibility because a client who fawns is never going to say,"I'm feeling like I want to people-please, you right now." They're never going to say that. Alyssa Scolari:  No, they're just going to do it. That's part of their trauma response, especially when they're activated. Melissa Parks:  That's right? Alyssa Scolari:  So this is a lot in a very heavy process for both the client and the clinician. Melissa Parks:  Yes. It's a dance. Alyssa Scolari:  Do you ever find that it's exhausting for you as the clinician? Melissa Parks:  It could potentially be, but I have good supervision. I think the best clinicians, even the ones that are, you know, have all the certifications in the world get supervision. And so I get supervision and so I have a place to bring my stuff and I have pretty good self care. I also, you know, do things behind the scenes, like structure my day appropriately. I do not have a huge caseload because of not only the nature of the clients that I see, the majority I'm doing EMDR or couples work, couples work is also very intense because you would have two nervous systems in the room with you. Alyssa Scolari: Yes. Melissa Parks:  You're trying to navigate that. So I do not see a ton of people. All of that really, I have learned, sets me up to not feel that burnout or that exhaustion. Alyssa Scolari:  You've learned how to take really good care of yourself. Melissa Parks:  Yeah. But there's days, you know, cause I'm a human Alyssa Scolari: Of course, therapists are human too. Melissa Parks:  Right. Alyssa Scolari: Absolutely. But I love the comment that you said about having supervision, because my supervisor says this all the time, which is every good clinician has a great mentor, therapist, et cetera. Melissa Parks:  Good. Yes. You need to go to therapy too. I'm a believer in that. Alyssa Scolari:  Yes. I love my therapist. Yup. Yep. Now there's also been some myths, I think about EMDR that it's sort of this like, cure all. So could you speak on that? Like, and I guess maybe this is different for every person, but what is the length of the process and then like, how do you know that you've gotten to a point where like EMDR is no longer needed or is it a lifelong process? Melissa Parks:  I wouldn't say lifelong, but I think it's not a magic thing. It's not magic or a cure-all fix-all kind of thing. No, no, no, no, no, definitely not. But I do think that it can be helpful. Like I said almost all of my individuals that I see I'm doing EMDR with because we have to remember EMDR is not just about the Phase Four desensitization piece. Sometimes with some clients I'm just using resource tapping, which is basically strengthening positive things that they bring into session. To strengthen a positive neural network in their brain. So if someone comes in and says, "Oh, I was a good mom this week, I had such good interactions with my kids." I'll say "You want to tap that in? That sounds like it's really important. Like we really want to strengthen that." Alyssa Scolari:  I saw you make a Tik-Tok about that. Melissa Parks:  That's right. That's part of EMDR too. That's resource tapping and that's a component of EMDR too. And so if we're not doing all eight phases, it's still EMDR. And so I look at it from that perspective. In terms of really targeting a trauma or a series of traumas, if it's complex PTSD, it could take a long time. The research says that EMDR is more of a shorter model than say some other like traditional talk therapies, but I'd hate to put a timeline on it. I mean, I've, I've seen people that have single incident traumas and we've done maybe eight sessions, ten sessions, twelve sessions, and they actually feel like this is so helpful. I'm good now. Thank you. Bye. And that's been great, but typically I'm working with people with complex trauma and we're in it for the long haul. Alyssa Scolari:  Okay. I was just going to say, it sounds more to me like EMDR is a treatment approach, like in its entirety and not something that you decide like... Melissa Parks:  Yes, you get it. Alyssa Scolari:  Does that make sense? Melissa Parks:  Yes. That is exactly how I use it. And how I don't look at it as just an intervention. Alyssa Scolari:  Right? Like it's not a supplement therapy. It is a treatment modality. Melissa Parks:  That is exactly how I approach it and how I incorporate it into my practice. And not everybody is like this. I mean, some clinicians are just trained in it and they just use it here or there occasionally, but that's not how I roll. And maybe it's just because I'm in love with it all, but yeah. I really use it as how a lens that I see my clients through because of all the components of it that we talked about in the beginning, based on the model that the past is in the present, the resiliency aspect of it, the bottom up approach. That's how I see my clients through that lens. And this is why this