Podcast appearances and mentions of Houston Post

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  • 27PODCASTS
  • 53EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
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  • Sep 27, 2021LATEST
Houston Post

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Best podcasts about Houston Post

Latest podcast episodes about Houston Post

Houston Matters
Texas Passes The 4 Million COVID-19 Case Mark (Sept. 27, 2021)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 50:32


On Monday's Houston Matters: There have been four million COVID-19 cases in Texas since the beginning of the pandemic. That news comes as booster shots become available for some 60 million older or at-risk Americans who received the Pfizer vaccine. We discuss those and other developments with Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. Also this hour: This week, the PBS series American Experience presents Citizen Hearst, a two-part biography of newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst. In conjunction, we reflect on Houston's newspaper history by talking with some former writers for the now-defunct Houston Post. Then, veterinarian Dr. Lori Teller answers your pet care questions. And we get an update on Houston sports.

LAisOurHouse
LA v Houston Post Game Interview w/ Greg Vanney, Chicharito, and Jonathan Klinsmann

LAisOurHouse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 18:49


LOS ANGELES (Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021) – Playing the first of two games in four days, the LA Galaxy fought back to earn a 1-1 draw against Houston Dynamo FC at Dignity Health Sports Park on Wednesday night. Javier “Chicharito” Hernandez tallied his 11th goal of the season, while Dejan Joveljić notched his second assist for the Galaxy. Wednesday's match marked the 33rd MLS regular-season meeting between LA and the Houston Dynamo, with the Galaxy trailing the series 11-12-10. In 15 all-time regular-season meetings against Houston at Dignity Health Sports Park, the Galaxy have posted a 6-4-5 record. In the last seven meetings between LA and Houston at Dignity Health Sports Park dating back to March 21, 2015, the Galaxy hold a 3-1-3 record.

Houston Sports Talk
Episode 543: Ep. 543: Remembering Astros Pitcher J.R. Richard (Listening back to our interview with the legend)

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 22:55


With the passing of Houston Astros pitching legend J.R. Richard this week, Host Robert Land shares his conversation with Richard a few years ago. Richard remembers striking out Willie Mays 3 times in his very 1st Astros, his high school basketball days, his feelings towards the Astros organization and so much more. Plus, Houston Post and Chronicle reporter Kenny Hand describes what it was like to find out J.R. Richard was homeless and Richard's close friend Enos Cabell explains what it was like to watch him pitch.Subscribe to us on Spotify, Apple, the Google podcast app or the Tunein app. Email Info@HoustonSportsTalk.net for questions, suggestions or comments. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @HSTPodcast

Bar Crawl Radio
Evelyn Kanter: News Reporter and Mavin of New York City

Bar Crawl Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 38:40


We had a delightful conversation under the Joan of Arc Statue on W. 93rd Street in Manhattan with Evelyn Kanter -- NYC TV news reporter and guide book writer – about her new book 100 Things to Do in New York City before You Die. Ms. Kanter has a degree in journalism from the University of Missouri. She was the consumer reporter on WABC-TV “Eyewitness News” and before that on WCBS Radio reporting on rip-offs and best buys. She has written for the New Times, Post and Daily News, as well as The Houston Post – and has rubbed elbows with Peter Jennings and Walter Cronkite and other notable broadcast greats. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Houston Sports Talk
Episode 499: Ep. 499: Memories of Rockets Owner Charlie Thomas (with Houston Post Reporter Robert Falkoff)

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2021 31:22


With the passing of Rockets former owner Charlie Thomas, former Rockets beat writer Robert Falkoff joins Host Robert Land to share memories of Thomas. Falkoff talks about how Thomas helped built Clutch City and how he had to make 2 major trades with implications as big as the James Harden deal. Falkoff also hits on the coin flips that Thomas won which led to Hakeem Olajuwon and Ralph Sampson. Subscribe to us on Spotify, Apple, the Google podcast app or the Stitcher app. Email Info@HoustonSportsTalk.net for questions, suggestions or comments. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @HSTPodcast

KAZI 88.7 FM Book Review
Episode 123: Historians, Journalist and Civil Rights Leader Discuss Social Justice

KAZI 88.7 FM Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 119:10


At the Fourth Annual Celebration of Diverse Literary Voices of Texas: Protests and Civil Rights on Saturday, July 11, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. on Zoom, the panelists engaged in a wide ranging discussion over lessons to be learned from the past work of civil rights leaders for the activists of today. The panelists were Peniel E. Joseph, author of THE SWORD AND THE SHIELD: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Linder, President of the Austin NAACP, Reginald Owens, former Chair of the Journalism Department, Louisiana Tech University, and Brandon K. Winford, author of JOHN HERVEY WHEELER: Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights. Peniel Joseph holds a joint professorship appointment at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the History Department in the College of Liberal Arts at The University of Texas at Austin. He is also the founding director of the LBJ School’s Center for the Study of Race and Democracy. Dr. Joseph is also the author of WAITING 'TIL THE MIDNIGHT HOUR: A Narrative History of Black Power in America, DARK DAYS, BRIGHT NIGHTS: From Black Power to Barack Obama, and STOKELY: A Life. Nelson Linder has served as the president of the Austin NAACP since 2000. He has won numerous awards for his civil rights activism including the Austin Urban League Whitney Young Award, the National NAACP Rupert Richardson Award, the University of Texas at Austin Dr. James Hill Community Circle Award, and the Austin Community College Lifetime Achievement Award, 2018. Reginald Owens was formerly the Chair of Journalism at Louisiana Tech University where he retired in 2016. He began his professional career as a police reporter at the Houston Post and later worked as managing editor of The (Houston) Informer, the third oldest black newspaper in the nation, and was a founding vice president of the Houston Association of Black Journalists. Brandon Winford is an assistant professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He is a historian of the late nineteenth and twentieth century United States and the African American experience, and his research focuses on the relationship between civil rights and black capitalism.

KAZI 88.7 FM Book Review
Episode 123: Historians, Journalist and Civil Rights Leader Discuss Social Justice

KAZI 88.7 FM Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 119:10


At the Fourth Annual Celebration of Diverse Literary Voices of Texas: Protests and Civil Rights on Saturday, July 11, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. on Zoom, the panelists engaged in a wide ranging discussion over lessons to be learned from the past work of civil rights leaders for the activists of today. The panelists were Peniel E. Joseph, author of THE SWORD AND THE SHIELD: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Linder, President of the Austin NAACP, Reginald Owens, former Chair of the Journalism Department, Louisiana Tech University, and Brandon K. Winford, author of JOHN HERVEY WHEELER: Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights.Peniel Joseph holds a joint professorship appointment at the LBJ School of Public Affairs and the History Department in the College of Liberal Arts at The University of Texas at Austin. He is also the founding director of the LBJ School's Center for the Study of Race and Democracy. Dr. Joseph is also the author of WAITING 'TIL THE MIDNIGHT HOUR: A Narrative History of Black Power in America, DARK DAYS, BRIGHT NIGHTS: From Black Power to Barack Obama, and STOKELY: A Life.Nelson Linder has served as the president of the Austin NAACP since 2000. He has won numerous awards for his civil rights activism including the Austin Urban League Whitney Young Award, the National NAACP Rupert Richardson Award, the University of Texas at Austin Dr. James Hill Community Circle Award, and the Austin Community College Lifetime Achievement Award, 2018.Reginald Owens was formerly the Chair of Journalism at Louisiana Tech University where he retired in 2016. He began his professional career as a police reporter at the Houston Post and later worked as managing editor of The (Houston) Informer, the third oldest black newspaper in the nation, and was a founding vice president of the Houston Association of Black Journalists. Brandon Winford is an assistant professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He is a historian of the late nineteenth and twentieth century United States and the African American experience, and his research focuses on the relationship between civil rights and black capitalism.

Beyond Boundaries Podcast
32: Deanna Benjamin

Beyond Boundaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2020 37:12


On this episode of the pod, Rob sits down with Assistant Dean in the College of Arts & Sciences and Senior Lecturer in the College Writing Program & University College, Dr. Deanna Benjamin. We talk about Dr. Benjamin's roles in advising current students and highlighting the work of young writers all over the WashU campus in her role as Co-Chair of the McLeod First-Year Writing Prize, an annual prize that recognizes student writing that addresses race, gender, and/or identity. We talk about her love of her students and delve into discussing her past life as a thespian working on stage lighting, her undergrad studies at University of Houston and grad work at Arizona State, and her work as a copy runner and copy editor for the Houston Post newspaper that allowed her to literally say "stop the presses!" on one occasion.

Composers Datebook
Hovhaness in "HOOS-ton"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2020 2:00


On today’s date in 1955, Leopold Stokowski gave his first concert as the new music director of the Houston Symphony—or, as Stoki pronounced it, the “HOOSTON Symphony.” It was a major cultural event in those days. NBC even televised a bit of the famously white-maned conductor rehearsing the Texans in a brand-new work that Stokowski himself had commissioned for the occasion: the second symphony of Alan Hovhaness, subtitled “Mysterious Mountain.” At the time, Hovhaness explained his subtitle as follows: “Mountains are symbols, like pyramids, of man’s attempt to know God. Mountains are symbolic meeting places between the mundane and spiritual worlds.” The new piece proved to be a terrific success for all concerned. The next day, the Houston Post’s music critic wrote, “The real mystery of Mysterious Mountain is that it should be so simple, sweetly, innocently lovely in an age that has tried so terribly hard to avoid those impressions in music.” For his part, Hovhaness once said, “Things that are complicated tend to disappear and get lost. Simplicity is difficult, not easy.” Before his death in the year 2000, Hovhaness would complete 67 symphonies.

Composers Datebook
Hovhaness in "HOOS-ton"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2020 2:00


On today’s date in 1955, Leopold Stokowski gave his first concert as the new music director of the Houston Symphony—or, as Stoki pronounced it, the “HOOSTON Symphony.” It was a major cultural event in those days. NBC even televised a bit of the famously white-maned conductor rehearsing the Texans in a brand-new work that Stokowski himself had commissioned for the occasion: the second symphony of Alan Hovhaness, subtitled “Mysterious Mountain.” At the time, Hovhaness explained his subtitle as follows: “Mountains are symbols, like pyramids, of man’s attempt to know God. Mountains are symbolic meeting places between the mundane and spiritual worlds.” The new piece proved to be a terrific success for all concerned. The next day, the Houston Post’s music critic wrote, “The real mystery of Mysterious Mountain is that it should be so simple, sweetly, innocently lovely in an age that has tried so terribly hard to avoid those impressions in music.” For his part, Hovhaness once said, “Things that are complicated tend to disappear and get lost. Simplicity is difficult, not easy.” Before his death in the year 2000, Hovhaness would complete 67 symphonies.

