Podcasts about sky with diamonds

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Best podcasts about sky with diamonds

Latest podcast episodes about sky with diamonds

Two Towns Over: An Urban Legends Podcast
Corner Cafe Gossip: Song Legends part 2: Lucy in the Sky with Puff the Magic Dragon on the Dark Side of the Rainbow

Two Towns Over: An Urban Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 42:14


We had so much fun, we did it again, more song legends this week as we look at the supposed meanings of "Puff the Magic Dragon" and "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds". Then we finish it out with the greatest in Stoner Magic, the supposed syncing of Pink Floyd's classic album "Dark Side of the Moon" with the film Wizard of Oz.

Help on the Way
Umm This 93 Show... Smokes? - 5/23/93

Help on the Way

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 131:25


Grab your beanie babies and part your hair in the middle, it's 1993! We're heading to Shoreline to listen to the Grateful Dead's May 23rd, 1993 show. In this episode our hosts, Game, Fig, and Knob, eat crow after this '93 show exceeded their expectations. Discussions abound about the John Mayer/Bob Weir acoustic duo, Beatles covers the Dead should've tried, and everyone's favorite Phil song, Wave to the Wind.  Jack Straw Loser Tom Thumb's Blues It's All Over Now Bird Song Music Never Stopped Iko Iko Wave to the Wind > Saint of Circumstance > Terrapin Station > Drums > Space > I Need a Miracle > Days Between > Not Fade Away Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds

Life Level 1
2022.08.09 - Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds

Life Level 1

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 14:14


In this episode, Bryan and Kristen discuss a little about LSD, talk about the Australopithecus named Lucy, and hypothesize what going to the museum while tripping would be like. Life Level 1 is a general topic podcast about life from the humorous perspective of Bryan and his broad, Kristen. Bryan has a background in video game development and Kristen has a background in life. The thoughts and opinions expressed on this podcast are those of the individual contributors alone and are not a reflection of their employers.

CHINA RISING
You are Jim Carrey in “The Truman Show” and in the Beatles’ “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”. Your choice to stay or leave. China Rising Radio Sinoland 220719

CHINA RISING

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 19:18


NOW IN 22 DIFFERENT LANGUAGES. CLICK ON THE LOWER LEFT HAND CORNER “TRANSLATE” TAB TO FIND YOURS! By Jeff J. Brown Sixteen years on the streets, living and working with the people of China, Jeff Downloadable podcast at the bottom of this page, Brighteon, iVoox, RuVid, as well as being syndicated on iTunes, Stitcher Radio...

Rock & Pop Stories
Beatles "Lucy in the sky with diamonds"