works for me in terms of a modality. So yes, that's right. It's not just an intervention to me. Alyssa Scolari:  Yeah, this is a treatment lens for you. Which I think is potentially why I bet you have so much success because the treatment of trauma really is recovery is a lifelong process, especially when it comes to trauma survivors. So I would imagine that if we're coining anything in some like eight week or twelve week intervention, it's not going to be as effective. Melissa Parks:  Right. Right. Agreed. Alyssa Scolari:  I love it. I learned so much about EMDR. This actually makes me want to, I don't know. This makes me definitely want to explore more. Melissa Parks:  Nice. Alyssa Scolari:  And so I have to ask because your Tik-Toks are amazing. How did you... Melissa Parks:  I get a little...I'm laughing cause I can get my sense of humor can come out there. I can have a little too much fun on there. Alyssa Scolari:  They're so funny. I love them. I show them to my husband. Melissa Parks:  Give me an Office audio, and I will roll with it. I will make it into something. I just love The Office. And if there's any audio on The Office, it's happening, it's going down. Alyssa Scolari:  It's going down. I love it so much. How did you get into, like, how did you decide like, Oh, this is what I'm going to do. Melissa Parks:  well, I've been on Instagram a few years probably, and I just decided to take the leap. Alyssa Scolari: Making those Tik-Toks at the rate that you put them out has got to be a second full-time job for you. I feel like they're hard. Melissa Parks:  Well, they are, I'm pretty, I'm slightly, not slightly. I'm pretty aware of like, not aware, but I can work my phone pretty good. And I'm not doing like major edits, so they don't take me too long. But I think it's just my, I think it's my imagination. I hear something like a sound or, and I'm like, Oh my gosh, this fits so perfectly with this. Or this is how a couple would react or this is what would happen in the brain and how the brain would talk to each other like that. It just comes to me with hearing these sounds. Alyssa Scolari:  Yeah. It's like, it seems looking at your profile and your content, very much of a creative outlet for you. And I would guess a way to also spread awareness. Melissa Parks: That's right. And I cannot tell you how many emails or messages I've received saying "Because of you. I decided to find a therapist" or "Because of you. I feel like I make sense. And I'm going to talk more about what's happening with my therapist" or" just because of you..." and that gives me fire and motivation to just keep going for sure. You know, I'm going to kind of change up how we see ourselves, how we see mental health and that's important. Alyssa Scolari:  and you are doing that and you very much send the message on your content, on all of your platforms. Cause I believe I also follow you on Instagram that it's not what's wrong with you. It's what happened to you. Melissa Parks:  Yes. Alyssa Scolari:  And I love that you put that vibe out there. Melissa Parks:  Yeah. Yeah. Thank you. Alyssa Scolari:  So healing. Melissa Parks:  Yeah, thank you. Alyssa Scolari:  So your Tik-Tok is...what's your Tik-Tok username? It's melissa_parks_says, right. Melissa Parks: [00:39:06] No, just melissaparkssays, all one (word) and it's the same for my Instagram: melissaparkssays Alyssa Scolari:  and then you have a website as well, right? Melissa Parks:  Yeah, the website, it is for my therapy practice. That's melissaparkstherapy.com. And yeah, I'll be doing some things in terms of more of that coaching piece, probably more towards summertime, and I'll be opening up some opportunities for EMDR therapists that want to be certified to do some consultation under me if they want to. So that would be important to maybe find me on social media for that. And I'm looking at some potentially courses or some kind of like membership sites so that people can work with me outside of that therapy treatment perspective. And of course, that's only for those that do not need the structure of therapy. That's very important to make sure that we delineate that. Alyssa Scolari: Ooo, you have some exciting things coming up in your future. Melissa Parks:  Yeah. Alyssa Scolari:  I'm excited for you. Oh, that's so fun. Well, I will link all of your socials on the show notes. So to all the listeners out there, you will know exactly where it should go to find more of Melissa's amazing content. Thank you for breaking down the scary beast that is EMDR, because it has really been quite frightening to me, but I feel like I have a really good grasp on it now. And it's not so scary. Melissa Parks:  I'm so glad. I'm so glad. And of course I'd be open to any and all questions for clarifying anything further. I'd be happy to come on again or whatever. It's been such a joy. So thank you for having me.