CCERP Podcast
20 Managing Houston Flooding: Floodplain Expert Bob Freitag and Environmental Advocate Susan Chadwick

CCERP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2020 102:02


Today we are joined by Susan Chadwick, environmental advocate and Executive Director of Save Buffalo Bayou, and Bob Freitag, expert on hazard mitigation and floodplain management, to discuss -Houston flooding-the USACE Interim Report (2020) on trying to manage flooding by altering Buffalo Bayou and Cypress Creek-floodplain management-modern science vs. old thinking about streams and floodplains-the nature of streams-how streams interact with geology, tides, flora, ecology, and climate-strategies for managing flooding -cost-benefit analyses of different strategies-benefits of modern, scientific, natural strategies over those of old, constrained strategies-what has worked elsewhere in the country and the world, and how some places are "rewilding" streams and discovering the deep, varied economic value of free "ecological services"About Susan: Susan Chadwick, a writer and journalist who grew up on Buffalo Bayou, is the president and executive director of Save Buffalo Bayou. She was the art critic for the Houston Post from 1985 until it closed in 1995.More about Susan, her work, and her contact info, at:a. https://www.linkedin.com/in/susan-chadwick-66502a3b/b. www.SaveBuffaloBayou.orgc. https://www.facebook.com/SaveBuffaloBayou/About: Bob Freitag is Senior Instructor Part-time and Director of the Institute for Hazards Mitigation Planning and Research (IHMP). The University of Washington Institute for Hazards Mitigation is an interdisciplinary academic Institute housed in the Department of Urban Design and Planning within the College of Built Environments at the University of Washington. http://mitigate.be.uw.edu) He is the past Executive Director of the Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup (http://www.crew.org/) and past member of the Association of State Floodplain Managers’ Board of Directors. (http://www.floods.org/) Bob is also a Certified Floodplain Manager. He has published many articles and written courses for FEMA and others concerning hazards mitigation and floodplain management, and was lead author of “Floodplain Management: a new approach for a new era” (Island Press 2009). Before coming to the University, he had a 25-year career with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) serving as Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO); Public Assistance, Mitigation and Education Officer. Prior to FEMA he was employed by several private architectural and engineering consultant firms in Hawaii and Australia, and taught science as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Philippines. Freitag received his Master of Urban Planning degree from the University of Washington. Contact Bob here: http://urbdp.be.washington.edu/people/robert-freitag/His book Floodplain Management: A New Approach for a New Eraby Bob Freitag, Susan Bolton, Frank Westerlund, Julie Clark: https://www.amazon.com/Floodplain-Management-New-Approach-Era/dp/1597266353Contact Michael:1. ccerppodcast@aol.com2. http://www.goldams.com 3. https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-gold-2883921/ 4. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1152144714995033/Join us at CCERP on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/1152144714995033/Show notes:1. Effect of and damage caused by Hurricane Harvey: https://www.khou.com/article/weather/hurricane/harvey/final-report-shows-harveys-impact-on-harris-county-by-the-numbers/285-5620169322. 2019 disasters and their costs: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/national/article239153533.html3. US Army Corps of Engineers' "Buffalo Bayou and Tributaries Resiliency Study, Texas:" https://www.swg.usace.army.mil/Portals/26/BBTnT_Interim_Report_202001001_Final_1.pdf?fbclid=IwAR0VI6q_U1Td_J3YXUwE3yMgwOKF3qsa0-BbZa8nRhIjZKKDiWg95823bcA4. Vermont flooding in Irma: "The Connecticut River Watershed Council and The Conservation Law Foundation have joined together to step back to look at why Otter Creek in Rutland leapt up as Irene struck, increasing in flow by nearly 20 times in the space of a little more than a day, while downstream in Middlebury the river rose much more gradually, and more safely." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucb-Y8iipng&fbclid=IwAR1g9l0tePGJxV3fj1xfrpWvtxKKTTaV84TXzQp3bh4CQT1ipOjkLebXHJg5. Rewilding Europea. https://rewildingeurope.comb. https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/europe/stories-in-europe/restoring-free-flowing-rivers-in-europe/c. https://europe.wetlands.org/publications/ecosystem-services-and-river-restoration/d. https://ec.europa.eu/environment/life/project/Projects/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.showFile&rep=file&fil=LIFE09_INF_UK_000032_LAYMAN.pdf6. The importance of Beaversa. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4t8h8nchfMb. https://www.npr.org/2018/06/24/620402681/the-bountiful-benefits-of-bringing-back-the-beaversc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwnXLllzi60d. https://www.aswm.org/aswm/aswm-webinarscalls/3355-2020-past-beaver-restoration-webinar-series#beaver17. Of the Mississippi River, "Mark Twain noted in 1883 that 'ten thousand river commissions, with the mines of the world at their back, cannot tame that lawless stream, cannot curb it or confine it, cannot say to it, go here, or go there, and make it obey.' From: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/long_reads/mississippi-national-waterway-trump-infrastructure-river-enviorment-a8266366.html8. Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America by John M. Barry: https://www.amazon.com/Rising-Tide-Mississippi-Changed-America/dp/0684840022/9. A tree, depending on factors such as age and species, can absorb 20-250 gallons of water per day, more or less. At , say 400 trees per acre in a forest, that is 8,000-100,000 galleons of water per day. See, for example:a. https://www.lsu.edu/botanic-gardens/research/trees.phpb. https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h/H636/c. https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/34466/PDFd. https://www.fs.fed.us/projects/hfi/10. Klamath River Restorationa. http://www.klamathrenewal.orgb. https://www.nfwf.org/programs/klamath-basin-restoration-program c. Salmon River: http://srrc.org11. Land subsidence from water dischargea. "Land Subsidence From Ground-Water Pumping" by S. A. Leake, U.S. Geological Survey: https://geochange.er.usgs.gov/sw/changes/anthropogenic/subside/b. "Texas Gulf Coast Groundwater and Land Subsidence:" https://txpub.usgs.gov/houston_subsidence/home/index.htmlc. "Land Subsidence due to Ground-Water Withdrawal Tulare-Wasco Area California" by B. E. Lofgren and R. L. Klausing: https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0437b/report.pdfd. "SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA:" https://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/circ1182/pdf/06SanJoaquinValley.pdf12. David Suzuki Foundation: https://davidsuzuki.org13. Ecosystem Valuationa. "The Value of the World's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital"by Robert Costanza, et. al.: https://mro.massey.ac.nz/bitstream/handle/10179/9476/Costanza%20et%20al%20%20Nature%201997%20prepublicaton.pdfb. "Twenty years of ecosystem services: How far have we come and how far do we still need to go?" by Robert Costanza, et. al.: https://www.robertcostanza.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/2017_J_Costanza-et-al.-20yrs.-EcoServices.pdfc. TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaAEfERGyO8d. Robert Costanza talk "Flourishing on Earth: Lessons from Ecological Economics:" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZkTlVPgqG4e. "Natural Capital and Ecosystem Services – Professor Robert Costanza:" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4F3M1b1bdI14. Association of State Wetland Managersa. https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Assiation+wetland+managers&t=osx&ia=webb. their floodplain functions videos: https://www.aswm.org/watersheds/natural-floodplain-function-alliance/1790-webinars.htmlc. ecosystem valuation: https://www.aswm.org/wetland-science/planning-design/ecosystem-service-valuationd. links to science on floodplains, wetlands, restoration, etc.: https://www.aswm.org/wetland-science15. Tides and riversa. https://eos.org/research-spotlights/when-rivers-and-tides-collideb. https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2015RG00050716. Food Forestsa. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GJFL0MD9fcb. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_m_0UPOzuIc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjUsobGWhs8d. https://projectfoodforest.org/what-is-a-food-forest/e. https://www.wildhomesteading.com/food-forest/17. Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World by David Epstein: https://www.amazon.com/Range-Generalists-Triumph-Specialized-World/dp/0735214484/18. Learning environments and domains: "kind" vs. "wicked"a. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-media-psychology-effect/202010/the-success-equation-our-wicked-worldb. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/experience-studio/202007/experience-kind-vs-wickedBios courtesy Susan Chadwick and Bob FretagImage from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SanJacinto_Watershed.png

BYU Football
BYU vs Houston: Post Game Show

BYU Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2020 98:37


BYU vs Houston: Post Game Show

BYU Football
BYU vs Houston: Post Game Show

BYU Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2020


Houston Sports Talk
Ep. 439: Our J.R. Richard conversation on the 40th anniversary of 'The Stroke' (Throwback Thursday)

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2020 21:57


With this week being the 40th anniversary of the Stroke that ended J.R. Richard's destined Hall of Fame run, Host Robert Land listens back to his conversation with Richard a few years ago. He remembers his very 1st Astros game, his basketball days, his feelings towards the Astros organization and so much more. Plus, Houston Post and Chronicle reporter Kenny Hand describes what it was like to find out J.R. Richard was homeless and Richard's close friend Enos Cabell explains what it was like to watch him pitch. Subscribe to us on Spotify, Apple, the Google podcast app or the Tunein app. Email Info@HoustonSportsTalk.net for questions, suggestions or comments. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @HSTPodcast

Houston Astros Podcast
6/22 ASTRO POD featuring Brian McTaggart

Houston Astros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 47:24


There's more to baseball than what fans see and hear on the field. Oftentimes, our eyes and ears of the ballpark come from our favorite broadcasters, photographers and reporters who cover this game each day and every day, with or without games being played. Brian McTaggart is a fan favorite who has been reporting, traveling and writing about the Houston Astros for 17 seasons and is the author of "100 Things Astros Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die." Broadcaster Steve Sparks catches up with the MLB.com reporter to see how he has been spending his time during the ambiguous 2020 season. McTaggart shares stories of growing up in Pasadena, spending his childhood at the Astrodome, writing for the Houston Post, attending U of H, covering the Little League World Series, Rice baseball and watching his favorite athlete, Hakeem Olajuwon. Episode 28 with McTaggart covers a lot of baseball but it takes us off the field for a few adventures as well.

Houston Astros Podcast
6/22 ASTRO POD featuring Brian McTaggart

Houston Astros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 47:24


There's more to baseball than what fans see and hear on the field. Oftentimes, our eyes and ears of the ballpark come from our favorite broadcasters, photographers and reporters who cover this game each day and every day, with or without games being played. Brian McTaggart is a fan favorite who has been reporting, traveling and writing about the Houston Astros for 17 seasons and is the author of "100 Things Astros Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die." Broadcaster Steve Sparks catches up with the MLB.com reporter to see how he has been spending his time during the ambiguous 2020 season. McTaggart shares stories of growing up in Pasadena, spending his childhood at the Astrodome, writing for the Houston Post, attending U of H, covering the Little League World Series, Rice baseball and watching his favorite athlete, Hakeem Olajuwon. Episode 28 with McTaggart covers a lot of baseball but it takes us off the field for a few adventures as well.

Houston Sports Talk
Ep. 426: The Legend of Muhammad Ali with Houston Columnist Mickey Herskowitz (Throwback Thursday)

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2020 21:54


Has it already been 4 years since the world lost Muhammad Ali? Host Robert Land looks back at his interview with Houston Post and Chronicle columnist Mickey Herskowitz, who shares several unforgettable personal stories from his 5 decades of covering Houston sports. Herskowitz was there at the recruiting office in Houston when Ali made the decision not to fight in Vietnam. Mickey drove through Harlem with Ali and gives us his incredible firsthand accounts of Ali's legend. Subscribe to us on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher and Tunein. Email Info@HoustonSportsTalk.net for questions or comments. Like ‘Houston Sports Talk’ on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @HSTPodcast

Houston Sports Talk
Ep. 423: Remembering the '86 Finals run with Rockets' Historian Robert Falkoff and Forward Robert Reid (Throwback Thursday)

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2020 48:56


For our Throwback Thursday, we look back at the '86 Rockets Finals run on the 34th anniversary of Ralph Sampson's buzzer beater against the Lakers (that put them in the Finals). Host Robert Land brings in former Houston Post beat writer Robert Falkoff to look at the build and the implosion of the '86 team, including the drug scandals and the injuries. Plus, Robert Reid joins us to give his perspective on what happened to Sampson, along with his memories of the '81 Finals run. Subscribe to us on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher and Tunein. Email Info@HoustonSportsTalk.net for questions or comments. Like ‘Houston Sports Talk’ on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @HSTPodcast

House of Mystery True Crime History
GARY TAYLOR - LUGGAGE BY KROGER

House of Mystery True Crime History

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 58:19


Luggage By Kroger has been recognized as one of 2009's top true crime thrillers with honors from five different national book competitions. The scorecard: * True Crime Silver Medal from the 2009 IPPYs * True Crime Bronze Medal and Finalist for Book-of-the-Year from the 2008 ForeWord Magazine Book-of-the-Year Awards * True Crime Runner-Up in the 2009 National Indie Excellence Awards * True Crime Finalist in the 2009 USA Book News Awards * General Nonfiction Runner-Up at the 2009 New York Book FestivalIn this true crime memoir, former Houston Post reporter Gary Taylor recounts his true-life fatal attraction involvement in the trail of violence that has dogged Texas attorney Catherine Mehaffey Shelton for nearly three decades, prompting coverage by newspapers, TV, movies and even Oprah Winfrey. Now Taylor invites readers to grab a seat on the wild ride of an obsessive relationship: erotic beginning to violent end and the trials required to clean up the mess. The result is an adventure odyssey of self-discovery through an encounter that nearly cost him his life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inside The Newsroom with Daniel Levitt
#74 — Major Garrett (CBS News)