Rock & Pop Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 3:29


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


This week's episode looks at “All You Need is Love”, the Our World TV special, and the career of the Beatles from April 1966 through August 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Rain" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ NB for the first few hours this was up, there was a slight editing glitch. If you downloaded the old version and don't want to redownload the whole thing, just look in the transcript for "Other than fixing John's two flubbed" for the text of the two missing paragraphs. Errata I say "Come Together" was a B-side, but the single was actually a double A-side. Also, I say the Lennon interview by Maureen Cleave appeared in Detroit magazine. That's what my source (Steve Turner's book) says, but someone on Twitter says that rather than Detroit magazine it was the Detroit Free Press. Also at one point I say "the videos for 'Paperback Writer' and 'Penny Lane'". I meant to say "Rain" rather than "Penny Lane" there. Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of songs by the Beatles. I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them. All my Beatles episodes refer to: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology. For this episode, I also referred to Last Interview by David Sheff, a longform interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono from shortly before Lennon's death; Many Years From Now by Barry Miles, an authorised biography of Paul McCartney; and Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles by Geoff Emerick and Howard Massey. Particularly useful this time was Steve Turner's book Beatles '66. I also used Turner's The Beatles: The Stories Behind the Songs 1967-1970. Johnny Rogan's Starmakers and Svengalis had some information on Epstein I hadn't seen anywhere else. Some information about the "Bigger than Jesus" scandal comes from Ward, B. (2012). “The ‘C' is for Christ”: Arthur Unger, Datebook Magazine and the Beatles. Popular Music and Society, 35(4), 541-560. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2011.608978 Information on Robert Stigwood comes from Mr Showbiz by Stephen Dando-Collins. And the quote at the end from Simon Napier-Bell is from You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, which is more entertaining than it is accurate, but is very entertaining. Sadly the only way to get the single mix of "All You Need is Love" is on this ludicrously-expensive out-of-print box set, but the stereo mix is easily available on Magical Mystery Tour. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I start the episode -- this episode deals, in part, with the deaths of three gay men -- one by murder, one by suicide, and one by an accidental overdose, all linked at least in part to societal homophobia. I will try to deal with this as tactfully as I can, but anyone who's upset by those things might want to read the transcript instead of listening to the episode. This is also a very, very, *very* long episode -- this is likely to be the longest episode I *ever* do of this podcast, so settle in. We're going to be here a while. I obviously don't know how long it's going to be while I'm still recording, but based on the word count of my script, probably in the region of three hours. You have been warned. In 1967 the actor Patrick McGoohan was tired. He had been working on the hit series Danger Man for many years -- Danger Man had originally run from 1960 through 1962, then had taken a break, and had come back, retooled, with longer episodes in 1964. That longer series was a big hit, both in the UK and in the US, where it was retitled Secret Agent and had a new theme tune written by PF Sloan and Steve Barri and recorded by Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But McGoohan was tired of playing John Drake, the agent, and announced he was going to quit the series. Instead, with the help of George Markstein, Danger Man's script editor, he created a totally new series, in which McGoohan would star, and which McGoohan would also write and direct key episodes of. This new series, The Prisoner, featured a spy who is only ever given the name Number Six, and who many fans -- though not McGoohan himself -- took to be the same character as John Drake. Number Six resigns from his job as a secret agent, and is kidnapped and taken to a place known only as The Village -- the series was filmed in Portmeirion, an unusual-looking town in Gwynnedd, in North Wales -- which is full of other ex-agents. There he is interrogated to try to find out why he has quit his job. It's never made clear whether the interrogators are his old employers or their enemies, and there's a certain suggestion that maybe there is no real distinction between the two sides, that they're both running the Village together. He spends the entire series trying to escape, but refuses to explain himself -- and there's some debate among viewers as to whether it's implied or not that part of the reason he doesn't explain himself is that he knows his interrogators wouldn't understand why he quit: [Excerpt: The Prisoner intro, from episode Once Upon a Time, ] Certainly that explanation would fit in with McGoohan's own personality. According to McGoohan, the final episode of The Prisoner was, at the time, the most watched TV show ever broadcast in the UK, as people tuned in to find out the identity of Number One, the person behind the Village, and to see if Number Six would break free. I don't think that's actually the case, but it's what McGoohan always claimed, and it was certainly a very popular series. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't watched it -- it's a remarkable series -- but ultimately the series seems to decide that such questions don't matter and that even asking them is missing the point. It's a work that's open to multiple interpretations, and is left deliberately ambiguous, but one of the messages many people have taken away from it is that not only are we trapped by a society that oppresses us, we're also trapped by our own identities. You can run from the trap that society has placed you in, from other people's interpretations of your life, your work, and your motives, but you ultimately can't run from yourself, and any time you try to break out of a prison, you'll find yourself trapped in another prison of your own making. The most horrifying implication of the episode is that possibly even death itself won't be a release, and you will spend all eternity trying to escape from an identity you're trapped in. Viewers became so outraged, according to McGoohan, that he had to go into hiding for an extended period, and while his later claims that he never worked in Britain again are an exaggeration, it is true that for the remainder of his life he concentrated on doing work in the US instead, where he hadn't created such anger. That final episode of The Prisoner was also the only one to use a piece of contemporary pop music, in two crucial scenes: [Excerpt: The Prisoner, "Fall Out", "All You Need is Love"] Back in October 2020, we started what I thought would be a year-long look at the period from late 1962 through early 1967, but which has turned out for reasons beyond my control to take more like twenty months, with a song which was one of the last of the big pre-Beatles pop hits, though we looked at it after their first single, "Telstar" by the Tornadoes: [Excerpt: The Tornadoes, "Telstar"] There were many reasons for choosing that as one of the bookends for this fifty-episode chunk of the podcast -- you'll see many connections between that episode and this one if you listen to them back-to-back -- but among them was that it's a song inspired by the launch of the first ever communications satellite, and a sign of how the world was going to become smaller as the sixties went on. Of course, to start with communications satellites didn't do much in that regard -- they were expensive to use, and had limited bandwidth, and were only available during limited time windows, but symbolically they meant that for the first time ever, people could see and hear events thousands of miles away as they were happening. It's not a coincidence that Britain and France signed the agreement to develop Concorde, the first supersonic airliner, a month after the first Beatles single and four months after the Telstar satellite was launched. The world was becoming ever more interconnected -- people were travelling faster and further, getting news from other countries quicker, and there was more cultural conversation – and misunderstanding – between countries thousands of miles apart. The Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, the man who also coined the phrase “the medium is the message”, thought that this ever-faster connection would fundamentally change basic modes of thought in the Western world. McLuhan thought that technology made possible whole new modes of thought, and that just as the printing press had, in his view, caused Western liberalism and individualism, so these new electronic media would cause the rise of a new collective mode of thought. In 1962, the year of Concorde, Telstar, and “Love Me Do”, McLuhan wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy, in which he said: “Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain, exactly as an infantile piece of science fiction. And as our senses have gone outside us, Big Brother goes inside. So, unless aware of this dynamic, we shall at once move into a phase of panic terrors, exactly befitting a small world of tribal drums, total interdependence, and superimposed co-existence.… Terror is the normal state of any oral society, for in it everything affects everything all the time.…” He coined the term “the Global Village” to describe this new collectivism. The story we've seen over the last fifty episodes is one of a sort of cultural ping-pong between the USA and the UK, with innovations in American music inspiring British musicians, who in turn inspired American ones, whether that being the Beatles covering the Isley Brothers or the Rolling Stones doing a Bobby Womack song, or Paul Simon and Bob Dylan coming over to the UK and learning folk songs and guitar techniques from Martin Carthy. And increasingly we're going to see those influences spread to other countries, and influences coming *from* other countries. We've already seen one Jamaican artist, and the influence of Indian music has become very apparent. While the focus of this series is going to remain principally in the British Isles and North America, rock music was and is a worldwide phenomenon, and that's going to become increasingly a part of the story. And so in this episode we're going to look at a live performance -- well, mostly live -- that was seen by hundreds of millions of people all over the world as it happened, thanks to the magic of satellites: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "All You Need is Love"] When we left the Beatles, they had just finished recording "Tomorrow Never Knows", the most experimental track they had recorded up to that date, and if not the most experimental thing they *ever* recorded certainly in the top handful. But "Tomorrow Never Knows" was only the first track they recorded in the sessions for what would become arguably their greatest album, and certainly the one that currently has the most respect from critics. It's interesting to note that that album could have been very, very, different. When we think of Revolver now, we think of the innovative production of George Martin, and of Geoff Emerick and Ken Townshend's inventive ideas for pushing the sound of the equipment in Abbey Road studios, but until very late in the day the album was going to be recorded in the Stax studios in Memphis, with Steve Cropper producing -- whether George Martin would have been involved or not is something we don't even know. In 1965, the Rolling Stones had, as we've seen, started making records in the US, recording in LA and at the Chess studios in Chicago, and the Yardbirds had also been doing the same thing. Mick Jagger had become a convert to the idea of using American studios and working with American musicians, and he had constantly been telling Paul McCartney that the Beatles should do the same. Indeed, they'd put some feelers out in 1965 about the possibility of the group making an album with Holland, Dozier, and Holland in Detroit. Quite how this would have worked is hard to figure out -- Holland, Dozier, and Holland's skills were as songwriters, and in their work with a particular set of musicians -- so it's unsurprising that came to nothing. But recording at Stax was a different matter.  While Steve Cropper was a great songwriter in his own right, he was also adept at getting great sounds on covers of other people's material -- like on Otis Blue, the album he produced for Otis Redding in late 1965, which doesn't include a single Cropper original: [Excerpt: Otis Redding, "Satisfaction"] And the Beatles were very influenced by the records Stax were putting out, often namechecking Wilson Pickett in particular, and during the Rubber Soul sessions they had recorded a "Green Onions" soundalike track, imaginatively titled "12-Bar Original": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "12-Bar Original"] The idea of the group recording at Stax got far enough that they were actually booked in for two weeks starting the ninth of April, and there was even an offer from Elvis to let them stay at Graceland while they recorded, but then a couple of weeks earlier, the news leaked to the press, and Brian Epstein cancelled the booking. According to Cropper, Epstein talked about recording at the Atlantic studios in New York with him instead, but nothing went any further. It's hard to imagine what a Stax-based Beatles album would have been like, but even though it might have been a great album, it certainly wouldn't have been the Revolver we've come to know. Revolver is an unusual album in many ways, and one of the ways it's most distinct from the earlier Beatles albums is the dominance of keyboards. Both Lennon and McCartney had often written at the piano as well as the guitar -- McCartney more so than Lennon, but both had done so regularly -- but up to this point it had been normal for them to arrange the songs for guitars rather than keyboards, no matter how they'd started out. There had been the odd track where one of them, usually Lennon, would play a simple keyboard part, songs like "I'm Down" or "We Can Work it Out", but even those had been guitar records first and foremost. But on Revolver, that changed dramatically. There seems to have been a complex web of cause and effect here. Paul was becoming increasingly interested in moving his basslines away from simple walking basslines and root notes and the other staples of rock and roll basslines up to this point. As the sixties progressed, rock basslines were becoming ever more complex, and Tyler Mahan Coe has made a good case that this is largely down to innovations in production pioneered by Owen Bradley, and McCartney was certainly aware of Bradley's work -- he was a fan of Brenda Lee, who Bradley produced, for example. But the two influences that McCartney has mentioned most often in this regard are the busy, jazz-influenced, basslines that James Jamerson was playing at Motown: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "It's the Same Old Song"] And the basslines that Brian Wilson was writing for various Wrecking Crew bassists to play for the Beach Boys: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)"] Just to be clear, McCartney didn't hear that particular track until partway through the recording of Revolver, when Bruce Johnston visited the UK and brought with him an advance copy of Pet Sounds, but Pet Sounds influenced the later part of Revolver's recording, and Wilson had already started his experiments in that direction with the group's 1965 work. It's much easier to write a song with this kind of bassline, one that's integral to the composition, on the piano than it is to write it on a guitar, as you can work out the bassline with your left hand while working out the chords and melody with your right, so the habit that McCartney had already developed of writing on the piano made this easier. But also, starting with the recording of "Paperback Writer", McCartney switched his style of working in the studio. Where up to this point it had been normal for him to play bass as part of the recording of the basic track, playing with the other Beatles, he now started to take advantage of multitracking to overdub his bass later, so he could spend extra time getting the bassline exactly right. McCartney lived closer to Abbey Road than the other three Beatles, and so could more easily get there early or stay late and tweak his parts. But if McCartney wasn't playing bass while the guitars and drums were being recorded, that meant he could play something else, and so increasingly he would play piano during the recording of the basic track. And that in turn would mean that there wouldn't always *be* a need for guitars on the track, because the harmonic support they would provide would be provided by the piano instead. This, as much as anything else, is the reason that Revolver sounds so radically different to any other Beatles album. Up to this point, with *very* rare exceptions like "Yesterday", every Beatles record, more or less, featured all four of the Beatles playing instruments. Now John and George weren't playing on "Good Day Sunshine" or "For No One", John wasn't playing on "Here, There, and Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" features no guitars or drums at all, and George's "Love You To" only features himself, plus a little tambourine from Ringo (Paul recorded a part for that one, but it doesn't seem to appear on the finished track). Of the three songwriting Beatles, the only one who at this point was consistently requiring the instrumental contributions of all the other band members was John, and even he did without Paul on "She Said, She Said", which by all accounts features either John or George on bass, after Paul had a rare bout of unprofessionalism and left the studio. Revolver is still an album made by a group -- and most of those tracks that don't feature John or George instrumentally still feature them vocally -- it's still a collaborative work in all the best ways. But it's no longer an album made by four people playing together in the same room at the same time. After starting work on "Tomorrow Never Knows", the next track they started work on was Paul's "Got to Get You Into My Life", but as it would turn out they would work on that song throughout most of the sessions for the album -- in a sign of how the group would increasingly work from this point on, Paul's song was subject to multiple re-recordings and tweakings in the studio, as he tinkered to try to make it perfect. The first recording to be completed for the album, though, was almost as much of a departure in its own way as "Tomorrow Never Knows" had been. George's song "Love You To" shows just how inspired he was by the music of Ravi Shankar, and how devoted he was to Indian music. While a few months earlier he had just about managed to pick out a simple melody on the sitar for "Norwegian Wood", by this point he was comfortable enough with Indian classical music that I've seen many, many sources claim that an outside session player is playing sitar on the track, though Anil Bhagwat, the tabla player on the track, always insisted that it was entirely Harrison's playing: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] There is a *lot* of debate as to whether it's George playing on the track, and I feel a little uncomfortable making a definitive statement in either direction. On the one hand I find it hard to believe that Harrison got that good that quickly on an unfamiliar instrument, when we know he wasn't a naturally facile musician. All the stories we have about his work in the studio suggest that he had to work very hard on his guitar solos, and that he would frequently fluff them. As a technical guitarist, Harrison was only mediocre -- his value lay in his inventiveness, not in technical ability -- and he had been playing guitar for over a decade, but sitar only a few months. There's also some session documentation suggesting that an unknown sitar player was hired. On the other hand there's the testimony of Anil Bhagwat that Harrison played the part himself, and he has been very firm on the subject, saying "If you go on the Internet there are a lot of questions asked about "Love You To". They say 'It's not George playing the sitar'. I can tell you here and now -- 100 percent it was George on sitar throughout. There were no other musicians involved. It was just me and him." And several people who are more knowledgeable than myself about the instrument have suggested that the sitar part on the track is played the way that a rock guitarist would play rather than the way someone with more knowledge of Indian classical music would play -- there's a blues feeling to some of the bends that apparently no genuine Indian classical musician would naturally do. I would suggest that the best explanation is that there's a professional sitar player trying to replicate a part that Harrison had previously demonstrated, while Harrison was in turn trying his best to replicate the sound of Ravi Shankar's work. Certainly the instrumental section sounds far more fluent, and far more stylistically correct, than one would