I Dare you to Heal
Healing vs Coping!

I Dare you to Heal

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 41:56


In this episode DrNechaRenee is joined by the fabulous Ashley-Reneé! This episode was really fun to record. The ladies talked about, what coping and  healing looks like,  negative coping mechanisms, some positive things you could do to cope, examples of healing techniques, and how does one know that it's time to start healing!What is EMDR?Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is an extensively researched, effective psychotherapy method proven to help people recover from trauma and other distressing life experiences, including PTSD, anxiety, depression, and panic disorders. *reference* If you have any questions,  positive words, or feedback drnecha@idareyoutoheal.meYou're invited to schedule a discovery call to work with DrNechaRenee, click hereConnect with DrNechaRenee on social media:Instagram - @idareyoutoheal    Facebook - @idareyoutoheal   BOOK: Set Boundaries, Find Peace by Nedra Glover Tawwab, order here https://www.nedratawwab.com/set-boundaries-find-peaceFollow Nedra Glover Tawwab on Instagram  You can learn more about Ashley-Reneé  and her business in various places:Instagram- Therapy @ ashleyrenee_therapy  andBusiness @officialtherapyforthebody

The Notorious MFT
The Eighth Episode: Dr. Brett and The Gestalt perspective on the authentic self and adoption/attachment

The Notorious MFT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 19:06


Dr. Brett Furst holds a B.S. in Child and Adolescent Development from The University of California, Davis, an M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy from Chapman University, and is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He has his Doctorate in Psychology from Alliant International University. Dr. Furst is a fully trained, EMDRIA approved, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapist. Dr. Furst, in addition to his focus on the underlying causes of addiction, specializes in academic and educational difficulties, and provides supportive services to those clients pursuing continuing education Therapeutically, Brett comes from a Gestalt perspective, placing emphasis on the exploration of the authentic self and how inauthenticity and the negative personas clients create contribute to their unhealthy habits and the disconnection from themselves through substance --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/william657/message

Stories of Hope in Hard Times
Dr. Jennifer Finlayson-Fife: Can I Learn to Trust Myself After Abuse?

Stories of Hope in Hard Times

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 34:02


A few weeks ago I had a listener reach out with a question about how she can learn to trust herself after being abused. Dr. Jennifer Finlayson-Fife joins us again to answer this question. Question From a Listener"I was sitting here, going thru some rather rough moments the past few days with this journey of healing from abuse that I'm on, and came upon a question that is really difficult for me. The question that has come to me is how do I learn to trust myself again after abuse has happened? Really trust myself, and not keep falling back into the traps of feeling the abuse was somehow caused by me, or whatnot? Where is trust in Me that lasts? Because it seems that I need to trust Me before I can really truly trust others, including the Savior. At least that's what I've read.” Episode Discussion PointsHow the brain begins to change how it views others after being abused Why abused children seem to feel they are the problem causing the abuse—that they are unlovable and deficient. One of the first steps is creating an accurate notion of God loving us unconditionally (instead of projecting our view of our imperfect parents on Him). This takes real faith and courage. “Faith is reaching in the dark for something better than where you are.” Once you know this, people who have struggled with abuse often need a trauma counselor to help them begin to look at life with the lens of truth. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy or trauma therapy helps abuse victims learn to understand the truth and put themselves in the mind of the abuser (sometimes) to see they were not at fault. Sometimes it is hard for people to learn to lean on the Savior if they have been abused—because it is an act of faith. Sometimes you feel you “don't get it,” or don't understand how God sees and loves you—but yet still act as though it is true. 4 Steps to Build Trust After AbuseFaith/Belief in another possibility Work with a good therapist, who can walk through “hell” with you and come back out into the light. This therapist will help you reprocess the meaning and see the truth of what really happened. Self-love is more something you do vs. something you feel. ”Do something hard as an investment in you.” “Your behavior is a step ahead of your feelings.” “The clarity of who you are comes after the behavior.” Connect with Dr. Jennifer Finlayson-FifeListen to her story on my podcast —https://www.tamarakanderson.com/podcasts/jennifer-finlayson-fife-why-you-really-need-self-compassion?rq=Jennifer (Jennifer Finlayson-Fife: Why You Really Need Self-Compassion) https://www.finlayson-fife.com (Check out her website here.) She also has courses, workshops, and a podcast you can listen to on her website. #tamarakanderson #storiesofhopeinhardtimes #podcast #hope #God #hardtimes #abuse #trauma #therapy #counselor #trust #help #healing #love #selflove #JenniferFinlaysonFife TranscriptionYou can find the transcription of today's episode here: https://www.tamarakanderson.com/podcasts/can-i-learn-to-trust-myself-after-abuse

Mind Body Health & Politics
Dr. Lewis Engel - The Flash Technique

Mind Body Health & Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:57


Link to the Flash Technique Video: https://youtu.be/f-QNuzTdJVYLewis is a licensed psychologist and has been practicing in San Francisco and Marin County for over 40 years. His approach to therapy is interactive and he seeks to understand his clients' struggles and collaboratively develop a process to resolve their difficulties.Currently, his area of specialization is Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). EMDR is an effective and well researched therapy originally developed for the treatment of the aftereffects of severe trauma such as combat, physical and sexual abuse, sexual assault, traffic accidents and natural disasters.In 2017, he assisted Philip Manfield, Ph.D. in the development of a revolutionary new technique, the Flash Technique, which combined with EMDR allows for the rapid and painless resolution of traumatic memories. EMDR and Flash are also successful in effectively treating anxiety, depression, avoidance, phobias and panic. These symptoms can arise either from major trauma or simply from the ordinary strains of growing up in a family and other challenges of life.In addition, he has written a popular book, Imaginary Crimes, that addresses why some of us sabotage ourselves and prevent ourselves from being happy and successful.