Inside The Newsroom with Daniel Levitt

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2020 50:26


Hello! Welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom where today’s guest is… Major Garrett, Chief White House Correspondent for CBS News and one of the hardest working journalists in the world today. Major and I discussed everything from how nerve-wracking it is to ask questions in front of the world in the WH press briefing room, to his spats with Barack Obama to being in the Oval Office with Donald Trump. It truly was a fascinating conversation and below is a post-game of everything we talked about. But first, my picks of the week followed by some personal news… Enjoy! 🤓Picks of the WeekJoe Biden — Pressure is building on the Democratic nominee, who so far has remained silent pertaining to an alleged sexual assault from 1993Louis Theroux — The greatest documentarian to have ever lived has a podcast! His first guest is Jon RonsonTiger King — I finally caught up to the hoopla and my god this show is fucked up. But also my god everyone must watch itPersonal NewsToday is my last day working on the visuals desk at The Guardian. It’s been an incredible two years at the UK’s foremost news source and a dream come true working for my “hometown” paper I grew up reading. So it was incredibly tough to leave but I’m thrilled and blessed to be joining The Wall Street Journal on Monday. Here’s to the next chapter! Like Me, PleaseBefore you read on, please like this edition of Inside The Newsroom by clicking the ❤️ up top. That way I’ll appear in clever algorithms and more people will be able to read. Cheers.Major 👇Who is Major Garrett?Major graduated from Mizzou in 1984 with degrees in journalism and political science. He’s been CBS News’ Chief White House Correspondent since 2012, and before that made stops with multiple outlets including the Amarillo Globe-News, the Las Vegas Review-Journal, the Houston Post, The Washington Times, U.S. News and World Report, CNN, the National Journal and Fox News, making him truly one of the most non-partisan reporters in America. And putting him over the top giving him rockstar status, Major also appeared on the Late Show with the legendary Stephen Colbert…As you’ll discover from the podcast, there may not be a harder working political reporter today. Major is also the author of four books — Common Cents, The Enduring Revolution, The Fifteen Biggest Lies in Politics, and Mr. Trump’s Wild Ride — and host of two podcasts for CBS — The Takeout and Debriefing the Briefing. Many of you may know Major from his courage to ask presidents the toughest questions, and there’s no better place to start than with Barack Obama…Major vs ObamaMajor’s highest profile moment came in July 2015, when he asked then President Obama a tough question that rattled even the usually unshakable Obama. After signing off on a nuclear deal with Iran that reduced the amount of uranium — used to fuel nuclear weapons — stockpiled by Iran, Obama faced an hour of questions by reporters on the specifics of the deal and the decisions he made to get the deal over the line. One of those questions came from Major, who challenged the President on why he didn’t include the release of four American hostages held by the Iranians as a condition for the deal. Below is the encounter and Major’s take on the confrontation.But that wasn’t Major’s first run-in with Obama. In June 2009, Iran was once again the topic of contention, this time as it pertained to Obama placing his administration on the side of the grassroots protestors against the Iranian regime. Then working for Fox News, Major explained in the podcast that reporters from the wire services — the AP, Bloomberg, Reuters etc — are routinely the first to be called upon by the President, but on this day, Obama picked Major to ask the first question. Major had to begin the press conference by asking about the most important issue, so after reading back several of Obama’s statements, Major simply asked “What took you so long?”, referring to growing pressure over previous weeks for Obama to pick a side. Let’s just say Obama wasn’t too happy.Everything’s Different With President TrumpPresidents and the media have had feuds since politics began in America, but I’m not breaking news by asserting that reporting in the age of Trump is different to anything journalists have experienced before. Major has covered the administrations of Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Obama and Trump, and emphatically said he’s never covered a president so combative as Trump, and that includes his two run-ins with Obama. In normal circumstances, political reporters from different networks rarely offer feedback to their peers, often keeping to themselves and concentrating on the task ahead. But the Trump administration has altered that, and we may never have seen a White House press corps proverbially stand so close together with reporters from rival outlets often supporting one another in the briefing room amid the barrage of attacks from the man at the front.What’s the Point of Political Debates?Major has moderated three major political debates in his career, most recently the Democratic South Carolina debate in February. The amount of dedication and preparation that goes into each debate is admirable, often taking weeks to research and practice every question and every scenario. If you’re like me, you’ll devour every single minute of every single one of the billion political debates the RNC and DNC hold every presidential cycle, especially if it involves Republicans screwing up walking to the stage when their names are called. God damn it gets me every time. But once the dopamine has run out, you’ll question the actual motive of having so many damn debates. Between June 2019 and March 2020, the DNC held an insane 13 debates, with at least 10 candidates on the stage at one time in the first seven. Apart from boosting ratings and the millions of dollars generated in fundraising, the debates do actually have a practical purpose. Just ask Michael Bloomberg.After weeks of sinking hundreds of millions of dollars in TV ads, Bloomberg took to the stage for the first time in Nevada. At the time, Bloomberg’s poll numbers were surging to 16 percent and he looked like a legitimate contender, but that ended exactly 14 days later thanks to Queen Elizabeth Warren, who rolled Bloomberg’s racist and sexist temperament into a ball and flicked him away like a bogey. If you look close enough, you can actually see Mini Mike’s soul leave his body.Laughs and takedowns aside, do political debates actually make a difference to voting habits? How on earth is 30 or 60 seconds, often with grown adults shouting over one another, enough time to discuss solutions to real issues? In my opinion it’s not, and the scientific evidence largely agrees that noticeable changes in polling and voting after debates are hard to identify. This Week …#73 — Nick Rubando (U.S. House Candidate) on running for the office for the first time and why Midwestern politics is so weird … Last Week …#72 — Ryan Broderick (BuzzFeed) on the 15th anniversary of YouTube#71 — Andrea Jones-Rooy (Comedian, Social Scientist) shooting the s**t on coronavirus, journalism and other funny things … Next WeekBetsy Sweet (U.S. Senate Candidate) from MaineJob CornerSign up to the Inside The Newsroom Job Board for weekly updates to more than 500 journalism jobs, internships and freelance gigs in the U.S., UK and around the world.Thanks for making it all the way to the bottom. Please like and share this edition of Inside The Newsroom by clicking the ❤️ below. That way I’ll appear in clever algorithms and more people will be able to read.If you haven’t already, please consider subscribing to get a newsletter about a cool news topic in your inbox every time I publish. You can find me on Twitter at @DanielLevitt32 and email me corrections/feedback or even a guest you’d like me to get on the podcast at daniellevitt32@gmail.com. Get on the email list at insidethenewsroom.substack.com

CCERP Podcast
5 Susan Chadwick of Save Buffalo Bayou: Taking Care of Our Local Bayous and Creeks and Why We Need Them Natural

CCERP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2019 32:38


Today we are joined by Susan Chadwick of Save Buffalo Bayou for a discussion of our local area, its history, the importance of natural creeks and bayous, what you can do to keep things wild and natural, and the natural beauty around us. Enjoy! (Oh, my cat Prince adds some dialogue, too!)About Susan: Susan Chadwick, a writer and journalist who grew up on Buffalo Bayou, is the president and executive director of Save Buffalo Bayou. She was the art critic for the Houston Post from 1985 until it closed in 1995.More about Susan, her work, and her contact info, at:a. https://www.linkedin.com/in/susan-chadwick-66502a3b/b. www.SaveBuffaloBayou.orgc. https://www.facebook.com/SaveBuffaloBayou/Contact Michael:1. ccerppodcast@aol.com2. http://www.goldams.com 3. https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-gold-2883921/ 4. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1152144714995033/Join us at CCERP on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/1152144714995033/Show notes:1. Buffalo Bayou: a. http://www.savebuffalobayou.orgb. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_Bayouc. https://web.archive.org/web/20130403174413/http://www.hcfcd.org/L_buffalobayou.htmld. http://www.savebuffalobayou.org/?page_id=48502. Cypress Creeka. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cypress_Creek_(Texas)b. https://web.archive.org/web/20130403160508/http://www.hcfcd.org/L_cypresscreek.html3. Braes Bayou (aka Brays Bayou)a. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brays_Bayoub. https://web.archive.org/web/20130403125818/http://www.hcfcd.org/L_braysbayou.html4. Native plantsa. Purple Passionflower: https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PAIN6b. Prairie Nymph: https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=HELA6c. Natives database: http://www.txsmartscape.com/plant-search/d. Native and adapted: http://counties.agrilife.org/harris/files/2011/05/houstonplants.pdf5. Aristotlea. "To summarize: Aristotle’s philosophy laid out an approach to the investigation of all natural phenomena, to determine form by detailed, systematic work, and thus arrive at final causes. His logical method of argument gave a framework for putting knowledge together, and deducing new results. He created what amounted to a fully-fledged professional scientific enterprise, on a scale comparable to a modern university science department. It must be admitted that some of his work - unfortunately, some of the physics - was not up to his usual high standards. He evidently found falling stones a lot less interesting than living creatures. Yet the sheer scale of his enterprise, unmatched in antiquity and for centuries to come, gave an authority to all his writings."It is perhaps worth reiterating the difference between Plato and Aristotle, who agreed with each other that the world is the product of rational design, that the philosopher investigates the form and the universal, and that the only true knowledge is that which is irrefutable. The essential difference between them was that Plato felt mathematical reasoning could arrive at the truth with little outside help, but Aristotle believed detailed empirical investigations of nature were essential if progress was to be made in understanding the natural world. " Read more: https://galileoandeinstein.phys.virginia.edu/lectures/aristot2.htmlb. "The Greeks cast their science from first principles, without troubling to examine the natural world. Aristotle changed everything." Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/oct/02/the-lagoon-armand-marie-leroi-aristotle-reviewc. Great BBC show about the book:i. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JN8ortM4M3oii. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e12pbSHrzAs6. Gabe Brown a. the 8" figure: https://social.shorthand.com/PaintedMtCorn/jCPnGp7QYM6/plant-and-grow-rich-chapter-2b. his book Dirt To Soil: https://www.amazon.com/Dirt-Soil-Familys-Regenerative-Agriculture/dp/1603587632c. In episode 63 of the Peak Human Podcast, Gabe says his soil can infiltrate 30” of rain in one hour!! Listen here: https://overcast.fm/+Na3jvm6yM/40:10 (Or find the episode here: https://www.peak-human.com/ and tune in at about 40 min 10 sec.)7. Wolves and the Lamar River in Yellowstone: https://www.pbs.org/strangedays/episodes/predators/experts/yellowstonewolves.html8. All about Alligatorsa. https://www.zooamerica.com/animals/american-alligator/b. https://wildlifelearningcenter.org/animals/northamerica/american-alligator/c. https://www.nps.gov/ever/learn/nature/alligator.htmd. https://www.nwf.org/Educational-Resources/Wildlife-Guide/Reptiles/American-Alligator9. Brazos Bend State Park -- where you can see Alligators! :)https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/brazos-bend10. No, Alligators are not that dangerous to humansa. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fatal_alligator_attacks_in_the_United_Statesb. http://crocdoc.ifas.ufl.edu/publications/factsheets/Alligator%20Attack%20Risk%20Comparison%202019.pdfc. "The total number of alligator deaths per year in the U.S. is unclear, according to alligator experts. However, it is thought to be far smaller than the toll from spiders, which kill around seven people each year in the United States. Cows kill about 20. Dogs, known as "man's best friend," kill an average of 28. " (from https://mashable.com/2016/06/15/alligator-attacks-florida-orlando-rare/)d. "[F]rom 1999 to 2014, 921 people died in the United States from encountering hornets, wasps or bees, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During that same time span, nine people died from crocodile or alligator attacks, and 78 people died from attacks by other reptiles. ...Meanwhile, 486 people died from dog attacks and 1,163 people died from attacks by other mammals, such as cows or horses. About 4.5 million dog bites occur each year." (from https://www.cnn.com/2016/06/17/health/animal-attacks-statistics/index.html)e. "Alligators are opportunistic carnivores, preferring to go after readily available and easily overpowered prey. The reptiles generally don’t attack for reasons other than food and rarely pursue humans. ... In fact, alligators tend to be naturally afraid of humans, but they may lose that fear—and associate humans with food—when people feed them. For this reason, it’s illegal in the state of Florida to feed wild alligators." (from https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2016/06/alligator-attack-toddler-disney-world-grand-floridian/)Bio and image courtesy Susan Chadwick.

