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American singer, actor, and producer

  • 1,125PODCASTS
  • 1,732EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about sinatra

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Sundays With Sinatra | 10-17-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 110:12


Host Joe Piscopo is going to take you on a Frank Sinatra Journey baby! On today's show, it will be all about your requests! Also, we found some special gems from Frank Sinatra for you! 

You Matter!
Episode 80: AJ Lambert, Frank Sinatra's Granddaughter, Recovering Alcohol Addicted Person

You Matter!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 50:41


The granddaughter of Frank Sinatra and recovering alcohol addicted person, AJ Lambert speaks with Karen about her journey.

What's One More
What's One More Meme With Tank and Jessica Sinatra

What's One More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:56


Tank Sinatra (aka George Resch) is a meme master. You may not know his name, but you definitely know his work. Some would argue he's the creator of the modern meme. It wouldn't be a stretch to say if you came across a meme that made you chuckle or LOL, it's one of his. He launched his Instagram account back in 2015, and since then, he is one of the most popular meme accounts on the platform. Tank also curates the accounts @influencersinthewild and @tanksgoodnews.Tank is joined by his wife, esthetician Jessica Resch. They discuss marriage, relationships, their approach to parenting and how they balance it all. Plus, Tank reveals where his nickname came from and how he deals with online trolls.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Sundays With Sinatra | 10-10-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 118:33


Host Joe Piscopo is going to take you on a Frank Sinatra Journey baby! On today's show, it  will be a #ColumbusDay/Italian American Heritage Month celebration! Check this out also, there are three special guests; which include, Chazz Palminteri, Deana Martin, and Rick Positano!!!! 

Humor en la Cadena SER
La Tertulia de Cómicos | Un país de ciencia ficción y una actuación de Sinatra

Humor en la Cadena SER

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 47:00


En la primera edición de la tertulia con público en más de un año y medio, Pedro Aznar, David Navarro y Virginia Riezu repasan lo más destacado de la actualidad política desde la Fnac de Callao, en Madrid. Pedro Vallín, periodista y analista político, nos habla de su libro “C3PO en la corte del rey Felipe”.Además, escuchamos en directo a Antonio Cuesta, Sam Rodríguez y Vaudí Cavalcanti, miembros del grupo tributo a Frank Sinatra “Sinatra & Jobim Project”.

A vivir que son dos días
La Tertulia de Cómicos | Un país de ciencia ficción y una actuación de Sinatra

A vivir que son dos días

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 47:00


En la primera edición de la tertulia con público en más de un año y medio, Pedro Aznar, David Navarro y Virginia Riezu repasan lo más destacado de la actualidad política desde la Fnac de Callao, en Madrid. Pedro Vallín, periodista y analista político, nos habla de su libro “C3PO en la corte del rey Felipe”.Además, escuchamos en directo a Antonio Cuesta, Sam Rodríguez y Vaudí Cavalcanti, miembros del grupo tributo a Frank Sinatra “Sinatra & Jobim Project”.

FRANKLY drinking: the swell Frank Sinatra and Whiskey podcast.

It's Bond and Bourbon. Our James Bond episode from last year, before the World We Knew changed.

The Dr. Joe Show
Episode 139 - Science Denial with Gale Sinatra

The Dr. Joe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 48:40


(Originally aired September 30, 2021) If there's one thing we can all agree on, it's scientific consensus, right? Right? Dr. Joe speaks with Dr. Gale Sinatra about the various reasons people in our communities may doubt, resist, or deny what's going on in the world, regardless of evidence. Get your copy of Science Denial: Why it Happens and What to Do About It!

The Trumpet Gurus Hang
Episode 77: Hanging With Walt Johnson

The Trumpet Gurus Hang

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 102:11


My guest for this episode is Walt Johnson. In the world of lead trumpet players, Walt is a true Superman. His stellar career has spanned six decades and has given him the opportunity to lend his prodigious talents to two of the biggest names in the history of modern music, The Chairman of the Board Frank Sinatra, and The King. His method book, Double High C in 10 Minutes, still tops sales charts, and his newest book Low Gear High Gear is destined to be another classic. Check out what Walt has to say about his beginnings, being a good team player, why he started making horn cases, his love for creativity, starting his professional career, getting sent to Vietnam, opportunities, adjusting to the personality of superstars, Sinatra and Elvis, dealing with the demands of high profile gigs, Double High C in 10 minutes, the importance of throat size, learning from other trumpet players, mindfulness and mortality, new musical projects, Low Gear High Gear, the true meaning of music, his daily approach to the trumpet, and so much more! So pour yourself a big glass, pull up a chair, and let the hang begin! --------------------------------------------------- Do you want a Double High C in 10 Minutes? Look no further: https://qpress.ca/product-category/trumpet/?filter_author-composer=johnson-walt Sound like a million bucks without breaking the bank with Barkley Microphones: http://barkleymic.com/ Let Vennture take the guesswork out of your mouthpiece search. Use the code "TRUMPETGURUS21" to get 10% off your order: https://www.vennture.mp/ Show your tired chops some love with Robinson's Remedies products: bit.ly/ChopLove Master your mindful mindset with Jose: bit.ly/MindfulnessSecrets 00:00:00 Intro 00:03:36 His beginnings 00:06:51 Being a good team player 00:11:14 Why he started making horn cases 00:14:19 His love for creativity 00:16:36 Starting his professional career 00:19:40 Getting sent to Vietnam 00:26:29 Opportunities 00:29:20 Adjusting to the personality of superstars 00:32:36 Sinatra 00:36:53 Dealing with the demands of high profile gigs 00:39:46 Double High C in 10 minutes 00:45:28 The importance of throat size 00:48:15 Learning from other trumpet players 00:52:14 Mindfulness and mortality 00:54:32 New musical projects 00:57:07 Low Gear High Gear 01:01:16 The true meaning of music 01:06:58 His daily approach to trumpet 01:13:01 Sound Off 01:17:05 Geared Up 01:23:12 Rapid Fire --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thetrumpetgurus/support

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Ramsey Mazda's Sunday with Sinatra | 9-26-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 167:40


Joe Piscopo plays the great music of Frank Sinatra

Fascination Street
Evan Stern - Podcaster (Vanishing Postcards)

Fascination Street

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 53:19


Evan SternTake a walk with me down Fascination Street as I get to know Evan Stern.Evan is a Texas native who eventually moved to The Big Apple in pursuit of following his performance dreams. Although he loves NYC; there is a nagging part of Evan that misses the great state of Texas. So he took some time off, flew to Texas, and then drove across The Lone Star State to visit tiny towns, and unique destinations that aren't on any map......... and then he turned that into a podcast! Vanishing Postcards is a documentary style podcast of sorts where Evan goes to out of the way places and talks to the people who inhabit them. Getting both their story AND the story of the area and businesses. In this episode, we chat about why he moved to New York, why he misses Texas so much, and what made him start a podcast dedicated to these unsung people and places. We talk about his podcast; and we have a lot of fun along the way. I talk about my favorite episode of his show, and Evan tells us what we can expect from Vanishing Postcards in the future. Enjoy!Follow Evan on social media:Twit: @EvanCSternInsta: @VanishingPostcardsFB: Evan Stern & Vanishing Postcards

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Ramsey Mazda's Sunday with Sinatra |10-3-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 157:53


Joe Piscopo takes your requests for the timeless music of Frank Sinatra

Notre Dame Stories
Making A Musical

Notre Dame Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 18:50


Ronnie and Alex Mansour chose Notre Dame over a traditional music conservatory because the University's music program allowed them the flexibility to do it, as Sinatra would say, their way. In this episode, Brendan O'Shaughnessy tells the story of the siblings who charted their own creative path at the University. Read more: nd.edu/stories/musical-mansours/

Speaking of Psychology
The psychology of science denial, doubt and disbelief, with Gale Sinatra, PhD, and Barbara Hofer, PhD

Speaking of Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 36:20


On hot-button topics such as climate change, vaccines and genetically modified foods, science denial is rampant – and it crosses party and ideological lines. What are the psychological forces that lead people to disbelieve scientific consensus?  Is science denial worse than it's ever been? How have the internet and social media changed the landscape of science skepticism? Psychologists Barbara Hofer of Middlebury College and Gale Sinatra of the University of Southern California, authors of the book “Science Denial: Why it Happens and What to Do About it,” discuss these and other questions.