expect: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Where previous attempts at what got called "raga-rock" had taken a couple of surface features of Indian music -- some form of a drone, perhaps a modal scale -- and had generally used a guitar made to sound a little bit like a sitar, or had a sitar playing normal rock riffs, Harrison's song seems to be a genuine attempt to hybridise Indian ragas and rock music, combining the instrumentation, modes, and rhythmic complexity of someone like Ravi Shankar with lyrics that are seemingly inspired by Bob Dylan and a fairly conventional pop song structure (and a tiny bit of fuzz guitar). It's a record that could only be made by someone who properly understood both the Indian music he's emulating and the conventions of the Western pop song, and understood how those conventions could work together. Indeed, one thing I've rarely seen pointed out is how cleverly the album is sequenced, so that "Love You To" is followed by possibly the most conventional song on Revolver, "Here, There, and Everywhere", which was recorded towards the end of the sessions. Both songs share a distinctive feature not shared by the rest of the album, so the two songs can sound more of a pair than they otherwise would, retrospectively making "Love You To" seem more conventional than it is and "Here, There, and Everywhere" more unconventional -- both have as an introduction a separate piece of music that states some of the melodic themes of the rest of the song but isn't repeated later. In the case of "Love You To" it's the free-tempo bit at the beginning, characteristic of a lot of Indian music: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] While in the case of "Here, There, and Everywhere" it's the part that mimics an older style of songwriting, a separate intro of the type that would have been called a verse when written by the Gershwins or Cole Porter, but of course in the intervening decades "verse" had come to mean something else, so we now no longer have a specific term for this kind of intro -- but as you can hear, it's doing very much the same thing as that "Love You To" intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] In the same day as the group completed "Love You To", overdubbing George's vocal and Ringo's tambourine, they also started work on a song that would show off a lot of the new techniques they had been working on in very different ways. Paul's "Paperback Writer" could indeed be seen as part of a loose trilogy with "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows", one song by each of the group's three songwriters exploring the idea of a song that's almost all on one chord. Both "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Love You To" are based on a drone with occasional hints towards moving to one other chord. In the case of "Paperback Writer", the entire song stays on a single chord until the title -- it's on a G7 throughout until the first use of the word "writer", when it quickly goes to a C for two bars. I'm afraid I'm going to have to sing to show you how little the chords actually change, because the riff disguises this lack of movement somewhat, but the melody is also far more horizontal than most of McCartney's, so this shouldn't sound too painful, I hope: [demonstrates] This is essentially the exact same thing that both "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" do, and all three have very similarly structured rising and falling modal melodies. There's also a bit of "Paperback Writer" that seems to tie directly into "Love You To", but also points to a possible very non-Indian inspiration for part of "Love You To". The Beach Boys' single "Sloop John B" was released in the UK a couple of days after the sessions for "Paperback Writer" and "Love You To", but it had been released in the US a month before, and the Beatles all got copies of every record in the American top thirty shipped to them. McCartney and Harrison have specifically pointed to it as an influence on "Paperback Writer". "Sloop John B" has a section where all the instruments drop out and we're left with just the group's vocal harmonies: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B"] And that seems to have been the inspiration behind the similar moment at a similar point in "Paperback Writer", which is used in place of a middle eight and also used for the song's intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Which is very close to what Harrison does at the end of each verse of "Love You To", where the instruments drop out for him to sing a long melismatic syllable before coming back in: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Essentially, other than "Got to Get You Into My Life", which is an outlier and should not be counted, the first three songs attempted during the Revolver sessions are variations on a common theme, and it's a sign that no matter how different the results might  sound, the Beatles really were very much a group at this point, and were sharing ideas among themselves and developing those ideas in similar ways. "Paperback Writer" disguises what it's doing somewhat by having such a strong riff. Lennon referred to "Paperback Writer" as "son of 'Day Tripper'", and in terms of the Beatles' singles it's actually their third iteration of this riff idea, which they originally got from Bobby Parker's "Watch Your Step": [Excerpt: Bobby Parker, "Watch Your Step"] Which became the inspiration for "I Feel Fine": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] Which they varied for "Day Tripper": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Day Tripper"] And which then in turn got varied for "Paperback Writer": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] As well as compositional ideas, there are sonic ideas shared between "Paperback Writer", "Tomorrow Never Knows", and "Love You To", and which would be shared by the rest of the tracks the Beatles recorded in the first half of 1966. Since Geoff Emerick had become the group's principal engineer, they'd started paying more attention to how to get a fuller sound, and so Emerick had miced the tabla on "Love You To" much more closely than anyone would normally mic an instrument from classical music, creating a deep, thudding sound, and similarly he had changed the way they recorded the drums on "Tomorrow Never Knows", again giving a much fuller sound. But the group also wanted the kind of big bass sounds they'd loved on records coming out of America -- sounds that no British studio was getting, largely because it was believed that if you cut too loud a bass sound into a record it would make the needle jump out of the groove. The new engineering team of Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott, though, thought that it was likely you could keep the needle in the groove if you had a smoother frequency response. You could do that if you used a microphone with a larger diaphragm to record the bass, but how could you do that? Inspiration finally struck -- loudspeakers are actually the same thing as microphones wired the other way round, so if you wired up a loudspeaker as if it were a microphone you could get a *really big* speaker, place it in front of the bass amp, and get a much stronger bass sound. The experiment wasn't a total success -- the sound they got had to be processed quite extensively to get rid of room noise, and then compressed in order to further prevent the needle-jumping issue, and so it's a muddier, less defined, tone than they would have liked, but one thing that can't be denied is that "Paperback Writer"'s bass sound is much, much, louder than on any previous Beatles record: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Almost every track the group recorded during the Revolver sessions involved all sorts of studio innovations, though rarely anything as truly revolutionary as the artificial double-tracking they'd used on "Tomorrow Never Knows", and which also appeared on "Paperback Writer" -- indeed, as "Paperback Writer" was released several months before Revolver, it became the first record released to use the technique. I could easily devote a good ten minutes to every track on Revolver, and to "Paperback Writer"s B-side, "Rain", but this is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily long episode and there's a lot of material to get through, so I'll break my usual pattern of devoting a Patreon bonus episode to something relatively obscure, and this week's bonus will be on "Rain" itself. "Paperback Writer", though, deserved the attention here even though it was not one of the group's more successful singles -- it did go to number one, but it didn't hit number one in the UK charts straight away, being kept off the top by "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra for the first week: [Excerpt: Frank Sinatra, "Strangers in the Night"] Coincidentally, "Strangers in the Night" was co-written by Bert Kaempfert, the German musician who had produced the group's very first recording sessions with Tony Sheridan back in 1961. On the group's German tour in 1966 they met up with Kaempfert again, and John greeted him by singing the first couple of lines of the Sinatra record. The single was the lowest-selling Beatles single in the UK since "Love Me Do". In the US it only made number one for two non-consecutive weeks, with "Strangers in the Night" knocking it off for a week in between. Now, by literally any other band's standards, that's still a massive hit, and it was the Beatles' tenth UK number one in a row (or ninth, depending on which chart you use for "Please Please Me"), but it's a sign that the group were moving out of the first phase of total unequivocal dominance of the charts. It was a turning point in a lot of other ways as well. Up to this point, while the group had been experimenting with different lyrical subjects on album tracks, every single had lyrics about romantic relationships -- with the possible exception of "Help!", which was about Lennon's emotional state but written in such a way that it could be heard as a plea to a lover. But in the case of "Paperback Writer", McCartney was inspired by his Aunt Mill asking him "Why do you write songs about love all the time? Can you ever write about a horse or the summit conference or something interesting?" His response was to think "All right, Aunt Mill, I'll show you", and to come up with a lyric that was very much in the style of the social satires that bands like the Kinks were releasing at the time. People often miss the humour in the lyric for "Paperback Writer", but there's a huge amount of comedy in lyrics about someone writing to a publisher saying they'd written a book based on someone else's book, and one can only imagine the feeling of weary recognition in slush-pile readers throughout the world as they heard the enthusiastic "It's a thousand pages, give or take a few, I'll be writing more in a week or two. I can make it longer..." From this point on, the group wouldn't release a single that was unambiguously about a romantic relationship until "The Ballad of John and Yoko",  the last single released while the band were still together. "Paperback Writer" also saw the Beatles for the first time making a promotional film -- what we would now call a rock video -- rather than make personal appearances on TV shows. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who the group would work with again in 1969, and shows Paul with a chipped front tooth -- he'd been in an accident while riding mopeds with his friend Tara Browne a few months earlier, and hadn't yet got round to having the tooth capped. When he did, the change in his teeth was one of the many bits of evidence used by conspiracy theorists to prove that the real Paul McCartney was dead and replaced by a lookalike. It also marks a change in who the most prominent Beatle on the group's A-sides was. Up to this point, Paul had had one solo lead on an A-side -- "Can't Buy Me Love" -- and everything else had been either a song with multiple vocalists like "Day Tripper" or "Love Me Do", or a song with a clear John lead like "Ticket to Ride" or "I Feel Fine". In the rest of their career, counting "Paperback Writer", the group would release nine new singles that hadn't already been included on an album. Of those nine singles, one was a double A-side with one John song and one Paul song, two had John songs on the A-side, and the other six were Paul. Where up to this point John had been "lead Beatle", for the rest of the sixties, Paul would be the group's driving force. Oddly, Paul got rather defensive about the record when asked about it in interviews after it failed to go straight to the top, saying "It's not our best single by any means, but we're very satisfied with it". But especially in its original mono mix it actually packs a powerful punch: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] When the "Paperback Writer" single was released, an unusual image was used in the advertising -- a photo of the Beatles dressed in butchers' smocks, covered in blood, with chunks of meat and the dismembered body parts of baby dolls lying around on them. The image was meant as part of a triptych parodying religious art -- the photo on the left was to be an image showing the four Beatles connected to a woman by an umbilical cord made of sausages, the middle panel was meant to be this image, but with halos added over the Beatles' heads, and the panel on the right was George hammering a nail into John's head, symbolising both crucifixion and that the group were real, physical, people, not just images to be worshipped -- these weren't imaginary nails, and they weren't imaginary people. The photographer Robert Whittaker later said: “I did a photograph of the Beatles covered in raw meat, dolls and false teeth. Putting meat, dolls and false teeth with The Beatles is essentially part of the same thing, the breakdown of what is regarded as normal. The actual conception for what I still call “Somnambulant Adventure” was Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. He comes across people worshipping a golden calf. All over the world I'd watched people worshiping like idols, like gods, four Beatles. To me they were just stock standard normal people. But this emotion that fans poured on them made me wonder where Christianity was heading.” The image wasn't that controversial in the UK, when it was used to advertise "Paperback Writer", but in the US it was initially used for the cover of an album, Yesterday... And Today, which was made up of a few tracks that had been left off the US versions of the Rubber Soul and Help! albums, plus both sides of the "We Can Work It Out"/"Day Tripper" single, and three rough mixes of songs that had been recorded for Revolver -- "Doctor Robert", "And Your Bird Can Sing", and "I'm Only Sleeping", which was the song that sounded most different from the mixes that were finally released: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I'm Only Sleeping (Yesterday... and Today mix)"] Those three songs were all Lennon songs, which had the unfortunate effect that when the US version of Revolver was brought out later in the year, only two of the songs on the album were by Lennon, with six by McCartney and three by Harrison. Some have suggested that this was the motivation for the use of the butcher image on the cover of Yesterday... And Today -- saying it was the Beatles' protest against Capitol "butchering" their albums -- but in truth it was just that Capitol's art director chose the cover because he liked the image. Alan Livingston, the president of Capitol was not so sure, and called Brian Epstein to ask if the group would be OK with them using a different image. Epstein checked with John Lennon, but Lennon liked the image and so Epstein told Livingston the group insisted on them using that cover. Even though for the album cover the bloodstains on the butchers' smocks were airbrushed out, after Capitol had pressed up a million copies of the mono version of the album and two hundred thousand copies of the stereo version, and they'd sent out sixty thousand promo copies, they discovered that no record shops would stock the album with that cover. It cost Capitol more than two hundred thousand dollars to recall the album and replace the cover with a new one -- though while many of the covers were destroyed, others had the new cover, with a more acceptable photo of the group, pasted over them, and people have later carefully steamed off the sticker to reveal the original. This would not be the last time in 1966 that something that was intended as a statement on religion and the way people viewed the Beatles would cause the group trouble in America. In the middle of the recording sessions for Revolver, the group also made what turned out to be their last ever UK live performance in front of a paying audience. The group had played the NME Poll-Winners' Party every year since 1963, and they were always shows that featured all the biggest acts in the country at the time -- the 1966 show featured, as well as the Beatles and a bunch of smaller acts, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Yardbirds, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, the Seekers, the Small Faces, the Walker Brothers, and Dusty Springfield. Unfortunately, while these events were always filmed for TV broadcast, the Beatles' performance on the first of May wasn't filmed. There are various stories about what happened, but the crux appears to be a disagreement between Andrew Oldham and Brian Epstein, sparked by John Lennon. When the Beatles got to the show, they were upset to discover that they had to wait around before going on stage -- normally, the awards would all be presented at the end, after all the performances, but the Rolling Stones had asked that the Beatles not follow them directly, so after the Stones finished their set, there would be a break for the awards to be given out, and then the Beatles would play their set, in front of an audience that had been bored by twenty-five minutes of awards ceremony, rather than one that had been excited by all the bands that came before them. John Lennon was annoyed, and insisted that the Beatles were going to go on straight after the Rolling Stones -- he seems to have taken this as some sort of power play by the Stones and to have got his hackles up about it. He told Epstein to deal with the people from the NME. But the NME people said that they had a contract with Andrew Oldham, and they weren't going to break it. Oldham refused to change the terms of the contract. Lennon said that he wasn't going to go on stage if they didn't directly follow the Stones. Maurice Kinn, the publisher of the NME, told Epstein that he wasn't going to break the contract with Oldham, and that if the Beatles didn't appear on stage, he would get Jimmy Savile, who was compering the show, to go out on stage and tell the ten thousand fans in the audience that the Beatles were backstage refusing to appear. He would then sue NEMS for breach of contract *and* NEMS would be liable for any damage caused by the rioting that was sure to happen. Lennon screamed a lot of abuse at Kinn, and told him the group would never play one of their events again, but the group did go on stage -- but because they hadn't yet signed the agreement to allow their performance to be filmed, they refused to allow it to be recorded. Apparently Andrew Oldham took all this as a sign that Epstein was starting to lose control of the group. Also during May 1966 there were visits from musicians from other countries, continuing the cultural exchange that was increasingly influencing the Beatles' art. Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys came over to promote the group's new LP, Pet Sounds, which had been largely the work of Brian Wilson, who had retired from touring to concentrate on working in the studio. Johnston played the record for John and Paul, who listened to it twice, all the way through, in silence, in Johnston's hotel room: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"] According to Johnston, after they'd listened through the album twice, they went over to a piano and started whispering to each other, picking out chords. Certainly the influence of Pet Sounds is very noticeable on songs like "Here, There, and Everywhere", written and recorded a few weeks after this meeting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] That track, and the last track recorded for the album, "She Said She Said" were unusual in one very important respect -- they were recorded while the Beatles were no longer under contract to EMI Records. Their contract expired on the fifth of June, 1966, and they finished Revolver without it having been renewed -- it would be several months before their new contract was signed, and it's rather lucky for music lovers that Brian Epstein was the kind of manager who considered personal relationships and basic honour and decency more important than the legal niceties, unlike any other managers of the era, otherwise we would not have Revolver in the form we know it today. After the meeting with Johnston, but before the recording of those last couple of Revolver tracks, the Beatles also met up again with Bob Dylan, who was on a UK tour with a new, loud, band he was working with called The Hawks. While the Beatles and Dylan all admired each other, there was by this point a lot of wariness on both sides, especially between Lennon and Dylan, both of them very similar personality types and neither wanting to let their guard down around the other or appear unhip. There's a famous half-hour-long film sequence of Lennon and Dylan sharing a taxi, which is a fascinating, excruciating, example of two insecure but arrogant men both trying desperately to impress the other but also equally desperate not to let the other know that they want to impress them: [Excerpt: Dylan and Lennon taxi ride] The day that was filmed, Lennon and Harrison also went to see Dylan play at the Royal Albert Hall. This tour had been controversial, because Dylan's band were loud and raucous, and Dylan's fans in the UK still thought of him as a folk musician. At one gig, earlier on the tour, an audience member had famously yelled out "Judas!" -- (just on the tiny chance that any of my listeners don't know that, Judas was the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the authorities, leading to his crucifixion) -- and that show was for many years bootlegged as the "Royal Albert Hall" show, though in fact it was recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. One of the *actual* Royal Albert Hall shows was released a few years ago -- the one the night before Lennon and Harrison saw Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone", Royal Albert Hall 1966] The show Lennon and Harrison saw would be Dylan's last for many years. Shortly after returning to the US, Dylan was in a motorbike accident, the details of which are still mysterious, and which some fans claim was faked altogether. The accident caused him to cancel all the concert dates he had booked, and devote himself to working in the studio for several years just like Brian Wilson. And from even further afield than America, Ravi Shankar came over to Britain, to work with his friend the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, on a duet album, West Meets East, that was an example in the classical world of the same kind of international cross-fertilisation that was happening in the pop world: [Excerpt: Yehudi Menuhin and Ravi Shankar, "Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali)"] While he was in the UK, Shankar also performed at the Royal Festival Hall, and George Harrison went to the show. He'd seen Shankar live the year before, but this time he met up with him afterwards, and later said "He was the first person that impressed me in a way that was beyond just being a famous celebrity. Ravi was my link to the Vedic world. Ravi plugged me into the whole of reality. Elvis impressed me when I was a kid, and impressed me when I met him, but you couldn't later on go round to him and say 'Elvis, what's happening with the universe?'" After completing recording and mixing the as-yet-unnamed album, which had been by far the longest recording process of their career, and which still nearly sixty years later regularly tops polls of the best album of all time, the Beatles took a well-earned break. For a whole two days, at which point they flew off to Germany to do a three-day tour, on their way to Japan, where they were booked to play five shows at the Budokan. Unfortunately for the group, while they had no idea of this when they were booked to do the shows, many in Japan saw the Budokan as sacred ground, and they were the first ever Western group to play there. This led to numerous death threats and loud protests from far-right activists offended at the Beatles defiling their religious and nationalistic sensibilities. As a result, the police were on high alert -- so high that there were three thousand police in the audience for the shows, in a venue which only held ten thousand audience members. That's according to Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, though I have to say that the rather blurry footage of the audience in the video of those shows doesn't seem to show anything like those numbers. But frankly I'll take Lewisohn's word over that footage, as he's not someone to put out incorrect information. The threats to the group also meant that they had to be kept in their hotel rooms at all times except when actually performing, though they did make attempts to get out. At the press conference for the Tokyo shows, the group were also asked publicly for the first time their views on the war in Vietnam, and John replied "Well, we think about it every day, and we don't agree with it and we think that it's wrong. That's how much interest we take. That's all we can do about it... and say that we don't like it". I say they were asked publicly for the first time, because George had been asked about it for a series of interviews Maureen Cleave had done with the group a couple of months earlier, as we'll see in a bit, but nobody was paying attention to those interviews. Brian Epstein was upset that the question had gone to John. He had hoped that the inevitable Vietnam question would go to Paul, who he thought might be a bit more tactful. The last thing he needed was John Lennon saying something that would upset the Americans before their tour there a few weeks later. Luckily, people in America seemed to have better things to do than pay attention to John Lennon's opinions. The support acts for the Japanese shows included  several of the biggest names in Japanese rock music -- or "group sounds" as the genre was called there, Japanese people having realised that trying to say the phrase "rock and roll" would open them up to ridicule given that it had both "r" and "l" sounds in the phrase. The man who had coined the term "group sounds", Jackey Yoshikawa, was there with his group the Blue Comets, as was Isao Bito, who did a rather good cover version of Cliff Richard's "Dynamite": [Excerpt: Isao Bito, "Dynamite"] Bito, the Blue Comets, and the other two support acts, Yuya Uchida and the Blue Jeans, all got together to perform a specially written song, "Welcome Beatles": [Excerpt: "Welcome Beatles" ] But while the Japanese audience were enthusiastic, they were much less vocal about their enthusiasm than the audiences the Beatles were used to playing for. The group were used, of course, to playing in front of hordes of screaming teenagers who could not hear a single note, but because of the fear that a far-right terrorist would assassinate one of the group members, the police had imposed very, very, strict rules on the audience. Nobody in the audience was allowed to get out of their seat for any reason, and the police would clamp down very firmly on anyone who was too demonstrative. Because of that, the group could actually hear themselves, and they sounded sloppy as hell, especially on the newer material. Not that there was much of that. The only song they did from the Revolver sessions was "Paperback Writer", the new single, and while they did do a couple of tracks from Rubber Soul, those were under-rehearsed. As John said at the start of this tour, "I can't play any of Rubber Soul, it's so unrehearsed. The only time I played any of the numbers on it was when I recorded it. I forget about songs. They're only valid for a certain time." That's certainly borne out by the sound of their performances of Rubber Soul material at the Budokan: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "If I Needed Someone (live at the Budokan)"] It was while they were in Japan as well that they finally came up with the title for their new album. They'd been thinking of all sorts of ideas, like Abracadabra and Magic Circle, and tossing names around with increasing desperation for several days -- at one point they seem to have just started riffing on other groups' albums, and seem to have apparently seriously thought about naming the record in parodic tribute to their favourite artists -- suggestions included The Beatles On Safari, after the Beach Boys' Surfin' Safari (and possibly with a nod to their recent Pet Sounds album cover with animals, too), The Freewheelin' Beatles, after Dylan's second album, and my favourite, Ringo's suggestion After Geography, for the Rolling Stones' Aftermath. But eventually Paul came up with Revolver -- like Rubber Soul, a pun, in this case because the record itself revolves when on a turntable. Then it was off to the Philippines, and if the group thought Japan had been stressful, they had no idea what was coming. The trouble started in the Philippines from the moment they stepped off the plane, when they were bundled into a car without Neil Aspinall or Brian Epstein, and without their luggage, which was sent to customs. This was a problem in itself -- the group had got used to essentially being treated like diplomats, and to having their baggage let through customs without being searched, and so they'd started freely carrying various illicit substances with them. This would obviously be a problem -- but as it turned out, this was just to get a "customs charge" paid by Brian Epstein. But during their initial press conference the group were worried, given the hostility they'd faced from officialdom, that they were going to be arrested during the conference itself. They were asked what they would tell the Rolling Stones, who were going to be visiting the Philippines shortly after, and Lennon just said "We'll warn them". They also asked "is there a war on in the Philippines? Why is everybody armed?" At this time, the Philippines had a new leader, Ferdinand Marcos -- who is not to be confused with his son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, also known as Bongbong Marcos, who just became President-Elect there last month. Marcos Sr was a dictatorial kleptocrat, one of the worst leaders of the latter half of the twentieth century, but that wasn't evident yet. He'd been elected only a few months earlier, and had presented himself as a Kennedy-like figure -- a young man who was also a war hero. He'd recently switched parties from the Liberal party to the right-wing Nacionalista Party, but wasn't yet being thought of as the monstrous dictator he later became. The person organising the Philippines shows had been ordered to get the Beatles to visit Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at 11AM on the day of the show, but for some reason had instead put on their itinerary just the *suggestion* that the group should meet the Marcoses, and had put the time down as 3PM, and the Beatles chose to ignore that suggestion -- they'd refused to do that kind of government-official meet-and-greet ever since an incident in 1964 at the British Embassy in Washington where someone had cut off a bit of Ringo's hair. A military escort turned up at the group's hotel in the morning, to take them for their meeting. The group were all still in their rooms, and Brian Epstein was still eating breakfast and refused to disturb them, saying "Go back and tell the generals we're not coming." The group gave their performances as scheduled, but meanwhile there was outrage at the way the Beatles had refused to meet the Marcos family, who had brought hundreds of children -- friends of their own children, and relatives of top officials -- to a party to meet the group. Brian Epstein went on TV and tried to smooth things over, but the broadcast was interrupted by static and his message didn't get through to anyone. The next day, the group's security was taken away, as were the cars to take them to the airport. When they got to the airport, the escalators were turned off and the group were beaten up at the arrangement of the airport manager, who said in 1984 "I beat up the Beatles. I really thumped them. First I socked Epstein and he went down... then I socked Lennon and Ringo in the face. I was kicking them. They were pleading like frightened chickens. That's what happens when you insult the First Lady." Even on the plane there were further problems -- Brian Epstein and the group's road manager Mal Evans were both made to get off the plane to sort out supposed financial discrepancies, which led to them worrying that they were going to be arrested or worse -- Evans told the group to tell his wife he loved her as he left the plane. But eventually, they were able to leave, and after a brief layover in India -- which Ringo later said was the first time he felt he'd been somewhere truly foreign, as opposed to places like Germany or the USA which felt basically like home -- they got back to England: [Excerpt: "Ordinary passenger!"] When asked what they were going to do next, George replied “We're going to have a couple of weeks to recuperate before we go and get beaten up by the Americans,” The story of the "we're bigger than Jesus" controversy is one of the most widely misreported events in the lives of the Beatles, which is saying a great deal. One book that I've encountered, and one book only, Steve Turner's Beatles '66, tells the story of what actually happened, and even that book seems to miss some emphases. I've pieced what follows together from Turner's book and from an academic journal article I found which has some more detail. As far as I can tell, every single other book on the Beatles released up to this point bases their account of the story on an inaccurate press statement put out by Brian Epstein, not on the truth. Here's the story as it's generally told. John Lennon gave an interview to his friend, Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, during which he made some comments about how it was depressing that Christianity was losing relevance in the eyes of the public, and that the Beatles are more popular than Jesus, speaking casually because he was talking to a friend. That story was run in the Evening Standard more-or-less unnoticed, but then an American teen magazine picked up on the line about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus, reprinted chunks of the interview out of context and without the Beatles' knowledge or permission, as a way to stir up controversy, and there was an outcry, with people burning Beatles records and death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. That's... not exactly what happened. The first thing that you need to understand to know what happened is that Datebook wasn't a typical teen magazine. It *looked* just like a typical teen magazine, certainly, and much of its content was the kind of thing that you would get in Tiger Beat or any of the other magazines aimed at teenage girls -- the September 1966 issue was full of articles like "Life with the Walker Brothers... by their Road Manager", and interviews with the Dave Clark Five -- but it also had a long history of publishing material that was intended to make its readers think about social issues of the time, particularly Civil Rights. Arthur Unger, the magazine's editor and publisher, was a gay man in an interracial relationship, and while the subject of homosexuality was too taboo in the late fifties and sixties for him to have his magazine cover that, he did regularly include articles decrying segregation and calling for the girls reading the magazine to do their part on a personal level to stamp out racism. Datebook had regularly contained articles like one from 1963 talking about how segregation wasn't just a problem in the South, saying "If we are so ‘integrated' why must men in my own city of Philadelphia, the city of Brotherly Love, picket city hall because they are discriminated against when it comes to getting a job? And how come I am still unable to take my dark- complexioned friends to the same roller skating rink or swimming pool that I attend?” One of the writers for the magazine later said “We were much more than an entertainment magazine . . . . We tried to get kids involved in social issues . . . . It was a well-received magazine, recommended by libraries and schools, but during the Civil Rights period we did get pulled off a lot of stands in the South because of our views on integration” Art Unger, the editor and publisher, wasn't the only one pushing this liberal, integrationist, agenda. The managing editor at the time, Danny Fields, was another gay man who wanted to push the magazine even further than Unger, and who would later go on to manage the Stooges and the Ramones, being credited by some as being the single most important figure in punk rock's development, and being immortalised by the Ramones in their song "Danny Says": [Excerpt: The Ramones, "Danny Says"] So this was not a normal teen magazine, and that's certainly shown by the cover of the September 1966 issue, which as well as talking about the interviews with John Lennon and Paul McCartney inside, also advertised articles on Timothy Leary advising people to turn on, tune in, and drop out; an editorial about how interracial dating must be the next step after desegregation of schools, and a piece on "the ten adults you dig/hate the most" -- apparently the adult most teens dug in 1966 was Jackie Kennedy, the most hated was Barry Goldwater, and President Johnson, Billy Graham, and Martin Luther King appeared in the top ten on both lists. Now, in the early part of the year Maureen Cleave had done a whole series of articles on the Beatles -- double-page spreads on each band member, plus Brian Epstein, visiting them in their own homes (apart from Paul, who she met at a restaurant) and discussing their daily lives, their thoughts, and portraying them as rounded individuals. These articles are actually fascinating, because of something that everyone who met the Beatles in this period pointed out. When interviewed separately, all of them came across as thoughtful individuals, with their own opinions about all sorts of subjects, and their own tastes and senses of humour. But when two or more of them were together -- especially when John and Paul were interviewed together, but even in social situations, they would immediately revert to flip in-jokes and riffing on each other's statements, never revealing anything about themselves as individuals, but just going into Beatle mode -- simultaneously preserving the band's image, closing off outsiders, *and* making sure they didn't do or say anything that would get them mocked by the others. Cleave, as someone who actually took them all seriously, managed to get some very revealing information about all of them. In the article on Ringo, which is the most superficial -- one gets the impression that Cleave found him rather difficult to talk to when compared to the other, more verbally facile, band members -- she talked about how he had a lot of Wild West and military memorabilia, how he was a devoted family man and also devoted to his friends -- he had moved to the suburbs to be close to John and George, who already lived there. The most revealing quote about Ringo's personality was him saying "Of course that's the great thing about being married -- you have a house to sit in and company all the time. And you can still go to clubs, a bonus for being married. I love being a family man." While she looked at the other Beatles' tastes in literature in detail, she'd noted that the only books Ringo owned that weren't just for show were a few science fiction paperbacks, but that as he said "I'm not thick, it's just that I'm not educated. People can use words and I won't know what they mean. I say 'me' instead of 'my'." Ringo also didn't have a drum kit at home, saying he only played when he was on stage or in the studio, and that you couldn't practice on your own, you needed to play with other people. In the article on George, she talked about how he was learning the sitar,  and how he was thinking that it might be a good idea to go to India to study the sitar with Ravi Shankar for six months. She also talks about how during the interview, he played the guitar pretty much constantly, playing everything from songs from "Hello Dolly" to pieces by Bach to "the Trumpet Voluntary", by which she presumably means Clarke's "Prince of Denmark's March": [Excerpt: Jeremiah Clarke, "Prince of Denmark's March"] George was also the most outspoken on the subjects of politics, religion, and society, linking the ongoing war in Vietnam with the UK's reverence for the Second World War, saying "I think about it every day and it's wrong. Anything to do with war is wrong. They're all wrapped up in their Nelsons and their Churchills and their Montys -- always talking about war heroes. Look at All Our Yesterdays [a show on ITV that showed twenty-five-year-old newsreels] -- how we killed a few more Huns here and there. Makes me sick. They're the sort who are leaning on their walking sticks and telling us a few years in the army would do us good." He also had very strong words to say about religion, saying "I think religion falls flat on its face. All this 'love thy neighbour' but none of them are doing it. How can anybody get into the position of being Pope and accept all the glory and the money and the Mercedes-Benz and that? I could never be Pope until I'd sold my rich gates and my posh hat. I couldn't sit there with all that money on me and believe I was religious. Why can't we bring all this out in the open? Why is there all this stuff about blasphemy? If Christianity's as good as they say it is, it should stand up to a bit of discussion." Harrison also comes across as a very private person, saying "People keep saying, ‘We made you what you are,' well, I made Mr. Hovis what he is and I don't go round crawling over his gates and smashing up the wall round his house." (Hovis is a British company that makes bread and wholegrain flour). But more than anything else he comes across as an instinctive anti-authoritarian, being angry at bullying teachers, Popes, and Prime Ministers. McCartney's profile has him as the most self-consciously arty -- he talks about the plays of Alfred Jarry and the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio: [Excerpt: Luciano Berio, "Momenti (for magnetic tape)"] Though he was very worried that he might be sounding a little too pretentious, saying “I don't want to sound like Jonathan Miller going on" --