Arrowhead Pride Postgame Show Podcast
Chiefs vs Houston_Post Game Reactions

Arrowhead Pride Postgame Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2019 60:35


Callers react, Pat and Andy talk and Pete and Jay let it all out with whats wrong with this team right now. Enjoy

Forgotten Darkness
53 - The Oklahoma Earless Murders

Forgotten Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2019 31:29


In the summer of 1907, two bodies turned up in different sections of Oklahoma, shot, presumably robbed – and with their ears cut off. Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/ My Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/forgdark/ Opening music from https://filmmusic.io. "Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com). License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Closing music by Soma. SOURCES “Another mystery.” McAlester Daily Capital, August 2, 1907. “Black Hand in Oklahoma.” Drummond Herald, August 15, 1907. “Brutal murder in box car.” Parsons (KS) Daily Sun, July 29, 1907. “Bury body held 5 years.” St. Louis (MO) Globe-Democrat, April 29, 1912. “Charles Gunreth is a victim of murderous organization.” Oklahoma Post, August 2, 1907. “Crawford is yet alive.” Tuttle Times, August 9, 1907. “Crime is fixed on Tuttle man.” Lawton Daily News-Republican, August 2, 1907. “Crimes committed by the same persons?” Chickasha Daily Express, August 7, 1907. “Ear snipped body again identified.” Wichita Beacon, December 20, 1911. “Ear snipper up again.” Chickasha Daily Express, March 20, 1908. “Ear snippers are believed to be in custody of officers.” Oklahoma Post, September 9, 1907. “Earless body is unidentified.” McAlester Daily Capital, August 3, 1907. “Ears severed from the heads.” Jasper (IN) Herald, August 9, 1907. “Earlsboro man is discharged.” Shawnee Daily Herald, September 18, 1907. “Expect more arrests in Gunreth mystery.” Oklahoma Post, September 14, 1907. “False arrest suits in murder mystery put off.” Daily Oklahoman, April 22, 1910. “Find body of murdered man.” Oklahoma News, March 18, 1907. “Firm under sweating.” Ardmore Morning Democrat, September 11, 1907. “Five men arrested, two are discharged.” Chickasha Daily Express, July 30, 1907. “Frantz offers reward.” Daily Ardmoreite, August 12, 1907. “Fryrear returns.” Tuttle Times, August 16, 1907. “The Gunreth murder.” Lawton Daily News-Republican, March 25, 1908. “Identification now complete.” Hobart Daily Republican, April 1, 1907. “Identity of dead man brought to light.” Hobart Daily Republican, March 22, 1907. “Indian may have committed the crime.” Oklahoma Post, August 2, 1907. “Isabel boy not victim.” Wichita Daily Eagle, August 23, 1907. “Isabel items.” Barber County Index, September 4, 1907. “Maintain innocence.” Chickasha Daily Express, September 11, 1907. “Man found in Elk Creek.” Roosevelt Record, March 22, 1907. “May be murderers of unknown man.” Lawton Daily News-Republican, July 29, 1907. “May catch ear snippers.” Chickasha Daily Express, December 26, 1907. “May have been Tuttle man.” Lawton Daily News-Republican, August 1, 1907. “May have murderer.” Chickasha Journal, July 30, 1907. “Most brutal murder committed.” Chickasha Daily Express, July 29, 1907. “Mummy is positively identified.” Chickasha Daily Express, December 21, 1911. “Murder case still a mystery.” Oklahoma City Weekly Times, August 9, 1907. “Murder growing mysterious.” Cement Courier, August 9, 1907. “Murder mystery grows complex!” Hobart Daily Republican, July 20, 1907. “Murdered in car.” Fort Smith (AR) Times, July 29, 1907. “Mysterious ear clipping baffle Oklahoma officials.” Greensboro (NC) Daily News, October 27, 1907. “Mysteriously disappeared.” Tuttle Times, August 2, 1907. “Not able to solve.” Shawnee Union Gazette, August 3, 1907. “Officers have right clue in big mystery.” Ardmore Morning Democrat, September 18, 1907. “One more victim of band of thugs.” Muskogee Daily Phoenix, August 2, 1907. “Sees his sister among the dead.” Oklahoma Post, September 1, 1907. “Still unidentified.” Daily Ardmoreite, August 20, 1907. “Theory of Gunreth murder revives old seduction story.” Oklahoma Post, August 7, 1907. “Three Tuttle men arrested.” Chickasha Journal, August 1, 1907. “To call special grand jury.” Chickasha Journal, August 5, 1907. “Two men found dead with ears clipped off.” Houston Post, September 3, 1912. “Unknown man murdered in Frisco box car.” Chickasha Journal, July 29, 1907. “Waters of Big Elk reveal ghastly crime.” Hobart Daily Republican, March 18, 1907. “Wilbur Gunreth's mother fails to identify body.” Oklahoma Post, August 3, 1907. “Will offer reward.” Vinita Daily Chieftain, August 5, 1907. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/58663849/johnny-robinett https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/69091681/wilbert-olin-gunreth  

Through The Fire
Updates: Episode One

Through The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2019 20:44


As promised, I’m adding more episodes to provide updates on the Prop B saga, the race for Houston Mayor, and the podcast itself, so thanks for listening.If you haven’t already, catch up on all six original episodes of the podcast to hear the story of the decades-long war between the city of Houston and its fire department. Listen to find out where it all began to where we are now.On this updates episode we’ll take a look at the Fire Union’s no-confidence vote in Fire Chief Sam Pena, the first televised mayoral debate, Prop B money being recouped from firefighters that resign or retire, even more questions surrounding Hurricane Harvey relief funds, and the latest controversy Turner find himself in, this time surrounding his connection to a man given an internship with the city that pays $95,000 a year.---Don't forget to leave us a rating and a review! Also, make sure to hit that subscribe button to stay up to date on the story as we add more episodes!Twitter: @TTFHoustonFacebook: @ThroughTheFirePodcast fb.me/ThroughTheFirePodcastEmail: ThroughTheFirePodcast@gmail.comSource Credits:ABC News, NBC News, Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, AP Archive, New York Times, KHOU, KPRC, KTRK, KRIV, KRBE, HTV Houston Television, NPR Houston, Houston Chronicle, Houston Post, Houston Press, Texas Monthly, WPRI, SylvesterTurner.com

Through The Fire
Episode Six: The Coolest Job In The World

Through The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2019 46:01


After a devastating vote by City Council that approved the laying off and demoting of hundreds of firefighters to pay for Proposition B, there was still ongoing mediation to attend to. If a resolution wasn’t reached, Democratic Judge Tanya Garrison would then be the lone voice in deciding the validity of Prop B. The Fire Union’s options were dwindling as mediations seemed more superficial and obligatory than an opportunity to make a deal, especially given that layoffs and demotions were already approved. So the Fire Union’s hope then seemed to lie with Judge Garrison and the upcoming election season, as a new crop of Mayor hopefuls, sought to take down the incumbent. With the recently approved layoffs and demotions, Prop B still tied up in court, and a heated mayoral race, there looked to be no end in sight, in war between the city of Houston and its fire department.---Don't forget to leave us a rating and a review! Also, make sure to hit that subscribe button to stay up to date on the story as we add more episodes!Twitter: @TTFHoustonFacebook: @ThroughTheFirePodcast fb.me/ThroughTheFirePodcastEmail: ThroughTheFirePodcast@gmail.comSource Credits:ABC News, NBC News, Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, AP Archive, New York Times, KHOU, KPRC, KTRK, KRIV, KRBE, HTV Houston Television, NPR Houston, Houston Chronicle, Houston Post, Houston Press, Texas Monthly, WPRI, SylvesterTurner.com 

Through The Fire
Episode Five: A Storm Is Coming

Through The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2019 58:14


It’s about 10 pm on November 6th, 2018 and the final Proposition B votes are being collected from around the city. Prop B was a ballot measure created by the Fire Union that would give firefighters equal pay with police officers of corresponding rank and years of service.That night, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner remained vocally steadfast in his stance that if Prop B passed, there would be hundreds of layoffs of firefighters and police officers and a reduction of services. He likened the pay parity initiative to a storm, saying “when you see a storm coming, you have to begin to make preparations.” For the Fire Union and its president Marty Lancton, this night was decades in the making but the last few years had been particularly eventful, more so than ever before. Pension reform that drastically reduced the retirements of firefighters, consistently stalled contract negotiations, years of Prop B legal battles, an acrid relationship with city leaders, all on top of unacceptable fleet and station conditions had left the rank and file of the fire department beaten and tired. Morale was fading fast. So, the passage of Prop B would not only be a remarkable legal victory for firefighters, but it would also be a momentous morale boost.  By almost 11 pm, the majority of votes had been counted and the outcome had become clear…So, would voters side with Turner and vote against Prop B for fear that it would bankrupt the city and comprise public safety, or were they certain that pay parity was within the city’s financial means and vote to give firefighters the raise they had gone without for the last eight years?  And, more than that, if Prop B did pass, would Turner honor the will of the voters and fully implement Prop B immediately or would he continue to fight it by taking legal action against it? And would he actually layoff hundreds of firefighter if it passed?And if it didn’t pass, what would Lancton and the Fire Union have prepared and how would that affect their strength in further negotiations as they continued to work without a contract?---Don't forget to leave us a rating and a review! Also, make sure to hit that subscribe button to stay up to date on the story as we add more episodes!Twitter: @TTFHoustonFacebook: @ThroughTheFirePodcast fb.me/ThroughTheFirePodcastEmail: ThroughTheFirePodcast@gmail.comSource Credits:ABC News, NBC News, Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, AP Archive, New York Times, KHOU, KPRC, KTRK, KRIV, KRBE, HTV Houston Television, NPR Houston, Houston Chronicle, Houston Post, Houston Press, Texas Monthly, WPRI, SylvesterTurner.com 

Through The Fire
Episode Four: An Uphill Battle

Through The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2019 51:10


It’s now the summer of 2017 and Sylvester Turner is a year and a half into his four years as Houston’s Mayor. Senate Bill 2190 is inching closer to being inked into law, despite strong objections and literal protests at the State Capitol by the both Fire Union and the Firefighters Pension Board. The bill, which Turner helped author, would overhaul Houston’s unsustainable pension system but would most adversely affect the retirements of firefighters. Fire Union President Marty Lancton was leading the Union’s resurgence by not only helping to halt the bill, but he was also sparing with Turner for a new contract for the department. It was a perfect storm; retirements and pay for firefighters were at stake and Lancton, fueled by the Union’s never-before-seen momentum, was squaring up against the city’s most capable Mayor ever. For years, the heavyweights traded blows and eventually, Turner would land one of the biggest haymakers to the fire department any mayor ever has. But Lancton and the Fire Union would prove that they were ready for the big time, and they went right back to trading blows, making never-before-seen moves in their fight against the city.---Don't forget to leave us a rating and a review! Also, make sure to hit that subscribe button to stay up to date on the story as we add more episodes!Twitter: @TTFHoustonFacebook: @ThroughTheFirePodcast fb.me/ThroughTheFirePodcastEmail: ThroughTheFirePodcast@gmail.comSource Credits:ABC News, NBC News, Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, AP Archive, New York Times, KHOU, KPRC, KTRK, KRIV, KRBE, HTV Houston Television, NPR Houston, Houston Chronicle, Houston Post, Houston Press, Texas Monthly, WPRI, SylvesterTurner.com 