Point of Inquiry
Science Denial - Why It Happens and What to Do About It

Point of Inquiry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 59:45


Throughout the modern world trust in science has continued to erode at dangerous speeds. From anti-vaxxers to climate change deniers, there is an ever growing movement of people that deny science at the peril of us all. The shift towards a public with increasing lack of scientific literacy and critical-thinking skills combined with the proliferation of online misinformation and disinformation and social media algorithms that reinforce ingrained worldviews has caused a situation that is out of control. On this episode of Point of Inquiry we speak with Gale Sinatra and Barbara Hofer on their new book, Science Denial: Why It Happens and What to Do About It. Sinatra and Hofer speak about their decades of research and work on science, scientific literacy, and how humans think and acquire knowledge, how "doing your own research" is explicitly not simply conducting a Google search. They also go into some of the psychological explanations for why people deny science and what everyone can do to help stem the tide. Gale M. Sinatra is the Stephen H. Crocker Professor of Education and Psychology at the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, where she directs the Motivated Change Research Lab. She received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She has been recognized by the American Educational Research Association for career achievements in research with the Sylvia Scribner Award. She resides in Altadena, California. Barbara K. Hofer is a Professor of Psychology Emerita at Middlebury College and is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. She received her Ph.D. in psychology and education from the University of Michigan and an Ed.M. in human development from Harvard University. She is the recipient of national awards for both research and teaching, from the American Educational Research Association and the American Psychological Association. She lives in Middlebury, Vermont.

Bizarre Albums
Frank Sinatra - Trilogy: Past Present & Future

Bizarre Albums

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 17:48


Focusing on disc 3 of Sinatra's triple album…he sings about the future and space travel. This is the story of Frank Sinatra's Trilogy: Past Present & Future, from 1980. Support the show: patreon.com/bizarrealbums Follow the show on Twitter & Instagram: @bizarrealbums Follow Tony on Twitter & Instagram: @tonythaxton --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Science Salon
212. Gale Sinatra & Barbara Hofer — Science Denial: Why It Happens and What to Do About It

Science Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 90:13


Michael Shermer speaks with Gale Sinatra and Barbara Hofer about the key psychological explanations for science denial and doubt that can help provide a means for improving scientific literacy and understanding — critically important at a time when denial has become deadly. Sinatra and Hofer offer tools for addressing science denial and explain both the importance of science education and its limitations, show how science communicators may inadvertently contribute to the problem, and explain how the internet and social media foster misinformation and disinformation. The authors focus on key psychological constructs such as reasoning biases, social identity, epistemic cognition, and emotions and attitudes that limit or facilitate public understanding of science, and describe solutions for individuals, educators, science communicators, and policy makers. If you have ever wondered why science denial exists, want to know how to understand your own biases and those of others, and would like to address the problem, this book will provide the insights you are seeking.

The Grand Scheme
Snatching Sinatra | Chapter 10: The Rights

The Grand Scheme

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 39:19


Back on the streets after four and a half years behind bars, Barry gets right back to scheming. Before long, he finds himself rich with casino money, and retires to a farm. But as the years go by, something starts to nag at him: even though the Wes gambit failed at trial, the narrative that Junior plotted his own kidnapping lingers in the popular imagination. Barry longs to tell his side of the story - but what if Frank Sinatra Senior won't let him?See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Sundays With Sinatra | 09-19-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 162:05


Host Joe Piscopo is ready to take you on a Frank Sinatra Journey Baby! Tonight we will celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month! Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim!

Off the Path from New York to Boston
Off The Path - Garden State: The House Where Sinatra Still Sings

Off the Path from New York to Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 5:26


It's not unusual to hear music on a boardwalk in New Jersey on a nice summer day. But there's one house where the music has played all day, every summer, for 20 years. And it's always the same performer coming from the speakers: Frank Sinatra.

Big Noise...From Planet Earth
Bassist John Beal- 6.24.21

Big Noise...From Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 79:06


What /Who becomes a bass legend most?How to finish Season One on an ultimate “low” note? It was several of my guests who chimed in- “Ya gotta interview John. He's a New York legend, has great stories, and, well, you've worked with him tons, right?” So here he is- stories of recording with the hippest jazz artists of the late 50s-early 60s, auditioning for Leopold Stokowski for his (now 56th year!) principal bass chair gig with the American Symphony Orchestra, being a Sondheim “rock” on Broadway, and his endless TV and Film credits- including laying down tracks from Sinatra to John Lennon's “Imagine”. John's wry sense of humor has been relied upon to diffuse the tensest of rehearsals and recording sessions- merely a cool fringe benefit to his unbelievably solid and beautiful musicianship. I've had the honor of working with him for 15 years at City Center's “Encores!”, and always look forward to gaining some priceless wisdom during our ritual ramen noodle outings. AND, in lieu of creating the duets, we've opted instead to showcase some of those early swinging sessions that John walked all over- awesome sides with Gerry Mulligan, James Moody, Al Cohn, and more. It was an honor to wrap up my first season doing this special “off-the-menu” interview with one of the true greats of the bass violin.

The Grand Scheme
Snatching Sinatra | Chapter 9: The Stunt

The Grand Scheme

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 36:30


Barry's trial is an overnight circus, and the evidence against him is overwhelming. But when Junior takes the stand and reveals his compliance with the demands of Barry and his accomplices, the defense team smells an opportunity. Determined to convince the jury that Junior's kidnapping was engineered by the Sinatra family as a publicity stunt for his concert tour, Barry cooks up a story about a mysterious operative named Wes who put him up to the kidnapping. It's a bold gambit - and, it turns out, a spectacular failure.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Top 10
The Top 10 - Bands that deserve a Biopic

The Top 10

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 125:12


It's time for the latest and greatest from The Top 10 and today we were inspired by the new St. Vincent movie coming out plus the spate of band/musician biopics that have released over the past few years to discuss bands we'd love to see get a biopic. This isn't for individual musicians so the Sinatra's and Diana Ross' of the world will be excluded from this list. Instead we're focusing on groups of musicians that haven't had a major motion picture made of their story a la Bohemian Rhapsody. Remember to LIKE the video and SHARE it on your social media. Also, SUBSCRIBE to the channel BELOW. Follow on twitter: John Rocha: https://www.twitter.com/therochasays Matt Knost: https:/www.twitter.com/mattknost The Top 10: https://www.twitter.com/top10show YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/thetop10podcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thetop10podcast Facebook: https://bit.ly/39m9Nbf Patreon: https://bit.ly/39sNb9b Merch: https://bit.ly/2WQBDtO

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Sundays With Sinatra | 09-12-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 161:26


Host Joe Piscopo is going to take you on a Frank Sinatra Journey baby!

The Grand Scheme
Snatching Sinatra | Chapter 8: The Bust

The Grand Scheme

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 30:33


Barry makes one last attempt to ride off into the sunset with Pam, but by the time he makes it to her house, she's got company. And it turns out the FBI's been listening in on their phone calls. After a series of narrow escapes, Barry finally finds himself handcuffed and brought up on serious charges. And then, just as he's writing out a confession, the man Barry hoped would be saved by the Plan of Operation (his dad) intervenes to save Barry from the Plan of Operation.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bike Shed
307: Walking Contradictions