christmas united states america tv jesus christ love music american new york time black canada world head chicago australia english europe bible babies internet uk washington france england japan olympic games americans mexico british san francisco new york times canadian french germany war dj africa society christianity masters european australian philadelphia italy inspiration german japanese loving ireland putting western public alabama south north america spain songs detroit night wife north trip greek bbc indian turkey talent horses tokyo fish jews union vietnam sweden ride rain britain idea muslims animals terror old testament melbourne mothers martin luther king jr beatles atlantic production world war ii fallout dutch bills places liverpool recording manchester philippines rolling stones cook shadows invitation capitol personality judas elvis village birmingham rock and roll denmark aftermath benefit pope austria holland destruction ward churches hammer prisoners evans tasks strangers stones mood ferrari shortly ticket depending bob dylan prime minister sorrow liberal djs newcastle big brother buddha parliament civil rights khan cage hawks musicians thirty pepper lp compare epstein john lennon clarke henderson invention bach shades turkish look up paul mccartney frank sinatra lsd cream high priests ten commandments satisfaction number one ballad carnival orchestras jamaican pink floyd hoops richards communists chess crawford readers newsweek hindu meek gallery first lady elect johnston rider safari yogi good morning wild west monitor steady makes sgt jimi hendrix motown g7 chester fringe beach boys blu ray west end digest leases autobiographies norwich itv lester alice in wonderland rich man mercedes benz eric clapton bumblebee hinduism umbrella anthology mick jagger kinks salvation army bad boy mount sinai tunisia come together ramones ravi george harrison viewers brotherly love rolls royce billy graham livingston indica bee gees paul simon blur eighth tilt oddly mccartney browne seekers ringo starr ferdinand nb unsurprisingly neanderthals kite pale ringo chuck berry yoko ono emi vedic monkees dunbar japanese americans ku klux klan docker keith richards beatle abbey road revolver turing brian wilson graceland rsa john coltrane reservation popes british isles bohemian stooges barrow open air alan turing merseyside sunnyside rupert murdoch god save smokey robinson otis redding orton royal albert hall leonard bernstein secret agents musically hard days toe concorde oldham southerners roy orbison good vibrations byrds john cage bangor isley brothers unger prime ministers bible belt abracadabra detroit free press west germany shankar roll up evening standard north wales nme pacemakers beautiful people ono george martin timothy leary peter sellers ian mckellen stax cole porter arimathea damon albarn leaving home blue jeans peter brown moody blues americanism yellow submarine wrecking crew all you need cliff richard popular music robert whittaker edwardian lonely hearts club band yardbirds dozier rochdale dusty springfield cleave leander pet sounds hello dolly marshall mcluhan she said glenn miller surfin sgt pepper escorts penny lane keith moon manchester university jackie kennedy bobby womack ravi shankar magical mystery tour sixty four rachmaninoff graham nash huns wilson pickett ken kesey jimmy savile priory manfred mann paramahansa yogananda shea stadium marianne faithfull sunday telegraph procol harum all together now magic circle from me barry goldwater jimi hendrix experience southern states maharishi buy me love jonathan miller maharishi mahesh yogi brenda lee alexandrian rubber soul dudley moore swami vivekananda eric burdon momenti richard jones small faces cogan eleanor rigby rso holding company raja yoga brian epstein global village monster magnet psychedelic experiences linda mccartney alan bennett kevin moore kinn michael nesmith strawberry fields scaffold peter cook larry williams leyton budokan cilla black telstar richard lester mcluhan ebu all you need is love in la ferdinand marcos steve cropper melody maker royal festival hall michael crawford greensleeves john sebastian british embassy tiger beat imelda marcos in my life norwegian wood clang biblical hebrew strawberry fields forever allen klein patrick mcgoohan united press international emerick number six ivor novello karlheinz stockhausen london evening standard steve turner la marseillaise beloved disciple delia derbyshire tommy dorsey hayley mills both john nems green onions yehudi menuhin cropper nelsons mellotron entertainments roger mcguinn medicine show edenic david mason whiter shade freewheelin candlestick park us west coast tomorrow never knows dave clark five derek taylor swinging london merry pranksters newfield ken scott sky with diamonds release me walker brothers emi records country joe three blind mice carl wilson peter asher jane asher georgie fame joe meek she loves you mellow yellow geoff emerick hovis david sheff love me do danger man biggles spicks road manager humperdinck ian macdonald long tall sally paperback writer merseybeat i feel fine mark lewisohn august bank holiday john drake bruce johnston churchills james jamerson michael lindsay hogg all our yesterdays northern songs say you love me martin carthy alfred jarry alternate titles sergeant pepper john betjeman hogshead billy j kramer brechtian edwardian england zeffirelli good day sunshine sloop john b european broadcasting union you know my name joe orton simon scott tony sheridan it be nice portmeirion robert stigwood owen bradley leo mckern richard condon gershwins west meets east exciters all too much bert kaempfert bert berns baby you cynthia lennon mcgoohan tyler mahan coe mount snowdon tony palmer she said she said brandenburg concerto david tudor hide your love away danny fields john dunbar only sleeping barry miles montys from head nik cohn invention no brian hodgson your mother should know andrew oldham michael hordern tara browne how i won we can work stephen dando collins lewisohn mike hennessey steve barri love you to get you into my life mike vickers alistair taylor christopher strachey kaempfert up against it gordon waller tilt araiza
A bit Spursy (Tottenham Hotspur Podcast)
Paratici in the Sky with Diamonds