Mamas Well - Parenting Conversations on Foster Care and Adoption
58. EMDR and play therapy for foster and adoptive children with Stephanie Walsh, LPC

Mamas Well - Parenting Conversations on Foster Care and Adoption

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 62:15


Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) along with play therapy can be a powerful combination for children from hard places. Host Tara Hutton is joined by Licensed Professional Counselor, Stephanie Walsh for an informative conversation on her experience with foster / adoptive children in the counseling room. For more on Stephanie Walsh: https://www.ndfcounseling.com How to find an EMDR therapist near you: https://www.emdria.org/find-an-emdr-therapist/ ______________________________________ Join the Mamas Well Community for the latest podcast releases, useful resources and Wisdom From The Well Cards HERE: https://www.mamaswell.com/community​​...​ To download this week's Wisdom from the Well Card, as well as the cards for all past and future episodes.. https://mamaswell.com/wftw-sign-up/​​​​​ Subscribe to Mamas Well YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UC5B52aJ6...​... Subscribe and listen to Mamas Well on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast...​... Mamas Well on Socials Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mamaswelll​​...​

The Creative Psychotherapist
60. Janet Bayramyan | Growing an Online Practice in Different States

The Creative Psychotherapist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:40


FEATURED GUEST: Janet Bayramyan, LCSW, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the states of California (LCSW88575) and Florida (SW16210). Working from a trauma focused perspective, she is committed to supporting individuals and couples through their healing of past and current distressing events. She is a certified Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) psychotherapist. She is also trained in Attachment Focused EMDR, Havening Techniques, and other trauma modalities. Using EMDR, she helps clients understand and process the impact of trauma and move through states of protection and connection in their nervous system to establish an embodied sense of safety. She is also certified in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Janet has been working in the field of psychological support since 2016 and is a member of the EMDR International Association, California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a member of the California Society of Clinical Social Workers. Janet graduated with her Master's Degree in Social Work from the University of Southern California and completed her Bachelor's level education from California State University Northridge. Her work experience includes working at psychotherapy clinics and centers with a variety of clients of different ages/backgrounds, those struggling with severe psychiatric mental illnesses, substance and process addictions, couples dealing with a wide range of relational problems, and individuals working though past trauma, etc. She believes that therapy should be supportive, trauma-informed, and should be culturally sensitive and consider all the layers of one's identity, including gender, race and sexuality. LISTEN & LEARN: Importance of understanding the laws and rules of all the states in which you practice. Selecting zip codes as a method for marketing an online practice. Growing a practice through networking. Janet's perspective on what it means to be a modern therapist. RESOURCES MENTIONED ON THE SHOW: https://www.raod2wellness.co @TherapywithJanetB for Facebook, Instagram & LinkedIN

From Survivor to Thriver
Episode 33- Mason Hohstadt: There is hope to be had if you reach out for help

From Survivor to Thriver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 99:27


Mason, a public health specialist and Chair of the Suicide Prevention Coalition of Garfield County, Colorado, discusses his personal story of overcoming social anxiety disorder while studying at the University of Colorado and how his arrest for possession in 2005 capped off a decade of being “wild and crazy.” A combination of therapy, medication, CBT, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), along with a newfound love of running, has aided in his recovery. Today, integrating his individual experiences around mental health and public health frameworks, he hopes to meet people where they are in their journeys and his passion for the social determinants of mental health is allowing him to move the needle at a population level. He gets quite candid about the importance of using evidence-based questions if you suspect someone is in crisis and offers several valuable resources for those in need.Contact Us: Email: amgits.reverse@gmail.comInstagram: @brushcreekthriversFacebook: From Survivor to Thriver

The Pilgrim Soul Podcast
#26: Therapy and Embodied Healing

The Pilgrim Soul Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 37:14


Mental health counselor Beth Hlabse joins Adrianna on the podcast to discuss her journey into Catholic counseling and her experience of God as a counselor. They discuss Beth's form of therapy that she primarily practices, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), and the journey towards mind-body healing. Beth shares her own experience as a person who has both experienced tremendous healing during her own experience with EMDR and her privilege to aid in the healing of others. Our weekly challenge is to engage in the three-step process of Awareness, Acceptance, and Discernment as a way of being with and processing emotions. And our media recommendation is to check out www.soulsandhearts.com for resources on Catholic therapy. We'd love to hear from you! Write to us at pilgrimsoulpodcast@gmail.com or find us on Instagram at @pilgrimsoulpodcast. We're happy to pass a message on to Beth as well. Other resources we mention: - Divine Mercy University: www.divinemercy.edu - EMDR Therapy and its history: www.emdr.com/history-of-emdr Our theme music is Nich Lampson's “Dolphin Kicks.”