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 36:56


On this episode, Chris talks about testing external services and dissects a tweet on refinements for Result. Steph talks about thoughbot's recent improvement to their feature flag system. Links: refinements For Result (https://twitter.com/alassek/status/1430683412264857600) Faking External Services in Tests with Adapters by German Velasco (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/faking-external-services-in-tests-with-adapters) Testing Interaction with 3rd-party APIs (https://thoughtbot.com/upcase/videos/testing-interaction-with-3rd-party-apis) Transcript: CHRIS: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new with you? STEPH: Hey, Chris. Well, today is Summit Day at thoughtbot, and it's the day where all the bots gather, and we hang out, and we chat, and we play games. And it's a lot of fun. We're actually taking more of a respite this year just because life has been taxing. And so we decided to give people more of the day off. So we still had some fun events, but most of it is everybody gets a chill day. Do something that brings you joy is the theme of the day. But we had Lightning Talks, which is my favorite thing that we do on Summit Day because I realize that I just work with the coolest people, and they have such interesting things to talk about. And we had such a variety of topics. So one of them, Alex Chen taught us acronyms in K-pop. And Sam Kapila, our resident foodie, taught us about a variety of spices. And one of my favorite talks was by Akshith Yellapragada, and it's the top 10 best limo entrances by The Bachelor, and it was phenomenal. And I really want to share some stuff that I learned with you. CHRIS: The Bachelor like the TV show? STEPH: Yeah, like the TV show. Are you familiar with it? Have you seen it before? CHRIS: I am familiar with it. I know it exists. I know that there's a spinoff, The Bachelorette. And I believe we have now exhausted my information on the matter. STEPH: [laughs] That's fair. For anyone that hasn't seen the show, the show revolves around a single person. For the bachelor, it's a single bachelor who dates a number of people over several weeks, and then they narrow down the people. There are elimination rounds, and the whole goal is for them to find their true love. So each week, someone is eliminated, and I think the show ends with a marriage proposal. So it's a wild show. It's something. [chuckles] And in Akshith's talk, I learned some really fun terminology. The first one is the Crown, and this is actually an important building block because we're going to get to the rest of the terminology that uses this word, so we got to start here. So the first one is the Crown, and this is the person that everyone's competing for. So they're the star of the show. They're the one that everybody is hoping to fall in love with or will fall in love with them so they get a marriage proposal. So then the other stuff that I've learned is all about the entrance because again, we're talking about the top 10 best entrances. And one of them is the sidecar entrance. So this is where the player, because yes, this is totally a game, has someone assist them in meeting the crown. So it could be like a family member, maybe it's like your grandma. And then there's TOT, T-O-T, which is short for Trick Or Treat. And this person exits the limo wearing a costume. So it's someone wearing a shark costume. There was someone wearing a sloth costume where they really dedicated to the role, and they climbed a tree and hung from a branch. I don't know for how long but for long enough to really vibe with the role. And then there's the Kringle, and this person brings a prop or a present to the Crown. And there's the Grandy, and this player arrives in something other than a limo. So the example that Akshith provided is someone arrived in a motorized cupcake. CHRIS: Was the cupcake edible? STEPH: I don't think so, fair question. [laughs] CHRIS: So really just like a go-kart that looked like a cupcake, not really a motorized cupcake, if I'm going to meet pedantic about the thing, [chuckles] which I think is my job. STEPH: Yes, it is a motorized non-edible cupcake, but that seems like something a next player should do. They should really up the game, and they should bring an edible motorized cupcake. CHRIS: Yeah, because you get the visual novelty, but then you layer on top of it that it's actually something that you can now eat, and it's a double win. STEPH: Ooh, and then you're a Grandy, and you're a Kringle because you arrived in something other than a limo, and it's a present. CHRIS: I love how you have so deeply internalized this now that you're like, ooh, okay. I can remix here. I'm going to bring together the pieces. Yeah, all right. Yeah, this all makes sense. STEPH: Yeah, it was a lot of fun. Those are most of my notes for today. I have some tech stuff too, but this felt like the most important thing to start the show with. CHRIS: We use the phrase tech talk and nonsense to describe the show often, but I think nonsense and tech talk is the correct orientation. STEPH: [chuckles] CHRIS: Correct in terms of importance and chronological order, and whatnot. But yeah. STEPH: I love that we start with a bit of nonsense. So I do have some tech stuff. But first, before I share any of that, what's going on in your world? CHRIS: I'm sure there's plenty of nonsense in my world, but at the top of my list is some tech stuff. So someone on Twitter, Adam Lassek, reached out and he suggested related to the conversation and the back and forth that I've been having with myself around some of the data structures within the app that I'm building…So I've talked about the dry-monads result object, and there's this success and failure. And I wanted to introduce this new method called bimap, but I wanted to do it in a reasonable way. So I wrapped, and then I wrapped, and I wrapped things. As an aside, former colleague and friend of the show, Joel Oliveira, sent a wonderful tweet which was a reference to the SNL video where they make a taco and put it inside of a pizza and put it inside of a bag. And that was his joke about it, which I really liked. That was an excellent reference. But in this case, Adam Lassek reached out and suggested if I'm that squeamish about monkey patching, which I am, have I considered refinements? And so he sent an image of a code sample, which is so kind of him to send that much detail over, but it was interesting because I know of refinements in Ruby. I know of that as an alternative to monkey patching, a more refined way, but a safer way, a more controlled way to alter code, but I've not actually used them. STEPH: I'm not familiar with refinements. What is that? CHRIS: Refinements are a way...so similar to monkey patching, where you say like, I'm going to reopen this class or this module and define a new method or redefine a method or do something like that, a refinement is a way to do that in a scoped manner. So I'll be honest, I'm not super familiar with them. I think I came into Ruby at a time where the community was moving away from monkey patching. And the dogmatic swing of the pendulum was like, that's a bad thing to do. And so even the refinements were introduced, as far as I understand it, to be a more controlled way to do it. So it's not just like, hey, cool. This module is redefined now in your app in a magical way that's really hard to figure out and hard for folks to debug refinements. You have to explicitly opt into within a certain lexical scope. I'll be honest; I know that at the headline level. I don't actually know the ramifications or where and when you can use them and how you can. But I know that that was the idea is refinements are a way to do monkey patching but in a more controlled, more understandable manner, and so the code sample that Adam shared does that. And it's very interesting. As I'm looking at it, I'm like, okay, that's cool because I think it'll be a little bit safer. But at the end of the day, my concern wasn't safety in this case because I was introducing a method that would be new, that would be additive to the API of this module that I'm working with, and so that I think of as a relatively safe operation. My hesitation was more around how does someone figure it out if they're working with this? And particularly, the name of the method that I was introducing was bimap so, B-I-M-A-P. And if someone sees that in our codebase and is like, "Bimap, where is this coming from?" Well, this is one of those dry-monad result objects. And they go to the code, and they try and look it up in the docs, and they're just not going to find anything. And I can imagine losing a lot of time to try and chase that down. There are ways to figure it out. There's the method in Ruby, which is a wonderful trick for chasing things down. Or if you grep the codebase, you'd find it. But I think I'm possibly over-indexed on worrying about that lost time, that moment. But I've lost that time so many times in my life where I'm like, I can't grep for this. I can't Google for this. And so I have so strongly moved in the direction of being like, everything should be grepable, everything should be googleable. Those are the two of the things that I believe about software. I think I believe a bunch of stuff. STEPH: I think we have a full episode that talks about what we believe in software. CHRIS: I believe we do. STEPH: Cool. Thanks. Yeah, I have not heard of refinements. That sounds really interesting. I really like that bit about everything should be grepable, and everything should be googleable, googling everything. I kind of agree with that one. We live in a world where we're always doing bespoke things so that one feels a little bit harder that we're always going to be able to Google it. But then that encourages people to constantly publish the bespoke work that they're doing so then others can benefit from that work. But the grepable, I absolutely agree with that one. It's so frustrating where I see a method, but I cannot find its definition. And then having the ways to figure out where that method is defined to then find its definition is crucial. CHRIS: Yeah, it's interesting. I definitely feel that way very strongly. And it's in such stark contrast to Rails. Rails is like, hey, don't worry. There's going to be a lot of methods. You don't need to worry about where they come from, or why they exist, or what they are, or what they do. Well, probably what they do. But all of the magic inflections on database tables,, and suddenly you have methods named after every column. That's both very magical and hard to grep for or impossible to grep for, but it also leaks the entire structure of your database into your application in a way that I've always felt a little bit complicated about. And so explicitness, grepability, those are things that I care about. There's another one, delegates in Rails, that I sometimes pause around using especially when it's like delegates 19 methods to user prefix user. And so you end up with methods that are like username. And that's a delegation to the user object to get the name method off of it, but it creates the method user_name. And you're never going to be able to grep for that. And it saves like a little bit of code, definitely, but it saves this very obvious, very knowable code. So this one I actually shy away from using delegates in most cases, and I'll just write out the methods manually because sometimes I like to hear the clackety of my keyboard. There's a reason I have a clackety keyboard. STEPH: You want to get your money's worth. You want to clackety as much as possible. Yeah, I'm also not a fan of delegates. This may be a lie, but I don't know that I've actually ever used it. I've worked with it, but I can't think of a time that I've implemented delegates. Maybe that's a lie, but I'm going to say it anyways because that feels true, at least in the last couple of years. CHRIS: I feel like that could be true for the last couple of years. I would be surprised if you have never even added to a delegates line. Because that's the thing, you can just keep shoveling stuff into them as well. So I would put money on you having used it at some point and then just forgotten about it. But who knows, maybe not. STEPH: This is where we play two truths and a lie and that one's my lie. [laughs] Yeah, that's also fair about adding to it because if that's already defined and it's easier to add to it, I don't know. Who knows what past Stephanie has done, probably some wild stuff. CHRIS: It's unknowable at this point. It's lost to the sands of time. But looping back to the core thing of this refinement and the module, I think I'm leaning in the direction of doing that and unwinding my wrapping and wrapping layer thing. Because obviously, as I talked about...I think it was the previous episode or maybe two episodes ago. There was conceptual complexity to the additional wrapping layer. Even as I was fully in the context of working on that, I was still getting myself confused in either triple wrapping or then unwrapping too much or whatever. And these are the concerns with this type of code. So moving away from that feels better, having just a single layer of context wrapping around a given value. And then the other thing it's actually just a lot less code, and it's less prone to error, I think. That's my hope. I have to look into exactly how refinements get used, but I noticed in