A bit Spursy (Tottenham Hotspur Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 76:32


Barney and Dan are back to catch up on Tottenham's (or more accurately Paratici's) dealings over the last week. They discuss current transfer business, complex feelings regarding Yves Bissouma, racial prejudices in football, the Mr Whippy van's alluring siren, the illustrious A bit Spursy medal's delay, fishing with Ledley, the quest for Adele, and a shout-out for friend-of-the-pod Marty's new venture.A bit Spursy is a Tottenham Hotspur podcast by Barney and Dan. Follow us on Twitter at @a_bit_spursy, email us at hello@abitspursy.com., support us on Patreon at patreon.com/abitspursy and join us on Discord at discord.gg/abitspursy.

Help on the Way
Life May Be Sweeter for This - 5/15/93

Help on the Way

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 119:51


This week on the Help on the Way Pod, our hosts Game, Fig, and Knob find out that what happens in the Sam Boyd Stadium does not stay in the Sam Boyd Stadium. It's May 15th, 1993, and the Grateful Dead are playing in the band, mostly. It's not the best show featured, but it leads to some interesting discussions about Phil, the end of The Dead, and of course a lengthy tangent on The Beatles.     Picasso Moon Peggy-O The Same Thing Tennessee Jed Broken Arrow Bird Song Here Comes Sunshine Playin' in the Band > Crazy Fingers >  Playin' Reprise > Drums > Space > All Along the Watchtower > The Days Between > One More Saturday Night Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds

Muziek Uit De Groef
E62 - The Beatles - Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)

Muziek Uit De Groef

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 68:50


Vandaag op 26 mei is het precies 55 jaar geleden dat het legendarische album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band uitkwam. Nadat de Beatles besloten te stoppen met touren focuste ze zich op het maken van nieuwe muziek, beter gezegd experimentele muziek. Door o.a.. psychedelische rock te gaan maken slaan The Beatles een hele andere weg in dan men toen gewend was. Met pop/rock nummers als With A Little Help From My Friends en Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds blijft het originele Beatles geluid sterk vertegenwoordigd maar een nummer als Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite! is een exact goed voorbeeld hoe The Beatles ook kunnen klinken die voor ons erg vreemd is. In deze aflevering behandelen we alle bovenstaande nummers en meer en vertellen we je welke artiesten zich lieten beïnvloeden door deze (nogmaals) legendarische plaat. Maarten vertelt er je met alle liefde en plezier over. • Volg ons op sociale media! : - Instagram : www.instagram.com/muziekuitdegroef - Twitter : www.twitter.com/uitdegroef

Strange New Trek - A Strange New Worlds Podcast
An Obol for Charon - DIS S02E04 - SNT010

Strange New Trek - A Strange New Worlds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 48:30


Space is full of mysteries, both biological and technological and also ancient balls. Stardate Discovery S02E04. A mysterious sphere threatens the USS Discovery even as May, in her original form, implements a plan that puts Tilly's life in danger. Saru and Burnham's bond grows when Saru is forced to acknowledge a deeply unsettling Kelpien truth. Topics A Communicator for Charon (1:18) Episode (3:44) My Number one has a first name… (5:08) Battlestar: Enterprise (7:27) Tilly's guilt (10:18) The Red Wasp (11:35) The problem with Pike (13:17) What we have here… (14:51) Space Corona (19:56) Party Like It's 2256 (20:50) Sol Invictus (24:59) Tilly in the Sky With Diamonds (25:56) Prime Directive questions…again (27:32) Space Lobotomy (29:54) Doctor, who? (32:47) Do you have impulse power without the warp core? Seriously…we want to know (34:43) Spheres being bros (35:39) Context is for Kelpiens (36:18) Some Ron Swanson wisdom (42:41) Slap me, I'm tripping! (44:01) Final Thoughts (45:04) Hit Us Up! strangenewtrek@gmail.com Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/strangenewtrek/message

Question Block
Lucy In the Sky with Diamonds: Bicycle Day, MK Ultra, and the History of LSD

Question Block

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 66:00


This week we're talking about the chemistry and culture of lysergic acid diethylamide. We'll discuss how it works, where to get it, and the moral panic that changed it from a psychiatric tool to a Schedule 1 illegal drug. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/secretloft/support

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM
Take Note: Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 27:47


In episode 3, Josiah finally reaches a state of Kokomo, Matt discovers honey lattes, and they both discuss their contempt for country music. Tune in to hear a song by The Beatles with not one, but two key changes!

Green Mountain Mysteries
Episode 48 - Albion In The Sky With Diamonds

Green Mountain Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 87:16


Episode 48 - Albion In The Sky With DiamondsWE'RE BACK, BABY! Our break is over, and it's time to dive into the fifth chapter of Green Mountain Mysteries!Just as soon as the gang is back together in Burlington, they're called by their friends in Monkton to investigate a mystery... if they can get there in one piece, that is. Albion litters and nearly loses his head, Desdemona goes for the Kobe, Ro gets roped in, and Sylvester just keeps sprinting.Starring Christine Tardif as Desdemona Brown, Darius Southland as Dr. Sylvester Coopersmith, Gwen Vetter as Ro Kamen, Thom Freitag as Albion Graves, and Michael Freitag as everyone else. Adventure written by Seth Burton.Follow Green Mountain Mysteries here!Twitter: https://twitter.com/GMMCastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/GMMCast/Discord: https://discord.gg/9FJzbzb

Craft Beer Enthusiasts podcast
Ep. #37 "Eady in The Sky With Diamonds"

Craft Beer Enthusiasts podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 98:03


On this weeks episode we drink some beer Bobby brought back from Other Half Brewin  out of NYC. Sipping through some wonderful double IPS's and Lagers we have a bkast talking beer travel and the adventures of drinking beer in a new city. As always dont forget to like and subscribe!

Troubadours on Trek
TOS 1:15, "Shore Leave," with Fabian Perez

Troubadours on Trek

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 65:54


-David Ramirez has a new live EP coming out the first quarter of 2022, called Rules and Regulations. Try Hard Coffee has created a custom coffee flavor that pairs with David's music. Pre-order your copy of David's new EP on vinyl (super limited edition) and get a free bag of coffee and other goodies to enjoy it with. Join David's mailing list for more information.-Delta Spirit and Wild Child have been in the studio and full length albums are coming soon for both. Join their mailing lists to stay in the loop.Here's a link to the official Troubadours on Trek Spotify Playlist, where you can hear all the featured songs from every episode in one playlist (songs will be added as episodes air on Patreon):-Fabian's song pairing for this episode: “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” by The Beatles.-Grace's song pairing for this episode: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane-Fabian's featured songs are "I Think We're Alone Now" and "Pure Imagination" by The Wild Reeds, from their 2020 Covers EP.Corrections:Pon farr, as established in "Amok Time," is the once-every-seven-years event in an adult Vulcan's life when they experience such extreme biological and psychological sexual desires that their normally rational minds are overcome and they are compelled to either mate with another Vulcan they are mentally bonded to, or engage in a ritualized battle. If they fail to do one of these two things, they will enter "Plak Tow," or the "blood fever," become violent and potentially die. Star Trek canon has established that Vulcans can have sex (and I guess, masturbate too) any time they want; not just during pon farr. But masturbating can't kill their crazy sex urges during pon farr. Only mating with a Vulcan they're bonded to can do that (or, alternatively, ritualized battle, or the "kal-il-fee").“Africa U.S.A” was a 100-acre wild animal preserve in Soledad Canyon, California (in Santa Clarita, about 30 miles northwest of Los Angeles). It only existed from 1965-1969 before it was tragically destroyed by a flood. “Shore Leave” was in fact the only Star Trek episode filmed there.Angela reappears at the end, after Kirk and the Caretaker have had a conversation about the planet. We don't see her coming out from underground, but at the end, when everybody is paired up we see her standing next to Rodriguez, apparently healed and/or resurrected. At no point does anyone mention her or the fact that she was injured/dead.Androids, or robots made to look like humans, are a science fiction staple. The term originates in the 1700's, as a descriptor for an automaton. (Automatons are human-like or animal-like mechanical dolls that move and perform functions when wound up or switched on. There are lots of creepy historical examples. See for yourself on YouTube.) Androids began showing up in science fiction around the turn of the century and have been heavily featured in lots of science fiction short stories, books, film, and television.Some famous and early examples are found in Metropolis, the 1927 German film by Fritz Lang, I, Robot by Issac Asimov, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick (which was the inspiration for Blade Runner), Westward , which, before it was the popular HBO series created by Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy, was another television series from the 1970's, written and directed by Michael Crichton, and of course, Star Trek. Episodes of the Original Series that feature androids include “What Are Little Girls Made Of?", "I, Mudd", "Return to Tomorrow", and "Requiem for Methuselah.” One of the most beloved main characters of Star Trek: Next Generation is Data, an android created by Dr. Noonien Soong.Many stories about androids are not really about androids as much as they are about humans; android stories tell us about the human condition and human nature. Depictions of female androids, like the androids in The Stepford Wives or Westworld, tell us something about the ways that humans (read: men) understand, idealize, and seek to control women.

Gleeboot
Tina In the Sky with Diamonds with Eric Cheng

Gleeboot

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 100:40


We are joined by actor Eric Cheng (@ericjcheng) to watch this episode that feels like Ryan Murphy bullying Jenna Ushkowitz. Why is Bree here? Are teenagers really this evil? Is Demi Lovato what this show needs? Find out here! Follow Gleeboot on social media! IG: @gleebootpod TW: @gleebootpod Tumblr: gleebootpod.tumblr.com ________________________________________ Gleeboot is hosted and produced by: Cullen Callaghan (IG: @culleneverafter) Allyssa Swearingen (IG: @a.m.swearingen) Hannah Sylvester This episode was edited by [EDITOR NAME]. “Gleeboot Harmony Theme” performed by Cullen, Allyssa and Hannah

El Quinto Beatle
El Quinto Beatle 2x04: Langostinos in the sky with diamonds

El Quinto Beatle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 28:08


Virginia estrena sección, y nos cuenta las cosas que sueña y que suelen ser dignas de aparecer en un cuadro de Dalí. Hablamos de la inspiración onírica, de Billy Wilder (eso Arturo, claro) y también se canta alguna canción. ¡Escúchanos! Con Virginia Maestro, Litus, Pancho Varona y Marta G. Navarro con Arturo González Campos, Andrés Vallejo y el público de Jazzville.