Through The Fire
Episode Three: Mayor Turner, the CEO

Through The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2019 32:05


As Houston’s 62nd Mayor, Sylvester Turner was responsible for leading the city through many national news worthy events, some remarkable, some odd, and many tragic. Turner’s years as Mayor were also dotted with suspect political and business dealings, with one opponent even calling it “the most corrupt administration” in the last 40 years. And the controversies didn’t end there. Turner initially earned the endorsement of the Firefighter’s Union. But, like many Mayors before, the relationship between Turner and the Fire Union quickly soured when he reneged on a campaign promise that earned him their endorsement to begin with. In doing so, Turner would deliver a devastating shot to the foundation of the department and trigger a new era of battles unlike any others in the decades-long war between city of Houston and its fire department.---Don't forget to leave us a rating and a review! Also, make sure to hit that subscribe button to stay up to date on the story as we add more episodes!Twitter: @TTFHoustonFacebook: @ThroughTheFirePodcast fb.me/ThroughTheFirePodcastEmail: ThroughTheFirePodcast@gmail.comSource Credits:ABC News, NBC News, Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, AP Archive, New York Times, KHOU, KPRC, KTRK, KRIV, KRBE, HTV Houston Television, NPR Houston, Houston Chronicle, Houston Post, Houston Press, Texas Monthly, WPRI, SylvesterTurner.com 

Through The Fire
Episode Two: Third Time's The Charm

Through The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2019 30:35


In 2015, Sylvester Turner had his sights set on becoming Houston’s next Mayor. This would be his third attempt at doing so over the last 25 years, so Turner knew he would need an edge this time, in order to finally win. And, Turner himself had a bit more of an edge, and he certainly wasn’t the same man that ran for Mayor in 1991. To know Sylvester Turner, we must not only look at his journey during that time, but we must know his story even before that, in order to fully appreciate who he has become and what kind of city leader, he might be.---Don't forget to leave us a rating and a review! Also, make sure to hit that subscribe button to stay up to date on the story as we add more episodes!Twitter: @TTFHoustonFacebook: @ThroughTheFirePodcast fb.me/ThroughTheFirePodcastEmail: ThroughTheFirePodcast@gmail.comSource Credits:ABC News, NBC News, Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, AP Archive, New York Times, KHOU, KPRC, KTRK, KRIV, KRBE, HTV Houston Television, NPR Houston, Houston Chronicle, Houston Post, Houston Press, Texas Monthly, WPRI, SylvesterTurner.com

Through The Fire
Episode One: A First Class Fire Department

Through The Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2019 36:07


Houston Mayors and city leaders have been at odds with the Houston Fire Department and its Fire Union for about as long as anyone can remember, even including the most senior Houston firefighters. The relationship could best be described as dysfunctional, marked by deep-seeded distrust, developed over decades of mutual denigration.Neglect of fire department infrastructure, incessant pay disputes, and a lack of innovation have all led to the slow rotting away of what should be a department that stands as a shining example among the rest. Instead, the third largest fire department in the country has just limped along, its broken pieces slapped back together with duct tape, and the relationship with city leaders left in tatters.The last four years of this war have, by far, been the most eventful, the most heartbreaking, and the most contentious.But where did it all go wrong and who’s to blame? To find out, it takes an closer look at the last four decades and an investigation to find out who fired the first shot in the war between the city of Houston and its fire department.---Don't forget to leave us a rating and a review! Also, make sure to hit that subscribe button to stay up to date on the story as we add more episodes!Twitter: @TTFHoustonFacebook: @ThroughTheFirePodcast fb.me/ThroughTheFirePodcastEmail: ThroughTheFirePodcast@gmail.comSource Credits:ABC News, NBC News, Fox News, Fox Business, CNN, AP Archive, New York Times, KHOU, KPRC, KTRK, KRIV, KRBE, HTV Houston Television, NPR Houston, Houston Chronicle, Houston Post, Houston Press, Texas Monthly, WPRI, SylvesterTurner.com

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
Conversations with the Pioneers of Oncology: Dr. Emil Freireich