a couple of places that sometimes we were wrapping with this local value object that gave us the bimap method, and sometimes we were forgetting to. And so, I could see that being a very subtle, easy way to introduce failures into the app that would be hard to catch just by looking at it. So I think having a more global refinement...although I think that's sort of a contradiction, a global refinement because I think refinements are meant to be local. But anyway, I'm going to look into it because it's a much more concise code sample than what I have. Yeah, I'm going to poke at that a little bit. But it was an interesting exploration of some different things. And then it forced me to consider why am I so resistant to monkey patching at this point, especially in this particular case where I think it's okay-ish? STEPH: That's a good question. Do you have any insights? I am also resistant to monkey patching. I feel that pain and also that timidness of diving into that space. But I'm curious, have you figured out any other reasons that you really prefer to avoid it? CHRIS: I think this one falls into that sort of...what's the word? Like tribal knowledge of we've been burned by it in the past and therefore we build almost a...religious is too strong of a word but that sort of cultural belief. This is a thing that we do not do because of the bad things that we've experienced in the past. And there are a lot of things that fall into that experiential negative space. So with monkey patching, things that I know we can run into is if I introduced this bimap method, but I introduce it subtly differently than the library will eventually, then they could eventually introduce it themselves. And suddenly, I have this fork of my code expects it to work this way, but you've now implemented it that way. I no longer can upgrade. This is a critical piece of infrastructure in my app. I've just painted myself into a corner by doing this. Whereas if I do this wrapping layer, that's my code. I own that. It's not going to be a problem in that same way. There's also the subtlety, the grepability that sort of thing is a concern in my mind. Like, is this our code? Is this their code? Is this an engine? Being able to find code within a codebase, I think, is a critical thing. And so that's a part of the hesitation. I also know longer ago prototypes...I want to say Prototype JS was the name of the project, but it was one that was just like, yeah, JavaScript doesn't have enough stuff in the standard library. So we're just going to override everything and add all of these wonderful methods sort of in the way that Active Support does, which is an interesting comparison. But the JavaScript community definitely moved away from Prototype. And now JavaScript is a language or the standard runtime that's available in most JavaScript engines. It has a lot of the methods, but there are conflicts, and stuff gets weird, and it's all complicated. But again, as I thought of it, Active Support is a complete contradiction to everything I'm saying. Active Support just adds whatever to anything, 2.days.ago. Why does the number 2 have a days method? Because it's great, that's why. But I'm just a walking contradiction, I guess. STEPH: Everything you said really resonates with me. And I'm just trying to reason with myself like yes, Active Support uses a lot of this, a lot of metaprogramming, and adds everything it wants to. So why does that feel okay? And I wonder if it comes down to one is more almost like an agreed standard. It's built by a team, and it's maintained by a team, and then it's used by a large number of people, and then you get that feedback. Or maybe it's not even just a team, but it's a larger community versus if it's internal to your software team, maybe that doesn't feel like a big enough group or if it just needs...Rails is also documented. So maybe that's part of it, too, is if you are going to dive into that space, it's easy to discover, and it's well-documented as if you are building an open-source project that other people are going to use. Like, you designed for the intent of people to use this pattern that you've introduced, then perhaps that's when it starts to feel okay. , But the experiences I have had is where people basically will add some dynamic programming or monkey patch an existing feature. And then that's very hard to find and has surprising results, or it gets outdated. So I guess it comes down to who are you designing for? Are you designing for more of an open-source community, or you're at least designing for the people behind you that are going to be using this? Or is this a one-off adventure that you have chosen for yourself and future developers to discover? [chuckles] CHRIS: Yeah, I think that's a good summary, although I'm open to the fact that I exist in a state of contradiction. I'm also fine with that, to be clear. [chuckles] But I think what you said is true, and I think there is subtlety and nuance and reasons that it's okay in one context and less okay in others. And that idea of just like, I don't know, this is one of those things that I got in my head that I've done the thinking a long time ago to decide this is a thing I don't do. So now, in order to override that, I would have to do so much thinking. I would have to be like, all right, well, my brain tells me, no, but I'm going to go reread everything about monkey patching right now to convince myself that it's okay or to fully get the context and the subtlety and the nuance. And so sometimes we have to rely on that heuristic knowledge of monkey patching, nope, don't do that. That's not a thing, but other stuff is fine. And well, Active Support is fine because it's Rails. But it is interesting to observe contradictions and be like, huh, look at me go. All right. Well, moving on. STEPH: It's our lizard brain that's saying, "Hey, there's danger here." [laughs] CHRIS: Exactly. STEPH: I rather like living in a world of contradictions, or at least I find it that I'm drawn to them. And maybe that's also one of the things that I really like about consulting is because then I join all these different teams, and I hear all these different opinions. So as I'm forming these opinions around something like tests are great, I really like tests, and then someone's like, "I really hate tests." I'm like, "Cool. Let's talk. I want to understand why you don't like this thing that I think is wonderful because then I'm really interested." So I find that I'm often really drawn to contradictions as I like hearing opinions that are very different than mine and finding out why people have a different opinion than mine. CHRIS: Yeah, the world is full of contradictions. So it's, I think, at least a useful way to exist in the world, to be open to them and to enjoy exploring them. But yeah, I'll update in future weeks if I do end up going the refinements route. I'll let you know if anything interesting falls out of that. And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. STEPH: So we made a recent improvement to our feature flag system, which I'm really excited about, that we have found a way to improve that workflow because it felt really great that we're...well, okay, I should say that with a caveat. It felt really great that we're using feature flags to ensure that the main branch is always in a deployable state. But it did not feel great around how tedious it was becoming to add all of the feature flags specifically because each time we're adding a feature flag, we're having to add a migration. So we're having to run a migration, add the feature flag column, and then we can interact with that feature flag. And that part's okay. It was more removing that feature flag once we're done with it, that that part was starting to feel tedious because then that's becoming a two-deploy process. So one change is to remove the code that's relying on that feature flag. And then the second deploy was to actually drop that column because we wanted it to be safe to make sure that the code wasn't trying to reference a database column that didn't exist anymore, which is what happened at one point at first when we weren't doing the two-deploy process. So the improvement that Chris White came up with is where we're now using a Postgres JSONB column. And it's here that we actually have a feature flag YAML file. And we can have the name of the feature flag. We have a description of the purpose of the feature flag. And we have an enabled property on there, so then we can turn it on and off. The benefit of this is now we don't have to do that two-deploy process. And we also don't have to run a migration for when we're adding a new feature flag. So we can add it to the feature flag file, we can load it in, and then we can set that property to say, "Yes, this is enabled," or "No, it's not." And that has just simplified our feature flag process. One tricky bit that I believe the team ran into is around enabling this with Active Admin because Active Admin was just relying on those database columns to then turn something on or off. But then we've added some methods that work well with Active Admin that then say, "Read from here when you're checking to see if something is enabled," or "Look at this list to see which feature flags can be turned on and off." So it's been a really nice improvement, and everybody on the team seems to be in favor of the ways that we've improved this. So it's been really nice. So I wanted to come back and bring an update on how we've simplified our feature flag system. CHRIS: That definitely sounds like a nice improvement, the ability to just more regularly iterate around that or taking away the pain, any pain associated with using feature flags. Because they are such a nice thing to have, but there's that overhead. Then you start to have that voice in your head that's like, do I really need a feature flag for this? Could I just sneak this one in? And we always regret that. I had a similar thing this week where I wrote some code. I didn't quite write as many tests as I should have. And it was wildly broken, just like all of the connection points through everything were broken. But then it pushed me in an interesting direction where I was like, well, what I'm going to do is write an integrated test. It was basically an event coming in from a webhook that then enqueued a job, which did a thing, which then spit out an email. But it was broken at like three layers, and I was very embarrassed, if we're being honest. But, I don't know, I was just having a low energy afternoon, and I did not write the test, which I know I'm supposed to do. So similarly, any pain that we can take out of these things that we're supposed to do, any way that we can pave the happy path, I'm all about those. I'm intrigued because I think we've talked about this before, but it sounds like you guys have a very home-grown feature flag system. Is that true? STEPH: We do. CHRIS: Is there something about it that makes it unique to your situation, or was it just like that's what happened? Someone early on was like, "We need feature flags. I can just do the simplest thing that works," and then that's where you're at now or? STEPH: You're asking a very good question. And I'm trying to recall what led us to the state that we're in because I feel like we had this same discussion several episodes back when we were introducing the home-grown feature flag system. And I was like, there are reasons, but I didn't really dive into those reasons because it felt very custom to the application. But now I've forgotten what those reasons were. So I think you ask a great question where it'd be worth revisiting to confirm that yes, there's a reason for this home-grown version versus using something like Flipper. CHRIS: I'm glad I'm at least consistent over time in the questions that I ask and the heuristics that I have. This does feel like one of those things. It's not quite like crypto where I'd be like, we can never write our own crypto. But a feature flag system, I would be really intrigued if there are things that they are just workflows or functionality that you really need that are not supported by any of the existing solutions that are out there. I think audit trails is an interesting one. I think Flipper has a hosted product at this point that does that, but the local version wouldn't necessarily. So maybe that's a thing that you want to get. Again, I'd just be really interested. It sounds like the current state of the world that you have is enabled or disabled; just broadly, that's it. Those are the two states for any given flag. Is that true? STEPH: It is. There's nothing complex with the flags in that nature. And then we use naming to indicate if something is more for beta, so if it's a change that we're making to the codebase, but it's a feature flag that we plan on removing, versus maybe it's a feature flag for enterprise customers. CHRIS: Oh, interesting. I wouldn't think of using a feature flag in that context where it's going to be like a persistent, long-lived; this is conditional logic around some state or some property of the viewer. I think of feature flags as a way to gate code conditionally based on a point in time. And the reason I asked about the enabled-disabled basically like the Boolean state for your flags is when I've worked with feature flags in the past, I've liked having the ability to say, for this user or these users, or this group of users, which we've named this is our beta list…and