CHED Afternoon News
‘Coolest darn mission': NASA asteroid hunter Lucy rockets into sky with diamonds

CHED Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 10:41


Guest: Dr. David Alexander - Director of the Rice Space Institute at Rice University in Houston, Texas.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AP Audio Stories
NASA's asteroid hunter Lucy soars into sky with diamonds

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 1:30


AFGHAN NEWSWIRE - THE VOICE OF THE FREE AFGHANISTAN
Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds And An Original Afghan Carpet …

AFGHAN NEWSWIRE - THE VOICE OF THE FREE AFGHANISTAN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 1:41


This episode is also available as a blog post: http://afghannewswire.com/2021/04/16/lucy-in-the-sky-with-diamonds-and-an-original-afghan-carpet/

AFGHAN NEWSWIRE - THE VOICE OF THE FREE AFGHANISTAN
Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds And An Original Afghan Carpet …

AFGHAN NEWSWIRE - THE VOICE OF THE FREE AFGHANISTAN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 1:47


This episode is also available as a blog post: http://afghannewswire.com/2021/04/17/lucy-in-the-sky-with-diamonds-and-an-original-afghan-carpet-2/

Natural 1 Bardic Inspiration
Hitmen in the sky with diamonds

Natural 1 Bardic Inspiration

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 39:20


Will and David explore the possibilities of the highest rated campaign setting. Come get some new ideas and listen to how they tackle worldbuilding challenges. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Moon Harbor Heroes
Cataclysm Crew Issue 93: Laura in the Sky With Diamonds

Moon Harbor Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 52:36


CW: loss of bodily autonomyCataclysm Crew is GMed by T. Huth. T. is the host of Inkubator On Air, a new play podcast available on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and Google Play. She can be found at thuthplaywright on Twitter or tphuth94 on Instagram.Debbie Diabolous was played Jeremy Borders (he/him), who GMs the Apex City podcast. You can also find him playing a grumpy French vampire on Shadows of St Fleur. He is also the writer of Magitech Space Western, which can be found at apexcity.itch.io. William Infernus was played by Jordan. The setting and additional characters for today's issue were from Apex City, a Masks actual play made of cybernetic bears, tyrannosaurus rexes, and just so many appetizers. Follow them on Twitter @ApexCityCast.The Rebel Rouser is played by Elliot Peterson. She can be found at @elliotylen on Twitter.The Wild Thing is played by Rose Hahn. Rose is an actor, content creaTor, and mental health advocate. Her podcast, What Was I Saying?: Living with ADHD can be found on Spotify, iTunes, and Google Play Music or on Twitter at @What_WasISaying? She can be found on Twitter or Instagram @smileyroseyyyy.Flyby is played by Jane Behre. You can find her @janeminustarzan on Twitter. Taranis is played by Kaito Cain.Kaito is a Twitch personality and loves their 3 mischievous cats. You can find them @TheVersian on Twitter and as Kaitocain on Twitch.tv.Blue Samurai is played by William Henry. You can find him on Twitter @rockoutwill or on Steam as Cyprus_GrunumnRascal King is played by Anthony Sheets. They can be found on twitter @icynewyear or at icynewyear.comThe Blade of Sorrows was played by Jason Patrick Galit. Jason Patrick Galit, widely known in pop culture circles as JPG, is a pop culture critic and "geek educator". His public speaking work with private businesses and outlets like Comic-Con International aims to enhance how people interact with media on an educational and inclusive level. You can find his voice on the podcasts like In Quest of Geek, "Providing Your Next Pop Culture Journey," and Nerds on a Roll, an actual-play tabletop RPG "bringing stories that matter to the table." @inquestofgeek @noar_podcastMusic from https://filmmusic.io "Mistake the Getaway" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

The Kyle Heimann Show
Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds – The Beatles – Song Gimmick S01E02

The Kyle Heimann Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 10:33


Watch the video: https://youtu.be/11y65L2kg78 The Song Gimmick: Tempo AND Time Signature Change! David Bennett Piano breakdown: https://youtu.be/AzsKR7vNzAA ----- Technical Specs (no sponsors): Note: you can buy your stuff from Ty Heimann by calling Sweetwater or emailing him. Their customer service will blow you away! https://www.sweetwater.com/ty_heimann If you buy from Amazon, use these links to support the show: Kyle: -SM7 (vintage version of the SM7b): https://amzn.to/3dGmBxr -Gator desktop stand with boom: https://amzn.to/3sYAjCl -boosted with the SE DM1: https://amzn.to/39PUXwU -USB interface Evo 4: https://amzn.to/3wDkvab -Microsoft Surface Book 3: https://amzn.to/31QJmJy -decently treated room (foam on ceiling, some on wall, carpet) -video is Sony A6400 with 18-135 lens: https://amzn.to/2RhOV1I -micro HDMI cable: https://amzn.to/3muALpg -HDMI to USB adapter: https://amzn.to/3wCAW6I Cory: -SM58: https://amzn.to/3aGCLWQ -Scarlett 2i2: https://amzn.to/3cWIERc -no treatment, but carpet -Macbook Pro 2019: https://amzn.to/323JMMB -video: built in laptop webcam Ty: -AKG P120: https://amzn.to/3vqtKt7 -Scarlett 2i2 2nd gen: https://amzn.to/3cWIERc -well treated room -Macbook Air M1: https://amzn.to/2RarMhu -video: built in laptop webcam Recorded over Zencastr: https://zencastr.com Read my review of Zencastr: https://www.kyleheimann.com/zencastr-review Video edited in Adobe Premier (no color grading or video alteration): https://www.kyleheimann.com/adobe Audio edited in Adobe Audition (denoise, eq, compression, volume boost) Kyle: -Speaking, music, podcasts: https://kyleheimann.com -Podcast network: https://spokestreet.com -Collaborative workspace: https://thelunarsquare.com Cory: -Further your mission through media: https://likableart.com -Created book: https://likableart.com/created-book Ty: -Order all your gear from him: https://www.sweetwater.com/ty_heimann -Lunch Break Nerd Brawl: https://lunchbreaknerdbrawl.podomatic.com -also on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lunchbreaknerdbrawl Show Notes: https://www.kyleheimann.com/sg02

Lucio91.9FM Podcast
Candy Rock: Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds

Lucio91.9FM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2021 2:56


@Lucio91.9FM te cuenta la historia de esta canción de los Beatles, la cual siempre ha estado relacionada con el LSD. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lucio-morales/message

I'm Dead Inside
Episode 55: Uzi In the Sky With Diamonds

I'm Dead Inside

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2021 103:07


This week we delve into the Beastie Boys, imbedding jewelry into your face, raining semen, fleshlights, Manson being canceled and the ever-evolving industry of COVID masks. We hope you enjoy!

Bestseller auf dem Plattenteller
Schweizer Hitparade vom 6. Februar 1968

Bestseller auf dem Plattenteller

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2021 59:00


Nur einen Hit zu haben, das ist ein «One-Hit-Wonder». John Fred & His Playboy Band gelang dies 1968 mit «Judy in Disguise». Die Geschichte dazu ist amüsant und handelt von Mädchen mit grossen Sonnenbrillen, einem Missverständnis und von «Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds» von den Beatles.

Guiricast
Andalucía in the Sky with Diamonds

Guiricast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 73:44


It is derby day in Andalusia this weekend and we look ahead to Málaga's short trip down the road to Almería. We talk about our experiences in Almería, Turki Al-Sheikh's experiences in Almería and John Lennon's experiences in Almería, before inadvertently going into a bit of  Beatles chat. Back to football, we also discussed what is going wrong for Málaga at home (after the 2-1 loss to Cartagena at La Rosaleda) the flaws of VAR and Salomón Rondón trivia.

SportDirect Radio
Guiricast (02x15): Andalucía in the Sky with Diamonds

SportDirect Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 73:44


It is derby day in Andalusia this weekend and we look ahead to Málaga's short trip down the road to Almería. We talk about our experiences in Almería, Turki Al-Sheikh's experiences in Almería and John Lennon's experiences in Almería, before inadvertently going into a bit of Beatles chat. Back to football, we also discussed what is going wrong for Málaga at home (after the 2-1 loss to Cartagena at La Rosaleda) the flaws of VAR and Salomón Rondón trivia.

Sing Out! Radio Magazine
Episode 2050: #20-50: Send the Singer Home, Pt.2

Sing Out! Radio Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2020 58:30


This week, we conclude our two-part feature “Send the Singer Home” with more great instrumental recordings. We’ll hear Bruce Cockburn, The Acousticats, Sharon Isbin, Brass Lassie, and many more. So, strike up the band one more time … this week on The Sing Out! Radio Magazine. Episode #20-50: Send the Singer Home, Pt.2 Host: Tom Druckenmiller Artist/”Song”/CD/Label Pete Seeger / “If I Had A Hammer”(excerpt) / Songs of Hope and Struggle / Smithsonian Folkways Bruce Cockburn / “Sweetness And Light” / Crowing Ignites / True North Maire Ni Chathasaigh – Chris Newman / “Molly St. George” / Fire Wire / Old Bridge The Acousticats / “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” / The Cat's Meow / Ranch Jim Campilongo & Honeyfingers / “She's A Woman” / Last Night, This Morning / Blue Hen Bill Evans / “Mother Nature's Son” / Native & Fine Bill Evans / “You've Got to Hide Your Love Away” / Native & Fine Bill Evans / “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” / Native & Fine Bill Evans / “A Hard Day's Night” / In Good Company / Native & Fine Bruce Cockburn / “Pibroch: The Wind in the Valley” / Crowing Ignites / True North Brass Lassie / “The Crown Knot” / Brass Lassie / Self Produced Jerry Miller / “Moon Fallin'” / New Road Under My Wheels / Signature Sounds Sharon Isbin-Amjad Ali Khan / “Love Avalanche-Raga Mishra Bhairav” / Strings for Peace / Zoho The Horseflies / “John Brown's Dream” / Two Traditions / Self Produced Leo Kottke / “Bean Time” / Greenhouse / Capitol-One Way Pete Seeger / “If I Had A Hammer”(excerpt) / Songs of Hope and Struggle / Smithsonian Folkways

Beatles para sempre
9 - Lucy in the sky with diamonds - indicada por Francisca de Pádua Leite. Beatles 1967

Beatles para sempre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2020 3:28


Porque gosto do ritmo, é animado, me deixa feliz. Foi o que disse Francisca de Pádua Leite sobre: Lucy in the sky with diamonds - Beatles 1967.