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2019 44:01


Dr. Hayes interviews Dr. Freireich on his involvement with combination chemotherapy.   TRANSCRIPT: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories, the Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, a collection of nine programs covering a range of educational and scientific content and offering enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows, including this one, at podcast.asco.org. Welcome to Cancer Stories. I'm Dr. Daniel Hayes. I'm a medical oncologist and a translational researcher at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center. And I've also had the privilege of being the past president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. I'm privileged to be your host for a series of podcast interviews with the people who founded our field. Over the last 40 years, I've been fortunate to have been trained, mentored, and also, frankly, inspired by these pioneers. In fact, it's my hope that, through these conversations, we can all be equally inspired by gaining an appreciation of the courage, the vision, and the scientific understanding that led these men and women to establish the field of clinical cancer care over the last 70 years. In fact, by understanding how we got to the present and what we now consider normal in oncology, we can also imagine, and we can work together towards a better future for our patients and their families during and after cancer treatment. Today, my guest on this podcast is Dr. Emil J. Freireich, who is generally considered one of the pioneers of combination chemotherapy. Dr. Freireich is currently the Ruth Harriet Haynesworth chair and distinguished teaching professor in the Department of Leukemia at the Division of Cancer Medicine at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. He was raised in Chicago during the Great Depression, the son of Hungarian immigrants. Dr. Freireich attended the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago starting, unbelievably, at age 16. And from there, he also received a medical degree in 1949. He completed his internship at Cook County Hospital and his residency at Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago. He then moved to Boston, where he studied hematology with Dr. Joseph Ross at Mass. General. And then he went to the NIH in 1955, where he stayed until he moved to MD Anderson a decade later. And there he still remains. He and his colleagues at the National Cancer Institute, Drs. Jim Holland and Emil "Tom" Frei, were the first to demonstrate that administering concurrent combination chemotherapy, rather than giving it sequentially with each episode of disease progression, resulted in complete responses in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. And that paper was first published in the now classic paper in Blood in 1958. In the mid-1960s, they ultimately developed the VAMP regimen. And that was reported in 1965, with really, in my opinion, the first cures that we'd seen with chemotherapy in an advanced cancer of any sort. This work was the groundbreaking basis for the subsequent cures of advanced Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, adult leukemias, testicular cancer, and, in my opinion, the striking results of adjuvant combination chemotherapy in breast and many other cancers. Dr. Freireich has authored over 500 peer-reviewed papers, numerous reviews and editorials. He's edited 16 different textbooks. And he's won too many awards and honors for me to even begin to list. But in particular in 1972, he received the Lasker Award, America's most highly regarded medical honor. And most importantly to me, frankly, is that he proceeded me as president of ASCO in 1980 to 1981. Dr. Freireich, I'm sorry for the long introduction. But your career is pretty substantial. Welcome to our program. Thank you. I have a number of questions. And to start with, I know, as I said, you grew up in Chicago during the depression and that you entered college at the age of 16. And I think our listeners would love to hear more about those circumstances. That's pretty unusual. And I've actually read about some of your childhood. You want to tell us more about that and how was it you chose medicine in the first place? I was born 1927 of to immigrant Hungarians. I had an older sister three years older. And they had a Hungarian restaurant in Chicago. And 1929, when I was two years old, there was a big event in the United States. They lost their restaurant. My father died suddenly, I believe of suicide, but not proven. And my mother, tough mother, went to work in a sweatshop. She worked 20 hours a day. She had two children. She found an Irish lady who worked for room and board only, no salary. Her name was Mary. So Mary was my ex officio mother. And I grew up, as you pointed out, in a ghetto community. I spent my life stealing things, hubcaps and windshield wipers, and avoiding getting crushed by the roving gangs. When I finished elementary school and when I went to a ghetto high school called Tuley, T-U-L-E-Y. In Tuley High School, I majored in typing and shorthand. My mother thought I could make a living as a secretary. I was prepubescent, short and fat. And I was a frequent victim of my colleagues in school. When I was very young, I can't tell you when, about eight or so, I developed tonsillitis. And we had in our little ghetto community one of these Tree Grows in Brooklyn physicians. His name was Dr. Rosenblum. And he took care of people in the ghetto for favors. My mother made him goulash. Dr. Rosenblum came to your house. He didn't have an office, because we didn't have any transportation. So my mother called him. And I had tonsillitis. He came and looked to me. He was wearing a suit and tie. I'd never seen that. During the depression, all the men wore coveralls and dirty pants. And he looks very elegant. He had a suit and a tie. He looked in my throat, and he said to my mother, the treatment for tonsillitis is ice cream. I always remember Dr. Rosenblum, because my mother had to go out and buy ice scream. And it's not bad treatment. It actually cools off the hot throat. So when I went to high school, taking shorthand and typing and getting beaten up by the bigger guys, a professor appeared like Dr. Rosenblum, suit and tie, young guy, PhD. Came to a ghetto high school to teach physics. Physics fascinated me. So I worked very hard in physics. He had a contest. I did a project on the Bernoulli theorem. And the classic project is a jet of water. You put a ping pong ball in it. And the ping pong ball stays in the jet, amazingly. That was because of Bernoulli. What happens when the ping pong ball goes off to one side, the fluid goes faster on the other side. It reduces the pressure, and that pushes it back in the stream. And that's the principle of airplanes and so on and so forth. So I won first prize. And he called me to his office. He said, Mr. Freireich, you should go to college. I said, what's college? He said, well, there's-- [LAUGHTER] He said there's a place down south of here called the University of Illinois where you can get advanced studies. What do you want to be when you grow up? So I thought a minute, and I said, I want to be like Dr. Rosenblum. I want to be a family doctor. He said, well, you have to go to college first. So I said, what do I need to go to college? He said you need about $25, which in that day was a lot of money. So I went home, and I told if it was my mother, my professor wants me to go to college. And I need $25. My mother, she's hardened in the depression, working in sweatshops. And she said, OK, I'm going to get $25. She asked around in the little Hungarian ghetto community. And we found a lady who had lost her husband and had an insurance policy. And so she had money. And she distributed it to her colleagues in the ghetto community for good causes, wonderful lady. So my mother dressed me up in a borrowed suit. And we went to see Mrs. so-and-so. And she patted my head and gave my mother $25. It's an incredible story. In fact, I'm struck by the fact that one of the founders of our field was a juvenile delinquent stealing hubcaps. Oh, yeah. I did that to hubcaps and windshield wipers and everything you could take off a car. I got a ticket on the Illinois Central Railroad, $6. I got off the Champaign-Urbana. And I said to the guy, where's the university? He said, over there. I went over there. I said, where do you register. They said, over there. So I went over there. And I said, I'm Freireich, and I'm registering for college. The guy said, where's your transcript. I said, well, they told me at the high school that they would send everything they needed. He said, we've never had a student from Tuley High School. I was the first to go. I was the first Tuley student to go to college. And he said, OK, I'll register you. And I'll write the university, and I'll get your transcript. I presume you're qualified. So how much is registration? $6! So I'm down to $13. I'm getting pretty poor. So I registered. And then I said, where do I live? He said, there's a list over there. And I went over there. I found the lady who lost her husband. She rented his bedroom for $6. And then I had to figure out how to eat. And I asked my friend the registrar, where do I eat? He said, go to work in one of these rich sorority houses. You get free meals. So I waited tables in a sorority house. I got good grades. When I had to elect a language, I took German, because at that time, all the science was in the Festschrift. The Germans had invented the chemical industry. And my advisor said, that's good for you if you want to be a doctor. So I took German. My professor in German, he taught stage German. And he read the role the first day. And he came to my name and he said Freireich, [EXAGGERATING "CH" SOUND] because, he said, Americans can't say. [EXAGGERATED "CH" SOUND] Everybody called me "Freireish." But he called me Freireich [EXAGGERATING "CH" SOUND]. And our book was called, Ich lerne Deutsch, I'm learning German. So "ich" was important. Freireich was important. I got an A in German because of my great name. And I did well in physics. And everything was accelerated during the war. So the university had three semesters a year instead of two. There was no summer. And the requirements for medical school were dropped from three years to two years. So two years is four semesters. So at the end of the first year, I was eligible for medical school. And my physics professor said, you better apply, because all the guys coming out of the military want to be doctors. So I said, aw, damn, I'm having such a good time scrubbing floors and smoking and getting along with good looking girls. He said, you better do it. So I applied. And I was accepted. So I had to leave the beautiful campus of Champaign-Urbana and go back to the ghetto of Chicago where my mother and my sister were living. And I couldn't figure out where I was going to get the money to pay for medical school. I had a friend who had had polio. Polio was rampant in those days. And I said to him, how do you get money to go to college? He said he gets money from the state, rehabilitation. And he said my rehab guy is coming to see me tomorrow. Why don't you come and see if you're eligible? So the rehab guy came. He said, what's wrong with you, Freireich? I said, I had a broken leg in college. He said, OK, fill in the forms. And I became a ward of the state of Illinois Department of Rehabilitation. From that point on, they paid all my tuition, all my supplies, all my microscope rentals, and so on. So I went to medical school free thanks to the State of Illinois Department of rehabilitation. So I went to Chicago. And a bunch of us sat in the room for the opening introduction. And the dean of the medical school came in. His name was Andrew C Ivey. I don't know if you know the name, famous GI physiologist. And Dr. Ivey said, you guys are lucky to be in medical school. There were 20 applicants for everyone accepted, 20. Isn't that's amazing? Because all the guys who were medics in the military realized that being a doctor is a soft job. So they all wanted to be doctors. But they didn't have as good an academic career as I did. So anyhow, I went to medical school. I did pretty well. It was complicated, medical school. I had to ride the L in Chicago. It cost a nickel. And I lived at home. And I rode the L in the morning. And I walked to the university campus. I attended classes. I walked to the L. And I went back home. And I did that for four years. And then, as I said, I graduated number six in the class. And I graduated. And I had to decide where to do an intern. I wanted to be a family doctor like Dr. Rosenblum. So I interned at Cook County Hospital. Cook County Hospital was an abattoir, terrible place. In that year, 1949, the two most prominent diseases were tuberculosis and polio. So my first rotation was the TB ward. That was horrible what you had to do to those men. 90% of them died. Then my next rotation was infectious diseases. And that was all children in iron lungs who were doomed to die. So I started off pretty badly. And then I got to the good things like surgery. I delivered a hundred babies. I did the ear, nose and throat. So I did everything. And I felt ready to go into practice. And then I got to internal medicine. Internal medicine was not like OB and all that stuff, not mechanical. It was intellectual. You had the worry about the blood flow to the kidney. And you had to get diuretics and blood and stuff. So internal medicine fascinated me. When I was on-call, I would admit 20 new patients a night, 20. And one guy I admitted was very interesting. He was a learned guy. And he was dying of heart failure. And I had to figure out how to treat him. And I admitted him. And when I got done, exhausted in the morning, I went to make rounds. And I didn't see him. And I said to the nurse, where's Mr. so-and-so. She said, don't worry about him. He's gone. I said, where did he go. She said he goes into the death room. Cook County Hospital, the problem was they had too many patients for the beds. And the head nurse made rounds every day. And the sickest patients went to the death room. And I went in there. And I found my patient. And I said to the nurse, I want my patient on the ward. I'm a young squirt. How old was I? I was 19, I think. So the next day, I get a call from the hospital director. He says, Freireich, I think you better leave County. I said, what do you mean? I'm having a good time. I'm learning everything. He said, you don't know how we operate. The nurses run the ward. And you make trouble. And that means you've got to leave. Uh-oh. So I said, well, the only thing I can do is get a residency in medicine and learn all this complicated stuff. So next door was Presbyterian Hospital, which had the Rush Clinic. Have you heard the rush clinic? They were a bunch of famous guys. I made rounds with Roland Woodyatt, the first physician in the United States to use insulin. I made rounds with-- I forgot the name of the cardiologist who described coronary artery disease. He was the first to recognize the association between chest pain and myocardial infarction. So these guys were great. And Olie Poll, who taught me EKG-- And I was going along fine. But again, the chair of medicine was a Harvard import, S Howard Armstrong. And he had a teaching service. And all the house staff wanted to be on the teaching service where they learned stuff. Private doctors, of course, were offended. So they descended on administration. And they fired the chair of medicine. Armstrong was fired. The house staff teaching service was disbanded. And Armstrong tried to tend to his house. He called me in. He said, Freireich, what do you know about medicine? I said, Dr. Armstrong, you got a wonderful department. I learned EKG. I learned diabetes. I learned heart. I learned everything. The only thing I don't know anything about is hematology, because the guy who teaches hematology is a jerk. Armstrong said, don't worry, Freireich. Go to Boston, that's where the new medicine is coming from Europe. And he gave me letters to the three great hematologists in Boston, Bill Dameshek, Joe Ross, and Dr. Israel, who was a clotter. So I took everything I owned. I put it in my 1946 fastback, broken down Oldsmobile. And I drove to Boston. When I got to Boston, I met Dr. Ross. The guy in the lab who was the chief was so Stuart Finch. I think he just retired. And I collaborated with a young man named Aaron Miller who worked at the VA hospital. And my project funded. Dameshek gave me a job but no money. Israel gave me a job, no money. Ross gave me a job and paid me $5,000 a year, wonderful. So I became a hematologist. I worked on the mechanism of the anemia of inflammation. I studied patients with rheumatoid arthritis. And we had radioisotopes. So I was able to study the iron metabolism and the binding to transferrant. And we did experiments in dogs. And we worked out the mechanism of the anemia. The biggest hematology group in the country, the Wintrobe group, who wrote the textbook, had proven that the anemia of inflammation was due to a failure to incorporate iron into heme. And we found that that was false. When we put the ion on transferrant, it went right into heme. The difficulty was the reutilization of iron from hemoglobin to new heme. And we proved that in dogs. We did experiments with turpentine abcesses in dogs. So I was on a roll. I was doing Nobel laureate stuff. I mean, I gave a paper to the AAP. I gave a paper to the ASCI. I was doing well. And one day I got a letter. You are drafted into the army as a private. If you don't want to be a private, you can become a second lieutenant if you accept the assignment we give you. So I told Ross, I'm leaving. I got to go. I tried to finish up all my experiments. I told my wife we're in trouble. We didn't know what we'd do. We had one baby, one-year-old. She was pregnant with our second child. I didn't tell you the story about my wife. What happened is the head nurse in the clinic, like me, she came for a visit to Boston. They broke into my car and stole her luggage. And so we became attached. And we got married. And we've been married 65 years. But anyhow, she got a job at Mass. General. I had a job at Mass. Memorial. We had enough money to live. And as I say, she got pregnant, and we had babies. And I got this letter that I'm drafted. So I said to my wife, we have to go to the Army. The next morning, I get a call from Chester Scott. Keefer, who you already mentioned-- Dr. Keefer was the physician in charge of the penicillin distribution during the war. He was a very famous infectious disease doctor. He was a brilliant teacher and respected and loved by everybody. When Eisenhower was elected president, as you probably know, like all Republicans, he wanted to decrease the size of the government. So he decided to combine three cabinet departments, Health, Education, and Welfare, into one. That was obviously going to save positions and money. And he appointed Oveta Culp Hobby, who was the publisher of the Houston Post newspaper. She didn't know anything about health. She didn't know anything about education or anything about welfare. So what she did was she hired three people as department heads. And she picked Dr. Keefer to be head of health. Dr. Keefer would not give up the dean of the medical school. So she agreed to have him do both jobs. He was dean of the medical school and Secretary of Health. And he called me to his office. And we all respected Dr. Keefer. You dressed up in a new coat and clicked your heels and said, yes, sir. He said, Freireich, Dr. Ross says you're doing good. Thank you, sir. Have you ever heard of the National Institutes of Health? No, sir. There's a place in Washington where they have a hospital out in the country. And they can't staff it. So we have to send young people who are drafted there. If you go to the public health service, you don't have to go in the army and get shot during the war. Yes, sir. He picked up the phone. Fred, I have a doctor Freireich in my office. He'll be there tomorrow morning. Bye. Thank you. I went home. I told my wife, I have to go to Washington. I got in my car, drove to Washington, 200 miles in a broken down car. I got there. I found the guy at the HEW. He said, Freireich, you have to go to NIH. So go out here and take the bus. It takes you to the clinical center. Before the war, they decided to put a clinical center in the campus of the National Institutes of Health, which were all basic science institutes. There was no medicine. So here was this hospital, and they couldn't staff it. So they took all the draft dodgers. They called us yellow berets. And they staff the NIH with guys right out of their training. So anyhow, I got in my car and drove out there. Where's NIH? There. Who do I talk to? There, you go there. I talked to all the clinical directors. No one needed me. I got to Gordon Zubrod, who had just come from St. Louis University. He was an infectious disease guy. Do you know Gordon Zubrod? Yeah, I actually met him a couple of times with Dr. Frei. Good, yes. Actually, I'd love to hear this story. Dr. Frei has told me the story, your first day at the NCI when you, quote, "found your office." Can you tell us about that one? Yeah. So anyhow, Dr. Zubrod said, what do you do, Freireich? I said, I'm a hematologist. He scratched his head. And he said, I'll tell you what, you have to cure leukemia. I said, yes, sir. You know I'm in the military, so you have to do what you're told. He said, your office is on the 12th floor. I went up to the the 12th floor. I walked along, looked for a name. I came to room that said Emil Frei. I said, isn't that like the damn government? They can't even spell my name. So I walked in. And there was a tall, skinny guy with no hair. I said, sir, you're in my office. He said, your office is next door. I'm Frei. You're Freireich. And we've been friends for a lifetime. He told that story to us many, many times, I'm going to tell you. He thought that was hilarious that this guy walked into his office and said, you're in my office. And he said, no, you're in my office. The other thing I want to talk about then, as you moved on, what made you and Dr. Frei and Dr. Holland decide to go at combination therapy? I think it was based on the infectious disease stuff. Correct, totally. At the time, we had three drugs, 6-MP, methotrexate, prednisone, 48, 53, and about 54, something. Each individually gave some responses. They lasted six to eight weeks. And the children all died. So the world's authority on hematology, Max Wintrobe, wrote a review. And he said, these drugs are simply torturing these children. And they don't do anything. Dameshek wrote editorials in Blood saying they're just killing children. So we were not very popular. But Zubrod came from infectious disease. And Tom Frei was infectious disease. And they had just discovered that in tuberculosis, if you use sequential streptomycin PAS, they became resistant to both drugs. If you gave them simultaneously, their effectiveness was prolonged. So combinations of agents were more effective than the sequences. So Zubrod said, why don't we do the same thing for cancer? We'll do 6-MP and methotrexate in sequence. And we'll do them in combination. To do the combination, we had to work out the doses. Dave Rolle did that in mice. 60% of two immunosuppressive drugs make one. And we gave 6-MP and methotrexate concurrently and in full dose sequentially, that is until they failed, we gave the other one. And the study was called Protocol 1. Jim Holland had gone to Roswell Park. And he agreed to join us. So we became the first acute leukemia cooperative group, Holland at Roswell Park, Frei and Freireich at MD Anderson. Freireich treated the children. And Frei protected Freireich from the rest at NCI and from Zubrod. Zubrod trusted Frei. So if I needed to do anything radical, I'd talk to Frei, and he'd talk to Zubrod. So we were a great team. That was really the start of the cooperative group set, right? That would be CALG, the cancer and leukemia group, is that right? That was the first cooperative group in the country. That's incredible. The cooperative group had to two institutions, Roswell Park and MD Anderson. Who tried to block you on these things? I know it must have taken a lot of courage to put all these drugs together. You mentioned Wintrobe. But were there others who were fundamentally opposed to using combinations? Oh, I'm getting to that. So with the first study, Protocol 1, Russell Park and MD Anderson, children received 6-MP and methotrexate simultaneously and in sequence. And it turned out that Protocol 1 was published. The combination had more frequent remissions and longer duration. So we were onto something. Next we did the prednisone. Prednisone's not myelosuppressive. We could do full-dose prednisone with 6-MP, full dose prednisone with methotrexate, same result. In every instance, the combination was superior to the sequence. So one day I'm sitting in my office. About once a week he'd come around and look. He came in one day. He said, Dr. Freireich, this ward is a mess. Everything is full of blood, the nurse's uniforms, the curtains, the ceiling. Well, anyhow, I was taking care of my bleeding children one day when a guy from Eli Lilly showed up. I think his name was Armstrong. And he said, we've got a new drug that was founded by-- you know who that was. Let me see his name. Mike Black. He discovered it in mice, periwinkle extract. Periwinkle had 80 alkaloids. And they screened them all against mice. And this one was active in one kind of mouse leukemia. But it wasn't active in L1210. So he said, we have this drug. And we offered it to Dr. Farber at Dana Farber. And we're going to offer it to you if you want to do it. I said, wonderful. So I wrote a protocol. And Zubrod said, but this drug is not active in L1210. And we know that the drugs active in L12101 leukemia are active in human leukemia. So this drug cannot be studied. Aha, time for Emil Frei III. I went to Tom. I said, look, Tom, vincristine is not myelosuppressive. As a single agent, it causes 80% complete remissions. I want to vincristine to 6-MP and methotrexate. Zubrod says no. Frei said, leave it to me. He talked to Zubrod. I told Zubrod, these children are dying. I've got to do something. So they approved it. And we did decide the VAMP. We knew prednisone was not myelosuppressive. We could add it to 6-MP and methotrexate, full dose. We knew this dose of 6-MP and methotrexate. Vincristine turned out to be not myelosuppressive, CNS toxicity. So we designed the VAMP drug. Then we said, let's let Holland and the other members of the cooperative group join so we can get this done quick. The cooperative group refused. Jim Holland refused. He wanted to do them one at a time, prednisone, 6-MP, methotrexate, vincristine, prednisone, vincristine, and so on. It would have taken us five years. We went through the same thing with MOPP. They wanted to do it one at a time. So we had to do it alone in the cancer institute. So Frei went to Zubrod and said, why can't we do it? Zubrod said, if you say it's OK, you can do it. Frei was chair of the group. And I'm not going to put my patients on the group. So Frei had to resign. Holland became the chair. And Frei was an advisor. So we started out with VAMP. We had 98% remissions. The remissions lasted about six weeks. We realized that they weren't cured. So we said to the parents, this treatment was toxic. It was full-dose 6-MP and methotrexate. And the parents said they're going to risk their children's life, but we're going to do what we called early intensification. That is, the children in complete remission would get full-dose induction therapy, never done before. And I met with the parents every morning and went over each child to be sure that they were with us. The parents were wonderful. We had solved the bleeding problem with platelet transfusions. We'd had white cell transfusions and so on. And they went along with us. So we did early intensification. We did it in about 12 patients. Two of them almost died, very severe infection on the brain. But we saved them. So we knew this was dangerous. But they all relapsed. Median duration remission was about eight weeks, even though we did early intensification. So MC Li had cured choriocarcinoma. I don't know if you know that story. MC Li and I were residents at Presbyterian at the same time. We were good friends. I was his advisor on this strategy. He measured chorionic gonadotropin in the urine. And he knew that as long as there was gonadotropin in the urine, they weren't cured. So he kept treating them. So we decided to follow the Li model. And what we did was we did early intensification, which they all survived, fortunately. And then we did intermittent reinduction. Every four to six weeks, we'd bring them in and give them another course of treatment. And we did that for a year. And then we stopped. And then we watched them. And that's when we found 20% of the patients were in remission at, I think, 18 months. Never been reported before. And I did report that to AACR. I've seen the AACR abstract. And I would love to know what was the energy in the room when that was presented. Did people stand up and throw rotten tomatoes at you, or did they stand up and applaud, or everything in between? No one applauded. Everybody was incredulous. The people in the group didn't believe it. Most people thought we were lying. If it wasn't for Frei, I'd have never gotten away with it. Let me ask you another question. Dr. Frei told me that the first patient you gave platelets to, you had to sneak out at night and do it. Is that true? He said there were people who did not want you to give platelet transfusions. The platelet transfusions were a bigger fight than the chemotherapy, because everybody knew that platelets were not the cause of it. Dr. Brecher had studied patients in the war from radiation injury. He had dogs that he completely phoresed, zero platelets. And they didn't bleed. So obviously, platelets were not the problem. The problem was a circulating anticoagulant. And I did experiments in the lab and proved that that was false. But anyway, the platelet transfusions are what made all of this possible, because the children all died of hemorrhage. And once we had platelets, we could treat them with the chemotherapy. Is there a story behind the first patients who got platelet transfusions? Again, Dr. Frei told me that-- Oh, boy, that's a wonderful story. I actually published it. This was a young man who was bleeding to death whose father was a minister. And since it was proven that platelets were not important and there was a circulating anticoagulant, I decided that the only way to arrest the hemorrhage was to do an exchange transfusion like you do in eritroblastosis fetalis. So I said to the minister, if you bring me 10 healthy volunteers, I want to do this experiment on your son. And he was desperate. His son was a beautiful 8-year-old boy. His name was Scotty Dinsmore. How do you like that? [LAUGHTER] Scotty Dinsmore was bleeding to death. And he arrived the next morning with 10 volunteers. And I sat down in the treatment room. And I did an exchange transfusion with 50 cc syringes, 50 ccs from Scotty in the trash can, 50 ccs from the donor in Scotty. And we calculated I had exchanged three blood volumes to get to where the concentration was detectable. And when I finished this four-hour procedure, bending over my back with syringes and volunteers, his platelet count was 100,000. And is bleeding completely stopped. So we thought we'd made a breakthrough, but we were smarter than that. We watched him every day and did a platelet count. And we found that the platelet lifespan was four to six days. And when the platelets got below 10,000-- we had done a retrospective study, and we knew what the threshold for bleeding was. And he started bleeding again. So it was obvious that it was not an anticoagulant. I did experiments in my lab. I took the serum and mixed it with the plasma and so forth. So we proved that it was platelets and not an anticoagulant. And then we had to figure out how to get platelets. And Allen Kleiman in the blood bank and I worked together to do platelet phoresis. We took the unit separate platelets, put the blood back, volunteer donors. And we proved that platelets stopped the bleeding. And we published that, a great paper, citation classic. I was going to say for the young folks. And I asked Dr. Frei this too when I was at the Dana Farber. Did you ever doubt yourself? Did you think, we need to quit doing this? This is more than we can handle. I know Dr. Farber was widely criticized in Boston for-- Oh, boy. He studied vincristine at the same time we did. Yeah. So did you ever say, maybe we should set this whole system down and give up? No, I was never intimidated, because Dr. Zubrod gave me orders, cure leukemia. So I was going to do it. Yeah, my impression from talking with Dr. Frei is Gordon Zubrod was the sort of unsung hero in all of this. He is. He is. He had the courage to back a 25-year-old guy and his resident to do things that were potentially insane. We could have gone to jail for what we did. We could have killed all those kids. That's what Dr. Frei-- Dr. Holland has told me the same story. So we owe you a great debt. So let me ask you. When you were the president of ASCO, in those days, what made you decide to run for ASCO? It was still pretty early in the early 1980s. Well, that's a very good story. I'm a pioneer in that regard too. When you became a cancer doctor, you had to join the AACR. AACR was dominant. I joined the AACR. I sent my papers on platelets and chemotherapy to AACR. They accepted all of them. But they put the clinical papers on Saturday morning. When I gave my first paper at AACR, the chairman of the session, my wife and my son were the only ones in the audience. Nobody stayed till Saturday morning. So I got mad. I said, I'm discovering things, and I can't present them at AACR. No one's listening. So we said, let's form a society that is clinical oncology and meets the day before AACR the clinical scientists who want to go AACR don't have to go to two meetings. So we organized a plenary meeting the day before AACR began. In the first session, we had a lecture on CML from-- I forgot who the talker was who is treating CML, Berechenal or someone. Karanovsky? I don't know. So we had lectures, not papers. And we did that for a couple of years. And then AACR knew what we were doing. We were totally cooperating. But we hired a manager. And we started a scientific exhibit. So we had lots of money. And AACR needed money. And we were rich. So I got a call from the president of AACR. And he said, we don't want to continue to meet at the same time, because all of our doctors want to get these free samples. And they go to your meetings, and they don't go to our meetings. So we're separating from ASCO. I said, that's terrible, because the ASCO doctors all want to go AACR. He said, sorry, we can't take you anymore. I forgot who was president at the time. So ASCO had to separate from AACR. They separated from us. Most people think we separated from them. They separated from us. You were there at the very start. So I really appreciate your contributions to the field. And I appreciate your taking time today. And I appreciate all the things you did to help all the patients who've now survived that wouldn't have if you hadn't. Thank you very much. Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories, the Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or a review on Apple podcast or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode. JCO's Cancer Stories, the Art of Oncology podcast is just one of ASCO's many podcasts. You can find all the shows at podcast.asco.org.