it's the ten people that just really love the product and are happy to bump into some rough edges. And so we'll put things on for them first or even like percentages, so roll it out to 10% and then 50% and so on. And I think the larger an application and user base gets, the more that sort of thing starts to feel right. STEPH: Yeah, we certainly have some complexity around where each customer can really specify which features that they want. And then the features also differ a bit for each customer. So we are in a world where we're pretty customized or configurable for different customers. And whether that's something that we could simplify, that would certainly be a good question or something to pursue. But part of this also feels like our decision may have been based around what the system was already doing, and we're looking for ways to make slow improvements versus trying to redesign the whole thing. Because initially, the way we were customizing all of these different features for customers was in a YAML file. And that part was painful because then, anytime we wanted to make a change, it required a deploy. So the introduction of feature flags is really to get away from having to deploy to then make a small change like that. But now that we're in the space that we can easily configure that change and do that on the fly and not have to issue a deploy, I think we're now in a good space to reassess. And the team may have some really good answers. Perhaps I'm just not recalling as to why we've chosen the more home-grown feature flags. But yeah, I'll visit that topic and report back. Because I've been coasting along on our new system and enjoying it, but you're asking some really good questions. CHRIS: I mean, as an aside, if you're coasting along and really enjoying it, then maybe you don't need to ask any questions. It's still interesting. I would be intrigued to know. But if it's not causing you any pain, then you probably shouldn't change it. Because frankly, changing out the feature flag system is going to be non-trivial, I'm pretty sure. You could feature flag the feature flag system, and then you can transition from one to the other. You need a third feature flag system for that. But anyway, I digress. [chuckles] STEPH: You referenced crypto earlier. So I think I like the feature flag, the feature flag system. We should have some crypto flags in there somewhere. I think that's a thing too. But I think the main goal if I'm looking into changing it would be, circling back to what we were talking about earlier, is discoverability, so having a home-grown feature flag system. How easy is it for…if nobody was around on the team and there was someone new working with it, how easy would it be for them to turn something on or off? And if that's easy, then that's great. Then I think we've got a great home-grown system. If that's challenging, then I definitely think it's worth reassessing. And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: One of the things that's been interesting working lately in the app that I'm building is thinking about testing. We have a number of interactions with third-party services. Frankly, a lot of the app is that at this point. We have a handful of different external data providers systems that we're interacting with, webhooks and flows and things like that. And so we had to make that decision that you always have to make in these sorts of situations which is, how are we going to test this? And there's a wonderful blog post on the thoughtbot blog called Faking External Services in Tests with Adapters. It's by the one and only German Velasco. And it is a beautiful summary of the different approaches that you can take, but it really dials into one, which is the adapter pattern. There's also a weekly iteration episode on Upcase with Joël Quenneville, which discusses a little bit more of an exploration of the different options. There are sort of a handful of different options that we can consider your whereas the blog post by German talks specifically about the adapters approach. But to talk about them briefly, there's one where you can go all the way outside your app, spin up a fake service. Typically, we would do this with Capybara Discoball, which is a wonderfully named project. But it allows you to spin up a little Sinatra app type thing such that your web application is still making quote, unquote "real HTTP requests." This external service is going to catch that and respond with whatever canned data or structured responses that you want. But you still have the ability in that to, say, tell it to create data beforehand or be in a certain state or respond with certain data or have any stateful persistence. So if you create a record in that external system, and then later you query for it, that system can do that. But it has the complexities of now, your test suite is running different systems. And do you have thread-safety or all that kind of stuff? So that's a particularly complex end of the spectrum. At the lowest end would be stubbing and mocking. You just take whatever external clients you have, and you're mocking the API calls in them. That's the lowest end. And that's the one, especially for feature specs, those I try and avoid. Then there's a middle ground of like WebMock or VCR, those sort of things where you're saying whenever you see an HTTP request that looks like this, respond in this way. You record the cassettes, all that kind of stuff. And then there's the one that we've settled on, which is the adapters. So the client that we've introduced in our local codebase to interact with any of these third-party systems internally has a class attribute, a cattr_accessor in the Rails parlance, I believe. And that allows us to switch out the backend. And so we have a real HTTP backend, and that's the one that actually runs in production and a test in-memory backend. And that in-memory backend can implement whatever logic. We're ending up with one of them almost recreating this external service, sort of re-coding some of their inconsistencies or oddities but also features and whatnot. But it feels like it has struck just the right balance, and it allows our feature specs to be very rich, very real. We start up the world, and we say, "Hey, external service be in this state." And then I'm going to go visit the page. I'm going to see the data. But we are almost making real HTTP requests. It's very close. It's always an interesting choice to make here. I'm very happy with the one that we've made, but it's still not perfect. There are always going to be trade-offs between the different options here. But it's always interesting revisiting this and being like, which one am I going to choose today? STEPH: I feel like my natural progression when testing external services; I always start with WebMock, and then I progress to using adapters. And then from there, I go to actually replacing the HTTP service that is receiving and then returning a response, like you mentioned to Capybara Discoball earlier. So I can certainly see what you like about the adapter pattern. You mentioned that you're coding some of the inconsistencies. That feels very real. I'm curious if you have an example of how you've had to manage that recently. CHRIS: A specific example would be the external API responds with certain error codes or error structures. So it's an error. It has a status of a number and then a reason, or sometimes instead of a key that is reason; it's the message. So it's like, oh, okay, I see that in this endpoint, you respond with reason, and then this endpoint you respond with message. So now, do I encode that into my fake? I guess I do. So my adapter now implements things like that. There are cases where it's inconsistency where I'm like, well, this is the way they behave. So I would like our test suite to exist in the context of that because then our app is getting exercise in a real way. But in some cases, it's like little bits of logic validation that an external system might do if that's an important part of the flow. The app that we're building has a lot of forms and a lot of data validation and things like that. And so, we want to make sure that we have robust handling around that robust messaging to the user so that it's very clear what they need to do and how they need to respond to things. And so putting in little bits of that like, oh, that's how you format a phone number, okay, cool. Our fake will also format phone numbers in that way, things like that. STEPH: Every time the topic of testing external services comes up, I really, really want VCR to be the answer. I really like the idea of being able to validate that...because you'd mentioned that we're programming the expected return from this other service. And it's very easy to get out of sync with those actual responses. And then we don't really have a great way to stay up to date other than we wait for production or staging environment to fail. And then we realize something has changed, and we have to go and update either our mock or our adapter. And maybe that doesn't happen often if you're working with an external service that is very good about broadcasting when they have a breaking change. But if you're working with a less stable endpoint, then I always want VCR to really work. But it's just one of those areas where I'm like, yes, that's the thing that I want. I want this idea where I can rerun my tests in a way that they actually hit that service and record the response. But then I have felt pain [chuckles] from working with VCR and how it's configured, and how people have used it. It's one of those where I don't blame the library. I like the library. But the way people have implemented it and test I have felt a lot of pain from that. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely agree with that. It feels like it's nice if you can push the mocking all the way out to that layer. Because like right now, our codebase has code in it that is subtly changing the behavior for a test, and I don't like that. It's only the swapping out of the adapter, so it's a very minimal thing. And we try and push all logic away from that such that the test adapter is as similar as possible to the real production situation. But it's enough difference that I agree I would like if VCR would just like, I catch the HTTP requests, and I respond with the same thing and sometimes we can pass through. I do think one of the fundamental limitations, or at least very hard to get right things, would be sequential requests. So I post to this endpoint in the external service, which creates some data. And then later, when I make a GET request to their endpoint, I should get back that data that I just created. That's, I guess, doable because you can have sequential requests, have cassettes that are first this request, then that request, then that request. And it knows that, like scope them to a given spec. But that feels extra difficult. And it does, again to your comment, the maintainers of that project do a wonderful job, but it's a really hard target to hit. STEPH: Well, and one of the other hard requirements with using a tool like VCR is then that external service really needs that sandbox staging environment that you can use. So that way you can create this data, you can rerun your test. So they're actually going to hit this real environment. They're going to create this data and that not have any harmful effects. And then you can record fetching that data. So it requires a lot of pieces to fall into place for it to work well. But then I was just thinking as you're talking about adapters, I'm like, yeah, I love the adapter pattern. I've really enjoyed that one for testing as well. But then I immediately start to think, oh, well, what happens when it gets out of sync, and how do we know that it got out of sync? And I don't have a great answer to that. CHRIS: Production blows up, obviously. STEPH: Production blows up, and then we go update our adapter. That's very calm. [laughs] CHRIS: It would be great if CI could more proactively catch that or...yeah, I agree. I would love if VCR would work because that facet of it is so attractive. But [chuckles] I've never gotten to walk exclusively the happy path with VCR. So here we are. This is a classic case of here's four options as to how we can think about this hard and important thing that we do in our codebases, and they all have trade-offs much like everything else in software. STEPH: I'm going to add this to my developer bucket list to live in a world where I can easily validate if an external API has changed or not and then also have tests that know when something has broken before production does. CHRIS: Ooph, dare to dream. I like it. STEPH: I'm a dreamer. CHRIS: I want to live in that world. Well, with that wonderful dream to take us out, should we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. CHRIS: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. STEPH: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or a review in iTunes as it helps other people find the show. CHRIS: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed on Twitter. And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: And I'm @SViccari. CHRIS: Or you can email us at hosts@bikeshed.fm. STEPH: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeee. Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Sundays With Sinatra | 09-05-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 161:34