Strong Songs
"A Day in the Life" by The Beatles

Strong Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 58:11


Wake up, fall out of bed, and drag a comb across your head, cause Strong Songs is finally doing an episode about The Beatles. It's time for Kirk to tackle the fab four, and what better Beatles song to analyze than Lennon and McCartney's two-tune casserole of a closer, "A Day in the Life." Get ready for some lilting Lennon dreamscapes, some meticulous McCartney melodies,  a really big glissando, and an even bigger E chord. Written by: John Lennon and Paul McCartney Album: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967) Listen/Buy: Apple Music | Amazon | Spotify ALSO FEATURED: "Rhapsody in Blue" by George Gershwin (1924), performed by the New York Philharmonic "Yesterday" by Paul McCartney (Lennon/McCartney), 1966 "Strawberry Fields Forever" by John Lennon (Lennon/McCartney), 1967 "Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)" and "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" also from Sgt. Pepper's, 1967 The Yoko Ono/John Lennon episode of the excellent podcast You're Wrong About "Mr. Blue Sky" by Jeff Lynne and ELO from Permission To Land, 1977 OUTRO SOLOIST: Steve Pardo This episode's outro soloist is the one and only Steve Pardo. Steve is a Nashville, TN based producer, composer, and saxophonist. You can find out more at his website: https://www.stevepardo.com/ STRONG MERCH!! As Kirk mentioned on the episode, the Strong Songs Store is now live! Check it out for some cool t-shirts, mugs, totes, and more: store.strongsongspodcast.com KEEP IT SOCIAL You can follow Strong Songs on Twitter @StrongSongs: http://twitter.com/strongsongs And you can find Kirk on Twitter @Kirkhamilton and on Instagram at @Kirk_Hamilton: https://www.instagram.com/kirk_hamilton/ NEWSLETTER/MAILING LIST Sign up for Kirk's mailing list to start getting monthly-ish newsletters with music recommendations, links, news, and extra thoughts on new Strong Songs episodes: https://kirkhamilton.substack.com/subscribe STRONG PLAYLISTS Kirk has condensed his Strong Songs picks into a single new list, which you can find on Spotify, Apple Music, and thanks to listener L.B., it's now on YouTube Music. SUPPORT STRONG SONGS ON PATREON! This whole thing happens thanks to the support of Strong Songs's wonderful patrons. For more on how to help Kirk keep making this show, go here: https://Patreon.com/StrongSongs NOVEMBER 2020 WHOLE-NOTE PATRONS Jeffrey Jue Rick Klaras Niko Laurie Acreman Ken Hirsh Jez Jenness Gardner Simon Cammell Guinevere Boostrom Jill Smith-Moore Narelle Horn Mickey Clark Nathaniel Bauernfeind Bill Rosinger Anne Britt David Zahm Erin Aidan Coughlan Jeanneret Manning Family Four Matt Butler Doug Paton Robert Paul R Watson Viki Dun Christer Lindqvist Sami Samhuri Craig J Covell AccessViolation Ryan Torvik Merlin Mann Fraser Glenn CALEB ROTACH Andre Bremer Chad Barnard Mark Schechter Dave Florey Dan Apczynski NOVEMBER 2020 HALF-NOTE PATRONS Kevin Potter M Shane Borders Pete Simm Shawn McCarthy Dallas Hockley Jana J Terron Ishihara Jason Gerry Rich Roskopf Melissa Gallo Joel Stevenson Will Dwyer Alethea Lee Lauren Reay Eric Prestemon Erika L Austin Cookies250 Spencer Shirley Joshua Jarvis Damian Brady Angela Livingstone Jeffrey C. Yarnell David Friedman Phillip Dalton Christopher Cudnoski Mark Edwards Randall Browning Sarah Sulan Diane Hughes Kenneth Tiong Jo Sutherland David Catlett Joe Laska Michael Casner Michael York Barb Courtney Derek Bender Melanie Andrich Franco Famularo Don Hutchison Lowell Meyer Etele Illes Jeff Almond Stephen Tsoneff Lorenz Schwarz Becca Sample chamomiatea Wen Jack Sjogren Aparajit Raghavan Benedict Pennington Geoff Golden Robyn Fraser Alexander Geddes Pascal Rueger Randy Souza Joe C Clare Holberton Jake Tinsley Georgia Livesay David Zucker Diane Turner Tom Coleman SUELLEN MOORE Judy Chapple Stuart Terry Mark Perry Malory Dhu Wik Eric Helm Jake Roberts Briony Leo Bill Fuller Jonathan Daniels Sheilah Steven Maron Michael Flaherty Jarrod Schindler Zoe Little Albukitty Caro Field Judith Stansfield Jenifer Carr michael bochner Duncan Dave Sharpe brant brantphillip Markus Koester David Cushman Alexander Jeremy Dawson Robbie Ferrero Gavin Doig Sam Fenn Tanner Morton AJ Schuster Jennifer Bush David Stroud Amanda Furlotti Andrew Baker Brooke Wilford Cyrus N. White Chris Brown Mark Haberlen Juan Carlos Montemayor Elosua Kate Albury Matt Gaskell Jules Bailey Eero Wahlstedt Bill Thornton Brian Amoebas Brett Douville Jeffrey Olson Matt Betzel Mueller Nate from Kalamazoo Melanie Stivers Richard Toller Alexander Polson John and Sharon Stenglein Tom Lauer Forrest Chang Earl Lozada Jon O’Keefe Justin McElroy Arjun Sharma Shane DeLeon James Johnson Andrew Lee Kevin Morrell Tom Clewer Kevin Pennyfeather Nicholas Schechter Justin Liew Emily Williams

Strong Songs
"A Day in the Life" by The Beatles

Strong Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 58:11


Wake up, fall out of bed, and drag a comb across your head, cause Strong Songs is finally doing an episode about The Beatles.It's time for Kirk to tackle the fab four, and what better Beatles song to analyze than Lennon and McCartney's two-tune casserole of a closer, "A Day in the Life." Get ready for some lilting Lennon dreamscapes, some meticulous McCartney melodies,  a really big glissando, and an even bigger E chord.Written by: John Lennon and Paul McCartneyAlbum: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)Listen/Buy: Apple Music | Amazon | SpotifyALSO FEATURED:"Rhapsody in Blue" by George Gershwin (1924), performed by the New York Philharmonic"Yesterday" by Paul McCartney (Lennon/McCartney), 1966"Strawberry Fields Forever" by John Lennon (Lennon/McCartney), 1967"Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)" and "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" also from Sgt. Pepper's, 1967The Yoko Ono/John Lennon episode of the excellent podcast You're Wrong About"Mr. Blue Sky" by Jeff Lynne and ELO from Permission To Land, 1977OUTRO SOLOIST: Steve PardoThis episode's outro soloist is the one and only Steve Pardo. Steve is a Nashville, TN based producer, composer, and saxophonist. You can find out more at his website: https://www.stevepardo.com/STRONG MERCH!!As Kirk mentioned on the episode, the Strong Songs Store is now live! Check it out for some cool t-shirts, mugs, totes, and more: store.strongsongspodcast.comKEEP IT SOCIALYou can follow Strong Songs on Twitter @StrongSongs: http://twitter.com/strongsongsAnd you can find Kirk on Twitter @Kirkhamilton and on Instagram at @Kirk_Hamilton: https://www.instagram.com/kirk_hamilton/NEWSLETTER/MAILING LIST Sign up for Kirk's mailing list to start getting monthly-ish newsletters with music recommendations, links, news, and extra thoughts on new Strong Songs episodes: https://kirkhamilton.substack.com/subscribeSTRONG PLAYLISTSKirk has condensed his Strong Songs picks into a single new list, which you can find on Spotify, Apple Music, and thanks to listener L.B., it's now on YouTube Music.SUPPORT STRONG SONGS ON PATREON!This whole thing happens thanks to the support of Strong Songs's wonderful patrons. For more on how to help Kirk keep making this show, go here: https://Patreon.com/StrongSongsNOVEMBER 2020 WHOLE-NOTE PATRONSJeffrey JueRick KlarasNikoLaurie AcremanKen HirshJezJenness GardnerSimon CammellGuinevere BoostromJill Smith-MooreNarelle HornMickey ClarkNathaniel BauernfeindBill RosingerAnne BrittDavid ZahmErinAidan CoughlanJeanneret Manning Family FourMatt ButlerDoug PatonRobert PaulR WatsonViki DunChrister LindqvistSami SamhuriCraig J CovellAccessViolationRyan TorvikMerlin MannFraserGlennCALEB ROTACHAndre BremerChad BarnardMark SchechterDave FloreyDan ApczynskiNOVEMBER 2020 HALF-NOTE PATRONSKevin PotterM Shane BordersPete SimmShawn McCarthyDallas HockleyJana JTerron IshiharaJason GerryRich RoskopfMelissa GalloJoel StevensonWill Dwyer Alethea LeeLauren ReayEric PrestemonErika L AustinCookies250Spencer ShirleyJoshua JarvisDamian BradyAngela LivingstoneJeffrey C. YarnellDavid FriedmanPhillip DaltonChristopher CudnoskiMark EdwardsRandall BrowningSarah SulanDiane HughesKenneth TiongJo SutherlandDavid CatlettJoe LaskaMichael CasnerMichael YorkBarb CourtneyDerek BenderMelanie AndrichFranco FamularoDon HutchisonLowell MeyerEtele IllesJeff AlmondStephen TsoneffLorenz SchwarzBecca SamplechamomiateaWenJack SjogrenAparajit RaghavanBenedict PenningtonGeoff GoldenRobyn FraserAlexander GeddesPascal RuegerRandy SouzaJoe CClare HolbertonJake TinsleyGeorgia LivesayDavid ZuckerDiane TurnerTom ColemanSUELLEN MOOREJudy ChappleStuart TerryMark PerryMaloryDhu WikEric HelmJake RobertsBriony LeoBill FullerJonathan DanielsSheilahSteven MaronMichael FlahertyJarrod SchindlerZoe LittleAlbukittyCaro FieldJudith StansfieldJenifer Carrmichael bochnerDuncanDave Sharpebrant brantphillipMarkus KoesterDavid CushmanAlexanderJeremy DawsonRobbie FerreroGavin DoigSam FennTanner MortonAJ SchusterJennifer BushDavid StroudAmanda FurlottiAndrew BakerBrooke WilfordCyrus N. WhiteChris BrownMark HaberlenJuan Carlos Montemayor ElosuaKate AlburyMatt GaskellJules BaileyEero WahlstedtBill ThorntonBrian AmoebasBrett DouvilleJeffrey OlsonMatt BetzelMuellerNate from KalamazooMelanie StiversRichard TollerAlexander PolsonJohn and Sharon StengleinTom LauerForrest ChangEarl LozadaJon O’KeefeJustin McElroyArjun SharmaShane DeLeonJames JohnsonAndrew LeeKevin MorrellTom ClewerKevin PennyfeatherNicholas SchechterJustin LiewEmily Williams

Beatles para sempre
53 - Farol - Música ilustrativa: Lucy in the Sky with diamonds - Beatles 1967.