Motoxpod
Houston Post Race

Motoxpod

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2019 12:48


Dylan Ferrandis, The 722, DeanO, and a post race track discussion with DV, the 722, and Chiz

Forgotten Darkness
23 - Death Rides the Rails, Part Three

Forgotten Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2019 38:43


Some speculative crimes that may be by the same killer.  Three crimes are described, the murder of the interracial Casaway family in San Antonio, TX; the Hills in Ardenwald, OR; and the Cobles in Rainier, WA. Photo Gallery: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.d.gable/media_set?set=a.10215903375210815&type=3&uploaded=12   San Antonio “Claims he is innocent,” Austin American-Statesman, August 14, 1911. “Five in family killed while asleep,” San Antonio Express, March 23, 1911. “House in which tragedy occurred appears gloomy,” San Antonio Express, March 25, 1911. “M'Williams held in jail,” Houston Post, August 17, 1911. “Mystery deepens,” Victoria Daily Advocate, March 27, 1911. Official Guide of the Railways and Steam Navigation Lines of the United States (1908). “Person crazed,” Victoria Daily Advocate, April 1, 1911. Ruby B. Casaway. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/134658370/ruby-b_-casaway “Says he killed Casaway family,” Victoria Daily Advocate, May 30, 1911. “Texas news,” Austin American-Statesman, August 10,1911. “Two brothers located,” San Antonio Express, March 31, 1911. “White suspected,” Victoria Daily Advocate, March 25, 1911. “With a smiling face defendant hears evidence,” San Antonio Express, August 15, 1911.   Ardenwald “A reign of terror at Ardenwald,” Salem Capital Journal, June 16, 1911. “Attorneys admit Harvey employed them after crime,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 21, 1911. "Fiend uses axe to murder family of five,” Oregon Daily Journal, June 9, 1911. “Harvey family record bad; case of state in brief,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 20, 1911. “Much evidence against Harvey not yet divulged,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 21, 1911. “Mulatto may be murderer of 4, belief of police,” Oregon Daily Journal, June 10, 1911. “Murder and suicide,” Salem Statesman Journal, June 12, 1890. “Nathan Harvey is dismissed; will be rearrested,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 26, 1911. “Nathan Harvey may be Barbara Holtzman slayer,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 21, 1911. “Neighbors recall strange actions of Nathan Harvey,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 21, 1911. “Posse on trail of man seeking an unused road,” Oregon Daily Journal, June 21, 1911. “Reward of $2875 for conviction of Hills' murderer,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 20, 1911. “Series of crimes for 20 years in Harvey's family,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 20, 1911. “Stories agree up to about an hour before murders,” Oregon Daily Journal, December 20, 1911. Thatcher, George A. Why Some Men Kill: Or, Murder Mysteries Revealed. Pacific Coast Rescue and Protective Society, 1919.   Rainier “Did insane man slay couple?,” Tacoma Times, July 12, 1911. “Fiend confesses,” Roseburg (OR) Review, July 25, 1911. “Rainier butchery proves parallel to that of Hills,” Oregon Daily Journal, July 12, 1911. “Sheriff Mass of Clackamas to go to Rainier, Wash.,” Oregon Daily Journal, July 16, 1911. “Slain with axe while asleep,” Seattle Star, July 12, 1911. “The Cathey boys in limelight,” Corvallis (OR) Weekly Gazette-Times, July 21, 1911.   Opening music by Kevin MacLeod. Closing music by Soma.