Host Joe Piscopo is going to take you on a Frank Sinatra Journey baby! It's Labor Day weekend, and it's all about your requests!

Ariel's Entertainment  Podcast
EP. 99- Going All In! Special Rapper Guest Geez Sinatra!

Ariel's Entertainment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 57:54


In This Episode 99 We Have Special Musical Guest “Geez Sinatra" from Atlanta Who Tells Us How He Became A Rapper and how to make it your passion/purpose/living! Follow & Support "Geez Sinatra" Instagram @ge3zsinatra & Youtube @geezsinatraFollow & Support Me @Venmo- @Ariel-Castillo-4PayPal- Paypal.me/arielentTIKTOK- @Arielent.comAriel Castillo SoundcloudInstagram- https://www.instagram.com/arielentpod/Website- Arielent.com

WGN - The After Hours with Rick Kogan Podcast
The one and only Tom Dreesen talks being back home in Chicago and his latest book, ‘Still Standing…: My Journey from Streets and Saloons to the Stage, and Sinatra'

WGN - The After Hours with Rick Kogan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021


WGN Radio’s Rick Kogan is joined in studio with legendary comedian Tom Dreesen to talk about being back home in Chicago and about his latest book, “Still Standing…: My Journey from Streets and Saloons to the Stage, and Sinatra”. You can purchase Tom’s book here. Tom also share stories from his career in entertainment. Follow […]

Nourish Balance Thrive
Love People Use Things (Because the Opposite Doesn't Work)

Nourish Balance Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 108:21


Joshua Fields Millburn is one half of the popular simple living duo known as The Minimalists. He and his best friend and fellow Minimalist Ryan Nicodemus have helped over 20 million people live more meaningful lives with less through their website, books, podcast, and Netflix films. The Minimalists have been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Forbes, TIME, ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, BBC, and NPR. Joshua has previously been an NBT client, and I'm fortunate enough to call him a friend. On this podcast, Joshua and I talk about minimalism, consumerism, values, and healing.  Joshua explains how minimalism is not simply about getting rid of material possessions (though that can play a role), but rather it's a process of getting to the root of life's lingering discontent - digging out from under the stuff, the debt, the stress and the loneliness and regaining control of your life. He describes some of the main points of his new book, Love People Use Things, and shares some of the most important lessons he's learned along his Minimalist journey. Here's the outline of this interview with Joshua Fields Millburn: [00:00:13] Paul Saladino. [00:01:29] Mimetic Desires; Podcast: Wanting: The Power of Mimetic Desire in Everyday Life. [00:02:09] Book: Love People, Use Things: Because the Opposite Never Works, by Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus. [00:02:51] Enneagram. [00:03:03] Ian Cron; Book: The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery, Podcast: Typology. [00:05:51] Consumerism. [00:08:03] Book: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed, by Lori Gottlieb. [00:08:28] Lori Gottlieb on The Minimalists Podcast. [00:14:21] Books by Chris Ryan: Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships and Civilized to Death: The Price of Progress. [00:17:50] Four types of values. [00:19:13] Book: Wanting: The Power of Mimetic Desire in Everyday Life, by Luke Burgis; thick vs. thin desires. [00:19:45] Luke Burgis on The Minimalist Podcast. [00:20:46] Erwin McManus, lead pastor at Mosaic; Hear him on The Minimalists Podcast. [00:22:40] Minimalism and what that term means. [00:24:36] Podcast: Healing Trauma with MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy, with Dan Engle. [00:26:00] The spontaneous combustion rule. [00:26:33] Chris Kelly on The Minimalists Podcast #138: Healthproblems. [00:30:39] The Minimalists: Less is Now Movie (trailer). [00:33:01] Podcast: Protein vs. Energy for Improved Body Composition and Healthspan. [00:33:46] The Minimalists Love People, Use Things Tour. [00:34:52] Spartanism (compulsive decluttering); Minimalists podcasts on hoarding and compulsive decluttering. [00:37:05] Minimalist diets and Joshua's story of regaining his health. [00:38:54] Minimalists Podcast episode #184: Minimalist Diets. [00:43:25] Documentary: The Sensitives. [00:46:22] Pain management solution: grounding.  [00:47:09] 4-Quadrant Model. [00:47:57] Book: Earthing: The Most Important Health Discovery Ever! (Second Edition), by Clinton Ober, Stephen T. Sinatra, et al. [00:48:37] Documentaries by Clint Ober. The Ground Therapy Universal Mat. [00:51:41] Elixinol CBD. [00:56:51] Book: The Brave Athlete: Calm the F*ck Down and Rise to the Occasion, by Simon Marshall, PhD. [01:00:18] Lyme disease coinfections; Sunjya Schweig, MD; Podcast: How to Prevent and Heal Lyme and Its Co-Infections. [01:03:03] Testosterone replacement therapy. [01:08:32] Book: The WEIRDest People in the World: How the West Became Psychologically Peculiar and Particularly Prosperous, by Joseph Henrich. [01:10:43] Personality traits; Introversion/Extraversion. [01:20:50] Podcast: Polysecure: Attachment, Trauma and Consensual Nonmonogamy, with Jessica Fern. [01:25:30] Homelessness, mental health, and intellect. [01:27:55] Overrated virtues. [01:31:24] Podcast: Healing and Transformation with Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP), with Jason Connell. [01:29:27] Problems with empathy. [01:33:39] Jealousy. [01:40:01] Object A; Peter Rollins. [01:45:52] theminimalists.com.


Sean Libby CEO of Benelynk joins the Lance Jay Radio Network....

The BadChristian Podcast
Science Denial

The BadChristian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 73:06


On this weeks episode we talk with Dr. Gale M. Sinatra and Dr. Barbara K. Hofer why people often deny science and rely on their biases. How do you change your mind or stay in the middle and avoid choosing hard sides? We also talk about our own experiences with family and our church upbringing and why often it's hard to go against your tribe. If you haven't gotten tickets yet for our new visual album then get those at Momenthouse. http://Momenthouse.com/emery https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B096SQYXY8/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0 Marriage supply: https://bit.ly/3gU1MRG BadChristian.com thebcclub.com Emeryland: emerymusic.com/emeryland

The Grand Scheme
Snatching Sinatra | Chapter 7: The Proceeds

The Grand Scheme

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 32:48


While hiding out at a friend's house, Barry counts out cash as the plot thickens around him. He's lost track of his accomplices, and when he switches on the radio, he discovers he's also lost Frank Sinatra Jr. By the time Barry tracks down John Irwin and Joe Amsler, there are sketches of his face on the front page of the LA Times. Time is running out - but as usual, Barry has a plan. And that plan is: to go Christmas shopping.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Real Food Made Easy
Getting barefoot to heal!

Real Food Made Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 33:01


The benefits of earthing are profound! Check out the references Susana has provided below and visit her website to learn more about working this earthy and smart Coach. Chevalier G. (2015). The effect of grounding the human body on mood. Psychological reports, 116(2), 534–542. https://doi.org/10.2466/06.PR0.116k21w5. Chevalier, G., Sinatra, S. T., Oschman, J. L., & Delany, R. M. (2013). Earthing (grounding) the human body reduces blood viscosity—a major factor in cardiovascular disease. The journal of alternative and complementary medicine, 19(2), 102-110. https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/acm.2011.0820?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%20%200pubmedChevalier, G., Sinatra, S. T., Oschman, J. L., Sokal, K., & Sokal, P. (2012). Earthing: health implications of reconnecting the human body to the earth's surface electrons. Journal of environmental and public health, 2012. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22757749/Ghaly, M., & Teplitz, D. (2004). The biologic effects of grounding the human body during sleep as measured by cortisol levels and subjective reporting of sleep, pain, and stress. Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.), 10(5), 767–776. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2004.10.767Menigoz, W., Latz, T. T., Ely, R. A., Kamei, C., Melvin, G., & Sinatra, D. (2020). Integrative and lifestyle medicine strategies should include Earthing (grounding): Review of research evidence and clinical observations. EXPLORE, 16(3), 152-160. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550830719305476?via%3DihubOschman, J. L., Chevalier, G., & Brown, R. (2015). The effects of grounding (earthing) on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Journal of Inflammation Research, 8, 83.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4378297/

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Sundays With Sinatra | 08-29-2021

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 175:09


Host Joe Piscopo is going to take you on a Frank Sinatra Journey baby!

The Jeff Ward Show
James Kaplan, author, Sinatra: The Chairman, and Frank: The Voice

The Jeff Ward Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 35:39


"The Jeff Ward Show” is for those who are unafraid to be intellectually challenged. With no political, social, or moral agenda, snarky Austin-based host, Jeff Ward, consistently challenges his audience to examine relevant issues and situations in alternative ways. Ward, who is known for his bold, irreverent commentary on stuff that matters, never leaves listeners without their curiosity piqued, their beliefs challenged, or their minds reeling. If you crave more of those “whoa” moments in your life, then you need “The Jeff Ward Show.” Subscribe, rate and write a review to Our Little Show!    Jeff Ward is a highly decorated former NCAA football player with extensive ties to the University of Texas. He's been nominated as an Outstanding Young Texas Ex, and while a student at The University of Texas, he was a four-year Letterman in football, a football team captain, a member of the Athletics Director's Academic Honor Roll, a three-time all-conference football player, and a two-time All-American football player. He's among the top five all-time leading scorers at The University of Texas, and he's the NCAA record holder for game-winning field goals. He was selected in the 1988 NFL Draft to play football professionally. The podcast market is oversaturated with NCAA and NFL football content but with Jeff, you get the educated perspective of someone who's lived it.    Jeff has been appearing on both national news and local (Texas-based) news platforms to discuss sports, politics and economics for over 20 years. Jeff's time at The University of Texas provided him with knowledge of worldwide economics, marketing strategies and the economics of sports, particularly with NCAA Football. With the NCAA always finding itself involved in hot-button issues, Jeff Ward explains what's going on behind the scenes.    Jeff takes a libertarian position when it comes to politics. Jeff is a Libertarian to maximize autonomy and freedom of politics. Jeff is aware that people are not going to agree with all of his opinions when it comes to politics, but he challenges you to look at other perspectives.  Being Libertarian displays a skepticism of authority and state power, but some Libertarians diverge on the scope of their opposition to existing systems of economics and systems of politics. Libertarian thinking highlights the dignity of each individual. The growing extension of dignity to people is one of the great libertarian achievements of the world. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Downtown Writers Jam
Mini Episode 20: Drs. Gale Sinatra and Barbara Hofer

The Downtown Writers Jam

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 39:47


Drs. Gale Sinatra and Barbara Hofer are the latest researchers to stop by the Bunker to talk about their work understanding why people are rejecting science these days. Their book, Science Denial, is out now. Gale, Barbara, and Brad took a deep dive into the psychology of why people deny some parts of science and discussed the ways we can understand the underlying fears and concerns people have. This is a Don't Miss Episode! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A.L.I.V.E. with Jessica Silverman
Ep 23: Fueling Femme Dreams + Bringing BIG Ideas to Life with Lauren Spalding, aka "Hermixalot"

A.L.I.V.E. with Jessica Silverman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 57:44


Today's episode couldn't have been more divine timing with Women's Equality Day this week on August 26th, and Lauren's birthday which was on August 23rd (Happy Birthday Lauren!) What a better way to celebrate than by soaking in her energy + POWERFUL message in fueling femme dreams and how she has been able to bring BIG ideas to life (Tits first, you'll hear the story behind this!) Come ALIVE + climb the Lauren Spalding tree with me, rooted in LOVE above all else, which takes many forms such as the movement of music + anything creative that Universally speaks to your Soul. In her words, “Be present in the moment, and try to string together as many moments as you can that feel good, and do good.” Lauren is a beacon of hope to provide womxn and non binary folx the opportunity to become DJ's, producers, and engineers in the music world through the educational non-profit Femme House, for which she co-founded with LP Giobbi. In 2021, still only 2.5% of non-males are producers + engineers. More on Lauren: Lauren A. Spalding graduated from high school on a Thursday afternoon, and started working as a publicity intern at Capitol Records the next morning (where the Beatles, Sinatra, and Nat King Cole recorded!) That was over fifteen years ago, and she hasn't worked a “real” job since. As an artist management consultant for her own shop, The Spalding Company, she's shepherded fruitful partnerships to help bring her clients' big ideas to life. As a managing member of Sofi Tukker's artist oasis, Animal Talk Collective, she's been a songwriter, party planner, publishing executive, and webmaster, sometimes all in the same day. As co-founder of educational non-profit FEMME HOUSE, she chips away at the equity gap inherent to the technical roles of the music industry, providing womxn and non binary folx opportunities to learn how to be producers and engineers. And as her artist alter ego, Hermixalot, she lives out her pre-teen Missy Elliot dreams, writing and performing songs to move the people. Lauren A. Spalding, The Spalding Company Music Curator, W San FranciscoCo-Founder + Executive Director, FEMME HOUSEManager, Animal Talk CollectiveShe is the Music Mentorship with Paty Cantú and Alicia Keys Book recommendation: The Alchemist Connect with Me:Live Vibrant: Come ALIVE with me with my new Live Vibrant experience, kicking off August 30th! Instagram: @mozen_wellnessWebsite: https://jessicasilverman.vipmembervault.comFacebook Group: A.L.I.V.E. with Jessica Silverman - bit.ly/mozenwellness If you enjoyed this episode, follow/subscribe to my show to help this podcast reach more listeners so I can keep this beautiful production flowing back to you! xo, JessSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/alivepodcast)