Lion's Leadership Den
Episode 11 - Errol Allen on Business Systems and Procedures

Lion's Leadership Den

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2018


Steve and Alex talk with Errol Allen about the importance of having systems and procedures in place in order to maximize the efficiency of how your business runs. When you flow chart how you step through specific tasks in the office, inefficiencies can be pinpointed and fixed. Training your employees properly allows you to hold them accountable for their performance. This also reduces turnover because employees have a clear understanding of what is expected. Documenting procedures is the key to properly train staff so they perform their tasks correctly every time. Task manuals show them exactly how to do their job. This also ensures that all clients receive the same experience and level of service regardless of which employee they are working with. Guest: Errol Allen of EA ConsultingInternationally known operations consultant, speaker, author and customer service expert Errol Allen provides practical advice and solutions garnered from over 25 years of hands – on experience. He possesses a multi-faceted perspective of organizations through the various positions held during his corporate tenure with companies such as ADT Security Systems, TCI Cablevision, The Houston Post, Excel Communications, e-talk and GEICO Insurance. From the phone to the field, Errol has serviced customers himself and understands that a “systems” orientation is crucial to providing excellent customer service. Hosts: Steve Rozenberg – Co Founder of Empire Industries LLC, investor, speaker.Alex Osenenko – President and CEO of FourandHalf

BYU Men's Basketball
BYU vs. Houston: Post-game

BYU Men's Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2018 16:06


BYU vs. Houston: Post-game

BYU Men's Basketball
BYU vs. Houston- Post-game interview with Assistant Coach Lee Cummard

BYU Men's Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2018 2:40


BYU vs. Houston- Post-game interview with Assistant Coach Lee Cummard

BYU Men's Basketball
BYU vs. Houston: Post-game Locker show interview with McKay Cannon

BYU Men's Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2018 1:01


BYU vs. Houston: Post-game Locker show interview with McKay Cannon

Houston Sports Talk
Houston Cougars Won the 'Game of the Century' 50 Years Ago

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2018 21:43


We look back on the 50th anniversary of the Game of the Century when UH defeated UCLA on January 20th 1968 in the Astrodome. Over the years on our show, we reminisced about the game, the atmosphere & the man behind it all, Cougars Head Coach & Naismith Hall of Famer Guy V. Lewis. You’ll hear past interviews from UH Legend Don Chaney, Houston Post & Chronicle sports writer & editor Mickey Herksowitz (who covered the game), Chronicle Cougars beat writer Joseph Duarte and Robert Jacobus, who wrote the book "Houston Cougars in the 1960’s: Death Threats, the Veer Offense & the Game of the Century”. Email Info@HoustonSportsTalk.net for comments or questions.

Faith & Family from KFUO Radio
The Underserved Neighborhoods of Houston Post-Harvey --- 2017/10/13

Faith & Family from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2017


Guests Nicole Ridley, CEO of LCMS Housing Support, Rev. Roosevelt Gray, Director of Black Ministry for the LCMS Office of National Mission, Deaconess Kim Schave, Director of Project and Policy Administration for the LCMS, and Rev. Dr. Steve Schave, Director of Urban Ministry for the LCMS Office of National Mission, share stories from their journey to Houston to see how the church and organizations can help those in the underserved neighborhoods of Houston recover after the destruction of Hurricane Harvey.

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games
Whitecaps vs Houston: Post-Match: Aug 19

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2017 46:30


Peter Schaad and Paul Dolan recap the 'Caps and Dynamo from BC Place.

Houston Sports Talk
Remembering Muhammad Ali

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2016 31:56


Bleacher Report's Brian McDonald and Houston Post & Chronicle longtime reporter Mickey Herskowitz share their memories of the Greatest of All Time. Mickey authored Howard Cosell's biography and he remembers their special relationship. Herskowitz also met Ali several times and helped Ali write his account of Muhammad's legal battle with the government over his refusal to fight in Vietnam. We talk about a memorable scene in Harlem and a skill Ali had that surprised everybody.

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games
May 28 Whitecaps Vs Houston Post Match

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2016 55:39


Houston Sports Talk
Legendary Sportswriter Mickey Herskowitz

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2016 64:42


Mickey spent over 50 years as a sportswriter and editor for the Houston Post & Chronicle. He tells stories about the Colt 45's, Astros & Buffs early days, Bud Adams, George Blanda, the Game of the Century and how the Rockets came to Houston. Herskowitz, who authored over 30 books, shares inside stories on subjects Nolan Ryan, Mickey Mantle and Howard Cosell.

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games
March 26 Whitecaps Vs Houston Post Match

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2016 50:55


Houston Sports Talk
Oilers Luv Ya Blue Special

Houston Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2016 76:15


Enjoy the best of our Oilers interviews over our show's 1st two & a half years. You'll hear from Dan Pastorini, Hall of Fame DE Elvin Beathea, Pro Bowl LB Robert Brazile, Spencer Tillman, Pro Bowl DE William Fuller, the Chronicle's John McClain & Dale Robertson, Oilers Radio voice Tom Franklin, Jerry Trupiano and Houston Post columnist Kenny Hand. The stories go from the classic Luv Ya Blue Bum Phillips era to Jerry Glanville to Buddy Ryan & Jack Pardee.

Come and Take It
Ovetta Culp Hobby

Come and Take It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2015 26:00


She was the wife of a former governor, publisher of the Houston Post, a noted philanthropist, and proudly served her country in World War 2. She was also the second woman to ever hold a cabinet position in the United States. She lived a fascinating life of service and responsibility to the people of the Lone Star State.

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games
Aug 29 Whitecaps Vs Houston Post Match

Whitecaps FC Soccer Games

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2015 85:57


Totally Tangerine Shedcast
Peter Houston post match at Tynecastle.

Totally Tangerine Shedcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2012 0:14


Totally Tangerine Shedcast
Peter Houston post match after the 3-0 defeat of Dundee.

Totally Tangerine Shedcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2012 0:25


Totally Tangerine Shedcast
Peter Houston post match at Stranraer. For full interview check out ArabZONE

Totally Tangerine Shedcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2012 1:35


Peter Houston speaks to ArabZONE after the final whistle at Stranraer.

Economic Club of Minnesota
Major Garrett -- White House Correspondent for the National Journal

Economic Club of Minnesota

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2012 49:30


Major Garrett is a White House correspondent for National Journal and also contributes to 2012 Decoded. Prior to National Journal, Garret reported for Fox News, where he was the Chief White House Correspondent. During his eight years at Fox, Garrett also covered Congress, two presidential elections, the war in Iraq and many other issues of national importance. Before joining Fox News, Garrett was a White House correspondent for CNN, covering Presidents Bush and Clinton. Prior to that he was a senior editor and congressional correspondent for U.S. News and World Report, where he reported on Congress and the impeachment of President Clinton. From 1990-1995, he was a congressional reporter for The Washington Times, and from 1995-1997, he was the newspaper's deputy national editor. Earlier in his career Garrett was a reporter for The Houston Post, Las Vegas Review-Journal and the Amarillo Globe-News. Garrett has also authored three books. His third, The Enduring Revolution (2005), was recently voted one of the best non-fiction political books of all time by readers of Chris Cillizza's Washington Post "The Fix" blog.

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers
True Murder-Luggage By Kroger-Gary Taylor

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2010 67:53


Grab a seat on the wild side of an obsessive relationship, from its erotic beginning to its violent end and the trials required to clean up the mess. Gary Taylor, a former Houston Post reporter recounts his personal, true-life fatal attraction involvement in the trail of violence that dogged texas attorney Catherine McHaffey Shelton for nearly three decades, prompting coverage by newspapers, magazines, 48 Hours, American Justice and even Oprah. The result is a tooth-grinding, genre-bending tale that blends memoir with murder mystery and legal procedural with psycho-killer in an adventure odyssey of self-discovery that nearly cost him his life. LUGGAGE BY KROGER-Gary Taylor

Reform the Money
Richard C. Cook — "Monetary Crisis and Solutions" (WTPRN Tue., June 3, 2008)

Reform the Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2010


Richard Cook is a former federal government analyst who was one of the key figures in the investigation of the space shuttle Challenger disaster. In 1985, he went to work for NASA as the lead resource analyst for the space shuttle solid rocket boosters, external tank, and Centaur upper stage. Cook’s first assignment led to his writing a memo on engineers’ concerns that flaws with the solid rocket booster O-ring seals could cause the shuttle to blow up. In 1986, after the Challenger disaster, he disrupted a NASA cover-up when he provided his memo, along with other documents on the hazards of the O-rings, to the New York Times. His disclosures paved the way for revelations by engineers from Morton Thiokol, Inc., about how they opposed the launch of Challenger the night before lift-off. Called to testify before the Presidential Commission at an internationally televised public hearing, Cook stood his ground when his experience and competence were challenged. He continued to contribute to the investigation during interviews with Commission staff and the NASA Office of Inspector General and in meetings with Senator Ernest Hollings, who was trying to raise issues before the Senate on whether there had been White House pressure to launch Challenger. In addition to extensive interviews with the media after the disaster, Cook published articles in the Washington Post, Washington Monthly, Space and Security News, and the Houston Post; gave a press conference with the Institute of Space and Security Studies, where he said that the Presidential Commission had been created to cover-up the role of the White House in the launch decision; and wrote a report which he submitted to the U.S. Justice Department with a request for a new investigation. In 1991, he was the recipient of the Cavallo Foundation Award for Moral Courage in Business and Government, sharing the award with Roger Boisjoly of Morton Thiokol. Before joining NASA, Cook worked as an analyst for the U.S. Civil Service Commission, where he received extensive training in federal government operations. He then worked for the Food and Drug Administration and next served in the Jimmy Carter White House under Esther Peterson, special assistant to the president for consumer affairs. He also taught history at the Field School, a private high school in Washington, D.C. Cook left NASA to become an analyst with the U.S. Treasury Department in 1986. There he developed and taught training courses on policy analysis and led project teams on financial policy and organizational restructuring. He authored Challenger Revealed- An Insider’s Account of How the Reagan Administration Caused the Greatest Tragedy of the Space Age in 2006. He retired from the federal government in January 2007 and works today as a writer, lecturer, and consultant. His website is richardccook.com. Cook graduated with honors from the College of William and Mary, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He resides in College Park, Maryland. One of his areas of interest has been the monetary system and he has written a series of articles about the current financial crisis including- Extraordinary Times, Intentional Collapse, and Takedown of the U.S.A., Has the Battle for America Begun?, and An Emergency Program of Monetary Reform for the United States. He spoke recently on Will We See the End of the Empire in Our Time? at the Building a New World Conference". His forthcoming book is entitled We Hold These Truths: The Hope of Monetary Reform and he can be contacted regarding the book at economicsanity@gmail.com. Richard spoke about the current crisis we're in, particularly what is not reported in the press or widely understood by the public about money creation, debt, and credit and the financial shenanigans that are impoverishing the country. He also oferred his ideas for monetary reform, including the abolition of the Federal Reserve, national control over the creation of credit and a citizen's dividend. DownloadRichard C. Cook's website is: http://www.richardccook.comSource: We The People Radio Network (WTPRN)Aired: 6/03/08 12:00 AMThis podcast is an aggregate of audio files freely available online. Please visit the original source and subscribe to the host website.