Vanishing Postcards
11. Postcard from Galveston - "Memories of the Maceos"

Vanishing Postcards

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 35:01


While garden clubs and hotel brochures are quick to remind visitors of Galveston's Gilded Age, few seem to acknowledge that in the more recent past this beachfront city provided a luxurious playground where the likes of Sinatra and Alice Faye flocked to gamble and dance at hotspots like The Balinese Room. Featuring stories of the Maceo brothers who once dominated this island's nightlife, and memories of a few who experienced these good times first hand, our latest episode takes listeners on a trip back to a time and place known as “The Free State of Galveston.” Maceo Spice Kimber Fountain Peter Mintun - piano --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/evan-stern1/message

The Roundtable
Book By Friend Who Spent The Wee Small Hours With Sinatra

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 15:52


Tony Oppedisano joins us to talk about his book "Sinatra and Me: In the Wee Small Hours." Oppedisano was Sinatra's closest confidant for the last decade of his life and the book delivers an intimate portrait of Ol' Blue Eyes.

Just Like The Movies
Ocean's 11 (2001)

Just Like The Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 99:24


Ocean's 11 is the rare remake that is better than the original (sorry Sinatra faithful), but that doesn't mean we loved it. Possibly the least liked film by Mike and Johnny to date on the rewatch and we get into why, but that doesn't mean there weren't things we really enjoyed. This is one of our more tangent-loaded episodes and we go off the rails a bit, but in our opinion - in the best way possible. Our apologies to Carl Reiner's family for this episode of the podcast... Subscribe to the podcast free on your preferred app and if it has a rating system, consider giving us a good one! And please share the link to our show with a friend who loves movies! Thank you for listening and be kind, rewind, relax, and enjoy the show.

The Grand Scheme
Snatching Sinatra | Chapter 6: Heavenly Valley

The Grand Scheme

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 29:40


Barry and Pam sneak back into his hotel room in Lake Tahoe to clean up the evidence he mistakenly left behind the previous night. The place is crawling with cops and FBI agents, so Barry and Pam go undercover as honeymooning skiers, and take to the bunny slopes to evade capture. The plan works like a charm. But when Barry gets back to Los Angeles, he's got a mutiny on his hands. Forced to improvise, Barry re-jiggers his ransom plan on the fly, and before long, he finds himself in a stand-off with the FBI.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix
Talking Willis Reed, Sinatra and Ali, with photographer George Kalinsky

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 60:14


On the Friday edition, Howard Beck welcomes legendary photographer George Kalinsky, who will be inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame next month. Kalinsky, the official photographer for Madison Square Garden since 1966, shares stories from his time with Knicks legend Willis Reed, as well as Frank Sinatra, Muhammad Ali and others. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Grand Scheme
Snatching Sinatra | Chapter 5: Strangers in the Night

The Grand Scheme

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 29:27


With Junior successfully nabbed at last, Barry and Joe make a death-defying escape from Lake Tahoe in the middle of a blizzard. Junior proves surprisingly compliant - even lending Barry a hand in his attempts to evade the police. Convinced that Junior's cooperation is evidence of the divine inspiration fueling the Plan of Operation, Barry arrives back in Los Angeles after an all-night road trip feeling exhausted but hopeful...until Junior abruptly stops cooperating and starts playing hardball.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin
Alex Gibney Seeks Truth

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 51:06


Alex Gibney is one of the most respected and prolific documentary filmmakers in history. His stories feature strong characters and a propulsive narrative that often exposes malfeasance or incompetency, and the victim is often the little guy or our highest ideals, like democracy. Gibney has made over 30 has made in the last two decades, including Taxi to the Dark Side, his 2008 film about the CIA's use of torture for which he won an Oscar. Alex Gibney talks to Alec about his latest film, The Crime of the Century (HBO), which he wrote, directed, produced, and narrated, and which explores the crime and manipulation at the center of the nation's opioid crisis. He also talks about inheriting his anti-authoritarian views, early lessons working with Scorcese, and what it was like to take on a legend like Sinatra. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Over My Dead Body
Introducing The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra

Over My Dead Body

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 8:43


Hosted and narrated by John Stamos, The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra is a complicated, nuanced story of one imperfect man trying to redeem himself by pulling off the perfect crime. Did you ever feel like everything's broken, and it's your job to fix it? That's how Barry Keenan was feeling back in 1963. He was broke, unemployed, hooked on booze and pills, and his family was falling apart. Barry needed a miracle. And against all odds, he got one. One day the voice of God came over the radio in Barry's car and told him there was a simple solution to all his problems: all he had to do was kidnap Frank Sinatra, Jr. For the first time ever, Barry Keenan shares his version of the bizarre story in his own words, from beginning to end. This is just a preview of The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra, but you can listen to full episodes at wondery.fm/TGS_OverMyDeadBody/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American History Tellers
Introducing The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 8:33


Hosted and narrated by John Stamos, The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra is a complicated, nuanced story of one imperfect man trying to redeem himself by pulling off the perfect crime. Did you ever feel like everything's broken, and it's your job to fix it? That's how Barry Keenan was feeling back in 1963. He was broke, unemployed, hooked on booze and pills, and his family was falling apart. Barry needed a miracle. And against all odds, he got one. One day the voice of God came over the radio in Barry's car and told him there was a simple solution to all his problems: all he had to do was kidnap Frank Sinatra, Jr. For the first time ever, Barry Keenan shares his version of the bizarre story in his own words, from beginning to end. This is just a preview of The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra, but you can listen to full episodes at wondery.fm/TGS_HistoryTellers.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Vanished Podcast
Introducing The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra

The Vanished Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 8:43


Hosted and narrated by John Stamos, The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra is a complicated, nuanced story of one imperfect man trying to redeem himself by pulling off the perfect crime. Did you ever feel like everything's broken, and it's your job to fix it? That's how Barry Keenan was feeling back in 1963. He was broke, unemployed, hooked on booze and pills, and his family was falling apart. Barry needed a miracle. And against all odds, he got one. One day the voice of God came over the radio in Barry's car and told him there was a simple solution to all his problems: all he had to do was kidnap Frank Sinatra, Jr. For the first time ever, Barry Keenan shares his version of the bizarre story in his own words, from beginning to end. This is just a preview of The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra, but you can listen to full episodes at wondery.fm/TGS_TheVanished.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Generation Why Podcast
Introducing The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra

The Generation Why Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 8:36


Hosted and narrated by John Stamos, The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra is a complicated, nuanced story of one imperfect man trying to redeem himself by pulling off the perfect crime. Did you ever feel like everything's broken, and it's your job to fix it? That's how Barry Keenan was feeling back in 1963. He was broke, unemployed, hooked on booze and pills, and his family was falling apart. Barry needed a miracle. And against all odds, he got one. One day the voice of God came over the radio in Barry's car and told him there was a simple solution to all his problems: all he had to do was kidnap Frank Sinatra, Jr. For the first time ever, Barry Keenan shares his version of the bizarre story in his own words, from beginning to end. This is just a preview of The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra, but you can listen to full episodes at wondery.fm/TGS_GenerationWhy.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Mysterious Mr. Epstein
Introducing The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra

The Mysterious Mr. Epstein

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 8:33


Hosted and narrated by John Stamos, The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra is a complicated, nuanced story of one imperfect man trying to redeem himself by pulling off the perfect crime. Did you ever feel like everything's broken, and it's your job to fix it? That's how Barry Keenan was feeling back in 1963. He was broke, unemployed, hooked on booze and pills, and his family was falling apart. Barry needed a miracle. And against all odds, he got one. One day the voice of God came over the radio in Barry's car and told him there was a simple solution to all his problems: all he had to do was kidnap Frank Sinatra, Jr. For the first time ever, Barry Keenan shares his version of the bizarre story in his own words, from beginning to end. This is just a preview of The Grand Scheme: Snatching Sinatra, but you can listen to full episodes at wondery.fm/TGS_MrEpstein.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.